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Sample records for assumed cosmic ray-modulated

  1. Cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays to and inside the heliosphere, encounter an outward moving solar wind with cyclic magnetic field fluctuation and turbulence, causing convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. Cosmic ray counts from the ground ground-based neutron monitors at different cut of rigidity show intensity changes, which are anti-correlated with sunspot numbers. They also lose energy as they propagate towards the Earth and experience various types of modulations due to different solar activity indices. In this work, we study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-2014 for Beijing, Moscow and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations located at different cut off rigidity. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for low cutoff rigidity as compared to high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station as compared to the high cut off rigidity station on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days does not show any significant dependence on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of different cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics, amplitude, phase.

  2. Cosmic-Ray Modulation Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraal, H.

    2013-06-01

    The temporal variation of the cosmic-ray intensity in the heliosphere is called cosmic-ray modulation. The main periodicity is the response to the 11-year solar activity cycle. Other variations include a 27-day solar rotation variation, a diurnal variation, and irregular variations such as Forbush decreases. General awareness of the importance of this cosmic-ray modulation has greatly increased in the last two decades, mainly in communities studying cosmogenic nuclides, upper atmospheric physics and climate, helio-climatology, and space weather, where corrections need to be made for these modulation effects. Parameterized descriptions of the modulation are even used in archeology and in planning the flight paths of commercial passenger jets. The qualitative, physical part of the modulation is generally well-understood in these communities. The mathematical formalism that is most often used to quantify it is the so-called Force-Field approach, but the origins of this approach are somewhat obscure and it is not always used correct. This is mainly because the theory was developed over more than 40 years, and all its aspects are not collated in a single document. This paper contains a formal mathematical description intended for these wider communities. It consists of four parts: (1) a description of the relations between four indicators of "energy", namely energy, speed, momentum and rigidity, (2) the various ways of how to count particles, (3) the description of particle motion with transport equations, and (4) the solution of such equations, and what these solutions mean. Part (4) was previously described in Caballero-Lopez and Moraal (J. Geophys. Res, 109: A05105, doi: 10.1029/2003JA010358, 2004). Therefore, the details are not all repeated here. The style of this paper is not to be rigorous. It rather tries to capture the relevant tools to do modulation studies, to show how seemingly unrelated results are, in fact, related to one another, and to point out the

  3. Heliospheric Impact on Cosmic Rays Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Bhupendra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Heliospheric Impact on Cosmic RaysModulation B. K. Tiwari Department of Physics, A. P. S. University, Rewa (M.P.), btiwari70@yahoo.com Cosmic rays (CRs) flux at earth is modulated by the heliosphereric magnetic field and the structure of the heliosphere, controls by solar outputs and their variability. Sunspots numbers (SSN) is often treated as a primary indicator of solar activity (SA). GCRs entering the helioshphere are affected by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind speed, their modulation varies with the varying solar activity. The observation based on data recoded from Omniweb data Centre for solar- interplanetary activity indices and monthly mean count rate of cosmic ray intensity (CRI) data from neutron monitors of different cut-off rigidities(Rc) (Moscow Rc=2.42Gv and Oulu Rc=0.80Gv). During minimum solar activity periodof solar cycle 23/24, the sun is remarkably quiet, weakest strength of the IMF and least dense and slowest, solar wind speed, whereas, in 2003, highest value of yearly averaged solar wind speed (~568 Km/sec) associated with several coronal holes, which generate high speed wind stream has been recorded. It is observed that GCRs fluxes reduces and is high anti-correlated with SSN (0.80) and IMF (0.86). CRI modulation produces by a strong solar flare, however, CME associated solar flare produce more disturbance in the interplanetary medium as well as in geomagnetic field. It is found that count rate of cosmic ray intensity and solar- interplanetary parameters were inverse correlated and solar indices were positive correlated. Keywords- Galactic Cosmic rays (GCRs), Sunspot number (SSN), Solar activity (SA), Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)

  4. A hysteresis effect in cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verschell, H. J.; Mendell, R. B.; Korff, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    The rigidity dependence is investigated in the modulation of cosmic ray protons and alphas at intermediate (2-13 Gv) rigidities during the declines and recoveries of the cosmic ray flux near cosmic ray minimum. The results include the finding that sudden changes in the modulation of the primary cosmic rays are initiated by large solar particle outflow and begin as type I Forbush decreases. Typically, the modulation spectrum becomes flatter at intermediate rigidity below 13 Gv and steeper at rigidities above 13 Gv during early recovery.

  5. Are cosmic rays modulated beyond the heliopause?

    SciTech Connect

    Kóta, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss the possible spatial variation of Galactic and anomalous cosmic rays (GCRs and ACRs) at and beyond the heliopause (HP). Remaining within the framework of the Parker transport equation and assuming incompressible plasma in the heliosheath, we consider highly idealized simple-flow models and compare our GCR results with recent publications of Scherer et al. and Strauss et al. First, we discuss an order-of-magnitude estimate and a simple spherical model to demonstrate that the modulation of GCRs beyond the HP must be quite small if the diffusion coefficient beyond the HP is greater than ≈10{sup 26} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}, a value that is two orders of magnitude smaller than the value of 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1} determined from observations of GCR composition. Second, we construct a non-spherical model, which allows lateral deflection of the flow and uses different diffusion coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find that modulation of GCRs beyond the HP remains small even if the perpendicular diffusion coefficient beyond the HP is quite small (≈10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}) as long as the parallel diffusion is sufficiently fast. We also consider the case when the parallel diffusion beyond the HP is fast, but the perpendicular diffusion is as small as ≈10{sup 20} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}; this results in a sharp, almost step-like increase of GCR flux (and decrease of ACRs) at the HP. Possible implications are briefly discussed. We further suggest the possibility that the observed sharp gradient of GCRs at the HP might push the HP closer to the Sun than previously thought.

  6. Cosmic ray modulation and merged interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Goldstein, M. L.; Mcdonald, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    Beyond several AU, interactions among shocks and streams give rise to merged interaction regions in which the magnetic field is turbulent. The integral intensity of . 75 MeV/Nuc cosmic rays at Voyager is generally observed to decrease when a merged interaction region moves past the spacecraft and to increase during the passage of a rarefaction region. When the separation between interaction regions is relatively large, the cosmic ray intensity tends to increase on a scale of a few months. This was the case at Voyager 1 from July 1, 1983 to May 1, 1984, when the spacecraft moved from 16.7 to 19.6 AU. Changes in cosmic ray intensity were related to the magnetic field strength in a simple way. It is estimated that the diffusion coefficient in merged interaction regions at this distance is similar to 0.6 x 10 to the 22nd power sq cm/s.

  7. Rigidity Dependence of Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The various observed harmonics of the cosmic ray variation may be understood on a unified basis if the free space cosmic ray anisotropy is non-sinusoidal in form. The major objective of this paper is to study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-1990 for Deep River, Goose Bay and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for Deep River having low cutoff rigidity as compared to Tokyo neutron monitor having high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases in 1987 at Deep River and in 1986 at Tokyo during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction at both the stations having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station i.e. Deep River as compared to the high cut off rigidity station i.e. Tokyo on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The solar wind velocity significantly remains in the range 350 to 425 km/s i.e. being nearly average on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days are weakly dependent on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of low and high cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics.

  8. Cosmic-ray modulation at solar maximum: modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, J.; Jokipii, J.

    The modulation of the galactic and anomalous cosmic rays is a result of the energy loss cosmic rays suffer during their passage through the heliospheric magnetic and electric fields. By contrast with the years of quiet heliosphere, which can be described with a tilted dipole model that remains stable for several solar rotations, cosmic-ray modulation during the periods of the active Sun is thought to be dominated by transient events. Propagating disturbances forming global merged interaction regions (GMIRs) act as propagating barriers. The heliospheric current sheet (HCS) dividing the opposite polarities of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) becomes highly tilted and may contain a significant quadrupole component, leading to a warped current sheet with a profound north-south asymmetry. We present numerical simulations to model cosmic-ray transport and acceleration in the heliosphere during solar maximum. Our 2-D and 3-D codes are extended to include several transients. We consider various complex configurations of the HMF, as well as a dynamical variation of the tilted current sheet, involving meridional field components. We discuss the effects of GMIRs on galactic and anomalous cosmic rays, and compare the time evolution of the two different species, as the disturbance propagates outward through the termination shock (TS) into the heliosheath. Some aspects of cosmic-ray modulation beyond the TS, in the subsonic heliosheath will also be addressed.

  9. Cosmic-Ray Modulation: an Ab Initio Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    A better understanding of cosmic-ray modulation in the heliosphere can only be gained through a proper understanding of the effects of turbulence on the diffusion and drift of cosmic rays. We present an ab initio model for cosmic-ray modulation, incorporating for the first time the results yielded by a two-component turbulence transport model. This model is solved for periods of minimum solar activity, utilizing boundary values chosen so that model results are in fair to good agreement with spacecraft observations of turbulence quantities, not only in the solar ecliptic plane but also along the out-of-ecliptic trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft. These results are employed as inputs for modelled slab and 2D turbulence energy spectra. The latter spectrum is chosen based on physical considerations, with a drop-off at the very lowest wavenumbers commencing at the 2D outerscale. There currently exist no models or observations for this quantity, and it is the only free parameter in this study. The modelled turbulence spectra are used as inputs for parallel mean free path expressions based on those derived from quasi-linear theory and perpendicular mean free paths from extended nonlinear guiding center theory. Furthermore, the effects of turbulence on cosmic-ray drifts are modelled in a self-consistent way, employing a recently developed model for drift along the wavy current sheet. The resulting diffusion coefficients and drift expressions are applied to the study of galactic cosmic-ray protons and antiprotons using a three-dimensional, steady-state cosmic-ray modulation code, and sample solutions in fair agreement with multiple spacecraft observations are presented.

  10. Heliospheric Energetic Particles and Galactic Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents an overview of the SH ‘Solar and Heliospheric cosmic rays’ session of the 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS), Kiel, Germany, 2014. It covers the topics of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) origin, acceleration and transport at the Sun and in the interplanetary medium, also from the aspect of multi-spacecraft observations, as well as the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) short- and long-term variations and the Jovian electron variations in the heliosphere. Relevant instruments and methods presented are also covered by this review. The paper is written from a personal perspective, emphasizing those results that the author found most interesting.

  11. Galactic cosmic-ray modulation near the heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Florinski, V.

    2014-09-20

    We investigate the modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the inner and outer heliosheaths using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The model is based on the Parker transport equation integrated using a stochastic phase-space trajectory method. Integration is performed on a plasma background obtained from a global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our results predict a negligible amount of modulation in the outer heliosheath because of weak scattering of cosmic ray ions owing to very low levels of magnetic fluctuation power at wavenumbers relevant to the transport of cosmic rays with MeV to GeV energies. This means that the heliopause may be treated as a Dirichlet-type boundary for the purpose of energetic particle modeling. We present models with and without drift velocity to facilitate comparison with papers published earlier. We also attempt to reproduce the sudden step-like increases of cosmic-ray intensity observed by Voyager 1 before its encounter with the heliopause. Our results indicate that very slow cross-field diffusion in the outer heliosheath could produce a large gradient of cosmic rays inside the heliospheric boundary. The resulting large gradient in cosmic-ray intensity near the heliopause qualitatively agrees with recent Voyager 1 observations.

  12. Cosmic ray modulation and turbulent interaction regions near 11 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    When Voyager 2 was near 11 AU, the counting rate of nuclei approx 75 MeV/nucleon decreased during the interval from July, 1982 to November, 1982, and it increased thereafter until August, 1983. A decrease in cosmic ray flux was generally associated with the passage of an interaction region in which the magnetic field strength B was higher than that predicted by the spiral field model, B sub p. Several large enhancements in B/B sup p were associated with merged interaction regions which probably resulted from the interaction of two or more distinct flows. During the passage of interaction regions the cosmic ray intensity decreased at a rate proportional to (B/B sup p -1), and during the passage of rarefaction regions (where B/B sup p 1) the cosmic ray intensity increased at a constant rate. The general form of the cosmic ray intensity profile during this approx 13 month minicycle can be described by integrating these relations using the observed B(t). Latitudinal variations of the interaction regions and of the short-term cosmic ray variations were identified.

  13. Study cosmic ray modulation near the heliopause: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Zhang, M.; Potgieter, M. S.; Feng, X.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    By incorporating the MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) global heliospheric data into the Parker's cosmic-rays (CRs) transport equation, we constructed a hybrid galactic cosmic ray transport model to study the galactic cosmic-rays (GCR) behaviour near the heliopause(HP). Based on this hybrid model, we found that: (1)By increasing the ratio of the parallel diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular diffusion coefficient in the outer heliosheath (the region near HP and beyond), the simulated radial flux gradient near the HP increases as well. As this ratio multiplying factor reaches 1010, the flux experiences a sudden jump near the HP, similar to what Voyager 1 had observed in 2012. (2)After increasing the ratio of the diffusion coefficients beyond the HP, more pseudo- particles in our numerical approach which have been traced from the upwind nose region exit in the downwind tail region. It is thus possible that they diffuse more directly from the tail region to the nose region.

  14. Interplanetary flow systems associated with cosmic ray modulation in 1977 - 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Ness, N. F.; Schwenn, R.; Lazarus, A. J.; Mariani, F.

    1983-01-01

    The hydromagnetic flow configurations associated with cosmic ray modulation in 1977 to 1980 were determined using solar wind plasma and magnetic field data from Voyagers 1 and 2 and Helios 1. The modulation was related to two types of large scale systems of flows: one containing a number of transients such as shocks, post shock flows and magnetic clouds; the other consisting primarily of a series of quasi-stationary flows following interaction regions containing a stream interface and often bounded by a forward reverse shock pair. Each of the three major episodes of cosmic ray modulation was characterized by the passage of the system of transient flows. Plateaus in the cosmic ray intensity time profile were associated with the passage of systems of corotating streams.

  15. A numerical investigation of cosmic ray modulation near the heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Ming; Toit Strauss, Du; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Feng, Xueshang; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    A hybrid transport model is used for studying the modulation of galactic cosmic ray in the global heliosphere. This model incorporates the output data of a comprehensive MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) model as numerical input for the Parker's transport equation which is solved using a Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) approach. We use this approach to study the transport of galactic cosmic rays near and beyond the heliopause (HP). We find that: The simulated radial flux near the HP increases when increasing the ratio of the parallel to the perpendicular diffusion coefficients in the interstellar magnetic field of the outer heliosheath. As the multiplying factor of this ratio reaches 10 ^{10}, the radial flux experiences a sudden upwards jump near the HP, similar to what Voyager 1 had observed in 2012. We simulate the cosmic ray radial flux along different directions in the heliosphere. There is not a well-defined thin layer between the solar wind region and interstellar region along the tail and polar directions of the heliosphere. By analysing the radial flux profile along the direction of Voyager 2, together with its trajectory information, the time when the HP may be crossed by Voyager 2 is predicted. We also simulate the cosmic ray radial flux for different energy values along the direction of Voyager 1. We find that there is indeed a modulation region beyond the HP but only of a modest width of about 10 AU, so that Voyager 1 observing the very local interstellar spectra is justified in numerical modelling. We find that after increasing the ratio of the mentioned diffusion coefficients beyond the HP, more pseudo-particles in our SDE approach, which have been traced from the upwind nose region, exit in the downwind tail region. It is thus possible that they diffuse directly from the tail region to the nose region.

  16. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY MODULATION IN A REALISTIC GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2013-02-10

    To understand the behavior of cosmic-ray modulation seen by the two Voyager spacecraft in the region near the termination shock (TS) and in the heliosheath at a distance of >100 AU, a realistic magnetohydrodynamic global heliosphere model is incorporated into our cosmic-ray transport code, so that the detailed effects of the heliospheric boundaries and their plasma/magnetic geometry can be revealed. A number of simulations of cosmic-ray modulation performed with this code result in the following conclusions. (1) Diffusive shock acceleration by the TS can significantly affect the level of cosmic-ray flux and, in particular, its radial gradient profile in the region near the TS and in the inner heliosheath. (2) The radial profile of cosmic-ray flux strongly depends on longitude. There is a slight north-south asymmetry due to an asymmetric TS, but the larger difference in the radial profiles comes from longitudinal variation. Voyager 1 and 2 are separated by {approx} 40 Degree-Sign in longitude. Simulations in these two directions show a large difference in the radial profile of cosmic-ray flux. Thus, it is not appropriate to determine the cosmic-ray radial gradient by directly using the two-point Voyager measurements. Various other simulations are also performed to show how sensitively the modulation level depends on latitude, cosmic-ray energy, and interstellar spectrum.

  17. COSMIC RAY MODULATION BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE: A HYBRID MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, R. D.; Potgieter, M. S.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.

    2013-03-01

    Results from a newly developed hybrid cosmic ray (CR) modulation model are presented. In this approach, the transport of CRs is computed by incorporating the plasma flow from a magnetohydrodynamic model for the heliospheric environment, resulting in representative CR transport. The model is applied to the modulation of CRs beyond the heliopause (HP) and we show that (1) CR modulation persists beyond the HP, so it is unlikely that the Voyager spacecraft will measure the pristine local interstellar spectra of galactic CRs when crossing the HP. (2) CR modulation in the outer heliosheath could maintain solar-cycle-related changes. (3) The modulation of CRs in the outer heliosheath is primarily determined by the ratio of perpendicular to parallel diffusion, so that the value of the individual diffusion coefficients cannot be determined uniquely using this approach. (4) CRs can efficiently diffuse between the nose and tail regions of the heliosphere.

  18. Galactic Cosmic Ray Modulation near the Heliospheric Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Scott, C. J.

    2014-07-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are modulated by the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) both over decadal time scales (due to long-term, global HMF variations), and over time scales of a few hours (associated with solar wind structures such as coronal mass ejections or the heliospheric current sheet, HCS). Due to the close association between the HCS, the streamer belt, and the band of slow solar wind, HCS crossings are often associated with corotating interaction regions where fast solar wind catches up and compresses slow solar wind ahead of it. However, not all HCS crossings are associated with strong compressions. In this study we categorize HCS crossings in two ways: Firstly, using the change in magnetic polarity, as either away-to-toward (AT) or toward-to-away (TA) magnetic field directions relative to the Sun and, secondly, using the strength of the associated solar wind compression, determined from the observed plasma density enhancement. For each category, we use superposed epoch analyses to show differences in both solar wind parameters and GCR flux inferred from neutron monitors. For strong-compression HCS crossings, we observe a peak in neutron counts preceding the HCS crossing, followed by a large drop after the crossing, attributable to the so-called `snow-plough' effect. For weak-compression HCS crossings, where magnetic field polarity effects are more readily observable, we instead observe that the neutron counts have a tendency to peak in the away magnetic field sector. By splitting the data by the dominant polarity at each solar polar region, we find that the increase in GCR flux prior to the HCS crossing is primarily from strong compressions in cycles with negative north polar fields due to GCR drift effects. Finally, we report on unexpected differences in GCR behavior between TA weak compressions during opposing polarity cycles.

  19. AN AB INITIO MODEL FOR COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.

    2013-07-20

    A proper understanding of the effects of turbulence on the diffusion and drift of cosmic rays (CRs) is of vital importance for a better understanding of CR modulation in the heliosphere. This study presents an ab initio model for CR modulation, incorporating for the first time the results yielded by a two-component turbulence transport model. This model is solved for solar minimum heliospheric conditions, utilizing boundary values chosen so that model results are in reasonable agreement with spacecraft observations of turbulence quantities in the solar ecliptic plane and along the out-of-ecliptic trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft. These results are employed as inputs for modeled slab and two-dimensional (2D) turbulence energy spectra. The modeled 2D spectrum is chosen based on physical considerations, with a drop-off at the very lowest wavenumbers. There currently exist no models or observations for the wavenumber where this drop-off occurs, and it is considered to be the only free parameter in this study. The modeled spectra are used as inputs for parallel mean free path expressions based on those derived from quasi-linear theory and perpendicular mean free paths from extended nonlinear guiding center theory. Furthermore, the effects of turbulence on CR drifts are modeled in a self-consistent way, also employing a recently developed model for wavy current sheet drift. The resulting diffusion and drift coefficients are applied to the study of galactic CR protons and antiprotons using a 3D, steady-state CR modulation code, and sample solutions in fair to good agreement with multiple spacecraft observations are presented.

  20. New aspects of the cosmic-ray modulation in 1974-1975 near solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Mason, G. M.; Simpson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Residual cosmic-ray modulation at or near the solar minima of 1965 and 1972-75 is compared on the basis of ground-based and satellite observations of nonrelativistic proton and helium components as well as variations in the relativistic component. It is found that the nonrelativistic fluxes lagged behind the high-energy fluxes to form a hysteresis loop over the period from 1965 to 1973, that the 1975 proton fluxes were about 85% higher than the 1972 level and about 35% higher than the 1965 level, and that the 1975 helium fluxes were about 60% higher than in 1965. Some unique recovery events are discussed, and a time-lag effect dependent on magnetic rigidity is examined which was associated with dynamic changes in the heliosphere. A qualitative explanation is offered for the hysteresis effect.

  1. Cosmic ray modulation and noise level on the extended multidirectional muons detector telescope installed in south of Brazil: preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, C. R.; Savian, J. F.; da Silva, M. R.; da Silva, S. M.; da Silva, C. W.; Dal Lago, A.; Kuwabara, T.; Munakata, K.; Bieber, J. W.; Schuch, N. J.; All

    Because of the large detector mass required to detect high-energy cosmic rays ground-based instruments remain the state-of-the-art method for studying these particles At energies up to 100 GeV primary galactic cosmic rays experience significant variation in response to solar wind disturbances such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections ICMEs In this way ground-based detectors can provide unique information on conditions in the near-earth interplanetary medium Since 2001 a prototype multidirectional high energy 50 GeV cosmic-ray muons detector telescope was operating in the Southern Space Observatory SSO CRSPE INPE - MCT Brazil geomagnetic coordinates 19o 13 S and 16o 30 E In December 2005 an upgrade increased the collection area in 600 becoming two layers of 28 m2 each The objective of this work is to analyze cosmic ray count rates observed by ground-based detector in order to find both variations not associated with interplanetary structures possible associated with the noise from the instrument and decrease rates caused by cosmic ray modulation due to interplanetary structures near Earth We use 1 minute resolution data from the extended telescope collected since January 2006 which is the first data since the update of the instrument on December 2005 We also use the disturbance storm time Dst index from Kyoto plasma and interplanetary magnetic field from the ACE satellite In the future this study will help to separate cosmic ray modulation caused by interplanetary structures from those variations in short periods less than 1 month

  2. The simulated features of heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation with a time-dependent drift model. III - General energy dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Le Roux, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The time-dependent cosmic-ray transport equation is solved numerically in an axially symmetric heliosphere. Gradient and curvature drifts are incorporated, together with an emulated wavy neutral sheet. This model is used to simulate heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation for the period 1985-1989 during which drifts are considered to be important. The general energy dependence of the modulation of Galactic protons is studied as predicted by the model for the energy range 1 MeV to 10 GeV. The corresponding instantaneous radial and latitudinal gradients are calculated, and it is found that, whereas the latitudinal gradients follow the trends in the waviness of the neutral sheet to a large extent for all energies, the radial gradients below about 200 MeV deviate from this general pattern. In particular, these gradients increase when the waviness decreases for the simulated period 1985-1987.3, after which they again follow the neutral sheet by increasing rapidly.

