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Sample records for association scan reveals

  1. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  2. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  3. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  4. Genomewide Scan Reveals Association of Psoriasis with IL-23 and NF-κB Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajan P.; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Helms, Cindy; Ding, Jun; Stuart, Philip E.; Goldgar, David; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Li, Yun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Feng, Bing Jian; Ruether, Andreas; Schreiber, Stefan; Weichenthal, Michael; Gladman, Dafna; Rahman, Proton; Schrodi, Steven J.; Prahalad, Sampath; Guthery, Stephen L; Fischer, Judith; Liao, Wilson; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Menter, Alan; Lathrop, G. Mark; Wise, Carol A.; Begovich, Ann B.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Krueger, Gerald G.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common immune mediated disorder that affects the skin, nails, and joints. To identify psoriasis susceptibility loci, we genotyped 438,670 SNPs in 1,409 European ancestry psoriasis cases and 1,436 controls. Twenty-one promising SNPs were followed-up in 5,048 psoriasis cases and 5,041 controls. Our results provide strong support for the association of at least seven genetic loci and psoriasis (each with p < 5×10−8 overall). Loci with confirmed association encode HLA-C, three genes involved in IL-23 signaling (IL23A, IL23R, IL12B), two genes that act downstream of TNF-α and regulate NF-κB signaling (TNIP1, TNFAIP3), and two genes involved in the modulation of Th2 immune responses (IL4, IL13). Although the proteins encoded in these loci are known to interact biologically, we found no evidence for epistasis between associated SNPs. Our results expand the catalog of genetic loci implicated in psoriasis susceptibility and suggest priority targets for study in other auto-immune disorders. PMID:19169254

  5. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  6. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  7. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  8. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  9. A Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Scan Reveals Novel Loci for Hypertension and Blood Pressure Traits

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youling; Tomlinson, Brian; Chu, Tanya; Fang, Yu Jing; Gui, Hongsheng; Tang, Clara S.; Yip, Benjamin H.; Cherny, Stacey S.; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Sham, Pak Chung; Lam, Tai Hing; Thomas, Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is caused by the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The condition which is very common, with about 18% of the adult Hong Kong Chinese population and over 50% of older individuals affected, is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. To identify genes influencing hypertension and blood pressure, we conducted a combined linkage and association study using over 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 328 individuals comprising 111 hypertensive probands and their siblings. Using a family-based association test, we found an association with SNPs on chromosome 5q31.1 (rs6596140; P<9×10−8) for hypertension. One candidate gene, PDC, was replicated, with rs3817586 on 1q31.1 attaining P = 2.5×10−4 and 2.9×10−5 in the within-family tests for DBP and MAP, respectively. We also identified regions of significant linkage for systolic and diastolic blood pressure on chromosomes 2q22 and 5p13, respectively. Further family-based association analysis of the linkage peak on chromosome 5 yielded a significant association (rs1605685, P<7×10−5) for DBP. This is the first combined linkage and association study of hypertension and its related quantitative traits with Chinese ancestry. The associations reported here account for the action of common variants whereas the discovery of linkage regions may point to novel targets for rare variant screening. PMID:22384028

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Scan on the Levels of Markers of Inflammation in Sardinians Reveals Associations That Underpin Its Complex Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Naitza, Silvia; Porcu, Eleonora; Steri, Maristella; Taub, Dennis D.; Mulas, Antonella; Xiao, Xiang; Strait, James; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Usala, Gianluca; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Pitzalis, Maristella; Loi, Alessia; Virdis, Francesca; Piras, Roberta; Deidda, Francesca; Whalen, Michael B.; Crisponi, Laura; Concas, Antonio; Podda, Carlo; Uzzau, Sergio; Scheet, Paul; Longo, Dan L.; Lakatta, Edward; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Cao, Antonio; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the genes that influence levels of pro-inflammatory molecules can help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this process. We first conducted a two-stage genome-wide association scan (GWAS) for the key inflammatory biomarkers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), the general measure of inflammation erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in a large cohort of individuals from the founder population of Sardinia. By analysing 731,213 autosomal or X chromosome SNPs and an additional ∼1.9 million imputed variants in 4,694 individuals, we identified several SNPs associated with the selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and replicated all the top signals in an independent sample of 1,392 individuals from the same population. Next, to increase power to detect and resolve associations, we further genotyped the whole cohort (6,145 individuals) for 293,875 variants included on the ImmunoChip and MetaboChip custom arrays. Overall, our combined approach led to the identification of 9 genome-wide significant novel independent signals—5 of which were identified only with the custom arrays—and provided confirmatory evidence for an additional 7. Novel signals include: for IL-6, in the ABO gene (rs657152, p = 2.13×10−29); for ESR, at the HBB (rs4910472, p = 2.31×10−11) and UCN119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 8.91×10−10) loci; for MCP-1, near its receptor CCR2 (rs17141006, p = 7.53×10−13) and in CADM3 (rs3026968, p = 7.63×10−13); for hsCRP, within the CRP gene (rs3093077, p = 5.73×10−21), near DARC (rs3845624, p = 1.43×10−10), UNC119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 1.50×10−14), and ICOSLG/AIRE (rs113459440, p = 1.54×10−08) loci. Confirmatory evidence was found for IL-6 in the IL-6R gene (rs4129267); for ESR at CR1 (rs12567990) and TMEM57 (rs10903129); for MCP-1 at DARC (rs12075); and for hsCRP at CRP (rs1205), HNF1A (rs225918), and APOC-I (rs

  11. Graphene grain boundary resistivity revealed by scanning tunneling potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Corentin; Clark, Kendal W.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Li, An-Ping; Oak Ridge National Lab Team

    2014-03-01

    All large-scale graphene films contain extended topological defects dividing graphene into domains or grains. Here, we study grain boundary (GB) resistivity in CVD graphene on Cu subsequently transferred to a SiO2 substrate. By using a scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) setup with a cryogenic four-probe STM, the spatial variation of the local electrochemical potential is resolved across individual GBs on a graphene surface in the presence of a current. The 2D distributions of electric field and conductivity were then numerically extracted by solving conduction equations. The derived conductivity of individual grains was compared to that measured with microscopic four-probe STM method to provide a model-independent determination of conductivity map for specific type of defect in graphene. The resistance of a GB is found to change with the width of the disordered transition region between adjacent grains. A quantitative modeling of boundary resistance reveals the increased electron Fermi wave vector within the boundary region, possibly due to boundary induced charge density variation.

  12. Ancient Pb and Ti mobilization revealed by Scanning Ion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiak, Monika A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.

    2014-05-01

    Zircons from strongly layered early Archean ortho- and paragneisses in ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic rocks of the Napier Complex, Enderby Land, East Antarctica are characterized by complex U-Th-Pb systematics [1,2,3]. A large number of zircons from three samples, Gage Ridge, Mount Sones and Dallwitz Nunatak, are reversely discordant (U/Pb ages older than 207Pb/206Pb ages) with the oldest date of 3.9 Ga [4] (for the grain from Gage Ridge orthogneiss). To further investigate this process, we utilized a novel high spatial resolution Scanning Ion Imaging technique on the CAMECA IMS 1280 at the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. Areas of 70 μm x 70 μm were selected for imaging in mono- and multicollection modes using a ~2 μm rastered primary beam to map out the distribution of 48Ti, 89Y, 180Hf, 232Th, 238U, 204Pb, 206Pb and 207Pb. The ion maps reveal variable distribution of certain elements within analysed grains that can be compared to their CL response. Yttrium, together with U and Th, exhibits zonation visible on the CL images, Hf shows expected minimal variation. Unusual patchiness is visible in the map for Ti and Pb distribution. The bright patches with enhanced signal do not correspond to any zones or to crystal imperfections (e.g. cracks). The presence of patchy titanium is likely to affect Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and patchy Pb affecting 207Pb/206Pb ages, usually considered as more robust for Archean zircons. Using the WinImage program, we produced 207Pb/206Pb ratio maps that allow calculation of 207Pb/206Pb ages for spots of any size within the frame of the picture and at any time after data collection. This provides a new and unique method for obtaining age information from zircon. These maps show areas of enhanced brightness where the 207Pb/206Pb ratio is higher and demonstrate that within these small areas (μm scale) the apparent 207Pb/206Pb age is older, in some of these patches even > 4 Ga. These data are a result of ancient Pb

  13. Genome Scan, Fine-Mapping, and Candidate Gene Analysis of Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate Reveals Phenotype-Specific Differences in Linkage and Association Results

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Field, L.Leigh; Maher, Brion S.; Goldstein McHenry, Toby; Cooper, Margaret E.; Govil, Manika; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Riley, Bridget; Jugessur, Astanand; Felix, Temis; Morene, Lina; Mansilla, M.Adela; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Doheny, Kim; Pugh, Elizabeth; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Non-syndromic orofacial clefts, i.e. cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP), are among the most common birth defects. The goal of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes for CL with or without CP (CL/P). Methods We performed linkage analyses of a 10 cM genome scan in 820 multiplex CL/P families (6,565 individuals). Significant linkage results were followed by association analyses of 1,476 SNPs in candidate genes and regions, utilizing a weighted false discovery rate (wFDR) approach to control for multiple testing and incorporate the genome scan results. Results Significant (multipoint HLOD ≥3.2) or genome-wide-significant (HLOD ≥4.02) linkage results were found for regions 1q32, 2p13, 3q27-28, 9q21, 12p11, 14q21-24 and 16q24. SNPs in IRF6 (1q32) and in or near FOXE1 (9q21) reached formal genome-wide wFDR-adjusted significance. Further, results were phenotype dependent in that the IRF6 region results were most significant for families in which affected individuals have CL alone, and the FOXE1 region results were most significant in families in which some or all of the affected individuals have CL with CP. Conclusions These results highlight the importance of careful phenotypic delineation in large samples of families for genetic analyses of complex, heterogeneous traits such as CL/P. PMID:19521098

  14. Family-based association tests for genomewide association scans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Min; Abecasis, Goncalo R

    2007-11-01

    With millions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified and characterized, genomewide association studies have begun to identify susceptibility genes for complex traits and diseases. These studies involve the characterization and analysis of very-high-resolution SNP genotype data for hundreds or thousands of individuals. We describe a computationally efficient approach to testing association between SNPs and quantitative phenotypes, which can be applied to whole-genome association scans. In addition to observed genotypes, our approach allows estimation of missing genotypes, resulting in substantial increases in power when genotyping resources are limited. We estimate missing genotypes probabilistically using the Lander-Green or Elston-Stewart algorithms and combine high-resolution SNP genotypes for a subset of individuals in each pedigree with sparser marker data for the remaining individuals. We show that power is increased whenever phenotype information for ungenotyped individuals is included in analyses and that high-density genotyping of just three carefully selected individuals in a nuclear family can recover >90% of the information available if every individual were genotyped, for a fraction of the cost and experimental effort. To aid in study design, we evaluate the power of strategies that genotype different subsets of individuals in each pedigree and make recommendations about which individuals should be genotyped at a high density. To illustrate our method, we performed genomewide association analysis for 27 gene-expression phenotypes in 3-generation families (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain pedigrees), in which genotypes for ~860,000 SNPs in 90 grandparents and parents are complemented by genotypes for ~6,700 SNPs in a total of 168 individuals. In addition to increasing the evidence of association at 15 previously identified cis-acting associated alleles, our genotype-inference algorithm allowed us to identify associated alleles at 4

  15. Temperature-scan cryocrystallography reveals reaction intermediates in bacteriophytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhong; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2012-03-27

    Light is a fundamental signal that regulates important physiological processes such as development and circadian rhythm in living organisms. Phytochromes form a major family of photoreceptors responsible for red light perception in plants, fungi and bacteria. They undergo reversible photoconversion between red-absorbing (Pr) and far-red-absorbing (Pfr) states, thereby ultimately converting a light signal into a distinct biological signal that mediates subsequent cellular responses. Several structures of microbial phytochromes have been determined in their dark-adapted Pr or Pfr states. However, the structural nature of initial photochemical events has not been characterized by crystallography. Here we report the crystal structures of three intermediates in the photoreaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome (PaBphP). We used cryotrapping crystallography to capture intermediates, and followed structural changes by scanning the temperature at which the photoreaction proceeded. Light-induced conformational changes in PaBphP originate in ring D of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore, and E-to-Z isomerization about the C{sub 15} = C{sub 16} double bond between rings C and D is the initial photochemical event. As the chromophore relaxes, the twist of the C{sub 15} methine bridge about its two dihedral angles is reversed. Structural changes extend further to rings B and A, and to the surrounding protein regions. These data indicate that absorption of a photon by the Pfr state of PaBphP converts a light signal into a structural signal via twisting and untwisting of the methine bridges in the linear tetrapyrrole within the confined protein cavity.

  16. Snow metamorphism as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominé, Florent; Lauzier, Thomas; Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Kuhs, Werner F; Techmer, Kirsten; Heinrichs, Till

    2003-09-01

    Current theories of snow metamorphism indicate that sublimating snow crystals have rounded shapes, while growing crystals have shapes that depend on growth rates. At slow growth rates, crystals are rounded. At moderate rates, they have flat faces with rounded edges. At fast growth rates, crystals have flat faces with sharp edges, and they have hollow faces at very fast growth rates. The main growth/sublimation mechanism is thought to be by the homogeneous nucleation of new layers at or near crystal edges. It was also suggested that the equilibrium shape of snow crystals would be temperature dependent: rounded above -10.5 degrees C, and faceted below. To test these paradigms, we have performed SEM investigations of snow samples having undergone metamorphism under natural conditions, and of snow samples subjected to isothermal metamorphism at -4 degrees and -15 degrees C in the laboratory. In general, current theories predicting crystal shapes as a function of growth rates, and of whether crystals are growing or sublimating, are verified. However, the transition in equilibrium shapes from rounded to faceted at -10.5 degrees C is not observed in our isothermal experiments that reveal a predominance of rounded shapes after more than a month of metamorphism at -4 and -15 degrees C. Some small crystals with flat faces that also have sharp angles at -15 degrees C, are observed in our isothermal experiments. These faces are newly formed, and contradict current theory. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain their occurrence. One is that they are due to sublimation at emerging dislocations. PMID:12938116

  17. FeatureScan: revealing property-dependent similarity of nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Deyneko, Igor V.; Bredohl, Björn; Wesely, Daniel; Kalybaeva, Yulia M.; Kel, Alexander E.; Blöcker, Helmut; Kauer, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    FeatureScan is a software package aiming to reveal novel types of DNA sequence similarity by comparing physico-chemical properties. Thirty-eight different parameters of DNA double strands such as charge, melting enthalpy, conformational parameters and the like are provided. As input FeatureScan requires two sequences, a pattern sequence and a target sequence, search conditions are set by selecting a specific DNA parameter and a threshold value. Search results are displayed in FASTA format and directly linked to external genome databases/browsers (ENSEMBL, NCBI, UCSC). An Internet version of FeatureScan is accessible at . As part of the HOBIT initiative () FeatureScan is also accessible as a web service at its above home page. Currently, several preloaded genomes are provided at this Internet website (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus and four strains of Escherichia coli) as target sequences. Standalone executables of FeatureScan are available on request. PMID:16845077

  18. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  19. Photoreceptor perturbation around subretinal drusenoid deposits revealed by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaolin; Rivero, Ernesto Blanco; Clark, Mark E; Witherspoon, Clark Douglas; Spaide, Richard F; Girkin, Christopher A.; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the microscopic structure of photoreceptors impacted by subretinal drusenoid deposits, also called pseudodrusen, an extracellular lesion associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Design Observational case series. Methods Fifty-three patients with AMD and 10 age-similar subjects in normal retinal health were recruited. All subjects underwent color fundus photography, infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subretinal drusenoid deposits were classified with a 3-stage OCT-based grading system. Lesions and surrounding photoreceptors were examined with AOSLO. Results Subretinal drusenoid deposits were found in 26 eyes of 13 patients with AMD and imaged by AOSLO and SD-OCT in 18 eyes (n=342 lesions). SD-OCT showed subretinal drusenoid deposits as highly reflective material accumulated internal to the retinal pigment epithelium. AOSLO revealed that photoreceptor reflectivity was qualitatively reduced by stage 1 subretinal drusenoid deposits and greatly reduced by stage 2. AOSLO presented a distinct structure in stage 3, a hyporeflective annulus consisting of deflected, degenerated or absent photoreceptors. A central core with a reflectivity superficially resembling photoreceptors is formed by the lesion material itself. A hyporeflective gap in the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone on either side of this core shown in SD-OCT corresponded to the hyporeflective annulus seen by AOSLO. Conclusions AOSLO and multimodal imaging of subretinal drusenoid deposits indicate solid, space filling lesions in the subretinal space. Associated retinal reflectivity changes are related to lesion stages and are consistent with perturbations to photoreceptors, as suggested by histology. PMID:24907433

  20. Single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    An, B.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Egashira, M.; Korai, Y.; Mochida, I.

    2001-06-04

    The electronic structure of a single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice has been revealed on an atomic scale by scanning tunneling microscopy. The pentagon is located at the apex of the conical protuberance of the graphitic particle. The enhanced charge density localized at each carbon atom in the pentagon is identified, and the ringlike pattern of the ({radical}3{times}{radical}3)R30{degree} superstructure of graphite is clearly observed around the pentagon. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  1. 75 FR 34482 - Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and Products..., associated software, and products containing the same by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S... certain biometric scanning devices, components thereof, associated software, or products containing...

  2. SCAN+

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  3. Dissociable Modulation of Overt Visual Attention in Valence and Arousal Revealed by Topology of Scan Path

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianguang; Jiang, Huihui; Jin, Yixiang; Chen, Nanhui; Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Zhengbo; Luo, Yuejia; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2011-01-01

    Emotional stimuli have evolutionary significance for the survival of organisms; therefore, they are attention-grabbing and are processed preferentially. The neural underpinnings of two principle emotional dimensions in affective space, valence (degree of pleasantness) and arousal (intensity of evoked emotion), have been shown to be dissociable in the olfactory, gustatory and memory systems. However, the separable roles of valence and arousal in scene perception are poorly understood. In this study, we asked how these two emotional dimensions modulate overt visual attention. Twenty-two healthy volunteers freely viewed images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) that were graded for affective levels of valence and arousal (high, medium, and low). Subjects' heads were immobilized and eye movements were recorded by camera to track overt shifts of visual attention. Algebraic graph-based approaches were introduced to model scan paths as weighted undirected path graphs, generating global topology metrics that characterize the algebraic connectivity of scan paths. Our data suggest that human subjects show different scanning patterns to stimuli with different affective ratings. Valence salient stimuli (with neutral arousal) elicited faster and larger shifts of attention, while arousal salient stimuli (with neutral valence) elicited local scanning, dense attention allocation and deep processing. Furthermore, our model revealed that the modulatory effect of valence was linearly related to the valence level, whereas the relation between the modulatory effect and the level of arousal was nonlinear. Hence, visual attention seems to be modulated by mechanisms that are separate for valence and arousal. PMID:21494331

  4. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  5. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone. PMID:25759085

  6. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model. PMID:26967146

  7. Sedimentary processes in Zenisu deep-sea channel revealed by side-scan imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shiguo; Guo, Junhua; Hidekazu, Tokuyama

    2005-12-01

    Side-scan sonar data collected by Cruises 99-09 Leg 2 and 00-06 Leg 1 of R/V Yokosuka were used to reveal the sedimentary processes in Zenisu deep-sea channel. The middle and lower segments of the channel are rich in turbidite and other debrite deposits. By high-resolution imaging, three sedimentary processes were distinguished with distinct acoustic features. 1. Slumps and slides occur with contrasting backscatter, rough surface textures, blockings, and acoustic shadows at head walls. They are very extensive and often in lobate form downslope. 2. Debris flow has uniform, general medium backscatter, sometimes showing marbling/lineation in lobate form. 3. Turbidity current is characterized by low backscatter confined to the channel as acoustic signal is attenuated. Regional tectonics must be the dominating factor that controls deposition pattern in this area.

  8. Dynamics of ribosome scanning and recycling revealed by translation complex profiling.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Regulation of messenger RNA translation is central to eukaryotic gene expression control. Regulatory inputs are specified by them RNA untranslated regions (UTRs) and often target translation initiation. Initiation involves binding of the 40S ribosomal small subunit (SSU) and associated eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs)near the mRNA 5′ cap; the SSU then scans in the 3′ direction until it detects the start codon and is joined by the 60S ribosomal large subunit (LSU) to form the 80S ribosome. Scanning and other dynamic aspects of the initiation model have remained as conjectures because methods to trap early intermediates were lacking. Here we uncover the dynamics of the complete translation cycle in live yeast cells using translation complex profile sequencing (TCP-seq), a method developed from the ribosome profiling approach. We document scanning by observing SSU footprints along 5′ UTRs. Scanning SSU have 5′-extended footprints (up to~75 nucleotides), indicative of additional interactions with mRNA emerging from the exit channel, promoting forward movement. We visualized changes in initiation complex conformation as SSU footprints coalesced into three major sizes at start codons (19, 29 and 37 nucleotides). These share the same 5′ start site but differ at the 3′ end, reflecting successive changes at the entry channel from an open to a closed state following start codon recognition. We also observe SSU 'lingering' at stop codons after LSU departure. Our results underpin mechanistic models of translation initiation and termination, built on decades of biochemical and structural investigation, with direct genome-wide in vivo evidence. Our approach captures ribosomal complexes at all phases of translation and will aid in studying translation dynamics in diverse cellular contexts. Dysregulation of translation is common in disease and, for example, SSU scanning is a target of anti-cancer drug development. TCP-seq will prove useful in discerning differences

  9. 75 FR 70290 - In the Matter of Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...''). 75 FR. 34482 (Jun. 17, 2010). Complainant Cross Match Technologies, Inc. of Palm Beach Gardens... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and... the United States after importation of certain biometric scanning devices, components...

  10. Evolutionary change driven by metal exposure as revealed by coding SNP genome scan in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Bélanger-Deschênes, Sébastien; Couture, Patrice; Campbell, Peter G C; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Pollution can drive rapid evolutionary change in wild populations. This study targets functional polymorphisms of chronically metal-contaminated wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A de novo transcriptome scan contrasted subsets of individuals from clean (n = 16) and contaminated (n = 16) lakes to identify 87 candidate annotated coding SNPs. Candidate genotypes and liver [metal] were obtained in 10 populations (n = 1,052) and a genome scan distinguished outliers: one nuclear (cyclin G1 gene) and two mitochondrial (cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes) also displaying allelic correlation to mean population [cadmium]. Whole mtDNA and 17 kb surrounding cyclin G1 were characterised through 454 sequencing thus revealing two non-synonymous substitutions involving dissimilar amino acids. Based on associated functions and inter-population differentiation, contaminated perch may have been selected for fast life cycle completion (p53 pathway) and memorization impairment mitigation (long-term potentiation pathway). In accordance with predicted evolutionary trajectory for stressed and energy deprived organisms, adapted perch would not compensate for repair mechanism inhibition, instead reallocating energy towards growth and favouring inexpensive impairment mitigation adaptations over costly detoxification. Overall, 85 years of selection could have driven rapid, potentially adaptive evolution by selecting alleles increasing perch fitness in polluted environments. PMID:23722603

  11. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology. PMID:24639675

  12. Anchoring structure of the calvarial periosteum revealed by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Shingo; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Uemura, Kei-ichiro; Togo, Akinobu; Yoshitomi, Munetake; Okayama, Satoko; Kusukawa, Jingo; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    An important consideration in regeneration therapy is the fact that the tissue surrounding an organ supports its function. Understanding the structure of the periosteum can contribute to more effective bone regeneration therapy. As a cellular source, the periosteum also assists bone growth and fracture healing; this further necessitates its direct contact with the bone. However, its anchoring strength appears to be inexplicably stronger than expected. In this study, we used focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography to investigate ultrathin serial sections as well as the three dimensional ultrastructure of the periosteum to clarify the architecture of its anchoring strength, as such assessments are challenging using conventional methods. We discovered perforating fibres that arise from the bone surface at 30 degree angles. Additionally, the fibres across the osteoblast layer were frequently interconnected to form a net-like structure. Fibroblast processes were observed extending into the perforating fibres; their morphologies were distinct from those of typical fibroblasts. Thus, our study revealed novel ultrastructures of the periosteum that support anchorage and serve as a cellular source as well as a mechanical stress transmitter. PMID:26627533

  13. BstYI bound to noncognate DNA reveals a "hemispecific" complex: implications for DNA scanning.

    PubMed

    Townson, Sharon A; Samuelson, James C; Bao, Yongming; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2007-04-01

    DNA recognition by proteins is essential for specific expression of genes in a living organism. En route to a target DNA site, a protein will often sample noncognate DNA sites through nonspecific protein-DNA interactions, resulting in a variety of conformationally different binding states. We present here the crystal structure of endonuclease BstYI bound to a noncognate DNA. Surprisingly, the structure reveals the enzyme in a "hemispecific" binding state on the pathway between nonspecific and specific recognition. A single base pair change in the DNA abolishes binding of only one monomer, with the second monomer bound specifically. We show that the enzyme binds essentially as a rigid body, and that one end of the DNA is accommodated loosely in the binding cleft while the other end is held tightly. Another intriguing feature of the structure is Ser172, which has a dual role in establishing nonspecific and specific contacts. Taken together, the structure provides a snapshot of an enzyme in a "paused" intermediate state that may be part of a more general mechanism of scanning DNA. PMID:17437717

  14. Irregular snow crystals: structural features as revealed by low temperature scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wergin, William P; Rango, Albert; Foster, James; Erbe, Eric F; Pooley, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, investigators using light microscopy have vaguely alluded to a unique type of snow crystal that has become known as an irregular snow crystal. However, the limited resolution and depth-of-field of the light microscope has prevented investigators from characterizing these crystals. In this study, a field-emission scanning electron microscope, equipped with a cold stage, was used to document the structural features, physical associations, and atmospheric metamorphosis of irregular snow crystals. The crystals appear as irregular hexagons, measuring 60 to 90 mm across, when viewed from the a-axis. Their length (c-axis) rarely exceeds the diameter. The irregular crystals are occasionally found as secondary particles on other larger forms of snow crystals; however, they most frequently occur in aggregates consisting of more than 100 irregular crystals. In the aggregates, the irregular crystals have their axes oriented parallel to one another and, collectively, tend to form columnar structures. Occasionally, these columnar structures exhibit rounded faces along one side, suggesting atmospheric metamorphoses during formation and descent. In extreme cases of metamorphoses, the aggregates would be difficult to distinguish from graupel. Frost, consisting of irregular crystals, has also been encountered, suggesting that atmospheric conditions that favor their growth can also occur terrestrially. PMID:12392356

