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Sample records for assisting gas optimization

  1. Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

    2006-09-30

    This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

    2004-10-01

    This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases

  4. Response surface methodology for the modeling and optimization of oil-in-water emulsion separation using gas sparging assisted microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Fouladitajar, Amir; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Dabir, Bahram; Rezaei, Hamid; Valizadeh, Bardiya

    2015-02-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were used to develop models for optimization and modeling of a gas sparging assisted microfiltration of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. The effect of gas flow rate (Q G ), oil concentration (C oil ), transmembrane pressure (TMP), and liquid flow rate (Q L ) on the permeate flux and oil rejection were studied by RSM. Two sets of experiments were designed to investigate the effects of different gas-liquid two-phase flow regimes; low and high gas flow rates. Two separate RSM models were developed for each experimental set. The oil concentration and TMP were found to be the most significant factors influencing both permeate flux and rejection. Also, the interaction between these parameters was the most significant one. At low Q G , the more the gas flow rate, the higher the permeate flux; however, in the high gas flow rate region, higher Q G did not necessarily improve the permeate flux. In the case of rejection, gas and liquid flow rates were found to be insignificant. The optimum process conditions were found to be the following: Q G  = 1.0 (L/min), C oil  = 1,290 (mg/L), TMP = 1.58 (bar), and Q L  = 3.0 (L/min). Under these optimal conditions, maximum permeate flux and rejection (%) were 115.9 (L/m(2)h) and 81.1 %, respectively. PMID:25182429

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao

    2003-10-01

    This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and

  6. Determination of volatile components of green, black, oolong and white tea by optimized ultrasound-assisted extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sereshti, Hassan; Samadi, Soheila; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi

    2013-03-01

    Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was used for extraction and preconcentration of volatile constituents of six tea plants. The preconcentrated compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Totally, 42 compounds were identified and caffeine was quantitatively determined. The main parameters (factors) of the extraction process were optimized by using a central composite design (CCD). Methanol and chloroform were selected as the extraction solvent and preconcentration solvent, respectively .The optimal conditions were obtained as 21 in for sonication time; 32°C for temperature; 27 L for volume of extraction solvent and 7.4% for salt concentration (NaCl/H(2)O). The determination coefficient (R(2)) was 0.9988. The relative standard deviation (RSD %) was 4.8 (n=5), and the enhancement factors (EFs) were 4.0-42.6. PMID:23375769

  7. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  8. Optimized ultrasonic assisted extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography for determination of essential oil of Oliveria decumbens Vent.

    PubMed

    Sereshti, Hassan; Izadmanesh, Yahya; Samadi, Soheila

    2011-07-22

    Ultrasonic assisted extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UAE-DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography (GC) was applied for extraction and determination of essential oil constituents of the plant Oliveria decumbens Vent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to see the effect of ultrasonic radiation on the extraction efficiency. By comparison with hydrodistillation, UAE-DLLME is fast, low cost, simple, efficient and consuming small amount of plant materials (∼1.0 g). The effects of various parameters such as temperature, ultrasonication time, volume of disperser and extraction solvents were investigated by a full factorial design to identify significant variables and their interactions. The results demonstrated that temperature and ultrasonication time had no considerable effect on the results. In the next step, a central composite design (CCD) was performed to obtain the optimum levels of significant parameters. The obtained optimal conditions were: 0.45 mL for disperser solvent (acetonitrile) and 94.84 μL for extraction solvent (chlorobenzene). The limits of detection (LODs), linear dynamic range and determination coefficients (R(2)) were 0.2-29 ng mL(-1), 1-2100 ng mL(-1) and 0.995-0.998, respectively. The main components of the essential oil were: thymol (47.06%), carvacrol (23.31%), gamma-terpinene (18.94%), p-cymene (8.71%), limonene (0.76%) and myristicin (0.63%). PMID:21679955

  9. Optimized entanglement-assisted quantum error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, Soraya; Brun, Todd A.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-10-15

    Using convex optimization, we propose entanglement-assisted quantum error-correction procedures that are optimized for given noise channels. We demonstrate through numerical examples that such an optimized error-correction method achieves higher channel fidelities than existing methods. This improved performance, which leads to perfect error correction for a larger class of error channels, is interpreted in at least some cases by quantum teleportation, but for general channels this interpretation does not hold.

  10. Optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (MCPD) and analysis of its esters from edible oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Peiwu; Matthäus, Bertrand; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Qi

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic-assisted extraction of 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol and its esters from edible oils was studied with isotope dilution GC-MS. Effects of several experimental parameters, such as types and concentrations of extracting solvent, ratios of liquid to material, extraction temperature, time of ultrasonic treatment on the extraction efficiency of 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol and its esters from edible oils and sample preparation for calibration were compared and optimized. The optimal extraction conditions were suggested as 66 mg oil sample in mixture of 0.5 mL MTBE/ethyl acetate (20% v/v) and 0.5 mL of sulfuric acid/n-propanol (0.3% v/v), being extracted for 30 min at 45°C under ultrasonic irradiation. Good linearity was gained in the range of 0.020-5.000 μg/g with the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.006 μg/g (S/N = 3) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.020 μg/g (S/N = 10). The recoveries at five spiked concentrations were ranged from 91.9 to 109.3% with RSD less than 9.4%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol and its esters amounts in rapeseed, sesame, peanut, camellia, and soybean oils. PMID:22888100

  11. Natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Wallman, P. Henrik; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An efficient method of producing hydrogen by high temperature steam electrolysis that will lower the electricity consumption to an estimated 65 percent lower than has been achievable with previous steam electrolyzer systems. This is accomplished with a natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer, which significantly reduces the electricity consumption. Since this natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer replaces one unit of electrical energy by one unit of energy content in natural gas at one-quarter the cost, the hydrogen production cost will be significantly reduced. Also, it is possible to vary the ratio between the electricity and the natural gas supplied to the system in response to fluctuations in relative prices for these two energy sources. In one approach an appropriate catalyst on the anode side of the electrolyzer will promote the partial oxidation of natural gas to CO and hydrogen, called Syn-Gas, and the CO can also be shifted to CO.sub.2 to give additional hydrogen. In another approach the natural gas is used in the anode side of the electrolyzer to burn out the oxygen resulting from electrolysis, thus reducing or eliminating the potential difference across the electrolyzer membrane.

  12. Optimization of solver for gas flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichkin, D.; Dodulad, O.; Kloss, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the work is optimization of the solver for rarefied gas flow modeling based on the Boltzmann equation. Optimization method is based on SIMD extensions for ×86 processors. Computational code is profiled and manually optimized with SSE instructions. Heat flow, shock waves and Knudsen pump are modeled with optimized solver. Dependencies of computational time from mesh sizes and CPU capabilities are provided.

  13. Offshore oil - growing optimism with gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The gas-rich Gulf of Mexico is on the rebound and there's growing optimism business conditions will continue to improve in 1994. Environmental regulations, such as the Clean Air Act and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, are having a significant impact on oil an gas drilling and production. The Clean Air Act has increased the use of natural gas, which is helping bolster gas consumption from the Gulf of Mexico's reserves. In late December 1993, the Clinton administration unveiled its long-awaited gas and oil initiative aimed at boosting markets for domestic natural gas and oil while developing a long-term strategy to reduce the nation's dependence on imported energy. This article examines the political and economic issues of concern to the oil and gas industry, and how international competition affects development in the Gulf.

  14. Requirement of Dissonance in Assisted Optimal State Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-Lin; Chen, Jing-Ling; Kwek, L. C.; Vedral, Vlatko

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem in quantum information is to explore what kind of quantum correlations is responsible for successful completion of a quantum information procedure. Here we study the roles of entanglement, discord, and dissonance needed for optimal quantum state discrimination when the latter is assisted with an auxiliary system. In such process, we present a more general joint unitary transformation than the existing results. The quantum entanglement between a principal qubit and an ancilla is found to be completely unnecessary, as it can be set to zero in the arbitrary case by adjusting the parameters in the general unitary without affecting the success probability. This result also shows that it is quantum dissonance that plays as a key role in assisted optimal state discrimination and not quantum entanglement. A necessary criterion for the necessity of quantum dissonance based on the linear entropy is also presented. PACS numbers: 03.65.Ta, 03.67.Mn, 42.50.Dv. PMID:23823646

  15. [Optimizing performance documentation in gynecology--assistance from the internet].

    PubMed

    Woernle, F; Seufert, R; Brockerhoff, P; Lellé, R J

    1999-01-01

    The documentation of operations in the field of gynecology and obstetrics is regulated by social laws in Germany. Only by optimal encoding of diagnoses and procedures an efficient cashing with the health insurance's can be achieved. This requires profound knowledge of the invoice modalities and usually support by computer systems. The Internet offers in this respect some assistance, which in the following is pointed out and evaluated critically. PMID:10573827

  16. Assistance of Novel Artificial Intelligence in Optimization of Aluminum Matrix Nanocomposite by Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazahery, Ali; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad

    2012-12-01

    In this article, a genetic algorithm (GA) is used to predict the mechanical properties and to optimize the process conditions of Al nanocomposites. An artificial intelligence method is also implemented as an assisting tool for engineering tasks of GAs. The principle of the survival of the fittest is applied to produce successively superior approximations to a solution. A population of points at each iteration is generated. The population approaches an optimal solution. The next population by computations that involve random choices is selected. The optimal volume percentage of SiC, cooling rate, and temperature gradient are computed to be 2.84 pct, 283 K/s (10 °C/s), 1273 K/m (1000 °C/m), respectively.

  17. Optimization of ethyl ester production assisted by ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Noipin, K; Kumar, S

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the optimization of the continuous flow potassium hydroxide-catalyzed synthesis of ethyl ester from palm oil with ultrasonic assistance. The process was optimized by application of factorial design and response surface methodology. The independent variables considered were ethanol to oil molar ratio, catalyst concentration, reaction temperature and ultrasonic amplitude; and the response was ethyl ester yield. The results show that ethanol to oil molar ratio, catalyst concentration, and ultrasonic amplitude have positive effect on ethyl ester yield, whereas reaction temperature has negative influence on ethyl ester yield. Second-order models were developed to predict the responses analyzed as a function of these three variables, and the developed models predicts the results in the experimental ranges studied adequately. This study shows that ultrasonic irradiation improved the ethyl ester production process to achieve ethyl ester yields above 92%. PMID:25116594

  18. Ultrasound assisted manufacturing of paraffin wax nanoemulsions: process optimization.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, A J; Holkar, C R; Karekar, S E; Pinjari, D V; Pandit, A B

    2015-03-01

    This work reports on the process optimization of ultrasound-assisted, paraffin wax in water nanoemulsions, stabilized by modified sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). This work focuses on the optimization of major emulsification process variables including sonication time, applied power and surfactant concentration. The effects of these variables were investigated on the basis of mean droplet diameter and stability of the prepared emulsion. It was found that the stable emulsion with droplet diameters about 160.9 nm could be formed with the surfactant concentration of 10 mg/ml and treated at 40% of applied power (power density: 0.61 W/ml) for 15 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the emulsion droplets. The droplets were solid at room temperature, showing bright spots under polarized light and a spherical shape under SEM. The electrophoretic properties of emulsion droplets showed a negative zeta potential due to the adsorption of head sulfate groups of the SDS surfactant. For the sake of comparison, paraffin wax emulsion was prepared via emulsion inversion point method and was checked its intrinsic stability. Visually, it was found that the emulsion get separated/creamed within 30 min. while the emulsion prepared via ultrasonically is stable for more than 3 months. From this study, it was found that the ultrasound-assisted emulsification process could be successfully used for the preparation of stable paraffin wax nanoemulsions. PMID:25465097

  19. Performance optimization of water-jet assisted underwater laser cutting of AISI 304 stainless steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, Suvradip; Madhukar, Yuvraj K.; Roy, Subhransu; Nath, Ashish K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent development of water-jet assisted underwater laser cutting has shown some advantages over the gas assisted underwater laser cutting, as it produces much less turbulence, gas bubble and aerosols, resulting in a more gentle process. However, this process has relatively low efficiency due to different losses in water. Scattering is reported to be a dominant loss mechanism, which depends on the growth of vapor layer at cut front and its removal by water-jet. Present study reports improvement in process efficiency by reducing the scattering loss using modulated laser power. Judicious control of laser pulse on- and off-time could improve process efficiency through restricting the vapor growth and its effective removal by water-jet within the laser on- and off-time, respectively. Effects of average laser power, duty cycle and modulation frequency on specific energy are studied to get an operating zone for maximum efficiency. Next, the variation in laser cut quality with different process parameters are studied within this operating zone using Design of experiment (DOE). Response surface methodology (RSM) is used by implementing three level Box-Behnken design to optimize the variation in cut quality, and to find out the optimal process parameters for desired quality. Various phenomena and material removal mechanism involved in this process are also discussed.

  20. Optimization of the assisted bidirectional Glenn for single ventricle palliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison; Shang, Jessica; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Figliola, Richard; Reinhartz, Olaf; Hsia, Tain-Yen

    2015-11-01

    For neonates with single ventricle physiology, a systemic-pulmonary shunt (e.g., a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS)) is typically employed as an early-stage procedure in preparation for a later-stage bidirectional Glenn (BDG). Mortality rates with the mBTS are high, yet the BDG has poorer outcomes in neonates. The assisted bidirectional Glenn (ABG) augments the inadequate pulmonary flow associated with early BDG implementation in neonates through an additional shunt between the innominate artery and the superior vena cava (SVC). The shunt uses a nozzle to inject high-velocity flow to the SVC, elevating downstream pulmonary pressure. Previous simulations and animal studies verified feasibility and higher pulmonary flow rates. In numerical simulations, we explore shunt geometries and placements implanted into a 3D model of the aorta and pulmonary arteries, coupled with a lumped parameter network describing the remaining circulatory system. We seek an ABG shunt that optimizes hemodynamic variables such as pulmonary flow rate and oxygenation and constrains SVC pressure. The optimized ABG will be evaluated against the mBTS and the BDG in simulations and experiments. A successful implementation of the ABG would replace the mBTS and BDG procedures and reduce mortality rates. Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Leducq Foundation.

  1. Solar sailing trajectory optimization with planetary gravity assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, XingShan; Li, JunFeng; Gong, ShengPing

    2015-01-01

    Significant propellant mass saving can be obtained with the use of complex multiple intermediate flyby maneuvers for conventional propulsion systems, and trip time also decreases for a portion of the proper solar sail missions. This paper discusses the performance of gravity assist (GA) in the time-optimal control problem of solar sailing with respect to sail lightness number and the energy difference between the initial and final orbit in the rendezvous problem in a two-body model, in which the GA is modeled as a substantial change in the velocity of the sailcraft at the GA time. In addition, this paper presents a method to solve the time-optimal problem of solar sailing with GA in a full ephemeris model, which introduces the third body's gravity in a dynamic equation. This study builds a set of inner constraints that can describe the GA process accurately. Finally, this study presents an example for evaluating the accuracy and rationality of the two-body model's simplification of GA by comparison with the full ephemeris model.

  2. Optimize control of natural gas plants

    SciTech Connect

    Treiber, S.; Walker, J.; Tremblay, M. de ); Delgadillo, R.L.; Velasquez, R.N.; Valarde, M.J.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Multivariable constraint control (MCS) has a very beneficial and profitable impact on the operation of natural gas plants. The applications described operate completely within a distributed control system (DCS) or programmable logic controllers (PLCs). That makes MCS accessible to almost all gas plant operators. The technology's relative ease of use, low maintenance effort and software sensor,'' make it possible to operate these control applications without increasing technical support staff. MCS improves not only profitability but also regulatory compliance of gas plants. It has been applied to fractionation units, cryogenic units, amine treaters, sulfur recovery units and utilities. The application typically pay for the cost of software and engineering in less than one month. If a DCS is installed within such a project the advanced control applications can generate a payout in less than one year. In the case here (an application on the deethanizers of a 500 MMscfd gas plant) product revenue increased by over $2 million/yr.

  3. Optimization of buffer gas pressure for Rb atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang; Liu, Xiaohu; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong

    2015-08-01

    The optimization of buffer gas pressure is very important to improve the performance of the rubidium (Rb) atomic magnetometer. In this paper we briefly introduce the basic principle and the experimental method of the rubidium magnetometer based on Faraday rotation effect, and describe the factors affecting the magnetometer sensitivity, then analyze and summarize the mechanism of the influence of spin-exchange, spin-destruction collisions, radiation trapping and the spin diffusion on spin relaxation of Rb atoms. Based on this, the relationship between the rubidium magnetometer sensitivity, the spin relaxation rate and the gas chamber conditions (buffer gas pressure, the bubble radius, measuring temperature) is established. Doing calculations by the simulation software, how the magnetometer sensitivity and the relaxation rate vary with the gas chamber conditions can be seen; finally, the optimal values of the buffer gas pressure under certain gas chamber conditions are obtained. The work is significant for the engineering development of rubidium magnetometer.

  4. Optimization of wastewater treatment plant operation for greenhouse gas mitigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Bowen, James D; Ozelkan, Ertunga C

    2015-11-01

    This study deals with the determination of optimal operation of a wastewater treatment system for minimizing greenhouse gas emissions, operating costs, and pollution loads in the effluent. To do this, an integrated performance index that includes three objectives was established to assess system performance. The ASMN_G model was used to perform system optimization aimed at determining a set of operational parameters that can satisfy three different objectives. The complex nonlinear optimization problem was simulated using the Nelder-Mead Simplex optimization algorithm. A sensitivity analysis was performed to identify influential operational parameters on system performance. The results obtained from the optimization simulations for six scenarios demonstrated that there are apparent trade-offs among the three conflicting objectives. The best optimized system simultaneously reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 31%, reduced operating cost by 11%, and improved effluent quality by 2% compared to the base case operation. PMID:26292772

  5. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

  6. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  7. Optimizing nanoporous materials for gas storage.

    PubMed

    Simon, Cory M; Kim, Jihan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Martin, Richard L; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend

    2014-03-28

    In this work, we address the question of which thermodynamic factors determine the deliverable capacity of methane in nanoporous materials. The deliverable capacity is one of the key factors that determines the performance of a material for methane storage in automotive fuel tanks. To obtain insights into how the molecular characteristics of a material are related to the deliverable capacity, we developed several statistical thermodynamic models. The predictions of these models are compared with the classical thermodynamics approach of Bhatia and Myers [Bhatia and Myers, Langmuir, 2005, 22, 1688] and with the results of molecular simulations in which we screen the International Zeolite Association (IZA) structure database and a hypothetical zeolite database of over 100,000 structures. Both the simulations and our models do not support the rule of thumb that, for methane storage, one should aim for an optimal heat of adsorption of 18.8 kJ mol(-1). Instead, our models show that one can identify an optimal heat of adsorption, but that this optimal heat of adsorption depends on the structure of the material and can range from 8 to 23 kJ mol(-1). The different models we have developed are aimed to determine how this optimal heat of adsorption is related to the molecular structure of the material. PMID:24394864

  8. Evacuation assistants: An extended model for determining effective locations and optimal numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolu; Zheng, Xiaoping; Cheng, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    The present research presents an extended evacuation field model for simulating crowd emergency evacuation processes under the control of evacuation assistants. Furthermore, a communication field for describing the escape information transmission process and its effect on evacuees is introduced. The effective locations and optimal numbers of evacuation assistants as generated through the model are proposed in an effort to verify as well as enhance existing models. Results show the following. (1) Locating evacuation assistants near exits reduces the time delay for pre-evacuation. (2) There is an optimal number of evacuation assistants for achieving evacuation efficiency; having excessive numbers of evacuation assistants does not improve the evacuation efficiency, and they may result in evacuation time delay and hinder the evacuation efficiency. (3) As the number of evacuees increases, the number of evacuation assistants needed decreases.

  9. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

  10. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.

    1995-05-01

    Exploration strategies are needed to identify subtle basement features critical to locating fractured regions in advance of drilling in tight gas reservoirs. The Piceance Basin served as a demonstration site for an analysis utilizing aeromagnetic surveys, remote sensing, Landsat Thematic Mapper, and Side Looking Airborne Radar imagery for the basin and surrounding areas. Spatially detailed aeromagnetic maps were used to to interpret zones of basement structure.

  11. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  12. Study on the gas-liquid interface and polymer melt front in gas-assisted injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.K.

    1997-03-01

    The algorithms are developed to predict the gas-liquid interface in gas-assisted injection molding. The simulation of two-dimensional, transient, non-isothermal and high viscous flow between two parallel plates with the generalized Newtonian fluid is presented in detail. The model takes into account the effects of the gas-liquid interface and polymer melt front.

  13. Mixed integer simulation optimization for optimal hydraulic fracturing and production of shale gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, B.; Wang, H. G.

    2016-08-01

    Optimal development of shale gas fields involves designing a most productive fracturing network for hydraulic stimulation processes and operating wells appropriately throughout the production time. A hydraulic fracturing network design-determining well placement, number of fracturing stages, and fracture lengths-is defined by specifying a set of integer ordered blocks to drill wells and create fractures in a discrete shale gas reservoir model. The well control variables such as bottom hole pressures or production rates for well operations are real valued. Shale gas development problems, therefore, can be mathematically formulated with mixed-integer optimization models. A shale gas reservoir simulator is used to evaluate the production performance for a hydraulic fracturing and well control plan. To find the optimal fracturing design and well operation is challenging because the problem is a mixed integer optimization problem and entails computationally expensive reservoir simulation. A dynamic simplex interpolation-based alternate subspace (DSIAS) search method is applied for mixed integer optimization problems associated with shale gas development projects. The optimization performance is demonstrated with the example case of the development of the Barnett Shale field. The optimization results of DSIAS are compared with those of a pattern search algorithm.

  14. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ting; Gross, Kenny C.; Wegerich, Stephan

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established.

  15. Method for nonlinear optimization for gas tagging and other systems

    DOEpatents

    Chen, T.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.

    1998-01-06

    A method and system are disclosed for providing nuclear fuel rods with a configuration of isotopic gas tags. The method includes selecting a true location of a first gas tag node, selecting initial locations for the remaining n-1 nodes using target gas tag compositions, generating a set of random gene pools with L nodes, applying a Hopfield network for computing on energy, or cost, for each of the L gene pools and using selected constraints to establish minimum energy states to identify optimal gas tag nodes with each energy compared to a convergence threshold and then upon identifying the gas tag node continuing this procedure until establishing the next gas tag node until all remaining n nodes have been established. 6 figs.

  16. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and

  17. Optimizing Computer Assisted Instruction By Applying Principles of Learning Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas O.

    The development of learning theory and its application to computer-assisted instruction (CAI) are described. Among the early theoretical constructs thought to be important are E. L. Thorndike's concept of learning connectisms, Neal Miller's theory of motivation, and B. F. Skinner's theory of operant conditioning. Early devices incorporating those…

  18. Procedures for shape optimization of gas turbine disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheu, Tsu-Chien

    1989-01-01

    Two procedures, the feasible direction method and sequential linear programming, for shape optimization of gas turbine disks are presented. The objective of these procedures is to obtain optimal designs of turbine disks with geometric and stress constraints. The coordinates of the selected points on the disk contours are used as the design variables. Structural weight, stress and their derivatives with respect to the design variables are calculated by an efficient finite element method for design senitivity analysis. Numerical examples of the optimal designs of a disk subjected to thermo-mechanical loadings are presented to illustrate and compare the effectiveness of these two procedures.

  19. Shaper-assisted phase optimization of a broad "holey" spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Miaochan; Wang, Kai; Hua, Xia; Strycker, Benjamin D; Sokolov, Alexei V

    2011-11-01

    We develop a technique for optimizing the phase of broad spectrally-separated frequency sidebands-a "holey" spectrum. We use a source of multiple-order coherent Raman sidebands, obtained by crossing femtosecond pump and Stokes beams in synthetic single-crystal diamond. We combine the sidebands into a single beam and show the phase coherence among the sidebands by investigating the interference between them in groups of three while varying one sideband phase by an acousto-optics pulse shaper. We then show how we optimize the broad "holey" spectrum by overcoming the limited temporal shaping window of the pulse shaper. We also explore how the resultant second harmonic/sum frequency generation of the full combined broadband spectrum varies as we vary different sideband phases. This step-by-step phase optimization of the "holey" spectrum can be applied to sidebands with similar structure to synthesize arbitrary optical waveforms. PMID:22109216

  20. Gas plant economic optimization is more than meeting product specification

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, P.N.; Colwell, L.W.; Gamez, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Gas plants require a higher level of process control to optimize the process to maximize operating profits. Automation alone does not achieve this objective whereas, on-line dynamic optimization of the control variables based on product pricing, the cost to process the gas and the contracts for gas and liquids is solvable by new control techniques. Daily operations are affected by a paradigm shift in the method of control for the facility. This newly developed and site proven technique has demonstrated how to improve benefits when net processing margins are positive and minimize operating cost when liquids margins are negative. Because ethane recovery versus its rejection is not a binary decision, a better means to operate can be shown to benefit the gas plant operator. Each specification has a cost to meet it or a penalty to exceed it. However, if allowed, exceeding specification may prove beneficial to the net profitability of the operations. With the decision being made on-line every few minutes, the results are more dramatic than previously understood. Gas Research Institute and Continental Controls, Inc. have installed more than 10 such systems in US gas processing plants. Project payout from the use of the MVC{reg_sign} technology has on average been less than six months. Processing savings have ranged from $.0075 to $.024 per Mcf. The authors paper last year showed where the benefits can be derived. This year the results of those facilities are shared along with the methodology to achieve them.

  1. Computer-Assisted Test Assembly Using Optimization Heuristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leucht, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a variation of a "greedy" algorithm that can be used in test-assembly problems. The algorithm, the normalized weighted absolute-deviation heuristic, selects items to have a locally optimal fit to a moving set of average criterion values. Demonstrates application of the model. (SLD)

  2. Analysis and optimization of hybrid MCFC gas turbines plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghi, Piero; Bove, Roberto; Desideri, Umberto

    High temperature fuel cells are electricity producers that guarantee relevant energetic and environmental performances. They feature high electricity to input chemical energy ratios and availability of high temperature heat. Notwithstanding, the search for a further increase in electric efficiency, especially when applying a CHP solution is not feasible, has brought to plant integration with gas turbines (GTs) in several studies and some pilot installations. While for pressurized fuel cells the choice of internal combustion gas turbines seem to be the only one feasible, in ambient pressure fuel cells it seems useful to analyze the combination with indirect heated GT. This choice allows to optimize turbine pressure ratio and cell size. In this work, a parametric performance evaluation of a hybrid molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) indirect heated gas turbine has been performed by varying the fuel cell section size and the fuel utilization coefficient. The analysis of performance variation with the latter parameter shows how a cell that is optimized for stand alone operation is not necessarily optimized for the integration in a hybrid cycle. Working with reduced utilization factors, in fact can reduce irreversible losses and does not necessarily yield to less electricity production since the heat produced in the post combustor is recovered by the gas turbine section. This aspect has not been taken into sufficient consideration in literature. The analysis illustrates the methodology to define new operating conditions so to allow global output and global efficiency maximization.

  3. Computer-assisted optimization of separations in capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.; Tavares, M.F.M.