  3. DESPIKING OF SPACECRAFT ENERGETIC PROTON FLUX TO STUDY GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; Zhao, L.-L.; Chen, H.-C. E-mail: llzhao@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2012-06-20

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) is usually assumed as a stable 'background', with solar influence considered as a modulation. The violent solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with solar activities change particle fluxes by several orders of magnitude in a few minutes. Thus, the flux observation of GCR provided by satellites may be heavily contaminated by spurious spikes due to SEPs, and that provided by ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) may be contaminated by the system error spikes and the ground level enhancement effect. To obtain the 'pure' background GCR flux for modulation research, the removal of multifarious spikes is necessary. In this article, we use a robust automatic despiking algorithm based on the Poincare map thresholding method provided by Goring and Nikora for 'purification' of the time-series GCR flux observations. We can show that the algorithm is good at cleaning up the heavily contaminated GCR intensity rates measured by both spacecraft and NMs without artificial parameters. In addition, using the algorithm to despike the spacecraft observations of relatively lower energetic proton flux, we get both 11 year and 27 day period cycles comparable to the much higher energy GCR flux data measured by the ground-based NMs.

  4. Despiking of spacecraft energetic proton flux to study galactic cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Qin, G.; Chen, H.

    2012-12-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) is usually considered as a stable "background," with solar influence assumed as a modulation. The solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with solar activities change particle fluxes by several orders of magnitude in a few minutes. Thus, the flux observation of GCR provided by satellite may be contaminated by spurious spikes due to SEPs. In addition, the GCR fluxes provided by ground-based neutron monitors may be contaminated by the system error spikes and the ground level enhancement effect. For modulation research, "pure" background GCR flux from the removal of spikes is needed. In this work, we use an automatic despiking algorithm based on the Poincare map thresholding method (Goring and Nikora 2002) for "purification" of the GCR flux observations. We can show that the algorithm is good at reducing the various kinds of spikes of GCR intensity rates measured by both spacecraft and neutron monitors without artificial parameters. In addition, using the algorithm to despike the spacecraft observations of relatively lower energy energetic proton flux, we get both 11-year and 27-day period cycles comparable to the much higher energy GCR flux data measured by the ground-based neutron monitors.

  5. ON COSMIC RAY MODULATION BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE: WHERE IS THE MODULATION BOUNDARY?

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, H.; Strauss, R. D.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S.; Fahr, H.-J.

    2011-07-10

    Two of the paradigms in modeling the transport of galactic cosmic rays are that the modulation boundary is the heliopause and that the local interstellar spectra are identical to the galactic cosmic ray spectra. Here we demonstrate that the proton spectrum is already modulated due to an altered interstellar diffusion in the outer heliosheath as a consequence of the heliospheric 'obstacle' in the interstellar flow. The main modulation effect however is adiabatic energy losses during a 'confinement time' of cosmic rays inside the heliosphere.

  6. Where is the cosmic-ray modulation boundary of the heliosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Luo, Xi; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere is modulated by solar activities. The outer boundary where the solar modulation begins has always been a subject matter of debate in the cosmic-ray and heliophysics community. Various experimental methods and theoretical model calculations have been used to determine the boundary. Although the heliopause was always suspected to be the boundary, it is only until very recently after Voyager 1 had crossed the heliopause did we confirm that the boundary is indeed the heliopause. In this paper, we use a model simulation and detailed Voyager observation of cosmic rays at the heliopause crossing to show that the modulation boundary, in fact, is a fraction of an AU beyond the heliopause. Such a conclusion requires a very low turbulence level of the interstellar magnetic field in the outer heliosheath. According to the quasi-linear theory, a low level of turbulence should result in a very large diffusion coefficient parallel to the magnetic field and a very small perpendicular diffusion coefficient. For the first time, we are confident that Voyager 1 has obtained the truly pristine local interstellar cosmic-ray spectra down to the energies below 1 MeV. The cosmic-ray intensity is rapidly filtered by a thin layer of the interstellar magnetic field immediately outside of the heliopause. Its filtration amount depends on the conditions of magnetic field turbulence on the both sides of the heliopause, thus making it solar-cycle dependent as well.

  7. Where is the cosmic-ray modulation boundary of the heliosphere?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Luo, Xi; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2015-09-15

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere is modulated by solar activities. The outer boundary where the solar modulation begins has always been a subject matter of debate in the cosmic-ray and heliophysics community. Various experimental methods and theoretical model calculations have been used to determine the boundary. Although the heliopause was always suspected to be the boundary, it is only until very recently after Voyager 1 had crossed the heliopause did we confirm that the boundary is indeed the heliopause. In this paper, we use a model simulation and detailed Voyager observation of cosmic rays at the heliopause crossing to show that the modulation boundary, in fact, is a fraction of an AU beyond the heliopause. Such a conclusion requires a very low turbulence level of the interstellar magnetic field in the outer heliosheath. According to the quasi-linear theory, a low level of turbulence should result in a very large diffusion coefficient parallel to the magnetic field and a very small perpendicular diffusion coefficient. For the first time, we are confident that Voyager 1 has obtained the truly pristine local interstellar cosmic-ray spectra down to the energies below 1 MeV. The cosmic-ray intensity is rapidly filtered by a thin layer of the interstellar magnetic field immediately outside of the heliopause. Its filtration amount depends on the conditions of magnetic field turbulence on the both sides of the heliopause, thus making it solar-cycle dependent as well.

  8. A study of periodicities and recurrences in solar activity and cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attolini, M. R.; Cecchini, S.; Galli, M.

    1985-01-01

    The 154d periodicity was found in the cosmic ray intensity (RE) vs Flares, and some other peaks of coherency in the RC vs aa sub I, that when interpreted as aliased values, might correspond to recurring interplanetary magnetic field structures and solar wind streams. It cannot be excluded, however, that some of the correspondence with aa are of terrestrial origin. This study cannot be considered exhaustive due to the fact that other solar variables, such as polar hole size, are possibly correlated to cosmic ray intensities. However, the number of observations is small so that the interpretation of the results is very difficult.

  9. A Numerical Simulation of Cosmic-Ray Modulation Near the Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Ming; Potgieter, Marius; Feng, Xueshang; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2015-07-01

    Based on a hybrid galactic cosmic-ray transport model, which incorporated MHD global heliospheric data into Parker’s cosmic-ray transport equation, we studied the behavior of the transport of galactic cosmic rays and the corresponding gradients in their flux near the heliopause (HP). We found that, (1) by increasing the ratio of the parallel diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular diffusion coefficient in the interstellar magnetic field of the outer heliosheath, the simulated radial flux near the HP increases as well. As the ratio multiplying factor reached 1010, the radial flux experienced a sudden jump near the HP, similar to what Voyager 1 observed in 2012. (2) The effect of changing the diffusion coefficients’ ratio on the radial flux variation depends on the energy of the cosmic rays, the lower the energy, the more pronounced the effect is. (3) The magnitude of the diffusion coefficients also affect the radial flux near the HP, the modulation beyond the HP varies by adjusting the magnitude multiplying factor.

  10. Long-term variations of interplanetary magnetic field spectra with implications for cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Chen, Jiasheng; Matthaeus, William H.; Smith, Charles W.; Pomerantz, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper calculates yearly averaged power spectra of interplanetary magnetic field turbulence at 1 AU over the period 1965-1988 for fluctuations in the frequency range 5.8 x 10 exp -6 to 4.6 x 10 exp -5 Hz, corresponding to periods of 6-48 hr. The amplitudes of the spectra vary with the sunspot cycle and are inversely correlated with the intensity of about 10-GeV cosmic rays. The observed spectra are used to calculate a lower limit to the cosmic ray scattering mean free path employing resonant magnetostatic quasi-linear theory for both 'slab' and isotropic geometries of the turbulence. The mean free paths thus obtained are typically about 0.1 AU in the slab model and about 0.3 AU in the isotropic model, but they are not significantly correlated with the modulated galactic cosmic ray intensity recorded by neutron monitors. It is inferred that the scattering processes described by resonant magnetostatic theory play, at best, a very minor role in the solar modulation of about 10-GeV cosmic rays.

  11. THE EFFECT OF A DYNAMIC INNER HELIOSHEATH THICKNESS ON COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, R.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2015-02-01

    The time-dependent modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere is studied over different polarity cycles by computing 2.5 GV proton intensities using a two-dimensional, time-dependent modulation model. By incorporating recent theoretical advances in the relevant transport parameters in the model, we showed in previous work that this approach gave realistic computed intensities over a solar cycle. New in this work is that a time dependence of the solar wind termination shock (TS) position is implemented in our model to study the effect of a dynamic inner heliosheath thickness (the region between the TS and heliopause) on the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. The study reveals that changes in the inner heliosheath thickness, arising from a time-dependent shock position, does affect cosmic-ray intensities everywhere in the heliosphere over a solar cycle, with the smallest effect in the innermost heliosphere. A time-dependent TS position causes a phase difference between the solar activity periods and the corresponding intensity periods. The maximum intensities in response to a solar minimum activity period are found to be dependent on the time-dependent TS profile. It is found that changing the width of the inner heliosheath with time over a solar cycle can shift the time of when the maximum or minimum cosmic-ray intensities occur at various distances throughout the heliosphere, but more significantly in the outer heliosphere. The time-dependent extent of the inner heliosheath, as affected by solar activity conditions, is thus an additional time-dependent factor to be considered in the long-term modulation of cosmic rays.

  12. Evidence for regions of negligible cosmic-ray modulation in the inner heliosphere ( 10 AU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Gold and Venkatesan report observations of periods during 1974-1976 when extended regions of heliolongitude that emitted lower than average solar wind velocities at 1 AU also exhibited higher than average cosmic ray intensities as measured by the E 35 MeV CPME anti-coincidence scintillator (28 sq cm omnidirectional geometric factor) on IMP-8. Their observations reproduced by a simple model, based on the observed steady solar wind structure, wherein there is little modulation of cosmic rays in the inner heliosphere until they reach the shocked plasma beyond the stream interactions in the outer heliosphere (similar to 5 to 10 AU). Beyond the interaction boundary, the intensity exhibits a constant radial gradient (similar to 2%/AU). The model also offers an explanation for the irregular behavior of the rotation averaged radial gradients observed by inside 10 AU, as well as the significant, but often ephemeral, latitude gradients observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 and IMP-8.

  13. Further considerations of cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Lockwood, M.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding effects of ionisation in the lower atmosphere is a new interdisciplinary area, crossing the traditionally distinct scientific boundaries between astro-particle and atmospheric physics and also requiring understanding of both heliospheric and magnetospheric influences on cosmic rays. Following the paper of Erlykin et al. (2014) we develop further the interpretation of our observed changes in long-wave (LW) radiation, Aplin and Lockwood (2013) by taking account of both cosmic ray ionisation yields and atmospheric radiative transfer. To demonstrate this, we show that the thermal structure of the whole atmosphere needs to be considered along with the vertical profile of ionisation. Allowing for, in particular, ionisation by all components of a cosmic ray shower and not just by the muons, reveals that the effect we have detected is certainly not inconsistent with laboratory observations of the LW absorption cross section. The analysis presented here, although very different from that of Erlykin et al., does come to the same conclusion that the events detected by AL were not caused by individual cosmic ray primaries - not because it is impossible on energetic grounds, but because events of the required energy are too infrequent for the 12 h-1 rate at which they were seen by the AL experiment. The present paper numerically models the effect of three different scenario changes to the primary GCR spectrum which all reproduce the required magnitude of the effect observed by AL. However, they cannot solely explain the observed delay in the peak effect which, if confirmed, would appear to open up a whole new and interesting area in the study of water oligomers and their effects on LW radiation. We argue that a technical artefact in the AL experiment is highly unlikely and that our initial observations merit both a wide-ranging follow-up experiment and more rigorous, self-consistent, three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  14. Study of the Cosmic-Ray Modulation During the Passage of ICMEs and CIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin; Kumar, Anand

    2016-02-01

    We compare the cosmic-ray response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) during their passage in near-Earth space. We study the relative importance of various structures/features identified during the passage of the ICMEs and CIRs observed during Cycle 23 (1995 - 2009). The identified ICME structures are the shock front, the sheath, and the CME ejecta. We isolate the shock arrival time, the passage of the sheath region, the arrival of ejecta, and the end time of their passage. Similarly, we isolate the CIR arrival, the associated forward shock, the stream interface, and the reverse shock during the passage of a CIR. For the cosmic-ray intensity, we utilize the data from high counting rate neutron monitors. In addition to neutron monitor data, we utilize near-simultaneous and same time-resolution data of interplanetary plasma and field, namely the solar-wind velocity, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) vector, and its variance. Further, we also utilize some derived interplanetary parameters. We apply the method of the superposed-epoch analysis. As the plasma and field properties are different during the passage of different structures, both in ICMEs and CIRs, we systematically vary the epoch time in our superposed-epoch analysis one by one. In this way, we study the role and effects of each of the identified individual structures/features during the passage of the ICMEs and CIRs. Relating the properties of various structures and the corresponding variations in plasma and field parameters with changes of the cosmic-ray intensity, we identify the relative importance of the plasma/field parameters in influencing the amplitude and time profiles of the cosmic-ray intensity variations during the passage of the ICMEs and CIRs.

  15. Investigation of Galactic Cosmic Rays Modulation by the Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Florinski, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are produced as a result of the interaction between fast and slowsolar-wind streams, and quite ubiquitous in every region of the heliosphere. Observations shown thatthe stream interfaces of CIRs between fast and slow solar wind streams and the leading edges of CIRsare responsible for the depressions of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) intensity. Based on the well knownlocal-scale expansion of the ideal MHD conservation law and the developed global MHD model ofCIRs in the heliosphere, we perform the numerical investigation of the transport and turbulence of thesolar wind fluctuation in CIRs. Turbulent energy density and correlation length distribution throughoutthe heliosphere are presented, and further in turn used to compute the mean free path and perpendiculardiffusion coefficient of energetic particles. We attempt to use the plasma background from the globalMHD simulations and the transport coefficients in our existing stochastic cosmic-ray transport code tonumerically solve the Parker transport equation for GCRs. The modulated GCR spectrum from Voyager2 observations near the termination shock was used at the external boundary condition. The computedGCR spectral features and temporal profiles at any given location was directly compared withobservations by spacecraft based cosmic-ray detectors and neutron monitors on the ground, which willgreatly enhance our understanding of the physics of GCR modulation by the CIRs in heliosphere.

  16. Peculiarities of cosmic ray modulation in the solar minimum 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Modzelewska, R.; Wawrzynczak, A.

    2014-06-01

    We study changes of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for the ending period of the solar cycle 23 and the beginning of the solar cycle 24 using neutron monitors experimental data. We show that an increase of the GCR intensity in 2009 is generally related with decrease of the solar wind velocity U, the strength B of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and the drift in negative (A < 0) polarity epoch. We present that temporal changes of rigidity dependence of the GCR intensity variation, before reaching maximum level in 2009 and after it, do not noticeably differ from each other. The rigidity spectrum of the GCR intensity variations calculated based on neutron monitors data (for rigidities > 10 GV) is hard in the minimum and near-minimum epoch. We do not recognize any nonordinary changes in the physical mechanism of modulation of the GCR intensity in the rigidity range of GCR particles to which neutron monitors respond. We compose 2-D nonstationary model of transport equation to describe variations of the GCR intensity for 1996-2012 including the A > 0 (1996-2001) and the A < 0 (2002-2012) periods; diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays for rigidity 10-15 GV is increased by ~ 30% in 2009 (A < 0) comparing with 1996 (A > 0). We believe that the proposed model is relatively realistic, and obtained results are satisfactorily compatible with neutron monitors data.

  17. An empirical model of heliospheric cosmic ray modulation on long-term time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvestari, Eleanna; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2016-03-01

    Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) entering the heliosphere are subject to modulation processes due to variable solar magnetic activity. Finding a relationship between cosmic-ray variations and the heliospheric parameters is important for reconstruction of solar activity in the past. Here, we develop a semi-empirical model describing the heliospheric modulation of GCRs in terms of heliospheric parameters such as the open solar magnetic flux, the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet and the polarity of the large scale solar magnetic field. Our model is fitted using annual data obtained for the period 1976-2013, which includes the very weak solar minimum during 2008-2010. The model shows a good agreement with the data, and therefore, can be used for reconstructions of the modulation potential at different levels of solar activity. The model's validity is also tested using the cosmogenic radionuclides 14C and 10Be stored in terrestrial archives. The tilt angle used to fit the parameters in our semi-empirical modulation model is reconstructed by a mathematical model described here.

  18. Cosmic Ray Modulation in the Outer Heliosphere During the Minimum of Solar Cycle 23/24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations.

  19. A study of Forbush Decreases with a full 3-D cosmic ray modulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Ming; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    We have constructed a 3-D numerical model for studying Forbush Decreases (FDs) in the global heliosphere. It incorporates 3-D propagation barriers, with enhanced cooling inside, into a time-dependent Parker type modulation model using a Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) approach. This numerical model simultaneously takes into account the effect of solar wind convection with associated adiabatic energy changes; gradient, curvature and current sheet drifts; as well as parallel and perpendicular diffusion. This state-of-the-art numerical model enables us to find and study some new 3-D features for FD type events: 1. The cosmic ray intensity at Earth varies depending on the relative location of the Earth to the current sheet, and is reflected also in the amplitude of the FDs. The local modulation conditions, at a given observational point, determine the total amplitude. 2. The radial, latitudinal and longitudinal extent of a diffusion barrier significantly affects the amplitude of a FD. 3. The recovery time of a FD, at a given observational location, is determined by the modulation conditions which the corresponding propagation barrier encounters as it moves outwards in the heliosphere.

  20. Cosmic Ray Modulation Observed by the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at High Rigidity Cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Pyle, Roger; Evenson, Paul; Ruffolo, David; Saiz, Alejandro; Clem, John; Madlee, Suttiwat; Nutaro, Tanin

    2016-07-01

    Neutron monitors (NMs) are the premier instruments for precisely tracking time variations in the Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux at the GV-range. For more than 60 years, the worldwide NM network has provided continuous measurements of the solar induced variations of the GCR flux impinging Earth and the data cover about six 11-year solar cycles. The recent rise of space exploration, with PAMELA and AMS-02 spacecraft, brings new energy sensitive measurements of GCR fluxes. Moreover since late 2007, the range of sensitivity of the worldwide NM network has been increased with the installation of the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor (PSNM), at the summit of Doi Inthanon, Thailand's highest mountain (2565 m altitude). PSNM records the GCR flux with the world's highest vertical rigidity cutoff for a fixed station, 16.8 GV. PSNM data now cover the period from the last solar minimum to the recent solar maximum and give us the opportunity to study the effect of the solar modulation at such high rigidity for the first time. We present here the observations of PSNM since 2007. The observed solar modulation is much weaker than predicted by the force field model with φ inferred from NM data at low cutoff. We compare measurements with those from NMs located at low rigidity cutoff and with spacecraft data. We discuss the solar modulation at high rigidity. Partially supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from Mahidol University, the Thailand Research Fund (BRG 5880009), the Science Achievement Scholarship of Thailand, and US National Science Foundation awards PLR-1341562, PLR-1245939, and their predecessors.

  1. A Numerical Simulation of Cosmic Ray Modulation Near the Heliopause. II. Some Physical Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Potgieter, Marius S.; Zhang, Ming; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Feng, Xueshang; du Toit Strauss, R.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) transport near the heliopause (HP) is studied using a hybrid transport model, with the parameters constrained by observations from the Voyager 1 spacecraft. We simulate the CR radial flux along different directions in the heliosphere. There is no well-defined thin layer between the solar wind region and the interstellar region along the tail and polar directions of the heliosphere. By analyzing the radial flux curve along the direction of Voyager 2, together with its trajectory information, the crossing time of the HP by Voyager 2 is predicted to be in 2017.14. We simulate the CR radial flux for different energy values along the direction of Voyager 1. We find that there is only a modest modulation region of about 10 au wide beyond the HP, so that Voyager 1 observing the Local Interstellar Spectra is justified in numerical modeling. We analyze the heliospheric exit information of pseudo-particles in our stochastic numerical (time-backward) method, conjecturing that they represent the behavior of CR particles, and we find that pseudo-particles that have been traced from the nose region exit in the tail region. This implies that many CR particles diffuse directly from the heliospheric tail region to the nose region near the HP. In addition, when pseudo-particles were traced from the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM), it is found that their exit location (entrance for real particles) from the simulation domain is along the prescribed Interstellar Magnetic Field direction. This indicates that parallel diffusion dominates CR particle transport in the LISM.

  2. Sunspot activity and cosmic ray modulation at 1 a.u. for 1900-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2014-10-01

    The descent of sunspot cycle 23 to an unprecedented minimum of long duration in 2006-2009 led to a prolonged galactic cosmic ray (GCR) recovery to the highest level observed in the instrumental era for a variety of energetic charged particle species on Earth, over a wide range of rigidities. The remarkable GCR increase measured by several ground-based, balloon-borne, and detectors on a satellite is described and discussed. It is accompanied by a decrease in solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field at 1 a.u., reaching the lowest values since measurements of the solar wind began in October 1963; the solar polar field strength (μT) measured at the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) is also significantly reduced compared to prior cycles since the start of the program in 1976, the polar field in the northern hemisphere reversed in June 2012 and again in February 2014, that in the southern hemisphere reversed in July 2013. If updates of WSO data confirm the second reversal in northern solar hemisphere, it would pose a serious challenge to the Dynamo Theory. The long-term change in solar behavior may have begun in 1992, perhaps earlier. The physical underpinnings of these solar changes need to be understood and their effect on GCR modulation processes clarified. The study discusses the recent phenomena in the context of GCR modulation since 1900. These happenings affected our empirical predictions for the key parameters for the next two sunspot cycles (they may be progressively less active than sunspot cycle 24) but it enhanced support for our prediction that solar activity is descending into a Dalton-like grand minimum in the middle of the twentyfirst century, reducing the frequency of the coronal mass ejections; they determine the space weather affecting the quality of life on Earth, radiation dose for hardware and human activities in space as well as the frequency of large Forbush decreases at 1 a.u.

  3. Solar Drivers of 11-yr and Long-Term Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Richardson, I. G.; Ling, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    In the current paradigm for the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), diffusion is taken to be the dominant process during solar maxima while drift dominates at minima. Observations during the recent solar minimum challenge the pre-eminence of drift: at such times. In 2009, the approx.2 GV GCR intensity measured by the Newark neutron monitor increased by approx.5% relative to its maximum value two cycles earlier even though the average tilt angle in 2009 was slightly larger than that in 1986 (approx.20deg vs. approx.14deg), while solar wind B was significantly lower (approx.3.9 nT vs. approx.5.4 nT). A decomposition of the solar wind into high-speed streams, slow solar wind, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs; including postshock flows) reveals that the Sun transmits its message of changing magnetic field (diffusion coefficient) to the heliosphere primarily through CMEs at solar maximum and high-speed streams at solar minimum. Long-term reconstructions of solar wind B are in general agreement for the approx. 1900-present interval and can be used to reliably estimate GCR intensity over this period. For earlier epochs, however, a recent Be-10-based reconstruction covering the past approx. 10(exp 4) years shows nine abrupt and relatively short-lived drops of B to < or approx.= 0 nT, with the first of these corresponding to the Sporer minimum. Such dips are at variance with the recent suggestion that B has a minimum or floor value of approx.2.8 nT. A floor in solar wind B implies a ceiling in the GCR intensity (a permanent modulation of the local interstellar spectrum) at a given energy/rigidity. The 30-40% increase in the intensity of 2.5 GV electrons observed by Ulysses during the recent solar minimum raises an interesting paradox that will need to be resolved.