  15. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  16. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  17. Genome-Wide Association Scan for Variants Associated with Early-Onset Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Ethan M.; Johnson, Anna M.; Wang, Yunfei; Zuhlke, Kimberly A.; Lu, Yurong; Ribado, Jessica V.; Keele, Gregory R.; Li, Jin; Duan, Qing; Li, Ge; Gao, Zhengrong; Li, Yun; Xu, Jianfeng; Isaacs, William B.; Zheng, Siqun; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related mortality for men in the United States. There is strong empirical and epidemiological evidence supporting a stronger role of genetics in early-onset prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association scan for early-onset prostate cancer. Novel aspects of this study include the focus on early-onset disease (defined as men with prostate cancer diagnosed before age 56 years) and use of publically available control genotype data from previous genome-wide association studies. We found genome-wide significant (p<5×10−8) evidence for variants at 8q24 and 11p15 and strong supportive evidence for a number of previously reported loci. We found little evidence for individual or systematic inflated association findings resulting from using public controls, demonstrating the utility of using public control data in large-scale genetic association studies of common variants. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of established common genetic variants for early-onset prostate cancer and the power of including early-onset prostate cancer cases in genetic association studies. PMID:24740154

  18. Tension zones of deep-seated rockslides revealed by thermal anomalies and airborne laser scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Bečkovský, David; Gajdošík, Juraj; Opálka, Filip; Plan, Lukas; Winkler, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Open cracks, tension fractures and crevice caves are important diagnostic features of gravitationally deformed slopes. When the cracks on the upper part of the slope open to the ground surface, they transfer relatively warm and buoyant air from the underground in cold seasons and thus could be detected by the infrared thermography (IRT) as warmer anomalies. Here we present two IRT surveys of deep-seated rockslides in Austria and the Czech Republic. We used thermal imaging cameras Flir and Optris, manipulated manually from the ground surface and also from unmanned aerial vehicle and piloted ultralight-plane platforms. The surveys were conducted during cold days of winter 2014/2015 and early in the morning to avoid the negative effect of direct sunshine. The first study site is the Bad Fischau rockslide in the southern part of the Vienna Basin (Austria). It was firstly identified by the morphostructural analysis of 1-m digital terrain model from the airborne laser scan data. The rockslide is superimposed on, and closely related to the active marginal faults of the Vienna basin, which is a pull apart structure. There is the 80-m-deep Eisenstein Show Cave situated in the southern lateral margin of the rockslide. The cave was originally considered to be purely of hydrothermal (hypogene) karstification; however its specific morphology and position within the detachment zone of the rockslide suggests its relation to gravitational slope-failure. The IRT survey revealed the Eisenstein Cave at the ground surface and also several other open cracks and possible cleft caves along the margins, headscarp, and also within the body of the rockslide. The second surveyed site was the Kněhyně rockslide in the flysch belt of the Outer Western Carpathians in the eastern Czech Republic. This deep-seated translational rockslide formed about eight known pseudokarst crevice caves, which reach up to 57 m in depth. The IRT survey recognized several warm anomalies indicating very deep

  19. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  20. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  1. Rime and graupel: description and characterization as revealed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rango, Albert; Foster, James; Josberger, Edward G; Erbe, Eric F; Pooley, Christopher; Wergin, William P

    2003-01-01

    Snow crystals, which form by vapor deposition, occasionally come in contact with supercooled cloud droplets during their formation and descent. When this occurs, the droplets adhere and freeze to the snow crystals in a process known as accretion. During the early stages of accretion, discrete snow crystals exhibiting frozen cloud droplets are referred to as rime. If this process continues, the snow crystal may become completely engulfed in frozen cloud droplets. The resulting particle is known as graupel. Light microscopic investigations have studied rime and graupel for nearly 100 years. However, the limiting resolution and depth of field associated with the light microscope have prevented detailed descriptions of the microscopic cloud droplets and the three-dimensional topography of the rime and graupel particles. This study uses low-temperature scanning electron microscopy to characterize the frozen precipitates that are commonly known as rime and graupel. Rime, consisting of frozen cloud droplets, is observed on all types of snow crystals including needles, columns, plates, and dendrites. The droplets, which vary in size from 10 to 100 microm, frequently accumulate along one face of a single snow crystal, but are found more randomly distributed on aggregations consisting of two or more snow crystals (snowflakes). The early stages of riming are characterized by the presence of frozen cloud droplets that appear as a layer of flattened hemispheres on the surface of the snow crystal. As this process continues, the cloud droplets appear more sinuous and elongate as they contact and freeze to the rimed crystals. The advanced stages of this process result in graupel, a particle 1 to 3 mm across, composed of hundreds of frozen cloud droplets interspersed with considerable air spaces; the original snow crystal is no longer discernible. This study increases our knowledge about the process and characteristics of riming and suggests that the initial appearance of the

  2. Rime and graupel: Description and characterization as revealed by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rango, A.; Foster, J.; Josberger, E.G.; Erbe, E.F.; Pooley, C.; Wergin, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    Snow crystals, which form by vapor deposition, occasionally come in contact with supercooled cloud droplets during their formation and descent. When this occurs, the droplets adhere and freeze to the snow crystals in a process known as accretion. During the early stages of accretion, discrete snow crystals exhibiting frozen cloud droplets are referred to as rime. If this process continues, the snow crystal may become completely engulfed in frozen cloud droplets. The resulting particle is known as graupel. Light microscopic investigations have studied rime and graupel for nearly 100 years. However, the limiting resolution and depth of field associated with the light microscope have prevented detailed descriptions of the microscopic cloud droplets and the three-dimensional topography of the rime and graupel particles. This study uses low-temperature scanning electron microscopy to characterize the frozen precipitates that are commonly known as rime and graupel. Rime, consisting of frozen cloud droplets, is observed on all types of snow crystals including needles, columns, plates, and dendrites. The droplets, which vary in size from 10 to 100 μm, frequently accumulate along one face of a single snow crystal, but are found more randomly distributed on aggregations consisting of two or more snow crystals (snowflakes). The early stages of riming are characterized by the presence of frozen cloud droplets that appear as a layer of flattened hemispheres on the surface of the snow crystal. As this process continues, the cloud droplets appear more sinuous and elongate as they contact and freeze to the rimed crystals. The advanced stages of this process result in graupel, a particle 1 to 3 mm across, composed of hundreds of frozen cloud droplets interspersed with considerable air spaces; the original snow crystal is no longer discernible. This study increases our knowledge about the process and characteristics of riming and suggests that the initial appearance of the

  3. Lung Metastasis From Prostate Cancer Revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT Without Osseous Metastasis on Bone Scan.

    PubMed

    Su, Hung-Yi; Chen, Meng-Lin; Hsieh, Ping-Ju; Hsieh, Teh-Sheng; Chao, Ing-Ming

    2016-05-01

    A 54-year-old man, a case of prostate cancer, underwent radical prostatectomy and hormone therapy. Elevated prostate-specific antigen level developed 7 years later, but pelvic MRI and bone scan revealed negative results. Radiotherapy was performed under the suspicion of local recurrence but in vain. F-FDG PET/CT performed 1 more year later showed 3 FDG-avid lesions in the right lung and mediastinum. Lung and lymph node metastases were proved with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Bone scan remained negative at that time. PMID:26859201

  4. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  5. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. PMID:25956335

  6. Genome-wide scan revealed genetic loci for energy metabolism in Hispanic children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide scans were conducted in a search for genetic locations linked to energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in children. Pedigreed data of 1030 Hispanic children and adolescents were from the Viva La Familia Study, which was designed to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors ...

  7. How to reveal metastable skyrmionic spin structures by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Kruse, C. N.; Dornheim, T.; Heinze, S.

    2016-05-01

    We predict the occurrence of metastable skyrmionic spin structures such as antiskyrmions and higher-order skyrmions in ultra-thin transition-metal films at surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations based on a spin Hamiltonian parametrized from density functional theory calculations. We show that such spin structures will appear with a similar contrast in spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy images. Both skyrmions and antiskyrmions display a circular shape for out-of-plane magnetized tips and a two-lobe butterfly contrast for in-plane tips. An unambiguous distinction can be achieved by rotating the tip magnetization direction without requiring the information of all components of the magnetization.

  8. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Falchook, Aaron D.; Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  9. Roller Coaster Scanning reveals spontaneous triggering of dendritic spikes in CA1 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Turi, Gergely F; Hájos, Norbert; Tamás, Gábor; Vizi, E Sylvester; Rózsa, Balázs

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are considered to be the controlling units of neural networks, despite their sparse number and unique morphological characteristics compared with excitatory pyramidal cells. Although pyramidal cell dendrites have been shown to display local regenerative events--dendritic spikes (dSpikes)--evoked by artificially patterned stimulation of synaptic inputs, no such studies exist for interneurons or for spontaneous events. In addition, imaging techniques have yet to attain the required spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of spontaneously occurring events that trigger dSpikes. Here we describe a high-resolution 3D two-photon laser scanning method (Roller Coaster Scanning) capable of imaging long dendritic segments resolving individual spines and inputs with a temporal resolution of a few milliseconds. By using this technique, we found that local, NMDA receptor-dependent dSpikes can be observed in hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons during spontaneous network activities in vitro. These NMDA spikes appear when approximately 10 spatially clustered inputs arrive synchronously and trigger supralinear integration in dynamic interaction zones. In contrast to the one-to-one relationship between computational subunits and dendritic branches described in pyramidal cells, here we show that interneurons have relatively small (∼14 μm) sliding interaction zones. Our data suggest a unique principle as to how interneurons integrate synaptic information by local dSpikes. PMID:21224413

  10. Scanning ESR microscopy revealing multiplex frictional heating events in the Nojima fault rocks, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, T.

    2007-12-01

    Whether or not the temperature rise due to frictional heating in a fault zone universally occurs is a significant problem in connection to the San Andreas fault heat flow paradox or the earthquake energy budget. Since paramagnetic iron hydroxides (γ-FeOOH or Fe(OH)3) inside the fault gouge change into ferrimagnetic iron oxides, maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3), by frictional heating [Fukuchi, 2003; Fukuchi et al., 2005; 2007], ferrimagnetic minerals in fault rocks are available as indicators of ancient frictional heating events. I thus started detecting FMR (ferrimagnetic resonance) signals derived from ferrimagnetic minerals in fault rocks using a scanning ESR (electron spin resonance) microscopy technique. In the scanning ESR microscopy, microwaves leaking out of a pinhole bored on a cavity resonator are directly absorbed by a flat slab sample, and continuous ESR data or ESR images are obtained by one- or two-dimensionally moving the slab sample with an X-Y stage. At the present stage, the resolution for detection is estimated as 0.25mm in using a 2.6mmφ pinhole. This resolution is enough to detect ancient frictional heating events recorded in natural fault rocks although frictional heat temperature changes at a unit of 1 mm or less with the distance from a fault plane. As a result of scanning ESR microscopy of the Nojima fault rocks in Japan, I have succeeded in detecting multiplex frictional heating events recorded in the fault gouge and pseudotachylyte. I now attempt to reconstruct the temperature of ancient frictional heat by inversion using each FMR signal peak showing the multiplex frictional heating events. A preliminary computer simulation indicates that the temperature rise due to frictional heating has universally occurred in the Nojima fault zone and the maximum temperature during ancient seismic fault slips may have momentarily risen above 1000°C. References Fukuchi, T. (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, No.B6, 2312, doi:10.1029/2002JB002007. Fukuchi, T

  11. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M.; Marti, X.; Holy, V.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-03-12

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

  13. Morphology of central California continental margin, revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.V.; McCulloch, D.S.; Eittreim, S.L.; Masson, D.G.

    1985-02-01

    Leg 2 of the 4-leg USGS EEZ-SCAN 84 program used GLORIA long-range side-scan sonar to survey the region from Pt. Conception to just south of Pt. Arena, from the shelf break to the 200-nmi coverage. The overlapping digital sonographs were slant-range and anamorphically corrected, and a photomosaic of the sonographs was constructed at a scale of 1:375,000 (1 in. = 11.1 km). The underlying bed rock appears to be an important control in shaping the morphology of this margin. Several faults have sea-floor expression and lie subparallel to the margin. The density of canyons and gullies on the slope varies from south to north, probably because of variations in the characteristics of the bed rock. The slope west of San Francisco is the most dissected segment of the central California slope. Monterey Fan is covered by large-scale bed forms (5-15 m amplitude and 1.5-2.0 km wavelength) over much of its surface. Monterey channel crosses southwestward across the fan, but abruptly turns south along a 40-km long surface fault that coincides with a well-mapped meander loop. The channel loops to the north then turns southward crossing the entire Monterey Fan, at its distal reaches, changes to a broad, braided pattern. Major slumps on the margin have long (> 30 km) scarps, some have slump folds, and one has a debris-flow deposit that can be acoustically traced for more than 75 km. Seventeen new seamounts were mapped. Taney Seamounts are large, rimmed, calderas with diameters of about 15 km each; these appear to be very large explosive or summit-collapse features.

  14. Pyrosequencing reveals regional differences in fruit-associated fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael W; Tsai, Peter; Anfang, Nicole; Ross, Howard A; Goddard, Matthew R

    2014-09-01

    We know relatively little of the distribution of microbial communities generally. Significant work has examined a range of bacterial communities, but the distribution of microbial eukaryotes is less well characterized. Humans have an ancient association with grape vines (Vitis vinifera) and have been making wine since the dawn of civilization, and fungi drive this natural process. While the molecular biology of certain fungi naturally associated with vines and wines is well characterized, complementary investigations into the ecology of fungi associated with fruiting plants is largely lacking. DNA sequencing technologies allow the direct estimation of microbial diversity from a given sample, avoiding culture-based biases. Here, we use deep community pyrosequencing approaches, targeted at the 26S rRNA gene, to examine the richness and composition of fungal communities associated with grapevines and test for geographical community structure among four major regions in New Zealand (NZ). We find over 200 taxa using this approach, which is 10-fold more than previously recovered using culture-based methods. Our analyses allow us to reject the null hypothesis of homogeneity in fungal species richness and community composition across NZ and reveal significant differences between major areas. PMID:24650123

  15. Cysteine scanning of CFTR's first transmembrane segment reveals its plausible roles in gating and permeation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolong; Bai, Yonghong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2013-02-19

    Previous cysteine scanning studies of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel have identified several transmembrane segments (TMs), including TM1, 3, 6, 9, and 12, as structural components of the pore. Some of these TMs such as TM6 and 12 may also be involved in gating conformational changes. However, recent results on TM1 seem puzzling in that the observed reactive pattern was quite different from those seen with TM6 and 12. In addition, whether TM1 also plays a role in gating motions remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated CFTR's TM1 by applying methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents from both cytoplasmic and extracellular sides of the membrane. Our experiments identified four positive positions, E92, K95, Q98, and L102, when the negatively charged MTSES was applied from the cytoplasmic side. Intriguingly, these four residues reside in the extracellular half of TM1 in previously defined CFTR topology; we thus extended our scanning to residues located extracellularly to L102. We found that cysteines introduced into positions 106, 107, and 109 indeed react with extracellularly applied MTS probes, but not to intracellularly applied reagents. Interestingly, whole-cell A107C-CFTR currents were very sensitive to changes of bath pH as if the introduced cysteine assumes an altered pKa-like T338C in TM6. These findings lead us to propose a revised topology for CFTR's TM1 that spans at least from E92 to Y109. Additionally, side-dependent modifications of these positions indicate a narrow region (L102-I106) that prevents MTS reagents from penetrating the pore, a picture similar to what has been reported for TM6. Moreover, modifications of K95C, Q98C, and L102C exhibit strong state dependency with negligible modification when the channel is closed, suggesting a significant rearrangement of TM1 during CFTR's gating cycle. The structural implications of these findings are discussed in light of the crystal structures of ABC

  16. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W.; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  17. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Two Distinct Classes of Erythroblastic Island Isolated from Adult Mammalian Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jia Hao; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Fraser, Stuart T

    2016-04-01

    Erythroblastic islands are multicellular clusters in which a central macrophage supports the development and maturation of red blood cell (erythroid) progenitors. These clusters play crucial roles in the pathogenesis observed in animal models of hematological disorders. The precise structure and function of erythroblastic islands is poorly understood. Here, we have combined scanning electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of surface proteins to develop a better understanding of the ultrastructure of these multicellular clusters. The erythroid-specific surface antigen Ter-119 and the transferrin receptor CD71 exhibited distinct patterns of protein sorting during erythroid cell maturation as detected by immuno-gold labeling. During electron microscopy analysis we observed two distinct classes of erythroblastic islands. The islands varied in size and morphology, and the number and type of erythroid cells interacting with the central macrophage. Assessment of femoral marrow isolated from a cavid rodent species (guinea pig, Cavis porcellus) and a marsupial carnivore species (fat-tailed dunnarts, Sminthopsis crassicaudata) showed that while the morphology of the central macrophage varied, two different types of erythroblastic islands were consistently identifiable. Our findings suggest that these two classes of erythroblastic islands are conserved in mammalian evolution and may play distinct roles in red blood cell production. PMID:26898901

  19. Wigner and Kondo physics in quantum point contacts revealed by scanning gate microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brun, B; Martins, F; Faniel, S; Hackens, B; Bachelier, G; Cavanna, A; Ulysse, C; Ouerghi, A; Gennser, U; Mailly, D; Huant, S; Bayot, V; Sanquer, M; Sellier, H

    2014-01-01

    Quantum point contacts exhibit mysterious conductance anomalies in addition to well-known conductance plateaus at multiples of 2e(2)/h. These 0.7 and zero-bias anomalies have been intensively studied, but their microscopic origin in terms of many-body effects is still highly debated. Here we use the charged tip of a scanning gate microscope to tune in situ the electrostatic potential of the point contact. While sweeping the tip distance, we observe repetitive splittings of the zero-bias anomaly, correlated with simultaneous appearances of the 0.7 anomaly. We interpret this behaviour in terms of alternating equilibrium and non-equilibrium Kondo screenings of different spin states localized in the channel. These alternating Kondo effects point towards the presence of a Wigner crystal containing several charges with different parities. Indeed, simulations show that the electron density in the channel is low enough to reach one-dimensional Wigner crystallization over a size controlled by the tip position. PMID:24978440

  20. Wigner and Kondo physics in quantum point contacts revealed by scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, B.; Martins, F.; Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; Bachelier, G.; Cavanna, A.; Ulysse, C.; Ouerghi, A.; Gennser, U.; Mailly, D.; Huant, S.; Bayot, V.; Sanquer, M.; Sellier, H.

    2014-06-01

    Quantum point contacts exhibit mysterious conductance anomalies in addition to well-known conductance plateaus at multiples of 2e2/h. These 0.7 and zero-bias anomalies have been intensively studied, but their microscopic origin in terms of many-body effects is still highly debated. Here we use the charged tip of a scanning gate microscope to tune in situ the electrostatic potential of the point contact. While sweeping the tip distance, we observe repetitive splittings of the zero-bias anomaly, correlated with simultaneous appearances of the 0.7 anomaly. We interpret this behaviour in terms of alternating equilibrium and non-equilibrium Kondo screenings of different spin states localized in the channel. These alternating Kondo effects point towards the presence of a Wigner crystal containing several charges with different parities. Indeed, simulations show that the electron density in the channel is low enough to reach one-dimensional Wigner crystallization over a size controlled by the tip position.

  1. Cysteine scanning reveals minor local rearrangements of the horizontal helix of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Stefan; Schnick, Christian; Burger, Eva-Maria; Nuber, Franziska; Krämer, Dorothée; Dawitz, Hannah; Brander, Sofia; Matlosz, Bartlomiej; Schäfer, Jacob; Maurer, Katharina; Glessner, Udo; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, respiratory complex I, couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. The complex consists of a peripheral arm catalyzing the redox reaction and a membrane arm catalyzing proton translocation. The membrane arm is almost completely aligned by a 110 Å unique horizontal helix that is discussed to transmit conformational changes induced by the redox reaction in a piston-like movement to the membrane arm driving proton translocation. Here, we analyzed such a proposed movement by cysteine-scanning of the helix of the Escherichia coli complex I. The accessibility of engineered cysteine residues and the flexibility of individual positions were determined by labeling the preparations with a fluorescent marker and a spin-probe, respectively, in the oxidized and reduced states. The differences in fluorescence labeling and the rotational flexibility of the spin probe between both redox states indicate only slight conformational changes at distinct positions of the helix but not a large movement. PMID:26115017

  2. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of Anti-TRAP (AT) Reveals Residues Involved in Binding to TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free L-tryptophan in many gram positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT3) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT12) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the “top” region of AT3, which are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation. PMID:18334255

  3. Strong-coupling superconductivity revealed by scanning tunneling microscope in tetragonal FeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiong; Du, Zengyi; Du, Guan; Gu, Qiangqiang; Lin, Hai; Fang, Delong; Yang, Huan; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the electronic properties of the tetragonal FeS superconductor by using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. It is found that the typical tunneling spectrum on the top layer of sulfur can be nicely fitted with an anisotropic s wave or a combination of two superconducting components in which one may have a highly anisotropic or nodal-like superconducting gap. The fittings lead to the superconducting gap of about Δmax≈0.90 meV , which yields a ratio of 2 Δmax/kBTc≈ 4.65. This value is larger than that of the predicted value 3.53 by the BCS theory in the weak-coupling limit, indicating a strong-coupling superconductivity. Two kinds of defects are observed on the surface, which can be assigned to the defects on the S sites (fourfold image) and Fe sites (dumbbell shape). Impurity-induced resonance states are found only for the defects on the S sites and stay at zero-bias energy.

  4. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan V.; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Turner, Stephen T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R2<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms. PMID:20161066

  5. Scanning electron microscopy reveals severe external root resorption in the large periapical lesion.

    PubMed

    Ookubo, Kensuke; Ookubo, Atsushi; Tsujimoto, Masaki; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationships between clinicopathological findings and the resorptive conditions of root apices of teeth with periodontitis. The samples included 21 root apices with large periapical radiolucent lesions. The preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative findings were correlated with the presence, extension, and the progression pattern of periapical resorption using a scanning electron microscope. The subjects' age, gender, chief complaint, type of tooth, percussion test results, size of periapical lesion using CT, and intraoperative findings were recorded. All apicoectomies were performed under an operative microscope for endodontic microsurgery. A significant large size was observed in cystic lesions compared with granulomatous lesions. The cementum surface at the periphery of the lesion was covered with globular structures (2-3 μm in diameter). Cementum resorption started as small defect formations at the surface. As the defect formation progressed, a lamellar structure appeared at the resorption area, and the size of globular structures became smaller than that of globules at the surface. Further resorption produced typical lacuna formation, which was particularly observed in fracture cases. The most morphologically severe destructive pattern of dentin resorption was observed in large cystic lesions. This study is the first report to elucidate the relationships between three clinical types of undesirable periapical lesions: (1) undertreatment, (2) periapical fracture, (3) macro-level resorption, and the microstructure of external root resorption including from small defects at the cementum surface to a significant destructive pattern inside the dentin. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:495-500, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26957368

  6. Perturbation-response scanning reveals ligand entry-exit mechanisms of ferric binding protein.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Canan; Atilgan, Ali Rana

    2009-10-01

    We study apo and holo forms of the bacterial ferric binding protein (FBP) which exhibits the so-called ferric transport dilemma: it uptakes iron from the host with remarkable affinity, yet releases it with ease in the cytoplasm for subsequent use. The observations fit the "conformational selection" model whereby the existence of a weakly populated, higher energy conformation that is stabilized in the presence of the ligand is proposed. We introduce a new tool that we term perturbation-response scanning (PRS) for the analysis of remote control strategies utilized. The approach relies on the systematic use of computational perturbation/response techniques based on linear response theory, by sequentially applying directed forces on single-residues along the chain and recording the resulting relative changes in the residue coordinates. We further obtain closed-form expressions for the magnitude and the directionality of the response. Using PRS, we study the ligand release mechanisms of FBP and support the findings by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the residue-by-residue displacements between the apo and the holo forms, as determined from the X-ray structures, are faithfully reproduced by perturbations applied on the majority of the residues of the apo form. However, once the stabilizing ligand (Fe) is integrated to the system in holo FBP, perturbing only a few select residues successfully reproduces the experimental displacements. Thus, iron uptake by FBP is a favored process in the fluctuating environment of the protein, whereas iron release is controlled by mechanisms including chelation and allostery. The directional analysis that we implement in the PRS methodology implicates the latter mechanism by leading to a few distant, charged, and exposed loop residues. Upon perturbing these, irrespective of the direction of the operating forces, we find that the cap residues involved in iron release are made to operate coherently, facilitating release of the

  7. Genomic Scan Reveals Loci under Altitude Adaptation in Tibetan and Dahe Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yabin; He, Xiaohong; Zhao, Qianjun; Luan, Yizhao; Guan, Weijun; Rao, Shaoqi; Ma, Yuehui

    2014-01-01

    High altitude environments are of particular interest in the studies of local adaptation as well as their implications in physiology and clinical medicine in human. Some Chinese pig breeds, such as Tibetan pig (TBP) that is well adapted to the high altitude and Dahe pig (DHP) that dwells at the moderate altitude, provide ideal materials to study local adaptation to altitudes. Yet, it is still short of in-depth analysis and understanding of the genetic adaptation to high altitude in the two pig populations. In this study we conducted a genomic scan for selective sweeps using FST to identify genes showing evidence of local adaptations in TBP and DHP, with Wuzhishan pig (WZSP) as the low-altitude reference. Totally, we identified 12 specific selective genes (CCBE1, F2RL1, AGGF1, ZFPM2, IL2, FGF5, PLA2G4A, ADAMTS9, NRBF2, JMJD1C, VEGFC and ADAM19) for TBP and six (OGG1, FOXM, FLT3, RTEL1, CRELD1 and RHOG) for DHP. In addition, six selective genes (VPS13A, GNA14, GDAP1, PARP8, FGF10 and ADAMTS16) were shared by the two pig breeds. Among these selective genes, three (VEGFC, FGF10 and ADAMTS9) were previously reported to be linked to the local adaptation to high altitudes in pigs, while many others were newly identified by this study. Further bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that majority of these selective signatures have some biological functions relevant to the altitude adaptation, for examples, response to hypoxia, development of blood vessels, DNA repair and several hematological involvements. These results suggest that the local adaptation to high altitude environments is sophisticated, involving numerous genes and multiple biological processes, and the shared selective signatures by the two pig breeds may provide an effective avenue to identify the common adaptive mechanisms to different altitudes. PMID:25329542

  8. Morphological observations of Diplodia maydis on synthetic and natural substrates as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J A; Campbell, L L; Pappelis, A J

    1974-01-01

    Mycelial and spore morphology of Diplodia maydis were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy after growth on various media and natural substrates (oat and corn kernels, and corn husks). Of several specimen preparation methods studied, Parducz fixation followed by critical-point or freeze-drying gave adequate preservation for pycnidia, mycelia, and spores. Morphological characteristics were similar in rotary and reciprocal shaker cultures and differed from that found in stationary cultures in the amount of slime-like material produced and precipitated matter on the mycelial surfaces. In general, mycelial surfaces were smooth. Large areas of coalesced material were present in all samples examined. Slime-like material produced in liquid media appeared as a finely laced net, randomly appearing throughout the mycelia with bead-like structures present along the net. A fine netting also was observed interspersed among the spores inside the pycnidia obtained from oats. Slime-like material was observed to cover the pycnidia produced on oat and corn kernels. In the latter case, the spores were less protected by the outer slime-like covering. Thickened node-like structures were observed in mycelial mats produced in modified Fries 2 medium, on potato dextrose agar plates, and on infected oats. Round and ovate thickened node-like structures were observed in mycelium produced on corn kernels. In general, node-like structures were less abundant in mycelia from naturally infected substrates. Conidia were commonly rounded to tapered and two celled, with a distinctive ridged septum at the middle. Dried spores were collapsed in a characteristic flask-like fashion. PMID:4203784