    1997-01-15

    A computer optimization routine has been developed which is capable of evaluating the quality of electrophoretic separations under a variety of operational conditions. The program includes theoretical models for electrophoretic and electroosmotic migration processes as well as a simple rationale of zone dispersion. The electrophoretic migration subroutine is based on classical equilibrium calculations and requires knowledge of the solute dissociation constant(s) and electrophoretic mobility(s). In the electrophoretic migration subroutine, the response of the fused-silica capillary surface to changes in buffer composition is modeled in analogy to an ion selective electrode. A mathematical function that relates the zeta potential to the pH and sodium concentration of the buffer solution is required. The migration time of each solute is then calculated from the sum of its effective electrophoretic mobility and the electroosmotic mobility. The removal width of each solute zone is derived from contributions to variance resulting from longitudinal diffusion and a finite injection and detection volume. The resolution between adjacent zones is estimated, and the overall quality of the separation is assessed by means of an appropriate response function. The computer optimization routine was experimentally validated with a mixture of nucleotide mono- and diphosphates in phosphate buffer solutions, with average errors in the effective electrophoretic mobility, electroosmotic mobility, and zone variance of 2.9, 2.3, and 9.4%, respectively. 56 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  5. Enhanced growth of high quality single crystal diamond by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at high gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Qi; Chin Chengyi; Lai, Joseph; Yan Chihshiue; Meng Yufei; Mao Hokwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2009-01-12

    Single crystals of diamond up to 18 mm in thickness have been grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at gas pressures of up to 350 torr. Growth rates of up to 165 {mu}m/h at 300 torr at high power density have been achieved. The processes were evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy. The high-quality single-crystal diamond grown at optimized conditions was characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The measurements reveal a direct relationship between residual absorption and nitrogen content in the gas chemistry. Fabrication of high quality single-crystal diamond at higher growth rates should be possible with improved reactor design that allows still higher gas synthesis pressures.

  6. Optimal Energy Consumption Analysis of Natural Gas Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enbin; Li, Changjun; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    There are many compressor stations along long-distance natural gas pipelines. Natural gas can be transported using different boot programs and import pressures, combined with temperature control parameters. Moreover, different transport methods have correspondingly different energy consumptions. At present, the operating parameters of many pipelines are determined empirically by dispatchers, resulting in high energy consumption. This practice does not abide by energy reduction policies. Therefore, based on a full understanding of the actual needs of pipeline companies, we introduce production unit consumption indicators to establish an objective function for achieving the goal of lowering energy consumption. By using a dynamic programming method for solving the model and preparing calculation software, we can ensure that the solution process is quick and efficient. Using established optimization methods, we analyzed the energy savings for the XQ gas pipeline. By optimizing the boot program, the import station pressure, and the temperature parameters, we achieved the optimal energy consumption. By comparison with the measured energy consumption, the pipeline now has the potential to reduce energy consumption by 11 to 16 percent. PMID:24955410

  7. Optimizing Noble Gas-Water Interactions via Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Warr, Oliver; Ballentine, Chris J; Mu, Junju; Masters, Andrew

    2015-11-12

    In this work we present optimized noble gas-water Lennard-Jones 6-12 pair potentials for each noble gas. Given the significantly different atomic nature of water and the noble gases, the standard Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules produce inaccurate unlike molecular interactions between these two species. Consequently, we find simulated Henry's coefficients deviate significantly from their experimental counterparts for the investigated thermodynamic range (293-353 K at 1 and 10 atm), due to a poor unlike potential well term (εij). Where εij is too high or low, so too is the strength of the resultant noble gas-water interaction. This observed inadequacy in using the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules is countered in this work by scaling εij for helium, neon, argon, and krypton by factors of 0.91, 0.8, 1.1, and 1.05, respectively, to reach a much improved agreement with experimental Henry's coefficients. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the xenon εij term, coupled with the reasonable agreement of the initial values, no scaling factor is applied for this noble gas. These resulting optimized pair potentials also accurately predict partitioning within a CO2-H2O binary phase system as well as diffusion coefficients in ambient water. This further supports the quality of these interaction potentials. Consequently, they can now form a well-grounded basis for the future molecular modeling of multiphase geological systems. PMID:26452070

  8. Performance analysis and optimization of power plants with gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besharati-Givi, Maryam

    The gas turbine is one of the most important applications for power generation. The purpose of this research is performance analysis and optimization of power plants by using different design systems at different operation conditions. In this research, accurate efficiency calculation and finding optimum values of efficiency for design of chiller inlet cooling and blade cooled gas turbine are investigated. This research shows how it is possible to find the optimum design for different operation conditions, like ambient temperature, relative humidity, turbine inlet temperature, and compressor pressure ratio. The simulated designs include the chiller, with varied COP and fogging cooling for a compressor. In addition, the overall thermal efficiency is improved by adding some design systems like reheat and regenerative heating. The other goal of this research focuses on the blade-cooled gas turbine for higher turbine inlet temperature, and consequently, higher efficiency. New film cooling equations, along with changing film cooling effectiveness for optimum cooling air requirement at the first-stage blades, and an internal and trailing edge cooling for the second stage, are innovated for optimal efficiency calculation. This research sets the groundwork for using the optimum value of efficiency calculation, while using inlet cooling and blade cooling designs. In the final step, the designed systems in the gas cycles are combined with a steam cycle for performance improvement.

  9. Optimization of simultaneous tritium-radiocarbon internal gas proportional counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicalzi, R. M.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Mace, E. K.; Moran, J. J.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Specific environmental applications can benefit from dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements in a single compound. Assuming typical environmental levels, it is often the low tritium activity relative to the higher radiocarbon activity that limits the dual measurement. In this paper, we explore the parameter space for a combined tritium and radiocarbon measurement using a natural methane sample mixed with an argon fill gas in low-background proportional counters of a specific design. We present an optimized methane percentage, detector fill pressure, and analysis energy windows to maximize measurement sensitivity while minimizing count time. The final optimized method uses a 9-atm fill of P35 (35% methane, 65% argon), and a tritium analysis window from 1.5 to 10.3 keV, which stops short of the tritium beta decay endpoint energy of 18.6 keV. This method optimizes tritium-counting efficiency while minimizing radiocarbon beta-decay interference.

  10. Design optimization of gas generator hybrid propulsion boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Phillips, Dwight U.; Fink, Lawrence E.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology used in support of a contract study for NASA/MSFC to optimize the design of gas generator hybrid propulsion booster for uprating the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is presented. The objective was to compare alternative configurations for this booster approach, optimizing each candidate concept on different bases, in order to develop data for a trade table on which a final decision was based. The methodology is capable of processing a large number of independent and dependent variables, adjusting the overall subsystems characteristics to arrive at a best compromise integrated design to meet various specified optimization criteria subject to selected constraints. For each system considered, a detailed weight statement was generated along with preliminary cost and reliability estimates.

  11. Design Optimization of Gas Generator Hybrid Propulsion Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Phillips, Dwight; Fink, Larry

    1990-01-01

    A methodology used in support of a study for NASA/MSFC to optimize the design of gas generator hybrid propulsion booster for uprating the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is presented. The objective was to compare alternative configurations for this booster approach, optimizing each candidate concept on different bases, in order to develop data for a trade table on which a final decision was based. The methodology is capable of processing a large number of independent and dependent variables, adjusting the overall subsystems characteristics to arrive at a best compromise integrated design to meet various specific optimization criteria subject to selected constraints. For each system considered, a detailed weight statement was generated along with preliminary cost and reliability estimates.

  12. Computer-assisted design and computer-assisted modeling technique optimization and advantages over traditional methods of osseous flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Matros, Evan; Albornoz, Claudia R; Rensberger, Michael; Weimer, Katherine; Garfein, Evan S

    2014-06-01

    There is increased clinical use of computer-assisted design (CAD) and computer-assisted modeling (CAM) for osseous flap reconstruction, particularly in the head and neck region. Limited information exists about methods to optimize the application of this new technology and for cases in which it may be advantageous over existing methods of osseous flap shaping. A consecutive series of osseous reconstructions planned with CAD/CAM over the past 5 years was analyzed. Conceptual considerations and refinements in the CAD/CAM process were evaluated. A total of 48 reconstructions were performed using CAD/CAM. The majority of cases were performed for head and neck tumor reconstruction or related complications whereas the remainder (4%) were performed for penetrating trauma. Defect location was the mandible (85%), maxilla (12.5%), and pelvis (2%). Reconstruction was performed immediately in 73% of the cases and delayed in 27% of the cases. The mean number of osseous flap bone segments used in reconstruction was 2.41. Areas of optimization include the following: mandible cutting guide placement, osteotomy creation, alternative planning, and saw blade optimization. Identified benefits of CAD/CAM over current techniques include the following: delayed timing, anterior mandible defects, specimen distortion, osteotomy creation in three dimensions, osteotomy junction overlap, plate adaptation, and maxillary reconstruction. Experience with CAD/CAM for osseous reconstruction has identified tools for technique optimization and cases where this technology may prove beneficial over existing methods. Knowledge of these facts may contribute to improved use and main-stream adoption of CAD/CAM virtual surgical planning by reconstructive surgeons. PMID:24323480

  13. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Kate; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Bell, Sean; Jacobs, Amelia; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Tilley, Mitch; Quick, Ralph

    2015-09-02

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling. This study of drilling operations seeks opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies. The scope of this study included analyzing 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'Perfect Well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.) and poor data collection practices An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate figures for analysis. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/ equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averaged 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million was spent on non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells, compared with only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry using Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time services, and official glossary terms to describe rig operations, and advanced drilling rigs/technology.

  14. Performance optimization of a gas turbine-based cogeneration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tamer

    2006-06-01

    In this paper an exergy optimization has been carried out for a cogeneration plant consisting of a gas turbine, which is operated in a Brayton cycle, and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). In the analysis, objective functions of the total produced exergy and exergy efficiency have been defined as functions of the design parameters of the gas turbine and the HRSG. An equivalent temperature is defined as a new approach to model the exergy rate of heat transfer from the HRSG. The optimum design parameters of the cogeneration cycle at maximum exergy are determined and the effects of these parameters on exergetic performance are investigated. Some practical mathematical relations are also derived to find the optimum values of the adiabatic temperature ratio for given extreme temperatures and consumer temperature.

  15. Optimal design of gas adsorption refrigerators for cryogenic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The design of gas adsorption refrigerators used for cryogenic cooling in the temperature range of 4K to 120K was examined. The functional relationships among the power requirement for the refrigerator, the system mass, the cycle time and the operating conditions were derived. It was found that the precool temperature, the temperature dependent heat capacities and thermal conductivities, and pressure and temperature variations in the compressors have important impacts on the cooling performance. Optimal designs based on a minimum power criterion were performed for four different gas adsorption refrigerators and a multistage system. It is concluded that the estimates of the power required and the system mass are within manageable limits in various spacecraft environments.

  16. On PDE solution in transient optimization of gas networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Marc C.

    2007-06-01

    Operative planning in gas distribution networks leads to large-scale mixed-integer optimization problems involving a hyperbolic PDE defined on a graph. We consider the NLP obtained under prescribed combinatorial decisions--or as relaxation in a branch-and-bound framework, addressing in particular the KKT systems arising in primal-dual interior methods. We propose a custom solution algorithm using sparse projections locally in time, based on the KKT systems' structural properties in space as induced by the discretized gas flow equations in combination with the underlying network topology. The numerical efficiency and accuracy of the algorithm are investigated, and detailed computational comparisons with a previously developed control space method and with the multifrontal solver MA27 are provided.

  17. Optimal design of gas adsorption refrigerators for cryogenic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.K.

    1983-12-01

    The design of gas adsorption refrigerators used for cryogenic cooling in the temperature range of 4K to 120K was examined. The functional relationships among the power requirement for the refrigerator, the system mass, the cycle time and the operating conditions were derived. It was found that the precool temperature, the temperature dependent heat capacities and thermal conductivities, and pressure and temperature variations in the compressors have important impacts on the cooling performance. Optimal designs based on a minimum power criterion were performed for four different gas adsorption refrigerators and a multistage system. It is concluded that the estimates of the power required and the system mass are within manageable limits in various spacecraft environments.

  18. Improving Gas Storage Development Planning Through Simulation-Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.M.; Ammer, J.; Trick, M.D.

    2000-07-25

    This is the first of two papers describing the application of simulator-optimization methods to a natural gas storage field development planning problem. The results presented here illustrate the large gains in cost-effectiveness that can be made by employing the reservoir simulator as the foundation for a wide-ranging search for solutions to management problems. The current paper illustrates the application of these techniques given a deterministic view of the reservoir. A companion paper will illustrate adaptations needed to accommodate uncertainties regarding reservoir properties.

  19. Optimizing quantum gas production by an evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, T.; Hohmann, M.; Kindermann, F.; Mayer, D.; Schmidt, F.; Widera, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the application of an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to enhance performance of an ultra-cold quantum gas experiment. The production of a ^{87}rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can be divided into fundamental cooling steps, specifically magneto-optical trapping of cold atoms, loading of atoms to a far-detuned crossed dipole trap, and finally the process of evaporative cooling. The EA is applied separately for each of these steps with a particular definition for the feedback, the so-called fitness. We discuss the principles of an EA and implement an enhancement called differential evolution. Analyzing the reasons for the EA to improve, e.g., the atomic loading rates and increase the BEC phase-space density, yields an optimal parameter set for the BEC production and enables us to reduce the BEC production time significantly. Furthermore, we focus on how additional information about the experiment and optimization possibilities can be extracted and how the correlations revealed allow for further improvement. Our results illustrate that EAs are powerful optimization tools for complex experiments and exemplify that the application yields useful information on the dependence of these experiments on the optimized parameters.

  20. Naturally fractured tight gas - gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, June 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J.M.; Ortoleva, P.; Payne, D.; Sibo, W.

    1996-11-15

    This document contains the status report for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas-Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project for the contract period 9/30/93 to 3/31/97. Data from seismic surveys are analyzed for structural imaging of reflector units. The data were stacked using the new, improved statics and normal moveout velocities. The 3-D basin modeling effort is continuing with code development. The main activities of this quarter were analysis of fluid pressure data, improved sedimentary history, lithologic unit geometry reconstruction algorithm and computer module, and further improvement, verification, and debugging of the basin stress and multi-phase reaction transport module.

  1. Fuel optimal low thrust rendezvous with outer planets via gravity assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, TieDing; Jiang, FangHua; Baoyin, HeXi; LI, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Low thrust propulsion and gravity assist (GA) are among the most promising techniques for deep space explorations. In this paper the two techniques are combined and treated comprehensively, both on modeling and numerical techniques. Fuel optimal orbit rendezvous via multiple GA is first formulated as optimal guidance with multiple interior constraints and then the optimal necessary conditions, various transversality conditions and stationary conditions are derived by Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (PMP). Finally the initial orbit rendezvous problem is transformed into a multiple point boundary value problem (MPBVP). Homotopic technique combined with random searching globally and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), is adopted to handle the numerical difficulty in solving the above MPBVP by single shooting method. Two scenarios in the end show the merits of the present approach.

  2. Optimal allocation of leaf epidermal area for gas exchange.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Hugo J; Price, Charles A; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C; Franks, Peter J; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2016-06-01

    A long-standing research focus in phytology has been to understand how plants allocate leaf epidermal space to stomata in order to achieve an economic balance between the plant's carbon needs and water use. Here, we present a quantitative theoretical framework to predict allometric relationships between morphological stomatal traits in relation to leaf gas exchange and the required allocation of epidermal area to stomata. Our theoretical framework was derived from first principles of diffusion and geometry based on the hypothesis that selection for higher anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax ) involves a trade-off to minimize the fraction of the epidermis that is allocated to stomata. Predicted allometric relationships between stomatal traits were tested with a comprehensive compilation of published and unpublished data on 1057 species from all major clades. In support of our theoretical framework, stomatal traits of this phylogenetically diverse sample reflect spatially optimal allometry that minimizes investment in the allocation of epidermal area when plants evolve towards higher gsmax . Our results specifically highlight that the stomatal morphology of angiosperms evolved along spatially optimal allometric relationships. We propose that the resulting wide range of viable stomatal trait combinations equips angiosperms with developmental and evolutionary flexibility in leaf gas exchange unrivalled by gymnosperms and pteridophytes. PMID:26991124

  3. Strategies to optimize the performance of Robotic-assisted ­laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lambrou, N.; Diaz, R.E.; Hinoul, P.; Parris, D.; Shoemaker, K.; Yoo, A.; Schwiers, M.

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid technique of robot-assisted, laparoscopic hysterectomy using the ENSEAL® Tissue Sealing Device is described in a retrospective, consecutive, observational case series. Over a 45 month period, 590 robot-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies +/- oophorectomy for benign and malignant indications were performed by a single surgeon with a bedside assistant at a tertiary healthcare center. Patient demographics, indications for surgery, comorbidities, primary and secondary surgical procedures, total operative and surgical time, estimated blood loss (EBL), length of stay (LOS), complications, transfusions and subsequent readmissions were analyzed. The overall complication rate was 5.9% with 35 patients experiencing 69 complications. Mean (SD) surgery time, operating room (OR) time, EBL, and LOS for the entire cohort were 75.5 (39.42) minutes, 123.8 (41.15) minutes, 83.1 (71.29) millilitres, and 1.2 (0.93) days, respectively. Mean surgery time in the first year (2009) was 91.6 minutes, which declined significantly each year by 18.0, 19.0, and 24.3 minutes, respectively. EBL and LOS did not vary ­significantly across the entire series. Using the cumulative sum method, an optimization curve for surgery time was evaluated, with three distinct optimization phases observed. In summary, the use of an advanced laparoscopic tissue-sealing device by a bedside surgical assistant provided an improved operative efficiency and reliable vessel sealing during robotic hysterectomy. PMID:25374656

  4. Shape optimization of pulsatile ventricular assist devices using FSI to minimize thrombotic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. C.; Marsden, A. L.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we perform shape optimization of a pediatric pulsatile ventricular assist device (PVAD). The device simulation is carried out using fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling techniques within a computational framework that combines FEM for fluid mechanics and isogeometric analysis for structural mechanics modeling. The PVAD FSI simulations are performed under realistic conditions (i.e., flow speeds, pressure levels, boundary conditions, etc.), and account for the interaction of air, blood, and a thin structural membrane separating the two fluid subdomains. The shape optimization study is designed to reduce thrombotic risk, a major clinical problem in PVADs. Thrombotic risk is quantified in terms of particle residence time in the device blood chamber. Methods to compute particle residence time in the context of moving spatial domains are presented in a companion paper published in the same issue (Comput Mech, doi: 10.1007/s00466-013-0931-y, 2013). The surrogate management framework, a derivative-free pattern search optimization method that relies on surrogates for increased efficiency, is employed in this work. For the optimization study shown here, particle residence time is used to define a suitable cost or objective function, while four adjustable design optimization parameters are used to define the device geometry. The FSI-based optimization framework is implemented in a parallel computing environment, and deployed with minimal user intervention. Using five SEARCH/ POLL steps the optimization scheme identifies a PVAD design with significantly better throughput efficiency than the original device.

  5. Binary particle swarm optimization algorithm assisted to design of plasmonic nanospheres sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboli, Milad; Akhlaghi, Majid; Shahmirzaee, Hossein

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a coherent perfect absorption (CPA)-type sensor based on plasmonic nanoparticles is proposed. It consists of a plasmonic nanospheres array on top of a quartz substrate. The refractive index changes above the sensor surface, which is due to the appearance of gas or the absorption of biomolecules, can be detected by measuring the resulting spectral shifts of the absorption coefficient. Since the CPA efficiency depends strongly on the number of plasmonic nanoparticles and the locations of nanoparticles, binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO) algorithm is used to design an optimized array of the plasmonic nanospheres. This optimized structure should be maximizing the absorption coefficient only in the one frequency. BPSO algorithm, a swarm of birds including a matrix with binary entries responsible for controlling nanospheres in the array, shows the presence with symbol of ('1') and the absence with ('0'). The sensor can be used for sensing both gas and low refractive index materials in an aqueous environment.

  6. Designing optimal greenhouse gas monitoring networks for Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziehn, T.; Law, R. M.; Rayner, P. J.; Roff, G.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric transport inversion is commonly used to infer greenhouse gas (GHG) flux estimates from concentration measurements. The optimal location of ground-based observing stations that supply these measurements can be determined by network design. Here, we use a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) in reverse mode together with a Bayesian inverse modelling framework to derive optimal GHG observing networks for Australia. This extends the network design for carbon dioxide (CO2) performed by Ziehn et al. (2014) to also minimise the uncertainty on the flux estimates for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), both individually and in a combined network using multiple objectives. Optimal networks are generated by adding up to five new stations to the base network, which is defined as two existing stations, Cape Grim and Gunn Point, in southern and northern Australia respectively. The individual networks for CO2, CH4 and N2O and the combined observing network show large similarities because the flux uncertainties for each GHG are dominated by regions of biologically productive land. There is little penalty, in terms of flux uncertainty reduction, for the combined network compared to individually designed networks. The location of the stations in the combined network is sensitive to variations in the assumed data uncertainty across locations. A simple assessment of economic costs has been included in our network design approach, considering both establishment and maintenance costs. Our results suggest that, while site logistics change the optimal network, there is only a small impact on the flux uncertainty reductions achieved with increasing network size.

  7. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time

  8. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from wild garlic (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Tomšik, Alena; Pavlić, Branimir; Vladić, Jelena; Ramić, Milica; Brindza, Ján; Vidović, Senka

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction was used for extraction of bioactive compounds and for production of Allium ursinum liquid extract. The experiments were carried out according to tree level, four variables, face-centered cubic experimental design (FDC) combined with response surface methodology (RSM). Temperature (from 40 to 80 °C), ethanol concentration (from 30% to 70%), extraction time (from 40 to 80 min) and ultrasonic power (from 19.2 to 38.4 W/L) were investigated as independent variables in order to obtain the optimal conditions for extraction and to maximize the yield of total phenols (TP), flavonoids (TF) and antioxidant activity of obtained extracts. Experimental results were fitted to the second order polynomial model where multiple regression and analysis of variance were used to determine the fitness of the model and optimal condition for investigated responses. The predicted values of the TP (1.60 g GAE/100 g DW), TF (0.35 g CE/100 g DW), antioxidant activity, IC50 (0.71 mg/ml) and EY (38.1%) were determined at the optimal conditions for ultrasound assisted extraction: 80 °C temperature, 70% ethanol, 79.8 min and 20.06 W/L ultrasonic power. The predicted results matched well with the experimental results obtained using optimal extraction conditions which validated the RSM model with a good correlation. PMID:26563916

  9. When gas analysis assists with postmortem imaging to diagnose causes of death.

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Giuliani, N; Egger, C; Rinaldi, A; Dominguez, A; Chevallier, C; Bruguier, C; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2015-06-01

    Postmortem imaging consists in the non-invasive examination of bodies using medical imaging techniques. However, gas volume quantification and the interpretation of the gas collection results from cadavers remain difficult. We used whole-body postmortem multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) followed by a full autopsy or external examination to detect the gaseous volumes in bodies. Gases were sampled from cardiac cavities, and the sample compositions were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/thermal conductivity detection (HS-GC-MS/TCD). Three categories were defined according to the presumed origin of the gas: alteration/putrefaction, high-magnitude vital gas embolism (e.g., from scuba diving accident) and gas embolism of lower magnitude (e.g., following a traumatic injury). Cadaveric alteration gas was diagnosed even if only one gas from among hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide or methane was detected. In alteration cases, the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was often >0.2, except in the case of advanced alteration, when methane presence was the best indicator. In the gas embolism cases (vital or not), hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and methane were absent. Moreover, with high-magnitude vital gas embolisms, carbon dioxide content was >20%, and the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was >0.2. With gas embolisms of lower magnitude (gas presence consecutive to a traumatic injury), carbon dioxide content was <20% and the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was often <0.2. We found that gas analysis provided useful assistance to the postmortem imaging diagnosis of causes of death. Based on the quantifications of gaseous cardiac samples, reliable indicators were determined to document causes of death. MDCT examination of the body must be performed as quickly as possible, as does gas sampling, to avoid generating any artifactual alteration gases. Because of cardiac gas composition analysis, it is possible to distinguish alteration gases and gas embolisms of different

  10. Iridium single atom tips fabricated by field assisted reactive gas etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John A.; Urban, Radovan; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple, reliable method to fabricate Ir single atom tips (SATs) from polycrystalline wire. An electrochemical etch in CaCl2 solution is followed by a field assisted reactive gas etch in vacuum at room temperature using oxygen as an etching gas and neon as an imaging gas. Once formed, SATs are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures and their underlying structure is examined through evaporation of the apex atoms. Furthermore, a method is developed to repair Ir SATs at liquid nitrogen temperatures when apex atoms evaporate. This method may be used to fabricate Ir SAT ion sources.

  11. Simulation of gas-assisted injection mold-cooling process using line source model approach for gas channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.P.; Hu, S.Y.; Chen, S.C.

    1998-10-01

    Gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM) process, being an innovative injection molding process, can substantially reduce production expenses through reduction in material cost, reduction in clamp tonnage and reduction in cycle time. Whether it is feasible to perform an integrated simulation for process simulation based on a unified CAE model for gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM) is a great concern. In the present study, numerical algorithms based on the same CAE model used for process simulation regarding filling and packaging stages were developed to simulate the cooling phase of GAIM using a cycle-averaged three-dimensional modified boundary element technique similar to that used for conventional injection molding. However, to use the current CAE model for analysis, gas channel was modeled by two-node elements using line source approach. It was found that this new modeling not only affects the mold wall temperature calculation very slightly but also reduces the computer time by 95% as compared with a full gas channel modeling required a lot of triangular elements on gas channel surface. This investigation indicates that it is feasible to achieve an integrated process simulation for GAIM under one CAE model resulting in great computational efficiency for industrial application.

  12. Study of optimal gas pressure in optically pumped D IIO gas terahertz laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhihong; Yao, Jianquan; Ren, Xia; Yang, Yang; Luo, Xizhang; Wang, Peng

    2008-03-01

    Heavy water vapor (D IIO gas) which owns special structure properties, can generate terahertz (THz) radiation by optically pumped technology, and its 385 μm wavelength radiation can be widely used. In this research, on the base of semi-classical density matrix theory, we set up a three-level energy system as its theoretical model, a TEA-CO II laser 9R (22) output line (λ=9.26 μm) acted as pumping source, D IIO gas molecules were operating medium, the expressions of pumping absorption coefficient G p and THz signal gain coefficient G s were deduced , It was shown that the gain of THz signal was related with the energy-level parameters of operating molecules and some operating parameters of the THz laser cavity, mainly including gas pressure, temperature etc.; By means of iteration method, the output power density of THz pulse signal was calculated numerically as its initial power density was known; Changing the parameter of gas pressure and keeping others steady, the relationship curve between the output power intensity (Is) of Tera-Hz pulse laser and the operating D IIO gas pressure (P) was obtained. The curve showed that the power intensity (Is) increased with gas pressure (P) in a certain range, but decreased when the pressure (P) exceeded some value because of the bottleneck effect, and there was an optimal gas pressure for the highest output power. We used a grating tuned TEA-CO II laser as pumping power and a sample tube of 97cm length as THz laser operating cavity to experiment. The results of theoretical calculation and experiment matched with each other.