  4. Cosmic ray modulation in three dimensions. [transport theory on particle motion and scattering in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quenby, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A brief critique of spherically symmetric conventional modulation theory is supplied. Estimates are made of the cosmic ray intensity at high solar latitudes. Direct evidence for significant off-ecliptic cosmic ray gradients is reviewed in support of the requirement for an off-ecliptic spacecraft mission. The possibility of measuring the galactic spectrum is discussed. The effect of interplanetary magnetic fields on cosmic ray motion is examined, and calculations (Fokker-Planck equation) are shown.

  5. Galactic cosmic ray modulation and interplanetary medium perturbations due to a long-living active region during October 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavassano, B.; Iucci, N.; Lepping, R. P.; Signorini, C.; Smith, E. J.; Villoresi, G.

    1994-01-01

    During October 1989, three very energetic flares were ejected by the same active region at longitudes 9 deg E, 32 deg W, and 57 deg W, respectively. The shape of the galactic cosmic ray variations suggests the presence of large magnetic cloud structures (Nagashima et al., 1990) following the shock-associated perturbations. In spite of long data gaps the interplanetary observations at Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 (near the Earth) and International Cometary Explorer (ICE)(approximately 1 AU, approximately 65 deg W) confirm this possibility for the event related to the 9 deg E flare; the principal axes analysis shows that the interplanetary magnetic field variations at both spacecraft locations are mainly confined on a meridian plane. This result suggests that the western longitudinal extension of this cloud is indeed very large (greater than or equal to 5 deg). The nonnegligible depression in the cosmic ray intensity observed inside the possible cloud related to the 57 deg W flare indicates that also the eastern extension could be very wide. The analysis of neutron monitor data shows clearly the cosmic ray trapping effect of magnetic clouds; this mechanism seems to be responsible for the enhanced diurnal effect often observed during the recovery phase of Forbush decreases. We give an interpretation for the anisotropic cosmic ray peak occurring in the third event, and, related to that, we suggest that the Forbush decrease modulated region at the Earth's orbit could be somewhat wider than the magnetic cloud, as already anticipated by Nagashima et al. (1990). By this analysis, based mainly on cosmic ray data, we show that it is possible to do reasonable inferences on the large-scale structure of flare-related interplanetary perturbations when interplanetary medium data are not completely present.

  6. Cosmic ray modulation at the solar maximum: Ulysses observations during the fast latitude scan of the inner heliosphere*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; McKibben, R. B.; Lopate, C.

    2002-05-01

    Starting at the maximum southern latitude of 80o in November 2000, Ulysses made a fast latitude scan of the inner heliosphere within approximately one year at the time of maximum solar activity. It passed through a perihelion at 1.34 AU near the solar equator in May 2001, and reached its maximum northern latitude in October 2001. The fast latitude scan provides best conditions for the determination of cosmic ray latitudinal gradients because of little expected drift of instrument performance and a small coverage of radial distance (2.2 to 1.34 AU). Although the time period is dominated by solar energetic particle events, measurements from the High-Energy Telescope on the Ulysses COSPIN experiment together with simultaneous measurements from the University of Chicago Charge Particle Telescope on IMP-8 near Earth made during rare solar quiet time periods found that the latitudinal gradient of cosmic ray intensities is essentially zero for all nuclei of energies above 30 MeV/n. Compared to the measurements of small cosmic ray latitude gradients made by Ulysses' first fast latitude scan at the 1994-1995 solar minimum, this observation indicates that the inner heliosphere is more spherically symmetric at the solar maximum. In this paper, we will discuss its implications to the understanding of the structure of heliospheric magnetic fields and the mechanisms of particle transport. * This work was supported in part by NASA Contract JPL-955432 and by NASA Grants NAG5-11036 and NAG5-10888

  7. CMEs, the Tail of the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Distribution, and 11-yr Cosmic Ray Modulation at 1 AU. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Using a recent classification of the solar wind at 1 AU into its principal components (slow solar wind, high-speed streams, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for 1972-2000, we show that the monthly-averaged galactic cosmic ray intensity is anti-correlated with the percentage of time that the Earth is imbedded in CME flows. We suggest that this correlation results primarily from a CME related change in the tail of the distribution function of hourly-averaged values of the solar wind magnetic field (B) between solar minimum and solar maximum. The number of high-B (square proper subset 10 nT) values increases by a factor of approx. 3 from minimum to maximum (from 5% of all hours to 17%), with about two-thirds of this increase due to CMEs. On an hour-to-hour basis, average changes of cosmic ray intensity at Earth become negative for solar wind magnetic field values square proper subset 10 nT.

  8. Transient Galactic Cosmic-ray Modulation during Solar Cycle 24: A Comparative Study of Two Prominent Forbush Decrease Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.-L.; Zhang, H.

    2016-08-01

    Forbush decrease (FD) events are of great interest for transient galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) modulation study. In this study, we perform comparative analysis of two prominent Forbush events during cycle 24, occurring on 2012 March 8 (Event 1) and 2015 June 22 (Event 2), utilizing the measurements from the worldwide neutron monitor (NM) network. Despite their comparable magnitudes, the two Forbush events are distinctly different in terms of evolving GCR energy spectrum and energy dependence of the recovery time. The recovery time of Event 1 is strongly dependent on the median energy, compared to the nearly constant recovery time of Event 2 over the studied energy range. Additionally, while the evolutions of the energy spectra during the two FD events exhibit similar variation patterns, the spectrum of Event 2 is significantly harder, especially at the time of deepest depression. These difference are essentially related to their associated solar wind disturbances. Event 1 is associated with a complicated shock-associated interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) disturbance with large radial extent, probably formed by the merging of multiple shocks and transient flows, and which delivered a glancing blow to Earth. Conversely, Event 2 is accompanied by a relatively simple halo ICME with small radial extent that hit Earth more head-on.

  9. A 17-year oscillation in cancer mortality birth cohorts on three continents - synchrony to cosmic ray modulations one generation earlier.

    PubMed

    Juckett, David A

    2009-11-01

    Cross-generational effects (grandmother effects) associated with epigenetic imprinting, environmental exposures, and lifestyle choices are beginning to be explored by various investigators. The possibility that low-level background radiation can be a driver of such effects has been suggested previously and is explored further in this study. Age-period-cohort analysis was performed on United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), and Australian (AU) female breast cancer mortality of the twentieth century, as well as on UK female total cancer mortality, to extract the high-frequency oscillations in the birth cohort time series. US fetal and infant congenital mortality were examined to extend the birth cohorts to modern times. A approximately 17-year cycle was detected in all birth cohort series, which spanned approximately 180 years from 1820 to 2000. This suggests a global, environmental cause. To mimic previous work in examining a possible link to cosmic radiation, the 17- to 18-year cycles of the cosmogenic nuclide (14)C, the sunspot double-cycle, neutron monitors, and a compilation of ground-based magnetic field observations were examined in the birth cohort and germ cell cohort time frames. Evidence is presented that optimal alignments with extraterrestrial oscillations occur in the time frame of the germ-cell cohort, one generation before the birth cohorts. Furthermore, the alignment is optimized by accounting for the changes in the maternal age distribution over time. These findings have potential importance to the mechanisms of disease as well as species adaptation and evolution. PMID:19506913

  10. Studies of Cosmic Ray Modulation and Energetic Particle Propagation in Time-Dependent 3-Dimensional Heliospheric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of this project was to perform theoretical calculations of propagation of cosmic rays and energetic particles in 3-dimensional heliospheric magnetic fields. We used Markov stochastic process simulation to achieve to this goal. We developed computation software that can be used to study particle propagation in, as two examples of heliospheric magnetic fields that have to be treated in 3 dimensions, a heliospheric magnetic field suggested by Fisk (1996) and a global heliosphere including the region beyond the termination shock. The results from our model calculations were compared with particle measurements from Ulysses, Earth-based spacecraft such as IMP-8, WIND and ACE, Voyagers and Pioneers in outer heliosphere for tests of the magnetic field models. We particularly looked for features of particle variations that can allow us to significantly distinguish the Fisk magnetic field from the conventional Parker spiral field. The computer code will eventually lead to a new generation of integrated software for solving complicated problems of particle acceleration, propagation and modulation in realistic 3-dimensional heliosphere of realistic magnetic fields and the solar wind with a single computation approach.

  11. The simulated features of heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation with a time-dependent drift model. II - On the energy dependence of the onset of new modulation in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Potgieter, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Time-dependent heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation for the period 1985-1989 is simulated by means of a time-dependent axially symmetric drift model with an emulated wavy heliospheric neutral sheet (HNS). The model is used to extend previous calculations to other energies in order to study a possible energy-dependence of the onset of new modulation at various radial distances in 1987. The model, with the outward propagating changes of the HNS as the only time-dependent parameters, is found to predict essentially no energy-dependence in the time when new modulation started in the simulated 1987. When a more practical approach in defining 'constant' modulation in 1987 is followed, the present calculations can be interpreted to indicate that the end of the recovery period in 1987 happened progressively earlier and the onset of new modulation progressively later the higher the rigidity of the cosmic rays. This period of relatively unchanged modulation is predicted to last longer with increasing radial distance.

  12. Study of cosmic-ray modulation during the recent deep solar minimum, mini maximum and intervening ascending phase of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, B.; Aslam, O. P. M.

    After a prolonged and deep solar minimum at the end of cycle 23, current solar cycle 24 is one of the very low active cycles, weakest cycle in more than 50 years. These two periods of deep minima and mini maxima are separated by a period of increasing solar activity as measured by sunspot numbers. We study the cosmic ray relationship with the solar activity, heliospheric plasma and field parameters including the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), during these three periods (phases) of different level and nature of solar activity; (a) a deep minimum, (b) an increasing period and (c) a ‘mini’ maximum. We utilize the neutron monitor data from stations located around the globe to study the rigidity dependence of modulation during the two extremes, i.e., minima and maxima. We also study the time lag between the GCR intensity and various solar/interplanetary parameters separately during the three activity phases. Using the cosmic ray data of neutron monitors with different cutoff rigidities, we study the rigidity dependence of time lag during individual phases. The role/effectiveness of various parameters, including the HCS tilt, in modulating the GCR intensity during the three different phases has also been studied by correlation analysis. The relative importance of various physical processes during different phases and the implication of these results for modulation models are also discussed.

  13. Cosmic ray modulation by solar wind disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbović, M.; Vršnak, B.; Čalogović, J.; Karlica, M.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: We perform a systematic statistical study of the relationship between characteristics of solar wind disturbances, caused by interplanetary coronal mass ejections and corotating interaction regions, and properties of Forbush decreases (FDs). Since the mechanism of FDs is still being researched, this analysis should provide a firm empirical basis for physical interpretations of the FD phenomenon. Methods: The analysis is based on the ground-based neutron monitor data and the solar wind data recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer, where the disturbances were identified as increases in proton speed, magnetic field, and magnetic field fluctuations. We focus on the relative timing of FDs, as well as on the correlations between various FD and solar wind parameters, paying special attention to the statistical significance of the results. Results: It was found that the onset, the minimum, and the end of FDs are delayed after the onset, the maximum, and the end of the magnetic field enhancement. The t-test shows that at the 95% significance level the average lags have to be longer than 3, 7, and 26 h, respectively. FD magnitude (| FD|) is correlated with the magnetic field strength (B), magnetic field fluctuations (δB), and speed (v), as well as with combined parameters, BtB, Bv, vtB, and BvtB, where tB is the duration of the magnetic field disturbance. In the |FD|(B) dependence, a "branching" effect was observed, i.e., two different trends exist. The analysis of the FD duration and recovery period reveals a correlation with the duration of the magnetic field enhancement. The strongest correlations are obtained for the dependence on combined solar wind parameters of the product of the FD duration and magnitude, implying that combined parameters are in fact true variables themselves, rather than just a product of variables. Conclusions: From the time lags we estimate that "the penetration depth" in the disturbance, at which FD onset becomes recognizable, is on the order of 100 Larmor radii and is comparable to a typical shock-sheath dimension. The results for the FD time profile indicate "shadow effect" of the solar wind disturbance before and after it passes the observer. The importance of reduced parallel diffusion during the passage of the disturbance is discussed, along with the influence of terrestrial effects on the observed "branching effect". Appendices A-C are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Cosmic ray transport near the heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R. D.; Fichtner, H.; Potgieter, M. S.; le Roux, J. A.; Luo, X.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we summarize our modelling efforts for cosmic rays near the heliopause, and discuss whether galactic cosmic ray modulation beyond the heliopause is possible and present an explanation for the anisotropic nature of the observed cosmic ray intensities in the very local interstellar medium. We show that (i) modulation beyond the heliopause is possible, but highly dependent on the assumed parameters (most notable, the perpendicular diffusion coefficient). Treating the heliopause as a tangential discontinuity, significantly damps this modulation effect and leads to modelled results that are similar to Voyager 1 observations. (ii) By choosing an appropriate functional form of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient on the pitch-angle level, we are able to account for the anisotropic behaviour observed for both galactic and anomalous cosmic rays in the local interstellar medium.

  15. Performance Improvement Assuming Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Individual performers, work teams, and organizations may be considered complex adaptive systems, while most current human performance technologies appear to assume simple determinism. This article explores the apparent mismatch and speculates on future efforts to enhance performance if complexity rather than simplicity is assumed. Included are…

  16. Coronal holes in the long-term cosmic rays modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    The present study of galactic CR modulation in the heliosphere through the 21-24 cycles continues the series of works, where long-term CR modulation was described using the multi-parametric model, including the solar activity (SA) characteristics. Initial data for modeling of CR variations are long-term observations of CR intensity, the characteristics of the solar global magnetic field and the short-time characteristic of SA (solar x-rays flares). Data of the CR intensity were obtained from the ground network of NM and stratospheric sounding. In order to improve the simulation of long-term CR variations we introduced into the model the characteristic of the regions with the open magnetic field - the coronal holes (CH). Location (latitude), the area and the magnetic flux of CHs were used. Modeling modulation is carried out for all period and separately for the periods with the same polarity of the global field of the Sun, taking into account the delay CR variations regarding changes of CA characteristics. The quality of the long-term variations description has been improved by including in the model the CH characteristics.

  17. The neutron moderated detector and groundbased cosmic ray modulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, P. H.; Raubenheimer, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Reports appear on modulation studies with the neutron monitor without lead. Some of these studies cast doubt on the reliability of this detector. The stability of the neutron moderated detector (NMD) at Sanae, Antarctic is discussed. The barometric coeficient of the 4NMD for epoch 1976 appears not to differ statistically from the 0.73%/mb of the 3NM64. The monthly averaged hourly counting rate of our 4NMD and 3NM64 correlates very well (correlation coefficient: 98%) over the years from 1974-1984, with the 4NMD showing a 8% larger long term modulation effect than the 3NM64, indicating a difference in sensitivities of the two detectors. From this difference in sensitivities spectra of ground level solar proton events and modulation functions of Forbush decreases are deduced.

  18. Collaboration: Assumed or Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between collaboration and gifted and talented students often is assumed to be an easy and successful learning experience. However, the transition from working alone to working with others necessitates an understanding of issues related to ability, sociability, and mobility. Collaboration has been identified as both an asset and a…

  19. New officers assume leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 2000-2002 AGU officers assumed their leadership roles on July l.On the weekend of May 27-29 the new council members and committee chairmen participated in a leadership conference. The primary focus for this was to set priorities and goals and to exchange information that will help each member of AGU's leadership team contribute effectively throughout his or her term. Participants emphasized the importance of continuing to encourage communication and the need for strengthening ties throughout the world and to address many of the complex problems of interest to us today. Another primary topic was continuing to increase the effectiveness of AGU's electronic communications—both formal electronic publications and informal communication among the leadership and members.

  20. Optical optimization for anti-coincidence detectors of a Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Long; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Zhao; Fu, Min-Xue; Chen, Yi-Bao; Zhao, Dong-Hua; Deng, Jing-Kang; Shang, Ren-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The anti-coincidence detectors of Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) are designed to suppress the X-ray background induced by incident charged cosmic-ray particles. The main components of anti-coincidence detectors are thin flat plastic scintillators. In this work we apply the TracePro program to study the light transfer features in the scintillators, and we propose several optimized reflector configurations to significantly improve the light transfer efficiency. The simulation results are verified by measurements of the detector prototypes. We chose a particular optimized reflector configuration.

  1. Calculations of the cosmic ray modulation in interplanetary space taking into account the possible dependence of the transport travel for the scattering of the particles and of the velocity of the solar winds on the angles they make with the helioequator plane: The case of isotropic diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Kobilinski, Z.

    1975-01-01

    The modulation of galactic cosmic rays is studied by the magnetic heterogeneities stream on the assumption that the diffusion coefficient is reduced whereas the solar wind velocity is increased with the growth of the angle between the sun's rotation axis and the direction of solar plasma motion. The stationary plane problem of isotropic diffusion is solved as it applies to two cases: (1) with due account of particle retardation by the antiphermium mechanism; and (2) without an account of the above mechanism. This problem is solved by the grid method in the polar coordinate system. The results of the calculations are followed by a discussion of the method of solution and of the errors.

  2. Galactic cosmic-ray mediation of a spherical solar wind flow. 1: The steady state cold gas hydrodynamical approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    1995-01-01

    Realistic models of the outer heliosphere should consider that the interstellar cosmic-ray pressure becomes comparable to pressures in the solar wind at distances more than 100 AU from the Sun. The cosmic-ray pressure dynamically affects solar wind flow through deceleration. This effect, which occurs over a scale length of the order of the effective diffusion length at large radial distances, has important implications for cosmic-ray modulation and acceleration. As a first step toward solution of this nonlinear problem, a steady state numerical model was developed for a relatively cold spherical solar wind flow which encounters the confining isotropic pressure of the surrounding Galactic medium. This pressure is assumed to be dominated by energetic particles (Galactic cosmic rays). The system of equations, which are solved self-consistently, includes the relevant hydrodynamical equations for the solar wind flow and the spherical cosmic-ray transport equation. To avoid the closure parameter problem of the two-fluid model, the latter equation is solved for the energy-dependent cosmic-ray distribution function.

  3. Cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects which are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characterisitc microwave background anisotropy. It was recently discovered that details of cosmic string evolution are very differnt from the so-called standard model that was assumed in most of the string-induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain.

  4. Cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P.

    1988-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects that are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation that are based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characteristic microwave background anistropy. It has recently been discovered by F. Bouchet and myself that details of cosmic string evolution are very different from the so-called ''standard model'' that has been assumed in most of the string induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain. 29 refs., 9 figs.

  5. The cosmic ray interplanetary radial gradient from 1972 - 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Lockwood, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    It is now established that the solar modulation of cosmic rays is produced by turbulent magnetic fields propagated outward by the solar wind. Changes in cosmic ray intensity are not simultaneous throughout the modulation region, thus requiring time dependent theories for the cosmic ray modulation. Fundamental to an overall understanding of this observed time dependent cosmic ray modulation is the behavior of the radial intensity gradient with time and heliocentric distance over the course of a solar modulation cycle. The period from 1977 to 1985 when data are available from the cosmic ray telescopes on Pioneer (P) 10, Voyager (V) 1 and 2, and IMP 8 spacecraft is studied. Additional data from P10 and other IMP satellites for 1972 to 1977 can be used to determine the gradient at the minimum in the solar modulation cycle and as a function of heliocentric distance. All of these telescopes have thresholds for protons and helium nuclei of E 60 MeV/nucleon.

  6. Our Cosmic Insignificance

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and we can make good sense of the idea of cosmic significance and its absence. It is also possible to explain why the vastness of the universe can make us feel insignificant. This impression does turn out to be mistaken, but not for the reasons typically assumed. In fact, we might be of immense cosmic significance—though we cannot, at this point, tell whether this is the case. PMID:25729095

  7. Variations of the cosmic ray general component in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurguzova, A. I.; Svirzhevsky, N. S.; Charakhchyan, T. N.; Krasotkin, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A cosmic ray variations, zonal cosmic ray modulation, was found in the lower atmosphere from the sonde measurement results. The variations give rise to anomalies in the latitude distributions of the cosmic ray charged component and the anomalous north-south asymmetry. To find the nature of the variations, the cosmic ray general component was measured with the same detectors as in the sonde measurements gas discharge counters and the counter telescopes with 7-mm Al filters detecting the electrons of energy above 200 keV and 5 MeV. The measurement data obtained in Antarctica in the years 1978 to 1983 are presented and discussed.

  8. Assuming Multiple Roles: The Time Crunch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKitric, Eloise J.

    Women's increased labor force participation and continued responsibility for most household work and child care have resulted in "time crunch." This strain results from assuming multiple roles within a fixed time period. The existence of an egalitarian family has been assumed by family researchers and writers but has never been verified. Time…

  9. Evolution of assumed stress hybrid finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1984-01-01

    Early versions of the assumed stress hybrid finite elements were based on the a priori satisifaction of stress equilibrium conditions. In the new version such conditions are relaxed but are introduced through additional internal displacement functions as Lagrange multipliers. A rational procedure is to choose the displacement terms such that the resulting strains are now of complete polynomials up to the same degree as that of the assumed stresses. Several example problems indicate that optimal element properties are resulted by this method.

  10. International Cosmic Ray Conference, 13th, University of Denver, Denver, Colo., August 17-30, 1973, Proceedings. Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An X-ray observation of the Norma-Lupus region, charge and isotope measurements of heavy cosmic ray nuclei and their role in the determination of cosmic ray age, and the possibility of a contribution to primary cosmic ray spectra from pulsars are among the topics covered in papers concerned with some of the results of recent cosmic ray research. Other topics covered include multiple scattering of charged particles in magnetic fields, absorption of primary cosmic rays in the atmosphere, and phase lag effects on cosmic ray modulation during a recent solar cycle. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  11. Assumed modes method and flexible multibody dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, S. S. K.; Mordfin, T. G.; Hu, T. G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of assumed modes in flexible multibody dynamics algorithms requires the evaluation of several domain dependent integrals that are affected by the type of modes used. The implications of these integrals - often called zeroth, first and second order terms - are investigated in this paper, for arbitrarily shaped bodies. Guidelines are developed for the use of appropriate boundary conditions while generating the component modal models. The issue of whether and which higher order terms must be retained is also addressed. Analytical results, and numerical results using the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System as the multibody system, are presented to qualitatively and quantitatively address these issues.

  12. Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldarriaga, Matias

    The following sections are included: * Rapporteur Talk by R. Ellis: Massive Black Holes: Evidence, Demographics and Cosmic Evolution * Rapporteur Talk by S. Furlanetto: The Cosmic Dawn: Theoretical Models and the Future

  13. Cosmic questions: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Primack, J R; Abrams, N E

    2001-12-01

    This introductory talk at the Cosmic Questions conference sponsored by the AAAS summarizes some earlier pictures of the universe and some pictures based on modern physics and cosmology. The uroboros (snake swallowing its tail) is an example of a traditional picture. The Biblical flat-earth picture was very different from the Greek spherical earth-centered picture, which was the standard view until the end of the Middle Ages. Many people incorrectly assume that the Newtonian picture of stars scattered through otherwise empty space is still the prevailing view. Seeing Earth from space shows the power of a new picture. The Hubble Space Telescope can see all the bright galaxies, all the way to the cosmic Dark Ages. We are at the center of cosmic spheres of time: looking outward is looking backward in time. All the matter and energy in the universe can be represented as a cosmic density pyramid. The laws of physics only allow the material objects in the universe to occupy a wedge-shaped region on a diagram of mass versus size. All sizes--from the smallest size scale, the Planck scale, to the entire visible universe--can be represented on the Cosmic Uroboros. There are interesting connections across this diagram, and the human scale lies in the middle. PMID:11797741

  14. Cosmic ray interactions in the ground: Temporal variations in cosmic ray intensities and geophysical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, D.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal variations in cosmic ray intensity have been deduced from observations of products of interactions of cosmic ray particles in the Moon, meteorites, and the Earth. Of particular interest is a comparison between the information based on Earth and that based on other samples. Differences are expected at least due to: (1) differences in the extent of cosmic ray modulation, and (2) changes in the geomagnetic dipole field. Any information on the global changes in the terrestrial cosmic ray intensity is therefore of importance. In this paper a possible technique for detecting changes in cosmic ray intensity is presented. The method involves human intervention and is applicable for the past 10,000 yrs. Studies of changes over longer periods of time are possible if supplementary data on age and history of the sample are available using other methods. Also discussed are the possibilities of studying certain geophysical processes, e.g., erosion, weathering, tectonic events based on studies of certain cosmic ray-produced isotopes for the past several million years.