  9. Properties of the Mechanosensitive Channel MscS Pore Revealed by Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels gate when the transmembrane turgor rises to levels that compromise the structural integrity of the cell wall. Gating creates a transient large diameter pore that allows hydrated solutes to pass from the cytoplasm at rates close to those of diffusion. In the closed conformation, the channel limits transmembrane solute movement, even that of protons. In the MscS crystal structure (Protein Data Bank entry 2oau), a narrow, hydrophobic opening is visible in the crystal structure, and it has been proposed that a vapor lock created by the hydrophobic seals, L105 and L109, is the barrier to water and ions. Tryptophan scanning mutagenesis has proven to be a highly valuable tool for the analysis of channel structure. Here Trp residues were introduced along the pore-forming TM3a helix and in selected other parts of the protein. Mutants were investigated for their expression, stability, and activity and as fluorescent probes of the physical properties along the length of the pore. Most Trp mutants were expressed at levels similar to that of the parent (MscS YFF) and were stable as heptamers in detergent in the presence and absence of urea. Fluorescence data suggest a long hydrophobic region with low accessibility to aqueous solvents, extending from L105/L109 to G90. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy data are consistent with significant homo-Förster resonance energy transfer between tryptophan residues from different subunits within the narrow pore. The data provide new insights into MscS structure and gating. PMID:26126964

  10. Whole genome association scan for genetic polymorphisms influencing information processing speed

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Michelle; Hansell, Narelle K.; Lahti, Jari; Davies, Gail; Medland, Sarah E.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tenesa, Albert; Widen, Elisabeth; McGhee, Kevin A.; Palotie, Aarno; Liewald, David; Porteous, David J.; Starr, John M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Deary, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is an important cognitive function that is compromised in psychiatric illness (e.g., schizophrenia, depression) and old age; it shares genetic background with complex cognition (e.g., working memory, reasoning). To find genes influencing speed we performed a genome-wide association scan in up to three cohorts: Brisbane (mean age 16 years; N = 1659); LBC1936 (mean age 70 years, N = 992); LBC1921 (mean age 82 years, N = 307), and; HBCS (mean age 64 years, N = 1080). Meta-analysis of the common measures highlighted various suggestively significant (p < 1.21 × 10−5) SNPs and plausible candidate genes (e.g., TRIB3). A biological pathways analysis of the speed factor identified two common pathways from the KEGG database (cell junction, focal adhesion) in two cohorts, while a pathway analysis linked to the GO database revealed common pathways across pairs of speed measures (e.g., receptor binding, cellular metabolic process). These highlighted genes and pathways will be able to inform future research, including results for psychiatric disease. PMID:21130836

  11. Features of MotA proton channel structure revealed by tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, L L; Zhou, J; Blair, D F

    1995-01-01

    The MotA protein of Escherichia coli is a component of the flagellar motors that functions in transmembrane proton conduction. Here, we report several features of MotA structure revealed by use of a mutagenesis-based approach. Single tryptophan residues were introduced at many positions within the four hydrophobic segments of MotA, and the effects on function were measured. Function was disrupted according to a periodic pattern that implies that the membrane-spanning segments are alpha-helices and that identifies the lipid-facing parts of each helix. The results support a hypothesis for MotA structure and mechanism in which water molecules form most of the proton-conducting pathway. The success of this approach in studying MotA suggests that it could be useful in structure-function studies of other integral membrane proteins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7644518

  12. Accurate 3d Scanning of Damaged Ancient Greek Inscriptions for Revealing Weathered Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, A. I.; Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.; Prignitz, S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper two non-invasive non-destructive alternative techniques to the traditional and invasive technique of squeezes are presented alongside with specialized developed processing methods, aiming to help the epigraphists to reveal and analyse weathered letters in ancient Greek inscriptions carved in masonry or marble. The resulting 3D model would serve as a detailed basis for the epigraphists to try to decipher the inscription. The data were collected by using a Structured Light scanner. The creation of the final accurate three dimensional model is a complicated procedure requiring large computation cost and human effort. It includes the collection of geometric data in limited space and time, the creation of the surface, the noise filtering and the merging of individual surfaces. The use of structured light scanners is time consuming and requires costly hardware and software. Therefore an alternative methodology for collecting 3D data of the inscriptions was also implemented for reasons of comparison. Hence, image sequences from varying distances were collected using a calibrated DSLR camera aiming to reconstruct the 3D scene through SfM techniques in order to evaluate the efficiency and the level of precision and detail of the obtained reconstructed inscriptions. Problems in the acquisition processes as well as difficulties in the alignment step and mesh optimization are also encountered. A meta-processing framework is proposed and analysed. Finally, the results of processing and analysis and the different 3D models are critically inspected and then evaluated by a specialist in terms of accuracy, quality and detail of the model and the capability of revealing damaged and "hidden" letters.

  13. Heart Disease and Colon Cancer Prevention Beliefs and Their Association With Information Seeking and Scanning.

    PubMed

    Hovick, Shelly R; Bigsby, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Despite their understanding of the links between (a) information seeking and scanning and (b) health outcomes, researchers still know relatively little about the impact of information behaviors on people's disease-related beliefs and attitudes. The goal of this study was to validate findings linking information and health behaviors and to assess whether information seeking and scanning are associated with beliefs about the effectiveness of heart disease and colon cancer risk prevention behaviors (in regard to exercise, controlling one's diet to prevent overweight/obesity, and daily fruit and vegetable intake), as well as determine whether the effects of seeking versus scanning on these beliefs differ. Data from the Annenberg National Health Communication Survey were analyzed (N = 3,212). For colon cancer, significant main effects were detected for information scanning for each of the 3 beliefs assessed (p < .05). For heart disease, both information scanning and heart disease media exposure (p < .05) were associated with stronger beliefs. Information seeking was not associated with beliefs for either disease (p > .05). Our results suggest that disease-related cognitions and beliefs, which ultimately impact decisions to engage in prevention behaviors, may be influenced most by less purposeful forms of information acquisition. PMID:26444664

  14. Finding needles in haystacks: scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the complex reactivity of Si(100) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, Erik S; Hines, Melissa A

    2015-07-21

    Many chemical reactions-etching, growth, and catalytic-produce highly faceted surfaces. Examples range from the atomically flat silicon surfaces produced by anisotropic etchants to the wide variety of faceted nanoparticles, including cubes, wires, plates, tetrapods, and more. This faceting is a macroscopic manifestation of highly site-specific surface reactions. In this Account, we show that these site-specific reactions literally write a record of their chemical reactivity in the morphology of the surface-a record that can be quantified with scanning tunneling microscopy. Paradoxically, the sites targeted by these highly site-specific reactions are extremely rare. This paradox can be understood from a simple kinetic argument. An etchant that produces atomically flat surfaces must rapidly etch every surface site except the terrace atoms on the perfectly flat surface. As a result, the etch morphology is dominated by the least reactive species (here, the terrace sites), not the most reactive species. In contrast, the most interesting chemical species-the site where the reaction occurs most rapidly and most selectively-is the hardest one to find. This highly reactive site, the key to the reaction, is the needle in the haystack, often occurring in densities far below 1% of a monolayer and thus invisible to surface spectroscopies. This kinetic argument is quite general and applies to a wide variety of reactions, not just etching reactions. Understanding these highly site-specific reactions requires a combination of experimental and computational techniques with both exquisite defect sensitivity and high chemical sensitivity. In this Account, we present examples of highly site-specific chemistry on the technologically important face of silicon, Si(100). In one example, we show that the high reactivity of one particular surface site, a silicon dihydride bound to a silicon monohydride, or an "α-dihydride", provides a fundamental explanation for anisotropic silicon etching

  15. Metasomatic Diamond Formation revealed by X-Ray CT Scanning of Diamondiferous Eclogites from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, S. H.; Kahle, R. L.; Shaw-Kahle, B.; Gurney, J. J.; du Plessis, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a private collection of diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths has been made available for non-destructive investigation. All samples have at least one diamond visible. The samples are predominantly sourced from the Excelsior and Newlands mines (South Africa), with additional samples from Roberts Victor mine (South Africa) and Orapa (Botswana). 3D volume models of the samples were created using X-ray tomography. The 3D images reveal abundant secondary veining that is clearly younger than the eclogite. Diamonds are located in fluid pathways and occur in both altered garnet and altered clinopyroxene. Most of the veining is unrelated to the spatial positioning of diamond in the samples. In some instances, early veining has annealed or partially annealed, suggesting a range in timing of at least some of the several metasomatic events that have affected the rock. Importantly, in the most graphic examples, a clear distinction can be seen between diamond-bearing and non-diamond-bearing veins, even where sulphide is present in abundance in the non-diamond-bearing veins. The amount of diamond detected in the xenoliths varies from a single crystal to well over 50 diamonds forming more than 9% of the rock. This extreme value contrasts with the diamond recovery from currently viable diamond mines of less than 2ppm or 0.0002%. The morphology of the diamonds includes step-faced flat-faced octahedra, single crystals and aggregates. This is particularly a feature of diamonds in the Excelsior specimens. In the samples from Newlands and Orapa, in contrast, diamond surfaces reflect resorption processes such as rounding and corrosion of the diamonds. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: Diamonds in this collection, sourced from within the Kalahari craton, appear to have formed by a metasomatic process during which fluids infiltrated pre-existing mantle-derived eclogite; Several metasomatic events have occurred during the residence of the eclogite in the

  16. 76 FR 52970 - In the Matter of Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... Cross Match Technologies, Inc. (``Cross Match'') of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. 75 FR 34482-83. The... Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005. 70 FR. 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Biometric Scanning Devices, Components Thereof, Associated Software,...

  17. Marine bacterial, archaeal and protistan association networks reveal ecological linkages.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joshua A; Countway, Peter D; Xia, Li; Vigil, Patrick D; Beman, J Michael; Kim, Diane Y; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Sachdeva, Rohan; Jones, Adriane C; Schwalbach, Michael S; Rose, Julie M; Hewson, Ian; Patel, Anand; Sun, Fengzhu; Caron, David A; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2011-09-01

    Microbes have central roles in ocean food webs and global biogeochemical processes, yet specific ecological relationships among these taxa are largely unknown. This is in part due to the dilute, microscopic nature of the planktonic microbial community, which prevents direct observation of their interactions. Here, we use a holistic (that is, microbial system-wide) approach to investigate time-dependent variations among taxa from all three domains of life in a marine microbial community. We investigated the community composition of bacteria, archaea and protists through cultivation-independent methods, along with total bacterial and viral abundance, and physico-chemical observations. Samples and observations were collected monthly over 3 years at a well-described ocean time-series site of southern California. To find associations among these organisms, we calculated time-dependent rank correlations (that is, local similarity correlations) among relative abundances of bacteria, archaea, protists, total abundance of bacteria and viruses and physico-chemical parameters. We used a network generated from these statistical correlations to visualize and identify time-dependent associations among ecologically important taxa, for example, the SAR11 cluster, stramenopiles, alveolates, cyanobacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Negative correlations, perhaps suggesting competition or predation, were also common. The analysis revealed a progression of microbial communities through time, and also a group of unknown eukaryotes that were highly correlated with dinoflagellates, indicating possible symbioses or parasitism. Possible 'keystone' species were evident. The network has statistical features similar to previously described ecological networks, and in network parlance has non-random, small world properties (that is, highly interconnected nodes). This approach provides new insights into the natural history of microbes. PMID:21430787

  18. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions. PMID:25895944

  19. Progressive dyspnea associated with a crazy-paving appearance on a chest computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Nimrod; Paul, Narinder; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    A 'crazy-paving' appearance of the lungs on computed tomography scanning of the chest was first described nearly 20 years ago in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and was thought to be characteristic of this condition. However, this pattern has subsequently been reported in a variety of pulmonary diseases and is now considered to be nonspecific. The present report describes a case of a 74-year-old man in whom congestive heart failure presented with a crazy-paving appearance of the lungs on a chest computed tomography scan. This uncommon association illustrates the importance of the correlation of clinical and radiographic information. PMID:16896429

  20. Reveal genes functionally associated with ACADS by a network study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulong; Su, Zhiguang

    2015-09-15

    Establishing a systematic network is aimed at finding essential human gene-gene/gene-disease pathway by means of network inter-connecting patterns and functional annotation analysis. In the present study, we have analyzed functional gene interactions of short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene (ACADS). ACADS plays a vital role in free fatty acid β-oxidation and regulates energy homeostasis. Modules of highly inter-connected genes in disease-specific ACADS network are derived by integrating gene function and protein interaction data. Among the 8 genes in ACADS web retrieved from both STRING and GeneMANIA, ACADS is effectively conjoined with 4 genes including HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. The functional analysis is done via ontological briefing and candidate disease identification. We observed that the highly efficient-interlinked genes connected with ACADS are HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. Interestingly, the ontological aspect of genes in the ACADS network reveals that ACADS, HAHDA and HADHB play equally vital roles in fatty acid metabolism. The gene ACAT1 together with ACADS indulges in ketone metabolism. Our computational gene web analysis also predicts potential candidate disease recognition, thus indicating the involvement of ACADS, HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1 not only with lipid metabolism but also with infant death syndrome, skeletal myopathy, acute hepatic encephalopathy, Reye-like syndrome, episodic ketosis, and metabolic acidosis. The current study presents a comprehensible layout of ACADS network, its functional strategies and candidate disease approach associated with ACADS network. PMID:26045367

  1. Thermal stability and molecular microstructure of heat-induced cereal grains, revealed with Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Majibur Rahman; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to use Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to reveal molecular thermal stability and thermal degradation behavior of heat-induced cereal grains and reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein structures of cereal grain tissues affected by heat processing and to quantify the protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modeling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were also conducted to identify molecular differences in the Raman spectra. Three cereal grain seeds, wheat, triticale, and corn, were used as the model for feed protein in the experiment. The specimens were autoclaved (moist heating) and dry-heated (roasted) at 121 °C for 80 min, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results revealed that there are marked differences in the secondary structures of the proteins subjected to various heating treatments of different cereals. The sensitivity of cereals to moist heating was much higher than the sensitivity to dry heating. The multivariate analyses (CLA and PCA) showed that heat treatment was significantly isolated between the different Raman raw spectra. The DSC study revealed that the thermal degradation behavior of cereals was significantly changed after moist- and dry-heat treatments. The position of the major endothermic peak of dry-heated cereals shifted toward a higher temperature, from 131.7 to 134.0 °C, suggesting the high thermal stability of dry-heated cereals. In contrast, the endothermic peak position was slightly decreased to 132.1 °C in the case of moist autoclaved heating. The digestive behavior and nutritive value of rumen-undegradable protein in animals may be related to the changes of the protein secondary molecular structure and thermal stability of the cereal grain materials, which is attributed by Raman microspectroscopy and DSC endotherm profiles. PMID:23724957

  2. A genome-wide linkage scan reveals CD53 as an important regulator of innate TNF-α levels

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Steffan D; Lakenberg, Nico; van der Breggen, Ruud; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Kloppenburg, Margreet; de Craen, Anton JM; Beekman, Marian; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline

    2010-01-01

    Cytokines are major immune system regulators. Previously, innate cytokine profiles determined by lipopolysaccharide stimulation were shown to be highly heritable. To identify regulating genes in innate immunity, we analyzed data from a genome-wide linkage scan using microsatellites in osteoarthritis (OA) patients (The GARP study) and their innate cytokine data on interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. A confirmation cohort consisted of the Leiden 85-Plus study. In this study, a linkage analysis was followed by manual selection of candidate genes in linkage regions showing LOD scores over 2.5. An single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) gene tagging method was applied to select SNPs on the basis of the highest level of gene tagging and possible functional effects. QTDT was used to identify the SNPs associated with innate cytokine production. Initial association signals were modeled by a linear mixed model. Through these analyses, we identified 10 putative genes involved in the regulation of TNFα. SNP rs6679497 in gene CD53 showed significant association with TNFα levels (P=0.001). No association of this SNP was observed with OA. A novel gene involved in the innate immune response of TNFα is identified. Genetic variation in this gene may have a role in diseases and disorders in which TNFα is closely involved. PMID:20407468

  3. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  4. BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR Genotype are Each Associated with Visual Scanning Patterns of Faces in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Antonios I.; Wallis, Yvonne; Bair, Hayley; Crawford, Hayley; Frisson, Steven; Zeegers, Maurice P.; McCleery, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have documented both neuroplasticity-related BDNF Val66Met and emotion regulation-related 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms as genetic variants that contribute to the processing of emotions from faces. More specifically, research has shown the BDNF Met allele and the 5-HTTLPR Short allele to be associated with mechanisms of negative affectivity that relate to susceptibility for psychopathology. We examined visual scanning pathways in response to angry, happy, and neutral faces in relation to BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR genotyping in 49 children aged 4–7 years. Analyses revealed that variations in the visual processing of facial expressions of anger interacted with BDNF Val66Met genotype, such that children who carried at least one low neuroplasticity Met allele exhibited a vigilance–avoidance pattern of visual scanning compared to homozygotes for the high neuroplasticity Val allele. In a separate investigation of eye gaze towards the eye versus mouth regions of neutral faces, we observed that short allele 5-HTTLPR carriers exhibited reduced looking at the eye region compared with those with the higher serotonin uptake Long allele. Together, these findings suggest that genetic mechanisms early in life may influence the establishment of patterns of visual scanning of environmental stressors, which in conjunction with other factors such as negative life events, may lead to psychological difficulties and disorders in the later adolescent and adult years. PMID:26217202

  5. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  6. Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Clara S.; Zhang, He; Cheung, Chloe Y. Y.; Xu, Ming; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Zhou, Wei; Cherny, Stacey S.; Zhang, Yan; Holmen, Oddgeir; Au, Ka-Wing; Yu, Haiyi; Xu, Lin; Jia, Jia; Porsch, Robert M.; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Weixian; Zheng, Huiping; Wong, Lai-Yung; Mu, Yiming; Dou, Jingtao; Fong, Carol H. Y.; Wang, Shuyu; Hong, Xueyu; Dong, Liguang; Liao, Yanhua; Wang, Jiansong; Lam, Levina S. M.; Su, Xi; Yan, Hua; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Jin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Xie, Gaoqiang; Woo, Yu-Cho; Wu, Yangfeng; Tan, Kathryn C. B.; Hveem, Kristian; Cheung, Bernard M. Y.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Xu, Aimin; Eugene Chen, Y; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Youyi; Lam, Tai-Hing; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Huo, Yong; Sham, Pak C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Tse, Hung-Fat; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P<2.69 × 10−7), including three Asian-specific coding variants in known genes (CETP p.Asp459Gly, PCSK9 p.Arg93Cys and LDLR p.Arg257Trp). Furthermore, missense variants at two novel loci—PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met and PKD1L3 p.Thr429Ser—also influence levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively. Another novel gene, TEAD2, is found to be associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through gene-based association analysis. Most of these newly identified coding variants show suggestive association (P<0.05) with CAD. These findings demonstrate that exome-wide genotyping on samples of non-European ancestry can identify additional population-specific possible causal variants, shedding light on novel lipid biology and CAD. PMID:26690388

  7. Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Tang, Clara S; Zhang, He; Cheung, Chloe Y Y; Xu, Ming; Ho, Jenny C Y; Zhou, Wei; Cherny, Stacey S; Zhang, Yan; Holmen, Oddgeir; Au, Ka-Wing; Yu, Haiyi; Xu, Lin; Jia, Jia; Porsch, Robert M; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Weixian; Zheng, Huiping; Wong, Lai-Yung; Mu, Yiming; Dou, Jingtao; Fong, Carol H Y; Wang, Shuyu; Hong, Xueyu; Dong, Liguang; Liao, Yanhua; Wang, Jiansong; Lam, Levina S M; Su, Xi; Yan, Hua; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Jin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Xie, Gaoqiang; Woo, Yu-Cho; Wu, Yangfeng; Tan, Kathryn C B; Hveem, Kristian; Cheung, Bernard M Y; Zöllner, Sebastian; Xu, Aimin; Eugene Chen, Y; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Youyi; Lam, Tai-Hing; Ganesh, Santhi K; Huo, Yong; Sham, Pak C; Lam, Karen S L; Willer, Cristen J; Tse, Hung-Fat; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P<2.69 × 10(-7)), including three Asian-specific coding variants in known genes (CETP p.Asp459Gly, PCSK9 p.Arg93Cys and LDLR p.Arg257Trp). Furthermore, missense variants at two novel loci-PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met and PKD1L3 p.Thr429Ser-also influence levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively. Another novel gene, TEAD2, is found to be associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through gene-based association analysis. Most of these newly identified coding variants show suggestive association (P<0.05) with CAD. These findings demonstrate that exome-wide genotyping on samples of non-European ancestry can identify additional population-specific possible causal variants, shedding light on novel lipid biology and CAD. PMID:26690388

  8. /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scanning in ampicillin-associated right-sided hemorrhagic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Saverymuttu, S.H.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1984-07-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis is a rare but well-recognized complication with ampicillin or penicillin derivative treatment. Early colonoscopy has been advocated in establishing the diagnosis by demonstrating the characteristic pattern of only right-sided involvement and so distinguishing it from other colitides. The authors report a patient who developed colitis after amoxycillin therapy in whom /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan demonstrated right-sided colitis which alerted them to the diagnosis. Discontinuation of the antibiotic resulting in rapid improvement, and return of the /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan to normal in this patient suggests that ampicillin-associated colitis should not be considered purely as a hemorrhagic disease but may in some cases have an inflammatory component.

  9. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  10. Proline Scan of the hERG Channel S6 Helix Reveals the Location of the Intracellular Pore Gate

    PubMed Central

    Thouta, Samrat; Sokolov, Stanislav; Abe, Yuki; Clark, Sheldon J.; Cheng, Yen M.; Claydon, Tom W.

    2014-01-01

    In Shaker-like channels, the activation gate is formed at the bundle crossing by the convergence of the inner S6 helices near a conserved proline-valine-proline motif, which introduces a kink that allows for electromechanical coupling with voltage sensor motions via the S4-S5 linker. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels lack the proline-valine-proline motif and the location of the intracellular pore gate and how it is coupled to S4 movement is less clear. Here, we show that proline substitutions within the S6 of hERG perturbed pore gate closure, trapping channels in the open state. Performing a proline scan of the inner S6 helix, from Ile655 to Tyr667 revealed that gate perturbation occurred with proximal (I655P-Q664P), but not distal (R665P-Y667P) substitutions, suggesting that Gln664 marks the position of the intracellular gate in hERG channels. Using voltage-clamp fluorimetry and gating current analysis, we demonstrate that proline substitutions trap the activation gate open by disrupting the coupling between the voltage-sensing unit and the pore of the channel. We characterize voltage sensor movement in one such trapped-open mutant channel and demonstrate the kinetics of what we interpret to be intrinsic hERG voltage sensor movement. PMID:24606930

  11. Individual Variability and Test-Retest Reliability Revealed by Ten Repeated Resting-State Brain Scans over One Month

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Changle; Wang, Luoyu; Yang, Ning; Wang, Ze; Dong, Hao-Ming; Yang, Zhi; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Weng, Xu-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in mind and behavior are believed to reflect the functional variability of the human brain. Due to the lack of a large-scale longitudinal dataset, the full landscape of variability within and between individual functional connectomes is largely unknown. We collected 300 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) datasets from 30 healthy participants who were scanned every three days for one month. With these data, both intra- and inter-individual variability of six common rfMRI metrics, as well as their test-retest reliability, were estimated across multiple spatial scales. Global metrics were more dynamic than local regional metrics. Cognitive components involving working memory, inhibition, attention, language and related neural networks exhibited high intra-individual variability. In contrast, inter-individual variability demonstrated a more complex picture across the multiple scales of metrics. Limbic, default, frontoparietal and visual networks and their related cognitive components were more differentiable than somatomotor and attention networks across the participants. Analyzing both intra- and inter-individual variability revealed a set of high-resolution maps on test-retest reliability of the multi-scale connectomic metrics. These findings represent the first collection of individual differences in multi-scale and multi-metric characterization of the human functional connectomes in-vivo, serving as normal references for the field to guide the use of common functional metrics in rfMRI-based applications. PMID:26714192

  12. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  13. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32*

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Matthew J.; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D.; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I. Martha

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  14. Ultrastructure of the fetal membranes of the oviparous kingsnake, Lampropeltis getula (Colubridae) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young K; Blackburn, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    In reptilian sauropsids, fetal (extraembryonic) membranes that line the eggshell sustain developing embryos by providing for gas exchange and uptake of water and eggshell calcium. However, a scarcity of morphological studies hinders an understanding of functional specializations and their evolution. In kingsnakes (Lampropeltis getula), scanning electron microscopy reveals two major fetal membranes: the chorioallantois and yolk sac omphalopleure. In early development, the chorioallantois contains tall chorionic epithelial cells, avascular connective tissue, and enlarged allantoic epithelial cells. During its maturation, the chorionic and allantoic epithelia thin dramatically and become underlain by a rich network of allantoic capillaries, yielding a membrane ideally suited for respiratory gas exchange. Yolk sac development initially is like that of typical lizards and snakes, forming an avascular omphalopleure, isolated yolk mass (IYM), and yolk cleft. However, unlike the situation in most squamates studied, the omphalopleure becomes transformed into a "secondary chorioallantois" via three asynchronous events: flattening of the epithelium, regression of the IYM, and vascularization by the allantois. Progressive expansion of chorioallantois parallels growing embryonic needs for gas exchange. In early through mid-development, external surfaces of both the chorionic and omphalopleure epithelium show an abundance of irregular surface protrusions that possibly increase surface area for water absorption. We postulate that the hypertrophied allantoic epithelial cells produce allantoic fluid, a viscous substance that facilitates water uptake and storage. Our findings are consistent with a previous study on the corn snake Pantherophis guttatus, but include new observations and novel functional hypotheses relevant to a reconstruction of basal squamate patterns. PMID:26335135

  15. Edge superconductivity in Nb thin film microbridges revealed by electric transport measurements and visualized by scanning laser microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, R.; Aladyshkin, A. Yu; Nefedov, I. M.; Putilov, A. V.; Kemmler, M.; Bothner, D.; Loerincz, A.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2013-09-01

    The resistance R versus perpendicular external magnetic field H was measured for superconducting Nb thin film microbridges with and without microholes (antidots, ADs). Well below the transition temperature, integral R(H) measurements of the resistive transition to the normal state on the plain bridge show two distinct regions, which can be identified as bulk and edge superconductivity, respectively. The latter case appears when bulk superconductivity becomes suppressed at the upper critical field Hc2 and below the critical field of edge superconductivity Hc3 ≈ 1.7 Hc2. The presence of additional edges in the AD bridge leads to a different shape of the R(H) curves. We used low-temperature scanning laser microscopy (LTSLM) to visualize the current distribution in the plain and AD bridges upon sweeping H. While the plain bridge shows a dominant LTSLM signal at its edges for H > Hc2 the AD bridge also gives a signal from the inner parts of the bridge due to the additional edge states around the ADs. LTSLM reveals an asymmetry in the current distribution between the left and right edges, which confirms theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental results are in good agreement with our numerical simulations (based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model), yielding the spatial distribution of the order parameter and current density for different bias currents and H values.