  13. Evaluation of Fiber Bundle Rotation for Enhancing Gas Exchange in a Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Eash, Heide J.; Mihelc, Kevin M.; Frankowski, Brain J.; Hattler, Brack G.; Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal through an intravenous respiratory assist catheter can be used as a means of treating patients with acute respiratory failure. We are beginning development efforts toward a new respiratory assist catheter with an insertional size <25F, which can be inserted percutaneously. In this study, we evaluated fiber bundle rotation as an improved mechanism for active mixing and enhanced gas exchange in intravenous respiratory assist catheters. Using a simple test apparatus of a rotating densely packed bundle of hollow fiber membranes, water and blood gas exchange levels were evaluated at various rotation speeds in a mock vena cava. At 12,000 RPM, maximum CO2 gas exchange rates were 449 and 523 mL/min per m², water and blood, respectively, but the rate of increase with increasing rotation rate diminished beyond 7500 RPM. These levels of gas exchange efficiency are two‐ to threefold greater than achieved in our previous respiratory catheters using balloon pulsation for active mixing. In preliminary hemolysis tests, which monitored plasma‐free hemoglobin levels in vitro over a period of 6 hours, we established that the rotating fiber bundle per se did not cause significant blood hemolysis compared with an intra‐aortic balloon pump. Accordingly, fiber bundle rotation appears to be a potential mechanism for increasing gas exchange and reducing insertional size in respiratory catheters. PMID:17515731

  14. Mechanism study on the effects of side assisting gas velocity during CO{sub 2} laser welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Linjie; Zhang Jianxun; Gong Shuili

    2009-07-15

    An experimental study on the effects of side assisting gas during CO{sub 2} laser welding has been carried out, and it is found that side assisting gas velocity can significantly affect the laser induced plasma and the weld cross-sectional geometry. In order to get better understanding on the associated mechanism, a three dimensional model based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy has been developed to simulate the spatial distributions of plasma temperature under different side assisting gas velocities. Furthermore, ray-tracing method is employed to investigate the variation of bremsstrahlung absorption and power density distribution on keyhole walls at different side assisting gas velocities with the assumption of conical keyhole shape. The results show that the diminishing of refraction and bremsstrahlung absorption due to an increase in side assisting gas velocity results in an increase in heat transfer efficiency, which contributes to the increase of weld cross-sectional area and penetration depth.

  15. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharide from Psidium guajava L. fruits.

    PubMed

    Amutha Gnana Arasi, Michael Antony Samy; Gopal Rao, Manchineela; Bagyalakshmi, Janardanan

    2016-10-01

    This study deals with the optimization of microwave assisted extraction of polysaccharide from Psidium guajava L. fruit using Response surface methodology. To evaluate the effect of three independent variables, Water to plant material ratio, microwave power used for extraction and Irradiation time, central composite design has been employed. The yield is considered as dependent variable. The design model estimated the optimum yield of 6.81677% at 200W microwave power level, 3:1 water to plant material ratio and 20min of irradiation time. Three factors three levels Central composite design coupled with RSM was used to model the extraction process. ANOVA was performed to find the significance of the model. The polysaccharide extracted using microwave assisted extraction process was analyzed using FTIR Spectroscopy. PMID:27180292

  16. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. PMID:25530679

  17. Gas assisted thin-film evaporation from confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Shankar

    A novel cooling mechanism based on evaporation of thin liquid films is presented for thermal management of confined heat sources, such as microprocessor hotspots, high power light emitting diodes and RF packages with a high operational frequency. A thin nanoporous membrane (˜1--5microm) is utilized to maintain microscopically thin liquid films (˜1--5microm) by capillary action, while providing a pathway for the vapor generated due to evaporation at the liquid-vapor interface. The vapor generated by evaporation is continuously removed by using a dry sweeping gas, keeping the membrane outlet dry. This thesis presents a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer mechanisms that result in cooling the confined heat sources. Performance analysis of this cooling mechanism demonstrates heat fluxes over 600W/cm2 for sufficiently thin membrane and film thicknesses (˜1--5microm) and by using air jet impingement for advection of vapor from the membrane surface. Based on the results from this performance analysis, a monolithic micro-fluidic device is designed and fabricated incorporating micro and nanoscale features. This MEMS/NEMS device serves multiple functionalities of hotspot simulation, temperature sensing, and evaporative cooling. Subsequent experimental investigations using this microfluidic device demonstrate heat fluxes in excess of 600W/cm2 at 90 °C using water as the evaporating coolant. In order to further enhance the device performance, a comprehensive theoretical and computational analysis of heat and mass transfer at micro and nanoscales is carried out. Since the coolant is confined using a nanoporous membrane, a detailed study of evaporation inside a nanoscale cylindrical pore is performed. The continuum analysis of water confined within a cylindrical nanopore determines the effect of electrostatic interaction and Van der Waals forces in addition to capillarity on the interfacial transport

  18. Effect of impeller design and spacing on gas exchange in a percutaneous respiratory assist catheter.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, R Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J; Burgreen, Greg W; Federspiel, William J

    2014-12-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2 ) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2-5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m(2) (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5-10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2-13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange. PMID:24749994

  19. Effect of Impeller Design and Spacing on Gas Exchange in a Percutaneous Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, R. Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J.; Burgreen, Greg W.; Federspiel, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2–5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m2 (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5–10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2–13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange. PMID:24749994

  20. Application of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Microwave-assisted Extraction of Polysaccharide from Tremella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuzhen; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Benguo; Zuo, Sasa

    Tremella is an excellent source of polysaccharides. In this study, microwave-assisted extraction was employed to extract polysaccharides from Tremella with water. By using response surface methodology, the effects of microwave output power, extraction time, and solid-liquid ratio on polysaccharide yield were investigated and the optimal conditions were determined as follows: extraction time 60 s, microwave output power 750 w, liquid-solid ratio 20. The average experimental polysaccharide yield under the optimum conditions was found to be 65.07±0.99%, which agreed with the predicted value of 69.07%.

  1. Optimizing the coating process of organic actinide extractants on magnetically assisted chemical separation particles.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B. A.; Tuazon, H. E.; Kaminski, M. D.; Aase, S. B.; Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Chemical Engineering; LLNL; California State Polytechnic Univ. at Pomona; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1997-01-01

    The coatings of ferromagnetic-charcoal-polymer microparticles (1-25 gm) with organic extractants specific for actinides were optimized for use in the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process. The organic extractants, octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP), coated the particles when a carrier organic solvent was evaporated. Coated particles were heated in an oven overnight to drive off any remaining carrier solvent and fix the extractants on the particles. Partitioning coefficients for americium obtained with the coated particles routinely reached 3000-4000 ml g-1, approximately 10 times the separation efficiency observed with the conventional solvent extraction system using CMPO and TBP.

  2. Optimization of diclofenac quantification from wastewater treatment plant sludge by ultrasonication assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Emel; Sari, Sevgi; Ozdemir, Gamze; Aydin, Egemen; Pehlivanoglu-Mantas, Elif; Okutman Tas, Didem

    2014-05-01

    A rapid quantification method of diclofenac from sludge samples through ultrasonication assisted extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE) was developed and used for the quantification of diclofenac concentrations in sludge samples with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Although the concentration of diclofenac in sludge samples taken from different units of wastewater treatment plants in Istanbul was below the limit of quantification (LOQ; 5ng/g), an optimized method for sludge samples along with the total mass balances in a wastewater treatment plant can be used to determine the phase with which diclofenac is mostly associated. Hence, the results will provide information on fate and transport of diclofenac, as well as on the necessity of alternative removal processes. In addition, since the optimization procedure is provided in detail, it is possible for other researchers to use this procedure as a starting point for the determination of other emerging pollutants in wastewater sludge samples. PMID:24704687

  3. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of phenols from seeds of grape pomace.

    PubMed

    Andjelković, Marko Z; Milenković-Andjelković, Ana S; Radovanović, Blaga C; Radovanović, Aleksandra N

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to optimize the extraction condition of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of phenols from the red grape of Vranac variety (Vitis vinifera L.) pomace seeds. The minimum experiments needed for optimization of UAE by response surface methodology (RSM) were obtained by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses of seed extracts. UAE greatly depends on three independent variables: extraction temperature, time and liquid/solid ratio. The RSM can be used for optimization of UAE conditions to obtain maximum responses such as extraction yield, TPC, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and proanthocyanidin content. The predicted values of the model were in accordance with experimental data under the same conditions (RSD was 0.74%). Experimental data also confirmed that UAE gives a better yield of phenolics than conventional solvent extraction (23.76% increase). The UAE under optimal extraction conditions is suitable for obtaining extracts that are rich in phenolic content, and have strong antioxidant activity which could be used as additives in food and medicaments. PMID:25551727

  4. Computer-assisted multi-segment gradient optimization in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tyteca, Eva; Park, Soo Hyun; Shellie, Robert A; Haddad, Paul R; Desmet, Gert

    2015-02-13

    This study reports simulation and optimization of ion chromatography separations using multi-segment gradient elution. First, an analytical expression for the gradient retention factor under these complex elution profiles was derived. This allows a rapid retention time prediction calculations under different gradient conditions, during computer-assisted method development. Next, these analytical expressions were implemented in an in-house written Matlab(®) routine that searches for the optimal (multi-segment) gradient conditions, either via a four-segment grid search or via the recently proposed one-segment-per-component search, in which the slope is adjusted after the elution of each individual component. Evaluation of the retention time simulation and optimization approaches was performed on a mixture of 18 inorganic anions and different subsets with varying number of compounds. The two considered multi-segment gradient optimization searches resulted in similar proposed gradient profiles, and corresponding chromatograms. Moreover, the resultant chromatograms were clearly superior to the chromatograms obtained from the best simple linear gradient profiles, found via a fine grid search. The proposed approach is useful for automated method development in ion chromatography in which complex elution profiles are often used to increase the separation power. PMID:25596760

  5. Optimization of a radiative membrane for gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Anthony; Boutami, Salim; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Benisty, Henri

    2014-05-01

    To engineer a cheap, portable and low-power optical gas sensor, incandescent sources are more suitable than expensive quantum cascade lasers and low-efficiency light-emitting diodes. Such sources of radiation have already been realized, using standard MEMS technology, consisting in free standing circular micro-hotplates. This paper deals with the design of such membranes in order to maximize their wall-plug efficiency. Specification constraints are taken into account, including available energy per measurement and maximum power delivered by the electrical supply source. The main drawback of these membranes is known to be the power lost through conduction to the substrate, thus not converted in (useful) radiated power. If the membrane temperature is capped by technological requirements, radiative flux can be favored by increasing the membrane radius. However, given a finite amount of energy, the larger the membrane and its heat capacity, the shorter the time it can be turned on. This clearly suggests that an efficiency optimum has to be found. Using simulations based on a spatio-temporal radial profile, we demonstrate how to optimally design such membrane systems, and provide an insight into the thermo-optical mechanisms governing this kind of devices, resulting in a nontrivial design with a substantial benefit over existing systems. To further improve the source, we also consider tailoring the membrane stack spectral emissivity to promote the infrared signal to be sensed as well as to maximize energy efficiency.

  6. Gas-assisted dispersive liquid-phase microextraction using ionic liquid as extracting solvent for spectrophotometric speciation of copper.

    PubMed

    Akhond, Morteza; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Pourshamsi, Tayebe; Ramezani, Amir M

    2016-07-01

    Gas-assisted dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (GA-DLPME) has been developed for preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of copper ion in different water samples. The ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and argon gas, respectively, were used as the extracting solvent and disperser. The procedure was based on direct reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, followed by extracting Cu(I) into ionic liquid phase by using neocuproine as the chelating agent. Several experimental variables that affected the GA-DLPME efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions (IL volume, 50µL; pH, 6.0; acetate buffer, 1.5molL(-1); reducing agent concentration, 0.2molL(-1); NC concentration, 120µgmL(-1); Ar gas bubbling time, 6min; argon flow rate, 1Lmin(-1); NaCl concentration, 6% w/w; and centrifugation time, 3min), the calibration graph was linear over the concentration range of 0.30-2.00µgmL(-1) copper ion with a limit of detection of 0.07µgmL(-1). Relative standard deviation for five replicate determinations of 1.0µgmL(-1) copper ion was found to be 3.9%. The developed method was successfully applied to determination of both Cu(I) and Cu(II) species in water samples. PMID:27154700

  7. Optimization of ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of six antidepressants in human plasma using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Taboada, V; Regenjo, M; Morales, L; Alvarez, I; Carro, A M; Lorenzo, R A

    2016-05-30

    A simple Ultrasounds Assisted-Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction (UA-DLLME) method is presented for the simultaneous determination of six second-generation antidepressants in plasma by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detector (UPLC-PDA). The main factors that potentially affect to DLLME were optimized by a screening design followed by a response surface design and desirability functions. The optimal conditions were 2.5mL of acetonitrile as dispersant solvent, 0.2mL of chloroform as extractant solvent, 3min of ultrasounds stirring and extraction pH 9.8.Under optimized conditions, the UPLC-PDA method showed good separation of antidepressants in 2.5min and good linearity in the range of 0.02-4μgmL(-1), with determination coefficients higher than 0.998. The limits of detection were in the range 4-5ngmL(-1). The method precision (n=5) was evaluated showing relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 8.1% for all compounds. The average recoveries ranged from 92.5% for fluoxetine to 110% for mirtazapine. The applicability of DLLME/UPLC-PDA was successfully tested in twenty nine plasma samples from antidepressant consumers. Real samples were analyzed by the proposed method and the results were successfully submitted to comparison with those obtained by a Liquid Liquid Extraction-Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (LLE-GC-MS) method. The results confirmed the presence of venlafaxine in most cases (19 cases), followed by sertraline (3 cases) and fluoxetine (3 cases) at concentrations below toxic levels. PMID:26955756

  8. Sulfur hexafluoride: Optimal use as a gas-phase, infrared sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, A.E.; Ludwick, L.M.; White, D.; Andrews, D.E.; Godbey, S.E. )

    1992-12-01

    Investigations into the use of sulfur hexafluoride, SF[sub 6], as a gas-phase, infrared photochemical sensitizer have revealed several interesting phenomena. The expedient use of SF[sub 6] can produce an optimal quantity of nitrated product in the gas-phase, laser-induced nitration of cyclopentane. The optimal utilization of sulfur hexafluoride required critical optimization of both frequency and quantity. The results are described herein. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of a Market Optimized Condensing Gas Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pescatore

    2006-01-11

    This program covered the development of a market optimized condensing gas water heater for residential applications. The intent of the program was to develop a condensing design that minimized the large initial cost premium associated with traditional condensing water heater designs. Equally important was that the considered approach utilizes design and construction methods that deliver the desired efficiency without compromising product reliability. Standard condensing water heater approaches in the marketplace utilize high cost materials such as stainless steel tanks and heat exchangers as well as expensive burner systems to achieve the higher efficiencies. The key in this program was to develop a water heater design that uses low-cost, available components and technologies to achieve higher efficiency at a modest cost premium. By doing this, the design can reduce the payback to a more reasonable length, increasing the appeal of the product to the marketplace. Condensing water heaters have been in existence for years, but have not been able to significantly penetrate the market. The issue has typically been cost. The high purchase price associated with existing condensing water heaters, sometimes as much as $2000, has been a very difficult hurdle to overcome in the marketplace. The design developed under this program has the potential to reduce the purchase price of this condensing design by as much as $1000 as compared to traditional condensing units. The condensing water heater design developed over the course of this program led to an approach that delivered the following performance attributes: 90%+ thermal efficiency; 76,000 Btu/hr input rate in a 50 gallon tank; First hour rating greater than 180 gph; Rapid recovery time; and Overall operating condition well matched to combination heat and hot water applications. Over the final three years of the program, TIAX worked very closely with A.O. Smith Water Products Company as our commercial partner to optimize

  10. Fast low-pressure microwave assisted extraction and gas chromatographic determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, M C; Maina, R; Tumiatti, V; Sarzanini, C; Rivoira, L; De Carlo, R M

    2012-11-23

    A new technology equipment for low-pressure microwave assisted extraction (usually employed for organic chemistry reactions), recently launched in the market, is used for the first time in environmental analysis for the extraction of commercial technical Aroclor mixtures from soil. Certified reference materials of Aroclor 1260, Aroclor 1254 and Aroclor 1242 in transformer oils were used to contaminate the soil samples and to optimize the extraction method as well as the subsequent gas chromatographic electron capture detection (GC-ECD) analytical method. The study was performed optimizing the extraction, the purification and the gas chromatographic separation conditions to enhance the resolution of difficult pairs of congeners (C28/31 and C141/179). After optimization, the recovery yields were included within the range 79-84%. The detection limits, evaluated for two different commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures (Aroclor 1260 and Aroclor 1242) were 0.056 ± 0.001 mg/kg and 0.290 ± 0.006 mg/kg, respectively. The method, validated with certified soil samples, was used to analyze a soil sample after an event of failure of a pole-mounted transformer which caused the dumping of PCB contaminated oil in soil. Moreover, the method provides simple sample handling, fast extraction with reduced amount of sample and solvents than usually required, and simple purification step involving the use of solvent (cyclohexane) volumes as low as 5 mL. Reliability and reproducibility of extraction conditions are ensured by direct and continuous monitoring of temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:23084486

  11. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of charantin from Momordica charantia fruits using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ahamad, Javed; Amin, Saima; Mir, Showkat R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) fruits are well known for their beneficial effects in diabetes that are often attributed to its bioactive component charantin. Objective: The aim of the present study is to develop and optimize an efficient protocol for the extraction of charantin from M. charantia fruits. Materials and Methods: Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions. RSM was based on a three-level, three-variable Box-Behnken design (BBD), and the studied variables included solid to solvent ratio, extraction temperature, and extraction time. Results: The optimal conditions predicted by the BBD were: UAE with methanol: Water (80:20, v/v) at 46°C for 120 min with solid to solvent ratio of 1:26 w/v, under which the yield of charantin was 3.18 mg/g. Confirmation trials under slightly adjusted conditions yielded 3.12 ± 0.14 mg/g of charantin on dry weight basis of fruits. The result of UAE was also compared with Soxhlet extraction method and UAE was found 2.74-fold more efficient than the Soxhlet extraction for extracting charantin. Conclusions: A facile UAE protocol for a high extraction yield of charantin was developed and validated. PMID:26681889

  12. Fusion of Optimized Indicators from Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for Driver Drowsiness Detection

    PubMed Central

    Daza, Iván G.; Bergasa, Luis M.; Bronte, Sebastián; Yebes, J. Javier; Almazán, Javier; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a non-intrusive approach for monitoring driver drowsiness using the fusion of several optimized indicators based on driver physical and driving performance measures, obtained from ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistant Systems) in simulated conditions. The paper is focused on real-time drowsiness detection technology rather than on long-term sleep/awake regulation prediction technology. We have developed our own vision system in order to obtain robust and optimized driver indicators able to be used in simulators and future real environments. These indicators are principally based on driver physical and driving performance skills. The fusion of several indicators, proposed in the literature, is evaluated using a neural network and a stochastic optimization method to obtain the best combination. We propose a new method for ground-truth generation based on a supervised Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). An extensive evaluation of indicators, derived from trials over a third generation simulator with several test subjects during different driving sessions, was performed. The main conclusions about the performance of single indicators and the best combinations of them are included, as well as the future works derived from this study. PMID:24412904

  13. Optimizing ultrasound-assisted extraction of prodigiosin by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Qing; Wang, Yu-Jie; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Chang-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Prodigiosin extraction from dried Serratia marcescens jx1 cells using ultrasound-assisted extraction was optimized. The experiment was carried out in accordance with a central composite design (CCD) three-level and single-variable approach. The extraction time, extraction temperature, and solute to solvent ratio with the application of ultrasonication were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) to maximize the extraction of prodigiosin from dried S. marcescens jx1 cells. The response of prodigiosin was determined using spectrophotometry. A quadratic model was established to predict the prodigiosin extraction yield. The analysis of variance showed that the quadratic model significantly contributed to the response of prodigiosin. The optimal extraction parameters were an extraction time of 17.5 min, an extraction temperature of 23.4°C, and a solvent-to-solute ratio of 1:27.2. Under these optimum conditions, the average prodigiosin yield was 4.3 g±0.02 g from 100 g of dried cells, which matches the predicted values. The obtained optimum conditions for prodigiosin extraction provide a scientific basis for the economical large-scale production of prodigiosin. PMID:24372158

  14. Optimization of enzyme-assisted extraction and characterization of polysaccharides from Hericium erinaceus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yang; Li, Qian; Mao, Guanghua; Zou, Ye; Feng, Weiwei; Zheng, Daheng; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Lulu; Zhang, Tianxiu; Yang, Jun; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2014-01-30

    The enzyme-assisted extraction (EAE) of polysaccharides from the fruits of Hericium erinaceus was studied. In this study, response surface methodology and the Box-Behnken design based on single-factor and orthogonal experiments were applied to optimize the EAE conditions. The optimal extraction conditions were as follows: a pH of 5.71, a temperature of 52.03°C and a time of 33.79 min. The optimal extraction conditions resulted in the highest H. erinaceus polysaccharides (HEP) yield, with a value 13.46 ± 0.37%, which represented an increase of 67.72% compared to hot water extraction (HWE). The polysaccharides were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, CD, AFM, and GC. The results showed that HEP was composed of mannose, glucose, xylose, and galactose in a molar ratio of 15.16:5.55:4.21:1. The functional groups of the H. erinaceus polysaccharides extracted by HWE and EAE were fundamentally identical but had apparent conformational changes. PMID:24299817

  15. Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Rao, Dandina N.

    2012-07-10

    A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

  16. Two-component co-injection and transfer molding and gas-assisted injection molding of polymers: Simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengtao

    Two-component molding is a novel process for manufacturing polymer products with a sandwich structure or a hollow structure. Typically, two different materials are injected or transferred into a mold sequentially or simultaneously. The skin is generally a prime polymer with required surface and bulk properties for intended use. The core can be solid, foam or gas. Obtaining a uniform encapsulated structure is difficult and there are no science-based rules for optimization of process setup. Thus, a physical model and process simulations have been developed based on the kinematics and dynamics of a moving interface, and Hele-Shaw approximation. The model has incorporated temperature and shear rate dependences of viscosity of both skin and core component into the transient interface evolution. Based on the developed model, simulations have been carried out to study flow rate controlled simultaneous co-injection molding of thermoplastics, pressure-controlled sequential transfer molding of rubber compounds, and gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM). The simulation results were compared with the experimental data, and in general, good agreement was found between the predicted and experimentally measured interface distribution in moldings. For simultaneous co-injection molding, it is found that material pairs with a broad range of viscosities may be utilized. Breakthrough phenomena are mainly determined by the volume of melt of initial single phase injection and rheological properties of material combinations. When the core has a lower viscosity than the skin, or the volume of initial injection of skin melt is smaller, breakthrough is very likely. However, the breakthrough can be eliminated by controlling injection rate of the skin and core melts. For sequential transfer molding, it is found that the rubber distribution in moldings are dominated by the rheological properties of components and the volume fraction transferred, but independent of the gate pressure. When the

  17. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 15: GAS-ASSISTED GLYCOL PUMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  18. Computer assisted optimization of liquid chromatographic separations of small molecules using mixed-mode stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Edgar Y; Benito Quintana, José; Rodil, Rosario; Cela, Rafael

    2012-05-18

    Mixed-mode stationary phases are gaining adepts in liquid chromatography (LC) as more and more applications are published and new commercial columns appear in the market ought to their ability to retain and separate analytes with multiple functionalities. The increased number of adjustable variables gives these columns an enhanced value for the chromatographer, but, on the other hand, it complicates the process of developing satisfactory separations when complex samples must be analyzed. Thus, the availability of computer assisted methods development (CAMD) tools is highly desirable in this field. Therefore, the first specific tool for the CAMD of LC separations in mixed-mode columns is presented. The tool consists in two processes. The first one develops a retention model for peaks in a predefined experimental domain of pH and buffer concentration. In this domain, the retention as a function of the proportion of organic modifier is modeled using a two-stage re-calibration process departing from isocratic retention data and then, from gradient elutions. With this two-stage approach, reliability is gained. In the second process, the model is finally interpolated and used for the unattended optimization of the different possible elution modes available in these columns. This optimization process is driven by an evolutionary algorithm. The development and application of this new chemometrics tool is demonstrated by the optimization of a mixture of neutral and ionizable compounds. Hence, several different types of gradients were generated, showing a good agreement between simulated and experimental data, with retention time errors lower than 5% in most cases. On the other hand, classical CAMD tools, such as design of experiments, were unable to efficiently deal with mixed-mode optimizations, rendering errors above 30% for several compounds. PMID:22494641

  19. Optimization of mask manufacturing rule check constraint for model based assist feature generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Seongbo; Kim, Young-chang; Chun, Yong-jin; Lee, Seong-Woo; Lee, Suk-joo; Choi, Seong-woon; Han, Woo-sung; Chang, Seong-hoon; Yoon, Seok-chan; Kim, Hee-bom; Ki, Won-tai; Woo, Sang-gyun; Cho, Han-gu

    2008-11-01

    SRAF (sub-resolution assist feature) generation technology has been a popular resolution enhancement technique in photo-lithography past sub-65nm node. It helps to increase the process window, and these are some times called ILT(inverse lithography technology). Also, many studies have been presented on how to determine the best positions of SRAFs, and optimize its size. According to these reports, the generation of SRAF can be formulated as a constrained optimization problem. The constraints are the side lobe suppression and allowable minimum feature size or MRC (mask manufacturing rule check). As we know, bigger SRAF gives better contribution to main feature but susceptible to SRAF side lobe issue. Thus, we finally have no choice but to trade-off the advantages of the ideally optimized mask that contains very complicated SRAF patterns to the layout that has been MRC imposed applied to it. The above dilemma can be resolved by simultaneously using lower dose (high threshold) and cleaning up by smaller MRC. This solution makes the room between threshold (side lobe limitation) and MRC constraint (minimum feature limitation) wider. In order to use smaller MRC restriction without considering the mask writing and inspection issue, it is also appropriate to identify the exact mask writing limitation and find the smart mask constraints that well reflect the mask manufacturability and the e-beam lithography characteristics. In this article, we discuss two main topics on mask optimizations with SRAF. The first topic is on the experimental work to find what behavior of the mask writing ability is in term of several MRC parameters, and we propose more effective MRC constraint for aggressive generation of SRAF. The next topic is on finding the optimum MRC condition in practical case, 3X nm node DRAM contact layer. In fact, it is not easy to encompass the mask writing capability for very complicate real SRAF pattern by using the current MRC constraint based on the only width and

  20. Optimization of laser-assisted glass frit bonding process by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Xiao, Yanyi; Wu, Xingyang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a systematic study on laser-assisted glass frit bonding process was carried out by response surface methodology (RSM). Laser power, sealing speed and spot diameter were considered as key bonding parameters. Combined with a central rotatable experimental design, RSM was employed to establish mathematical model to predict the relationship between the shear force after bonding and the bonding process parameters. The model was validated experimentally. Based on the model, the interaction effects of the process parameters on the shear force were analyzed and the optimum bonding parameters were achieved. The results indicate that the model can be used to illustrate the relationship between the shear force and the bonding parameters. The predicted results obtained under the optimized parameters by the models are consistent with the experimental results.