  15. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Morrison, David

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic impacts and their effects on the earth's surface are discussed. The manner in which the object impacts with the earth is described. The formation of crytovolcanic structures by craters is examined. Examples of cosmic debris collisions with earth, in particular the Tunguska explosion of 1908 and the Meteor Crater in Arizona, are provided.

  16. Cosmic superstrings.

    PubMed

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe. PMID:18534932

  17. 46 CFR 174.075 - Compartments assumed flooded: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

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  1. 46 CFR 174.075 - Compartments assumed flooded: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

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  2. 24 CFR 203.41 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

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  3. 24 CFR 234.66 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  5. 24 CFR 203.41 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  6. 24 CFR 203.41 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  7. 24 CFR 234.66 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  8. 24 CFR 203.512 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

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  9. 24 CFR 203.41 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Free assumability; exceptions. 203... § 203.41 Free assumability; exceptions. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: (1) Low- or moderate... benefit of any member, founder, contributor or individual. (b) Policy of free assumability with...

  10. 24 CFR 234.66 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

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  11. 24 CFR 203.512 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  12. 24 CFR 203.512 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  13. 24 CFR 234.66 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Free assumability; exceptions. 234... CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility Requirements-Individually Owned Units § 234.66 Free assumability; exceptions. For purposes of HUD's policy of free assumability with no restrictions, as...

  14. 24 CFR 203.512 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Free assumability; exceptions. 203... AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Servicing Responsibilities General Requirements § 203.512 Free assumability; exceptions. (a) Policy of free assumability with no restrictions. A mortgagee shall not...

  15. 24 CFR 203.512 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  16. 24 CFR 203.41 - Free assumability; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Free assumability; exceptions. 203... § 203.41 Free assumability; exceptions. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: (1) Low- or moderate... benefit of any member, founder, contributor or individual. (b) Policy of free assumability with...

  17. Cosmic string structure at the gravitational radiation scale

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2007-06-15

    We use our model of the small scale structure on cosmic strings to develop further the result of Siemens, Olum, and Vilenkin that the gravitational radiation length scale on cosmic strings is smaller than the previously assumed {gamma}G{mu}t. We discuss some of the properties of cosmic string loops at this cutoff scale, and we argue that recent network simulations point to two populations of cosmic string loops, one near the horizon scale and one near the gravitational radiation cutoff.

  18. Cosmic Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    A team of French high-school students sent a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to recreate Viktor Hess's historical experiment that demonstrated the existence of ionizing radiation from the sky--later called cosmic radiation. This discovery earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1936.

  19. Cosmic balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    A team of French high-school students sent a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to recreate Viktor Hess’s historical experiment that demonstrated the existence of ionizing radiation from the sky—later called cosmic radiation. This discovery earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1936.

  20. Spring Allergies? Don't Assume It's Only Pollen

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Spring Allergies? Don't Assume It's Only Pollen Identifying your triggers is the first step toward ... reducing your symptoms, experts say. You may believe pollen is the culprit. But, other substances such as ...

  1. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  2. Cosmic Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Cosmic Topology is the name given to the study of the overall shape of the universe, which involves both global topological features and more local geometrical properties such as curvature. Whether space is finite or infinite, simply-connected or multi-connected like a torus, smaller or greater than the portion of the universe that we can directly observe, are questions that refer to topology rather than curvature. A striking feature of some relativistic, multi-connected "small" universe models is to create multiples images of faraway cosmic sources. While the most recent cosmological data fit the simplest model of a zero-curvature, infinite space model, they are also consistent with compact topologies of the three homogeneous and isotropic geometries of constant curvature, such as, for instance, the spherical Poincaré Dodecahedral Space, the flat hypertorus or the hyperbolic Picard horn. After a "dark age" period, the field of Cosmic Topology has recently become one of the major concerns in cosmology, not only for theorists but also for observational astronomers, leaving open a number of unsolved issues.

  3. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  4. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. II

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, C.R.; Morrison, D. NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1990-02-01

    The role of extraterrestrial impacts in shaping the earth's history is discussed, arguing that cosmic impacts represent just one example of a general shift in thinking that has made the idea of catastrophes respectable in science. The origins of this view are presented and current catastrophic theory is discussed in the context of modern debate on the geological formation of the earth. Various conflicting theories are reviewed and prominent participants in the ongoing scientific controversy concerning catastrophism are introduced.

  5. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Morrison, David

    1990-01-01

    The role of extraterrestrial impacts in shaping the earth's history is discussed, arguing that cosmic impacts represent just one example of a general shift in thinking that has made the idea of catastrophes respectable in science. The origins of this view are presented and current catastrophic theory is discussed in the context of modern debate on the geological formation of the earth. Various conflicting theories are reviewed and prominent participants in the ongoing scientific controversy concerning catastrophism are introduced.

  6. Abstraction and Assume-Guarantee Reasoning for Automated Software Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaki, S.; Clarke, E.; Giannakopoulou, D.; Pasareanu, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    Compositional verification and abstraction are the key techniques to address the state explosion problem associated with model checking of concurrent software. A promising compositional approach is to prove properties of a system by checking properties of its components in an assume-guarantee style. This article proposes a framework for performing abstraction and assume-guarantee reasoning of concurrent C code in an incremental and fully automated fashion. The framework uses predicate abstraction to extract and refine finite state models of software and it uses an automata learning algorithm to incrementally construct assumptions for the compositional verification of the abstract models. The framework can be instantiated with different assume-guarantee rules. We have implemented our approach in the COMFORT reasoning framework and we show how COMFORT out-performs several previous software model checking approaches when checking safety properties of non-trivial concurrent programs.

  7. Assume-Guarantee Abstraction Refinement Meets Hybrid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogomolov, Sergiy; Frehse, Goran; Greitschus, Marius; Grosu, Radu; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Podelski, Andreas; Strump, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Compositional verification techniques in the assume- guarantee style have been successfully applied to transition systems to efficiently reduce the search space by leveraging the compositional nature of the systems under consideration. We adapt these techniques to the domain of hybrid systems with affine dynamics. To build assumptions we introduce an abstraction based on location merging. We integrate the assume-guarantee style analysis with automatic abstraction refinement. We have implemented our approach in the symbolic hybrid model checker SpaceEx. The evaluation shows its practical potential. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work combining assume-guarantee reasoning with automatic abstraction-refinement in the context of hybrid automata.

  8. Solutions of contact problems by the assumed stress hybrid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubomura, K.; Pian, T. H. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for contact problems which may be either frictional or frictionless and may involve extensive sliding between deformable bodies. It was based on an assumed stress hybrid approach and on an incremental variational principle for which the Euler's equations of the functional include the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the contact surface. The tractions at an assumed contact surface were introduced as Lagrangian multipliers in the formulation. It was concluded from the results of several example solutions that the extensive sliding contact between deformable bodies can be solved by the present method.

  9. A Report on Women West Point Graduates Assuming Nontraditional Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Janice D.; Adams, Jerome

    In 1980 the first women graduated from the military and college training program at West Point. To investigate the progress of both male and female graduates as they assume leadership roles in the regular Army, 35 women and 113 men responded to a survey assessing career involvement and planning, commitment and adjustment, and satisfaction.…

  10. New approach to cosmic ray investigations above the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A. G.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    It is assumed that at energies around the knee the nucleus-nucleus interaction is drastically changed due to production of blobs of quark-gluon matter with very large orbital momentum. This approach allows explain all so-called unusual events observed in cosmic rays and gives a new connection between results of EAS investigations and energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic rays. To check this approach, the experiments in cosmic rays and at LHC are proposed.

  11. Cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund

    1988-01-01

    The possible consequences of forming cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings in the early universe are discussed. Lecture 1 describes the group theoretic reasons for and the field theoretic reasons why cosmic strings can form in spontaneously broken gauge theories. Lecture 2 discusses the accretion of matter onto string loops, emphasizing the scenario with a cold dark matter dominated universe. In lecture 3 superconducting cosmic strings are discussed, as is a mechanism which leads to the formation of structure from such strings.

  12. Pixelwise-adaptive blind optical flow assuming nonstationary statistics.

    PubMed

    Foroosh, Hassan

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we address some of the major issues in optical flow within a new framework assuming nonstationary statistics for the motion field and for the errors. Problems addressed include the preservation of discontinuities, model/data errors, outliers, confidence measures, and performance evaluation. In solving these problems, we assume that the statistics of the motion field and the errors are not only spatially varying, but also unknown. We, thus, derive a blind adaptive technique based on generalized cross validation for estimating an independent regularization parameter for each pixel. Our formulation is pixelwise and combines existing first- and second-order constraints with a new second-order temporal constraint. We derive a new confidence measure for an adaptive rejection of erroneous and outlying motion vectors, and compare our results to other techniques in the literature. A new performance measure is also derived for estimating the signal-to-noise ratio for real sequences when the ground truth is unknown. PMID:15700527

  13. Modeling turbulent/chemistry interactions using assumed pdf methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, R. L, Jr.; White, J. A.; Girimaji, S. S.; Drummond, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Two assumed probability density functions (pdfs) are employed for computing the effect of temperature fluctuations on chemical reaction. The pdfs assumed for this purpose are the Gaussian and the beta densities of the first kind. The pdfs are first used in a parametric study to determine the influence of temperature fluctuations on the mean reaction-rate coefficients. Results indicate that temperature fluctuations significantly affect the magnitude of the mean reaction-rate coefficients of some reactions depending on the mean temperature and the intensity of the fluctuations. The pdfs are then tested on a high-speed turbulent reacting mixing layer. Results clearly show a decrease in the ignition delay time due to increases in the magnitude of most of the mean reaction rate coefficients.

  14. Automated Assume-Guarantee Reasoning by Abstraction Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Giannakopoulous, Dimitra; Glannakopoulou, Dimitra

    2008-01-01

    Current automated approaches for compositional model checking in the assume-guarantee style are based on learning of assumptions as deterministic automata. We propose an alternative approach based on abstraction refinement. Our new method computes the assumptions for the assume-guarantee rules as conservative and not necessarily deterministic abstractions of some of the components, and refines those abstractions using counter-examples obtained from model checking them together with the other components. Our approach also exploits the alphabets of the interfaces between components and performs iterative refinement of those alphabets as well as of the abstractions. We show experimentally that our preliminary implementation of the proposed alternative achieves similar or better performance than a previous learning-based implementation.

  15. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  16. Positron fraction in cosmic rays and models of cosmic-ray propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Cowsik, R.; Burch, B.

    2010-07-15

    The positron fraction observed by PAMELA and other experiments up to {approx}100 GeV is analyzed in terms of models of cosmic-ray propagation. It is shown that generically we expect the positron fraction to reach {approx}0.6 at energies of several TeV, and its energy dependence bears an intimate but subtle connection with that of the boron to carbon ratio in cosmic rays. The observed positron fraction can be fit in a model that assumes a significant fraction of the boron below {approx}10 GeV is generated through spallation of cosmic-ray nuclei in a cocoonlike region surrounding the sources, and the positrons of energy higher than a few GeV are almost exclusively generated through cosmic-ray interactions in the general interstellar medium. Such a model is consistent with the bounds on cosmic-ray anisotropies and other observations.

  17. Phantom Cosmic Ray Decreases and their Extraterrestrial Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Simon; Owens, Mathew; Lockwood, Mike; Scott, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are extremely high energy charged particles accelerated at extra-solar sources such as supernovae, active galactic nuclei, quasars, and gamma-ray bursts. Upon arrival at Earth's atmosphere, they collide with air molecules to produce a shower of secondary particles. One product of this air shower is energetic neutrons, which can be detected at the Earth's surface. Neutron monitors have been routinely operating for more than half a century and have shown that the cosmic ray flux at the top of the atmosphere is modulated by the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), both at solar cycle time scales and due to shorter-term HMF variations, such as result from coronal mass ejections (CMEs). When a CME passes over the Earth, the neutron monitor counts are reduced sharply and suddenly (in a matter of hours) due to the modulation of cosmic rays by the enhancement in the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). Such a drop in neutron counts is known as a Forbush Decrease. We present examples of unusual Forbush Decreases where there is no disturbance in the HMF at Earth at the time, which we name 'Phantom Cosmic Ray Decreases' (PCRDs). For recent PCRD events, we examine STEREO in-situ data and in each case, we find a large CME in either STEREO-A or -B. We also study neutron counts for each event from a number of neutron monitors at different longitudes. Differences between the size of the cosmic ray decreases at different longitudes are shown to give information on the location of the cosmic ray modulation source. We thus propose that these PCRDs are caused by CMEs which have missed Earth but which are large and intense enough to block out galactic cosmic rays on trajectories toward Earth.

  18. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  19. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  20. 17. Photographic copy of photograph. Location unknown but assumed to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photographic copy of photograph. Location unknown but assumed to be uper end of canal. Features no longer extant. (Source: U.S. Department of Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Indian Irrigation service. Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1925. Vol. I, Narrative and Photographs, Irrigation District #4, California and Southern Arizona, RG 75, Entry 655, Box 28, National Archives, Washington, DC.) Photographer unknown. MAIN (TITLED FLORENCE) CANAL, WASTEWAY, SLUICEWAY, & BRIDGE, 1/26/25. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Marin Canal, Amhurst-Hayden Dam to Picacho Reservoir, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  1. Finite elements based on consistently assumed stresses and displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Finite element stiffness matrices are derived using an extended Hellinger-Reissner principle in which internal displacements are added to serve as Lagrange multipliers to introduce the equilibrium constraint in each element. In a consistent formulation the assumed stresses are initially unconstrained and complete polynomials and the total displacements are also complete such that the corresponding strains are complete in the same order as the stresses. Several examples indicate that resulting properties for elements constructed by this consistent formulation are ideal and are less sensitive to distortions of element geometries. The method has been used to find the optimal stress terms for plane elements, 3-D solids, axisymmetric solids, and plate bending elements.

  2. An ab initio model for the modulation of galactic cosmic-ray electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.

    2013-12-20

    The modulation of galactic cosmic-ray electrons is studied using an ab initio three-dimensional steady state cosmic-ray modulation code in which the effects of turbulence on both the diffusion and drift of these cosmic-rays are treated as self-consistently as possible. A significant refinement is that a recent two-component turbulence transport model is used. This model yields results in reasonable agreement with observations of turbulence quantities throughout the heliosphere. The sensitivity of computed galactic electron intensities to choices of various turbulence parameters pertaining to the dissipation range of the slab turbulence spectrum, and to the choice of model of dynamical turbulence, is demonstrated using diffusion coefficients derived from the quasi-linear and extended nonlinear guiding center theories. Computed electron intensities and latitude gradients are also compared with spacecraft observations.

  3. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  4. Organohalogens in nature: More widespread than previously assumed

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, G.; Grimvall, A. )

    1991-08-01

    Although the natural production of organohalogens has been observed in several studies, it is generally assumed to be much smaller than the industrial production of these compounds. Nevertheless, two important natural sources have been known since the 1970s: red algae in marine ecosystems produce large amounts of brominated compounds, and methyl halides of natural origin are present in the atmosphere. During the past few years it has been shown that organohalogens are so widespread in groundwater, surface water, and soil that all samples in the studies referred to contain measurable amounts of absorbable organohalogens (AOX). The authors document the widespread occurrence of organohalogens in unpolluted soil and water and discuss possible sources of these compounds. It has been suggested that these organohalogens originate from long-range atmospheric transport of industrially produced compounds. The authors review existing evidence of enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter in soil and show that, most probably, natural halogenation in the terrestrial environment is the largest source.

  5. An assumed partition algorithm for determining processor inter-communication

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Falgout, R D; Yang, U M

    2005-09-23

    The recent advent of parallel machines with tens of thousands of processors is presenting new challenges for obtaining scalability. A particular challenge for large-scale scientific software is determining the inter-processor communications required by the computation when a global description of the data is unavailable or too costly to store. We present a type of rendezvous algorithm that determines communication partners in a scalable manner by assuming the global distribution of the data. We demonstrate the scaling properties of the algorithm on up to 32,000 processors in the context of determining communication patterns for a matrix-vector multiply in the hypre software library. Our algorithm is very general and is applicable to a variety of situations in parallel computing.

  6. Assumed Probability Density Functions for Shallow and Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogenschutz, Peter A.; Krueger, Steven K.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2010-04-01

    The assumed joint probability density function (PDF) between vertical velocity and conserved temperature and total water scalars has been suggested to be a relatively computationally inexpensive and unified subgrid-scale (SGS) parameterization for boundary layer clouds and turbulent moments. This paper analyzes the performance of five families of PDFs using large-eddy simulations of deep convection, shallow convection, and a transition from stratocumulus to trade wind cumulus. Three of the PDF families are based on the double Gaussian form and the remaining two are the single Gaussian and a Double Delta Function (analogous to a mass flux model). The assumed PDF method is tested for grid sizes as small as 0.4 km to as large as 204.8 km. In addition, studies are performed for PDF sensitivity to errors in the input moments and for how well the PDFs diagnose some higher-order moments. In general, the double Gaussian PDFs more accurately represent SGS cloud structure and turbulence moments in the boundary layer compared to the single Gaussian and Double Delta Function PDFs for the range of grid sizes tested. This is especially true for small SGS cloud fractions. While the most complex PDF, Lewellen-Yoh, better represents shallow convective cloud properties (cloud fraction and liquid water mixing ratio) compared to the less complex Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF, there appears to be no advantage in implementing Lewellen-Yoh for deep convection. However, the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF better represents the liquid water flux, is less sensitive to errors in the input moments, and diagnoses higher order moments more accurately. Between the Lewellen-Yoh and Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDFs, it appears that neither family is distinctly better at representing cloudy layers. However, due to the reduced computational cost and fairly robust results, it appears that the Analytic Double Gaussian 1 PDF could be an ideal family for SGS cloud and turbulence representation in coarse

  7. COSMIC program documentation experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalar, M. C.

    1970-01-01

    A brief history of COSMIC as it relates to the handling of program documentation is summarized; the items that are essential for computer program documentation are also discussed. COSMIC documentation and program standards handbook is appended.

  8. Cosmic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    An image based on data taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope reveals a triplet of galaxies intertwined in a cosmic dance. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The three galaxies, catalogued as NGC 7173 (top), 7174 (bottom right) and 7176 (bottom left), are located 106 million light-years away towards the constellation of Piscis Austrinus (the 'Southern Fish'). NGC 7173 and 7176 are elliptical galaxies, while NGC 7174 is a spiral galaxy with quite disturbed dust lanes and a long, twisted tail. This seems to indicate that the two bottom galaxies - whose combined shape bears some resemblance to that of a sleeping baby - are currently interacting, with NGC 7176 providing fresh material to NGC 7174. Matter present in great quantity around the triplet's members also points to the fact that NGC 7176 and NGC 7173 have interacted in the past. Astronomers have suggested that the three galaxies will finally merge into a giant 'island universe', tens to hundreds of times as massive as our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02b/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The triplet is part of a so-called 'Compact Group', as compiled by Canadian astronomer Paul Hickson in the early 1980s. The group, which is the 90th entry in the catalogue and is therefore known as HCG 90, actually contains four major members. One of them - NGC 7192 - lies above the trio, outside of this image, and is another peculiar spiral galaxy. Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of typically four to ten galaxies in close proximity to one another. Another striking example is Robert's Quartet. Compact groups are excellent laboratories for the study of galaxy interactions and their effects, in particular the formation of stars. As the striking image reveals, there are many other galaxies in the field. Some are distant ones, while others seem to be part of the family. Studies made with other telescopes have indeed revealed that the HCG 90 group contains 16 members

  9. Cosmic rays from cosmic strings with condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-02-15

    We revisit the production of cosmic rays by cusps on cosmic strings. If a scalar field ('Higgs') has a linear interaction with the string world sheet, such as would occur if there is a bosonic condensate on the string, cusps on string loops emit narrow beams of very high energy Higgses which then decay to give a flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. The ultrahigh energy flux and the gamma to proton ratio agree with observations if the string scale is {approx}10{sup 13} GeV. The diffuse gamma ray and proton fluxes are well below current bounds. Strings that are lighter and have linear interactions with scalars produce an excess of direct and diffuse cosmic rays and are ruled out by observations, while heavier strings ({approx}10{sup 15} GeV) are constrained by their gravitational signatures. This leaves a narrow window of parameter space for the existence of cosmic strings with bosonic condensates.

  10. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  11. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  12. Cosmic ray antiprotons from nearby cosmic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Gupta, Nayantara

    2015-05-01

    The antiproton flux measured by PAMELA experiment might have originated from Galactic sources of cosmic rays. These antiprotons are expected to be produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei with cold protons. Gamma rays are also produced in similar interactions inside some of the cosmic accelerators. We consider a few nearby supernova remnants observed by Fermi LAT. Many of them are associated with molecular clouds. Gamma rays have been detected from these sources which most likely originate in decay of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions. The observed gamma ray fluxes from these SNRs are used to find out their contributions to the observed diffuse cosmic ray antiproton flux near the earth.

  13. The effect of cosmic rays on thunderstorm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragin, Y. A.

    1975-01-01

    The inflow of charges of small ions, formed by cosmic rays, into thunderstorm cells is estimated on the basis of rocket measurements of ionic concentrations below 90 km. Out of the two processes that form the thunderstorm charge (generation and separation of charges), the former is supposed to be caused by cosmic rays, and the nature of separation is assumed to be the same as in other thunderstorm theories.

  14. Cosmic Superstrings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2004-12-10

    It is possible that superstrings, as well as other one-dimensional branes, could have been produced in the early universe and then expanded to cosmic size today. I discuss the conditions under which this will occur, and the signatures of these strings. Such cosmic superstrings could be the brightest objects visible in gravitational wave astronomy, and might be distinguishable from gauge theory cosmic strings by their network properties.

  15. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  16. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  17. Cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic and galactic pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke

    2013-02-01

    In an extragalactic newly-born pulsar, nuclei striped off the star surface can be accelerated to extreme energies and leave the source through dense supernova surroundings. The escaped ultrahigh energy cosmic rays can explain both UHE energy spectral and atmospheric depth observations. In addition, assuming that Galactic pulsars accelerate cosmic rays with the same injection composition, very high energy cosmic rays from local pulsars can meet the flux measurements from above the knee to the ankle, and at the same time, agree with the detected composition trend.

  18. An ab initio approach to the anisotropic perpendicular diffusion of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Nicholas; Richardson, John; Burger, Renier

    2016-07-01

    The assumption that cosmic-ray diffusion perpendicular to the background magnetic field is anisotropic has been made in many numerical modulation studies. This was done in order to reproduce spacecraft observations of, for example, lower than expected latitude gradients of galactic protons. This assumption is usually justified in terms of observations of non-axisymmetric turbulent magnetic fluctuations, but is often implemented in a completely ad hoc manner. This study implements anisotropic perpendicular diffusion coefficients in an ab initio cosmic ray modulation model in a self-consistent manner, employing perpendicular mean free path expressions derived for the case where transverse magnetic fluctuations are non-axisymmetric. Voyager magnetic field observations are analysed to ascertain the nature of this non-axisymmetry, and modulation model solutions for various assumptions as to the spatial dependence of this non-axisymmetry, also taking into account the Voyager observations, are presented.