  16. Saturation scanning of ubiquitin variants reveals a common hot spot for binding to USP2 and USP21.

    PubMed

    Leung, Isabel; Dekel, Ayelet; Shifman, Julia M; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby ubiquitin (Ub) recognizes enzymes in the Ub proteasome system is crucial for understanding the biological function of Ub. Many structures of Ub complexes have been solved and, in most cases, reveal a large structural epitope on a common face of the Ub molecule. However, owing to the generally weak nature of these interactions, it has been difficult to map in detail the functional contributions of individual Ub side chains to affinity and specificity. Here we took advantage of Ub variants (Ubvs) that bind tightly to particular Ub-specific proteases (USPs) and used phage display and saturation scanning mutagenesis to comprehensively map functional epitopes within the structural epitopes. We found that Ubvs that bind to USP2 or USP21 contain a remarkably similar core functional epitope, or "hot spot," consisting mainly of positions that are conserved as the wild type sequence, but also some positions that prefer mutant sequences. The Ubv core functional epitope contacts residues that are conserved in the human USP family, and thus it is likely important for the interactions of Ub across many family members. PMID:27436899

  17. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  18. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  19. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  20. Curved Saccade Trajectories Reveal Conflicting Predictions in Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target…

  1. A genome-wide sib-pair scan for quantitative language traits reveals linkage to chromosomes 10 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. D.; Mueller, K. L.; Gamazon, E. R.; Cox, N. J.; Tomblin, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is considerable evidence that individual differences in language development are highly heritable, there have been few genome-wide scans to locate genes associated with the trait. Previous analyses of language impairment have yielded replicable evidence for linkage to regions on chromosomes 16q, 19q, 13q (within lab) and at 13q (between labs). Here we report the first linkage study to screen the continuum of language ability, from normal to disordered, as found in the general population. 383 children from 147 sib-ships (214 sib-pairs) were genotyped on the Illumina® Linkage IVb Marker Panel using three composite language-related phenotypes and a measure of phonological memory (PM). Two regions (10q23.33; 13q33.3) yielded genome-wide significant peaks for linkage with PM. A peak suggestive of linkage was also found at 17q12 for the overall language composite. This study presents two novel genetic loci for the study of language development and disorders, but fails to replicate findings by previous groups. Possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:25997078

  2. Mobility and age of black carbon in two temperate grassland soils revealed by differential scanning calorimetry and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Feng, Xiaojuan; Eglinton, Timothy; Wacker, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a natural component of soil organic matter (SOM) and abundant in many ecosystems. Its stability, due to its relative resistance to microbial decomposition, means it plays an important role in soil C sequestration. A recent review suggests that BC may be mobile in soil; hence, its contribution to a stable SOM pool may change over time due to its lateral or vertical reallocation (Rumpel et al. 2014). However, direct evidence of the mobility of BC, particularly with reference to its vertical mobility, is scarce. We studied the amount of BC in two temperate grassland fields (eutric clayey Camibsol,) that were established in 2001 on former cropland. Volumetric soil samples (0-50 cm, 5 cm increments) were taken at 10 spots in each field in 2001, 2006 and 2011. One of the fields was ploughed in 2007 and the sward was re-sown. BC content was measured by differential scanning calorimetry for a total number of c. 500 samples. The mean BC/OC ratio was 0.10 (±0.05) and reached 0.25 in some samples. Radiocarbon measurements from 24 bulk soil samples revealed relatively small 14C contents in 2001 (92±2.7 pMC) which increased over time (2006: 99.0±1.1 pMC; 2011: 99.1±1.1 pMC). Thermal fractionation of BC by DSC revealed calibrated BC ages of 400 to 1000 years (pMC 87-94), suggesting that BC originates from medieval and post-medieval fire clearings. The change in soil signature may have been caused by a preferential transport of old BC down the soil profile, leading to a selective enrichment of younger soil C over time. In line with this interpretation the DSC measurements suggest that in both fields, BC concentrations significantly decreased for most layers between 2001 and 2006. However, between 2006 and 2011, no further vertical reallocation was observed in the continuous grassland, whereas BC contents of the field ploughed in 2007 significantly increased in the top layers. Together, these data suggest that ploughing in 2001 triggered subsequent

  3. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  4. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K J; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21(st) century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  5. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K. J.; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K.; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  6. [Somatic polyploidy associated metabolic changes revealed by modular biology].

    PubMed

    Anatskaia, O V; Vinogradov, A E

    2010-01-01

    Excessive somatic polyploidy usually accompanies physiologic and pathologic overload and it is generally accepted as a symptom of pathology. At the same time, polyploidy cells exist in most fungal, plant, mollusk, fish, bird and mammalian tissues confirming their great evolutionary success. The secret of this success remains enigmatic. Since transcriptome rearrangements usually start with metabolic flux redistribution, we decided to investigate firstly the effects of polyploidy on cell metabolism. Using multitest approach of modular biology and databases Entrez Gene, RefSeq, GNF SymAtlas, Gene Ontology, KEGG, BioCarta; MsigDb, Reactome, GenMAPP, and HumanCyc, we performed detailed comparison of metabolic genes expression in human and mouse organs with reciprocal pattern of polyploidy (i. e. in the heart and in the liver). Pairwise criss-cross comparison of diploid vs. polyploid organs allowed removing species- and tissue-specific effects. From our results, polyploidy is associated with rearrangements of main metabolic pathways. We found deep depression of mitochondrial processes, features of autophagia, and increased carbohydrate degradation and lipid biosynthesis. Taken together, these changes pointed to the energy and oxygen deprivation. We also found clear indications of enhanced oxidative stress protection. The major of them are triggering of pentose-phosphate pathway, depression of mitochondria-cytoplasm electron shuttles, and impartment of electron flows across 1 (NADH dehydrogenase) and IV (cytochrome c-oxydase) breath complexes. We suggest that all these changes are necessary for the increase in metabolic plasticity and for the protection of replicating DNA from oxidative damage. PMID:20302017

  7. Genome-wide association scan for five major dimensions of personality

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Deiana, Barbara; Usala, Gianluca; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Scally, Matthew; Patriciu, Nicholas; Chen, Wei-Min; Distel, Marijn A; Slagboom, Eline P; Boomsma, Dorret I; Villafuerte, Sandra; Śliwerska, Elżbieta; Burmeister, Margit; Amin, Najaf; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Personality traits are summarized by five broad dimensions with pervasive influences on major life outcomes, strong links to psychiatric disorders, and clear heritable components. To identify genetic variants associated with each of the five dimensions of personality we performed a genome wide association (GWA) scan of 3,972 individuals from a genetically isolated population within Sardinia, Italy. Based on analyses of 362,129 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) we found several strong signals within or near genes previously implicated in psychiatric disorders. They include the association of Neuroticism with SNAP25 (rs362584, P = 5 × 10−5), Extraversion with BDNF and two cadherin genes (CDH13 and CDH23; Ps < 5 × 10−5), Openness with CNTNAP2 (rs10251794, P = 3 × 10−5), Agreeableness with CLOCK (rs6832769, P = 9 × 10−6), and Conscientiousness with DYRK1A (rs2835731, P = 3 × 10−5). Effect sizes were small (less than 1% of variance), and most failed to replicate in the follow-up independent samples (N up to 3,903), though the association between Agreeableness and CLOCK was supported in two of three replication samples (overall P = 2 × 10−5). We infer that a large number of loci may influence personality traits and disorders, requiring larger sample sizes for the GWA approach to identify significant genetic variants. PMID:18957941

  8. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  9. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  10. Regarding the Credibility of Data Showing an Alleged Association of Cancer with Radiation from CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Socol, Yehoshua; Welsh, James S

    2016-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans are of high clinical value as a diagnostic technique, and new applications continue to be identified. However, their application is challenged by emerging concerns regarding carcinogenesis from their radiation. Recent articles made a significant contribution to the above-mentioned concerns by reporting evidence for direct association of the radiation from CT scans with cancer. Such interpretation of the data has already been criticized; there is the possibility of reverse causation due to confounding factors. Nevertheless, such work has had a high impact, with one article being cited more than 300 times from the Web of Science Core Collection within 2 years. However, the data points on cancer relative risk versus CT dose in that article fit straight lines corresponding to the linear no-threshold hypothesis suspiciously well. Here, by applying rigorous statistical analysis, it is shown that the probability of the fit truly being that good or better is only 2%. The results of such studies therefore appear "too good to be true" and the credibility of their conclusions must be questioned. PMID:25616624

  11. Thoracic ultrasound for pleural effusion: delays and cost associated with departmental scanning.

    PubMed

    Bateman, K; Downey, D G; Teare, T

    2010-04-01

    Pleural effusion is a common clinical condition on medical wards and the majority of cases undergo pleural aspiration or chest drain insertion as a diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. The use of a thoracic ultrasound scan (USS) improves diagnostic yield for pleural fluid aspiration and reduces complications and USS is increasingly recommended prior to all pleural aspirations or drains and 'real time' scanning which, as well as potentially reducing delays, enhances the safety of the procedure. In many U.K hospitals a thoracic USS is still routinely performed in the radiology department. We reviewed radiology records and case notes from hospital in-patients to assess potential delays and associated costs with departmental thoracic USS and to identify cases where physician-led portable USS would potentially have improved the patient's journey. We demonstrated delays resulting in significant financial costs to the hospital of an estimated pound17, 880 per annum. However, the cost to the patient is also significant, both in terms of patient experience (many of whom will have an underlying diagnosis of metastatic carcinoma and with a limited life expectancy) but also patient safety. Respiratory physicians are increasingly recognising the importance of portable thoracic USS to guide pleural procedures and there has been increasing use of physician-led portable thoracic USS. Hospitals should be encouraged to fund both portable thoracic USS equipment but it is also crucial that training in this area is properly supported. PMID:20097552

  12. Tree Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Maxwell, Taylor; Posada, David; Stengård, Jari H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    We use evolutionary trees of haplotypes to study phenotypic associations by exhaustively examining all possible biallelic partitions of the tree, a technique we call tree scanning. If the first scan detects significant associations, additional rounds of tree scanning are used to partition the tree into three or more allelic classes. Two worked examples are presented. The first is a reanalysis of associations between haplotypes at the Alcohol Dehydrogenase locus in Drosophila melanogaster that was previously analyzed using a nested clade analysis, a more complicated technique for using haplotype trees to detect phenotypic associations. Tree scanning and the nested clade analysis yield the same inferences when permutation testing is used with both approaches. The second example is an analysis of associations between variation in various lipid traits and genetic variation at the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in three human populations. Tree scanning successfully identified phenotypic associations expected from previous analyses. Tree scanning for the most part detected more associations and provided a better biological interpretative framework than single SNP analyses. We also show how prior information can be incorporated into the tree scan by starting with the traditional three electrophoretic alleles at APOE. Tree scanning detected genetically determined phenotypic heterogeneity within all three electrophoretic allelic classes. Overall, tree scanning is a simple, powerful, and flexible method for using haplotype trees to detect phenotype/genotype associations at candidate loci. PMID:15371364

  13. Combining microtomy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for structural analyses of plant-fungus associations.

    PubMed

    Rath, Magnus; Grolig, Franz; Haueisen, Janine; Imhof, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    The serious problem of extended tissue thickness in the analysis of plant-fungus associations was overcome using a new method that combines physical and optical sectioning of the resin-embedded sample by microtomy and confocal microscopy. Improved tissue infiltration of the fungal-specific, high molecular weight fluorescent probe wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 633 resulted in high fungus-specific fluorescence even in deeper tissue sections. If autofluorescence was insufficient, additional counterstaining with Calcofluor White M2R or propidium iodide was applied in order to visualise the host plant tissues. Alternatively, the non-specific fluorochrome acid fuchsine was used for rapid staining of both, the plant and the fungal cells. The intricate spatial arrangements of the plant and fungal cells were preserved by immobilization in the hydrophilic resin Unicryl™. Microtomy was used to section the resin-embedded roots or leaves until the desired plane was reached. The data sets generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the remaining resin stubs allowed the precise spatial reconstruction of complex structures in the plant-fungus associations of interest. This approach was successfully tested on tissues from ectomycorrhiza (Betula pendula), arbuscular mycorrhiza (Galium aparine; Polygala paniculata, Polygala rupestris), ericoid mycorrhiza (Calluna vulgaris), orchid mycorrhiza (Limodorum abortivum, Serapias parviflora) and on one leaf-fungus association (Zymoseptoria tritici on Triticum aestivum). The method provides an efficient visualisation protocol applicable with a wide range of plant-fungus symbioses. PMID:24249491

  14. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P.; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-07-01

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers.

  15. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-01-01

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers. PMID:27445217

  16. The intrinsic defect structure of exfoliated MoS2 single layers revealed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vancsó, Péter; Magda, Gábor Zsolt; Pető, János; Noh, Ji-Young; Kim, Yong-Sung; Hwang, Chanyong; Biró, László P.; Tapasztó, Levente

    2016-01-01

    MoS2 single layers have recently emerged as strong competitors of graphene in electronic and optoelectronic device applications due to their intrinsic direct bandgap. However, transport measurements reveal the crucial role of defect-induced electronic states, pointing out the fundamental importance of characterizing their intrinsic defect structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is able to image atomic scale defects in MoS2 single layers, but the imaged defect structure is far from the one probed in the electronic devices, as the defect density and distribution are substantially altered during the TEM imaging. Here, we report that under special imaging conditions, STM measurements can fully resolve the native atomic scale defect structure of MoS2 single layers. Our STM investigations clearly resolve a high intrinsic concentration of individual sulfur atom vacancies, and experimentally identify the nature of the defect induced electronic mid-gap states, by combining topographic STM images with ab intio calculations. Experimental data on the intrinsic defect structure and the associated defect-bound electronic states that can be directly used for the interpretation of transport measurements are essential to fully understand the operation, reliability and performance limitations of realistic electronic devices based on MoS2 single layers. PMID:27445217

  17. Extension of Type 2 Diabetes Genome-Wide Association Scan Results in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Allan F.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Saxena, Richa; Pollin, Toni I.; Franks, Paul W.; Hanson, Robert L.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Genome-wide association scans (GWASs) have identified novel diabetes-associated genes. We evaluated how these variants impact diabetes incidence, quantitative glycemic traits, and response to preventive interventions in 3,548 subjects at high risk of type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which examined the effects of lifestyle intervention, metformin, and troglitazone versus placebo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— We genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near diabetes-associated loci, including EXT2, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, HHEX, LOC387761, and SLC30A8 in DPP participants and performed Cox regression analyses using genotype, intervention, and their interactions as predictors of diabetes incidence. We evaluated their effect on insulin resistance and secretion at 1 year. RESULTS— None of the selected SNPs were associated with increased diabetes incidence in this population. After adjustments for ethnicity, baseline insulin secretion was lower in subjects with the risk genotype at HHEX rs1111875 (P = 0.01); there were no significant differences in baseline insulin sensitivity. Both at baseline and at 1 year, subjects with the risk genotype at LOC387761 had paradoxically increased insulin secretion; adjustment for self-reported ethnicity abolished these differences. In ethnicity-adjusted analyses, we noted a nominal differential improvement in β-cell function for carriers of the protective genotype at CDKN2A/B after 1 year of troglitazone treatment (P = 0.01) and possibly lifestyle modification (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS— We were unable to replicate the GWAS findings regarding diabetes risk in the DPP. We did observe genotype associations with differences in baseline insulin secretion at the HHEX locus and a possible pharmacogenetic interaction at CDKNA2/B. PMID:18544707

  18. Genomewide Association Scan of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviour in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schosser, Alexandra; Butler, Amy W.; Ising, Marcus; Perroud, Nader; Uher, Rudolf; Ng, Mandy Y.; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.; Korszun, Ania; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian; Gill, Michael; Rice, John P.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mors, Ole; Rietschel, Marcella; Lucae, Susanne; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Preisig, Martin; Perry, Julia; Tozzi, Federica; Muglia, Pierandrea; Aitchison, Katherine J.; Breen, Gerome; Craig, Ian W.; Farmer, Anne E.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; McGuffin, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Suicidal behaviour can be conceptualised as a continuum from suicidal ideation, to suicidal attempts to completed suicide. In this study we identify genes contributing to suicidal behaviour in the depression study RADIANT. Methodology/Principal Findings A quantitative suicidality score was composed of two items from the SCAN interview. In addition, the 251 depression cases with a history of serious suicide attempts were classified to form a discrete trait. The quantitative trait was correlated with younger onset of depression and number of episodes of depression, but not with gender. A genome-wide association study of 2,023 depression cases was performed to identify genes that may contribute to suicidal behaviour. Two Munich depression studies were used as replication cohorts to test the most strongly associated SNPs. No SNP was associated at genome-wide significance level. For the quantitative trait, evidence of association was detected at GFRA1, a receptor for the neurotrophin GDRA (p = 2e-06). For the discrete trait of suicide attempt, SNPs in KIAA1244 and RGS18 attained p-values of <5e-6. None of these SNPs showed evidence for replication in the additional cohorts tested. Candidate gene analysis provided some support for a polymorphism in NTRK2, which was previously associated with suicidality. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a genome-wide assessment of possible genetic contribution to suicidal behaviour in depression but indicates a genetic architecture of multiple genes with small effects. Large cohorts will be required to dissect this further. PMID:21750702

  19. Combinatorial Mismatch Scan (CMS) for loci associated with dementia in the Amish

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Jacob L; Hahs, Daniel W; Jiang, Lan; Scott, William K; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Jackson, Charles E; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2006-01-01

    Background Population heterogeneity may be a significant confounding factor hampering detection and verification of late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) susceptibility genes. The Amish communities located in Indiana and Ohio are relatively isolated populations that may have increased power to detect disease susceptibility genes. Methods We recently performed a genome scan of dementia in this population that detected several potential loci. However, analyses of these data are complicated by the highly consanguineous nature of these Amish pedigrees. Therefore we applied the Combinatorial Mismatch Scanning (CMS) method that compares identity by state (IBS) (under the presumption of identity by descent (IBD)) sharing in distantly related individuals from such populations where standard linkage and association analyses are difficult to implement. CMS compares allele sharing between individuals in affected and unaffected groups from founder populations. Comparisons between cases and controls were done using two Fisher's exact tests, one testing for excess in IBS allele frequency and the other testing for excess in IBS genotype frequency for 407 microsatellite markers. Results In all, 13 dementia cases and 14 normal controls were identified who were not related at least through the grandparental generation. The examination of allele frequencies identified 24 markers (6%) nominally (p ≤ 0.05) associated with dementia; the most interesting (empiric p ≤ 0.005) markers were D3S1262, D5S211, and D19S1165. The examination of genotype frequencies identified 21 markers (5%) nominally (p ≤ 0.05) associated with dementia; the most significant markers were both located on chromosome 5 (D5S1480 and D5S211). Notably, one of these markers (D5S211) demonstrated differences (empiric p ≤ 0.005) under both tests. Conclusion Our results provide the initial groundwork for identifying genes involved in late-onset Alzheimer's disease within the Amish community. Genes identified within

  20. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria. PMID:25483987

  1. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  2. Structural reconstruction and spontaneous formation of Fe polynuclears: a self-assembly of Fe-porphyrin coordination chains on Au(111) revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxu; Zhou, Kun; Shi, Ziliang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    A self-assembled Fe-porphyrin coordination chain structure on a Au(111) surface is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), revealing structural reconstruction resulting from an alternative change of molecular orientations and spontaneous formation of uniformly sized Fe polynuclears. The alternation of the molecular orientations is ascribed to the cooperation of the attractive coordination and the intermolecular steric repulsion as elucidated by high-resolution STM observations. Furthermore, chemical control experiments are carried out to determine the number of atoms in an Fe polynuclear, suggesting a tentative Fe dinuclear-module that serves not only as a coordination center to link porphyrin units together but also as a "dangling" site for further functionalization by a guest terpyridine ligand. The chain structure and the Fe polynuclears are stable up to 320 K as revealed by real-time STM scanning. Annealing at higher temperatures converts the chain structure into a two-dimensional coordination structure. PMID:27167835

  3. A Genome-Wide Scan of Selective Sweeps and Association Mapping of Fruit Traits Using Microsatellite Markers in Watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Umesh K.; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R.; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C.; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5′ untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness. PMID:25425675

  4. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps and association mapping of fruit traits using microsatellite markers in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Umesh K; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5' untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness. PMID:25425675

  5. Aerosol size distribution estimation and associated uncertainty for measurement with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquelin, L.; Fischer, N.; Motzkus, C.; Mace, T.; Gensdarmes, F.; Le Brusquet, L.; Fleury, G.

    2013-04-01

    Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) is a high resolution nanoparticle sizing system that has long been hailed as the researcher's choice for airborne nanoparticle size characterization for nano applications including nanotechnology research and development. SMPS is widely used as the standard method to measure airborne particle size distributions below 1 μm. It is composed of two devices: a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) selects particle sizes thanks to their electrical mobility and a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) enlarges particles to make them detectable by common optical counters. System raw data represent the number of particles counted over several classes of mobility diameters. Then, common inversion procedures lead to the estimation of the aerosol size distribution. In this paper, we develop a methodology to compute the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the size distribution when several experiences have been carried out. The requirement to repeat the measure ensures a realistic variability on the simulated data to be generated. The work we present consists in considering both the uncertainties coming from the experimental dispersion and the uncertainties induced by the lack of knowledge on physical phenomena. Experimental dispersion is quantified with the experimental data while the lack of knowledge is modelled via the existing physical theories and the judgements of experts in the field of aerosol science. Thus, running Monte-Carlo simulations give an estimation of the size distribution and its corresponding confidence region.

  6. Power and sample size estimation for epigenome-wide association scans to detect differential DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Bell, Jordana T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epigenome-wide association scans (EWAS) are under way for many complex human traits, but EWAS power has not been fully assessed. We investigate power of EWAS to detect differential methylation using case-control and disease-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin designs with genome-wide DNA methylation arrays. Methods and Results: We performed simulations to estimate power under the case-control and discordant MZ twin EWAS study designs, under a range of epigenetic risk effect sizes and conditions. For example, to detect a 10% mean methylation difference between affected and unaffected subjects at a genome-wide significance threshold of P = 1 × 10−6, 98 MZ twin pairs were required to reach 80% EWAS power, and 112 cases and 112 controls pairs were needed in the case-control design. We also estimated the minimum sample size required to reach 80% EWAS power under both study designs. Our analyses highlighted several factors that significantly influenced EWAS power, including sample size, epigenetic risk effect size, the variance of DNA methylation at the locus of interest and the correlation in DNA methylation patterns within the twin sample. Conclusions: We provide power estimates for array-based DNA methylation EWAS under case-control and disease-discordant MZ twin designs, and explore multiple factors that impact on EWAS power. Our results can help guide EWAS experimental design and interpretation for future epigenetic studies. PMID:25972603

  7. Recent Developments in Genomewide Association Scans: A Workshop Summary and Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W.; Duggan, David

    2005-01-01

    With the imminent availability of ultra-high-volume genotyping platforms (on the order of 100,000–1,000,000 genotypes per sample) at a manageable cost, there is growing interest in the possibility of conducting genomewide association studies for a variety of diseases but, so far, little consensus on methods to design and analyze them. In April 2005, an international group of >100 investigators convened at the University of Southern California over the course of 2 days to compare notes on planned or ongoing studies and to debate alternative technologies, study designs, and statistical methods. This report summarizes these discussions in the context of the relevant literature. A broad consensus emerged that the time was now ripe for launching such studies, and several common themes were identified—most notably the considerable efficiency gains of multistage sampling design, specifically those made by testing only a portion of the subjects with a high-density genomewide technology, followed by testing additional subjects and/or additional SNPs at regions identified by this initial scan. PMID:16080110

  8. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep. PMID:26990958

  9. Associative symmetry of the memory for object-location associations as revealed by the testing effect.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Tobias; Schoell, Eszter; Büchel, Christian

    2008-06-01

    The nature of episodic associations has been subject to a long standing debate, where the two opposing positions postulate associations as either a holistic representation of the constituent elements or as independently modifiable pointers between them. In spite of a history of inconsistent findings, evidence in favour of the theory of symmetric associations has accumulated, yet only for verbal memory [Caplan, J. B., Glaholt, M. G., & McIntosh, A. R. (2006). Linking associative and serial list memory: Pairs versus triples. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 32(6), 1244-1265; Kahana, M. J. (2002). Associative symmetry and memory theory. Memory and Cognition, 30(6), 823-840]. Although object-location associations differ in several fundamental characteristics from verbal paired-associates, we recently found associative symmetry in the memory for this class of associations as well [Sommer, T., Rose, M., & Büchel, C. (2007). Associative symmetry vs. independent associations in the memory for object-location associations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33(1), 90-106]. Due to the inconsistencies in the verbal literature, we felt it to be pertinent to confirm this finding using another experimental approach. Based on recent advances in understanding the effects of successive testing, we were able to make use of this knowledge and introduce this effect as an experimental manipulation in the study of associative symmetry. In particular, we investigated whether the influence of a prior memory test on a subsequent memory test differs when the same or opposite constituent element of an object-location paired-associate cues the retrieval on each test. We observed an identical testing effect for both conditions, which was exclusively driven by reminiscence, the recovery of previously inaccessible information. This finding lends strong support in favour of holistically or symmetrically represented object

  10. Recent rock fall activity in the Wetterstein Mountains revealed by a time series of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpa, Anne; Baewert, Henning; Cook, Kristen; Morche, David