  1. Multiparticle quantum Szilard engine with optimal cycles assisted by a Maxwell's demon.

    PubMed

    Cai, C Y; Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2012-03-01

    We present a complete-quantum description of a multiparticle Szilard engine that consists of a working substance and a Maxwell's demon. The demon is modeled as a multilevel quantum system with specific quantum control, and the working substance consists of identical particles obeying Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics. In this description, a reversible scheme to erase the demon's memory by a lower-temperature heat bath is used. We demonstrate that (1) the quantum control of the demon can be optimized for a single-particle Szilard engine so that the efficiency of the demon-assisted thermodynamic cycle could reach the Carnot cycle's efficiency and (2) the low-temperature behavior of the working substance is very sensitive to the quantum statistics of the particles and the insertion position of the partition. PMID:22587045

  2. Optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of cordycepin from Cordyceps militaris using orthogonal experimental design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Ju; Pan, Meng-Chun; Chang, Chao-Kai; Chang, Shu-Wei; Hsieh, Chang-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the optimization of the extraction conditions of cordycepin from Cordyceps militaris by using ultrasonication. For this purpose, the orthogonal experimental design was used to investigate the effects of factors on the ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE). Four factors: extraction time (min), ethanol concentration (%), extraction temperature (°C) and extraction frequency (kHz), were studied. The results showed that the highest cordycepin yield of 7.04 mg/g (86.98% ± 0.23%) was obtained with an extraction time of 60 min, ethanol concentration of 50%, extraction temperature of 65 °C and extraction frequency of 56 kHz. It was found that the cordycepin extraction yield increased with the effect of ultrasonication during the extraction process. Therefore, UAE can be used as an alternative to conventional immersion extraction with respect to the recovery of cordycepin from C. militaris, with the advantages of shorter extraction time and reduced solvent consumption. PMID:25514223

  3. Are there optimal numbers of oocytes, spermatozoa and embryos in assisted reproduction?

    PubMed

    Milachich, Tanya; Shterev, Atanas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this overview is to discuss the current information about the search for the optimum yield of gametes in assisted reproduction, as one of the major pillars of IVF success. The first topic is focused on the number of male gametes and the possible impact of some genetic traits on these parameters. The number of spermatozoa did not seem to be crucial when there is no severe male factor of infertility. Genetic testing prior to using those sperm cells is very important. Different methods were applied in order to elect the "best" spermatozoa according to specific indications. The next problem discussed is the importance of the number of oocytes collected. Several studies have agreed that "15 oocytes is the perfect number," as the number of mature oocytes is more important. However, if elective single embryo transfer is performed, the optimal number of oocytes will enable a proper embryo selection. The third problem discussed concerns fertility preservation. Many educational programs promote and encourage procreation at maternal ages between 20-35 years, since assisted reproduction is unable to fully overcome the effects of female aging and fertility loss after that age. It is also strongly recommended to ensure a reasonable number of cryopreserved mature oocytes, preferably in younger ages (<35), for which an average of two stimulation cycles are likely required. For embryo cryopreservation, the "freeze all" strategy suggests the vitrification of good embryos, therefore quality is prior to number and patient recruitment for this strategy should be performed cautiously. PMID:27584608

  4. Numerical simulation of an industrial microwave assisted filter dryer: criticality assessment and optimization.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Cristina; Veronesi, Paolo; Grisoni, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Industrial-scale filter dryers, equipped with one or more microwave input ports, have been modelled with the aim of detecting existing criticalities, proposing possible solutions and optimizing the overall system efficiency and treatment homogeneity. Three different loading conditions have been simulated, namely the empty applicator, the applicator partially loaded by both a high-loss and low loss load whose dielectric properties correspond to the one measured on real products. Modeling results allowed for the implementation of improvements to the original design such as the insertion of a wave guide transition and a properly designed pressure window, modification of the microwave inlet's position and orientation, alteration of the nozzles' geometry and distribution, and changing of the cleaning metallic torus dimensions and position. Experimental testing on representative loads, as well as in production sites, allowed for the confirmation of the validity of the implemented improvements, thus showing how numerical simulation can assist the designer in removing critical features and improving equipment performances when moving from conventional heating to hybrid microwave-assisted processing. PMID:18350999

  5. Determination of cycle configuration of gas turbines and aircraft engines by an optimization procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuijikawa, Y.; Nagaoka, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analyses and optimization of simple and sophisticated cycles, particularly for various gas turbine engines and aero-engines (including the scramjet engine) to achieve maximum performance. The optimization of such criteria as thermal efficiency, specific output, and total performance for gas turbine engines, and overall efficiency, nondimensional thrust, and specific impulse for aero-engines has been performed by the optimization procedure with the multiplier method. Comparison of results with analytical solutions establishes the validity of the optimization procedure.

  6. Microlenticular lens replication by the combination of gas-assisted imprint technology and LIGA-like process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hung; Shih, Ching-Jui; Wang, Hsuan-Cheng; Chang, Fuh-Yu; Young, Hong-Tsu; Chang, Wen-Chuan

    2012-09-01

    A mold used in creating diffractive optical elements significantly affects the quality of these devices. In this study, we improved traditional microlens fabrication processes, which have shortcomings, mainly by combining gas-assisted imprint technology and the lithographie galvanoformung abformung (LIGA)-like process. This combination resulted in the production of high-quality optical components with high replication rates, high uniformity, large areas and high flexibility. Given the pixel size of the panel used, the optimal viewing distance, the film thickness and the glass thickness in the formula, we could determine the radius of curvature and the thickness of the lens. By the use of U-groove machining, precise electroforming and embossing to produce polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds, lens film elements can be produced via an ultraviolet (UV)-cured molding process that converts microlenses into flexible polyethylene terephthalate films. In this study, the microlenticular lens mold is fabricated by U-groove machining, Ni electroforming and PDMS casting. Then, the PDMS mold with microlenticular lens structure is used in the gas-assisted UV imprint process and the PET film with microlenticular lens array is obtained. The lenticular lens had a radius of curvature and height of 228 and 18 µm, respectively. A 3D confocal laser microscope was used to measure the radius of curvature and the spacing of the metal molds, nickel (Ni) molds, PDMS molds and the finished thin-film products. The geometry of the final microlenticular lens was very close to the design values. All geometric errors were below 5%, the surface roughness reached the optical level (with all Ra values less than 10 nm) and the replication rate was 95%. The results demonstrate that this process can be used to fabricate gapless, lenticular-shaped, high-precision microlens arrays with a unitary curvature.

  7. Total dissolved gas prediction and optimization in RiverWare

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kevin M.; Witt, Adam M.; Hadjerioua, Boualem

    2015-09-01

    Management and operation of dams within the Columbia River Basin (CRB) provides the region with irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage. These various system-wide demands can require unique dam operations that may result in both voluntary and involuntary spill, thereby increasing tailrace levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) which can be fatal to fish. Appropriately managing TDG levels within the context of the systematic demands requires a predictive framework robust enough to capture the operationally related effects on TDG levels. Development of the TDG predictive methodology herein attempts to capture the different modes of hydro operation, thereby making it a viable tool to be used in conjunction with a real-time scheduling model such as RiverWare. The end result of the effort will allow hydro operators to minimize system-wide TDG while meeting hydropower operational targets and constraints. The physical parameters such as spill and hydropower flow proportions, accompanied by the characteristics of the dam such as plant head levels and tailrace depths, are used to develop the empirically-based prediction model. In the broader study, two different models are developed a simplified and comprehensive model. The latter model incorporates more specific bubble physics parameters for the prediction of tailrace TDG levels. The former model is presented herein and utilizes an empirically based approach to predict downstream TDG levels based on local saturation depth, spillway and powerhouse flow proportions, and entrainment effects. Representative data collected from each of the hydro projects is used to calibrate and validate model performance and the accuracy of predicted TDG uptake. ORNL, in conjunction with IIHR - Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa, carried out model adjustments to adequately capture TDG levels with respect to each plant while maintaining a generalized model configuration. Validation results

  8. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Lavoie, Christian; Alptekin, Emre; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Zhu, Frank; Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  9. DUV ArF light source automated gas optimization for enhanced repeatability and availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Tanuj; O'Brien, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The need for repeatable, reliable, and faster DUV ArF light source gas optimizations drove the development of Automated Gas Optimization (AGO). These automate the manual gas optimization procedure previously used to select the laser chamber gas pressures and in addition, bandwidth actuation settings, to deliver consistent performance and long gas lives, while maintaining stability and bounds on laser inputs. Manual gas optimization procedure requires at least two refills and an on-site visit by service personnel that can take over an hour to complete. This results in inconsistent light source performance, and sometimes unscheduled downtime. The key to AGO technology is the real-time estimation and monitoring of the laser's gas and bandwidth states, and automatic adjustment of gas pressure and bandwidth actuators until the states reach their specified targets, thus creating a closed loop. AGO executes on every refill, typically complete in less than 5 minutes, and collect performance data to allow long-term trending. They include built-in safety features and flexibility to allow future upgrades of light source features or performance tuning. Deployed in many lasers in the field, AGO has proved to be a dependable automation, yielding repeatable, fast, and reliable optimizations and valuable long-term trending data used to assess chamber performance

  10. A new systems approach to optimizing investments in gas production and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, E.L.

    1983-03-01

    This paper presents a new analytical approach for determining the optimal sequence of investments to make in each year of an extended planning horizon in each of a group of reservoirs producing gas and gas liquids through an interconnected trunkline network and a gas processing plant. The optimality criterion is to maximize net present value while satisfying fixed offtake requirements for dry gas, but with no limits on gas liquids production. The planning problem is broken into n + 2 separate but interrelated subproblems; gas reservoir development and production, gas flow in a trunkline gathering system, and plant separation activities to remove undesirable gas (CO/sub 2/) or to recover valuable liquid components. The optimal solution for each subproblem depends upon the optimal solutions for all of the other subproblems, so that the overall optimal solution is obtained iteratively. The iteration technique used is based upon a combination of heuristics and the decompostion algorithm of mathematical programming. Each subproblem is solved once during each overall iteration. In addition to presenting some mathematical details of the solution approach, this paper describes a computer system which has been developed to obtain solutions.

  11. Solar-assisted gas-energy water-heating feasibility for apartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of residential energy use, solar-energy technology for buildings, and the requirements for implementing technology in the housing industry led to a project to develop a solar water heater for apartments. A design study for a specific apartment was used to establish a solar water-heater cost model which is based on plumbing contractor bids and manufacturer estimates. The cost model was used to size the system to minimize the annualized cost of hot water. The annualized cost of solar-assisted gas-energy water heating is found to be less expensive than electric water heating but more expensive than gas water heating. The feasibility of a natural gas utility supplying the auxiliary fuel is evaluated. It is estimated that gas-utilizing companies will find it profitable to offer solar water heating as part of a total energy service option or on a lease basis when the price of new base-load supplies of natural gas reaches $2.50-$3.00 per million Btu.

  12. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from Cimicifugae rhizoma with response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Shen, Bao-Jia; Xie, Dong-Hao; Cai, Bao-Chang; Qin, Kun-Ming; Cai, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cimicifugae rhizoma was a Ranunculaceae herb belonging to the composite family, and the roots of C. rhizoma have been widely used in tradition Chinese medicine. Materials and Methods: Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of phenolic compounds from C. rhizoma. Caffeic acid (CA), isoferulic acid (IA), ferulic acid (FA), and total phenols were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of several experimental parameters, such as ultrasonic power (W), extraction temperature (°C), and ethanol concentration (%) on extraction efficiencies of phenolic compounds from C. rhizoma were evaluated. Results: The results showed that the optimal UAE condition was obtained with ultrasonic power of 377.35 W, extraction temperature of 70°C, and ethanol concentration of 58.37% for total phenols, and ultrasonic power of 318.28 W, extraction temperature of 59.65°C, and ethanol concentration of 64.43% for combination of CA, IA, FA. Conclusions: The experimental values under optimal conditions were in good consistent with the predicted values, which suggested UAE is more efficient for the extraction of phenolic compounds from plant materials. PMID:26600711

  13. Optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) seed oil.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuting; Xu, Zhenbo; Zheng, Baodong; Martin Lo, Y

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of pomegranate seed oil (PSO) was evaluated using a variety of solvents. Petroleum ether was the most effective for oil extraction, followed by n-hexane, ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, acetone, and isopropanol. Several variables, such as ultrasonic power, extraction temperature, extraction time, and the ratio of solvent volume and seed weight (S/S ratio) were studied for optimization using response surface methodology (RSM). The highest oil yield, 25.11% (w/w), was obtained using petroleum ether under optimal conditions for ultrasonic power, extraction temperature, extraction time, and S/S ratio at 140 W, 40 °C, 36 min, and 10 ml/g, respectively. The PSO yield extracted by UAE was significantly higher than by using Soxhlet extraction (SE; 20.50%) and supercriti cal fluid extraction (SFE; 15.72%). The fatty acid compositions were significantly different among the PSO extracted by Soxhlet extraction, SFE, and UAE, with punicic acid (>65%) being the most dominant using UAE. PMID:22964031

  14. Optimal control of FES-assisted standing up in paraplegia using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, R; Andrews, B J

    1999-11-01

    A practical system for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) assisted standing up in paraplegia should involve only a minimum of manual set up and tuning. An improved tuning method, using a genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed and demonstrated using computer simulation. Specifically, the GA adjusts the parameters of fuzzy logic (FL) and gain-scheduling proportional integral derivative (GS-PID) controllers that electrically stimulate the hip and knee musculature during the sit-stand maneuver. These new GA designed controllers were found to be effective in coordinating volitional and FES control according to formulated criteria. The latter was based on the deviations from a desired trajectory of the knee and hip joints and the magnitude of the voluntary upper body forces. The magnitude of the average arm forces were slightly higher when compared with the open-loop maximal stimulation of the hip and knee musculature; however, the terminal knee velocities were significantly reduced to less than 10 degrees /s. For practical implementation, the number of trials required to optimize the FL and GS-PID controllers can be reduced by a proposed pre-training procedure using a computer model scaled to the individual. The GA designed controllers remain near optimal provided the model-subject mismatch is small. PMID:10699563

  15. Simulation based flow distribution network optimization for vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Ting; Devillard, Mathieu; Advani, Suresh G.

    2004-05-01

    In the vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process, using a flow distribution network such as flow channels and high permeability fabrics can accelerate the resin infiltration of the fibre reinforcement during the manufacture of composite parts. The flow distribution network significantly influences the fill time and fill pattern and is essential for the process design. The current practice has been to cover the top surface of the fibre preform with the distribution media with the hope that the resin will flood the top surface immediately and penetrate through the thickness. However, this approach has some drawbacks. One is when the resin finds its way to the vent before it has penetrated the preform entirely, which results in a defective part or resin wastage. Also, if the composite structure contains ribs or inserts, this approach invariably results in dry spots. Instead of this intuitive approach, we propose a science-based approach to design the layout of the distribution network. Our approach uses flow simulation of the resin into the network and the preform and a genetic algorithm to optimize the flow distribution network. An experimental case study of a co-cured rib structure is conducted to demonstrate the design procedure and validate the optimized flow distribution network design. Good agreement between the flow simulations and the experimental results was observed. It was found that the proposed design algorithm effectively optimized the flow distribution network of the part considered in our case study and hence should prove to be a useful tool to extend the VARTM process to manufacture of complex structures with effective use of the distribution network layup.

  16. Laser gas assisted treatment of AISI H12 tool steel and corrosion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Toor, Ihsan-ul-Haq; Malik, Jahanzaib; Patel, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser gas assisted treatment of AISI H12 tool steel surface is carried out and the electrochemical response of the laser treated surface is investigated. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the treated layer are examined using a scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Potentiodynamic polarization tests are carried out for untreated and laser treated specimen in 0.2 M NaCl solution at room temperature. It is found that the laser treated AISI H12 workpiece surfaces exhibit higher corrosion resistance as compared to untreated specimen as confirmed by lower corrosion rate, higher pitting potential, and lower passive current density.

  17. Cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Jose A.; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2007-03-15

    A simple method is described for the unambiguous identification of the individual components in a gas mixture showing strong overlapping of their mass spectrometric cracking patterns. The method, herein referred to as cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry, takes advantage of the different vapor pressure values of the individual components at low temperature (78 K for liquid nitrogen traps), and thus of the different depletion efficiencies and outgassing patterns during the fast cooling and slow warming up of the trap, respectively. Examples of the use of this technique for gas mixtures with application to plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon and carbon-nitrogen hard films are shown. Detection of traces of specific C{sub 3} hydrocarbons (<50 ppm of initial methane) in methane/hydrogen plasmas and the possible trapping of thermally unstable C-N compounds in N{sub 2} containing deposition plasmas are addressed as representative examples of specific applications of the technique.

  18. Genetic algorithm to optimize the design of main combustor and gas generator in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Min; Ko, Sangho; Koo, Jaye

    2014-06-01

    A genetic algorithm was used to develop optimal design methods for the regenerative cooled combustor and fuel-rich gas generator of a liquid rocket engine. For the combustor design, a chemical equilibrium analysis was applied, and the profile was calculated using Rao's method. One-dimensional heat transfer was assumed along the profile, and cooling channels were designed. For the gas-generator design, non-equilibrium properties were derived from a counterflow analysis, and a vaporization model for the fuel droplet was adopted to calculate residence time. Finally, a genetic algorithm was adopted to optimize the designs. The combustor and gas generator were optimally designed for 30-tonf, 75-tonf, and 150-tonf engines. The optimized combustors demonstrated superior design characteristics when compared with previous non-optimized results. Wall temperatures at the nozzle throat were optimized to satisfy the requirement of 800 K, and specific impulses were maximized. In addition, the target turbine power and a burned-gas temperature of 1000 K were obtained from the optimized gas-generator design.

  19. Optimization of Ultrasound-assisted Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Myrcia amazonica DC. (Myrtaceae) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    de Morais Rodrigues, Mariana Cristina; Borges, Leonardo Luiz; Martins, Frederico Severino; Mourão, Rosa Helena V.; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myrcia amazonica. DC is a species predominantly found in northern Brazil, and belongs to the Myrtaceae family, which possess various species used in folk medicine to treat gastrointestinal disorders, infectious diseases, and hemorrhagic conditions and are known for their essential oil contents. Materials and Methods: This study aimed applied the Box–Behnken design combined with response surface methodology to optimize ultrasound-assisted extraction of total polyphenols, total tannins (TT), and total flavonoids (TF) from M. amazonica DC. Results: The results indicated that the best conditions to obtain highest yields of TT were in lower levels of alcohol degree (65%), time (15 min), and also solid: Liquid ratio (solid to liquid ratio; 20 mg: 5 mL). The TF could be extracted with high amounts with higher extraction times (45 min), lower values of solid: Liquid ratio (20 mg: mL), and intermediate alcohol degree level. Conclusion: The exploitation of the natural plant resources present very important impact for the economic development, and also the valorization of great Brazilian biodiversity. The knowledge obtained from this work should be useful to further exploit and apply this raw material. SUMMARY Myrcia amazonica leaves possess phenolic compounds with biological applications;Lower levels of ethanolic strength are more suitable to obtain a igher levels of phenolic compouds such as tannins;Box-Behnken design indicates to be useful to explore the best conditions of ultrasound assisted extraction. Abbreviation used: Nomenclature ES: Ethanolic strength, ET: Extraction time, SLR: Solid to liquid ratio, TFc: Total flavonoid contents, TPc: Total polyphenol contents, TTc: Total tannin contents PMID:27019555

  20. Optimized ejector-diffuser design procedure for natural gas vapor recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, J.C.; Carroll, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for designing optimized ejector-diffuser systems for recovering natural gas vapor from oil storage tanks is presented. The system utilizes high pressure gas from the separator to entrain the ambient pressure gas from the tanks and then pumps the mixture to the sales line. The analysis predicts the minimum separator pressure and the optimum nozzle Mach number and ejector area ratio required to accomplish this task. The results of a parametric study suggest that this system is feasible and that the higher the required ejector compression ratio the more critical is the use of an optimized design.

  1. Analysis of gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotopes and optimal feed position

    SciTech Connect

    Chuntong Ying; Hongjiang Wu; Mingsheng Zhou; Yuguang Nie; Guangjun Liu

    1997-10-01

    Analysis of the concentration distribution in a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent isotope mixtures is different from that in a cascade for separation of two-component mixtures. This paper presents the governing equations for a multicomponent isotope separation cascade. Numerically predicted separation factors for the gas centrifuge cascade agree well with the experimental data. A theoretical optimal feed position is derived for a short square cascade for a two-component mixture in a close-separation case. The optimal feed position for a gas centrifuge cascade for separation of multicomponent mixture is discussed.

  2. Numerical simulations of CO2 -assisted gas production from hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhara, P.; Anderson, B. J.; Myshakin, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experimental studies over the last decade have reviewed the feasibility of using CO2 or CO2+N2 gas mixtures to recover CH4 gas from hydrates deposits. That technique would serve the dual purpose of CO2 sequestration and production of CH4 while maintaining the geo-mechanical stability of the reservoir. In order to analyze CH4 production process by means of CO2 or CO2+N2 injection into gas hydrate reservoirs, a new simulation tool, Mix3HydrateResSim (Mix3HRS)[1], was previously developed to account for the complex thermodynamics of multi-component hydrate phase and to predict the process of CH4 substitution by CO2 (and N2) in the hydrate lattice. In this work, Mix3HRS is used to simulate the CO2 injection into a Class 2 hydrate accumulation characterized by a mobile aqueous phase underneath a hydrate bearing sediment. That type of hydrate reservoir is broadly confirmed in permafrost and along seashore. The production technique implies a two-stage approach using a two-well design, one for an injector and one for a producer. First, the CO2 is injected into the mobile aqueous phase to convert it into immobile CO2 hydrate and to initiate CH4 release from gas hydrate across the hydrate-water boundary (generally designating the onset of a hydrate stability zone). Second, CH4 hydrate decomposition is induced by the depressurization method at a producer to estimate gas production potential over 30 years. The conversion of the free water phase into the CO2 hydrate significantly reduces competitive water production in the second stage, thereby improving the methane gas production. A base case using only the depressurization stage is conducted to compare with enhanced gas production predicted by the CO2-assisted technique. The approach also offers a possibility to permanently store carbon dioxide in the underground formation to greater extent comparing to a direct injection of CO2 into gas hydrate sediment. Numerical models are based on the hydrate formations at the

  3. Optimal waste-to-energy strategy assisted by GIS For sustainable solid waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. T.; Hashim, H.

    2014-02-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management has become more complex and costly with the rapid socio-economic development and increased volume of waste. Planning a sustainable regional waste management strategy is a critical step for the decision maker. There is a great potential for MSW to be used for the generation of renewable energy through waste incineration or landfilling with gas capture system. However, due to high processing cost and cost of resource transportation and distribution throughout the waste collection station and power plant, MSW is mostly disposed in the landfill. This paper presents an optimization model incorporated with GIS data inputs for MSW management. The model can design the multi-period waste-to-energy (WTE) strategy to illustrate the economic potential and tradeoffs for MSW management under different scenarios. The model is capable of predicting the optimal generation, capacity, type of WTE conversion technology and location for the operation and construction of new WTE power plants to satisfy the increased energy demand by 2025 in the most profitable way. Iskandar Malaysia region was chosen as the model city for this study.

  4. Hybrid neural prediction and optimized adjustment for coke oven gas system in steel industry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Quanli; Wang, Wei; Pedrycz, Witold; Cong, Liqun

    2012-03-01

    An energy system is the one of most important parts of the steel industry, and its reasonable operation exhibits a critical impact on manufacturing cost, energy security, and natural environment. With respect to the operation optimization problem for coke oven gas, a two-phase data-driven based forecasting and optimized adjusting method is proposed, where a Gaussian process-based echo states network is established to predict the gas real-time flow and the gasholder level in the prediction phase. Then, using the predicted gas flow and gasholder level, we develop a certain heuristic to quantify the user's optimal gas adjustment. The proposed operation measure has been verified to be effective by experimenting with the real-world on-line energy data sets coming from Shanghai Baosteel Corporation, Ltd., China. At present, the scheduling software developed with the proposed model and ensuing algorithms have been applied to the production practice of Baosteel. The application effects indicate that the software system can largely improve the real-time prediction accuracy of the gas units and provide with the optimized gas balance direction for the energy optimization. PMID:24808550

  5. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H2O2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time. This lack of uniformity could be attributed to the surface condition of the wafer. Optimization of the process parameters show adequate accuracy of the model with acceptable percentage errors of 6%, 59%, 1.8%, 38% and 61% for determination of the height, separation, size, the pore size and the etching rate respectively.