  19. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  20. Steady state and dynamical structure of a cosmic-ray-modified termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, D. J.; Zank, G. P.

    1993-11-01

    A hydrodynamic model is developed for the structure of a cosmic-ray-modified termination shock. The model is based on the two-fluid equations of diffuse shock acceleration (Drury and Volk, 1981). Both the steady state structure of the shock and its interaction with outer heliospheric disturbances are considered. Under the assumption that the solar wind is decelerated by diffusing interstellar cosmic rates, it is shown that the natural state of the termination shock is a gradual deceleration and compression, followed by a discontinuous jump to a downstream state which is dominated by the pressure contribution of the cosmic rays. A representative model is calculated for the steady state which incorporates both interstellar cosmic ray mediation and diffusively accelerated anomalous ions through a proposed thermal leakage mechanism. The interaction of large-scale disturbances with the equilibrium termination shock model is shown to result in some unusual downstream structure, including transmitted shocks and cosmic-ray-modified contact discontinuities. The structure observed may be connected to the 2-kHz outer heliospheric radio emission (Cairns et al., 1992a, b). The time-dependent simulations also demonstrate that interaction with solar wind compressible turbulence (e.g., traveling interplanetary shocks, etc.) could induce the termination shock to continually fluctuate between cosmic-ray-dominated and gas-dynamic states. This fluctuation may represent a partial explanation of the galactic cosmic ray modulation effect and illustrates that the Pioneer and Voyager satellites will encounter an evolving shock whose structure and dynamic properties are strongly influence by the mediation of interstellar and anomalous cosmic rays.

  1. Steady state and dynamical structure of a cosmic-ray-modified termination shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. J.; Zank, G. P.

    1993-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is developed for the structure of a cosmic-ray-modified termination shock. The model is based on the two-fluid equations of diffuse shock acceleration (Drury and Volk, 1981). Both the steady state structure of the shock and its interaction with outer heliospheric disturbances are considered. Under the assumption that the solar wind is decelerated by diffusing interstellar cosmic rates, it is shown that the natural state of the termination shock is a gradual deceleration and compression, followed by a discontinuous jump to a downstream state which is dominated by the pressure contribution of the cosmic rays. A representative model is calculated for the steady state which incorporates both interstellar cosmic ray mediation and diffusively accelerated anomalous ions through a proposed thermal leakage mechanism. The interaction of large-scale disturbances with the equilibrium termination shock model is shown to result in some unusual downstream structure, including transmitted shocks and cosmic-ray-modified contact discontinuities. The structure observed may be connected to the 2-kHz outer heliospheric radio emission (Cairns et al., 1992a, b). The time-dependent simulations also demonstrate that interaction with solar wind compressible turbulence (e.g., traveling interplanetary shocks, etc.) could induce the termination shock to continually fluctuate between cosmic-ray-dominated and gas-dynamic states. This fluctuation may represent a partial explanation of the galactic cosmic ray modulation effect and illustrates that the Pioneer and Voyager satellites will encounter an evolving shock whose structure and dynamic properties are strongly influence by the mediation of interstellar and anomalous cosmic rays.

  2. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  3. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  4. Deepening Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    This article is a special blend of research, theory, and practice, with clear insight into the origins of Cosmic Education and cosmic task, while recalling memories of student explorations in botany, in particular, episodes from Mr. Leonard's teaching. Mr. Leonard speaks of a storytelling curriculum that eloquently puts perspective into dimensions…

  5. From cosmic ray source to the Galactic pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schure, K. M.; Bell, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic cosmic ray spectrum is a remarkably straight power law. Our current understanding is that the dominant sources that accelerate cosmic rays up to the knee (3 × 1015 eV) or perhaps even the ankle (3 × 1018 eV), are young Galactic supernova remnants. In theory, however, there are various reasons why the spectrum may be different for different sources, and may not even be a power law if non-linear shock acceleration applies during the most efficient stages of acceleration. We show how the spectrum at the accelerator translates to the spectrum that makes up the escaping cosmic rays that replenish the Galactic pool of cosmic rays. We assume that cosmic ray confinement, and thus escape, is linked to the level of magnetic field amplification, and that the magnetic field is amplified by streaming cosmic rays according to the non-resonant hybrid or resonant instability. When a fixed fraction of the energy is transferred to cosmic rays, it turns out that a source spectrum that is flatter than E-2 will result in an E-2 escape spectrum, whereas a steeper source spectrum will result in an escape spectrum with equal steepening. This alleviates some of the concern that may arise from expected flat or concave cosmic ray spectra associated with non-linear shock modification.

  6. Light from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, Daniele A.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-02-15

    The time-dependent metric of a cosmic string leads to an effective interaction between the string and photons--the ''gravitational Aharonov-Bohm'' effect--and causes cosmic strings to emit light. We evaluate the radiation of pairs of photons from cosmic strings and find that the emission from cusps, kinks and kink-kink collisions occurs with a flat spectrum at all frequencies up to the string scale. Further, cusps emit a beam of photons, kinks emit along a curve, and the emission at a kink-kink collision is in all directions. The emission of light from cosmic strings could provide an important new observational signature of cosmic strings that is within reach of current experiments for a range of string tensions.

  7. Determination of galactic cosmic ray latitudinal gradient using Earth based detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    BADRUDDIN; Yadav, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Using cosmic ray intensity data from the Deep River Neutron monitor and the relation between solar wind velocity and heliomagnetic latitude, an attempt is made to evaluate quantitatively the latitudinal gradient of cosmic ray intensity during the periods dominated by a two sector pattern. Assuming a constant orientation of the heliospheric current sheet on a time scale of the order of a year, a relationship is determined between cosmic ray intensity and heliomagnetic latitude.

  8. Matter creation and cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Vargas dos Santos, Marcelo; Waga, Ioav

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the creation of cold dark matter (CCDM) cosmology as an alternative to explain the cosmic acceleration. Particular attention is given to the evolution of density perturbations and constraints coming from recent observations. By assuming negligible effective sound speed we compare CCDM predictions with redshift-space-distortion based f(z)σ8(z) measurements. We identify a subtle issue associated with which contribution in the density contrast should be used in this test and then show that the CCDM results are the same as those obtained with ΛCDM. These results are then contrasted with the ones obtained at the background level. For the background tests we have used type Ia supernovae data (Union 2.1 compilation) in combination with baryonic acoustic oscillations and cosmic microwave background observations and also measurements of the Hubble parameter at different redshifts. As a consequence of the studies we have performed at both the background and perturbation levels, we explicitly show that CCDM is observationally degenerate with respect to ΛCDM (dark degeneracy). The need to overcome the lack of a fundamental microscopic basis for the CCDM is the major challenge for this kind of model.

  9. Gravitational entropy of cosmic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman , R. A.

    2014-09-01

    We apply a recent proposal to define ``gravitational entropy'' to the expansion of cosmic voids within the framework of non-perturbative General Relativity. By considering CDM void configurations compatible with basic observational constraints, we show that this entropy grows from post-inflationary conditions towards a final asymptotic value in a late time fully non-linear regime described by the Lemaître- Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models. A qualitatively analogous behavior occurs if we assume a positive cosmological constant consistent with a Λ-CDM background model. However, the Λ term introduces a significant suppression of entropy growth with the terminal equilibrium value reached at a much faster rate.

  10. Preservation of Organic Molecules Under Cosmic Rays in Martian Surface Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Glavin, D.; McLain, H.; Dworkin, J.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Eigenbrode, J.

    2016-05-01

    Organic molecules are destroyed in the surface rocks of Mars by cosmic rays at faster rates than was assumed in previous studies. Only surface rocks, with an exposure age of less than 50 million years, might contain unaltered amino acids.

  11. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  12. Cosmic-ray astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry in the interstellar medium is driven by fast ion-molecule reactions. This, of course, demands a mechanism for ionization, and cosmic rays are the ideal candidate as they can operate throughout the majority of both diffuse and dense interstellar clouds. Aside from driving interstellar chemistry via ionization, cosmic rays also interact with the interstellar medium in ways that heat the ambient gas, produce gamma rays, and produce light element isotopes. In this paper we review the observables generated by cosmic-ray interactions with the interstellar medium, focusing primarily on the relevance to astrochemistry. PMID:23812538

  13. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  14. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  15. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  16. Getting around cosmic variance

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, M.; Loeb, A.

    1997-10-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies probe the primordial density field at the edge of the observable Universe. There is a limiting precision ({open_quotes}cosmic variance{close_quotes}) with which anisotropies can determine the amplitude of primordial mass fluctuations. This arises because the surface of last scatter (SLS) probes only a finite two-dimensional slice of the Universe. Probing other SLS{close_quote}s observed from different locations in the Universe would reduce the cosmic variance. In particular, the polarization of CMB photons scattered by the electron gas in a cluster of galaxies provides a measurement of the CMB quadrupole moment seen by the cluster. Therefore, CMB polarization measurements toward many clusters would probe the anisotropy on a variety of SLS{close_quote}s within the observable Universe, and hence reduce the cosmic-variance uncertainty. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. A COSMIC VARIANCE COOKBOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: rix@mpia.de E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu

    2011-04-20

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg{sup 2}) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by 'cosmic variance'. This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift z-bar and redshift bin size {Delta}z. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, z-bar , {Delta}z, and stellar mass m{sub *}. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates ({delta}{sigma}{sub v}/{sigma}{sub v}) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at z-bar =2 and with {Delta}z = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is {approx}38%, while it is {approx}27% for GEMS and {approx}12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, the relative cosmic variance is {approx}19% for GOODS, {approx}13% for GEMS, and {approx}6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at z

  18. A Cosmic Variance Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-04-01

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg2) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by "cosmic variance." This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift \\bar{z} and redshift bin size Δz. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, \\bar{z}, Δz, and stellar mass m *. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates (δσ v /σ v ) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at \\bar{z}=2 and with Δz = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m *>1011 M sun is ~38%, while it is ~27% for GEMS and ~12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m * ~ 1010 M sun, the relative cosmic variance is ~19% for GOODS, ~13% for GEMS, and ~6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at \\bar{z}=2 for small fields and massive galaxies, while for larger fields and intermediate mass galaxies, cosmic variance is

  19. The Cosmic Labyrinth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, M.

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the intertwined relationship between the terrestrial and celestial using the labyrinth as a metaphor referencing sources from art, gardens and Australian Indigenous culture. Including the Morning Star with the labyrinthine mortuary ritual in Arnhem Land, the cosmic plan garden at Auschwitz and Marea Atkinson's art project undertaken at the Villa Garzoni garden in Italy to create The Cosmic Labyrinth installation exhibited at Palazzo Franchetti, Venice, during the sixth conference on the Inspiration of Astronomical Phenomena.

  20. Cosmic Ray Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Belkhir, F.; Attallah, R.

    2010-10-01

    Radiation levels at aircraft cruising altitudes are twenty times higher than at sea level. Thus, on average, a typical airline pilot receives a larger annual radiation dose than some one working in nuclear industry. The main source of this radiation is from galactic cosmic radiation, high energy particles generated by exploding stars within our own galaxy. In this work we study cosmic rays dosimetry at various aviation altitudes using the PARMA model.

  1. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of January 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Marketing and customer service activities in this period are presented as is the progress report of NASTRAN maintenance and support. Tables of disseminations and budget summary conclude the report.

  2. The dependence of solar modulation on the sign of the cosmic ray particle charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.; Simpson, J. A.; Evenson, P.

    1986-01-01

    ISEE-3 spacecraft cosmic ray telescope data on the modulation of cosmic ray electrons are compared with IMP-8 spacecraft data on low energy He atoms to evaluate the effects of solar maxima on cosmic ray modulation. The investigation is constrained to the modulation of 70-95 MeV He-4 nuclei and 600-1000 MeV electrons over the period 1965-1984, an interval covering solar maxima in 1970 and 1981. It is shown that the occurrences of solar maxima are associated with magnetic field polarity reversals. When the interplanetary magnetic field reverses polarity, oppositely charged particles flow in different directions, thereby permitting studies of drift effects and modulation. Data on the recovery periods after the solar maxima show that the He-4 nuclei recovered before the electron population in 1970, while the situation was reversed in 1981. Actual flux ratio reversals were recorded in the years surrounding the maxima. Although the data support a connection between modulation of cosmic rays and the sign of charged particles, current models cannot account for the deviation of electron intensities from the nuclei intensities.

  3. Anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Desiati, Paolo; DuVernois, Michael

    2016-07-01

    TeV cosmic rays are significantly deflected by the magnetic field of the heliosphere, and they gain or lose energies in heliospheric electric field that in the meantime drives the motion of plasma. These propagation mechanisms will cause the map of TeV cosmic rays seen at the Earth to look different from the map seen in the local interstellar medium without the presence of the heliosphere. We have developed a method of using Liouville's theorem to map out particle distribution function to Earth from the local interstellar medium, where we assume that the cosmic rays have small pitch-angle anisotropy harmonics up to the second order and a small uniform spatial density gradient. The amount of heliospheric distortion can be determined by tracing the trajectories of cosmic rays propagating through the heliosphere. In this paper, we apply this method to TeV cosmic ray propagation through a MHD-kinetic model of the heliosphere and try to fit observations from Tibet ASgamma and IceCube experiments. We are able to locate features in the TeV cosmic ray anisotropy that are associated with the interstellar magnetic field, hydrogen deflection plane, heliotail, and solar corona. Some of the features are also slightly affected by the solar cycle and interstellar magnetic turbulence. The results provide us powerful tools to explore large-scale heliospheric structures as well as to determine the cosmic ray distribution in the local interstellar medium.

  4. Energy Spectra and Mass Composition of Cosmic Rays in the Fractal-Like Galactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagutin, A. A.; Tyumentsev, A. G.; Yushkov, A. V.

    We consider the problem of the cosmic ray spectrum formation assuming that cosmic rays are produced by galactic sources. The fractional diffusion equation proposed in our recent papers is used to describe the cosmic rays propagation in interstellar medium. We show that in the framework of this approach it is possible to explain the locally observed basic features of the cosmic rays in the energy region 1010 ÷ 1020 eV: difference between spectral exponents of protons and other nuclei, mass composition variation, "knee" problem, flattening of the primary spectrum for E ≥ 1018 ÷ 1019 eV.

  5. Search for Antihelium in the Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, R. L.; Stochaj, S. J.; Stephens, S. A.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Bowen, T.; Moats, A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.

    1997-04-01

    On 1987 August 22 a balloon flight was conducted using the Goddard Space Flight Center Low-Energy Antiproton configuration of the New Mexico State University balloon-borne magnet spectrometer. The launch site was Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada. The balloon flew at an average atmospheric depth of 4.7 g cm-2 for more than 22 hr. During this period a sample of 4.2 × 104 helium nuclei was gathered. No antihelium candidates were found in this sample. The resultant upper limit for the ratio of antihelium to helium in cosmic rays over the rigidity interval from 1 to 25 GV/c is 9 × 10-5 at 95% confidence. This limit is below the predicted level, assuming equal matter and antimatter in the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  6. Discovery of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Per

    2013-02-01

    The mysterious invisible radiation that ionized air was studied a century ago by many scientists. Finally, on 7 August 1912, Victor Hess in his seventh balloon flight that year, reached an altitude of about 5000 m. With his electroscopes on board the hydrogen-filled balloon he observed that the ionization instead of decreasing with altitude increased significantly. Hess had discovered cosmic rays, a discovery that gave him the 1936 Nobel Prize in physics. When research resumed after World War I focus was on understanding the nature of the cosmic radiation. Particles or radiation? Positive or negative? Electrons, positrons or protons? Progress came using new instruments like the Geiger-Muller tube and around 1940 it was clear that cosmic rays were mostly protons.

  7. Semilocal cosmic string networks

    SciTech Connect

    Achucarro, Ana; Salmi, Petja; Urrestilla, Jon

    2007-06-15

    We report on a large-scale numerical study of networks of semilocal cosmic strings in flat space in the parameter regime in which they are perturbatively stable. We find a population of segments with an exponential length distribution and indications of a scaling network without significant loop formation. Very deep in the stability regime strings of superhorizon size grow rapidly and ''percolate'' through the box. We believe these should lead at late times to a population of infinite strings similar to topologically stable strings. However, the strings are very light; scalar gradients dominate the energy density, and the network has thus a global texturelike signature. As a result, the observational constraints, at least from the temperature power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, on models predicting semilocal strings should be closer to those on global textures or monopoles, rather than on topologically stable gauged cosmic strings.

  8. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Kroll, Mike; Nierstenhöfer, Nils

    2016-08-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the long-standing mysteries in physics and astrophysics. Simple arguments suggest that a scenario of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way as the dominant sources for the cosmic ray population below the knee could work: a generic calculation indicates that these objects can provide the energy budget necessary to explain the observed flux of cosmic rays. However, this argument is based on the assumption that all sources behave in the same way, i.e. they all have the same energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. In this paper, we investigate if a realistic population of SNRs is capable of producing the cosmic ray flux as it is observed below the knee. We use 21 SNRs that are well-studied from radio wavelengths up to gamma-ray energies and derive cosmic ray spectra under the assumption of hadronic emission. The cosmic ray spectra show a large variety in their energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. These sources are assumed to be representative for the total class of SNRs, where we assume that about 100-200 cosmic ray emitting SNRs should be present today. Finally, we use these source spectra to simulate the cosmic ray transport from individual SNRs in the Galaxy with the GALPROP code for cosmic ray propagation. We find that the cosmic ray budget can be matched well for these sources. We conclude that gamma-ray emitting SNRs can be a representative sample of cosmic ray emitting sources. In the future, experiments like CTA and HAWC will help to distinguish hadronic from leptonic sources and to further constrain the maximum energy of the sources and contribute to producing a fully representative sample in order to further investigate the possibility of SNRs being the dominant sources of cosmic rays up to the knee.

  9. Supernova and cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A general overview of supernova astronomy is presented, followed by a discussion of the relationship between SN and galactic cosmic rays. Pre-supernova evolution is traced to core collapse, explosion, and mass ejection. The two types of SN light curves are discussed in terms of their causes, and the different nucleosynthetic processes inside SNs are reviewed. Physical events in SN remnants are discussed. The three main connections between cosmic rays and SNs, the energy requirement, the acceleration mechanism, and the detailed composition of CR, are detailed.

  10. Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2015-12-01

    The multi-facet nature of the origin of cosmic rays is such that some of the problems currently met in our path to describing available data are due to oversimplified models of CR acceleration and transport, and others to lack of knowledge of the physical processes at work in certain conditions. On the other hand, the phenomenology of cosmic rays, as arising from better observations, is getting so rich that it makes sense to try to distinguish the problems that derive from too simple views of Nature and those that are challenging the very foundations of the existing paradigms. Here I will briefly discuss some of these issues.

  11. Heterotic cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Krause, Axel

    2006-08-15

    We show that all three conditions for the cosmological relevance of heterotic cosmic strings, the right tension, stability and a production mechanism at the end of inflation, can be met in the strongly coupled M-theory regime. Whereas cosmic strings generated from weakly coupled heterotic strings have the well-known problems posed by Witten in 1985, we show that strings arising from M5-branes wrapped around 4-cycles (divisors) of a Calabi-Yau in heterotic M-theory compactifications solve these problems in an elegant fashion.

  12. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiener, Juergen

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  13. 76 FR 4933 - Environmental Review Procedures for Entities Assuming HUD Environmental Review Responsibilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Responsibilities; Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...: Environmental Review Procedures for Entities Assuming HUD Environmental Responsibilities. OMB Control...

  14. Bosonic condensates in realistic supersymmetric GUT cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allys, Erwan

    2016-04-01

    We study the realistic structure of F-term Nambu-Goto cosmic strings forming in a general supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory implementation, assuming standard hybrid inflation. Examining the symmetry breaking of the unification gauge group down to the Standard Model, we discuss the minimal field content necessary to describe abelian cosmic strings appearing at the end of inflation. We find that several fields will condense in most theories, questioning the plausible occurrence of associated currents (bosonic and fermionic). We perturbatively evaluate the modification of their energy per unit length due to the condensates. We provide a criterion for comparing the usual abelian Higgs approximation used in cosmology to realistic situations.

  15. Distortion of the cosmic background radiation by superconducting strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, J. P.; Thompson, C.

    1987-01-01

    Superconducting cosmic strings can be significant energy sources, keeping the universe ionized past the commonly assumed epoch of recombination. As a result, the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation is distorted in the presence of heated primordial gas via the Suniaev-Zel'dovich effect. Thiis distortion can be relatively large: the Compton y parameter attains a maximum in the range 0.001-0.005, with these values depending on the mass scale of the string. A significant contribution to y comes from loops decaying at high redshift when the universe is optically thick to Thomson scattering. Moreover, the isotropic spectral distortion is large compared to fluctuations at all angular scales.

  16. Cosmic microwave background polarization signals from tangled magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, T R; Subramanian, K

    2001-09-01

    Tangled, primordial cosmic magnetic fields create small rotational velocity perturbations on the last scattering surface of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For fields which redshift to a present value of B0 = 3 x 10(-9) G, these vector modes are shown to generate polarization anisotropies of order 0.1-4 microK on small angular scales (500assuming delta function or a power law spectra with n = -1. About 200 times larger signals result for n = 2 spectra. Unlike inflation generated, scalar modes, these signals are dominated by the odd parity, B-type polarization, which could help in their detection. PMID:11531471

  17. Recombination clumping factor during cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the role of recombinations in the intergalactic medium, and the related concept of the clumping factor, during cosmic reionization. The clumping factor is, in general, a local quantity that depends on both the local overdensity and the scale below which the baryon density field can be assumed smooth. That scale, called the filtering scale, depends on over-density and local thermal history. We present a method for building a self-consistent analytical model of inhomogeneous reionization, assuming the linear growth rate of the density fluctuation, which simultaneously accounts for these effects. We show that taking into account the local clumping factor introduces significant corrections to the total recombination rate, compared to the model with a globally uniform clumping factor.

  18. Our Cosmic Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donna L.

    2005-01-01

    To help students understand the connection that Earth and the solar system have with the cosmic cycles of stellar evolution, and to give students an appreciation of the beauty and elegance of celestial phenomena, the Chandra X-Ray Center (CXC) educational website contains a stellar evolution module that is available free to teachers. In this…

  19. Heavy cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Donaire, M.; Rajantie, A.

    2006-03-15

    We argue that cosmic strings with high winding numbers generally form in first-order gauge symmetry breaking phase transitions, and we demonstrate this using computer simulations. These strings are heavier than single-winding strings and therefore more easily observable. Their cosmological evolution may also be very different.

  20. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  1. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  2. The Motivation of Teachers to Assume the Role of Cooperating Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonett, Connie L. Foye

    2009-01-01

    The Motivation of Teachers to Assume the Role of Cooperating Teacher This study explored a phenomenological understanding of the motivation and influences that cause experienced teachers to assume pedagogical training of student teachers through the role of cooperating teacher. The research question guiding the study was what motivates teachers to…

  3. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  4. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  5. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  6. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  7. 41 CFR 102-78.55 - For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? 102-78.55 Section 102-78.55 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation § 102-78.55 For which properties must Federal agencies assume historic preservation responsibilities? Federal agencies must...

  8. 39 CFR 3060.40 - Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax... Federal income tax. (a) The assumed Federal income tax on competitive products income shall be based on... income tax on competitive products income shall be September 30. (c) The calculation of the...