    2015-04-01

    The north face of the Hochwanner in the Reintal valley, Wetterstein Mountains, southern Germany, has been a site of frequent rock fall activity for the past several hundred years. The so-called 'Steingerümpel' rock fall included an estimated volume of 2.3-2.7 x 106 m3 and led to damming of the Partnach river. This event was dated to 1400-1600 AD. The rock fall left a prominent scar in the rock face where subsequent rock fall activity was concentrated, postulated to be a 'delayed consequence' of the Steingerümpel event. Previous workers used airborne and terrestrial laser scan data to evaluate the volume of the detached material and the deposits on the talus cone at the foot of the slope from the 'delayed consequence' activity between 2006 and 2008 (Heckmann et al., 2012). The largest event during this period was a 5 x 104 m3 rock fall in August 2007. We compared the data of six terrestrial laser scans, which were acquired in June and September 2008, September 2010, June 2011, August 2013, October and November 2014, in order to assess the volumes of detached material after the large rock fall event of 2007. The aim is to investigate the post-event activity at a site of a large rock fall in order to give estimates about the timing when the activity is back to normal conditions in relation to the magnitude of the large event. Although no large rock fall occurred in the observation period, the comparison of the laser scan data indicate that the average rock wall retreat at this site is still higher compared to the mean annual rock wall retreat rate of 0.54 mm/yr for the last millennium in the Reintal valley (Krautblatter et al., 2012). This shows that sites of large rock falls remain active even years after the event. Heckmann, T.; Bimböse, M.; Krautblatter, M.; Haas, F.; Becht, M.; Morche, D. (2012): From geotechnical analysis to quantification and modelling using LiDAR data: a study on rockfall in the Reintal catchment, Bavarian Alps, Germany; Earth Surface

  11. Temporal associative processes revealed by intrusions in paired-associate recall.

    PubMed

    Davis, Orin C; Geller, Aaron S; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J

    2008-02-01

    Although much is known about the factors that influence the acquisition and retention of individual paired associates, the existence of temporally defined associations spanning multiple pairs has not been demonstrated. We report two experiments in which subjects studied randomly paired nouns for a subsequent cued recall test. When subjects recalled nontarget items, their intrusions tended to come from nearby pairs. This across-pair contiguity effect was graded, spanning noncontiguously studied word pairs. The existence of such long-range temporally defined associations lends further support to contextual-retrieval models of episodic association. PMID:18605481

  12. Revealing the Role of Catalysts in Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers by Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Zhong, Jun; Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Sun, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    The identification of effective components on the atomic scale in carbon nanomaterials which improve the performance in various applications remains outstanding challenges. Here the catalyst residues in individual carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) were clearly imaged with a concurrent characterization of their electronic structure by nanoscale scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Except for prominent catalyst nanoparticle at the tip, tiny catalyst clusters along the tube (fiber) were detected, indicating a migration of the catalysts with the growth of CNTs (CNFs). The observation provides the direct evidence on the atomic metal in CNT for oxygen reduction reported in the literature. Interaction between catalysts (Fe, Ni) and CNTs (CNFs) at the tip was also identified by comparing the X-ray absorption spectra. A deep understanding of catalyst residues such as Fe or Ni in carbon nanomaterials is very vital to growth mechanism development and practical applications. PMID:24398972

  13. Super-Resolution Scanning Patch-Clamp Reveals Clustering of Functional Ion Channels in the Adult Ventricular Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Anamika; Lin, Xianming; Novak, Pavel; Mehta, Kinneri; Korchev, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Compartmentation of ion channels on the cardiomyocyte surface is important for electrical propagation and electromechanical coupling. The specialized T-tubule and costameric structures facilitate spatial coupling of various ion channels and receptors. Existing methods like immunofluorescence and patch-clamp techniques are limited in their ability to localize functional ion channels. As such, a correlation between channel protein location and channel function remains incomplete. Objective To validate a method that permits to routinely image the topography of a live cardiomyocyte, and then study clustering of functional ion channels from a specific microdomain. Methods and Results We used scanning ion conductance microscopy and conventional cell-attached patch-clamp with a software modification that allows controlled increase of pipette tip diameter. The sharp nanopipette used for topography scan was modified into a larger patch pipette which can be positioned with nanoscale precision to a specific site of interest (crest, groove or T-tubules of cardiomyocytes), and sealed to the membrane for cell-attached recording of ion channels. Using this method, we significantly increased the probability of detecting activity of L-type calcium channels in the T-tubules of ventricular cardiomyocytes. We also demonstrated that active sodium channels do not distribute homogenously on the sarcolemma but rather, they segregate into clusters of various densities -most crowded in the crest region- that are surrounded by areas virtually free of functional sodium channels. Conclusions Our new method substantially increases the throughput of recording location-specific functional ion channels on the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma, thus allowing characterization of ion channels in relation to the microdomain in which they reside. PMID:23438901

  14. Results of integrated geological-geophysical investigations in Makhtesh Ramon (Israel) aimed to revealing diamondiferous associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L.; Kouznetsov, S.; Sazonova, L.; Korotaeva, N.; Surkov, A.; Smirnov, S.; Vaksman, V.; Klepatch, C.; Itkis, S.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of several geological, mineralogical, petrological and geophysical factors makes possible to select the Makhtesh Ramon erosional-tectonic structure (southern Israel) for searching of diamondiferous associations. About 200 kg of geological associations (concentrate) have been withdrawn in this area (during 2001-2002 field works) from the depth of 0.2-1 m for mineralogical-geochemical analyses. The following minerals of the anticipating diamondiferous association were revealed in the selected probes: (first group) - chrome-diopside, orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope, picroilmenite, moissanite, corundum, perovskite, black spinel, olivine, anatase, titanomagnetite and tourmaline (including black samples). Chrome-diopside as an indicator mineral may be found only in the neighboring zone of basic pipe occurrence. Orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope and tourmaline also are essential indicators of the presence of diamondiferous association in the studied district. Moissanite and corundum are the rarely occurring minerals indicating certain presence of buried kimberlite pipes. These minerals do not rolled and oxidized that is additional evidence of the neighboring occurrence of the indigenous rocks. Data of electronic microscopy show that the grains of (1) picroilmenite and (2) pyrope contain, respectively: (1) cobalt, chrome, magnesium and nickel and (2) chrome, magnesium and aluminum. These data indicate that both picroilmenite and pyrope have the hyper-abyssal origin. Besides above mentioned minerals, list of indicator minerals (second group) in the probes includes: hexagonal quartz, feldspars, pyroxenes (black, green, dark-green, gray-green, brown-green), magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, galenite, pyrite, limonite, small magnetic spheres (quant. matter), mica, hydro-mica, chromite, leucoxene, zircon, rutile, secondary minerals of cuprum (green and blue), calcite, etc. The last minerals (by their combined considering with the first group) are also indicators

  15. The genetic architecture of seed composition in soybean is refined by genome-wide association scans across multiple populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to re...

  16. Are Prenatal Ultrasound Scans Associated with the Autism Phenotype? Follow-Up of a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoch, Yonit K.; Williams, Cori J.; Granich, Joanna; Hunt, Anna M.; Landau, Lou I.; Newnham, John P.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2012-01-01

    An existing randomised controlled trial was used to investigate whether multiple ultrasound scans may be associated with the autism phenotype. From 2,834 single pregnancies, 1,415 were selected at random to receive ultrasound imaging and continuous wave Doppler flow studies at five points throughout pregnancy (Intensive) and 1,419 to receive a…

  17. Cysteine Scanning of CFTR’s First Transmembrane Segment Reveals Its Plausible Roles in Gating and Permeation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaolong; Bai, Yonghong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Previous cysteine scanning studies of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel have identified several transmembrane segments (TMs), including TM1, 3, 6, 9, and 12, as structural components of the pore. Some of these TMs such as TM6 and 12 may also be involved in gating conformational changes. However, recent results on TM1 seem puzzling in that the observed reactive pattern was quite different from those seen with TM6 and 12. In addition, whether TM1 also plays a role in gating motions remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated CFTR’s TM1 by applying methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents from both cytoplasmic and extracellular sides of the membrane. Our experiments identified four positive positions, E92, K95, Q98, and L102, when the negatively charged MTSES was applied from the cytoplasmic side. Intriguingly, these four residues reside in the extracellular half of TM1 in previously defined CFTR topology; we thus extended our scanning to residues located extracellularly to L102. We found that cysteines introduced into positions 106, 107, and 109 indeed react with extracellularly applied MTS probes, but not to intracellularly applied reagents. Interestingly, whole-cell A107C-CFTR currents were very sensitive to changes of bath pH as if the introduced cysteine assumes an altered pKa-like T338C in TM6. These findings lead us to propose a revised topology for CFTR’s TM1 that spans at least from E92 to Y109. Additionally, side-dependent modifications of these positions indicate a narrow region (L102-I106) that prevents MTS reagents from penetrating the pore, a picture similar to what has been reported for TM6. Moreover, modifications of K95C, Q98C, and L102C exhibit strong state dependency with negligible modification when the channel is closed, suggesting a significant rearrangement of TM1 during CFTR’s gating cycle. The structural implications of these findings are discussed in light of the crystal structures of ABC

  18. Monitoring Si growth on Ag(111) with scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that silicene structure involves silver atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Prévot, G.; Bernard, R.; Cruguel, H.; Borensztein, Y.

    2014-11-24

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), the elaboration of the so-called silicene layer on Ag(111) is monitored in real time during Si evaporation at different temperatures. It is shown that the growth of silicene is accompanied by the release of about 65% of the surface Ag atoms from the Si covered areas. We observe that Si islands develop on the Ag terraces and Si strips at the Ag step edges, progressively forming ordered (4×4), (√(13)×√(13)) R13.9°, and dotted phases. Meanwhile, displaced Ag atoms group to develop additional bare Ag terraces growing round the Si islands from the pristine Ag step edges. This indicates a strong interaction between Si and Ag atoms, with an important modification of the Ag substrate beneath the surface layer. This observation is in contradiction with the picture of a silicene layer weakly interacting with the unreconstructed Ag substrate, and strongly indicates that the structure of silicene on Ag(111) corresponds either to a Si-Ag surface alloy or to a Si plane covered with Ag atoms.

  19. Lysine-scanning Mutagenesis Reveals an Amendable Face of the Cyclotide Kalata B1 for the Optimization of Nematocidal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Colgrave, Michelle L.; Clark, Richard J.; Kotze, Andrew C.; Craik, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclotides are a family of macrocyclic peptides that combine the unique features of a head-to-tail cyclic backbone and a cystine knot motif, the combination of which imparts them with extraordinary stability. The prototypic cyclotide kalata B1 is toxic against two economically important gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. A lysine scan was conducted to examine the effect of the incorporation of positive charges into the kalata B1 cyclotide framework. Each of the non-cysteine residues in this 29-amino acid peptide was successively substituted with lysine, and the nematocidal and hemolytic activities of the suite of mutants were determined. Substitution of 11 residues within kalata B1 decreased the nematocidal activity dramatically. On the other hand, six other residues that are clustered on the surface of kalata B1 were tolerant to Lys substitution, and indeed the introduction of positively charged residues into this region increased nematocidal activity. This activity was increased further in double and triple lysine mutants, with a maximal increase (relative to the native kalata B1) of 13-fold obtained with a triple lysine mutant (mutated at positions Thr-20, Asn-29, and Gly-1). Hemolytic activity correlated with the nematocidal activity of all lysine mutants. Our data clearly highlight the residues crucial for nematocidal and hemolytic activity in cyclotides, and demonstrate that the nematocidal activity of cyclotides can be increased by incorporation of basic amino acids. PMID:20103593

  20. Ion-Abrasion Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals Surface-Connected Tubular Conduits in HIV-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Adam E.; Narayan, Kedar; Shi, Dan; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Gousset, Karine; He, Haifeng; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Yoo, Terry S.; Bliss, Donald; Freed, Eric O.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1-containing internal compartments are readily detected in images of thin sections from infected cells using conventional transmission electron microscopy, but the origin, connectivity, and 3D distribution of these compartments has remained controversial. Here, we report the 3D distribution of viruses in HIV-1-infected primary human macrophages using cryo-electron tomography and ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM), a recently developed approach for nanoscale 3D imaging of whole cells. Using IA-SEM, we show the presence of an extensive network of HIV-1-containing tubular compartments in infected macrophages, with diameters of ∼150–200 nm, and lengths of up to ∼5 µm that extend to the cell surface from vesicular compartments that contain assembling HIV-1 virions. These types of surface-connected tubular compartments are not observed in T cells infected with the 29/31 KE Gag-matrix mutant where the virus is targeted to multi-vesicular bodies and released into the extracellular medium. IA-SEM imaging also allows visualization of large sheet-like structures that extend outward from the surfaces of macrophages, which may bend and fold back to allow continual creation of viral compartments and virion-lined channels. This potential mechanism for efficient virus trafficking between the cell surface and interior may represent a subversion of pre-existing vesicular machinery for antigen capture, processing, sequestration, and presentation. PMID:19779568

  1. Observations on the micromorphology of the tropical rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Green, E D; Baker, C

    1996-09-01

    Ornithonyssus bacoti (Hirst) is an important parasite of rodents. The characteristic shape of the dorsal and sternal shields and gnathosoma used as taxonomic characteristics was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The anal plate is distinctly pear-shaped with a pair of adanal setae lateral to the anal valves, a single postanal seta and a distinct dentate cribrum formed by peg-like projections. In the adult mites a peritreme extends anteriorly to the 1st coxa from the spiracle situated laterally between the 3rd and 4th coxa. The peritreme is an open canal protected by an overhanging dorsal ridge and lined with short peg-like aciculae. The gnathosoma includes a pair of pedipalps, a pair of protrusile chelicerae retracted into the hypostoma, and a serrate tritosternum ventrally. A unique feature to the normal setae of the pedipalps is a golf club-shaped seta which is found medially on the palp genu. A distinctive double-bladed 'palpal claw' or apotele is directed medially from the palp tibia. The pincer-like chela consists of a spear-like prong forming the moveable digit and a curved stylus-like fixed digit used to pierce the skin. Each leg ends with a pair of hooked tarsal claws and a pair of lateral comblike pretarsal appendages adjacent to the pulvillus. The pulvillus may be retracted, allowing the pretarsal operculum to function as a 'clasping organ' that enables the mite to clasp the hairs of the host during feeding. PMID:9120855

  2. Systems Genetic Validation of the SNP-Metabolite Association in Rice Via Metabolite-Pathway-Based Phenome-Wide Association Scans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaping; Liu, Yemao; Niu, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingyong; Hu, Xuehai; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xia, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    In the post-GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Scan) era, the interpretation of GWAS results is crucial to screen for highly relevant phenotype-genotype association pairs. Based on the single genotype-phenotype association test and a pathway enrichment analysis, we propose a Metabolite-pathway-based Phenome-Wide Association Scan (M-PheWAS) to analyze the key metabolite-SNP pairs in rice and determine the regulatory relationship by assessing similarities in the changes of enzymes and downstream products in a pathway. Two SNPs, sf0315305925 and sf0315308337, were selected using this approach, and their molecular function and regulatory relationship with Enzyme EC:5.5.1.6 and with flavonoids, a significant downstream regulatory metabolite product, were demonstrated. Moreover, a total of 105 crucial SNPs were screened using M-PheWAS, which may be important for metabolite associations. PMID:26640468

  3. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  4. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE. PMID:26667091

  5. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish.

    PubMed

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp, a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark "maze" and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. PMID:26961107

  6. Genome-wide association study reveals multiple loci associated with primary tooth development during infancy.

    PubMed

    Pillas, Demetris; Hoggart, Clive J; Evans, David M; O'Reilly, Paul F; Sipilä, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Millwood, Iona Y; Kaakinen, Marika; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Blane, David; Charoen, Pimphen; Sovio, Ulla; Pouta, Anneli; Freimer, Nelson; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Laitinen, Jaana; Vaara, Sarianna; Glaser, Beate; Crawford, Peter; Timpson, Nicholas J; Ring, Susan M; Deng, Guohong; Zhang, Weihua; McCarthy, Mark I; Deloukas, Panos; Peltonen, Leena; Elliott, Paul; Coin, Lachlan J M; Smith, George Davey; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2010-02-01

    Tooth development is a highly heritable process which relates to other growth and developmental processes, and which interacts with the development of the entire craniofacial complex. Abnormalities of tooth development are common, with tooth agenesis being the most common developmental anomaly in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study of time to first tooth eruption and number of teeth at one year in 4,564 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966) and 1,518 individuals from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). We identified 5 loci at P<5x10(-8), and 5 with suggestive association (P<5x10(-6)). The loci included several genes with links to tooth and other organ development (KCNJ2, EDA, HOXB2, RAD51L1, IGF2BP1, HMGA2, MSRB3). Genes at four of the identified loci are implicated in the development of cancer. A variant within the HOXB gene cluster associated with occlusion defects requiring orthodontic treatment by age 31 years. PMID:20195514

  7. Temporal Variations in the Roughness of Eroding River Banks Revealed by High-Resolution Digital Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, S. E.; Leyland, J.; Rinaldi, M.; Teruggi, L.; Ostuni, D.

    2010-12-01

    of the roughness is approximated as a series of user defined Gaussian functions, with the skin drag component characterised by the deviation of points from the fitted curves. In our study these bank ‘roughness profiles’ are extracted from an annual series (2003-present) of high-resolution DEMs of the river bank, the latter being constructed either through digital photogrammetry or terrestrial laser scanning surveys. The DEMs are used to quantify accurately the spatial trends and amounts of annual bank erosion observed in relation to the hydrological regime of the river, and are compared to the temporal variations in river bank form and skin roughness components as the bank erodes. The data are used to evaluate the extent to which there is a dynamic feedback between the bank erosion process and bank form roughness.

  8. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens. PMID:26496084

  9. Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario 2001 Environmental Scan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario, Toronto.

    The 2001 Environmental Scan for the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario is designed to assist colleges in their strategic planning processes. It provides information about economy and labor, various trends in education and training, postsecondary enrollment and demographics, transfer payments and operating grants, Ontario's…

  10. Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario 2002 Environmental Scan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of Ontario, Toronto.

    This environmental scan is designed to assist Ontario's colleges in their strategic planning processes. Ontario's colleges have supported a 35% increase in enrollment, with a 40% decrease in funding, over the last ten years, while operating costs have risen. In addition, Ontario eliminated the secondary school Ontario Academic Courses (OACs),…

  11. The interaction of asbestos and iron in lung tissue revealed by synchrotron-based scanning X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Schneider, Giulia; Salomé, Murielle; Schneider, Manuela; Calligaro, Carla; Kiskinova, Maya; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos is a potent carcinogen associated with malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer but its carcinogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Asbestos toxicity is ascribed to its particular physico-chemical characteristics, and one of them is the presence of and ability to adsorb iron, which may cause an alteration of iron homeostasis in the tissue. This observational study reports a combination of advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and micro-spectroscopic methods that provide correlative morphological and chemical information for shedding light on iron mobilization features during asbestos permanence in lung tissue. The results show that the processes responsible for the unusual distribution of iron at different stages of interaction with the fibres also involve calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. It has been confirmed that the dominant iron form present in asbestos bodies is ferritin, while the concurrent presence of haematite suggests alteration of iron chemistry during asbestos body permanence. PMID:23350030

  12. Potential for Adult-Based Epidemiological Studies to Characterize Overall Cancer Risks Associated with a Lifetime of CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor; Lubin, Jay H.; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that radiation exposure from pediatric CT scanning is associated with small excess cancer risks. However, the majority of CT scans are performed on adults, and most radiation-induced cancers appear during middle or old age, in the same age range as background cancers. Consequently, a logical next step is to investigate the effects of CT scanning in adulthood on lifetime cancer risks by conducting adult-based, appropriately designed epidemiological studies. Here we estimate the sample size required for such studies to detect CT-associated risks. This was achieved by incorporating different age-, sex-, time- and cancer type-dependent models of radiation carcinogenesis into an in silico simulation of a population-based cohort study. This approach simulated individual histories of chest and abdominal CT exposures, deaths and cancer diagnoses. The resultant sample sizes suggest that epidemiological studies of realistically sized cohorts can detect excess lifetime cancer risks from adult CT exposures. For example, retrospective analysis of CT exposure and cancer incidence data from a population-based cohort of 0.4 to 1.3 million (depending on the carcinogenic model) CT-exposed UK adults, aged 25–65 in 1980 and followed until 2015, provides 80% power for detecting cancer risks from chest and abdominal CT scans. PMID:24828111

  13. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals LEMD3 and WIF1 on SSC5 as the Candidates for Porcine Ear Size

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weizhen; Liu, Xin; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Kebin; Shi, Huibi; Zhang, Yuebo; Wang, Ligang; Wang, Lixian

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative trait loci (QTL) for porcine ear size was previously reported to mainly focus on SSC5 and SSC7. Recently, a missense mutation, G32E, in PPARD in the QTL interval on SSC7 was identified as the causative mutation for ear size. However, on account of the large interval of QTL, the responsible gene on SSC5 has not been identified. In this study, an intercross population was constructed from the large-eared Minzhu, an indigenous Chinese pig breed, and the Western commercial Large White pig to examine the genetic basis of ear size diversity. A GWAS was performed to detect SNPs significantly associated with ear size. Thirty-five significant SNPs defined a 10.78-Mb (30.14–40.92 Mb) region on SSC5. Further, combining linkage disequilibrium and haplotype sharing analysis, a reduced region of 3.07-Mb was obtained. Finally, by using a selective sweep analysis, a critical region of about 450-kb interval containing two annotated genes LEMD3 and WIF1 was refined in this work. Functional analysis indicated that both represent biological candidates for porcine ear size, with potential application in breeding programs. The two genes could also be used as novel references for further study of the mechanism underlying human microtia. PMID:25006967

  14. Correction of step artefact associated with MRI scanning of long bones.

    PubMed

    Rathnayaka, Kanchana; Cowin, Gary; Schuetz, Michael A; Sahama, Tony; Schmutz, Beat

    2013-07-01

    3D models of long bones are being utilised for a number of fields including orthopaedic implant design. Accurate reconstruction of 3D models is of utmost importance to design accurate implants to allow achieving a good alignment between two bone fragments. Thus for this purpose, CT scanners are employed to acquire accurate bone data exposing an individual to a high amount of ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a potential alternative to computed tomography (CT) for scanning of volunteers for 3D reconstruction of long bones, essentially avoiding the high radiation dose from CT. In MRI imaging of long bones, the artefacts due to random movements of the skeletal system create challenges for researchers as they generate inaccuracies in the 3D models generated by using data sets containing such artefacts. One of the defects that have been observed during an initial study is the lateral shift artefact occurring in the reconstructed 3D models. This artefact is believed to result from volunteers moving the leg during two successive scanning stages (the lower limb has to be scanned in at least five stages due to the limited scanning length of the scanner). As this artefact creates inaccuracies in the implants designed using these models, it needs to be corrected before the application of 3D models to implant design. Therefore, this study aimed to correct the lateral shift artefact using 3D modelling techniques. The femora of five ovine hind limbs were scanned with a 3T MRI scanner using a 3D vibe based protocol. The scanning was conducted in two halves, while maintaining a good overlap between them. A lateral shift was generated by moving the limb several millimetres between two scanning stages. The 3D models were reconstructed using a multi threshold segmentation method. The correction of the artefact was achieved by aligning the two halves using the robust iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, with the help of the overlapping

  15. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatos-DeVito, Maura; Schipul, Sarah E.; Bulluck, John C.; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4-13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD.…

  16. Chronic osteomyelitis: bone and gallium scan patterns associated with active disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Bone and gallium scans are used to assess osteomyelitis patients with prior bone disease. To refine the criteria for interpreting these scans, the data from 136 consecutive patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis were reviewed. Active osteomyelitis was diagnosed with surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 patients, excluded with the same criteria in 16, and excluded by clinical follow-up for at least 6 months in 71. Five different scintigraphic patterns were found. The true-positive and false-positive ratios, the likelihood ratios, and posterior probabilities for active osteomyelitis in each pattern were calculated. Only one pattern (gallium uptake exceeding bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake) was indicative of active disease. Other patterns slightly raised or decreased the probability of disease. The extent of these changes varies directly with the prior probability of disease, determined from patient-specific factors (e.g., clinical data, laboratory data, findings on plain films) known best by the referring clinician.

  17. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  18. A genome-wide association study reveals genes associated with fusarium ear rot resistance in a maize core diversity panel.

    PubMed

    Zila, Charles T; Samayoa, L Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B

    2013-11-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0-100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  19. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genes Associated with Fusarium Ear Rot Resistance in a Maize Core Diversity Panel

    PubMed Central

    Zila, Charles T.; Samayoa, L. Fernando; Santiago, Rogelio; Butrón, Ana; Holland, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a negative impact on agronomic performance. Identification of specific allele variants contributing to improved resistance may be useful to breeders by allowing selection of resistance alleles in coupling phase linkage with favorable agronomic characteristics. We report the results of a genome-wide association study to detect allele variants associated with increased resistance to Fusarium ear rot in a maize core diversity panel of 267 inbred lines evaluated in two sets of environments. We performed association tests with 47,445 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) while controlling for background genomic relationships with a mixed model and identified three marker loci significantly associated with disease resistance in at least one subset of environments. Each associated SNP locus had relatively small additive effects on disease resistance (±1.1% on a 0–100% scale), but nevertheless were associated with 3 to 12% of the genotypic variation within or across environment subsets. Two of three identified SNPs colocalized with genes that have been implicated with programmed cell death. An analysis of associated allele frequencies within the major maize subpopulations revealed enrichment for resistance alleles in the tropical/subtropical and popcorn subpopulations compared with other temperate breeding pools. PMID:24048647

  20. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J.; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−119), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  1. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  2. DTI and VBM reveal white matter changes without associated gray matter changes in patients with idiopathic restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Belke, Marcus; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Keil, Boris; Rosenow, Felix; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Knake, Susanne; Menzler, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We evaluated cerebral white and gray matter changes in patients with iRLS in order to shed light on the pathophysiology of this disease. Methods Twelve patients with iRLS were compared to 12 age- and sex-matched controls using whole-head diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) techniques. Evaluation of the DTI scans included the voxelwise analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). Results Diffusion tensor imaging revealed areas of altered FA in subcortical white matter bilaterally, mainly in temporal regions as well as in the right internal capsule, the pons, and the right cerebellum. These changes overlapped with changes in RD. Voxel-based morphometry did not reveal any gray matter alterations. Conclusions We showed altered diffusion properties in several white matter regions in patients with iRLS. White matter changes could mainly be attributed to changes in RD, a parameter thought to reflect altered myelination. Areas with altered white matter microstructure included areas in the internal capsule which include the corticospinal tract to the lower limbs, thereby supporting studies that suggest changes in sensorimotor pathways associated with RLS. PMID:26442748

  3. Meta-Analysis of 13 Genome Scans Reveals Multiple Cleft Lip/Palate Genes with Novel Loci on 9q21 and 2q32-35

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Cooper, Margaret E.; Goldstein, Toby; Maher, Brion S.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Schultz, Rebecca; Mansilla, M. Adela; Field, L. Leigh; Liu, You-e; Prescott, Natalie; Malcolm, Sue; Winter, Robin; Ray, Ajit; Moreno, Lina; Valencia, Consuelo; Neiswanger, Katherine; Wyszynski, Diego F.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Albacha-Hejazi, Hasan; Beaty, Terri H.; McIntosh, Iain; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Edwards, Matthew; Harkin, Louise; Scott, Rodney; Roddick, Laurence G.