  6. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  7. Microwave-assisted extraction of jujube polysaccharide: Optimization, purification and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Hosein; Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi

    2016-06-01

    The operational parameters involved in microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of jujube polysaccharide including microwave power, water to raw material ratio and extraction temperature and time were optimized by RSM. MAE at 400W, 75°C, 60min, using 30g water/g powdered jujube was the best condition for maximum yield (9.02%) of polysaccharide. Two novel water-soluble polysaccharides (JCP-1 and JCP-2) with average molecular weights of 9.1×10(4)-1.5×10(5)Da in term of the symmetrical narrow peaks were identified using the analytical purification procedures. The JCP-1 and JCP-2 mainly composed of glucose, arabinose, galactose and rhamnose in molar ratios of 1.4:2.1:4.2:0.9 and 1.2:1.8:4.1:1.1, respectively. The use of 1.5% JCP-1 led to a high emulsifying stability (95.5%) in a model oil-in-water type emulsion with a reduced surface tension (44.1mN/m) and droplet size (1.32μm), and an increased apparent viscosity (0.13Pas) during 21-day cold storage. The antioxidant activities were increased in dose-dependent manners (25-200μg/mL). PMID:27083348

  8. Optimized ultrasound-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from Polygonum cuspidatum.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Hung; Chen, Bao-Yuan; Liu, Yung-Chuan; Chang, Chieh-Ming J; Deng, Tzu-Shing; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Shieh, Chwen-Jen

    2013-01-01

    In this study the phenolic compounds piceid, resveratrol and emodin were extracted from P. cuspidatum roots using ultrasound-assisted extraction. Multiple response surface methodology was used to optimize the extraction conditions of these phenolic compounds. A three-factor and three-level Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to evaluate the effects of the operation parameters, including extraction temperature (30-70 °C), ethanol concentration (40%-80%), and ultrasonic power (90-150 W), on the extraction yields of piceid, resveratrol, and emodin. The statistical models built from multiple response surface methodology were developed for the estimation of the extraction yields of multi-phenolic components. Based on the model, the extraction yields of piceid, resveratrol, and emodin can be improved by controlling the extraction parameters. Under the optimum conditions, the extraction yields of piceid, resveratrol and emodin were 10.77 mg/g, 3.82 mg/g and 11.72 mg/g, respectively. PMID:24362626

  9. Optimization of microwave assisted extraction of pectin from sour orange peel and its physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Saeid; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-04-20

    Microwave assisted extraction technique was used to extract pectin from sour orange peel. Box-Behnken design was used to study the effect of irradiation time, microwave power and pH on the yield and degree of esterification (DE) of pectin. The results showed that the optimum conditions for the highest yield of pectin (29.1%) were obtained at pH of 1.50, microwave power of 700W, and irradiation time of 3min. DE values of pectin ranged from 1.7% to 37.5%, indicating that the obtained pectin was low in methoxyl. Under optimal conditions, the galacturonic acid content and emulsifying activity were 71.0±0.8% and 40.7%, respectively. In addition, the emulsion stability value ranged from 72.1% to 83.4%. Viscosity measurement revealed that the solutions of pectin at low concentrations showed nearly Newtonian flow behavior, and as the concentration increased, pseudoplastic flow became dominant. PMID:26876828

  10. Optimization of microwave-assisted hot air drying conditions of okra using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Prasad, Suresh; Murthy, Ganti S

    2014-02-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) was dried to a moisture level of 0.1 g water/g dry matter using a microwave-assisted hot air dryer. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the drying conditions based on specific energy consumption and quality of dried okra. The drying experiments were performed using a central composite rotatable design for three variables: air temperature (40-70 °C), air velocity (1-2 m/s) and microwave power level (0.5-2.5 W/g). The quality of dried okra was determined in terms of color change, rehydration ratio and hardness of texture. A second-order polynomial model was well fitted to all responses and high R(2) values (>0.8) were observed in all cases. The color change of dried okra was found higher at high microwave power and air temperatures. Rehydration properties were better for okra samples dried at higher microwave power levels. Specific energy consumption decreased with increase in microwave power due to decrease in drying time. The drying conditions of 1.51 m/s air velocity, 52.09 °C air temperature and 2.41 W/g microwave power were found optimum for product quality and minimum energy consumption for microwave-convective drying of okra. PMID:24493879

  11. Areal density optimizations for heat-assisted magnetic recording of high-density media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is hoped to be the future recording technique for high-density storage devices. Nevertheless, there exist several realization strategies. With a coarse-grained Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch model, we investigate in detail the benefits and disadvantages of a continuous and pulsed laser spot recording of shingled and conventional bit-patterned media. Additionally, we compare single-phase grains and bits having a bilayer structure with graded Curie temperature, consisting of a hard magnetic layer with high TC and a soft magnetic one with low TC, respectively. To describe the whole write process as realistically as possible, a distribution of the grain sizes and Curie temperatures, a displacement jitter of the head, and the bit positions are considered. For all these cases, we calculate bit error rates of various grain patterns, temperatures, and write head positions to optimize the achievable areal storage density. Within our analysis, shingled HAMR with a continuous laser pulse moving over the medium reaches the best results and thus has the highest potential to become the next-generation storage device.

  12. Optimal distribution of medical backpacks and health surveillance assistants in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Amber G; Van Itallie, Elizabeth S; Wu, Duo

    2014-09-01

    Despite recent progress, Malawi continues to perform poorly on key health indicators such as child mortality and life expectancy. These problems are exacerbated by a severe lack of access to health care. Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) help bridge this gap by providing community-level access to basic health care services. However, the success of these HSAs is limited by a lack of supplies and long distances between HSAs and patients. To address this issue, we used large-scale weighted p-median and capacitated facility location problems to create a scalable, three-tiered plan for optimal allocation of HSAs, HSA designated medical backpacks, and backpack resupply centers. Our analysis uses real data on the location and characteristics of hospitals, health centers, and the general population. In addition to offering specific recommendations for HSA, backpack, and resupply center locations, it provides general insights into the scope of the proposed HSA backpack program scale-up. In particular, it demonstrates the importance of local health centers to the resupply network. The proposed assignments are robust to changes in the underlying population structure, and could significantly improve access to medical supplies for both HSAs and patients. PMID:24293077

  13. Optimization of ultrasound assisted extraction of anthocyanins from red cabbage using Taguchi design method.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Raheleh; Tamadon, Ali Mohammad; Niakousari, Mehrdad

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing demand for developing suitable and more efficient extraction of active compounds from the plants and ultrasound is one of these novel methodologies. Moreover, the experimental set up to reach an appropriate condition for an optimum yield is demanding and time consuming. In the present study, Taguchi L9 orthogonal design was applied to optimize the process parameters (output power, time, temperature and pulse mode) for ultrasound assisted extraction of anthocyanins from red cabbage and the concluding yield of anthocyanin was measured by pH differential method. The statistical analysis revealed that the most important factors contributing to the extraction efficiency were time, temperature and power, respectively and the optimum condition was at 30 min, 15 °C and 100 W which could result the maximum anthocyanin yield of about 20.9 mg/L. The theoretical result was confirmed experimentally by carrying out the trials at the optimum condition and evaluating the actual yield. PMID:26604387

  14. Optimal distribution of medical backpacks and health surveillance assistants in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Elizabeth S.; Wu, Duo

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent progress, Malawi continues to perform poorly on key health indicators such as child mortality and life expectancy. These problems are exacerbated by a severe lack of access to health care. Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) help bridge this gap by providing community-level access to basic health care services. However, the success of these HSAs is limited by a lack of supplies and long distances between HSAs and patients. To address this issue, we used large-scale weighted p-median and capacitated facility location problems to create a scalable, three-tiered plan for optimal allocation of HSAs, HSA designated medical backpacks, and backpack resupply centers. Our analysis uses real data on the location and characteristics of hospitals, health centers, and the general population. In addition to offering specific recommendations for HSA, backpack, and resupply center locations, it provides general insights into the scope of the proposed HSA backpack program scale-up. In particular, it demonstrates the importance of local health centers to the resupply network. The proposed assignments are robust to changes in the underlying population structure, and could significantly improve access to medical supplies for both HSAs and patients. PMID:24293077

  15. MW-assisted synthesis of carboxymethyl tamarind kernel polysaccharide-g-polyacrylonitrile: optimization and characterization.

    PubMed

    Meenkashi; Ahuja, Munish; Verma, Purnima

    2014-11-26

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of graft copolymer of carboxymethyl tamarind seed polysaccharide and polyacrylonitrile was carried out. The effect of formulation and process variables on grafting efficiency of carboxymethyl tamarind kernel polysaccharide-g-poly(acrylonitrile) was studied using response surface methodology. The results revealed that the significant factors affecting grafting efficiency were concentrations of ammonium persulphate, acrylonitrile and interaction effects of ammonium persulphate and acrylonitrile concentrations. The optimal calculated parameters were found to be microwave exposure time-99.48 s, microwave exposure power-160 W, concentration of acrylonitrile-0.10% (w/v), concentration of ammonium persulphate--40 mmol/l, which provided graft copolymer with grafting efficiency of 96%. The formation of graft copolymer was confirmed by FT-IR studies and validated by scanning electron micrographs. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated higher thermal stability of graft copolymer and X-ray diffraction study revealed increase in crystallinity on graft polymerization. Further, the graft copolymer showed pH dependant swelling. PMID:25256516

  16. Optimization of strawberry volatile sampling by direct gas chromatography olfactometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work was to choose a suitable sampling headspace technique to study ‘Festival’ aroma, the main strawberry cultivar grown in Florida. For that, the aromatic quality of extracts from different headspace techniques was evaluated using direct gas chromatography-olfactometry (D-GC-O), a s...

  17. Thromboresistance comparison of the HeartMate II ventricular assist device with the device thrombogenicity emulation- optimized HeartAssist 5 VAD.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Che; Girdhar, Gaurav; Xenos, Michalis; Alemu, Yared; Soares, Jõao S; Einav, Shmuel; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-02-01

    Approximately 7.5 × 106 patients in the US currently suffer from end-stage heart failure. The FDA has recently approved the designations of the Thoratec HeartMate II ventricular assist device (VAD) for both bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy (DT) due to its mechanical durability and improved hemodynamics. However, incidence of pump thrombosis and thromboembolic events remains high, and the life-long complex pharmacological regimens are mandatory in its VAD recipients. We have previously successfully applied our device thrombogenicity emulation (DTE) methodology for optimizing device thromboresistance to the Micromed Debakey VAD, and demonstrated that optimizing device features implicated in exposing blood to elevated shear stresses and exposure times significantly reduces shear-induced platelet activation and significantly improves the device thromboresistance. In the present study, we compared the thrombogenicity of the FDA-approved HeartMate II VAD with the DTE-optimized Debakey VAD (now labeled HeartAssist 5). With quantitative probability density functions of the stress accumulation along large number of platelet trajectories within each device which were extracted from numerical flow simulations in each device, and through measurements of platelet activation rates in recirculation flow loops, we specifically show that: (a) Platelets flowing through the HeartAssist 5 are exposed to significantly lower stress accumulation that lead to platelet activation than the HeartMate II, especially at the impeller-shroud gap regions (b) Thrombus formation patterns observed in the HeartMate II are absent in the HeartAssist 5 (c) Platelet activation rates (PAR) measured in vitro with the VADs mounted in recirculation flow-loops show a 2.5-fold significantly higher PAR value for the HeartMate II. This head to head thrombogenic performance comparative study of the two VADs, one optimized with the DTE methodology and one FDA-approved, demonstrates the efficacy of

  18. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  19. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  20. Quantification of Conventional and Nonconventional Charge-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds in the Condensed and Gas Phases.

    PubMed

    Katsyuba, Sergey A; Vener, Mikhail V; Zvereva, Elena E; Fei, Zhaofu; Scopelliti, Rosario; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Siankevich, Sviatlana; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-11-01

    Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds (CAHBs) play critical roles in many systems from biology through to materials. In none of these areas has the role and function of CAHBs been explored satisfactorily because of the lack of data on the energy of CAHBs in the condensed phases. We have, for the first time, quantified three types of CAHBs in both the condensed and gas phases for 1-(2'-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2OHmim][OAc]). The energy of conventional OH···[OAc](-) CAHBs is ∼10 kcal·mol(-1), whereas nonconventional C(sp2)H···[OAc](-) and C(sp3)H···[OAc](-) CAHBs are weaker by ∼5-7 kcal·mol(-1). In the gas phase, the strength of the nonconventional CAHBs is doubled, whereas the conventional CAHBs are strengthened by <20%. The influence of cooperativity effects on the ability of the [OAc](-) anion to deprotonate the imidazolium cation is evaluated. The ability to quantify CAHBs in the condensed phase on the basis of easier accessible gas-phase estimates is highlighted. PMID:26496074

  1. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention. PMID:26126173

  2. Optimize Flue Gas Settings to Promote Microalgae Growth in Photobioreactors via Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Chen, Amelia B; Yu, Yi; Kucera, Leah; Tang, Yinjie

    2013-01-01

    Flue gas from power plants can promote algal cultivation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions1. Microalgae not only capture solar energy more efficiently than plants3, but also synthesize advanced biofuels2-4. Generally, atmospheric CO2 is not a sufficient source for supporting maximal algal growth5. On the other hand, the high concentrations of CO2 in industrial exhaust gases have adverse effects on algal physiology. Consequently, both cultivation conditions (such as nutrients and light) and the control of the flue gas flow into the photo-bioreactors are important to develop an efficient “flue gas to algae” system. Researchers have proposed different photobioreactor configurations4,6 and cultivation strategies7,8 with flue gas. Here, we present a protocol that demonstrates how to use models to predict the microalgal growth in response to flue gas settings. We perform both experimental illustration and model simulations to determine the favorable conditions for algal growth with flue gas. We develop a Monod-based model coupled with mass transfer and light intensity equations to simulate the microalgal growth in a homogenous photo-bioreactor. The model simulation compares algal growth and flue gas consumptions under different flue-gas settings. The model illustrates: 1) how algal growth is influenced by different volumetric mass transfer coefficients of CO2; 2) how we can find optimal CO2 concentration for algal growth via the dynamic optimization approach (DOA); 3) how we can design a rectangular on-off flue gas pulse to promote algal biomass growth and to reduce the usage of flue gas. On the experimental side, we present a protocol for growing Chlorella under the flue gas (generated by natural gas combustion). The experimental results qualitatively validate the model predictions that the high frequency flue gas pulses can significantly improve algal cultivation. PMID:24121788

  3. Optimize flue gas settings to promote microalgae growth in photobioreactors via computer simulations.

    PubMed

    He, Lian; Chen, Amelia B; Yu, Yi; Kucera, Leah; Tang, Yinjie

    2013-01-01

    Flue gas from power plants can promote algal cultivation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions(1). Microalgae not only capture solar energy more efficiently than plants(3), but also synthesize advanced biofuels(2-4). Generally, atmospheric CO2 is not a sufficient source for supporting maximal algal growth(5). On the other hand, the high concentrations of CO2 in industrial exhaust gases have adverse effects on algal physiology. Consequently, both cultivation conditions (such as nutrients and light) and the control of the flue gas flow into the photo-bioreactors are important to develop an efficient "flue gas to algae" system. Researchers have proposed different photobioreactor configurations(4,6) and cultivation strategies(7,8) with flue gas. Here, we present a protocol that demonstrates how to use models to predict the microalgal growth in response to flue gas settings. We perform both experimental illustration and model simulations to determine the favorable conditions for algal growth with flue gas. We develop a Monod-based model coupled with mass transfer and light intensity equations to simulate the microalgal growth in a homogenous photo-bioreactor. The model simulation compares algal growth and flue gas consumptions under different flue-gas settings. The model illustrates: 1) how algal growth is influenced by different volumetric mass transfer coefficients of CO2; 2) how we can find optimal CO2 concentration for algal growth via the dynamic optimization approach (DOA); 3) how we can design a rectangular on-off flue gas pulse to promote algal biomass growth and to reduce the usage of flue gas. On the experimental side, we present a protocol for growing Chlorella under the flue gas (generated by natural gas combustion). The experimental results qualitatively validate the model predictions that the high frequency flue gas pulses can significantly improve algal cultivation. PMID:24121788

  4. Efficient microwave assisted synthesis of metal-organic framework UiO-66: optimization and scale up.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Marco; Dau, Phuong V; Cohen, Seth M; Ranocchiari, Marco; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Costantino, Ferdinando; Sabatini, Stefano; Vivani, Riccardo

    2015-08-21

    A highly efficient and scalable microwave assisted synthesis of zirconium-based metal-organic framework UiO-66 was developed. In order to identify the best conditions for optimizing the process, a wide range of parameters was investigated. The efficiency of the process was evaluated with the aid of four quantitative indicators. The properties of the materials prepared by microwave irradiation were compared with those synthesized by conventional heating, and no significant effects on morphology, crystal size, or defects were found from the use of microwave assisted heating. Scale up was performed maintaining the high efficiency of the process. PMID:26165508

  5. Optimized determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    He, Kuang; Lv, YuanCai; Chen, YuanCai

    2014-10-01

    A method based on ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography has been optimized for the determination of six polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners. The optimal condition relevant to the extraction was first investigated, more than 98.7 ± 0.7% recovery was achieved with dichloromethane as extractant, 5 min extraction time, and three cycles of ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid extraction. Then multiple function was employed to optimize polybrominated diphenyl ether detection conditions with overall resolution and chromatography signal area as the responses. The condition chosen in this experiment was methanol/water 93:7 v/v, flow rate 0.80 mL/min, column temperature 30.0°C. The optimized technique revealed good linearity (R(2) > 0.9962 over a concentration range of 1-100 μg/L) and repeatability (relative standard deviation < 6.3%). Furthermore, the detection limit (S/N = 3) of the method were ranged from 0.02 to 0.13 μg/L and the quantification limit (S/N = 10) ranged from 0.07 to 0.35 μg/L. Finally, the proposed method was applied to spiked samples and satisfactory results were achieved. These results indicate that ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was effective to identify and quantify the complex polybrominated diphenyl ethers in effluent samples. PMID:25142014

  6. Optimal diving behaviour and respiratory gas exchange in birds.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G; Butler, Patrick J

    2006-11-01

    This review discusses the advancements in our understanding of the physiology and behaviour of avian diving that have been underpinned by optimal foraging theory and the testing of optimal models. To maximise their foraging efficiency during foraging periods, diving birds must balance numerous factors that are directly or indirectly related to the replenishment of the oxygen stores and the removal of excess carbon dioxide. These include (1) the time spent underwater (which diminishes the oxygen supply, increases carbon dioxide levels and may even include a build up of lactate due to anaerobic metabolism), (2) the time spent at the surface recovering from the previous dive and preparing for the next (including reloading their oxygen supply, decreasing their carbon dioxide levels and possibly also metabolising lactate) and (3) the trade-off between maximising oxygen reserves for consumption underwater by taking in more air to the respiratory system, and minimising the energy costs of positive buoyancy caused by this air, to maximise the time available underwater to forage. Due to its importance in avian diving, replenishment of the oxygen stores has become integral to models of optimal diving, which predict the time budgeting of animals foraging underwater. While many of these models have been examined qualitatively, such tests of predictive trends appear fallible and only quantifiable support affords strong evidence of their predictive value. This review describes how the quantification of certain optimal diving models, using tufted ducks, indeed demonstrates some predictive success. This suggests that replenishment of the oxygen stores and removal of excess carbon dioxide have significant influences on the duration of the surface period between dives. Nevertheless, present models are too simplistic to be robust predictors of diving behaviour for individual animals and it is proposed that they require refinement through the incorporation of other variables that also

  7. Analysis of Trace Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) in Vegetables Using Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lei; Wang, Xiong-Ke; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2015-08-01

    A reliable, sensitive, and cost-effective method was developed for determining three quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) including dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and didodecyldimethylammonium chloride in various vegetables using ultrasonic-assisted extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The variety and acidity of extraction solvents, extraction times, and cleanup efficiency of sorbents were estimated to obtain an optimized procedure for extraction of the QACs in nine vegetable matrices. Excellent linearities (R(2) > 0.992) were obtained for the analytes in the nine matrices. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.7-6.0 and 2.3-20.0 μg/kg (dry weight, dw) in various matrices, respectively. The recoveries in the nine matrices ranged from 70.5% to 108.0% with relative standard deviations below 18.0%. The developed method was applied to determine the QACs in 27 vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou in southern China, showing very high detection frequency with a concentration of 23-180 μg/kg (dw). PMID:26165915

  8. Microwave-assisted phase-transfer catalysis for the rapid one-pot methylation and gas chromatographic determination of phenolics.

    PubMed

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C; Karatapanis, Andreas; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2010-01-29

    Microwave-assisted phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) is reported for the first time, for the one-step extraction-derivatization-preconcentration and gas chromatographic determination of twenty phenols and ten phenolic acids. The well established phase-transfer catalytic methylation is largely accelerated when heating is replaced with the "greener" microwave irradiation. The overall procedure was thoroughly optimized and the analytes were determined by GC/MS. The method presented adequate analytical characteristics being more sensitive in analyzing phenols than phenolic acids. The limits of detection without any additional preconcentration steps (e.g. solvent evaporation) were adequate and ranged from 0.4 to 15.8ng/mL while limits of quantitation were between 1.2 and 33.3ng/mL. The method was applied to the determination of phenols, in spiked environmental samples and phenolic acids in aqueous infusions of commercially available pharmaceutical dry plants. The recoveries of fortified composite lake water samples and Mentha spicata aqueous infusions ranged from 89.3% to 117.3% for phenols and 93.3% to 115.2% for phenolic acids. PMID:20022019

  9. Optimizing Natural Gas Networks through Dynamic Manifold Theory and a Decentralized Algorithm: Belgium Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Caleb; Winfrey, Leigh

    2014-10-01

    Natural Gas is a major energy source in Europe, yet political instabilities have the potential to disrupt access and supply. Energy resilience is an increasingly essential construct and begins with transmission network design. This study proposes a new way of thinking about modelling natural gas flow. Rather than relying on classical economic models, this problem is cast into a time-dependent Hamiltonian dynamics discussion. Traditional Natural Gas constraints, including inelastic demand and maximum/minimum pipe flows, are portrayed as energy functions and built into the dynamics of each pipe flow. Doing so allows the constraints to be built into the dynamics of each pipeline. As time progresses in the model, natural gas flow rates find the minimum energy, thus the optimal gas flow rates. The most important result of this study is using dynamical principles to ensure the output of natural gas at demand nodes remains constant, which is important for country to country natural gas transmission. Another important step in this study is building the dynamics of each flow in a decentralized algorithm format. Decentralized regulation has solved congestion problems for internet data flow, traffic flow, epidemiology, and as demonstrated in this study can solve the problem of Natural Gas congestion. A mathematical description is provided for how decentralized regulation leads to globally optimized network flow. Furthermore, the dynamical principles and decentralized algorithm are applied to a case study of the Fluxys Belgium Natural Gas Network.

  10. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-term basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.

  11. Optimal design of a gas transmission network: A case study of the Turkish natural gas pipeline network system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunes, Ersin Fatih

    Turkey is located between Europe, which has increasing demand for natural gas and the geographies of Middle East, Asia and Russia, which have rich and strong natural gas supply. Because of the geographical location, Turkey has strategic importance according to energy sources. To supply this demand, a pipeline network configuration with the optimal and efficient lengths, pressures, diameters and number of compressor stations is extremely needed. Because, Turkey has a currently working and constructed network topology, obtaining an optimal configuration of the pipelines, including an optimal number of compressor stations with optimal locations, is the focus of this study. Identifying a network design with lowest costs is important because of the high maintenance and set-up costs. The quantity of compressor stations, the pipeline segments' lengths, the diameter sizes and pressures at compressor stations, are considered to be decision variables in this study. Two existing optimization models were selected and applied to the case study of Turkey. Because of the fixed cost of investment, both models are formulated as mixed integer nonlinear programs, which require branch and bound combined with the nonlinear programming solution methods. The differences between these two models are related to some factors that can affect the network system of natural gas such as wall thickness, material balance compressor isentropic head and amount of gas to be delivered. The results obtained by these two techniques are compared with each other and with the current system. Major differences between results are costs, pressures and flow rates. These solution techniques are able to find a solution with minimum cost for each model both of which are less than the current cost of the system while satisfying all the constraints on diameter, length, flow rate and pressure. These results give the big picture of an ideal configuration for the future state network for the country of Turkey.

  12. Experimental optimisation of the gas-assisted laser cutting of thick steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Malikov, A G; Orishich, Anatolii M; Shulyat'ev, Viktor B

    2009-06-30

    We report on the experimental optimisation of the oxygen-assisted CO{sub 2} laser cutting of low-carbon sheet steel 5 to 25 mm in thickness. It is shown that the cut edge roughness is minimal when the energy input per unit volume of the material removed and the incident beam power per unit sheet thickness remain constant at {approx}20 J mm{sup -3} and {approx}200 W mm{sup -1}, respectively, over the entire range of sheet thicknesses examined. The corresponding Peclet number is Pe = 0.5. These results can be used to determine the optimal beam power and cutting speed for a particular sheet thickness. At sufficiently large thicknesses, the conditions that ensure the minimum roughness can be written in the form of relations between nondimensional parameters. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    This DOE-funded research into seismic detection of natural fractures is one of six projects within the DOE`s Detection and Analysis of Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs Program, a multidisciplinary research initiative to develop technology for prediction, detection, and mapping of naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The demonstration of successful seismic techniques to locate subsurface zones of high fracture density and to guide drilling orientation for enhanced fracture permeability will enable better returns on investments in the development of the vast gas reserves held in tight formations beneath the Rocky Mountains. The seismic techniques used in this project were designed to capture the azimuthal anisotropy within the seismic response. This seismic anisotropy is the result of the symmetry in the rock fabric created by aligned fractures and/or unequal horizontal stresses. These results may be compared and related to other lines of evidence to provide cross-validation. The authors undertook investigations along the following lines: Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-wave seismic data; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in a nine-component (P- and S-sources, three-component receivers) vertical seismic profile; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-to-S converted wave seismic data (P-wave source, three-component receivers); and Description of geological and reservoir-engineering data that corroborate the anisotropy: natural fractures observed at the target level and at the surface, estimation of the maximum horizontal stress in situ, and examination of the flow characteristics of the reservoir.

  14. Stacking optimization of compressor blades of gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheu, Tsu-Chien

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is presented to obtain optimal designs of axial compressor blades with structural design constraints. Coefficients of the polynomials defining the circumferential tilting angles and the axial leaning distances of the airfoil cross sections from the initial design geometry are used as design variables. The compressor blades are modeled by 20-node solid elements. An efficient finite element method is developed for modal analysis and sensitivity analysis with respect to the design variables. Based on this information, a sequential linear programming method is applied to calculate the required change of geometry for the desired structural design constraints.

  15. Alternating Current Dielectrophoresis Optimization of Pt-Decorated Graphene Oxide Nanostructures for Proficient Hydrogen Gas Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Rathi, Servin; Singh, Budhi; Lee, Inyeal; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2015-07-01

    Alternating current dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an excellent technique to assemble nanoscale materials. For efficient DEP, the optimization of the key parameters like peak-to-peak voltage, applied frequency, and processing time is required for good device. In this work, we have assembled graphene oxide (GO) nanostructures mixed with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles between the micro gap electrodes for a proficient hydrogen gas sensors. The Pt-decorated GO nanostructures were well located between a pair of prepatterned Ti/Au electrodes by controlling the DEP technique with the optimized parameters and subsequently thermally reduced before sensing. The device fabricated using the DEP technique with the optimized parameters showed relatively high sensitivity (∼10%) to 200 ppm hydrogen gas at room temperature. The results indicates that the device could be used in several industry applications, such as gas storage and leak detection. PMID:26042360

  16. Swarm intelligence for multi-objective optimization of synthesis gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, T.; Vasant, P.; Elamvazuthi, I.; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2012-11-01

    In the chemical industry, the production of methanol, ammonia, hydrogen and higher hydrocarbons require synthesis gas (or syn gas). The main three syn gas production methods are carbon dioxide reforming (CRM), steam reforming (SRM) and partial-oxidation of methane (POM). In this work, multi-objective (MO) optimization of the combined CRM and POM was carried out. The empirical model and the MO problem formulation for this combined process were obtained from previous works. The central objectives considered in this problem are methane conversion, carbon monoxide selectivity and the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio. The MO nature of the problem was tackled using the Normal Boundary Intersection (NBI) method. Two techniques (Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)) were then applied in conjunction with the NBI method. The performance of the two algorithms and the quality of the solutions were gauged by using two performance metrics. Comparative studies and results analysis were then carried out on the optimization results.