  9. 39 CFR 3060.40 - Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax... Federal income tax. (a) The assumed Federal income tax on competitive products income shall be based on... income tax on competitive products income shall be September 30. (c) The calculation of the...

  10. 39 CFR 3060.40 - Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax... Federal income tax. (a) The assumed Federal income tax on competitive products income shall be based on... income tax on competitive products income shall be September 30. (c) The calculation of the...

  11. Pre-Service Teachers' Personal Epistemic Beliefs and the Beliefs They Assume Their Pupils to Have

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebmann, Karin; Schloemer, Tobias; Berding, Florian; Luttenberger, Silke; Paechter, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In their workaday life, teachers are faced with multiple complex tasks. How they carry out these tasks is also influenced by their epistemic beliefs and the beliefs they assume their pupils hold. In an empirical study, pre-service teachers' epistemic beliefs and those they assume of their pupils were investigated in the setting of teacher…

  12. Testing modified gravity with cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, J.; Munshi, D.; Valageas, P.; van Waerbeke, L.; Brax, P.; Coles, P.; Rizzo, L.

    2015-12-01

    We use the cosmic shear data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey to place constraints on f(R) and Generalized Dilaton models of modified gravity. This is highly complementary to other probes since the constraints mainly come from the non-linear scales: maximal deviations with respects to the General Relativity (GR) + Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario occurs at k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1. At these scales, it becomes necessary to account for known degeneracies with baryon feedback and massive neutrinos, hence we place constraints jointly on these three physical effects. To achieve this, we formulate these modified gravity theories within a common tomographic parametrization, we compute their impact on the clustering properties relative to a GR universe, and propagate the observed modifications into the weak lensing ξ± quantity. Confronted against the cosmic shear data, we reject the f(R) \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 1\\rbrace model with more than 99.9 per cent confidence interval (CI) when assuming a ΛCDM dark matter only model. In the presence of baryonic feedback processes and massive neutrinos with total mass up to 0.2 eV, the model is disfavoured with at least 94 per cent CI in all different combinations studied. Constraints on the \\lbrace |f_{R_0}| = 10^{-4}, n = 2\\rbrace model are weaker, but nevertheless disfavoured with at least 89 per cent CI. We identify several specific combinations of neutrino mass, baryon feedback and f(R) or Dilaton gravity models that are excluded by the current cosmic shear data. Notably, universes with three massless neutrinos and no baryon feedback are strongly disfavoured in all modified gravity scenarios studied. These results indicate that competitive constraints may be achieved with future cosmic shear data.

  13. Effect of Assumed Damage and Location on the Delamination Onset Predictions for Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Isabelle L.; Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The difference in delamination onset predictions based on the type and location of the assumed initial damage are compared in a specimen consisting of a tapered flange laminate bonded to a skin laminate. From previous experimental work, the damage was identified to consist of a matrix crack in the top skin layer followed by a delamination between the top and second skin layer (+45 deg./-45 deg. interface). Two-dimensional finite elements analyses were performed for three different assumed flaws and the results show a considerable reduction in critical load if an initial delamination is assumed to be present, both under tension and bending loads. For a crack length corresponding to the peak in the strain energy release rate, the delamination onset load for an assumed initial flaw in the bondline is slightly higher than the critical load for delamination onset from an assumed skin matrix crack, both under tension and bending loads. As a result, assuming an initial flaw in the bondline is simpler while providing a critical load relatively close to the real case. For the configuration studied, a small delamination might form at a lower tension load than the critical load calculated for a 12.7 mm (0.5") delamination, but it would grow in a stable manner. For the bending case, assuming an initial flaw of 12.7 mm (0.5") is conservative, the crack would grow unstably.

  14. ORIGIN OF THE COSMIC-RAY SPECTRAL HARDENING

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2012-06-10

    Recent data from ATIC, CREAM, and PAMELA indicate that the cosmic-ray energy spectra of protons and nuclei exhibit a remarkable hardening at energies above 100 GeV nucleon{sup -1}. We propose that the hardening is an interstellar propagation effect that originates from a spatial change of the cosmic-ray transport properties in different regions of the Galaxy. The key hypothesis is that the diffusion coefficient is not separable into energy and space variables as usually assumed. Under this scenario, we can reproduce the observational data well. Our model has several implications for cosmic-ray acceleration/propagation physics and can be tested by ongoing experiments such as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer or Fermi-LAT.

  15. A Concept Analysis: Assuming Responsibility for Self-Care among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Kathleen M.; Decker, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This concept analysis clarifies “assuming responsibility for self-care” by adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods Walker and Avant’s (2005) methodology guided the analysis. Results Assuming responsibility for self-care was defined as a process specific to diabetes within the context of development. It is daily, gradual, individualized to person, and unique to task. The goal is ownership that involves autonomy in behaviors and decision-making. Practice Implications Adolescents with type 1 diabetes need to be assessed for assuming responsibility for self-care. This achievement has implications for adolescents’ diabetes management, short- and long-term health, and psychosocial quality of life. PMID:20367781

  16. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  17. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  18. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  19. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of April 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Five articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: GAP 1.0 - Groove Analysis Program, Version 1.0; SUBTRANS - Subband/Transform MATLAB Functions for Image Processing; CSDM - COLD-SAT Dynamic Model; CASRE - Computer Aided Software Reliability Estimation; and XOPPS - OEL Project Planner/Scheduler Tool. Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and disseminations are also described along with a budget summary.

  20. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Tajima, Toshiki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2002-10-01

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f([epsilon]) [is proportional to] 1/[epsilon]2. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations. [copyright] 2002 American Institute of Physics

  1. The effects of magnetic field modifications on the solar modulation of cosmic rays with a SDE-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raath, J. L.; Potgieter, M. S.; Strauss, R. D.; Kopp, A.

    2016-05-01

    A numerical model for the solar modulation of cosmic rays, based on the solution of a set of stochastic differential equations (SDEs), is used to illustrate the effects of modifying the heliospheric magnetic field, particularly in the polar regions of the heliosphere. SDE-based models are well suited for such studies so that new insights are gained. To this end, the differences in the modulation brought about by each of three choices for the heliospheric magnetic field, i.e. the unmodified Parker field, the Smith-Bieber modified field, and the Jokipii-Kóta modified field, are studied as typical well-known cases. It is illustrated that although both these modifications change the Parker field satisfactorily in the polar regions of the heliosphere, the Smith-Bieber modification is more effective in reducing cosmic ray drift effects in these regions. The features of these two modifications, as well as the effects on the solar modulation of cosmic rays, are illustrated qualitatively and quantitatively. In particular, it is shown how the Smith-Bieber modified field is applied in a cosmic ray modulation model to reproduce observational proton spectra from the PAMELA mission during the solar minimum of 2006-2009. These SDE-based results are compared with those obtained in previous studies of this unusual solar minimum activity period and found to be in good qualitative agreement.

  2. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  3. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  4. A Warped Cosmic String

    SciTech Connect

    Slagter, R. J.

    2010-06-23

    We present a cosmic string solution in Einstein-Yang-Mills Gauss-Bonnet theory on a warped 5 dimensional space-time conform the Randall-Sundrum-2 theory. In a simplipied model, we find an exact solutions with exponential decreasing or periodic warp function. In a more general setting, where the metric- and Yang-Mills components depend on both scales and one of the YM components resides in the bulk, we find a time dependent numerical solution.

  5. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  6. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, F. C.; Cheng, C.

    2006-12-01

    Six identical micro-satellites of the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission were successfully launched on April 14, 2006 US time. The mission is a Taiwan-US collaborative project jointly carried out by the National Space Organization (NSPO) in Taiwan and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in the United States. Each satellite carries three science payloads: a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver which measures the amplitude and phase of GPS signals, a Tri-Band Beacon (TBB) transmitter which emits three coherent frequencies at 150 MHz, 400 MHz and 1066.7 MHz, and a Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP) which measures photon emission at 135.6 nm wavelength. The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission provides the first satellite constellation to obtain vertical profiles in near-real time of temperature, pressure, and water vapor in the neutral atmosphere and electron density in the ionosphere. Using the GPS radio occultation (RO) technique, the satellite constellation will take at least 2,500 measurements of vertical profiles of atmospheric air density, temperature and water vapor and ionospheric electron density every 24 hours around the globe, filling in current atmospheric data gaps over the oceans and the polar region. Combining the GPS RO data with the data from TIP and ground TBB receivers, the 3D global distribution of electron density and scintillation in the ionosphere can be obtained for space weather monitoring and modeling. Taiwan science teams are conducting an Intensive Observation Period (IOP) campaign to cross validate RO data with other observations (ground based radiosonde, weather satellites, and balloons, radars, ionosondes, etc.), and to assess the impact of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC observations on predictions of typhoon intensity and track over eastern Asia as well as ionospheric response to storms and substorms. Highlights of early results from the FORMOSAT- 3/COSMIC mission will be presented.

  7. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  8. Relativistic heavy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Fernandez, J. I.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Binns, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    During three balloon flights of a 1 sq m sr ionization chamber/Cerenkov counter detector system, measurements were made of the atmospheric attenuation, flux, and charge composition of cosmic ray nuclei with 16 is less than or = Z is less than or = 30 and rigidity greater than 4.5 GV. The attenuation mean free path in air of VH (20 less than or = Z less than or = 30) nuclei is found to be 19.7 + or - 1.6 g/sq cm, a value somewhat greater than the best previous measurement. The attenuation mean free path of iron is found to be 15.6 + or - 2.2 g/sq cm, consistent with predictions of geometric cross-section formulae. An absolute flux of VH nuclei 10 to 20% higher than earlier experiments at similar geomagnetic cutoff and level of solar activity was measured. The relative abundances of even-charged nuclei are found to be in good agreement with results of other recent high resolution counter experiments. The observed cosmic ray chemical composition implies relative abundances at the cosmic ray source of Ca/Fe = 0.12 + or - 0.04 and S/Fe = 0.14 + or - 0.05.

  9. 25 CFR 117.5 - Procedure for hearings to assume supervision of expenditure of allowance funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIANS WHO DO NOT HAVE CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY § 117.5 Procedure for hearings to assume supervision of... not having certificates of competency, including amounts paid for each minor, shall, in case...

  10. Searching for Cosmic Strings in the Cosmic Microwave Background:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty

    The role of cosmic defects in cosmology is entering its new phase—as a test for several fundamental physics, including unification theories and inflation. We discuss how to use the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to detect cosmic strings, a type of cosmic defects, and how to use this result to constrain the underlying physics. In particular, we use the simulations for the Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) to demonstrate the power of this approach. The required resolution and sensitivity in such a method are discussed, and so is the possible scientific impact.

  11. Effects of anisotropic dynamics on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2011-08-01

    The dynamics of cosmic strings is considered in anisotropic backgrounds. In particular, the behaviour of infinitely long straight cosmic strings and of cosmic string loops is determined. Small perturbations of a straight cosmic string are calculated. The relevance of these results is discussed with respect to the possible observational imprints of an anisotropic phase on the behaviour of a cosmic string network.

  12. The relationship between the galactic matter distribution, cosmic ray dynamics, and gamma ray production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and analysis of the results of gamma ray astronomy suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density should be enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model using recent 21 cm radio observations of the neutral hydrogen and 2.6 mm observations of carbon monoxide, which is considered to be a tracer of molecular hydrogen. The model assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2) on the scale of galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3) the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height of the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of about 3:1.

  13. Cosmic superstrings and primordial magnetogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2005-08-15

    Cosmic superstrings are produced at the end of brane inflation. Their properties are similar to cosmic strings arising in grand unified theories. Like cosmic strings they can give rise to a primordial magnetic field, as a result of vortical motions stirred in the ionized plasma by the gravitational pull of moving string segments. The resulting magnetic field is both strong enough and coherent enough to seed the galactic dynamo and explain the observed magnetic fields of the galaxies.

  14. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  15. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema

    Blasi, Pasquale [INAF/Arcetri-Italy and Fermilab, Italy

    2010-01-08

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the ?end? of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform ?cosmic ray astronomy?, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  16. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-08-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  17. Cosmic Rays Across the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould Zweibel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays play an important role in the dynamics, energetics, and chemisry of gas inside and outside galaxies. It has long been recognized that gamma ray astronomy is a powerful probe of cosmic ray acceleration and propagation, and that gamma ray data, combined with other observations of cosmic rays and of the host medium and with modeling, can provide an integrated picture of cosmic rays and their environments. I will discuss the plasma physics underlying this picture, where it has been successful, and where issues remain.

  18. High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Newborn Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Newborn pulsars offer favorable sites for cosmic ray acceleration and interaction. Particles could be striped off the star surface and accelerated in the pulsar wind up to PeV-100 EeV energies, depending on the pulsar's birth period and magnetic field strength. Once accelerated, the cosmic rays interact with the surrounding supernova ejecta until they escape the source. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300,ms, we find the combined contribution of extragalactic pulsars produce ultrahigh energy cosmic rays that agree with both the observed energy spectrum and composition trend reported by the Auger Observatory. Meanwhile, we point out their Galactic counterparts naturally give rise to a cosmic ray flux peaked at very high energies (VHE, between 10^16 and 10^18 ,eV), which can bridge the gap between predictions of cosmic rays produced by supernova remnants and the observed spectrum and composition just below the ankle. Young pulsars in the universe would also contribute to a diffuse neutrino background due to the photomeson interactions, whose detectability and typical neutrino energy are discussed. Lastly, we predict a neutrino emission level for the future birth of a nearby pulsar.

  19. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MAXIMUM ENERGY OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, M.; Katayose, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.

    2010-06-20

    A model of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum is proposed that assumes various acceleration limits at multiple sources. The model describes the broken power-law energy spectrum of cosmic rays by superposition of multiple sources; a diffusive shock acceleration mechanism plays an essential role. The maximum energy of galactic cosmic rays is discussed based on a comparison of experimental data with calculations done using the proposed model. The model can describe the energy spectrum at very high energies of up to several times 10{sup 18} eV, but the observed highest-energy cosmic rays deviate from the model predictions, indicating a different origin, such as an extragalactic source. This model describes the steepening of the power index at the so-called knee. However, it was found that additional assumptions are needed to explain the sharpness of the knee. Two possible explanations for the structure of the knee are discussed in terms of nearby source(s) and the hard energy spectrum suggested by nonlinear effects of cosmic-ray acceleration mechanisms.

  20. On Becoming a Cosmic Educator. Spotlight: Cosmic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Biff

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Maria Montessori's five pedagogical guidelines for her Cosmic Education concept: starting with the larger context; treating planet Earth as a cosmic organism; stressing similarities among seemingly different groups of people, organisms, or objects; showing chains of interdependence among all things; and examining behavior from a cosmic…

  1. The Emergence of Cosmic Education. Spotlight: Cosmic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudeau, Sr. Christina Marie

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the influence of Hindu, Moslem, and Buddhist metaphysics on Maria Montessori's own pedagogical philosophy of Cosmic Education, which she regarded as the core of all learning experiences, after her visit to India. Considers the relationship between Montessori's ideas of child development and Cosmic Education, and the effect of Indian…

  2. Cosmic Dawn with WFIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James

    Central objectives: WFIRST-AFTA has tremendous potential for studying the epoch of "Cosmic Dawn" the period encompassing the formation of the first galaxies and quasars, and their impact on the surrounding universe through cosmological reionization. Our goal is to ensure that this potential is realized through the middle stages of mission planning, culminating in designs for both WFIRST and its core surveys that meet the core objectives in dark energy and exoplanet science, while maximizing the complementary Cosmic Dawn science. Methods: We will consider a combined approach to studying Cosmic Dawn using a judicious mixture of guest investigator data analysis of the primary WFIRST surveys, and a specifically designed Guest Observer program to complement those surveys. The Guest Observer program will serve primarily to obtain deep field observations, with particular attention to the capabilities of WFIRST for spectroscopic deep fields using the WFI grism. We will bring to bear our years of experience with slitless spectroscopy on the Hubble Space Telescope, along with an expectation of JWST slitless grism spectroscopy. We will use this experience to examine the implications of WFIRST’s grism resolution and wavelength coverage for deep field observations, and if appropriate, to suggest potential modifications of these parameters to optimize the science return on WFIRST. We have assembled a team of experts specializing in (1) Lyman Break Galaxies at redshifts higher than 7 (2) Quasars at high redshifts (3) Lyman-alpha galaxies as probes of reionization (4) Theoretical simulations of high-redshift galaxies (5) Simulations of grism observations (6) post-processing analysis to find emission line galaxies and high redshift galaxies (7) JWST observations and calibrations. With this team we intend to do end-to-end simulations starting with halo populations and expected spectra of high redshift galaxies and finally extracting what we can learn about (a) reionization

  3. Genesis and propagation of cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, M.M.; Wefel, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a panorama of contemporary state-of-the-art knowledge on the origin of cosmic rays and how they propagate through space. Twenty-eight articles cover such topics as objects which generate cosmic rays, processes which accelerate particles to cosmic ray energies, the interaction of cosmic rays with their environment, elementary particles in cosmic rays, how to detect cosmic rays and future experiments to measure highly energetic particles.

  4. CosmicSIG science and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, Angela V.

    2014-03-01

    Recent activities of the Cosmic Ray Science Interest Group (CosmicSIG) of the Physics of the Cosmos PAG will be reviewed. CosmicSIG was formed to provide an assessment to NASA HQ and the PCOS program office of the status of current and future missions in the area of cosmic-ray astrophysics. CosmicSIG also strives to act as a focal point and forum for the cosmic ray community.

  5. Cosmic ray anisotropy as signature for the transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Giacinti, G.; Kachelrieß, M.; Semikoz, D.V.; Sigl, G.

    2012-07-01

    We constrain the energy at which the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs by computing the anisotropy at Earth of cosmic rays emitted by Galactic sources. Since the diffusion approximation starts to loose its validity for E/Z∼>10{sup 16−17} eV, we propagate individual cosmic rays using Galactic magnetic field models and taking into account both their regular and turbulent components. The turbulent field is generated on a nested grid which allows spatial resolution down to fractions of a parsec. Assuming sufficiently frequent Galactic CR sources, the dipole amplitude computed for a mostly light or intermediate primary composition exceeds the dipole bounds measured by the Auger collaboration around E ≈ 10{sup 18} eV. Therefore, a transition at the ankle or above would require a heavy composition or a rather extreme Galactic magnetic field with strength ∼>10 μG. Moreover, the fast rising proton contribution suggested by KASCADE-Grande data between 10{sup 17} eV and 10{sup 18} eV should be of extragalactic origin. In case heavy nuclei dominate the flux at E∼>10{sup 18} eV, the transition energy can be close to the ankle, if Galactic CRs are produced by sufficiently frequent transients as e.g. magnetars.

  6. Three dimensional potential and current distributions in a Hall generator with assumed velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankiewicz, N.; Palmer, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three-dimensional potential and current distributions in a Faraday segmented MHD generator operating in the Hall mode are computed. Constant conductivity and a Hall parameter of 1.0 is assumed. The electric fields and currents are assumed to be coperiodic with the electrode structure. The flow is assumed to be fully developed and a family of power-law velocity profiles, ranging from parabolic to turbulent, is used to show the effect of the fullness of the velocity profile. Calculation of the square of the current density shows that nonequilibrium heating is not likely to occur along the boundaries. This seems to discount the idea that the generator insulating walls are regions of high conductivity and are therefore responsible for boundary-layer shorting, unless the shorting is a surface phenomenon on the insulating material.

  7. Assuming a Pharmacy Organization Leadership Position: A Guide for Pharmacy Leaders.

    PubMed

    Shay, Blake; Weber, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Important and influential pharmacy organization leadership positions, such as president, board member, or committee chair, are volunteer positions and require a commitment of personal and professional time. These positions provide excellent opportunities for leadership development, personal promotion, and advancement of the profession. In deciding to assume a leadership position, interested individuals must consider the impact on their personal and professional commitments and relationships, career planning, employer support, current and future department projects, employee support, and personal readiness. This article reviews these factors and also provides an assessment tool that leaders can use to determine their readiness to assume leadership positions. By using an assessment tool, pharmacy leaders can better understand their ability to assume an important and influential leadership position while achieving job and personal goals. PMID:27621512

  8. Collisional tearing in a field-reversed sheet pinch assuming nonparallel propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, K. B.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Linear tearing in a collisional reversed-field sheet pinch is examined assuming that the wave vector k is not parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. Equilibrium and magnetic geometry are defined, and a set of perturbed moment equations is derived assuming quasi-parallel propagation. It is shown that the usual expression for collisional growth is recovered, assuming that k sub y = 0. It is shown that the y component of momentum balance requires the generation of nonzero dJ sub x well away from the null, and an interial coupling when z not equal to 0. The effects of k sub y not equal to 0 on the growth rate are discussed.

  9. Wormhole cosmic censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Miranda, Galaxia

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a Kerr-like wormhole supported by phantom matter, which is an exact solution of the Einstein-phantom field equations. It is shown that the solution has a naked ring singularity which is unreachable to null geodesics falling freely from the outside. Similarly to Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship, that states that all naked singularities in the Universe must be protected by event horizons, here we conjecture from our results that a naked singularity can also be fully protected by the intrinsic properties of a wormhole's throat.

  10. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  11. Antiprotons in cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental observations and results are discussed. It was found that the approximately 50 antiprotons collected in balloon experiments to date have generated considerable theoretical interest. Clearly, confirmatory experiments and measurements over an extended energy range are required before definite conclusions are drawn. Antiproton measurements have a bearing on astrophysical problems ranging from cosmic ray propagation to issues of cosmological import. The next generation of balloon experiments and the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility being discussed for operation on NASA's space station should provide data and insights of highest interest.

  12. Characteristics of cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.

    1995-11-01

    The nature of cosmic time is illuminated using Hamilton-Jacobi theory for general relativity. For problems of interest to cosmology, one may solve for the phase of the wave functional by using a line integral in superspace. Each contour of integration corresponds to a particular choice of time hypersurface, and each yields the same answer. In this way, one can construct a covariant formalism where all time hypersurfaces are treated on an equal footing. Using the method of characteristics, explicit solutions for an inflationary epoch with several scalar fields are given. The theoretical predictions of double inflation are compared with recent galaxy data and large angle microwave background anistropies.

  13. Cosmological cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an infinite cosmic string on a cosmological background is investigated. It is found that the metric is approximately a scaled version of the empty space string metric, i.e., conical in nature. Results are used to place bounds on the amount of cylindrical gravitational radiation currently emitted by such a string. The gravitational radiation equations are then analyzed explicitly and it is shown that even initially large disturbances are rapidly damped as the expansion proceeds. The implications of the gravitational radiation background and the limitations of the quadrupole formula are discussed.

  14. Dynamical evolution of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, F.R.

    1988-05-11

    The author have studied by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a network of cosmic strings, both in the radiation and matter era. Our basic conclusion is that a scaling solution exists, i.e., the string energy density evolves as t/sup -2/. This means that the process by which long strings dump their energy into closed loops (which can gravitationally radiate away) is efficient enough to prevent the string domination over other forms of energy. This conclusion does not depend on the initial string energy density, nor on the various numerical parameters. On the other hand, the generated spectrum of loop sizes does depend on the value of our numerical lower cutoff (i.e., the minimum length of loop we allow to be chopped off the network). Furthermore, the network evolution is very different from what was assumed before), namely the creation of a few horizon sized loops per horizon volume and per hubble time, which subsequently fragment into about 10 smaller daughter loops. Rather, many tiny loops are directly cut from the network of infinite strings, and it appears that the only fundamental scale (the horizon) has been lost. This is probably because a fundamental ingredient had been overlooked, namely the kinks. These kinks are created in pairs at each intercommutation, and very rapidly, the long strings appear to be very kinky. Thus the number of long strings per horizon is still of the order of a few, but their total length is fairly large. Furthermore, a large number of kinks favors the formation of small loops, and their sizes might well be governed by the kink density along the long strings. Finally, we computed the two-point correlation function of the loops and found significant differences from the work of Turok.