    2004-01-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common birth defect with a complex etiology. A 10-cM genome scan of 388 extended multiplex families with CL/P from seven diverse populations (2,551 genotyped individuals) revealed CL/P genes in six chromosomal regions, including a novel region at 9q21 (heterogeneity LOD score [HLOD]=6.6). In addition, meta-analyses with the addition of results from 186 more families (six populations; 1,033 genotyped individuals) showed genomewide significance for 10 more regions, including another novel region at 2q32-35 (P=.0004). These are the first genomewide significant linkage results ever reported for CL/P, and they represent an unprecedented demonstration of the power of linkage analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. PMID:15185170

  4. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Gy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  5. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems. PMID:25754883

  6. Common Trends in Mutualism Revealed by Model Associations Between Invertebrates and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaston, John; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Mutually beneficial interactions between microbes and animals are a conserved and ubiquitous feature of biotic systems. In many instances animals, including humans, are dependent on their microbial associates for nutrition, defense, or development. To maintain these vital relationships animals have evolved processes that ensure faithful transmission of specific microbial symbionts between generations. Elucidating mechanisms of transmission and symbiont specificity has been aided by the study of experimentally tractable invertebrate animals with diverse and highly evolved associations with microbes. Here we review several invertebrate model systems that are contributing to our current understanding of symbiont transmission, recognition, and specificity. Although the details of transmission and symbiont selection vary among associations, comparisons of diverse mutualistic associations are revealing a number of common themes, including restriction of symbiont diversity during transmission and glycan-lectin interactions during partner selection and recruitment. PMID:19909347

  7. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  8. [Acute intestinal obstruction revealing enteropathy associated t-cell lymphoma, about a case].

    PubMed

    Garba, Abdoul Aziz; Adamou, Harissou; Magagi, Ibrahim Amadou; Brah, Souleymane; Habou, Oumarou

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare complication of celiac disease (CD). We report a case of EATL associated with CD revealed by acute intestinal obstruction. A North African woman of 38 years old with a history of infertility and chronic abdominal pain was admitted in emergency with acute intestinal obstruction. During the surgery, we found a tumor on the small intestine with mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the specimen objectified a digestive T lymphoma CD3+ and immunological assessment of celiac disease was positive. The diagnosis of EATL was thus retained. Chemotherapy (CHOEP protocol) was established as well as gluten-free diet with a complete response to treatment. The EATL is a rare complication of CD that can be revealed by intestinal obstruction. The prognosis can be improved by early treatment involving surgery and chemotherapy. Its prevention requires early diagnosis of celiac and gluten-free diets. PMID:27217874

  9. Using epigenome-wide association scans of DNA methylation in age-related complex human traits.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T

    2012-10-01

    With rapid technological advancements emerging epigenetic studies of complex traits have shifted from candidate gene analyses towards epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS). EWAS aim to systematically identify epigenetic variants across the genome that associate with complex phenotypes. Recent EWAS using case-control and disease-discordant identical twin designs have identified phenotype-associated differentially methylated regions for several traits. However, EWAS still face many challenges related to methodology, design and interpretation, owing to the dynamic nature of epigenetic variants over time. This article reviews analytical considerations in conducting EWAS and recent applications of this approach to human aging and age-related complex traits. PMID:23130833

  10. Endophenotyping reveals differential phenotype-genotype correlations between myopia-associated polymorphisms and eye biometric parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Huan; Chen, Haoyu; Huang, Shulan; Lin, Jianwei; Zheng, Yuqian; Xie, Mingliang; Lin, Wenjie; Pang, Chi Pui

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association with ocular biometric parameters in myopia-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the gap junction protein delta 2 (GJD2), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) genes in two geographically different Chinese cohorts. Methods In 814 unrelated Han Chinese individuals aged above 50 years including 362 inland residents and 432 island dwellers, comprehensive ophthalmic examinations were performed. Three SNPs, including GJD2 rs634990, IGF1 rs6214, and HGF rs3735520, were genotyped. Genetic association with ocular biometric parameters was analyzed in individual cohorts, using linear regression controlled for sex and age. Common associations shared by the two cohorts were revealed by meta-analysis. Results Meta-analysis showed that GJD2 rs634990 alone was not associated with any biometric parameters (adjusted p>0.645). The T allele of IGF1 rs6214 was specifically associated with thicker lens (β±SE=0.055±0.022, adjusted p=0.034). The A allele of HGF rs3735520 was associated with longer vitreous chamber depth (β±SE=0.143±0.060, adjusted p=0.050). Significant interaction between HGF rs3735520 and GJD2 rs634990 was found in association with axial length and vitreous chamber depth (adjusted p=0.003 and 0.033, respectively), and possibly with spherical error (adjusted p=0.056). Conclusions Our endophenotyping analysis showed differential association between selected myopia-associated genes and ocular biometric parameters in our Chinese cohorts, which may underline substantial but diversified effects of these genes and their interaction on the development of eye structure and etiology of myopia. PMID:22509107

  11. Abnormal Tc-99m-MDP/GA-67 scan patterns in association with active chronic osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Weissman, B.; McNeil, B.J.

    1985-05-01

    In this study the authors reviewed data from 136 patients (pts) in order to refine the interpretive criteria used to diagnose active osteomyelitis (AOM) in patients with previous bone disease (e.g., old osteomyelitis, fractures, orthopedic devices excluding prostheses). They evaluated bone (Tc-99mMDP) and gallium 67 studies and obtained followup in all pts. AOM was diagnosed by surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 pts and was excluded by the same criteria in 16 pts. An additional 71 pts had the diagnosis excluded by followup clinical criteria. Five patterns were found. T1: abnormal Tc-99m-MDP, normal Ga-67. T2: diffuse increased uptake of both radiopharmaceuticals with Tc-99m-MDP greater than Ga-67. T3: different geographic distribution, but similar intensities of uptake of both. T4: very similar uptake and distribution of both. T5: Ga-67 exceeded Tc-99m-MDP. The authors conclude that T5 is diagnostic of AOM, T3 and T4 raise the probability of AOM than before scanning, T1 and T2 decrease it.

  12. Direct observation of graphene growth and associated copper substrate dynamics by in situ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Weinberg, Gisela; Zhang, Qiang; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Kurnatowska, Michalina; Plodinec, Milivoj; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng; Schloegl, R; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2015-02-24

    This work highlights the importance of in situ experiments for an improved understanding of graphene growth on copper via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene growth inside the chamber of a modified environmental scanning electron microscope under relevant low-pressure CVD conditions allows visualizing structural dynamics of the active catalyst simultaneously with graphene nucleation and growth in an unparalleled way. It enables the observation of a complete CVD process from substrate annealing through graphene nucleation and growth and, finally, substrate cooling in real time and nanometer-scale resolution without the need of sample transfer. A strong dependence of surface dynamics such as sublimation and surface premelting on grain orientation is demonstrated, and the influence of substrate dynamics on graphene nucleation and growth is presented. Insights on the growth mechanism are provided by a simultaneous observation of the growth front propagation and nucleation rate. Furthermore, the role of trace amounts of oxygen during growth is discussed and related to graphene-induced surface reconstructions during cooling. Above all, this work demonstrates the potential of the method for in situ studies of surface dynamics on active metal catalysts. PMID:25584770

  13. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Maggioni, Davide; Arrigoni, Roberto; Seveso, Davide; Puce, Stefania; Galli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  14. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Simone; Maggioni, Davide; Arrigoni, Roberto; Seveso, Davide; Puce, Stefania; Galli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  15. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J; Acemel, Rafael D; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-06-16

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  16. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J.; Acemel, Rafael D.; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  17. Association between Periodontal Disease and Inflammatory Arthritis Reveals Modulatory Functions by Melanocortin Receptor Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F.M.; Norling, Lucy V.; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A.; da Silva, Tarcília A.; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp8–γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 μg dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 μg DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r−/− compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. PMID:24979595

  18. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective . Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent multi-site GWAS of DSM-IV-TR ADHD. Method . Families were ascertained at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH, N=309 trios), Washington University at St Louis (WASH-U, N=272 trios), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, N=156 trios). Genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip platforms. After applying quality control filters, association with ADHD was tested with 835,136 SNPs in 735 DSM-IV ADHD trios from 732 families. Results . Our smallest p-value (6.7E-07) did not reach the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance (5.0E-08) but one of the 20 most significant associations was located in a candidate gene of interest for ADHD, (SLC9A9, rs9810857, p=6.4E-6). We also conducted gene-based tests of candidate genes identified in the literature and found additional evidence of association with SLC9A9. Conclusion . We and our colleagues in the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium are working to pool together GWAS samples to establish the large data sets needed to follow-up on these results and to identify genes for ADHD and other disorders. PMID:20732626

  19. Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Weedon, Michael N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Perry, John R.B.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Shields, Beverley; Morris, Andrew P.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Harries, Lorna W.; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Owen, Katharine R.; Knight, Beatrice; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Doney, Alex S.F.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibility loci in and around the genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and IGF2BP2 and confirmed the recently described associations at HHEX/IDE and SLC30A8. Our findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, emphasizing the contribution of multiple variants of modest effect. The regions identified underscore the importance of pathways influencing pancreatic beta cell development and function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:17463249

  20. Association scan of 14,500 nonsynonymous SNPs in four diseases identifies autoimmunity variants.

    PubMed

    Burton, Paul R; Clayton, David G; Cardon, Lon R; Craddock, Nick; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; McCarthy, Mark I; Ouwehand, Willem H; Samani, Nilesh J; Todd, John A; Donnelly, Peter; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Davison, Dan; Easton, Doug; Evans, David M; Leung, Hin-Tak; Marchini, Jonathan L; Morris, Andrew P; Spencer, Chris C A; Tobin, Martin D; Attwood, Antony P; Boorman, James P; Cant, Barbara; Everson, Ursula; Hussey, Judith M; Jolley, Jennifer D; Knight, Alexandra S; Koch, Kerstin; Meech, Elizabeth; Nutland, Sarah; Prowse, Christopher V; Stevens, Helen E; Taylor, Niall C; Walters, Graham R; Walker, Neil M; Watkins, Nicholas A; Winzer, Thilo; Jones, Richard W; McArdle, Wendy L; Ring, Susan M; Strachan, David P; Pembrey, Marcus; Breen, Gerome; St Clair, David; Caesar, Sian; Gordon-Smith, Katharine; Jones, Lisa; Fraser, Christine; Green, Elaine K; Grozeva, Detelina; Hamshere, Marian L; Holmans, Peter A; Jones, Ian R; Kirov, George; Moskivina, Valentina; Nikolov, Ivan; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Collier, David A; Elkin, Amanda; Farmer, Anne; Williamson, Richard; McGuffin, Peter; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barrett, Jennifer H; Bishop, Timothy D; Iles, Mark M; Maqbool, Azhar; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Hall, Alistair S; Braund, Peter S; Dixon, Richard J; Mangino, Massimo; Stevens, Suzanne; Thompson, John R; Bredin, Francesca; Tremelling, Mark; Parkes, Miles; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charles W; Nimmo, Elaine R; Satsangi, Jack; Fisher, Sheila A; Forbes, Alastair; Lewis, Cathryn M; Onnie, Clive M; Prescott, Natalie J; Sanderson, Jeremy; Matthew, Christopher G; Barbour, Jamie; Mohiuddin, M Khalid; Todhunter, Catherine E; Mansfield, John C; Ahmad, Tariq; Cummings, Fraser R; Jewell, Derek P; Webster, John; Brown, Morris J; Lathrop, Mark G; Connell, John; Dominiczak, Anna; Marcano, Carolina A Braga; Burke, Beverley; Dobson, Richard; Gungadoo, Johannie; Lee, Kate L; Munroe, Patricia B; Newhouse, Stephen J; Onipinla, Abiodun; Wallace, Chris; Xue, Mingzhan; Caulfield, Mark; Farrall, Martin; Barton, Anne; Bruce, Ian N; Donovan, Hannah; Eyre, Steve; Gilbert, Paul D; Hilder, Samantha L; Hinks, Anne M; John, Sally L; Potter, Catherine; Silman, Alan J; Symmons, Deborah P M; Thomson, Wendy; Worthington, Jane; Dunger, David B; Widmer, Barry; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Lango, Hana; Perry, John R B; Shields, Beverley M; Weedon, Michael N; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hitman, Graham A; Walker, Mark; Elliott, Kate S; Groves, Christopher J; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Rayner, Nigel W; Timpson, Nicolas J; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Newport, Melanie; Sirugo, Giorgio; Lyons, Emily; Vannberg, Fredrik; Hill, Adrian V S; Bradbury, Linda A; Farrar, Claire; Pointon, Jennifer J; Wordsworth, Paul; Brown, Matthew A; Franklyn, Jayne A; Heward, Joanne M; Simmonds, Matthew J; Gough, Stephen C L; Seal, Sheila; Stratton, Michael R; Rahman, Nazneen; Ban, Maria; Goris, An; Sawcer, Stephen J; Compston, Alastair; Conway, David; Jallow, Muminatou; Newport, Melanie; Sirugo, Giorgio; Rockett, Kirk A; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Chaney, Amy; Downes, Kate; Ghori, Mohammed J R; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E; Inouye, Michael; Keniry, Andrew; King, Emma; McGinnis, Ralph; Potter, Simon; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Whittaker, Pamela; Widden, Claire; Withers, David; Cardin, Niall J; Davison, Dan; Ferreira, Teresa; Pereira-Gale, Joanne; Hallgrimsdo'ttir, Ingeleif B; Howie, Bryan N; Su, Zhan; Teo, Yik Ying; Vukcevic, Damjan; Bentley, David; Brown, Matthew A; Compston, Alastair; Farrall, Martin; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hill, Adrian V S; Parkes, Miles; Pembrey, Marcus; Stratton, Michael R; Mitchell, Sarah L; Newby, Paul R; Brand, Oliver J; Carr-Smith, Jackie; Pearce, Simon H S; McGinnis, R; Keniry, A; Deloukas, P; Reveille, John D; Zhou, Xiaodong; Sims, Anne-Marie; Dowling, Alison; Taylor, Jacqueline; Doan, Tracy; Davis, John C; Savage, Laurie; Ward, Michael M; Learch, Thomas L; Weisman, Michael H; Brown, Mathew

    2007-11-01

    We have genotyped 14,436 nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and 897 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tag SNPs from 1,000 independent cases of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and breast cancer (BC). Comparing these data against a common control dataset derived from 1,500 randomly selected healthy British individuals, we report initial association and independent replication in a North American sample of two new loci related to ankylosing spondylitis, ARTS1 and IL23R, and confirmation of the previously reported association of AITD with TSHR and FCRL3. These findings, enabled in part by increased statistical power resulting from the expansion of the control reference group to include individuals from the other disease groups, highlight notable new possibilities for autoimmune regulation and suggest that IL23R may be a common susceptibility factor for the major 'seronegative' diseases. PMID:17952073

  1. The nature of nurture: a genomewide association scan for family chaos.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Lee M; Plomin, Robert

    2008-07-01

    Widely used measures of the environment, especially the family environment of children, show genetic influence in dozens of twin and adoption studies. This phenomenon is known as gene-environment correlation in which genetically driven influences of individuals affect their environments. We conducted the first genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of an environmental measure. We used a measure called CHAOS which assesses 'environmental confusion' in the home, a measure that is more strongly associated with cognitive development in childhood than any other environmental measure. CHAOS was assessed by parental report when the children were 3 years and again when the children were 4 years; a composite CHAOS measure was constructed across the 2 years. We screened 490,041 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a two-stage design in which children in low chaos families (N = 469) versus high chaos families (N = 369) from 3,000 families of 4-year-old twins were screened in Stage 1 using pooled DNA. In Stage 2, following SNP quality control procedures, 41 nominated SNPs were tested for association with family chaos by individual genotyping an independent representative sample of 3,529. Despite having 99% power to detect associations that account for more than 0.5% of the variance, none of the 41 nominated SNPs met conservative criteria for replication. Similar to GWA analyses of other complex traits, it is likely that most of the heritable variation in environmental measures such as family chaos is due to many genes of very small effect size. PMID:18360741

  2. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  3. A twin study of breastfeeding with a preliminary genome wide association scan

    PubMed Central

    Colodro-Conde, L.; Zhu, G.; Power, R. A.; Henders, A.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Medland, S. E.; Ordoñana, J.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been an important survival trait during human history, though it has long been recognised that individuals differ in their exact breastfeeding behaviour. Here our aims were, first, to explore to what extent genetic and environmental influences contributed to the individual differences in breastfeeding behaviour; second, to detect possible genetic variants related to breastfeeding; and lastly, to test if the genetic variants associated with breastfeeding have been previously found to be related with breast size. Data were collected from a large community-based cohort of Australian twins, with 3,364 women for the twin modelling analyses and 1,521 of them included in the genome wide association study. Monozygotic twin correlations (rMZ = .52, 95% CI .46 – .57) were larger than dizygotic twin correlations (rDZ = .35, 95% CI .25 – .43) and the best-fitting model was the one composed by additive genetics and unique environmental factors, explaining 53% and 47% of the variance in breastfeeding behaviour, respectively. No breastfeeding-related genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. The polygenic risk score analyses showed no significant results, suggesting breast size does not influence breastfeeding. This study confers a replication of a previous one exploring the sources of variance of breastfeeding and, to our knowledge, is the first one to conduct a Genome-Wide Association Study on breastfeeding and look at the overlap with variants for breast size. PMID:25475840

  4. Genome-wide association scan of the time to onset of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Lasky-Su, Jessica; Anney, Richard J L; Neale, Benjamin M; Franke, Barbara; Zhou, Kaixin; Maller, Julian B; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Chen, Wai; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans Christoph; Taylor, Eric; Daly, Mark; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V

    2008-12-01

    A time-to-onset analysis for family-based samples was performed on the genomewide association (GWAS) data for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to determine if associations exist with the age at onset of ADHD. The initial dataset consisted of 958 parent-offspring trios that were genotyped on the Perlegen 600,000 SNP array. After data cleaning procedures, 429,981 autosomal SNPs and 930 parent-offspring trios were used found suitable for use and a family-based logrank analysis was performed using that age at first ADHD symptoms as the quantitative trait of interest. No SNP achieved genome-wide significance, and the lowest P-values had a magnitude of 10(-7). Several SNPs among a pre-specified list of candidate genes had nominal associations including SLC9A9, DRD1, ADRB2, SLC6A3, NFIL3, ADRB1, SYT1, HTR2A, ARRB2, and CHRNA4. Of these findings SLC9A9 stood out as a promising candidate, with nominally significant SNPs in six distinct regions of the gene. PMID:18937294

  5. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  6. Genomic regions underlying agronomic traits in linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) as revealed by association mapping.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerda, Braulio J; Duguid, Scott; Booker, Helen; Rowland, Gordon; Diederichsen, Axel; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The extreme climate of the Canadian Prairies poses a major challenge to improve yield. Although it is possible to breed for yield per se, focusing on yield-related traits could be advantageous because of their simpler genetic architecture. The Canadian flax core collection of 390 accessions was genotyped with 464 simple sequence repeat markers, and phenotypic data for nine agronomic traits including yield, bolls per area, 1,000 seed weight, seeds per boll, start of flowering, end of flowering, plant height, plant branching, and lodging collected from up to eight environments was used for association mapping. Based on a mixed model (principal component analysis (PCA) + kinship matrix (K)), 12 significant marker-trait associations for six agronomic traits were identified. Most of the associations were stable across environments as revealed by multivariate analyses. Statistical simulation for five markers associated with 1000 seed weight indicated that the favorable alleles have additive effects. None of the modern cultivars carried the five favorable alleles and the maximum number of four observed in any accessions was mostly in breeding lines. Our results confirmed the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits and the inherent difficulties associated with their identification while illustrating the potential for improvement through marker-assisted selection. PMID:24138336

  7. [Hypokalemic paralysis revealing Sjögren's syndrome associated with auto-immune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Baaj, Mohamed; Safi, Somaya; Hassikou, Hassna; Tabache, Fatima; Mouden, Karim; Hadri, Larbi

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of 36-year-old woman, admitted for hypotonic tetraparesis. Laboratory tests revealed severe hypokalaemia, acidosis, hyperchloremia and alkaline urinary pH allowing the diagnosis of distal tubular acidosis. Additional investigations led to the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroïditis. The evolution was favorable under potassium citrate alkalinisation, the corticosteroid therapy and hormonal substitution. Based on this observation, the pathogenesis of distal tubular acidosis during auto-immune diseases (Sjögren's syndrome, monoclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, hypothyroidism) was discussed as well as its consequences and management. PMID:19836323

  8. Sequencing of LRP2 reveals multiple rare variants associated with urinary trefoil factor-3.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Gearoid M; Olden, Matthias; Garnaas, Maija; Yang, Qiong; Liu, Xuan; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Larson, Martin G; Goessling, Wolfram; Fox, Caroline S

    2014-12-01

    Novel biomarkers are being investigated to identify patients with kidney disease. We measured a panel of 13 urinary biomarkers in participants from the Offspring Cohort of the Framingham Heart Study. Using an Affymetrix chip with imputation to 2.5 M single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we conducted a GWAS of these biomarkers (n=2640) followed by exonic sequencing and genotyping. Functional studies in zebrafish were used to investigate histologic correlation with renal function. Across all 13 biomarkers, there were 97 significant SNPs at three loci. Lead SNPs at each locus were rs6555820 (P=6.7×10(-49); minor allele frequency [MAF]=0.49) in HAVCR1 (associated with kidney injury molecule-1), rs7565788 (P=2.15×10(-16); MAF=0.22) in LRP2 (associated with trefoil factor 3 [TFF3]), and rs11048230 (P=4.77×10(-8); MAF=0.10) in an intergenic region near RASSF8 (associated with vascular endothelial growth factor). Validation in the CKDGen Consortium (n=67,093) showed that only rs7565788 at LRP2, which encodes megalin, was associated with eGFR (P=0.003). Sequencing of exons 16-72 of LRP2 in 200 unrelated individuals at extremes of urinary TFF3 levels identified 197 variants (152 rare; MAF<0.05), 31 of which (27 rare) were nonsynonymous. In aggregate testing, rare variants were associated with urinary TFF3 levels (P=0.003), and the lead GWAS signal was not explained by these variants. Knockdown of LRP2 in zebrafish did not alter the renal phenotype in static or kidney injury models. In conclusion, this study revealed common variants associated with urinary levels of TFF3, kidney injury molecule-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor and identified a cluster of rare variants independently associated with TFF3. PMID:24876117

  9. Scanning, Scanning, Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia; Myers, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses uses of scanning (process of copying or converting text, images, and objects into information that the computer can recognize and manipulate) in schools and notes possible desktop publishing projects. Describes popular scanners and ways to edit a scanned image. A sidebar gives costs and telephone numbers for nine scanners. (AEF)

  10. Anatomy and growth pattern of Amazon deep-sea fan as revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) and high-resolution seismic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Flood, R.D.; Kowsmann, R.O.; Belderson, R.H.; Gorini, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Imaging of the Amazon deep-sea fan with long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) has, for the first time, revealed the anatomy, trends, and growth pattern of distributary channels on this fan. Only one channel-levee system was active at any given time and extended from the Amazon Submarine Canyon downslope onto the lower fan (> 4,200 m). Formation of new channel-levee systems occurred when a currently active channel-levee system was cut off and abandoned through avulsion, and a new channel-levee system was established nearby. Through time, successive channel-levee formation and abandonment built two broad levee complexes consisting of groups of overlapping, coalescing segments of channel-levee systems across the present fan surface. These, plus older, now buried levee complexes, indicate that fan growth is radially outward and downslope through development of successive levee complexes. The most striking characteristic of the distributary channels is their intricate, often recurving, meanders with sinuosities of up to 2.5. Cutoffs and abandoned meander loops indicate that the channels migrate laterally through time. Channel bifurcation results predominantly from avulsion when flows breach a channel levee, thereby abandoning the present channel and establishing a new channel-levee segment nearby. No clear evidence of channel branching (i.e., division of a single channel into two active segments) or braiding was observed. 22 figs.

  11. New insights into slide processes and seafloor geology revealed by side-scan imagery of the massive Hinlopen Slide, Arctic Ocean margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Kelly A.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Mienert, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    The submarine Hinlopen Slide, located along the Arctic Ocean margin, is one of the largest known mass movements on Earth. The slide scar has several unusual morphometric characteristics, including headwalls up to 1,500 m high and spectacularly large, steep-sided rafted megablocks. The slide processes and continental margin properties that produced these features are not well known. A new high-resolution TOBI (towed ocean bottom instrument) side-scan sonar dataset reveals information about the detailed seafloor morphology and, therefore, slide dynamics during the final stages of sliding. First, the headwall area was efficiently and almost completely evacuated of slide debris, which is unusual for large submarine slides. Second, features relating to the propagation of extension to the shelf behind the headwall are absent, suggesting "strong" cohesive shelf material here or that a very stable shelf configuration was reached, possibly defined by NE-SW-trending faults. Third, there is little evidence for the translation of shelf material, again uncommon for submarine slides. Taken together with the occurrence of massive megablocks in the slide debris, Hinlopen Slide is distinct because of the juxtaposition of apparently "stronger" shelf material that has remained intact (headwalls, megablocks), and "weaker" shelf material that disaggregated fully during slope failure. Nevertheless, there is sonograph evidence of variable post-slide disintegration of the megablocks. Contrary to previous interpretations, this suggests that the blocks comprise sedimentary lithologies that are prone to failure, a key aspect awaiting confirmation.