  17. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  18. An effective vacuum assisted extraction method for the optimization of labdane diterpenoids from Andrographis paniculata by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Qi; Wu, Zhen-Feng; Ke, Gang; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    An effective vacuum assisted extraction (VAE) technique was proposed for the first time and applied to extract bioactive components from Andrographis paniculata. The process was carefully optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). Under the optimized experimental conditions, the best results were obtained using a boiling temperature of 65 °C, 50% ethanol concentration, 16 min of extraction time, one extraction cycles and a 12:1 liquid-solid ratio. Compared with conventional ultrasonic assisted extraction and heat reflux extraction, the VAE technique gave shorter extraction times and remarkable higher extraction efficiency, which indicated that a certain degree of vacuum gave the solvent a better penetration of the solvent into the pores and between the matrix particles, and enhanced the process of mass transfer. The present results demonstrated that VAE is an efficient, simple and fast method for extracting bioactive components from A. paniculata, which shows great potential for becoming an alternative technique for industrial scale-up applications. PMID:25558855

  19. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. PMID:25037415

  20. Preconcentration modeling for the optimization of a micro gas preconcentrator applied to environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Camara, Malick; Breuil, Philippe; Briand, Danick; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Pijolat, Christophe; de Rooij, Nico F

    2015-04-21

    This paper presents the optimization of a micro gas preconcentrator (μ-GP) system applied to atmospheric pollution monitoring, with the help of a complete modeling of the preconcentration cycle. Two different approaches based on kinetic equations are used to illustrate the behavior of the micro gas preconcentrator for given experimental conditions. The need for high adsorption flow and heating rate and for low desorption flow and detection volume is demonstrated in this paper. Preliminary to this optimization, the preconcentration factor is discussed and a definition is proposed. PMID:25810264

  1. Improving the measurement accuracy of mixed gas by optimizing carbon nanotube sensor's electrode separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Huimin; Zhang, Yong; Quan, Long

    2015-10-01

    Because of excellent superiorities, triple-electrode carbon nanotube sensor acts good in the detection of multi-component mixed gas. However, as one of the key factors affecting the accuracy of detection, the electrode separation of carbon nanotube gas sensor with triple-electrode structure is very difficult to decide. An optimization method is presented here to improve the mixed gas measurement accuracy. This method optimizes every separation between three electrodes of the carbon nanotube sensors in the sensor array when test the multi-component gas mixture. It collects the ionic current detected by sensor array composed of carbon nanotube sensors with different electrode separations, and creates the kernel partial least square regression (KPLSR) quantitative analysis model of detected gases. The optimum electrode separations come out when the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of test samples reaches the minimum value. The gas mixtures of CO and NO2 are measured using sensor array composed of two carbon nanotube sensor with different electrode separations. And every electrode separation of two sensors is optimized by above-mentioned method. The experimental results show that the proposed method selects the optimal distances between electrodes effectively, and achieves higher measurement accuracy.

  2. Optimization of heat transfer in cooled shell elements of gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, N. G.; Grinkrug, M. S.

    1985-08-01

    A theoretical solution is presented for the problem of finding an optimum distribution of the coefficients of heat transfer from the coolant in the shell structures of gas-turbine engines. The approach proposed here provides a way to efficiently use the mechanical properties of materials, to optimize coolant distribution over the shell surface, and, ultimately to improve the economy and performance of gas-turbine engines.

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This document contains the quarterly report dated January 1-March 31, 1997 for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project. Topics covered in this report include AVOA modeling using paraxial ray tracing, AVOA modeling for gas- and water-filled fractures, 3-D and 3-C processing, and technology transfer material. Several presentations from a Geophysical Applications Workshop workbook, workshop schedule, and list of workshop attendees are also included.

  4. Dual gas-bubble-assisted solvothermal synthesis of magnetite with tunable size and structure.

    PubMed

    He, Quanguo; Wu, Zhaohui; Huang, Chunyan

    2011-10-01

    We present a facile solvothermal approach by employing ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) and ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) as dual gas-bubble-generating structure-directing agent to produce of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with tunable size ranging from 90 nm to 400 nm and controllable structures including porous and hollow construction. The size, morphology and structure of the final products are achieved by simple adjustment of the molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac, ammonium ion concentration and the reaction time. The results reveal that the molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac strongly influenced the morphology and size of magnetite particles, even could decide the kind of architecture including solid, hollow and porous to form. Particularly, ammonium ion molar concentration plays a significant role in controlling size and magnetic property for magnetite particles. Simultaneously, prolonging the reaction time is beneficial to the magnetite particles growth and inner space escalation with altered reaction time at a certain concentration of ammonium and molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac. Such a design conception of dual gas-bubble-assistance used here is promisingly positive and significant for hollow magnetic particles fabrication and may be extended to other nano-scale hollow construction. PMID:22400226

  5. [INVITED] Laser gas assisted treatment of Ti-alloy: Analysis of surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Karatas, C.

    2016-04-01

    Laser gas assisted treatment of Ti6Al4V alloy surface is carried out and nitrogen/oxygen mixture with partial pressure of PO2/PN2=1/3 is introduced during the surface treatment process. Analytical tools are used to characterize the laser treated surfaces. The fracture toughness at the surface and the residual stress in the surface region of the laser treated layer are measured. Scratch tests are carried out to determine the friction coefficient of the treated surface. It is found that closely spaced regular laser scanning tracks generates a self-annealing effect in the laser treated layer while lowering the stress levels in the treated region. Introducing high pressure gas mixture impingement at the surface results in formation of oxide and nitride species including, TiO, TiO2, TiN and TiOxNy in the surface region. A dense layer consisting of fine size grains are formed in the surface region of the laser treated layer, which enhances the microhardness at the surface. The fracture toughness reduces after the laser treatment process because of the microhardness enhancement at the surface. The residual stress formed is comprehensive, which is in the order of -350 MPa.

  6. Process Optimization through Adaptation of Shielding Gas Selection and Feeding during Laser Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patschger, Andreas; Sahib, Christoffer; Bergmann, Jean Pierre; Bastick, André

    For this paper the influence of the shielding gas itself as well as the feeding method on austenitic welding joints was examined with thin sheets frequently used in the household appliance industry. The composition of the shielding gas mixture with active and/or inert gases was varied in the examination, and the effect on the weld seam could be made clear. By comparing different shielding gas feeding concepts, the process was optimized with regard to seam formation. Moreover, the influence of oxygen on the seam shape was examined in the deep welding regime on a specific example.

  7. Gas pressure sintering of silicon nitride to optimize fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Nunn, S.D.; Beavers, T.M.; Menchhofer, P.A.; Barker, D.L.; Coffey, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Gas-pressure sintering (GPS) can be used to densify silicon nitride containing a wide variety of sintering additives. Parameters affecting the sintering behavior include densification temperature, densification time, grain growth temperature, grain growth time and heating rates. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples sintered to high densities at all conditions used in the present study, whereas the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} samples required the highest temperatures and longest times to achieve densities {ge}98 % T. D. The main effect on the fracture toughness for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples was the use of a lower densification temperature, which was 1900C in the present study. For the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}SiO4{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} composition, fracture toughness was sensitive to and improved by a slower heating rate (10c/min), a lower densification temperature (1900`), a higher grain growth temperature (2000C), and a longer grain growth time (2 h).

  8. Low-thrust trajectory optimization of asteroid sample return mission with multiple revolutions and moon gravity assists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gao; Jiang, FanHuag; Li, JunFeng

    2015-11-01

    Near-Earth asteroids have gained a lot of interest and the development in low-thrust propulsion technology makes complex deep space exploration missions possible. A mission from low-Earth orbit using low-thrust electric propulsion system to rendezvous with near-Earth asteroid and bring sample back is investigated. By dividing the mission into five segments, the complex mission is solved separately. Then different methods are used to find optimal trajectories for every segment. Multiple revolutions around the Earth and multiple Moon gravity assists are used to decrease the fuel consumption to escape from the Earth. To avoid possible numerical difficulty of indirect methods, a direct method to parameterize the switching moment and direction of thrust vector is proposed. To maximize the mass of sample, optimal control theory and homotopic approach are applied to find the optimal trajectory. Direct methods of finding proper time to brake the spacecraft using Moon gravity assist are also proposed. Practical techniques including both direct and indirect methods are investigated to optimize trajectories for different segments and they can be easily extended to other missions and more precise dynamic model.

  9. Optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of antioxidant compounds from Guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaves using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fansheng; Yu, Shujuan; Feng, Zeng; Wu, Xinlan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To optimization of extraction of antioxidant compounds from guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaves and showed that the guava leaves are the potential source of antioxidant compounds. Materials and Methods: The bioactive polysaccharide compounds of guava leaves (P. guajava L.) were obtained using ultrasonic-assisted extraction. Extraction was carried out according to Box-Behnken central composite design, and independent variables were temperature (20–60°C), time (20–40 min) and power (200–350 W). The extraction process was optimized by using response surface methodology for the highest crude extraction yield of bioactive polysaccharide compounds. Results: The optimal conditions were identified as 55°C, 30 min, and 240 W. 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl and hydroxyl free radical scavenging were conducted. Conclusion: The results of quantification showed that the guava leaves are the potential source of antioxidant compounds. PMID:26246720

  10. Optimal Capacity and Location Assessment of Natural Gas Fired Distributed Generation in Residential Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Sarah My

    With ever increasing use of natural gas to generate electricity, installed natural gas fired microturbines are found in residential areas to generate electricity locally. This research work discusses a generalized methodology for assessing optimal capacity and locations for installing natural gas fired microturbines in a distribution residential network. The overall objective is to place microturbines to minimize the system power loss occurring in the electrical distribution network; in such a way that the electric feeder does not need any up-gradation. The IEEE 123 Node Test Feeder is selected as the test bed for validating the developed methodology. Three-phase unbalanced electric power flow is run in OpenDSS through COM server, and the gas distribution network is analyzed using GASWorkS. The continual sensitivity analysis methodology is developed to select multiple DG locations and annual simulation is run to minimize annual average losses. The proposed placement of microturbines must be feasible in the gas distribution network and should not result into gas pipeline reinforcement. The corresponding gas distribution network is developed in GASWorkS software, and nodal pressures of the gas system are checked for various cases to investigate if the existing gas distribution network can accommodate the penetration of selected microturbines. The results indicate the optimal locations suitable to place microturbines and capacity that can be accommodated by the system, based on the consideration of overall minimum annual average losses as well as the guarantee of nodal pressure provided by the gas distribution network. The proposed method is generalized and can be used for any IEEE test feeder or an actual residential distribution network.

  11. Designing an optimized injection strategy for acid gas disposal without dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.A.; Svrcek, W.Y.; Monnery, W.D.; Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Wichert, E.; Reed, A.E.; Johnson, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    The economics of recovering sulfur from sour natural gas have become unfavorable for small fields. Hydrocarbon producing companies require a cost effective yet environmentally sound alternative method to deal with acid gas. Compressed acid gas reinjection into producing, depleted or non-producing formations has emerged as a viable alternative to traditional sulfur recovery. Most injection schemes include dehydration facilities to remove the saturated water from the gas, preventing corrosion and hydrate formation. An alternative, less costly approach is to keep the water in the vapor phase throughout the injection circuit, eliminating the need to dehydrate. To design an optimized injection strategy, determination of thermodynamic and physical properties such as water content, dewpoint, bubble point, hydrate conditions and density of the acid gas is necessary. Experiments were conducted to determine properties of an acid gas containing a nominal 10% H{sub 2}S with remaining 90% CO{sub 2} and a minor amount of methane. Results indicate that the acid gas can be cooled between compression stages to 40 C (104 F) without entering the two phase region. For an injection pressure of 17,700 kPa (2,567 psia), dehydration is not required to cool the compressed gas to 8 C (46 F) without hydrate formation or corrosion problems. At 9,000 kPa (1,305 psia) the gas can be safely cooled to {minus}2 C (28 F).

  12. A new type of hydrostatic/hydrodynamic gas journal bearing and its optimization for maximum stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Chang, H.S.

    1995-07-01

    The orifice annular and shallow pocket restricted hybrid has journal bearing is a new type of gas bearing which has good high-speed stability performance. In this paper, the stability of this bearing with three shallow pockets is studied theoretically, and the optimization for its maximum stability is carried out by use of the Complex Method. Some useful conclusions are obtained.

  13. "Optimal" application of ventilatory assist in Cheyne-Stokes respiration: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Khoo, M C; Benser, M E

    2005-01-01

    Although a variety of ventilator therapies have been employed to treat Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR), these modalities do not completely eliminate CSR. As well, most current strategies require that ventilatory assist be provided continuously. We used a computer model of the respiratory control system to determine whether a ventilatory assist strategy could be found that would substantially reduce the severity of CSR while minimizing the application of positive airway pressure. We assessed the effects of different levels of ventilatory assist applied during breaths that fell below selected hypopneic thresholds. These could be applied during the descending, ascending, or both phases of the CSR cycle. We found that ventilatory augmentation equal to 30-40% of eupneic drive, applied whenever ventilation fell below 70% of the eupneic level during the ascending or descending-and-ascending phases of CSR led to the greatest regularization of breathing with minimal ventilator intervention. Application of ventilatory assist during the descending phase produced little effect. PMID:17281585

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  15. Accretion and Orbital Inspiral in Gas-assisted Supermassive Black Hole Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-08-01

    Many galaxies are expected to harbor binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their centers. Their interaction with the surrounding gas results in the accretion and exchange of angular momentum via tidal torques, facilitating binary inspiral. Here, we explore the non-trivial coupling between these two processes and analyze how the global properties of externally supplied circumbinary disks depend on the binary accretion rate. By formulating our results in terms of the angular momentum flux driven by internal stresses, we come up with a very simple classification of the possible global disk structures, which differ from the standard constant \\dot{M} accretion disk solution. The suppression of accretion by the binary tides, leading to a significant mass accumulation in the inner disk, accelerates binary inspiral. We show that once the disk region strongly perturbed by the viscously transmitted tidal torque exceeds the binary semimajor axis, the binary can merge in less than its mass-doubling time due to accretion. Thus, unlike the inspirals driven by stellar scattering, the gas-assisted merger can occur even if the binary is embedded in a relatively low-mass disk (lower than its own mass). This is important for resolving the “last parsec” problem for SMBH binaries and understanding powerful gravitational wave sources in the universe. We argue that the enhancement of accretion by the binary found in some recent simulations cannot persist for a long time and should not affect the long-term orbital inspiral. We also review existing simulations of SMBH binary–disk coupling and propose a numerical setup which is particularly well suited to verifying our theoretical predictions.

  16. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-termmore » basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.« less

  17. Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kler, A. M.; Zakharov, Yu. B.; Potanina, Yu. M.

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization problem for the gas-turbine flow path parameters within an integral complex problem. We report comparative data for optimizations of the combined cycle power plant at coordinated and separate optimizations, when, first, the gas turbine and, then, the steam part of a combined cycle plant is optimized. The comparative data are presented in terms of economic indicators, energy-effectiveness characteristics, and specific costs. Models that were used in the present study for calculating the flow path enable taking into account, as a factor influencing the economic and energy effectiveness of the power plant, the heat stability of alloys from which the nozzle and rotor blades of gas-turbine stages are made.

  18. Ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal synthesis of activated carbon-HKUST-1-MOF hybrid for efficient simultaneous ultrasound-assisted removal of ternary organic dyes and antibacterial investigation: Taguchi optimization.

    PubMed

    Azad, F Nasiri; Ghaedi, M; Dashtian, K; Hajati, S; Pezeshkpour, V

    2016-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) composite with HKUST-1 metal organic framework (AC-HKUST-1 MOF) was prepared by ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal method and characterized by FTIR, SEM and XRD analysis and laterally was applied for the simultaneous ultrasound-assisted removal of crystal violet (CV), disulfine blue (DSB) and quinoline yellow (QY) dyes in their ternary solution. In addition, this material, was screened in vitro for their antibacterial actively against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) bacteria. In dyes removal process, the effects of important variables such as initial concentration of dyes, adsorbent mass, pH and sonication time on adsorption process optimized by Taguchi approach. Optimum values of 4, 0.02g, 4min, 10mgL(-1) were obtained for pH, AC-HKUST-1 MOF mass, sonication time and the concentration of each dye, respectively. At the optimized condition, the removal percentages of CV, DSB and QY were found to be 99.76%, 91.10%, and 90.75%, respectively, with desirability of 0.989. Kinetics of adsorption processes follow pseudo-second-order model. The Langmuir model as best method with high applicability for representation of experimental data, while maximum mono layer adsorption capacity for CV, DSB and QY on AC-HKUST-1 estimated to be 133.33, 129.87 and 65.37mgg(-1) which significantly were higher than HKUST-1 as sole material with Qm to equate 59.45, 57.14 and 38.80mgg(-1), respectively. PMID:26964963

  19. Air assist fuel nozzle reduces aircraft gas turbine engine emissions at idle operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    Reduction in unburned hydrocarbons from jet engine by use of air assist fuel nozzle is discussed. Operation of nozzle for improving combustion efficiency by improving fuel atomization is analyzed. Advantages to be achieved by air assist fuel nozzle are analyzed.

  20. Cutting by a high power laser at a long distance without an assist gas for dismantling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmouch, G.; Meyrueis, P.; Grandjean, P.

    1997-09-01

    As the applications of laser processing progress, new fields of use are being investigated, including dismantling with power lasers. To fulfil our dismantling requirements we propose a new laser method that we have called the laser dismantling (LD) process. This cutting method uses a high-power laser at a long distance, without an assist gas, and with a focal length of the system of 1 m to 10 m. Precision and accuracy in the process are not the same as for laser cutting for production and assembly. The first application of the laser dismantling process, on which we demonstrate our method, is the dismantling of obsolete nuclear plants with remote controlled, or automatic, robots in irradiated environments. For our demonstrator, the beam from a Nd:YAG laser was focused by a multimode optical fibre. The objectives of this paper are: to discuss the criteria for determining the theoretical feasibility of LD; to discuss issues related to future industrial implementation by introducing the process's basic principles; and to compare LD with classical laser processing, which differs not only in the consideration of cutting quality and speed, but also in the cutting irregularities that could be accepted.

  1. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient ‘green technique’, gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm−2h−1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry. PMID:25819091

  2. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-03-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient `green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm-2h-1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry.

  3. Multi-response optimization of factors affecting ultrasonic assisted extraction from Iranian basil using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Izadiyan, Parisa; Hemmateenejad, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports on the extraction of antioxidant compounds from Iranian Ocimum basilicum. Central composite design (CCD) was used to investigate the effect of extraction variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). Three independent variables including temperature, methanol to water ratio percent, and sonication time were studied for simultaneous optimization of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and extraction yield. Both quantitative modeling and response surface methodology suggested that methanol to water ratio percent and extraction temperature were the most effective parameters of UAE process. However, sonication time was found out to be an insignificant factor in ultrasound-assisted extraction of antioxidant and total phenolic compounds of O. basilicum. The optimum conditions were determined as temperature of 59 °C, methanol to water ratio of 65.2% (v/v), and extraction time of 20 min. PMID:26213050

  4. Optimization of enzymolysis-ultrasonic assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Momordica charabtia L. by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tao; Hu, Jianguo; Fu, Lidan; Zhang, Lijin

    2015-01-22

    An efficient enzymolysis-ultrasonic assisted extraction (EUAE) was developed and optimized for the extraction of polysaccharide from Momordica charabtia L. The single factor experiments and orthogonal experiments were used for the key experimental factors and their test range. Based on the preliminary experimental results, the response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design (BBD) were applied for the optimization of EUAE conditions. Using the multiple regression analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA), the experimental data were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation and were used to generate the mathematical model of optimization experiments. The optimal extraction conditions were as follows: a pH of 4.38, a extraction temperature of 52.02°C and a extraction time of 36.87 min. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the extraction yield of Momordica charabtia L. polysaccharides (MCP) was 29.75±0.48%, which was well matched with the predicted value (29.80%) of the BBD model. PMID:25439951

  5. Adsorbed Natural Gas Storage in Optimized High Surface Area Microporous Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Rash, Tyler; Nordwald, Erik; Shocklee, Joshua Shawn; Wexler, Carlos; Pfeifer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) is an attractive alternative technology to compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG) for the efficient storage of natural gas, in particular for vehicular applications. In adsorbants engineered to have pores of a few molecular diameters, a strong van der Walls force allows reversible physisorption of methane at low pressures and room temperature. Activated carbons were optimized for storage by varying KOH:C ratio and activation temperature. We also consider the effect of mechanical compression of powders to further enhance the volumetric storage capacity. We will present standard porous material characterization (BET surface area and pore-size distribution from subcritical N2 adsorption) and methane isotherms up to 250 bar at 293K. At sufficiently high pressure, specific surface area, methane binding energy and film density can be extracted from supercritical methane adsorption isotherms. Research supported by the California Energy Commission (500-08-022).

  6. Methodology for optimizing the development and operation of gas storage fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, J.C.; Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.

    1995-04-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center is pursuing the development of a methodology that uses geologic modeling and reservoir simulation for optimizing the development and operation of gas storage fields. Several Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) will serve as the vehicle to implement this product. CRADAs have been signed with National Fuel Gas and Equitrans, Inc. A geologic model is currently being developed for the Equitrans CRADA. Results from the CRADA with National Fuel Gas are discussed here. The first phase of the CRADA, based on original well data, was completed last year and reported at the 1993 Natural Gas RD&D Contractors Review Meeting. Phase 2 analysis was completed based on additional core and geophysical well log data obtained during a deepening/relogging program conducted by the storage operator. Good matches, within 10 percent, of wellhead pressure were obtained using a numerical simulator to history match 2 1/2 injection withdrawal cycles.

  7. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine- shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  8. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine-shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  9. Simultaneous removal of NOx and SO2 from flue gas using combined Na2SO3 assisted electrochemical reduction and direct electrochemical reduction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingbin; He, Yi; Sun, Tonghua; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2014-07-15

    A method combining Na2SO3 assisted electrochemical reduction and direct electrochemical reduction using Fe(II)(EDTA) solution was proposed to simultaneously remove NOx and SO2 from flue gas. Activated carbon was used as catalyst to accelerate the process. This new system features (a) direct conversion of NOx and SO2 to harmless N2 and SO4(2-); (b) fast regeneration of Fe(II)(EDTA); (c) minimum use of chemical reagents; and (d) recovery of the reduction by-product (Na2SO4). Fe(II)(EDTA) solution was continuously recycled and reused during entire process, and no harmful waste was generated. Approximately 99% NOx and 98% SO2 were removed under the optimal condition. The stability test showed that the system operation was reliable. PMID:24910913

  10. Growth Optimization of III-N Electronic Devices by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh

    InAlN has received significant attention due to its great potential for electronic and optoelectronic applications. In particular, In 0.18Al0.82N presents the advantage of being lattice-matched to GaN and simultaneously exhibiting a high spontaneous polarization charge, making In0.18 Al0.82N attractive for use as the barrier layer in high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). However, in the case of InAlN growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE), a strong non-uniformity in the in-plane In distribution was observed for both N-face and metal-face In0.18Al 0.82N. This compositional inhomogeneity manifests itself as a columnar microstructure with AlN-rich cores (5-10 nm in width) and InN-rich intercolumn boundaries. Because of the large differences between the bandgaps and polarization of InN and AlN, this non-uniformity in InAlN composition could be a source of scattering, leading to mobility degradation in HEMTs. In this work, the growth conditions for high quality lattice-matched InAlN layers on free-standing GaN substrates were explored by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) in the N-rich regime. The microstructure of N-face InAlN layers, lattice-matched to GaN, was investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Microstructural analysis showed an absence of the lateral composition modulation that was previously observed in InAlN films grown by PAMBE. Using same growth conditions for InAlN layer, N-face GaN/AlN/GaN/InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors with lattice-matched InAlN back barriers were grown directly on SiC. A room temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility of 1100cm2 V-1s-1 and 2DEG sheet charge density of 1.9 x1013 cm 2 was measured on these devices. However, the threading dislocation density (TDD) of GaN grown directly on SiC by PAMBE (≈2 x10 10 cm-2 ) is two orders of magnitude higher than GaN grown by MOCVD on SiC or sapphire (≈5 x10 8 cm-2). This high TDD can

  11. Trace gas retrieval for limb DOAS under changing atmospheric conditions: The X-gas scaling method vs optimal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueneke, Tilman; Grossmann, Katja; Knecht, Matthias; Raecke, Rasmus; Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Changing atmospheric conditions during DOAS measurements from fast moving aircraft platforms pose a challenge for trace gas retrievals. Traditional inversion techniques to retrieve trace gas concentrations from limb scattered UV/vis spectroscopy, like optimal estimation, require a-priori information on Mie extinction (e.g., aerosol concentration and cloud cover) and albedo, which determine the atmospheric radiative transfer. In contrast to satellite applications, cloud filters can not be applied because they would strongly reduce the usable amount of expensively gathered measurement data. In contrast to ground-based MAX-DOAS applications, an aerosol retrieval based on O4 is not able to constrain the radiative transfer in air-borne applications due to the rapidly decreasing amount of O4 with altitude. Furthermore, the assumption of a constant cloud cover is not valid for fast moving aircrafts, thus requiring 2D or even 3D treatment of the radiative transfer. Therefore, traditional techniques are not applicable for most of the data gathered by fast moving aircraft platforms. In order to circumvent these limitations, we have been developing the so-called X-gas scaling method. By utilising a proxy gas X (e.g. O3, O4, …), whose concentration is either a priori known or simultaneously in-situ measured as well as remotely measured, an effective absorption length for the target gas is inferred. In this presentation, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the novel approach along with some sample cases. A particular strength of the X-gas scaling method is its insensitivity towards the aerosol abundance and cloud cover as well as wavelength dependent effects, whereas its sensitivity towards the profiles of both gases requires a priori information on their shapes.

  12. An integrated approach for optimal design of micro gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuligno, Luca; Micheli, Diego; Poloni, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    The present work presents an approach for the optimized design of small gas turbine combustors, that integrates a 0-D code, CFD analyses and an advanced game theory multi-objective optimization algorithm. The output of the 0-D code is a baseline design of the combustor, given the required fuel characteristics, the basic geometry (tubular or annular) and the combustion concept (i.e. lean premixed primary zone or diffusive processes). For the optimization of the baseline design a simplified parametric CAD/mesher model is then defined and submitted to a CFD code. Free parameters of the optimization process are position and size of the liner hole arrays, their total area and the shape of the exit duct, while different objectives are the minimization of NOx emissions, pressure losses and combustor exit Pattern Factor. A 3D simulation of the optimized geometry completes the design procedure. As a first demonstrative example, the integrated design process was applied to a tubular combustion chamber with a lean premixed primary zone for a recuperative methane-fuelled small gas turbine of the 100 kW class.

  13. Multicycle Optimization of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Loading Patterns Using Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Ziver, A. Kemal; Carter, Jonathan N.; Pain, Christopher C.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Overton, Richard S.

    2003-02-15

    A genetic algorithm (GA)-based optimizer (GAOPT) has been developed for in-core fuel management of advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) at HINKLEY B and HARTLEPOOL, which employ on-load and off-load refueling, respectively. The optimizer has been linked to the reactor analysis code PANTHER for the automated evaluation of loading patterns in a two-dimensional geometry, which is collapsed from the three-dimensional reactor model. GAOPT uses a directed stochastic (Monte Carlo) algorithm to generate initial population members, within predetermined constraints, for use in GAs, which apply the standard genetic operators: selection by tournament, crossover, and mutation. The GAOPT is able to generate and optimize loading patterns for successive reactor cycles (multicycle) within acceptable CPU times even on single-processor systems. The algorithm allows radial shuffling of fuel assemblies in a multicycle refueling optimization, which is constructed to aid long-term core management planning decisions. This paper presents the application of the GA-based optimization to two AGR stations, which apply different in-core management operational rules. Results obtained from the testing of GAOPT are discussed.