  15. Optimal Control for TB disease with vaccination assuming endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Wicaksono, B. C.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious disease in the world which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease is spread through the air via the droplets from the infectious persons when they are coughing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has paid a special attention to the TB by providing some solution, for example by providing BCG vaccine that prevent an infected person from becoming an active infectious TB. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of the spread of the TB which assumes endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection factors. We also assume that some of the susceptible population are vaccinated. Furthermore we investigate the optimal vaccination level for the disease.

  16. Assumed process of piping failure in nuclear power plants under destructive earthquake conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, H. . Inst. of Industrial Science)

    1991-05-01

    This paper deals with an assumed process of piping failure in nuclear power plants which may cause a catastrophic accident during a destructive earthquake conditions. The type of failure discussed is the so-called double-ended guillotine break, DEGB. As a safety problems, we are going to eliminate this type of failure by LBB, and we have assumed that this would then not occur by an earthquake. The author tries to clarify the possibility of failure during earthquakes. He reviews his related papers since 1973, and discusses zipping failure of snubbers and supporting devices. He shows a procedure to simulate the zipping failure of a piping system supported by snubbers.

  17. Superbubbles and Local Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streitmatter, Robert E.; Jones, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the possibility that distinctive features of the local cosmic ray spectra and composition are influenced by the Solar system being embedded within the cavity of an ancient superbubble. Shifts in the measured cosmic ray composition between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 20) eV as well as the "knee" and "second knee" may be understood in this picture.

  18. Cosmic Rays and Experiment CZELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Smolek, Karel; Nyklicek, Michal

    2007-11-26

    This paper gives a review of the physics of cosmic rays with emphasis on the methods of detection and study. A summary is given of the Czech project CZELTA which is part of a multinational program to study cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 14} eV.

  19. Flat wormholes from cosmic strings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, G.

    1997-11-01

    The author describes the analytical extension of certain cylindrical multi-cosmic string metrics to wormhole spacetimes with only one region at spatial infinity, and investigates in detail the geometry of asymptotically Minkowskian wormhole spacetimes generated by one or two cosmic strings. It is found that such wormholes tend to lengthen rather than shorten space travel. Possible signatures of these wormholes are briefly discussed.

  20. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  1. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  2. Does a cosmic censor exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, W.

    1984-11-01

    A distinction is drawn between the event horizon conjecture (EHC), the conjecture that an event horizon forms in a gravitational collapse, and cosmic censorship, the idea that every singularity which develops in the course of collapse must be enclosed within a horizon. It is argued that a body of circumstantial evidence seems to favor EHC, but cosmic censorship seems contraindicated.

  3. Use of the Egret instrument in studies of the origin of the cosmic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, C.D.

    1989-10-27

    This is a continuation of previous studies aimed at predicting spectral signatures of discrete cosmic-ray sources. In this paper, a formalism is developed for calculating gamma-ray spectra observed at Earth from the decay of neutral pions formed in collisions of cosmic-ray protons and ions with galactic gas and dust. The cosmic rays are assumed to be emitted by discrete sources, and their intensities and spectra are described by solutions to a diffusion equation. Calculations of spectral signatures expected from these hypothetical point sources of cosmic rays are presented. In particular, a steady source of cosmic rays could show a harder gamma-ray spectrum than the spectrum of the diffuse galactic background, whereas an impulsive source of cosmic rays could show a much softer spectrum. Observations of the angular variations of gamma-ray intensities and spectra near point sources will provide information on cosmic-ray propagation in other parts of our galaxy, as well as on the nature of the discrete sources themselves. Capabilities of the Egret telescope in mapping spectra from cosmic-ray point sources are briefly discussed. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Monopole annihilation in cosmic necklaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D. E-mail: kdo@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2010-05-01

    A sequence of two symmetry breaking transitions in the early universe may produce monopoles whose flux is confined into two strings each, which thus assemble into ''necklaces'' with monopoles as beads. Such ''cosmic necklaces'' have been proposed as a source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We analyze the evolution of these systems and show that essentially all monopoles annihilate or leave the string at early times, after which cosmic necklaces evolve in a similar way to a network of ordinary cosmic strings. We investigate several modifications to the basic picture, but in nearly all cases we find that too few monopoles remain on the necklaces to produce any observable cosmic rays. There may be a small window for superconducting condensates to prevent annihilations, but only if both the string and the condensate scale are very high.

  5. Testing Cosmic Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has provided a wealth of information about the history and physics of the early Universe. Much progress has been made on uncovering the emerging Standard Model of Cosmology by such experiments as COBE and WMAP, and ESA's Planck Surveyor will likely increase our knowledge even more. Despite the success of this model, mysteries remain. Currently understood physics does not offer a compelling explanation for the homogeneity, flatness, and the origin of structure in the Universe. Cosmic Inflation, a brief epoch of exponential expansion, has been posted to explain these observations. If inflation is a reality, it is expected to produce a background spectrum of gravitational waves that will leave a small polarized imprint on the CMB. Discovery of this signal would give the first direct evidence for inflation and provide a window into physics at scales beyond those accessible to terrestrial particle accelerators. I will briefly review aspects of the Standard Model of Cosmology and discuss our current efforts to design and deploy experiments to measure the polarization of the CMB with the precision required to test inflation.

  6. Cosmic tidal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Yu, Yu; Er, Xinzhong; Chen, Xuelei

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational coupling of a long-wavelength tidal field with small-scale density fluctuations leads to anisotropic distortions of the locally measured small-scale matter correlation function. Since the local correlation function is known to be statistically isotropic in the absence of such tidal interactions, the tidal distortions can be used to reconstruct the long-wavelength tidal field and large-scale density field in analogy with the cosmic microwave background lensing reconstruction. In this paper we present the theoretical framework of cosmic tidal reconstruction and test the reconstruction in numerical simulations. We find that the density field on large scales can be reconstructed with good accuracy and the cross-correlation coefficient between the reconstructed density field and the original density field is greater than 0.9 on large scales (k ≲0.1 h /Mpc ), with the filter scale ˜1.25 Mpc /h . This is useful in the 21 cm intensity mapping survey, where the long-wavelength radial modes are lost due to a foreground subtraction process.

  7. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of August, 1993. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Ten articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) MOM3D - A Method of Moments Code for Electromagnetic Scattering (UNIX Version); (2) EM-Animate - Computer Program for Displaying and Animating the Steady-State Time-Harmonic Electromagnetic Near Field and Surface-Current Solutions; (3) MOM3D - A Method of Moments Code for Electromagnetic Scattering (IBM PC Version); (4) M414 - MIL-STD-414 Variable Sampling Procedures Computer Program; (5) MEDOF - Minimum Euclidean Distance Optimal Filter; (6) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (Macintosh Version); (7) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (IBM PC Version); (8) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version); (9) CLIPS 6.0 - C Language Integrated Production System, Version 6.0 (DEC VAX VMS Version); and (10) TFSSRA - Thick Frequency Selective Surface with Rectangular Apertures. Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  8. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  9. 13 CFR 120.1718 - SBA's right to assume Seller's responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBA's right to assume Seller's responsibilities. 120.1718 Section 120.1718 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1718 SBA's right to...

  10. 13 CFR 120.1718 - SBA's right to assume Seller's responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 calendar days of Seller's receipt of such request. SBA will notify the Obligor of the change in... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false SBA's right to assume Seller's... LOANS Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan...

  11. 75 FR 54965 - Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Purchaser or Owner Assuming Seller's Loans, VA Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...., Washington, DC 20420 or e-mail nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0111'' in any... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Statement of Purchaser or Owner Assuming Seller's Loans, VA Form... Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of...

  12. The Impact of Assumed Knowledge Entry Standards on Undergraduate Mathematics Teaching in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Deborah; Cattlin, Joann

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, many Australian universities have relaxed their selection requirements for mathematics-dependent degrees, shifting from hard prerequisites to assumed knowledge standards which provide students with an indication of the prior learning that is expected. This has been regarded by some as a positive move, since students who…

  13. 22 CFR 72.21 - Consular officer may not assume financial responsibility for the estate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Consular officer may not assume financial responsibility for the estate. 72.21 Section 72.21 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PROTECTION AND WELFARE... next of kin)....

  14. 22 CFR 72.21 - Consular officer may not assume financial responsibility for the estate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consular officer may not assume financial responsibility for the estate. 72.21 Section 72.21 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PROTECTION AND WELFARE... next of kin)....

  15. A Model for Teacher Effects from Longitudinal Data without Assuming Vertical Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariano, Louis T.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Lockwood, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using longitudinal measures of student achievement to estimate individual teacher effects. Current multivariate models assume each teacher has a single effect on student outcomes that persists undiminished to all future test administrations (complete persistence [CP]) or can diminish with time but remains…

  16. Comparison of ELCAP data with lighting and equipment load levels and profiles assumed in regional models

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    The analysis in this report was driven by two primary objectives: to determine whether and to what extent the lighting and miscellaneous equipment electricity consumption measured by metering in real buildings differs from the levels assumed in the various prototypes used in power forecasting; and to determine the reasons for those differences if, in fact, differences were found. 13 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. 42 CFR 476.82 - Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs. 476.82 Section 476.82 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and...

  18. 42 CFR 476.82 - Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs. 476.82 Section 476.82 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and...

  19. 42 CFR 476.82 - Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs. 476.82 Section 476.82 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and...

  20. 42 CFR 476.82 - Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Continuation of functions not assumed by QIOs. 476.82 Section 476.82 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Quality...

  1. 39 CFR 3060.40 - Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax. 3060.40 Section 3060.40 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND TAX RULES FOR THE THEORETICAL COMPETITIVE PRODUCTS ENTERPRISE § 3060.40 Calculation of the...

  2. 39 CFR 3060.40 - Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculation of the assumed Federal income tax. 3060.40 Section 3060.40 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND... liability on the taxable income from the competitive products of the Postal Service theoretical...

  3. 49 CFR 568.7 - Requirements for manufacturers who assume legal responsibility for a vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 CFR 567.5(f). (b) If an intermediate manufacturer of a vehicle assumes legal responsibility for... intermediate manufacturer shall ensure that a label is affixed to the final vehicle in conformity with 49 CFR... responsibility for a vehicle. 568.7 Section 568.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...

  4. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Antoine S. G.; Metzler, Knut; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Leya, Ingo

    2016-07-01

    If chondrules were exposed to cosmic rays prior to meteorite compaction, they should retain an excess of cosmogenic noble gases. Beyersdorf-Kuis et al. (2015) showed that such excesses can be detected provided that the chemical composition of each individual chondrule is precisely known. However, their study was limited to a few samples as they had to be irradiated in a nuclear reactor for instrumental neutron activation analysis. We developed a novel analytical protocol that combines the measurements of He and Ne isotopic concentrations with a fast method to correct for differences in chemical composition using micro X-ray computed tomography. Our main idea is to combine noble gas, nuclear track, and petrography data for numerous chondrules to understand the precompaction exposure history of the chondrite parent bodies. Here, we report our results for a total of 77 chondrules and four matrix samples from NWA 8276 (L3.00), NWA 8007 (L3.2), and Bjurböle (L/LL4). All chondrules from the same meteorite have within uncertainty identical 21Ne exposure ages, and all chondrules from Bjurböle have within uncertainty identical 3He exposure ages. However, most chondrules from NWA 8276 and a few from NWA 8007 show small but resolvable differences in 3He exposure age that we attribute to matrix contamination and/or gas loss. The finding that none of the chondrules has noble gas excesses is consistent with the uniform track density found for each meteorite. We conclude that the studied chondrules did not experience a precompaction exposure longer than a few Ma assuming present-day flux of galactic cosmic rays. A majority of chondrules from L and LL chondrites thus rapidly accreted and/or was efficiently shielded from cosmic rays in the solar nebula.

  5. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Antoine S. G.; Metzler, Knut; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    If chondrules were exposed to cosmic rays prior to meteorite compaction, they should retain an excess of cosmogenic noble gases. Beyersdorf-Kuis et al. showed that such excesses can be detected provided that the chemical composition of each individual chondrule is precisely known. However, their study was limited to a few samples as they had to be irradiated in a nuclear reactor for instrumental neutron activation analysis. We developed a novel analytical protocol that combines the measurements of He and Ne isotopic concentrations with a fast method to correct for differences in chemical composition using micro X-ray computed tomography. Our main idea is to combine noble gas, nuclear track, and petrography data for numerous chondrules to understand the precompaction exposure history of the chondrite parent bodies. Here, we report our results for a total of 77 chondrules and four matrix samples from NWA 8276 (L3.00), NWA 8007 (L3.2), and Bjurböle (L/LL4). All chondrules from the same meteorite have within uncertainty identical 21Ne exposure ages, and all chondrules from Bjurböle have within uncertainty identical 3He exposure ages. However, most chondrules from NWA 8276 and a few from NWA 8007 show small but resolvable differences in 3He exposure age that we attribute to matrix contamination and/or gas loss. The finding that none of the chondrules has noble gas excesses is consistent with the uniform track density found for each meteorite. We conclude that the studied chondrules did not experience a precompaction exposure longer than a few Ma assuming present-day flux of galactic cosmic rays. A majority of chondrules from L and LL chondrites thus rapidly accreted and/or was efficiently shielded from cosmic rays in the solar nebula.

  6. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, Gμ << 10-7, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  7. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, Gμ << 10{sup -7}, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  8. Cosmic ray anisotropies at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinic, N. J.; Alarcon, A.; Teran, F.

    1986-01-01

    The directional anisotropies of the energetic cosmic ray gas due to the relative motion between the observers frame and the one where the relativistic gas can be assumed isotropic is analyzed. The radiation fluxes formula in the former frame must follow as the Lorentz invariance of dp/E, where p, E are the 4-vector momentum-energy components; dp is the 3-volume element in the momentum space. The anisotropic flux shows in such a case an amplitude, in a rotating earth, smaller than the experimental measurements from say, EAS-arrays for primary particle energies larger than 1.E(14) eV. Further, it is shown that two consecutive Lorentz transformations among three inertial frames exhibit the violation of dp/E invariance between the first and the third systems of reference, due to the Wigner rotation. A discussion of this result in the context of the experimental anisotropic fluxes and its current interpretation is given.

  9. Cosmic rays in star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persic, Massimo; Rephaeli, Yoel

    2012-03-01

    The energy density of cosmic ray protons (CRp) in star-forming environments can be (i) measured from γ-ray πo-decay emission, (ii) inferred from the measured radio non-thermal synchrotron emission (once a theoretical p/e ratio and particle-field equipartition have been assumed), and (iii) estimated from the observed supernova rate and the deduced CRp residency time. For most of the currently available galaxies where these methods can be simultaneously applied, the results of the various methods agree and suggest that CRp energy densities range from Script O(10-1) eV cm-3 in very quiet environments up to Script O(102) eV cm-3 in very active ones. The only case for which the methods do not agree is the Small Magellanic Cloud, where the discrepancy between measured and estimated CRp energy density may be due to a smaller characteristic CR confinement volume.

  10. Universal density profile for cosmic voids.

    PubMed

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2014-06-27

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., arXiv:1309.5087 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. (to be published)

  11. Cosmic ray propagation in galactic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Evoli, Carmelo; Yan, Huirong E-mail: hryan@pku.edu.cn

    2014-02-10

    We revisit propagation of galactic cosmic rays (CRs) in light of recent advances in CR diffusion theory in realistic interstellar turbulence. We use a tested model of turbulence in which it has been shown that fast modes dominate scattering of CRs. As a result, propagation becomes inhomogeneous and environment dependent. By adopting the formalism of the nonlinear theory developed by Yan and Lazarian, we calculate the diffusion of CRs self-consistently from first principles. We assume a two-phase model for the Galaxy to account for different damping mechanisms of the fast modes, and we find that the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient is mainly affected by medium properties. We show that it gives a correct framework to interpret some of the recent CR puzzles.

  12. Particle production and dissipative cosmic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, H.; Kumekawa, K.; Yamaguchi, M.; Yoshimura, M.

    1996-06-01

    The large amplitude oscillation of a cosmic field that may occur right after inflation and in the decay process of weakly interacting fields gives rise to violent particle production via the parametric resonance. In the large amplitude limit the problem of back reaction against the field oscillation is formulated for Yukawa-type inflaton coupling, and the energy spectrum of created particles is determined in a semiclassical approximation, assuming that interaction among created particles is weak. For a large enough amplitude the field decay is rapid, and the resulting energy spectrum is broadly distributed, implying larger production of high energy particles than what a simple estimate of the reheating temperature due to the Born formula would suggest.

  13. Cosmic statistics of statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, István; Colombi, Stéphane; Bernardeau, Francis

    1999-12-01

    The errors on statistics measured in finite galaxy catalogues are exhaustively investigated. The theory of errors on factorial moments by Szapudi & Colombi is applied to cumulants via a series expansion method. All results are subsequently extended to the weakly non-linear regime. Together with previous investigations this yields an analytic theory of the errors for moments and connected moments of counts in cells from highly non-linear to weakly non-linear scales. For non-linear functions of unbiased estimators, such as the cumulants, the phenomenon of cosmic bias is identified and computed. Since it is subdued by the cosmic errors in the range of applicability of the theory, correction for it is inconsequential. In addition, the method of Colombi, Szapudi & Szalay concerning sampling effects is generalized, adapting the theory for inhomogeneous galaxy catalogues. While previous work focused on the variance only, the present article calculates the cross-correlations between moments and connected moments as well for a statistically complete description. The final analytic formulae representing the full theory are explicit but somewhat complicated. Therefore we have made available a fortran program capable of calculating the described quantities numerically (for further details e-mail SC at colombi@iap.fr). An important special case is the evaluation of the errors on the two-point correlation function, for which this should be more accurate than any method put forward previously. This tool will be immensely useful in the future for assessing the precision of measurements from existing catalogues, as well as aiding the design of new galaxy surveys. To illustrate the applicability of the results and to explore the numerical aspects of the theory qualitatively and quantitatively, the errors and cross-correlations are predicted under a wide range of assumptions for the future Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The principal results concerning the cumulants ξ, Q3 and Q4 is that

  14. WINDS, CLUMPS, AND INTERACTING COSMIC RAYS IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Gallagher, J. S. III

    2013-05-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via Type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07 yr{sup -1}. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and {gamma}-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are compared to the observed radio and {gamma}-ray spectra of M82. {chi}{sup 2} tests are used with radio and {gamma}-ray observations and a range of model predictions to find the best-fit parameters. The best-fit model yields constraints on key parameters in the starburst zone of M82, including a magnetic field strength of {approx}250 {mu}G and a wind advection speed in the range of 300-700 km s{sup -1}. We find that M82 is a good electron calorimeter but not an ideal cosmic-ray proton calorimeter and discuss the implications of our results for the astrophysics of the far-infrared-radio correlation in starburst galaxies.

  15. Cosmic Dawn Science Interest Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Cosmic Origins Program Analysis Group

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn was identified as one of the three science objectives for this decade in the _New Worlds, New Horizons_ Decadal report, and it will likely continue to be a research focus well into the next decade. Cosmic Dawn refers to the interval during which the Universe transitioned from a nearly completely neutral state back to a nearly fully ionized state and includes the time during which the first stars formed and the first galaxies assembled.The Cosmic Dawn Science Interest Group (SIG) was formed recently under the auspices of the Cosmic Origins Program Analysis Group (COPAG). The Cosmic Dawn SIG focusses on the science cases, observations, and technology development needed to address the "great mystery" of Cosmic Origins. The reach of this SIG is broad, involving the nature of the first stars and the detectability of gamma-ray bursts at high redshifts, the extent to which the first galaxies and first supermassive black holes grew together, and the technology required to pursue these questions.For further information, consult the Cosmic Dawn SIG Web site http://cd-sig.jpl.nasa.gov/ and join the mailing list (by contacting the author).Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Solitary nonspecific ileal ulcer. Diagnosis by coloileoscopy in a patient with previously assumed irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Börsch, G; Jahnke, A; Bergbauer, M; Nebel, W

    1983-11-01

    We present a case of solitary nonspecific ileal ulcer found by coloileoscopy in a patient with previously assumed irritable bowel syndrome. Follow-up endoscopies two weeks after initiation of short-term prednisone therapy, and again four months later, demonstrated rapid and persistent healing. This observation raises the question of whether or not primary ileal ulcers are indeed as rare as previously assumed when only surgical and autopsy findings were taken into consideration. Also, the natural history of this clinical entity, in general, could be somewhat more benign than suggested by those ulcers in which complications make surgery necessary, since these cases may not adequately reflect the full clinical spectrum of nonspecific small-bowel ulcers. PMID:6628147

  17. Collisionless tearing in a field-reversed sheet pinch assuming nonparallel propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, K. B.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of collisionless linear tearing is examined assuming a wave vector with a component normal to the equilibrium field. The geometry is defined and the general form of the linear dispersion equation is calculated. The linear theory results when k is parallel to B are reviewed, and Ampere's law is calculated for the external adiabatic region when k times B does not equal zero, using two-fluid theory. A solution is obtained for the approximate form of the perturbed currents and vector potential assuming quasi-parallel k. The resonant current contributions within the singular layer are calculated, obtaining an estimate of the dispersion equation. The form of the adiabatic currents within the singular layer is calculated, showing that an x-z current system persists even in the limit k perpendicular to B goes to zero. Finally, the perturbed vector potential solutions across the singular layer are matched to obtain the shape of the complete eigenfunction.

  18. Cosmic Light EDU kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    In 2015 we celebrate the International Year of Light, a great opportunity to promote awareness about the importance of light coming from the Cosmos and what messages it is bringing to mankind. In parallel a unique moment to attract the attention of stakeholders on the dangers of light pollution and its impact in our lives and our pursuit of more knowledge. In this presentation I want to present one of the conrnerstones of IYL2015, a partnership between the Galileo Teacher Training Program, Universe Awareness and Globe at Night, the Cosmic Light EDU kit. The aim of this project is to assemble a core set of tools and resources representing our basic knowledge pilars about the Universe and simple means to preserve our night sky.

  19. Solar Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, Leonty I.

    2001-05-01

    The book summarizes the results of solar cosmic-ray (SCR) investigations since 1942. The present monograph, unlike the reviews published earlier, treats the problem in self-contained form, in all its associations - from fundamental astrophysical aspects to geophysical and astronautical applications. It includes a large amount of new data, accumulated during the last two or three decades of space research. As a result of the `information burst' in space physics, there are a lot of new interesting theoretical concepts, models, and ideas that deserve attention. The author gives an extensive bibliography which covers incompartially the main achievements and failures in this field. The book will be helpful for a wide audience of space physicists and it will be relevant to graduate and postgraduate courses.

  20. Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2000-06-01

    In the eventful early moments of the Big Bang, the emerging universe expanded and cooled rapidly. Was this great phase transition perfectly smooth? There are indications that it cannot have been--that topological defects must have formed, just as ice on a freezing pond forms plates with zig-zag boundaries between them. The leading theory holds that these defects would have been cosmic strings, curiously microscopic and massive at the same time. The theory has the rare advantage that its processes can be simulated in the laboratory; also, as astronomical measurements are refined, its predictions can be tested by observation. Alejandro Gangui describes the huge hypothetical strings and recent work that indicates that they may conduct great amounts of electrical current.