  12. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  13. Eye Tracking Reveals Impaired Attentional Disengagement Associated with Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Sabatos-DeVito, Maura; Schipul, Sarah E; Bulluck, John C; Belger, Aysenil; Baranek, Grace T

    2016-04-01

    This study used a gap-overlap paradigm to examine the impact of distractor salience and temporal overlap on the ability to disengage and orient attention in 50 children (4-13 years) with ASD, DD and TD, and associations between attention and sensory response patterns. Results revealed impaired disengagement and orienting accuracy in ASD. Disengagement was impaired across all groups during temporal overlap for dynamic stimuli compared to static, but only ASD showed slower disengagement from multimodal relative to unimodal dynamic stimuli. Attentional disengagement had differential associations with distinct sensory response patterns in ASD and DD. Atypical sensory processing and temporal binding appear to be intertwined with development of disengagement in ASD, but longitudinal studies are needed to unravel causal pathways. PMID:26816345

  14. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. PMID:27091876

  15. A Scan of Chromosome 10 Identifies a Novel Locus Showing Strong Association with Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S. K.; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M.; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J.; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O’Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C.; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10–specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P<.05). Five of these markers replicated at P<.05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P=.0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:16385451

  16. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  17. Quantitative Glycoproteomics Analysis Reveals Changes in N-Glycosylation Level Associated with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in epithelial cancers, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, little is known about the glycoproteome of the human pancreas or its alterations associated with pancreatic tumorigenesis. Using quantitative glycoproteomics approach, we investigated protein N-glycosylation in pancreatic tumor tissue in comparison with normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis tissue. The study lead to the discovery of a roster of glycoproteins with aberrant N-glycosylation level associated with pancreatic cancer, including mucin-5AC (MUC5AC), carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3), and galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP). Pathway analysis of cancer-associated aberrant glycoproteins revealed an emerging phenomenon that increased activity of N-glycosylation was implicated in several pancreatic cancer pathways, including TGF-β, TNF, NF-kappa-B, and TFEB-related lysosomal changes. In addition, the study provided evidence that specific N-glycosylation sites within certain individual proteins can have significantly altered glycosylation occupancy in pancreatic cancer, reflecting the complexity of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer-associated glycosylation events. PMID:24471499

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  19. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    PubMed

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), and this association was even more significant when comparing all parasite-positive samples with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.001). Additionally, our data revealed that a low abundance of Prevotella and a higher abundance of Clostridial cluster XIVa was associated with parasite-negative samples (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Our data support the theory that Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella. PMID:27230509

  20. Genome-wide association Scan of dental caries in the permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 90% of adults aged 20 years or older with permanent teeth have suffered from dental caries leading to pain, infection, or even tooth loss. Although caries prevalence has decreased over the past decade, there are still about 23% of dentate adults who have untreated carious lesions in the US. Dental caries is a complex disorder affected by both individual susceptibility and environmental factors. Approximately 35-55% of caries phenotypic variation in the permanent dentition is attributable to genes, though few specific caries genes have been identified. Therefore, we conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genes affecting susceptibility to caries in adults. Methods Five independent cohorts were included in this study, totaling more than 7000 participants. For each participant, dental caries was assessed and genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were genotyped or imputed across the entire genome. Due to the heterogeneity among the five cohorts regarding age, genotyping platform, quality of dental caries assessment, and study design, we first conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses on each of the five independent cohorts separately. We then performed three meta-analyses to combine results for: (i) the comparatively younger, Appalachian cohorts (N = 1483) with well-assessed caries phenotype, (ii) the comparatively older, non-Appalachian cohorts (N = 5960) with inferior caries phenotypes, and (iii) all five cohorts (N = 7443). Top ranking genetic loci within and across meta-analyses were scrutinized for biologically plausible roles on caries. Results Different sets of genes were nominated across the three meta-analyses, especially between the younger and older age cohorts. In general, we identified several suggestive loci (P-value ≤ 10E-05) within or near genes with plausible biological roles for dental caries, including RPS6KA2 and PTK2B, involved in p38-depenedent MAPK signaling

  1. Genome-wide association reveals the locus responsible for four-horned ruminant.

    PubMed

    Kijas, James W; Hadfield, Tracy; Naval Sanchez, Marina; Cockett, Noelle

    2016-04-01

    Phenotypic variability in horn characteristics, such as their size, number and shape, offers the opportunity to elucidate the molecular basis of horn development. The objective of this study was to map the genetic determinant controlling the production of four horns in two breeds, Jacob sheep and Navajo-Churro, and examine whether an eyelid abnormality occurring in the same populations is related. Genome-wide association mapping was performed using 125 animals from the two breeds that contain two- and four-horned individuals. A case-control design analysis of 570 712 SNPs genotyped with the ovine HD SNP Beadchip revealed a strong association signal on sheep chromosome 2. The 10 most strongly associated SNPs were all located in a region spanning Mb positions 131.9-132.6, indicating the genetic architecture underpinning the production of four horns is likely to involve a single gene. The closest genes to the most strongly associated marker (OAR2_132568092) were MTX2 and the HOXD cluster, located approximately 93 Kb and 251 Kb upstream respectively. The occurrence of an eyelid malformation across both breeds was restricted to polled animals and those carrying more than two horns. This suggests the eyelid abnormality may be associated with departures from the normal developmental production of two-horned animals and that the two conditions are developmentally linked. This study demonstrated the presence of separate loci responsible for the polled and four-horned phenotypes in sheep and advanced our understanding of the complexity that underpins horn morphology in ruminants. PMID:26767438

  2. Integrative analysis reveals disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the most common complex diseases with high leading cause of death in men. Identifications of prostate cancer associated genes and biomarkers are thus essential as they can gain insights into the mechanisms underlying disease progression and advancing for early diagnosis and developing effective therapies. Methods In this study, we presented an integrative analysis of gene expression profiling and protein interaction network at a systematic level to reveal candidate disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. At first, we reconstructed the human prostate cancer protein-protein interaction network (HPC-PPIN) and the network was then integrated with the prostate cancer gene expression data to identify modules related to different phases in prostate cancer. At last, the candidate module biomarkers were validated by its predictive ability of prostate cancer progression. Results Different phases-specific modules were identified for prostate cancer. Among these modules, transcription Androgen Receptor (AR) nuclear signaling and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signalling pathway were shown to be the pathway targets for prostate cancer progression. The identified candidate disease-associated genes showed better predictive ability of prostate cancer progression than those of published biomarkers. In context of functional enrichment analysis, interestingly candidate disease-associated genes were enriched in the nucleus and different functions were encoded for potential transcription factors, for examples key players as AR, Myc, ESR1 and hidden player as Sp1 which was considered as a potential novel biomarker for prostate cancer. Conclusions The successful results on prostate cancer samples demonstrated that the integrative analysis is powerful and useful approach to detect candidate disease-associate genes and modules which can be used as the potential biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. The

  3. Signatures of selection in the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) revealed by a genome scan analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galarza, Julio; Henriques, Dora; Johnston, J Spencer; Azevedo, João C; Patton, John C; Muñoz, Irene; De la Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the genetic mechanisms of adaptive population divergence is one of the most fundamental endeavours in evolutionary biology and is becoming increasingly important as it will allow predictions about how organisms will respond to global environmental crisis. This is particularly important for the honey bee, a species of unquestionable ecological and economical importance that has been exposed to increasing human-mediated selection pressures. Here, we conducted a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome scan in honey bees collected across an environmental gradient in Iberia and used four FST -based outlier tests to identify genomic regions exhibiting signatures of selection. Additionally, we analysed associations between genetic and environmental data for the identification of factors that might be correlated or act as selective pressures. With these approaches, 4.4% (17 of 383) of outlier loci were cross-validated by four FST -based methods, and 8.9% (34 of 383) were cross-validated by at least three methods. Of the 34 outliers, 15 were found to be strongly associated with one or more environmental variables. Further support for selection, provided by functional genomic information, was particularly compelling for SNP outliers mapped to different genes putatively involved in the same function such as vision, xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune response. This study enabled a more rigorous consideration of selection as the underlying cause of diversity patterns in Iberian honey bees, representing an important first step towards the identification of polymorphisms implicated in local adaptation and possibly in response to recent human-mediated environmental changes. PMID:24118235

  4. The Genetic Architecture of Seed Composition in Soybean Is Refined by Genome-Wide Association Scans Across Multiple Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Justin N.; Nelson, Randall L.; Song, Qijian; Cregan, Perry B.; Li, Zenglu

    2014-01-01

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to resolve loci controlling moderately complex quantitative traits (QTL) in numerous crop species. Yet, it is still unclear how soybean’s unique population history will affect GWA scans. Using one of the populations in this study, we simulated phenotypes resulting from a range of genetic architectures. We found that with a heritability of 0.5, ∼100% and ∼33% of the 4 and 20 simulated QTL can be recovered, respectively, with a false-positive rate of less than ∼6×10−5 per marker tested. Additionally, we demonstrated that combining information from multi-locus mixed models and compressed linear-mixed models improves QTL identification and interpretation. We applied these insights to exploring seed composition in soybean, refining the linkage group I (chromosome 20) protein QTL and identifying additional oil QTL that may allow some decoupling of highly correlated oil and protein phenotypes. Because the value of protein meal is closely related to its essential amino acid profile, we attempted to identify QTL underlying methionine, threonine, cysteine, and lysine content. Multiple QTL were found that have not been observed in family-based mapping studies, and each trait exhibited associations across multiple populations. Chromosomes 1 and 8 contain strong candidate alleles for essential amino acid increases. Overall, we present these and additional data that will be useful in determining breeding strategies for the continued improvement of soybean’s nutrient portfolio. PMID:25246241

  5. A comprehensive alanine-scanning mutagenesis study reveals roles for salt bridges in the structure and activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fei; Yue, Shousong; Peng, Zhenying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Chen, Gao; Yu, Jinhui; Xuan, Ning; Bi, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between salt bridges and stability/enzymatic activity is unclear. We studied this relationship by systematic alanine-scanning mutation analysis using the typical M4 family metalloprotease Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE, also known as pseudolysin) as a model. Structural analysis revealed seven salt bridges in the PAE structure. We constructed ten mutants for six salt bridges. Among these mutants, six (Asp189Ala, Arg179Ala, Asp201Ala, Arg205Ala, Arg245Ala and Glu249Ala) were active and four (Asp168Ala, Arg198Ala, Arg253Ala, and Arg279Ala) were inactive. Five mutants were purified, and their catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km), half-lives (t1/2) and thermal unfolding curves were compared with those of PAE. Mutants Asp189Ala and Arg179Ala both showed decreased thermal stabilities and increased activities, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp189-Arg179 stabilizes the protein at the expense of catalytic efficiency. In contrast, mutants Asp201Ala and Arg205Ala both showed slightly increased thermal stability and slightly decreased activity, suggesting that the salt bridge Asp201-Arg205 destabilizes the protein. Mutant Glu249Ala is related to a C-terminal salt bridge network and showed both decreased thermal stability and decreased activity. Furthermore, Glu249Ala showed a thermal unfolding curve with three discernable states [the native state (N), the partially unfolded state (I) and the unfolded state (U)]. In comparison, there were only two discernable states (N and U) in the thermal unfolding curve of PAE. These results suggest that Glu249 is important for catalytic efficiency, stability and unfolding cooperativity. This study represents a systematic mutational analyses of salt bridges in the model metalloprotease PAE and provides important insights into the structure-function relationship of enzymes. PMID:25815820

  6. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, orderedmore » restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.« less

  7. Scanning the Landscape of Genome Architecture of Non-O1 and Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by Whole Genome Mapping Reveals Extensive Population Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks. PMID:25794000

  8. CGG Repeat-Associated Non-AUG Translation Utilizes a Cap-Dependent Scanning Mechanism of Initiation to Produce Toxic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kearse, Michael G; Green, Katelyn M; Krans, Amy; Rodriguez, Caitlin M; Linsalata, Alexander E; Goldstrohm, Aaron C; Todd, Peter K

    2016-04-21

    Repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation produces toxic polypeptides from nucleotide repeat expansions in the absence of an AUG start codon and contributes to neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. How RAN translation occurs is unknown. Here we define the critical sequence and initiation factors that mediate CGG repeat RAN translation in the 5' leader of fragile X mRNA, FMR1. Our results reveal that CGG RAN translation is 30%-40% as efficient as AUG-initiated translation, is m(7)G cap and eIF4E dependent, requires the eIF4A helicase, and is strongly influenced by repeat length. However, it displays a dichotomous requirement for initiation site selection between reading frames, with initiation in the +1 frame, but not the +2 frame, occurring at near-cognate start codons upstream of the repeat. These data support a model in which RAN translation at CGG repeats uses cap-dependent ribosomal scanning, yet bypasses normal requirements for start codon selection. PMID:27041225

  9. Cutting Edge: Il-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase 4 Structures Reveal Novel Features And Multiple Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuglstatter, A.; Villasenor, A.G.; Shaw, D.; Lee, S.W.; Tsing, S.; Niu, L.; Song, K.W.; Barnett, J.W.; Browner, M.F.

    2007-07-09

    L-1R-associated kinase (IRAK)4 plays a central role in innate and adaptive immunity, and is a crucial component in IL-1/TLR signaling. We have determined the crystal structures of the apo and ligand-bound forms of human IRAK4 kinase domain. These structures reveal several features that provide opportunities for the design of selective IRAK4 inhibitors. The N-terminal lobe of the IRAK4 kinase domain is structurally distinctive due to a loop insertion after an extended N-terminal helix. The gatekeeper residue is a tyrosine, a unique feature of the IRAK family. The IRAK4 structures also provide insights into the regulation of its activity. In the apo structure, two conformations coexist, differing in the relative orientation of the two kinase lobes and the position of helix C. In the presence of an ATP analog only one conformation is observed, indicating that this is the active conformation.

  10. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  11. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints.

    PubMed

    David, Maude M; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis P

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  12. Ecoinformatics Can Reveal Yield Gaps Associated with Crop-Pest Interactions: A Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheim, Jay A.; Meisner, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Farmers and private consultants execute a vast, decentralized data collection effort with each cropping cycle, as they gather pest density data to make real-time pest management decisions. Here we present a proof of concept for an ecoinformatics approach to pest management research, which attempts to harness these data to answer questions about pest-crop interactions. The impact of herbivory by Lygus hesperus on cotton is explored as a case study. Consultant-derived data satisfied a ‘positive control’ test for data quality by clearly resolving the expected negative relationship between L. hesperus density and retention of flower buds. The enhanced statistical power afforded by the large ecoinformatics dataset revealed an early-season window of crop sensitivity, during which L. hesperus densities as low as 1-2 per sample were associated with yield loss. In contrast, during the mid-season insecticide use by farmers was often unnecessary, as cotton compensated fully for moderate L. hesperus densities. Because the dataset emerged from the commercial production setting, it also revealed the limited degree to which farmers were willing to delay crop harvest to provide opportunities for compensatory fruiting. Observational approaches to pest management research have strengths and weaknesses that complement those of traditional, experimental approaches; combining these methods can contribute to enhanced agricultural productivity. PMID:24260408

  13. Genetic architecture dissection by genome-wide association analysis reveals avian eggshell ultrastructure traits.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhongyi; Sun, Congjiao; Shen, ManMan; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of an eggshell is considered the major determinant of eggshell quality, which has biological and economic significance for the avian and poultry industries. However, the interrelationships and genome-wide architecture of eggshell ultrastructure remain to be elucidated. Herein, we measured eggshell thickness (EST), effective layer thickness (ET), mammillary layer thickness (MT), and mammillary density (MD) and conducted genome-wide association studies in 927 F2 hens. The SNP-based heritabilities of eggshell ultrastructure traits were estimated to be 0.39, 0.36, 0.17 and 0.19 for EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively, and a total of 719, 784, 1 and 10 genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively. ABCC9, ITPR2, KCNJ8 and WNK1, which are involved in ion transport, were suggested to be the key genes regulating EST and ET. ITM2C and KNDC1 likely affect MT and MD, respectively. Additionally, there were linear relationships between the chromosome lengths and the variance explained per chromosome for EST (R(2) = 0.57) and ET (R(2) = 0.67). In conclusion, the interrelationships and genetic architecture of eggshell ultrastructure traits revealed in this study are valuable for our understanding of the avian eggshell and contribute to research on a variety of other calcified shells. PMID:27456605

  14. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  15. Population analysis of microsatellite genotypes reveals a signature associated with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fonville, Natalie C; Vaksman, Zalman; McIver, Lauren J; Garner, Harold R

    2015-05-10

    Ovarian cancer (OV) ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, yet there remain few informative biomarkers for this disease. Microsatellites are repetitive genomic regions which we hypothesize could be a source of novel biomarkers for OV and have traditionally been under-appreciated relative to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). In this study, we explore microsatellite variation as a potential novel source of genomic variation associated with OV. Exomes from 305 OV patient germline samples and 54 tumors, sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, were analyzed for microsatellite variation and compared to healthy females sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project. We identified a subset of 60 microsatellite loci with genotypes that varied significantly between the OV and healthy female populations. Using these loci as a signature set, we classified germline genomes as 'at risk' for OV with a sensitivity of 90.1% and a specificity of 87.6%. Cross-analysis with a similar set of breast cancer associated loci identified individuals 'at risk' for both diseases. This study revealed a genotype-based microsatellite signature present in the germlines of individuals diagnosed with OV, and provides the basis for a potential novel risk assessment diagnostic for OV and new personal genomics targets in tumors. PMID:25779658

  16. Genetic architecture dissection by genome-wide association analysis reveals avian eggshell ultrastructure traits

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhongyi; Sun, Congjiao; Shen, ManMan; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of an eggshell is considered the major determinant of eggshell quality, which has biological and economic significance for the avian and poultry industries. However, the interrelationships and genome-wide architecture of eggshell ultrastructure remain to be elucidated. Herein, we measured eggshell thickness (EST), effective layer thickness (ET), mammillary layer thickness (MT), and mammillary density (MD) and conducted genome-wide association studies in 927 F2 hens. The SNP-based heritabilities of eggshell ultrastructure traits were estimated to be 0.39, 0.36, 0.17 and 0.19 for EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively, and a total of 719, 784, 1 and 10 genome-wide significant SNPs were associated with EST, ET, MT and MD, respectively. ABCC9, ITPR2, KCNJ8 and WNK1, which are involved in ion transport, were suggested to be the key genes regulating EST and ET. ITM2C and KNDC1 likely affect MT and MD, respectively. Additionally, there were linear relationships between the chromosome lengths and the variance explained per chromosome for EST (R2 = 0.57) and ET (R2 = 0.67). In conclusion, the interrelationships and genetic architecture of eggshell ultrastructure traits revealed in this study are valuable for our understanding of the avian eggshell and contribute to research on a variety of other calcified shells. PMID:27456605

  17. Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Baute, Gregory J; Kane, Nolan C; Grassa, Christopher J; Lai, Zhao; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-04-01

    The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study, we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a globally important oilseed. To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes, including wild, landrace, and modern lines of H. annuus, as well as two cross-compatible wild relatives, Helianthus argophyllus and Helianthus petiolaris. Outlier analyses identified 122 and 15 candidate genes associated with domestication and improvement, respectively. As in several previous studies, genes putatively involved in oil biosynthesis were the most extreme outliers. Additionally, several promising associations were observed with previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs), such as branching. Admixture analyses revealed that all the modern cultivar genomes we examined contained one or more introgressions from wild populations, with every chromosome having evidence of introgression in at least one modern line. Cumulatively, introgressions cover c. 10% of the cultivated sunflower genome. Surprisingly, introgressions do not avoid candidate domestication genes, probably because of the reintroduction of branching. PMID:25641359

  18. Evidence for Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking of the Superconducting State near Twin-Boundary Interfaces in FeSe Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watashige, T.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Hanaguri, T.; Kohsaka, Y.; Kasahara, S.; Furusaki, A.; Sigrist, M.; Meingast, C.; Wolf, T.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Junctions and interfaces consisting of unconventional superconductors provide an excellent experimental playground to study exotic phenomena related to the phase of the order parameter. Not only does the complex structure of unconventional order parameters have an impact on the Josephson effects, but it also may profoundly alter the quasiparticle excitation spectrum near a junction. Here, by using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we visualize the spatial evolution of the LDOS near twin boundaries (TBs) of the nodal superconductor FeSe. The π /2 rotation of the crystallographic orientation across the TB twists the structure of the unconventional order parameter, which may, in principle, bring about a zero-energy LDOS peak at the TB. The LDOS at the TB observed in our study, in contrast, does not exhibit any signature of a zero-energy peak, and an apparent gap amplitude remains finite all the way across the TB. The low-energy quasiparticle excitations associated with the gap nodes are affected by the TB over a distance more than an order of magnitude larger than the coherence length ξa b. The modification of the low-energy states is even more prominent in the region between two neighboring TBs separated by a distance ≈7 ξa b . In this region, the spectral weight near the Fermi level (≈±0.2 meV ) due to the nodal quasiparticle spectrum is almost completely removed. These behaviors suggest that the TB induces a fully gapped state, invoking a possible twist of the order parameter structure, which breaks time-reversal symmetry.

  19. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Ana; Airey, David; Thompson, Brent; Zhu, C; Rinchik, Eugene M; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Erikson, Keith; Blakely, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  20. Metabolomics Reveals Dynamic Metabolic Changes Associated with Age in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Lin, Gigin; Chiang, Meng-Han; Yang, Shu-Chen; Chao, Wei-Ju; Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Han; Hua, Man-Chin; Liao, Sui-Ling; Lai, Shen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A detailed understanding of the metabolic processes governing rapid growth in early life is still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the age-related metabolic changes in healthy children throughout early childhood. Methods Healthy children from a birth cohort were enrolled in this study from birth through 4 years of age. Urinary metabolites were assessed at 6 months, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 yr of age by using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis including principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Metabolic pathway analysis was performed using the MetPA web tool. Results A total of 105 urine samples from 30 healthy children were collected and analyzed. Metabolites contributing to the discrimination between age groups were identified by using supervised PLS-DA (Q2 = 0.60; R2 = 0.66). A significantly higher urinary trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and betaine level was found in children aged 6 months. Urinary glycine and glutamine levels declined significantly after 6 months of age and there was a concomitant compensatory increase in urinary creatine and creatinine. Metabolic pathway analysis using MetPA revealed similar nitrogen metabolism associated energy production across all ages assessed. Pathways associated with amino acid metabolism were significantly different between infants aged 6 months and 1 year, whereas pathways associated with carbohydrate metabolism were significantly different between children at ages 2 and 3 years. Conclusions Urine metabolomics ideally represents dynamic metabolic changes across age. Urinary metabolic profiles change significantly within the first year of life, which can potentially provide crucial information about infant nutrition and growth. PMID:26914934

  1. Evaluation of copy number variations reveals novel candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder-associated pathways

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Anthony J.; Ma, Deqiong; Cukier, Holly N.; Nations, Laura D.; Schmidt, Mike A.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Jaworski, James M.; Salyakina, Daria; Konidari, Ioanna; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Williams, Scott M.; Menon, Ramkumar; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable, yet relatively few associated genetic loci have been replicated. Copy number variations (CNVs) have been implicated in autism; however, the majority of loci contribute to <1% of the disease population. Therefore, independent studies are important to refine associated CNV regions and discover novel susceptibility genes. In this study, a genome-wide SNP array was utilized for CNV detection by two distinct algorithms in a European ancestry case–control data set. We identify a significantly higher burden in the number and size of deletions, and disrupting more genes in ASD cases. Moreover, 18 deletions larger than 1 Mb were detected exclusively in cases, implicating novel regions at 2q22.1, 3p26.3, 4q12 and 14q23. Case-specific CNVs provided further evidence for pathways previously implicated in ASDs, revealing new candidate genes within the GABAergic signaling and neural development pathways. These include DBI, an allosteric binder of GABA receptors, GABARAPL1, the GABA receptor-associated protein, and SLC6A11, a postsynaptic GABA transporter. We also identified CNVs in COBL, deletions of which cause defects in neuronal cytoskeleton morphogenesis in model vertebrates, and DNER, a neuron-specific Notch ligand required for cerebellar development. Moreover, we found evidence of genetic overlap between ASDs and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric diseases. These genes include glutamate receptors (GRID1, GRIK2 and GRIK4), synaptic regulators (NRXN3, SLC6A8 and SYN3), transcription factor (ZNF804A) and RNA-binding protein FMR1. Taken together, these CNVs may be a few of the missing pieces of ASD heritability and lead to discovering novel etiological mechanisms. PMID:22543975

  2. Highly Divergent Integration Profile of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 5 Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Janovitz, Tyler; Oliveira, Thiago; Sadelain, Michel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV-5) is a human parvovirus that infects a high percentage of the population. It is the most divergent AAV, the DNA sequence cleaved by the viral endonuclease is distinct from all other described serotypes and, uniquely, AAV-5 does not cross-complement the replication of other serotypes. In contrast to the well-characterized integration of AAV-2, no published studies have investigated the genomic integration of AAV-5. In this study, we analyzed more than 660,000 AAV-5 integration junctions using high-throughput integrant capture sequencing of infected human cells. The integration activity of AAV-5 was 99.7% distinct from AAV-2 and favored intronic sequences. Genome-wide integration was highly correlated with viral replication protein binding and endonuclease sites, and a 39-bp consensus integration motif was revealed that included these features. Algorithmic scanning identified 126 AAV-5 hot spots, the largest of which encompassed 3.3% of all integration events. The unique aspects of AAV-5 integration may provide novel tools for biotechnology and gene therapy. IMPORTANCE Viral integration into the host genome is an important aspect of virus host cell biology. Genomic integration studies of the small single-stranded AAVs have largely focused on site preferential integration of AAV-2, which depends on the viral replication protein (Rep). We have now established the first genome wide integration profile of the highly divergent AAV-5 serotype. Using integrant capture sequencing, more than 600,000 AAV-5 integration junctions in human cells were analyzed. AAV-5 integration hot spots were 99.7% distinct from AAV-2. Integration favored intronic sequences, occurred on all chromosomes, and integration hot spot distribution was correlated with human genomic GAGC repeats and transcriptional activity. These features support expansion of AAV-5 based vectors for gene transfer considerations. PMID:24335317

  3. Multivariate analysis reveals genetic associations of the resting default mode network in psychotic bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Shashwath A.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; O’Neil, Kasey; Berwise, Clifton; Dunn, Sabra M.; Boccaccio, Leah E.; Narayanan, Balaji; Kocherla, Mohan; Sprooten, Emma; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Sweeney, John A.; Clementz, Brett A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The brain’s default mode network (DMN) is highly heritable and is compromised in a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, genetic control over the DMN in schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) is largely unknown. Study subjects (n = 1,305) underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and were analyzed by a two-stage approach. The initial analysis used independent component analysis (ICA) in 324 healthy controls, 296 SZ probands, 300 PBP probands, 179 unaffected first-degree relatives of SZ probands (SZREL), and 206 unaffected first-degree relatives of PBP probands to identify DMNs and to test their biomarker and/or endophenotype status. A subset of controls and probands (n = 549) then was subjected to a parallel ICA (para-ICA) to identify imaging–genetic relationships. ICA identified three DMNs. Hypo-connectivity was observed in both patient groups in all DMNs. Similar patterns observed in SZREL were restricted to only one network. DMN connectivity also correlated with several symptom measures. Para-ICA identified five sub-DMNs that were significantly associated with five different genetic networks. Several top-ranking SNPs across these networks belonged to previously identified, well-known psychosis/mood disorder genes. Global enrichment analyses revealed processes including NMDA-related long-term potentiation, PKA, immune response signaling, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis that significantly influenced DMN modulation in psychoses. In summary, we observed both unique and shared impairments in functional connectivity across the SZ and PBP cohorts; these impairments were selectively familial only for SZREL. Genes regulating specific neurodevelopment/transmission processes primarily mediated DMN disconnectivity. The study thus identifies biological pathways related to a widely researched quantitative trait that might suggest novel, targeted drug treatments for these diseases. PMID:24778245