  14. Optimization of wave rotors for use as gas turbine engine topping cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    Use of a wave rotor as a topping cycle for a gas turbine engine can improve specific power and reduce specific fuel consumption. Maximum improvement requires the wave rotor to be optimized for best performance at the mass flow of the engine. The optimization is a trade-off between losses due to friction and passage opening time, and rotational effects. An experimentally validated, one-dimensional CFD code, which includes these effects, has been used to calculate wave rotor performance, and find the optimum configuration. The technique is described, and results given for wave rotors sized for engines with sea level mass flows of 4, 26, and 400 lb/sec.

  15. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of antioxidant compounds from Tunisian Zizyphus lotus fruits using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Hammi, Khaoula Mkadmini; Jdey, Ahmed; Abdelly, Chedly; Majdoub, Hatem; Ksouri, Riadh

    2015-10-01

    The optimization of antioxidant extraction conditions from a ripe edible fruits of Zizyphus lotus (L.) with an ultrasound-assisted system was achieved by response surface methodology. The central composite rotatable design was employed for optimization of extraction parameters in terms of total phenolic content and antioxidant activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and phosphomolybdenum assay. The optimum operating conditions for extraction were as follows: ethanol concentration, 50%; extraction time, 25 min; extraction temperature, 63°C and ratio of solvent to solid, 67 mL/g. Under these conditions, the obtained extract exhibited a high content of phenolic compounds (40.782 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry matter) with significant antioxidant properties (the total antioxidant activity was 75.981 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry matter and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity was 0.289 mg/mL). PMID:25872429

  16. Response surface modeling and optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of three flavonoids from tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lian-Xin; Zou, Liang; Zhao, Jiang-Lin; Xiang, Da-Bing; Zhu, Peng; Zhao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Buckwheat (Fagopyrum spp., Polygonaceae) is a widely planted food crop. Flavonoids, including quercetin, rutin, and kaempferol, are the main bioactive components in tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn). From the nutriological and pharmacological perspectives, flavonoids have great value in controlling blood glucose and blood pressure levels, and they also have antioxidant properties. Objective: To optimize the conditions for extraction of quercetin, rutin, and kaempferol from F. tataricum. Materials and Methods: A combination of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and response surface methodology (RSM) was used for flavonoid extraction and yield assessment. The RSM was based on a three-level, three-variable Box-Behnken design. Results: Flavonoids were optimally extracted from F. tataricum by using 72% methanol, at 60°C, for 21 minutes. Under these conditions, the obtained extraction yield of the total flavonoids was 3.94%. Conclusion: The results indicated that the UAE method was effective for extraction of flavonoids from tartary buckwheat. PMID:23930003

  17. Multivariate statistical analysis and optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of natural pigments from waste red beet stalks.

    PubMed

    Maran, J Prakash; Priya, B

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of natural pigment extraction from waste red beet stalks were optimized under four factors (extraction temperature, ultrasonic power, extraction time and solid-liquid ratio) by using three level Box-Behnken response surface design. Extraction temperature, ultrasonic power and solid-liquid ratio were significantly influenced the extraction yield of pigments. Extraction temperature of 53 °C, ultrasonic power of 89 w, extraction time of 35 min and SL ratio of 1:19 g/ml was identified as the optimal condition. Under this condition, the actual yield of (betacyanin of 1.28 ± 0.02 and betaxanthin of 5.31 ± 0.09 mg/g) pigments was well correlated with predicted values (betacyanin was 1.29 mg/g and betaxanthin was 5.32 mg/g). PMID:26788000

  18. Optimization for ultrasound-assisted extraction of polysaccharides with antioxidant activity in vitro from the aerial root of Ficus microcarpa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changxing; Li, Xia; Jiao, Yunpeng; Jiang, Dingyun; Zhang, Ling; Fan, Benxia; Zhang, Qianghua

    2014-09-22

    In this study, optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction and antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from the aerial root of Ficus microcarpa (FMPS) were investigated. The optimal conditions for extraction of FMPS were determined as followings: ultrasound power 200 W, ultrasound temperature 70°C, extraction temperature 74°C, liquid-solid ratio 35, extraction time 238 min, ultrasound time 49 min. The experimental yield of FMPS (3.44%) obtained under these conditions was well agreement with the value predicted by the model. In addition, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and antioxidant activity assays revealed that FMPS were acidic polysaccharides and had strong Fe2+ chelating activity and moderate hydrogen peroxide scavenging effect. Further work on the purification, structure characterization and antioxidant activity in vivo of FMPS is in progress. PMID:24906722

  19. Teaching Assistant Training and Supervision: An Examination of Optimal Delivery Modes and Skill Emphases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Loreto R.; Yamokoski, Cynthia A.; Meyers, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    We collected data from 149 graduate teaching assistants at a Midwestern university concerning their classroom duties, experiences with TA training and supervision, sense of self-efficacy toward teaching, preference for supervisory style, and feedback on those modes and skill domains in TA training they felt were most effective and best prepared…

  20. Adaptive Computer-Assisted Tutorials: A Cybernetic Approach Optimization with Finite-State Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offir, Joseph

    This paper presents the concepts of a computer-directed system to improve human performance in structured learning situations. Attention is focused on finite-state systems in order to provide a systematic method for constructing training systems and to assist in analysis of problem solving and curriculum planning. The finite-state approach allows…

  1. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78°C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences. PMID:24267075

  2. Determination of cyclic and linear siloxanes in wastewater samples by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cortada, Carol; dos Reis, Luciana Costa; Vidal, Lorena; Llorca, Julio; Canals, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A fast, simple and environmentally friendly ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (USA-DLLME) procedure has been developed to preconcentrate eight cyclic and linear siloxanes from wastewater samples prior to quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A two-stage multivariate optimization approach has been developed employing a Plackett-Burman design for screening and selecting the significant factors involved in the USA-DLLME procedure, which was later optimized by means of a circumscribed central composite design. The optimum conditions were: extractant solvent volume, 13 µL; solvent type, chlorobenzene; sample volume, 13 mL; centrifugation speed, 2300 rpm; centrifugation time, 5 min; and sonication time, 2 min. Under the optimized experimental conditions the method gave levels of repeatability with coefficients of variation between 10 and 24% (n=7). Limits of detection were between 0.002 and 1.4 µg L(-1). Calculated calibration curves gave high levels of linearity with correlation coefficient values between 0.991 and 0.9997. Finally, the proposed method was applied for the analysis of wastewater samples. Relative recovery values ranged between 71 and 116% showing that the matrix had a negligible effect upon extraction. To our knowledge, this is the first time that combines LLME and GC-MS for the analysis of methylsiloxanes in wastewater samples. PMID:24468359

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

  4. Optimization of a microwave-assisted extraction of secondary metabolites from crustose lichens with quantitative spectrophotodensitometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sarah; Hitti, Eric; Boustie, Joël; Bernard, Aurélie; Tomasi, Sophie

    2009-11-01

    A focused and rapid microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) process was carried out and optimized for secondary metabolites from crustose lichens using Taguchi experimental design and quantitative analysis on TLC by a Camag((R)) spectrophotodensitometer. The procedure was improved by quantitative determination of norstictic acid (NA), a common depsidone isolated from Pertusaria pseudocorallina (Sw.) Arn. Various experimental parameters that can potentially affect the NA extraction yields including extraction time, irradiation power, volume and the percentage of tetrahydrofuran (THF) were optimized. Results suggest that THF percentage and solvent volume were statistically the most significant factors. The optimal conditions were determined as follows: THF level of 100%, solvent volume of 15mL, microwave power of 100W and extraction time of 7min. Compared to the reflux method, MAE showed a drastic reduction of extraction time (7min vs. 3h) and solvent consumption (15mL vs. 30mL). The NA in total yield was 90% using the two methods. The optimal conditions were applied to other crustose lichens, Aspicilia radiosa, Diploicia canescens and Ochrolechia parella for the extraction of NA, diploicine (DP) and variolaric acid (VA), with 83%, 90% and 95% of recovery, respectively. PMID:19796768

  5. Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins from blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) wine pomace.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zhang, Ling-Li; Yue, Xue-Yang; Liang, Jin; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Xue-Ling; Yue, Peng-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction (UAE) of total anthocyanins (TA) and phenolics (TP) from Blueberry Wine Pomace (BWP) was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). A Box-Behnken design was used to predict that the optimized conditions were an extraction temperature of 61.03°C, a liquid-solid ratio of 21.70mL/g and a sonication time of 23.67min. Using the modeled optimized conditions, the predicted and experimental yields of TA and TP were within a 2% difference. The yields of TA and TP obtained through the optimized UAE method were higher than those using a Conventional Solvent Extraction (CSE) method. Seven anthocyanins, namely delphinidin-3-O-glucoside, delphindin-3-O-arabinoside, petunidin-3-O-glucoside, cyanidin-3-O-arabinoside, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, malvidin-3-O-glucoside and malvidin-3-O-arabinoside, were found in the BWP extract from both the UAE and CSE methods. PMID:26988477

  6. Optimized production of vanillin from green vanilla pods by enzyme-assisted extraction combined with pre-freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Mo, Limei; Chen, Feng; Lu, Minquan; Dong, Wenjiang; Wang, Qinghuang; Xu, Fei; Gu, Fenglin

    2014-01-01

    Production of vanillin from natural green vanilla pods was carried out by enzyme-assisted extraction combined with pre-freezing and thawing. In the first step the green vanilla pods were pre-frozen and then thawed to destroy cellular compartmentation. In the second step pectinase from Aspergillus niger was used to hydrolyze the pectin between the glucovanillin substrate and β-glucosidase. Four main variables, including enzyme amount, reaction temperature, time and pH, which were of significance for the vanillin content were studied and a central composite design (CCD) based on the results of a single-factor tests was used. Response surface methodology based on CCD was employed to optimize the combination of enzyme amount, reaction temperature, time, and pH for maximum vanillin production. This resulted in the optimal condition in regards of the enzyme amount, reaction temperature, time, and pH at 84.2 mg, 49.5 °C, 7.1 h, and 4.2, respectively. Under the optimal condition, the experimental yield of vanillin was 4.63% ± 0.11% (dwb), which was in good agreement with the value predicted by the model. Compared to the traditional curing process (1.98%) and viscozyme extract (2.36%), the optimized method for the vanillin production significantly increased the yield by 133.85% and 96%, respectively. PMID:24556615

  7. Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Smutzer

    2006-01-01

    Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

  8. Optimization of the idler wavelength tunable cascaded optical parametric oscillator based on chirp-assisted aperiodically poled lithium niobate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chen; Rong, Shu; Ye, Ge; Zhuo, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We present the numerical results for the optimization of the pump-to-idler conversion efficiencies of nanosecond idler wavelength tunable cascaded optical parametric oscillators (OPO) in different wavelength tuning ranges, where the primary signals from the OPO process are recycled to enhance the pump-to-idler conversion efficiencies via the simultaneous difference frequency generation (DFG) process by monolithic aperiodically poled, magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate (APMgLN) crystals. The APMgLN crystals are designed with different chirp parameters for the DFG process to broaden their thermal acceptance bandwidths to different extents. The idler wavelength tuning of the cascaded OPO is realized by changing the temperature of the designed APMgLN crystal and the cascaded oscillation is achieved in a single pump pass singly resonant linear cavity. The pump-to-idler conversion efficiencies with respect to the pump pulse duration and ratio of OPO coefficient to DFG coefficient are calculated by numerically solving the coupled wave equations. The optimal working conditions of the tunable cascaded OPOs pumped by pulses with energies of 350 μJ and 700 μJ are compared to obtain the general rules of optimization. It is concluded that the optimization becomes the interplay between the ratio of OPO coefficient to DFG coefficient and the pump pulse duration when the idler wavelength tuning range and the pump pulse energy are fixed. Besides, higher pump pulse energy is beneficial for reaching higher optimal pump-to-idler conversion efficiency as long as the APMgLN crystal is optimized according to this pump condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first numerical analysis of idler wavelength tunable cascaded OPOs based on chirp-assisted APMgLN crystals. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61505236), the Innovation Program of Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, China (Grant No. CX-2), and the Program of Shanghai

  9. Kinetics of ultrasound-assisted extraction of antioxidant polyphenols from food by-products: Extraction and energy consumption optimization.

    PubMed

    Pradal, Delphine; Vauchel, Peggy; Decossin, Stéphane; Dhulster, Pascal; Dimitrov, Krasimir

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of antioxidant polyphenols from chicory grounds was studied in order to propose a suitable valorization of this food industry by-product. The main parameters influencing the extraction process were identified. A new mathematical model for multi-criteria optimization of UAE was proposed. This kinetic model permitted the following and the prediction of the yield of extracted polyphenols, the antioxidant activity of the obtained extracts and the energy consumption during the extraction process in wide ranges of temperature (20-60°C), ethanol content in the solvent (0-60% (vol.) in ethanol-water mixtures) and ultrasound power (0-100W). After experimental validation of the model, several simulations at different technological restrictions were performed to illustrate the potentiality of the model to find the optimal conditions for obtaining a given yield within minimal process duration or with minimal energy consumption. The advantage of ultrasound assistance was clearly demonstrated both for the reduction of extraction duration and for the reduction of energy consumption. PMID:27150754

  10. Minimization of Blast furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2012-08-15

    The goal of the research is to improve the competitive edge of steel mills by using the advanced CFD technology to optimize the gas and burden distributions inside a blast furnace for achieving the best gas utilization. A state-of-the-art 3-D CFD model has been developed for simulating the gas distribution inside a blast furnace at given burden conditions, burden distribution and blast parameters. The comprehensive 3-D CFD model has been validated by plant measurement data from an actual blast furnace. Validation of the sub-models is also achieved. The user friendly software package named Blast Furnace Shaft Simulator (BFSS) has been developed to simulate the blast furnace shaft process. The research has significant benefits to the steel industry with high productivity, low energy consumption, and improved environment.

  11. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    DOEpatents

    Serres, Nicolas

    2010-11-09

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  12. Identifying Optimal Zeolitic Sorbents for Sweetening of Highly Sour Natural Gas.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi S; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2016-05-10

    Raw natural gas is a complex mixture comprising methane, ethane, other hydrocarbons, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. For sour gas fields, selective and energy-efficient removal of H2 S is one of the crucial challenges facing the natural-gas industry. Separation using nanoporous materials, such as zeolites, can be an alternative to energy-intensive amine-based absorption processes. Herein, the adsorption of binary H2 S/CH4 and H2 S/C2 H6 mixtures in the all-silica forms of 386 zeolitic frameworks is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Adsorption of a five-component mixture is utilized to evaluate the performance of the 16 most promising materials under close-to-real conditions. It is found that depending on the fractions of CH4 , C2 H6 , and CO2 , different sorbents allow for optimal H2 S removal and hydrocarbon recovery. PMID:27087591

  13. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    PubMed

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  14. Mass-based design and optimization of wave rotors for gas turbine engine enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Liu, H.

    2016-04-01

    An analytic method aiming at mass properties was developed for the preliminary design and optimization of wave rotors. In the present method, we introduce the mass balance principle into the design and thus can predict and optimize the mass qualities as well as the performance of wave rotors. A dedicated least-square method with artificial weighting coefficients was developed to solve the over-constrained system in the mass-based design. This method and the adoption of the coefficients were validated by numerical simulation. Moreover, the problem of fresh air exhaustion (FAE) was put forward and analyzed, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated. Parameter analyses and optimization elucidated which designs would not only achieve the best performance, but also operate with minimum EGR and no FAE.

  15. Microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization for rapid analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mou, Zhao-Li; Hao, Shuang-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2012-11-01

    A rapid and practical microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization (MAED) method was developed for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine. Several critical experimental parameters for MAED, including reaction temperature, microwave power and the amount of derivatization reagent (methanol), were optimized with response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and total unsaturated fatty acids content obtained with MAED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional Soxhlet or microwave extraction and then derivatization method. The investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of the derivatization reaction revealed that microwave assistance could reduce activation energy and increase the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor. The MAED method simplified the sample preparation procedure, shortened the reaction time, but improved the extraction and derivatization efficiency of lipids and reduced ingredient losses, especially for the oxidization and isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, speed and practicality of this method indicates great potential for high throughput analysis of fatty acids in natural medicinal samples. PMID:22968083

  16. A comparative study of expected improvement-assisted global optimization with different surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Ye, Fan; Li, Enying; Li, Guangyao

    2016-08-01

    Efficient global optimization (EGO) uses the surrogate uncertainty estimator called expected improvement (EI) to guide the selection of the next sampling candidates. Theoretically, any modelling methods can be integrated with the EI criterion. To improve the convergence ratio, a multi-surrogate efficient global optimization (MSEGO) was suggested. In practice, the EI-based optimization methods with different surrogates show widely divergent characteristics. Therefore, it is important to choose the most suitable algorithm for a certain problem. For this purpose, four single-surrogate efficient global optimizations (SSEGOs) and an MSEGO involving four surrogates are investigated. According to numerical tests, both the SSEGOs and the MSEGO are feasible for weak nonlinear problems. However, they are not robust for strong nonlinear problems, especially for multimodal and high-dimensional problems. Moreover, to investigate the feasibility of EGO in practice, a material identification benchmark is designed to demonstrate the performance of EGO methods. According to the tests in this study, the kriging EGO is generally the most robust method.

  17. Optimization of a miniature Maglev ventricular assist device for pediatric circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juntao; Koert, Andrew; Gellman, Barry; Gempp, Thomas M; Dasse, Kurt A; Gilbert, Richard J; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2007-01-01

    A miniature Maglev blood pump based on magnetically levitated bearingless technology is being developed and optimized for pediatric patients. We performed impeller optimization by characterizing the hemodynamic and hemocompatibility performances using a combined computational and experimental approach. Both three-dimensional flow features and hemolytic characteristics were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Hydraulic pump performances and hemolysis levels of three different impeller designs were quantified and compared numerically. Two pump prototypes were constructed from the two impeller designs and experimentally tested. Comparison of CFD predictions with experimental results showed good agreement. The optimized impeller remarkably increased overall pump hydraulic output by more than 50% over the initial design. The CFD simulation demonstrated a clean and streamlined flow field in the main flow path. The numerical results by hemolysis model indicated no significant high shear stress regions. Through the use of CFD analysis and bench-top testing, the small pediatric pump was optimized to achieve a low level of blood damage and improved hydraulic performance and efficiency. The Maglev pediatric blood pump is innovative due to its small size, very low priming volume, excellent hemodynamic and hematologic performance, and elimination of seal-related and bearing-related failures due to adoption of magnetically levitated bearingless motor technology, making it ideal for pediatric applications. PMID:17237645

  18. Optimization of solar assisted heat pump systems via a simple analytic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analytic method for calculating the optimum operating temperature of the collector/storage subsystem in a solar assisted heat pump is presented. A tradeoff exists between rising heat pump coefficient of performance and falling collector efficiency as this temperature is increased, resulting in an optimum temperature whose value increases with increasing efficiency of the auxiliary energy source. Electric resistance is shown to be a poor backup to such systems. A number of options for thermally coupling the system to the ground are analyzed and compared.

  19. Optimizing power cylinder lubrication on a large bore natural gas engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeman, Matthew R.

    More than 6000 integral compressors, located along America's natural gas pipelines, pump natural gas across the United States. These compressors are powered by 2-stroke, large bore natural gas burning engines. Lowering the operating costs, reducing the emissions, and ensuring that these engines remain compliant with future emission regulations are the drivers for this study. Substantial research has focused on optimizing efficiency and reducing the fuel derived emissions on this class of engine. However, significantly less research has focused on the effect and reduction of lubricating oil derived emissions. This study evaluates the impact of power cylinder lubricating oil on overall engine emissions with an emphasis on reducing oxidation catalyst poisoning. A traditional power cylinder lubricator was analyzed; power cylinder lubricating oil was found to significantly impact exhaust emissions. Lubricating oil was identified as the primary contributor of particulate matter production in a large bore natural gas engine. The particulate matter was determined to be primarily organic carbon, and most likely direct oil carryover of small oil droplets. The particulate matter production equated to 25% of the injected oil at a nominal power cylinder lubrication rate. In addition, power cylinder friction is considered the primary contributor to friction loss in the internal combustion engine. This study investigates the potential for optimizing power cylinder lubrication by controlling power cylinder injection to occur at the optimal time in the piston cycle. By injecting oil directly into the ring pack, it is believed that emissions, catalyst poisoning, friction, and wear can all be reduced. This report outlines the design and theory of two electronically controlled lubrication systems. Experimental results and evaluation of one of the systems is included.

  20. Optimization of Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Radical-Scavenging Capacity of Phenols and Flavonoids from Clerodendrum cyrtophyllum Turcz Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Zheng, Xiaoxue; Yang, Qi; Liang, Zhenyi; Li, Donghai; Yang, Xiaobo; Xu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) was developed to extract phenolic and flavonoid antioxidants from Clerodendrum cyrtophyllum Turcz leaves. The optimal experimental parameters for antioxidant extraction from C. cyrtophyllum leaves were measured using single-factor experimentation combined with response surface methodology (RSM). Total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) assays were used to quantify antioxidant compounds. Next, antioxidant radical scavenging capacity was measured using 2,2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′ -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonicacid) (ABTS) radicals. Optimized extraction conditions for UAE from C. cyrtophyllum leaves were as follows: 60.9% ethanol, 85.4 min, and 63.3°C for maximal TPC extraction (16.8±0.2 mg GAE/g DW); 67.7% ethanol, 82.9 min, and 63.0°C for maximal TFC extraction (49.3±0.4 mg RT/g DW); 48.8% ethanol, 85.1 min, and 63.9°C for maximal DPPH radical-scavenging capacity (86.8±0.2%); and 50.6% ethanol, 81.3 min, and 63.4°C for maximal ABTS radical-scavenging capacity (92.9±0.5%). Ethanol concentration was the most important factor in the extraction process. Our work offers optimal extraction conditions for C. cyrtophyllum as a potential source of natural antioxidants. PMID:23874607

  1. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction parameters of chlorophyll from Chlorella vulgaris residue after lipid separation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weibao; Liu, Na; Zhang, Ji; Yang, Qi; Hua, Shaofeng; Song, Hao; Xia, Chungu

    2014-09-01

    An investigation into ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was conducted for the extraction of chlorophyll from Chlorella vulgaris residue after lipid separation. The best possible combination of extraction parameters was obtained with the response surface methodology (RSM), at a three-variable, three-level experiment Box-Behnken design (BBD). The optimum extraction parameters were as follows: extraction temperature, 61.4 °C, extraction time, 78.7 min, ethanol volume, 79.4 %, at a fixed ultrasonic power of 200 W. Under the modified optimal conditions, the model predicted a total chlorophyll content of 30.1 mg/g. Verification of the optimization showed that chlorophyll extraction of 31.1 ± 1.56 mg/g was observed under the optimal conditions, which well matches with the predicted value. Under these conditions, two stage extraction could sufficiently reach the maximal chlorophyll yield (35.2 mg/g), and the extraction rate reached up to 88.9 %. The present paper provides a feasible technology route for comprehensive utilization of bioactive substances from Chlorella and microalgal biomass biorefinery. PMID:25190857

  2. Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Natural Antioxidants from Sugar Apple (Annona squamosa L.) Peel Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Sugar apple (Annona squamosa L.) is a popular tropical fruit and its peel is a municipal waste. An ultrasound-assisted extraction method was developed for the recovery of natural antioxidants from sugar apple peel. Central composite design was used to optimize solvent concentration (13.2%-46.8%), ultrasonic time (33.2-66.8 min), and temperature (43.2-76.8 °C) for the recovery of natural antioxidants from sugar apple peel. The second-order polynomial models demonstrated a good fit of the quadratic models with the experimental results in respect to total phenolic content (TPC, R²=0.9524, p<0.0001), FRAP (R²=0.9743, p<0.0001), and TEAC (R²=0.9610, p<0.0001) values. The optimal extraction conditions were 20:1 (mL/g) of solvent-to-solid ratio, 32.68% acetone, and 67.23 °C for 42.54 min under ultrasonic irradiation. Under these conditions, the maximal yield of total phenolic content was 26.81 (mg GA/g FW). The experimental results obtained under optimal conditions agreed well with the predicted results. The application of ultrasound markedly decreased extraction time and improved the extraction efficiency, compared with the conventional methods. PMID:26593890

  3. RSM based optimized enzyme-assisted extraction of antioxidant phenolics from underutilized watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Thunb.) rind.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Sultana, Bushra; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Asghar, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme assisted solvent extraction (EASE) of phenolic compounds from watermelon (C. lanatus) rind (WMR) was optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with Rotatable Central Composite Design (RCCD). Four variables each at five levels i.e. enzyme concentration (EC) 0.5-6.5 %, pH 6-9, temperature (T) 25-75 °C and treatment time (t) 30-90 min, were augmented to get optimal yield of polyphenols with maximum retained antioxidant potential. The polyphenol extracts obtained under optimum conditions were evaluated for their in-vitro antioxidant activities and characterized for individual phenolic profile by RP-HPLC-DAD. The results obtained indicated that optimized EASE enhanced the liberation of antioxidant phenolics up to 3 folds on fresh weight basis (FW) as compared to conventional solvent extraction (CSE), with substantial level of total phenolics (173.70 mg GAE/g FW), TEAC 279.96 mg TE/g FW and DPPH radical scavenging ability (IC50) 112.27 mg/mL. Chlorogenic acid (115.60-1611.04), Vanillic acid (26.13-2317.01) and Sinapic acid (113.01-241.12 μg/g) were major phenolic acid found in EASEx of WMR. Overall, it was concluded that EASE might be efficient and green technique to revalorize under-utilized WMR into potent antioxidant phenolic for their further application in food and nutraceutical industries. PMID:26243925

  4. Optimization of Ultrasound Assisted Extraction of Functional Ingredients from Stevia Rebaudiana Bertoni Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šic Žlabur, Jana; Voća, Sandra; Dobričević, Nadica; Brnčić, Mladen; Dujmić, Filip; Rimac Brnčić, Suzana

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal an effective extraction procedure for maximization of the yield of steviol glycosides and total phenolic compounds as well as antioxidant activity in stevia extracts. Ultrasound assisted extraction was compared with conventional solvent extraction. The examined solvents were water (100°C/24 h) and 70% ethanol (at 70°C for 30 min). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of steviol glycosides in the extracts obtained were performed using high performance liquid chromatography. Total phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and radical scavenging capacity by 2, 2-azino-di-3-ethylbenzothialozine- sulphonic acid) assay were also determined. The highest content of steviol glycosides, total phenolic compounds, and flavonoids in stevia extracts were obtained when ultrasound assisted extraction was used. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was correlated with the total amount of phenolic compounds. The results indicated that the examined sonication parameters represented as the probe diameter (7 and 22 mm) and treatment time (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min) significantly contributed to the yield of steviol glycosides, total phenolic compounds, and flavonoids. The optimum conditions for the maximum yield of steviol glycosides, total phenolic compounds, and flavonoids were as follows: extraction time 10 min, probe diameter 22 mm, and temperature 81.2°C.