  4. Efficacy of ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid associated with chlorhexidine on intracanal medication removal: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Abi-Rached, Giselle P C; Herrera, Daniel R; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C R; Almeida, Jose F A; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 17% ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) used alone or associated with 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) on intracanal medications (ICM) removal. Sixty single-rooted human teeth with fully formed apex were selected. The cervical and middle thirds of each canal were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and rotary files. The apical third was shaped with hand files. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups depending on the ICM used after instrumentation: calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)(2) +CHX or Ca(OH)(2) +sterile saline (SS). After seven days, each group was divided into subgroups according to the protocol used for ICM removal: instrumentation and irrigation either with EDTA, CHX+EDTA, or SS (control groups). All specimens were sectioned and processed for observation of the apical thirds by using scanning electron microscopy. Two calibrated evaluators attributed scores to each specimen. The differences between the protocols for ICM removal were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used for comparison between the score of debris obtained in each root canal third. Remains of Ca(OH)(2) were found in all specimens independently of the protocol and ICM used (P > 0.05). Seventeen percent EDTA showed the best results in removing ICM when used alone (P < 0.05), particularly in those associated with CHX. It was concluded that the chelating agent 17% EDTA significantly improved the removal of ICM when used alone. Furthermore, the type of the vehicle associated with Ca(OH)(2) also plays a role in the ICM removal. PMID:24941937

  5. Autonomous gliders reveal features of the water column associated with foraging by adelie penguins.

    PubMed

    Kahl, L Alex; Schofield, Oscar; Fraser, William R

    2010-12-01

    Despite their strong dependence on the pelagic environment, seabirds and other top predators in polar marine ecosystems are generally studied during their reproductive phases in terrestrial environments. As a result, a significant portion of their life history is understudied which in turn has led to limited understanding. Recent advances in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technologies have allowed satellite-tagged Adélie penguins to guide AUV surveys of the marine environment at the Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on the western Antarctic Peninsula. Near real-time data sent via Iridium satellites from the AUVs to a centralized control center thousands of miles away allowed scientists to adapt AUV sampling strategies to meet the changing conditions of the subsurface. Such AUV data revealed the water masses and fine-scale features associated with Adélie penguin foraging trips. During this study, the maximum concentration of chlorophyll was between 30 and 50 m deep. Encompassing this peak in the chlorophyll concentration, within the water-column, was a mixture of nutrient-laden Upper Circumpolar Deep (UCDW) and western Antarctic Peninsula winter water (WW). Together, data from the AUV survey and penguin dives reveal that 54% of foraging by Adélie penguins occurs immediately below the chlorophyll maximum. These data demonstrate how bringing together emerging technologies, such as AUVs, with established methods such as the radio-tagging of penguins can provide powerful tools for monitoring and hypothesis testing of previously inaccessible ecological processes. Ocean and atmosphere temperatures are expected to continue increasing along the western Antarctic Peninsula, which will undoubtedly affect regional marine ecosystems. New and emerging technologies such as unmanned underwater vehicles and individually mounted satellite tracking devices will provide the tools critical to documenting and understanding the widespread ecological change

  6. Kinetoplastid Phylogenomics Reveals the Evolutionary Innovations Associated with the Origins of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Aslett, Martin; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Bringaud, Frederic; Schlacht, Alexander; Hartley, Catherine; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Dacks, Joel B.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Field, Mark C.; Ginger, Michael L.; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Summary The evolution of parasitism is a recurrent event in the history of life and a core problem in evolutionary biology. Trypanosomatids are important parasites and include the human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp., which in humans cause African trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis, respectively. Genome comparison between trypanosomatids reveals that these parasites have evolved specialized cell-surface protein families, overlaid on a well-conserved cell template. Understanding how these features evolved and which ones are specifically associated with parasitism requires comparison with related non-parasites. We have produced genome sequences for Bodo saltans, the closest known non-parasitic relative of trypanosomatids, and a second bodonid, Trypanoplasma borreli. Here we show how genomic reduction and innovation contributed to the character of trypanosomatid genomes. We show that gene loss has “streamlined” trypanosomatid genomes, particularly with respect to macromolecular degradation and ion transport, but consistent with a widespread loss of functional redundancy, while adaptive radiations of gene families involved in membrane function provide the principal innovations in trypanosomatid evolution. Gene gain and loss continued during trypanosomatid diversification, resulting in the asymmetric assortment of ancestral characters such as peptidases between Trypanosoma and Leishmania, genomic differences that were subsequently amplified by lineage-specific innovations after divergence. Finally, we show how species-specific, cell-surface gene families (DGF-1 and PSA) with no apparent structural similarity are independent derivations of a common ancestral form, which we call “bodonin.” This new evidence defines the parasitic innovations of trypanosomatid genomes, revealing how a free-living phagotroph became adapted to exploiting hostile host environments. PMID:26725202

  7. Systems Genetics Analysis of GWAS reveals Novel Associations between Key Biological Processes and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Vivar, Juan; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Segrè, Ayellet V; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Nikpay, Majid; Erdmann, Jeannette; Blankenberg, Stefan; O'Donnell, Christopher; März, Winfried; Laaksonen, Reijo; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Epstein, Stephen E; Shah, Svati H; Granger, Christopher B; Hazen, Stanley L; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple genetic variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, individually these explain only a small fraction of the heritability of CAD and for most, the causal biological mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to obtain further insights into potential causal processes of CAD by integrating large-scale GWA data with expertly curated databases of core human pathways and functional networks. Approaches and Results Employing pathways (gene sets) from Reactome, we carried out a two-stage gene set enrichment analysis strategy. From a meta-analyzed discovery cohort of 7 CADGWAS data sets (9,889 cases/11,089 controls), nominally significant gene-sets were tested for replication in a meta-analysis of 9 additional studies (15,502 cases/55,730 controls) from the CARDIoGRAM Consortium. A total of 32 of 639 Reactome pathways tested showed convincing association with CAD (replication p<0.05). These pathways resided in 9 of 21 core biological processes represented in Reactome, and included pathways relevant to extracellular matrix integrity, innate immunity, axon guidance, and signaling by PDRF, NOTCH, and the TGF-β/SMAD receptor complex. Many of these pathways had strengths of association comparable to those observed in lipid transport pathways. Network analysis of unique genes within the replicated pathways further revealed several interconnected functional and topologically interacting modules representing novel associations (e.g. semaphorin regulated axonal guidance pathway) besides confirming known processes (lipid metabolism). The connectivity in the observed networks was statistically significant compared to random networks (p<0.001). Network centrality analysis (‘degree’ and ‘betweenness’) further identified genes (e.g. NCAM1, FYN, FURIN etc.) likely to play critical roles in the maintenance and functioning of several of the replicated pathways. Conclusions These findings

  8. Metabolomic profiling reveals mitochondrial-derived lipid biomarkers that drive obesity-associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Brante P; Freemerman, Alex J; Zhang, Jimmy; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Galanko, Joseph A; O'Connell, Thomas M; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Stevens, Robert D; Newgard, Christopher B; Brauer, Heather A; Troester, Melissa A; Makowski, Liza

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Several animal models of obesity exist, but studies are lacking that compare traditional lard-based high fat diets (HFD) to "Cafeteria diets" (CAF) consisting of nutrient poor human junk food. Our previous work demonstrated the rapid and severe obesogenic and inflammatory consequences of CAF compared to HFD including rapid weight gain, markers of Metabolic Syndrome, multi-tissue lipid accumulation, and dramatic inflammation. To identify potential mediators of CAF-induced obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, we used metabolomic analysis to profile serum, muscle, and white adipose from rats fed CAF, HFD, or standard control diets. Principle component analysis identified elevations in clusters of fatty acids and acylcarnitines. These increases in metabolites were associated with systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that paralleled weight gain, physiologic measures of Metabolic Syndrome, and tissue inflammation in CAF-fed rats. Spearman pairwise correlations between metabolites, physiologic, and histologic findings revealed strong correlations between elevated markers of inflammation in CAF-fed animals, measured as crown like structures in adipose, and specifically the pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids and oxidation intermediates laurate and lauroyl carnitine. Treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with lauroyl carnitine polarized macrophages towards the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype through downregulation of AMPK and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results presented herein demonstrate that compared to a traditional HFD model, the CAF diet provides a robust model for diet-induced human obesity, which models Metabolic Syndrome-related mitochondrial dysfunction in serum, muscle, and adipose, along with pro-inflammatory metabolite alterations. These data also suggest that modifying the availability or metabolism of saturated fatty acids may limit the inflammation associated with obesity leading to Metabolic

  9. Comparative genomics reveals distinct host-interacting traits of three major human-associated propionibacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propionibacteria are part of the human microbiota. Many studies have addressed the predominant colonizer of sebaceous follicles of the skin, Propionibacterium acnes, and investigated its association with the skin disorder acne vulgaris, and lately with prostate cancer. Much less is known about two other propionibacterial species frequently found on human tissue sites, Propionibacterium granulosum and Propionibacterium avidum. Here we analyzed two and three genomes of P. granulosum and P. avidum, respectively, and compared them to two genomes of P. acnes; we further highlight differences among the three cutaneous species with proteomic and microscopy approaches. Results Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-like structure surrounding P. avidum cells, that is absent in P. acnes and P. granulosum. In contrast, P. granulosum possesses pili-like appendices, which was confirmed by surface proteome analysis. The corresponding genes were identified; they are clustered with genes encoding sortases. Both, P. granulosum and P. avidum lack surface or secreted proteins for predicted host-interacting factors of P. acnes, including several CAMP factors, sialidases, dermatan-sulphate adhesins, hyaluronidase and a SH3 domain-containing lipoprotein; accordingly, only P. acnes exhibits neuraminidase and hyaluronidase activities. These functions are encoded on previously unrecognized island-like regions in the genome of P. acnes. Conclusions Despite their omnipresence on human skin little is known about the role of cutaneous propionibacteria. All three species are associated with a variety of diseases, including postoperative and device-related abscesses and infections. We showed that the three organisms have evolved distinct features to interact with their human host. Whereas P. avidum and P. granulosum produce an EPS-like surface structure and pili-like appendices, respectively, P. acnes possesses a number of unique surface

  10. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  11. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  12. Characterizing WW Domain Interactions of Tumor Suppressor WWOX Reveals Its Association with Multiprotein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Huang, Haiming; Kim, TaeHyung; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib K.; Sudol, Marius; Reichmann, Dana; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kim, Philip M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2014-01-01

    WW domains are small modules present in regulatory and signaling proteins that mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain. Based on its ligand recognition motifs, the WW domain family is classified into four groups. The largest one, to which WWOX belongs, recognizes ligands with a PPXY motif. To pursue the functional properties of the WW domains of WWOX, we employed mass spectrometry and phage display experiments to identify putative WWOX-interacting partners. Our analysis revealed that the first WW (WW1) domain of WWOX is the main functional interacting domain. Furthermore, our study uncovered well known and new PPXY-WW1-interacting partners and shed light on novel LPXY-WW1-interacting partners of WWOX. Many of these proteins are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, including transcription, RNA processing, tight junction, and metabolism. By utilizing GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays, we validated that WWOX is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, which contains two LPXY motifs. We found that ITCH mediates Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination of WWOX, leading to its nuclear localization and increased cell death. Our data suggest that the WW1 domain of WWOX provides a versatile platform that links WWOX with individual proteins associated with physiologically important networks. PMID:24550385

  13. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  14. Molecular Details of α-Synuclein Membrane Association Revealed by Neutrons and Photons

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiping; Hess, Sara K.; Heinrich, Frank; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is an abundant neuronal protein associated with Parkinson’s disease that is disordered in solution, but exists in equilibrium between a bent- and an elongated-helix on negatively charged membranes. Here, neutron reflectometry (NR) and fluorescence spectroscopy were employed to uncover molecular details of the interaction between α-syn and two anionic lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine (PS). Both NR and site-specific Trp measurements indicate that penetration depth of α-syn is similar for either PA- or PS-containing membranes (~9–11 Å from bilayer center) even though there is a preference for α-syn binding to PA. However, closer examination of the individual Trp quenching profiles by brominated lipids reveal differences into local membrane interactions especially at position 39 where conformational heterogeneity was observed. The data also indicate that while W94 penetrates the bilayer as deeply as W4, W94 resides in a more polar surrounding. Taken together, we suggest the N- and C-terminal regions near positions 4 and 94 are anchored to the membrane, while the putative linker spanning residue 39 samples multiple conformations, which are sensitive to the chemical nature of the membrane surface. This flexibility may enable α-syn to bind diverse biomembranes in vivo. PMID:25790164

  15. Comparative secretomics reveals novel virulence-associated factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; Wang, Hua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a causative agent of serious human seafood-borne gastroenteritis disease and even death. In this study, for the first time, we obtained the secretomic profiles of seven V. parahaemolyticus strains of clinical and food origins. The strains exhibited various toxic genotypes and phenotypes of antimicrobial susceptibility and heavy metal resistance, five of which were isolated from aquatic products in Shanghai, China. Fourteen common extracellular proteins were identified from the distinct secretomic profiles using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques. Of these, half were involved in protein synthesis and sugar transport of V. parahaemolyticus. Strikingly, six identified proteins were virulence-associated factors involved in the pathogenicity of some other pathogenic bacteria, including the translation elongation factor EF-Tu, pyridoxine 5′-phosphate synthase, σ54 modulation protein, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, transaldolase and phosphoglycerate kinase. In addition, comparative secretomics also revealed several extracellular proteins that have not been described in any bacteria, such as the ribosome-recycling factor, translation elongation factor EF-Ts, phosphocarrier protein HPr and maltose-binding protein MalE. The results in this study will facilitate the better understanding of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus and provide data in support of novel vaccine candidates against the leading seafood-borne pathogen worldwide. PMID:26236293

  16. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as 'setae' on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in 'pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were 'delipidized' to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems. PMID:25902194

  17. Molecular characterization of coprophilous fungal communities reveals sequences related to root-associated fungal endophytes.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José; Poudel, Ravin; Khidir, Hana H

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the use of molecular methods to characterize the coprophilous fungal communities (CFC) that inhabit the dung of four species of mammalian herbivores at two sites, Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in New Mexico and Wind Cave National Park (WCNP) in South Dakota. Results reveal that CFC from domesticated cattle (Bos taurus) at SNWR, and bison (Bison bison) and black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at WCNP were diverse but dominated primarily by members within eight taxonomic orders, including the rarely cultured and anaerobic order Neocallimastigales. In addition, 7.7% (138 of 1,788) of the sequences obtained from all dung samples were at least 97% similar to root-associated fungal (RAF) sequences previously described from blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), a common forage grass found throughout North America and growing at both study sites. In contrast, 95.8% (295 of 308) of the sequences and four of the total seven operational taxonomic units obtained from pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) dung belonged to the Pleosporalean order. We hypothesize that some herbivore vectors disperse non-systemic (non-clavicipitaceous) fungal endophytes. These dispersal events, it is argued, are most likely to occur via herbivores that occasionally forage and masticate root tissue, especially in arid regions where aboveground vegetation is sparse. The results of this study suggest that some (possibly many) members of the RAF community can expand their ecological role to include colonizing dung. PMID:20842497

  18. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation. PMID:24789705

  19. Whole-exome sequencing reveals LRP5 mutations and canonical Wnt signaling associated with hepatic cystogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cnossen, Wybrich R.; te Morsche, René H. M.; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Chrispijn, Melissa; Venselaar, Hanka; Mehdi, Soufi; Bergmann, Carsten; Veltman, Joris A.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic livers are seen in the rare inherited disorder isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and are recognized as the most common extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Hepatic cystogenesis is characterized by progressive proliferation of cholangiocytes, ultimately causing hepatomegaly. Genetically, polycystic liver disease is a heterogeneous disorder with incomplete penetrance and caused by mutations in PRKCSH, SEC63, PKD1, or PKD2. Genome-wide SNP typing and Sanger sequencing revealed no pathogenic variants in hitherto genes in an extended PCLD family. We performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA samples from two members. A heterozygous variant c.3562C > T located at a highly conserved amino acid position (p.R1188W) in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene segregated with the disease (logarithm of odds score, 4.62) but was not observed in more than 1,000 unaffected individuals. Screening of LRP5 in a PCLD cohort identified three additional mutations in three unrelated families with polycystic livers (p.V454M, p.R1529S, and p.D1551N), again all undetected in controls. All variants were predicted to be damaging with profound structural effects on LRP5 protein domains. Liver cyst tissue and normal hepatic tissue samples from patients and controls showed abundant LRP5 expression by immunohistochemistry. Functional activity analyses indicated that mutant LRP5 led to reduced wingless signal activation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that germ-line LRP5 missense mutations are associated with hepatic cystogenesis. The findings presented in this study link the pathophysiology of PCLD to deregulation of the canonical wingless signaling pathway. PMID:24706814

  20. Whole-exome sequencing reveals LRP5 mutations and canonical Wnt signaling associated with hepatic cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Wybrich R; te Morsche, René H M; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Chrispijn, Melissa; Venselaar, Hanka; Mehdi, Soufi; Bergmann, Carsten; Veltman, Joris A; Drenth, Joost P H

    2014-04-01

    Polycystic livers are seen in the rare inherited disorder isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and are recognized as the most common extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Hepatic cystogenesis is characterized by progressive proliferation of cholangiocytes, ultimately causing hepatomegaly. Genetically, polycystic liver disease is a heterogeneous disorder with incomplete penetrance and caused by mutations in PRKCSH, SEC63, PKD1, or PKD2. Genome-wide SNP typing and Sanger sequencing revealed no pathogenic variants in hitherto genes in an extended PCLD family. We performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA samples from two members. A heterozygous variant c.3562C > T located at a highly conserved amino acid position (p.R1188W) in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene segregated with the disease (logarithm of odds score, 4.62) but was not observed in more than 1,000 unaffected individuals. Screening of LRP5 in a PCLD cohort identified three additional mutations in three unrelated families with polycystic livers (p.V454M, p.R1529S, and p.D1551N), again all undetected in controls. All variants were predicted to be damaging with profound structural effects on LRP5 protein domains. Liver cyst tissue and normal hepatic tissue samples from patients and controls showed abundant LRP5 expression by immunohistochemistry. Functional activity analyses indicated that mutant LRP5 led to reduced wingless signal activation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that germ-line LRP5 missense mutations are associated with hepatic cystogenesis. The findings presented in this study link the pathophysiology of PCLD to deregulation of the canonical wingless signaling pathway. PMID:24706814

  1. Association between Y haplogroups and autosomal AIMs reveals intra-population substructure in Bolivian populations.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Carlos; Gomes, Verónica; Romanini, Carola; Oliveira, Andréa M; Rocabado, Omar; Aquino, Juliana; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2015-07-01

    For the correct evaluation of the weight of genetic evidence in a forensic context, databases must reflect the structure of the population, with all possible groups being represented. Countries with a recent history of admixture between strongly differentiated populations are usually highly heterogeneous and sub-structured. Bolivia is one of these countries, with a high diversity of ethnic groups and different levels of admixture (among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans) across the territory. For a better characterization of the male lineages in Bolivia, 17 Y-STR and 42 Y-SNP loci were genotyped in samples from La Paz and Chuquisaca. Only European and Native American Y-haplogroups were detected, and no sub-Saharan African chromosomes were found. Significant differences were observed between the two samples, with a higher frequency of European lineages in Chuquisaca than in La Paz. A sample belonging to haplogroup Q1a3a1a1-M19 was detected in La Paz, in a haplotype background different from those previously found in Argentina. This result supports an old M19 North-south dispersion in South America, possibly via two routes. When comparing the ancestry of each individual assessed through his Y chromosome with the one estimated using autosomal AIMs, (a) increased European ancestry in individuals with European Y chromosomes and (b) higher Native American ancestry in the carriers of Native American Y-haplogroups were observed, revealing an association between autosomal and Y-chromosomal markers. The results of this study demonstrate that a sub-structure does exist in Bolivia at both inter- and intrapopulation levels, a fact which must be taken into account in the evaluation of forensic genetic evidence. PMID:24878616

  2. Oncogene mutation profiling reveals poor prognosis associated with FGFR1/3 mutation in liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfang; Shen, Yaoyuan; Ren, Yan; Liu, Wei; Li, Man; Liang, Weihua; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is one of the most prevalent soft tissue sarcomas. LPS shows a poor response to radiation and chemotherapy. The causes of death in patients with LPS include locally recurrent and metastatic disease. We sought to examine novel gene mutations and pathways in primary and matched recurrent LPSs to identify potential therapeutic targets. We conducted a high-throughput analysis of 238 known mutations in 19 oncogenes using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. Nucleic acids were extracted from 19 primary and recurrent LPS samples, encompassing 9 dedifferentiated LPSs (DDLPS), 9 myxoid/round cell LPSs, and 1 pleomorphic LPS. Mutation screening revealed missense mutations in 21.1% (4/19) of the LPS specimens, including 4 different genes (FGFR1, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and KIT). Based on histologic subtypes, 22.2% DDLPS (2/9) and 22.2% myxoid cell LPS (2/9) contained gene mutations. Specifically, 3 (23.1%) of 13 primary tumors harbored mutations. Furthermore, although gene mutations were identified in 1 (11.1%) of 9 recurrent LPS samples, the difference between the primary and the recurrence was not statistically significant. Analysis of patient survival data indicated that patients harboring FGFR1/3 mutations experienced reduced overall survival (P<.05). Despite the limited number of samples, our findings provide the first evidence of FGFR1/3 mutations in DDLPS, which were associated with poor clinical outcomes. The FGFR pathway may play an important role in the development and progression of DDLPS and warrants further investigation; moreover, PIK3CA mutation is a common event (11.1%) in myxoid cell LPS. PMID:27237367

  3. Trauma-associated Human Neutrophil Alterations Revealed by Comparative Proteomics Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian-Ying; Krovvidi, Ravi K.; Gao, Yuqian; Gao, Hong; Petritis, Brianne O.; De, Asit; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Bankey, Paul E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese R; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Tujin; Brown, Joseph N.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Davis, Ronald W.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) play an important role in mediating the innate immune response after severe traumatic injury; however, the cellular proteome response to traumatic condition is still largely unknown. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We applied 2D-LC-MS/MS based shotgun proteomics to perform comparative proteome profiling of human PMNs from severe trauma patients and healthy controls. RESULTS A total of 197 out of ~2500 proteins (being identified with at least two peptides) were observed with significant abundance changes following the injury. The proteomics data were further compared with transcriptomics data for the same genes obtained from an independent patient cohort. The comparison showed that the protein abundance changes for the majority of proteins were consistent with the mRNA abundance changes in terms of directions of changes. Moreover, increased protein secretion was suggested as one of the mechanisms contributing to the observed discrepancy between protein and mRNA abundance changes. Functional analyses of the altered proteins showed that many of these proteins were involved in immune response, protein biosynthesis, protein transport, NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and apoptosis pathways. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Our data suggest increased neutrophil activation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis in response to trauma. The study not only reveals an overall picture of functional neutrophil response to trauma at the proteome level, but also provides a rich proteomics data resource of trauma-associated changes in the neutrophil that will be valuable for further studies of the functions of individual proteins in PMNs. PMID:23589343

  4. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam R.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Dejene, Eden A.; Ramadan, James W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Taylor, Kent D.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Watanabe, Richard M.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  5. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  6. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan ... Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, et al. eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ...

  7. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  8. Genome-Wide Scan and Test of Candidate Genes in the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Reveal New Locus Influencing Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Johnstun, Joel A.; Yeh, Jan-Ying; Marine, Melanie; Tavalire, Hannah F.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background New strategies to combat the global scourge of schistosomiasis may be revealed by increased understanding of the mechanisms by which the obligate snail host can resist the schistosome parasite. However, few molecular markers linked to resistance have been identified and characterized in snails. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we test six independent genetic loci for their influence on resistance to Schistosoma mansoni strain PR1 in the 13-16-R1 strain of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. We first identify a genomic region, RADres, showing the highest differentiation between susceptible and resistant inbred lines among 1611 informative restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) markers, and show that it significantly influences resistance in an independent set of 439 outbred snails. The additive effect of each RADres resistance allele is 2-fold, similar to that of the previously identified resistance gene sod1. The data fit a model in which both loci contribute independently and additively to resistance, such that the odds of infection in homozygotes for the resistance alleles at both loci (13% infected) is 16-fold lower than the odds of infection in snails without any resistance alleles (70% infected). Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium is high, with both sod1 and RADres residing on haplotype blocks >2Mb, and with other markers in each block also showing significant effects on resistance; thus the causal genes within these blocks remain to be demonstrated. Other candidate loci had no effect on resistance, including the Guadeloupe Resistance Complex and three genes (aif, infPhox, and prx1) with immunological roles and expression patterns tied to resistance, which must therefore be trans-regulated. Conclusions/Significance The loci RADres and sod1 both have strong effects on resistance to S. mansoni. Future approaches to control schistosomiasis may benefit from further efforts to characterize and harness this natural genetic variation. PMID:26372103

  9. A genome-wide association analysis of temozolomide response using lymphoblastoid cell lines reveals a clinically relevant association with MGMT

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Chad C.; Havener, Tammy M.; Medina, Marisa Wong; Auman, J. Todd; Mangravite, Lara M.; Krauss, Ronald M.; McLeod, Howard L.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) have emerged as an innovative model system for mapping gene variants that predict dose response to chemotherapy drugs. In the current study, this strategy was expanded to the in vitro genome-wide association approach, using 516 LCLs derived from a Caucasian cohort to assess cytotoxic response to temozolomide. Genome-wide association analysis using approximately 2.1 million quality controlled single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified a statistically significant association (p < 10−8) with SNPs in the O6-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. We also demonstrate that the primary SNP in this region is significantly associated with differential gene expression of MGMT (p< 10−26) in LCLs, and differential methylation in glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The previously documented clinical and functional relationships between MGMT and temozolomide response highlight the potential of well-powered GWAS of the LCL model system to identify meaningful genetic associations. PMID:23047291

  10. Genome-wide SNP scan of pooled DNA reveals nonsense mutation in FGF20 in the scaleless line of featherless chickens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scaleless (sc/sc) chickens carry a single recessive mutation that causes a lack of almost all body feathers, as well as foot scales and spurs, due to a failure of skin patterning during embryogenesis. This spontaneous mutant line, first described in the 1950s, has been used extensively to explore the tissue interactions involved in ectodermal appendage formation in embryonic skin. Moreover, the trait is potentially useful in tropical agriculture due to the ability of featherless chickens to tolerate heat, which is at present a major constraint to efficient poultry meat production in hot climates. In the interests of enhancing our understanding of feather placode development, and to provide the poultry industry with a strategy to breed heat-tolerant meat-type chickens (broilers), we mapped and identified the sc mutation. Results Through a cost-effective and labour-efficient SNP array mapping approach using DNA from sc/sc and sc/+ blood sample pools, we map the sc trait to chromosome 4 and show that a nonsense mutation in FGF20 is completely associated with the sc/sc phenotype. This mutation, common to all sc/sc individuals and absent from wild type, is predicted to lead to loss of a highly conserved region of the FGF20 protein important for FGF signalling. In situ hybridisation and quantitative RT-PCR studies reveal that FGF20 is epidermally expressed during the early stages of feather placode patterning. In addition, we describe a dCAPS genotyping assay based on the mutation, developed to facilitate discrimination between wild type and sc alleles. Conclusions This work represents the first loss of function genetic evidence supporting a role for FGF ligand signalling in feather development, and suggests FGF20 as a novel central player in the development of vertebrate skin appendages, including hair follicles and exocrine glands. In addition, this is to our knowledge the first report describing the use of the chicken SNP array to map genes based on