  5. Read buffer optimizations to support compiler-assisted multiple instruction retry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alewine, N. J.; Fuchs, W. K.; Hwu, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple instruction retry is a recovery mechanism for transient processor faults. We previously developed a compiler-assisted approach to multiple instruction ferry in which a read buffer of size 2N (where N represents the maximum instruction rollback distance) was used to resolve some data hazards while the compiler resolved the remaining hazards. The compiler-assisted scheme was shown to reduce the performance overhead and/or hardware complexity normally associated with hardware-only retry schemes. This paper examines the size and design of the read buffer. We establish a practical lower bound and average size requirement for the read buffer by modifying the scheme to save only the data required for rollback. The study measures the effect on the performance of a DECstation 3100 running ten application programs using six read buffer configurations with varying read buffer sizes. Two alternative configurations are shown to be the most efficient and differed depending on whether split-cycle-saves are assumed. Up to a 55 percent read buffer size reduction is achievable with an average reduction of 39 percent given the most efficient read buffer configuration and a variety of applications.

  6. Optimization of ion assist beam deposition of magnesium oxide template films during initial nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, James R; Matias, Vladimir; Stan, Liliana; De Paula, Raymond F; Hammond, Robert H; Clemens, Bruce M

    2010-01-01

    Recent efforts in investigating the mechanism of ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) of biaxially textured thin films of magnesium oxide (MgO) template layers have shown that the texture develops suddenly during the initial 2 nm of deposition. To help understand and tune the behavior during this initial stage, we pre-deposited thin layers of MgO with no ion assist prior to IBAD growth of MgO. We found that biaxial texture develops for pre-deposited thicknesses < 2 nm, and that the thinnest layer tested, at 1 nm, resulted in the best qualitative RHEED image, indicative of good biaxial texture development. The texture developed during IBAD growth on the 1.5 nm pre-deposited layer is slightly worse and IBAD growth on the 2 nm pre-deposited layer produces a fiber texture. Application of these layers on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} starting surface, which has been shown to impede texture development, improves the overall quality of the IBAD MgO and has some of the characteristics of a biaxially texture RHEED pattern. It is suggested that the use of thin (<2 nm) pre-deposited layers may eliminate the need for bed layers like Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} that are currently thought to be required for proper biaxial texture development in IBAD MgO.

  7. Industrial SO2 emission monitoring through a portable multichannel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youwen; Liu, Cheng; Xie, Pinhua; Hartl, Andreas; Chan, Kalok; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Qin, Min; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-03-01

    SO2 variability over a large concentration range and interferences from other gases have been major limitations in industrial SO2 emission monitoring. This study demonstrates accurate industrial SO2 emission monitoring through a portable multichannel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm. The proposed analyzer features a large dynamic measurement range and correction of interferences from other coexisting infrared absorbers such as NO, CO, CO2, NO2, CH4, HC, N2O, and H2O. The multichannel gas analyzer measures 11 different wavelength channels simultaneously to correct several major problems of an infrared gas analyzer including system drift, conflict of sensitivity, interferences among different infrared absorbers, and limitation of measurement range. The optimized algorithm uses a third polynomial instead of a constant factor to quantify gas-to-gas interference. Measurement results show good performance in the linear and nonlinear ranges, thereby solving the problem that the conventional interference correction is restricted by the linearity of the intended and interfering channels. The results imply that the measurement range of the developed multichannel analyzer can be extended to the nonlinear absorption region. The measurement range and accuracy are evaluated through experimental laboratory calibration. Excellent agreement was achieved, with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.99977 with a measurement range from approximately 5 to 10 000 ppmv and a measurement error of less than 2 %. The instrument was also deployed for field measurement. Emissions from three different factories were measured. The emissions of these factories have been characterized by different coexisting infrared absorbers, covering a wide range of concentration levels. We compared our measurements with commercial SO2 analyzers. Overall, good agreement was achieved.

  8. COMETBOARDS Can Optimize the Performance of a Wave-Rotor-Topped Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.

    1997-01-01

    A wave rotor, which acts as a high-technology topping spool in gas turbine engines, can increase the effective pressure ratio as well as the turbine inlet temperature in such engines. The wave rotor topping, in other words, may significantly enhance engine performance by increasing shaft horse power while reducing specific fuel consumption. This performance enhancement requires optimum selection of the wave rotor's adjustable parameters for speed, surge margin, and temperature constraints specified on different engine components. To examine the benefit of the wave rotor concept in engine design, researchers soft coupled NASA Lewis Research Center's multidisciplinary optimization tool COMETBOARDS and the NASA Engine Performance Program (NEPP) analyzer. The COMETBOARDS-NEPP combined design tool has been successfully used to optimize wave-rotor-topped engines. For illustration, the design of a subsonic gas turbine wave-rotor-enhanced engine with four ports for 47 mission points (which are specified by Mach number, altitude, and power-setting combinations) is considered. The engine performance analysis, constraints, and objective formulations were carried out through NEPP, and COMETBOARDS was used for the design optimization. So that the benefits that accrue from wave rotor enhancement could be examined, most baseline variables and constraints were declared to be passive, whereas important parameters directly associated with the wave rotor were considered to be active for the design optimization. The engine thrust was considered as the merit function. The wave rotor engine design, which became a sequence of 47 optimization subproblems, was solved successfully by using a cascade strategy available in COMETBOARDS. The graph depicts the optimum COMETBOARDS solutions for the 47 mission points, which were normalized with respect to standard results. As shown, the combined tool produced higher thrust for all mission points than did the other solution, with maximum benefits

  9. Comparison and improvements of optimization methods for gas emission source identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Denglong; Deng, Jianqiang; Zhang, Zaoxiao

    2013-12-01

    Identification of gas leakage source term is important for atmosphere safety. Optimization is one useful method to determine leakage source parameters. The performances of different optimization methods, including genetic algorithm (GA), simulated annealing (SA), pattern search (PS) method, Nelder-Mead simplex method (N-M simplex) and their hybrid optimization methods, were discussed. It was seen that GA-PS hybrid optimization has the best performance for location and source strength estimation while the hybrid methods with N-M simplex is the best one when time cost and robustness are added into consideration. Moreover, the performances of these optimization methods with different initial values, signal noise ratios (SNR), sensor numbers and sensor distribution forms were discussed. Further, experiment data test showed that the less deviation of forward simulation model from the real condition, the better performance of the source parameters determination method is. When two error correction coefficients were added to the Gaussian dispersion model, the accuracy of source strength and downwind distance estimation is increased. Other different cost functions were also applied to identify the source parameters. Finally, a new forward dispersion model based on radial basis function neural network and Gaussian model (Gaussian-RBF network) was presented and then it was applied to determine the leakage source parameters. The results showed that the performance of optimization method based on Gaussian-RBF network model is significantly improved, especially for location estimation. Therefore, the optimization method with a good selection of forward dispersion model and cost function will obtain a satisfactory estimation result.

  10. Response surface optimization of ultrasound-assisted polysaccharides extraction from pomegranate peel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cai-Ping; Zhai, Xi-Chuan; Li, Lin-Qiang; Wu, Xiao-Xia; Li, Bing

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasonic technique was employed to extract polysaccharides from pomegranate peel. The optimal conditions for ultrasonic extraction of pomegranate peel polysaccharide (PPP) were determined by response surface methodology. Box-Behnken design was applied to evaluate the effects of four independent variables (ratio of water to raw material, extraction time, extraction temperature, ultrasonic power) on the yield of PPP. The correlation analysis of mathematical-regression models indicated that quadratic polynomial model could be employed to optimize the ultrasonic extraction of PPP. The optimum extraction parameters were as follows: ratio of water to raw material, 24 ml/g; extraction time, 63 min; extraction temperature, 55°C; and ultrasonic power, 148 W. Under these conditions, the polysaccharide yield was 13.658 ± 0.133% for the pomegranate peel, which well matches with the predicted value. PMID:25660869

  11. Optimization and Technological Development Strategies of an Antimicrobial Extract from Achyrocline alata Assisted by Statistical Design

    PubMed Central

    Demarque, Daniel P.; Fitts, Sonia Maria F.; Boaretto, Amanda G.; da Silva, Júlio César Leite; Vieira, Maria C.; Franco, Vanessa N. P.; Teixeira, Caroline B.; Toffoli-Kadri, Mônica C.; Carollo, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Achyrocline alata, known as Jateí-ka-há, is traditionally used to treat several health problems, including inflammations and infections. This study aimed to optimize an active extract against Streptococcus mutans, the main bacteria that causes caries. The extract was developed using an accelerated solvent extraction and chemometric calculations. Factorial design and response surface methodologies were used to determine the most important variables, such as active compound selectivity. The standardized extraction recovered 99% of the four main compounds, gnaphaliin, helipyrone, obtusifolin and lepidissipyrone, which represent 44% of the extract. The optimized extract of A. alata has a MIC of 62.5 μg/mL against S. mutans and could be used in mouth care products. PMID:25710523

  12. A surrogate assisted evolutionary optimization method with application to the transonic airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrokhi, Ava; Jahangirian, Alireza

    2010-06-01

    A multi-layer perceptron neural network (NN) method is used for efficient estimation of the expensive objective functions in the evolutionary optimization with the genetic algorithm (GA). The estimation capability of the NN is improved by dynamic retraining using the data from successive generations. In addition, the normal distribution of the training data variables is used to determine well-trained parts of the design space for the NN approximation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by two transonic airfoil design problems considering inviscid and viscous flow solvers. Results are compared with those of the simple GA and an alternative surrogate method. The total number of flow solver calls is reduced by about 40% using this fitness approximation technique, which in turn reduces the total computational time without influencing the convergence rate of the optimization algorithm. The accuracy of the NN estimation is considerably improved using the normal distribution approach compared with the alternative method.

  13. Optimization and technological development strategies of an antimicrobial extract from Achyrocline alata assisted by statistical design.

    PubMed

    Demarque, Daniel P; Fitts, Sonia Maria F; Boaretto, Amanda G; da Silva, Júlio César Leite; Vieira, Maria C; Franco, Vanessa N P; Teixeira, Caroline B; Toffoli-Kadri, Mônica C; Carollo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Achyrocline alata, known as Jateí-ka-há, is traditionally used to treat several health problems, including inflammations and infections. This study aimed to optimize an active extract against Streptococcus mutans, the main bacteria that causes caries. The extract was developed using an accelerated solvent extraction and chemometric calculations. Factorial design and response surface methodologies were used to determine the most important variables, such as active compound selectivity. The standardized extraction recovered 99% of the four main compounds, gnaphaliin, helipyrone, obtusifolin and lepidissipyrone, which represent 44% of the extract. The optimized extract of A. alata has a MIC of 62.5 μg/mL against S. mutans and could be used in mouth care products. PMID:25710523

  14. Fast surrogate-assisted simulation-driven optimization of compact microwave hybrid couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgan, Piotr; Koziel, Slawomir

    2016-07-01

    This work presents a robust methodology for expedited simulation-driven design optimization of compact microwave hybrid couplers. The technique relies on problem decomposition, and a bottom-up design strategy, starting from the level of basic building blocks of the coupler, and finishing with a tuning procedure that exploits a fast surrogate model of the entire structure. The latter is constructed by cascading local response surface approximations of coupler elementary elements. The cross-coupling effects within the structure are neglected in the first stage of the design process; however, they are accounted for in the tuning phase by means of space-mapping correction of the surrogate. The proposed approach is demonstrated through the design of a compact rat-race and two branch-line couplers. In all cases, the computational cost of the optimization process is very low and corresponds to just a few high-fidelity electromagnetic simulations of respective structures. Experimental validation is also provided.

  15. MULTI-SCALE MODELING AND APPROXIMATION ASSISTED OPTIMIZATION OF BARE TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bacellar, Daniel; Ling, Jiazhen; Aute, Vikrant; Radermacher, Reinhard; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers are very common in air-conditioning, heat pump and refrigeration applications. In these heat exchangers, there is a great benefit in terms of size, weight, refrigerant charge and heat transfer coefficient, by moving from conventional channel sizes (~ 9mm) to smaller channel sizes (< 5mm). This work investigates new designs for air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers with tube outer diameter ranging from 0.5 to 2.0mm. The goal of this research is to develop and optimize the design of these heat exchangers and compare their performance with existing state of the art designs. The air-side performance of various tube bundle configurations are analyzed using a Parallel Parameterized CFD (PPCFD) technique. PPCFD allows for fast-parametric CFD analyses of various geometries with topology change. Approximation techniques drastically reduce the number of CFD evaluations required during optimization. Maximum Entropy Design method is used for sampling and Kriging method is used for metamodeling. Metamodels are developed for the air-side heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop as a function of tube-bundle dimensions and air velocity. The metamodels are then integrated with an air-to-refrigerant heat exchanger design code. This integration allows a multi-scale analysis of air-side performance heat exchangers including air-to-refrigerant heat transfer and phase change. Overall optimization is carried out using a multi-objective genetic algorithm. The optimal designs found can exhibit 50 percent size reduction, 75 percent decrease in air side pressure drop and doubled air heat transfer coefficients compared to a high performance compact micro channel heat exchanger with same capacity and flow rates.

  16. Optimization of ultrasonic assisted continuous production of biodiesel using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, M; Ghobadian, B; Barzegar, M; Banakar, A

    2015-11-01

    This paper evaluates and optimizes the continuous production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil. In this research work, methanol and potassium hydroxide were used as catalyst engaging response surface methodology. For this purpose, the central composite experimental design (CCED), the effects of various factors such as irradiation distance, probe diameter, ultrasonic amplitude, vibration pulse and material flow into the reactor on reaction yield were studied to optimize the process. The results showed that all of the considered parameters affect the reaction efficiency significantly. The optimum combination of the findings include: irradiation distance which was 75 mm, probe diameter of 28 mm, ultrasonic amplitude of 56%, vibration pulse of 62% and flow rate of 50 ml/min that caused the reaction yield of 91.6% and energy consumption of 102.8 W. To verify this optimized combination, three tests were carried out. The results showed an average efficiency of 91.12% and 102.4 W power consumption which is well matched with the model's predictions. PMID:26186820

  17. Optimal integration strategies for a syngas fuelled SOFC and gas turbine hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yingru; Sadhukhan, Jhuma; Lanzini, Andrea; Brandon, Nigel; Shah, Nilay

    This article aims to develop a thermodynamic modelling and optimization framework for a thorough understanding of the optimal integration of fuel cell, gas turbine and other components in an ambient pressure SOFC-GT hybrid power plant. This method is based on the coupling of a syngas-fed SOFC model and an associated irreversible GT model, with an optimization algorithm developed using MATLAB to efficiently explore the range of possible operating conditions. Energy and entropy balance analysis has been carried out for the entire system to observe the irreversibility distribution within the plant and the contribution of different components. Based on the methodology developed, a comprehensive parametric analysis has been performed to explore the optimum system behavior, and predict the sensitivity of system performance to the variations in major design and operating parameters. The current density, operating temperature, fuel utilization and temperature gradient of the fuel cell, as well as the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio of the gas turbine cycle, together with three parameters related to the heat transfer between subsystems are all set to be controllable variables. Other factors affecting the hybrid efficiency have been further simulated and analysed. The model developed is able to predict the performance characteristics of a wide range of hybrid systems potentially sizing from 2000 to 2500 W m -2 with efficiencies varying between 50% and 60%. The analysis enables us to identify the system design tradeoffs, and therefore to determine better integration strategies for advanced SOFC-GT systems.

  18. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  19. Stochastic modelling of turbulent combustion for design optimization of gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehanna Ismail, Mohammed Ali

    The present work covers the development and the implementation of an efficient algorithm for the design optimization of gas turbine combustors. The purpose is to explore the possibilities and indicate constructive suggestions for optimization techniques as alternative methods for designing gas turbine combustors. The algorithm is general to the extent that no constraints are imposed on the combustion phenomena or on the combustor configuration. The optimization problem is broken down into two elementary problems: the first is the optimum search algorithm, and the second is the turbulent combustion model used to determine the combustor performance parameters. These performance parameters constitute the objective and physical constraints in the optimization problem formulation. The examination of both turbulent combustion phenomena and the gas turbine design process suggests that the turbulent combustion model represents a crucial part of the optimization algorithm. The basic requirements needed for a turbulent combustion model to be successfully used in a practical optimization algorithm are discussed. In principle, the combustion model should comply with the conflicting requirements of high fidelity, robustness and computational efficiency. To that end, the problem of turbulent combustion is discussed and the current state of the art of turbulent combustion modelling is reviewed. According to this review, turbulent combustion models based on the composition PDF transport equation are found to be good candidates for application in the present context. However, these models are computationally expensive. To overcome this difficulty, two different models based on the composition PDF transport equation were developed: an improved Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF algorithm and the generalized stochastic reactor model. Improvements in the Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF model performance and its computational efficiency were achieved through the

  20. Sensitive determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in water samples by ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction prior to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Ariel R; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2010-06-15

    A novel application of an ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) technique is proposed for the extraction and preconcentration of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) from water samples prior to its determination by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). USAEME employs a non-polar high-density solvent (extractant solvent), which forms an oil-in-water emulsion (O/W) in the aqueous sample bulk assisted by ultrasonic radiation. Several factors including, solvent type and volume, extraction time, extraction temperature, shaking mode and matrix modifiers were studied and optimized over the relative recovery of the target analyte. An aliquot of 5mL water sample was conditioned by adding 150microL 6.15molL(-1) sodium chloride and 300microL 0.05molL(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 6), and finally extracted with 40microL chloroform by using USAEME technique. Under the optimal experimental conditions 2,4,6-TCA was quantitatively extracted achieving an enrichment factor (EF) of 555. The detection limit (LOD), calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), was 0.2ngL(-1) and the RSD was 6.3% (n=5) when 1ngL(-1) 2,4,6-TCA standard mixture was analyzed. The coefficients of estimation of the calibration curves obtained following the proposed methodology was >or=0.997 and the linear working range was 1-5000ngL(-1). Finally, the proposed technique was successfully applied for extraction and determination of the 2,4,6-TCA in water samples. Recovery studies lead values >or=94%, which showed a successfully robustness of the analytical methodology for determination of nanogram per liter of 2,4,6-TCA in water samples. PMID:20441935

  1. Determination of volatile nitrosamines in meat products by microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Martínez-Castillo, Nelson; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were evaluated for use in the extraction and preconcentration of volatile nitrosamines in meat products. Parameters affecting MAE, such as the extraction solvent used, and DLLME, including the nature and volume of the extracting and disperser solvents, extraction time, salt addition and centrifugation time, were optimized. In the MAE method, 0.25g of sample mass was extracted in 10mL NaOH (0.05M) in a closed-vessel system. For DLLME, 1.5mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 20μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by syringe into 5mL of the sample extract solution (previously adjusted to pH 6), thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and a volume of 3μL of the sedimented phase was analyzed by GC-MS. The enrichment factors provided by DLLME varied from 220 to 342 for N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosopiperidine, respectively. The matrix effect was evaluated for different samples, and it was concluded that sample quantification can be carried out by aqueous calibration. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits ranged from 0.003 to 0.014ngmL(-1) for NPIP and NMEA, respectively (0.12-0.56ngg(-1) in the meat products). PMID:21376329

  2. Evaluation of the contamination of spirits by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of twelve polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), included in the list of priority pollutants, in different spirits has been obtained by means of a rapid and sensitive method based on gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The environmentally friendly ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) technique allowed the easy and effective preconcentration of the PAHs from the sample matrices. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the nature and volume of the extractant solvent, and the addition of salt, as well as the sonication parameters were investigated and optimized. The absence of matrix effects under the optimized conditions allowed the sample quantification against aqueous standards. Detection limits ranged between 1.8 and 6.3 ng L(-1), depending on the compound. Different spirit samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, and contents of up to 0.9 μg L(-1) were found. Relative recoveries at fortified levels of 0.2 and 1 μg L(-1) were in the range 84-118%. PMID:26212977

  3. Rapid determination of alkylphenols in aqueous samples by in situ acetylation and microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Pei; Wang, Yu-Chen; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-08-01

    A rapid and solvent-free procedure for the determination of 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol isomers in aqueous samples is described. The method involves in-situ acetylation and microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction prior to their determination using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry operated in the selected ion storage mode. The dual experimental protocols to evaluate the effects of various derivatization and extraction parameters were investigated and the conditions optimized. Under optimized conditions, 300 μL of acetic anhydride mixed with 1 g of potassium hydrogencarbonate and 2 g of sodium chloride in a 20 mL aqueous sample were efficiently extracted by a 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber that was located in the headspace when the system was microwave irradiated at 80 W for 5 min. The limits of quantitation were 5 and 50 ng/L for 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol isomers, respectively. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations, were less than 8% for both intra- and inter-day analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 74 to 88%. A standard addition method was used to quantitate 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol isomers, and the concentrations ranged from 120 to 930 ng/L in various environmental water samples. PMID:22899640

  4. Optimization of Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction of Flavonoid Compounds and Antioxidants from Alfalfa Using Response Surface Method.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chang-Liang; Dong, Xiao-Fang; Tong, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) was used to extract flavonoid-enriched antioxidants from alfalfa aerial part. Response surface methodology (RSM), based on a four-factor, five-level central composite design (CCD), was employed to obtain the optimal extraction parameters, in which the flavonoid content was maximum and the antioxidant activity of the extracts was strongest. Radical scavenging capacity of the extracts, which represents the amounts of antioxidants in alfalfa, was determined by using 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonicacid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) methods. The results showed good fit with the proposed models for the total flavonoid extraction (R² = 0.9849), for the antioxidant extraction assayed by ABTS method (R² = 0.9764), and by DPPH method (R² = 0.9806). Optimized extraction conditions for total flavonoids was a ratio of liquid to solid of 57.16 mL/g, 62.33 °C, 57.08 min, and 52.14% ethanol. The optimal extraction parameters of extracts for the highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was a ratio of liquid to solid 60.3 mL/g, 54.56 °C, 45.59 min, and 46.67% ethanol, and by ABTS assay was a ratio of liquid to solid 47.29 mL/g, 63.73 °C, 51.62 min, and 60% ethanol concentration. Our work offers optimal extraction conditions for total flavonoids and antioxidants from alfalfa. PMID:26343617

  5. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction for six inorganic and organic arsenic species in chicken tissues using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2015-09-01

    Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the parameters for microwave-assisted extraction of six major inorganic and organic arsenic species (As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone) from chicken tissues, followed by detection using a high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry detection method, which allows the simultaneous analysis of both inorganic and organic arsenic species in the extract in a single run. Effects of extraction medium, solution pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and the temperature and time of microwave-assisted extraction on the extraction of the targeted arsenic species were studied. The optimum microwave-assisted extraction conditions were: 100 mg of chicken tissue, extracted by 5 mL of 22% v/v methanol, 90 mmol/L (NH4 )2 HPO4 , and 0.07% v/v trifluoroacetic acid (with pH adjusted to 10.0 by ammonium hydroxide solution), ramping for 10 min to 71°C, and holding for 11 min. The method has good extraction performance for total arsenic in the spiked and nonspiked chicken tissues (104.0 ± 13.8% and 91.6 ± 7.8%, respectively), except for the ones with arsenic contents close to the quantitation limits. Limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) for As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone in chicken tissues using this method were 0.012, 0.058, 0.039, 0.061, 0.102, and 0.240 mg/kg (dry weight), respectively. PMID:26106064

  6. Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Morphine from Capsules of Papaver somniferum by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bulduk, Ibrahim; Gezer, Bahdışen; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, amount of morphine from poppy capsules (Papaver somniferum) was investigated using ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE). Response surface methodology was used to estimate effective experimental conditions on the content extraction of poppy capsules. For this purpose, solvent/solid ratio (10–20 mL/500 mg sample), pH (1–13), time (30–60 min), and temperature (30–50°C) were chosen as experimental variables. The affected response is extraction recovery values for morphine from poppy straw. For interpreting the relationship between experimental factors and response, a design table was established with combinations of three different concentrations levels of this compound in 29 trials. The second order quadratic model gave a satisfactory description of the experimental data. In our study, R-Squared (0.96), Adj-R-Squared (0.92), and Pred R-Squared (0.78) values for extraction yield display good accuracy of the derived model. The predicted optimal conditions for the highest morphine level (3.38 mg morphine/500 mg-sample) were found at 19.99 mL solvent/500 mg solid ratio, 59.94 min extraction time, 1.10 pH, and 42.36°C temperature. In the optimal extraction conditions, the experimental values are very close to the predicted values. Consequently, the response surface modeling can be achieved sufficiently to predict extraction yield from poppy straw by ultrasound assisted extraction. PMID:25861273

  7. Employing response surface methodology for the optimization of ultrasound assisted extraction of lutein and β-carotene from spinach.

    PubMed

    Altemimi, Ammar; Lightfoot, David A; Kinsel, Mary; Watson, Dennis G

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of lutein and β-carotene from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves is important to the dietary supplement industry. A Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology (RSM) were used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of lutein and β-carotene from spinach. Three independent variables, extraction temperature (°C), extraction power (%) and extraction time (min) were studied. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) followed by UV visualization and densitometry was used as a simple and rapid method for both identification and quantification of lutein and β-carotene during UAE. Methanol extracts of leaves from spinach and authentic standards of lutein and β-carotene were separated by normal-phase TLC with ethyl acetate-acetone (5:4 (v/v)) as the mobile phase. In this study, the combination of TLC, densitometry, and Box-Behnken with RSM methods were effective for the quantitative analysis of lutein and β-carotene from spinach extracts. The resulting quadratic polynomial models for optimizing lutein and β-carotene from spinach had high coefficients of determination of 0.96 and 0.94, respectively. The optimal UAE settings for output of lutein and β-carotene simultaneously from spinach extracts were an extraction temperature of 40 °C, extraction power of 40% (28 W/cm3) and extraction time of 16 min. The identity and purity of each TLC spot was measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Therefore, UAE assisted extraction of carotenes from spinach can provide a source of lutein and β-carotene for the dietary supplement industry. PMID:25875040

  8. Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Morphine from Capsules of Papaver somniferum by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Bulduk, Ibrahim; Gezer, Bahdışen; Cengiz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, amount of morphine from poppy capsules (Papaver somniferum) was investigated using ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE). Response surface methodology was used to estimate effective experimental conditions on the content extraction of poppy capsules. For this purpose, solvent/solid ratio (10-20 mL/500 mg sample), pH (1-13), time (30-60 min), and temperature (30-50°C) were chosen as experimental variables. The affected response is extraction recovery values for morphine from poppy straw. For interpreting the relationship between experimental factors and response, a design table was established with combinations of three different concentrations levels of this compound in 29 trials. The second order quadratic model gave a satisfactory description of the experimental data. In our study, R-Squared (0.96), Adj-R-Squared (0.92), and Pred R-Squared (0.78) values for extraction yield display good accuracy of the derived model. The predicted optimal conditions for the highest morphine level (3.38 mg morphine/500 mg-sample) were found at 19.99 mL solvent/500 mg solid ratio, 59.94 min extraction time, 1.10 pH, and 42.36°C temperature. In the optimal extraction conditions, the experimental values are very close to the predicted values. Consequently, the response surface modeling can be achieved sufficiently to predict extraction yield from poppy straw by ultrasound assisted extraction. PMID:25861273

  9. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  10. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Sloan W.; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511