  1. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  2. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  3. Interplanetary radial cosmic-ray gradients and their implication for a possible large modulation effect at the heliospheric boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Lockwood, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    It is proposed here that a large and time-variable part of the overall 11-year cosmic ray modulation in the heliosphere takes place near the heliosphere boundary itself. This conclusion is reached by examining interplanetary radial gradient measurements which show that out to 30-40 AU this gradient remains nearly independent of heliocentric distance throughout the solar cycle. Properties of the solar wind which suggest that the distance to the pressure balance boundary does not vary by more than + or - 25 percent over the solar cycle are also used in support of the proposal. The importance of the large modulation effect at the boundary could exceed that of interplanetary effects expected from present models.

  4. ANS shell elements with improved transverse shear accuracy. [Assumed Natural Coordinate Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Daniel D.; Park, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    A method of forming assumed natural coordinate strain (ANS) plate and shell elements is presented. The ANS method uses equilibrium based constraints and kinematic constraints to eliminate hierarchical degrees of freedom which results in lower order elements with improved stress recovery and displacement convergence. These techniques make it possible to easily implement the element into the standard finite element software structure, and a modified shape function matrix can be used to create consistent nodal loads.

  5. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S.; Welsh, Barry; and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  6. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  7. The impact of assumed knowledge entry standards on undergraduate mathematics teaching in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Deborah; Cattlin, Joann

    2015-10-01

    Over the last two decades, many Australian universities have relaxed their selection requirements for mathematics-dependent degrees, shifting from hard prerequisites to assumed knowledge standards which provide students with an indication of the prior learning that is expected. This has been regarded by some as a positive move, since students who may be returning to study, or who are changing career paths but do not have particular prerequisite study, now have more flexible pathways. However, there is mounting evidence to indicate that there are also significant negative impacts associated with assumed knowledge approaches, with large numbers of students enrolling in degrees without the stated assumed knowledge. For students, there are negative impacts on pass rates and retention rates and limitations to pathways within particular degrees. For institutions, the necessity to offer additional mathematics subjects at a lower level than normal and more support services for under-prepared students impacts on workloads and resources. In this paper, we discuss early research from the First Year in Maths project, which begins to shed light on the realities of a system that may in fact be too flexible.

  8. A cosmic microwave background feature consistent with a cosmic texture.

    PubMed

    Cruz, M; Turok, N; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Hobson, M

    2007-12-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high-energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture, which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent 5 degrees -radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherwise hard to explain, is compatible with having being caused by a texture. From this model, we constrain the fundamental symmetry-breaking energy scale to be (0) approximately 8.7 x 10(15) gigaelectron volts. If confirmed, this detection of a cosmic defect will probe physics at energies exceeding any conceivable terrestrial experiment. PMID:17962521

  9. Cosmic sparks from superconducting strings.

    PubMed

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-01

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents approximately 10{5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{-1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model. PMID:18851517

  10. Cosmic Sparks from Superconducting Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-03

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents {approx}10{sup 5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{sup -1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model.

  11. Cosmic rays in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The different types of cosmic ray particles and their role in the heliosphere are briefly described. The rates of various energetic particles were examined as a function of time and used to derive various differential energy gradients. The Pioneer and Voyager cosmic ray observations throughout the heliosphere are indeed giving a perspective on the three-dimensional character and size of the heliosphere. Most clearly the observations are emphasizing the role that transient variations in the outer heliosphere, and most likely the heliospheric boundary shock, play in the 11 year solar cycle modulation of cosmic rays.

  12. Numerical Cosmic-Ray Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, F.

    2009-04-01

    We present a numerical method for integrating the equations describing a system made of a fluid and cosmic-rays. We work out the modified characteristic equations that include the CR dynamical effects in smooth flows. We model the energy exchange between cosmic-rays and the fluid, due to diffusive processes in configuration and momentum space, with a flux conserving method. For a specified shock acceleration efficiency as a function of the upstream conditions and shock Mach number, we modify the Riemann solver to take into account the cosmic-ray mediation at shocks without resolving the cosmic-ray induced substructure. A self-consistent time-dependent shock solution is obtained by using our modified solver with Glimm's method. Godunov's method is applied in smooth parts of the flow.

  13. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate.

    PubMed

    Carslaw, K S; Harrison, R G; Kirkby, J

    2002-11-29

    It has been proposed that Earth's climate could be affected by changes in cloudiness caused by variations in the intensity of galactic cosmic rays in the atmosphere. This proposal stems from an observed correlation between cosmic ray intensity and Earth's average cloud cover over the course of one solar cycle. Some scientists question the reliability of the observations, whereas others, who accept them as reliable, suggest that the correlation may be caused by other physical phenomena with decadal periods or by a response to volcanic activity or El Niño. Nevertheless, the observation has raised the intriguing possibility that a cosmic ray-cloud interaction may help explain how a relatively small change in solar output can produce much larger changes in Earth's climate. Physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain how cosmic rays could affect clouds, but they need to be investigated further if the observation is to become more than just another correlation among geophysical variables. PMID:12459578

  14. Protostars: Forges of cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Marcowith, A.; Hennebelle, P.; Ferrière, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic rays are particles presumably accelerated in supernova remnant shocks that propagate in the interstellar medium up to the densest parts of molecular clouds, losing energy and their ionisation efficiency because of the presence of magnetic fields and collisions with molecular hydrogen. Recent observations hint at high levels of ionisation and at the presence of synchrotron emission in protostellar systems, which leads to an apparent contradiction. Aims: We want to explain the origin of these cosmic rays accelerated within young protostars as suggested by observations. Methods: Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient cosmic-ray acceleration through diffusive shock acceleration. We analyse three main acceleration sites (shocks in accretion flows, along the jets, and on protostellar surfaces), then we follow the propagation of these particles through the protostellar system up to the hot spot region. Results: We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of cosmic-ray protons, which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Other promising acceleration sites are protostellar surfaces, where shocks caused by impacting material during the collapse phase are strong enough to accelerate cosmic-ray protons. In contrast, accretion flow shocks are too weak to efficiently accelerate cosmic rays. Though cosmic-ray electrons are weakly accelerated, they can gain a strong boost to relativistic energies through re-acceleration in successive shocks. Conclusions: We suggest a mechanism able to accelerate both cosmic-ray protons and electrons through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which can be used to explain the high ionisation rate and the synchrotron emission observed towards protostellar sources. The existence of an internal source of energetic particles can have a strong and unforeseen impact on the ionisation of the protostellar disc, on the star and planet formation

  15. Coherent scattering of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opher, R.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that cosmic neutrino scattering can be non-negligible when coherence effects previously neglected are taken into account. The coherent neutrino scattering cross section is derived and the neutrino index of refraction evaluated. As an example of coherent neutrino scattering, a detector using critical reflection is described which in principle can detect the low energy cosmic neutrino background allowed by the measured cosmological red shift.

  16. Cosmic string induced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Landriau, M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2011-02-15

    We compute maps of CMB temperature fluctuations seeded by cosmic strings using high resolution simulations of cosmic strings in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We create full-sky, 18 deg. and 3 deg. CMB maps, including the relevant string contribution at each resolution from before recombination to today. We extract the angular power spectrum from these maps, demonstrating the importance of recombination effects. We briefly discuss the probability density function of the pixel temperatures, their skewness, and kurtosis.

  17. Pip Analysis of the Cosmic Microwave Background Data - Application to the Tenerife Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez de La Cruz, C. M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Cayon, L.; Rebolo, R.; Sanz, J. L.

    1994-12-01

    We present two geometrical methods to analyse the cosmic microwave background data along a strip in the sky. These methods are motivated by the fact that the temperature fluctuation field, on large angular scales, is not ergodic on the cosmic photosphere. This property is examined in the context of different experimental configurations. The methods involve a numerical study of the expected pip number and distribution function of pip sizes, and take into account the non-ergodicity of the temperature field. They are applied to the new measurements of the Tenerife experiment, assuming a Gaussian random field for the temperature fluctuations with power spectra poc k in a flat universe. Moreover, these geometrical methods can be readily used to test non-Gaussian random fields as representations of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations. Key words: methods: data analysis - cosmic microwave background - cosmology: observations.

  18. TeV cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra in the myriad model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, G.; Delahaye, T.; Keum, Y.-Y.; Liu, W.; Salati, P.; Taillet, R.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Recent measurements of cosmic ray proton and helium spectra show a hardening above a few hundred GeV. This excess is hard to understand in the framework of the conventional models of Galactic cosmic ray production and propagation. Aims: We propose here to explain this anomaly by the presence of local sources (myriad model). Methods: Cosmic ray propagation is described as a diffusion process taking place inside a two-zone magnetic halo. We calculate the proton and helium fluxes at the Earth between 50 GeV and 100 TeV. As an improvement over a similar analysis, we consistently derive these fluxes by taking both local and remote sources for which a unique injection rate is assumed into account. Results: We find cosmic ray propagation parameters compatible with B/C measurements for which the proton and helium spectra agree remarkably with the PAMELA and CREAM measurements over four decades in energy.

  19. Traction free finite elements with the assumed stress hybrid model. M.S. Thesis, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafie, Kurosh

    1991-01-01

    An effective approach in the finite element analysis of the stress field at the traction free boundary of a solid continuum was studied. Conventional displacement and assumed stress finite elements were used in the determination of stress concentrations around circular and elliptical holes. Specialized hybrid elements were then developed to improve the satisfaction of prescribed traction boundary conditions. Results of the stress analysis indicated that finite elements which exactly satisfy the free stress boundary conditions are the most accurate and efficient in such problems. A general approach for hybrid finite elements which incorporate traction free boundaries of arbitrary geometry was formulated.

  20. Comparison of symbolic and numerical integration methods for an assumed-stress hybrid shell element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Govind; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid shell elements have long been regarded with reserve by the commercial finite element developers despite the high degree of reliability and accuracy associated with such formulations. The fundamental reason is the inherent higher computational cost of the hybrid approach as compared to the displacement-based formulations. However, a noteworthy factor in favor of hybrid elements is that numerical integration to generate element matrices can be entirely avoided by the use of symbolic integration. In this paper, the use of the symbolic computational approach is presented for an assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom and the significant time savings achieved is demonstrated through an example.

  1. Improved finite strip Mindlin plate bending element using assumed shear strain distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A linear finite strip plate element based on Mindlin/Reissner plate theory is developed. The analysis is suitable for both thin and thick plates. In the formulation new transverse shear strains are introduced and assumed constant in each two-code linear strip. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for the analysis of plates are presented for different support and loading conditions and a wide range of thicknesses. No sign of shear locking phenomenon was observed with the newly developed element.

  2. A variational justification of the assumed natural strain formulation of finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to study the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements from a variational standpoint. The study is based on two hybrid extensions of the Reissner-type functional that uses strains and displacements as independent fields. One of the forms is a genuine variational principle that contains an independent boundary traction field, whereas the other one represents a restricted variational principle. Two procedures for element level elimination of the strain field are discussed, and one of them is shown to be equivalent to the inclusion of incompatible displacement modes. Also, the 4-node C(exp 0) plate bending quadrilateral element is used to illustrate applications of this theory.

  3. Assumed strain distributions for a finite strip plate bending element using Mindlin-Reissner plate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Mullen, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A linear finite strip plate element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory is developed. The analysis is suitable for both thin and thick plates. In the formulation, new transverse shear strains are introduced and assumed constant in each two-node linear strip. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for the analysis of plates are presented for different support and loading conditions and a wide range of thicknesses. No sign of shear locking is observed with the newly developed element.

  4. Development of cosmic ray techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, B.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that most advances of cosmic-ray physics have been directly related to the development of observational techniques. A review is presented of the history of the evolution of the techniques and equipment for the study of cosmic-ray physics, taking into account the new scientific advances accompanying each new development related to experimental technology. All of the early observations were performed by means of ionization chambers. These chambers had already been in use for a number of years, when they were first applied to the study of cosmic rays in the early years of this century. However, an application to the low-intensity cosmic radiation required special refinements. Attention is given to the design of suitable electrometers, the development of self-recording instruments, the 'tube counter', the development of the coincidence method, a cosmic-ray 'telescope', a magnetic lens for cosmic rays, an arrangement of Geiger-Mueller counters for the demonstration of secondary radiation, cloud chambers, scintillation counters, and air shower experiments.

  5. Revisit of cosmic age problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuang; Li Xiaodong; Li Miao

    2010-11-15

    We investigate the cosmic age problem associated with 9 extremely old globular clusters in M31 galaxy and 1 very old high-z quasar automatic plate-measuring machine 08279+5255 at z=3.91. These 9 globular clusters have not been used to study the cosmic age problem in the previous literature. By evaluating the age of the Universe in the {Lambda} cold dark matter model with the observational constraints from the Type Ia supernovae, the baryon acoustic oscillations, the cosmic microwave background, and the independent H{sub 0} measurements, we find that the existence of 5 globular clusters and 1 high-z quasar are in tension (over 2{sigma} confidence level) with the current cosmological observations. So if the age estimates of these objects are correct, the cosmic age puzzle still remains in the standard cosmology. Moreover, we extend our investigations to the cases of the interacting dark energy models. It is found that although the introduction of the interaction between dark sectors can give a larger cosmic age, the interacting dark energy models still have difficulty to pass the cosmic age test.

  6. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  7. Analytical Study on Fire and Explosion Accidents Assumed in HTGR Hydrogen Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Inaba, Yoshitomo; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Nitta, Yoshikazu

    2004-04-15

    One of the most important safety design issues for a hydrogen production system coupling with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is to ensure reactor safety against fire and explosion accidents because a large amount of combustible fluid is dealt with in the system. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has a demonstration test plan of a hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane coupling with the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). In the plan, we developed the P2A code system to analyze event sequences and consequences in detail on the fire and explosion accidents assumed in the HTGR or HTTR hydrogen production system. This paper describes the three accident scenarios assumed in the system, the structure of P2A, the analysis procedure with P2A, and the results of the numerical analyses based on the accident scenarios. It is shown that P2A is a useful tool for the accident analysis in the system.

  8. Effects of assumed tow architecture on the predicted moduli and stresses in woven composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Clinton Dane

    1994-01-01

    This study deals with the effect of assumed tow architecture on the elastic material properties and stress distributions of plain weave woven composites. Specifically, the examination of how a cross-section is assumed to sweep-out the tows of the composite is examined in great detail. The two methods studied are extrusion and translation. This effect is also examined to determine how sensitive this assumption is to changes in waviness ratio. 3D finite elements were used to study a T300/Epoxy plain weave composite with symmetrically stacked mats. 1/32nd of the unit cell is shown to be adequate for analysis of this type of configuration with the appropriate set of boundary conditions. At low waviness, results indicate that for prediction of elastic properties, either method is adequate. At high waviness, certain elastic properties become more sensitive to the method used. Stress distributions at high waviness ratio are shown to vary greatly depending on the type of loading applied. At low waviness, both methods produce similar results.

  9. Factors that affect action possibility judgments: the assumed abilities of other people.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Timothy N; Wong, Lokman; Chandrasekharan, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    Judging what actions are possible and impossible to complete is a skill that is critical for planning and executing movements in both individual and joint actions contexts. The present experiments explored the ability to adapt action possibility judgments to the assumed characteristics of another person. Participants watched alternating pictures of a person's hand moving at different speeds between targets of different indexes of difficulty (according to Fitts' Law) and judged whether or not it was possible for individuals with different characteristics to maintain movement accuracy at the presented speed. Across four studies, the person in the pictures and the background information about the person were manipulated to determine how and under what conditions participants adapted their judgments. Results revealed that participants adjusted their possibility judgments to the assumed motor capabilities of the individual they were judging. However, these adjustments only occurred when participants were instructed to take the other person into consideration suggesting that the adaption process is a voluntary process. Further, it was observed that the slopes of the regression equations relating movement time and index of difficulty did not differ across conditions. All differences between conditions were in the y-intercept of the regression lines. This pattern of findings suggests that participants formed the action possibility judgments by first simulating their own performance, and then adjusted the "possibility" threshold by adding or subtracting a correction factor to determine what is and is not possible for the other person to perform. PMID:23644579

  10. Perceiving others' personalities: examining the dimensionality, assumed similarity to the self, and stability of perceiver effects.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Guglielmo, Steve; Beer, Jennifer S

    2010-03-01

    In interpersonal perception, "perceiver effects" are tendencies of perceivers to see other people in a particular way. Two studies of naturalistic interactions examined perceiver effects for personality traits: seeing a typical other as sympathetic or quarrelsome, responsible or careless, and so forth. Several basic questions were addressed. First, are perceiver effects organized as a global evaluative halo, or do perceptions of different traits vary in distinct ways? Second, does assumed similarity (as evidenced by self-perceiver correlations) reflect broad evaluative consistency or trait-specific content? Third, are perceiver effects a manifestation of stable beliefs about the generalized other, or do they form in specific contexts as group-specific stereotypes? Findings indicated that perceiver effects were better described by a differentiated, multidimensional structure with both trait-specific content and a higher order global evaluation factor. Assumed similarity was at least partially attributable to trait-specific content, not just to broad evaluative similarity between self and others. Perceiver effects were correlated with gender and attachment style, but in newly formed groups, they became more stable over time, suggesting that they grew dynamically as group stereotypes. Implications for the interpretation of perceiver effects and for research on personality assessment and psychopathology are discussed. PMID:20175628

  11. Children's Everyday Learning by Assuming Responsibility for Others: Indigenous Practices as a Cultural Heritage Across Generations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, David Lorente

    2015-01-01

    This chapter uses a comparative approach to examine the maintenance of Indigenous practices related with Learning by Observing and Pitching In in two generations--parent generation and current child generation--in a Central Mexican Nahua community. In spite of cultural changes and the increase of Western schooling experience, these practices persist, to different degrees, as a Nahua cultural heritage with close historical relations to the key value of cuidado (stewardship). The chapter explores how children learn the value of cuidado in a variety of everyday activities, which include assuming responsibility in many social situations, primarily in cultivating corn, raising and protecting domestic animals, health practices, and participating in family ceremonial life. The chapter focuses on three main points: (1) Cuidado (assuming responsibility for), in the Nahua socio-cultural context, refers to the concepts of protection and "raising" as well as fostering other beings, whether humans, plants, or animals, to reach their potential and fulfill their development. (2) Children learn cuidado by contributing to family endeavors: They develop attention and self-motivation; they are capable of responsible actions; and they are able to transform participation to achieve the status of a competent member of local society. (3) This collaborative participation allows children to continue the cultural tradition and to preserve a Nahua heritage at a deeper level in a community in which Nahuatl language and dress have disappeared, and people do not identify themselves as Indigenous. PMID:26955923

  12. Constraints on cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal was to derive a more detailed picture of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the interstellar medium and its effects on cosmic ray propagation. To do so, radio astronomical observations (scattering and Faraday rotation) were combined with knowledge of solar system spacecraft observations of MHD turbulence, simulations of wave propagation, and modeling of the galactic distribution to improve the knowledge. A more sophisticated model was developed for the galactic distribution of electron density turbulence. Faraday rotation measure data was analyzed to constrain magnetic field fluctuations in the ISM. VLBI observations were acquired of compact sources behind the supernova remnant CTA1. Simple calculations were made about the energies of the turbulence assuming a direct link between electron density and magnetic field variations. A simulation is outlined of cosmic ray propagation through the galaxy using the above results.

  13. Constraining invisible neutrino decays with the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2005-11-15

    Precision measurements of the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background indicate that neutrinos must be freely streaming at the photon decoupling epoch when T{approx_equal}0.3 eV. This requirement implies restrictive limits on 'secret neutrino interactions', notably on neutrino Yukawa couplings with hypothetical low-mass (pseudo)scalars {phi}. For diagonal couplings in the neutrino mass basis we find g < or approx. 1x10{sup -7}, comparable to limits from supernova 1987A. For the off-diagonal couplings and assuming hierarchical neutrino masses we find g < or approx. 1x10{sup -11}(0.05 eV/m){sup 2} where m is the heavier mass of a given neutrino pair connected by g. This stringent limit excludes that the flavor content of high-energy neutrinos from cosmic-ray sources is modified by {nu}{yields}{nu}{sup '}+{phi} decays on their way to Earth.

  14. Anomalous Transport of High Energy Cosmic Rays in Galactic Superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Nasser F.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays may exhibit anomalous transport as they traverse and are accelerated by a collection of supernovae explosions in a galactic superbubble. Signatures of this anomalous transport can show up in the particles' evolution and their spectra. In a continuous-time-random- walk (CTRW) model assuming standard diffusive shock acceleration theory (DSA) for each shock encounter, and where the superbubble (an OB stars association) is idealized as a heterogeneous region of particle sources and sinks, acceleration and transport in the superbubble can be shown to be sub-diffusive. While the sub-diffusive transport can be attributed to the stochastic nature of the acceleration time according to DSA theory, the spectral break appears to be an artifact of transport in a finite medium. These CTRW simulations point to a new and intriguing phenomenon associated with the statistical nature of collective acceleration of high energy cosmic rays in galactic superbubbles.

  15. Constraining warm dark matter with cosmic shear power spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, Katarina; Weller, Jochen; Bridle, Sarah; Slosar, Anže E-mail: sarah.bridle@ucl.ac.uk E-mail: jochen.weller@usm.lmu.de

    2011-01-01

    We investigate potential constraints from cosmic shear on the dark matter particle mass, assuming all dark matter is made up of light thermal relic particles. Given the theoretical uncertainties involved in making cosmological predictions in such warm dark matter scenarios we use analytical fits to linear warm dark matter power spectra and compare (i) the halo model using a mass function evaluated from these linear power spectra and (ii) an analytical fit to the non-linear evolution of the linear power spectra. We optimistically ignore the competing effect of baryons for this work. We find approach (ii) to be conservative compared to approach (i). We evaluate cosmological constraints using these methods, marginalising over four other cosmological parameters. Using the more conservative method we find that a Euclid-like weak lensing survey together with constraints from the Planck cosmic microwave background mission primary anisotropies could achieve a lower limit on the particle mass of 2.5 keV.

  16. Semi-analytical model of cosmic ray electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascenko, A.; Spanier, F.

    2011-07-01

    We present a numerical extension to the analytical propagation model introduced in Hein and Spanier (2008) to describe the leptonic population in the galactic disc. The model is used to derive a possible identification of the components that contribute to the leptonic cosmic ray spectrum, as measured by PAMELA, Fermi and HESS, with an emphasis on secondary e+-e- production in collisions of cosmic ray particles with ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We find that besides secondaries, an additional source symmetric in e+ and e- production is needed to explain both the PAMELA anomaly and the Fermi bump, assuming a power-law primary electron spectrum. Our model also allows us to derive constraints for some properties of the ISM.

  17. Bosonic structure of realistic SO(10) supersymmetric cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allys, Erwan

    2016-05-01

    We study the bosonic structure of F -term Nambu-Goto cosmic strings forming in a realistic SO(10) implementation, assuming standard hybrid inflation. We describe the supersymmetric grand unified theory, and its spontaneous symmetry breaking scheme in parallel with the inflationary process. We also write the explicit tensor formulation of its scalar sector, focusing on the subrepresentations singlet under the standard model, which is sufficient to describe the string structure. We then introduce an ansatz for Abelian cosmic strings, discussing in details the hypothesis, and write down the field equations and boundary conditions. Finally, after doing a perturbative study of the model, we present and discuss the results obtained with numerical solutions of the string structure.

  18. A simulation of high energy cosmic ray propagation 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Kifune, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Mori, M.; Nishijima, K.; Teshima, M.

    1985-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray propagation of the energy region 10 to the 14.5 power - 10 to the 18th power eV is simulated in the inter steller circumstances. In conclusion, the diffusion process by turbulent magnetic fields is classified into several regions by ratio of the gyro-radius and the scale of turbulence. When the ratio becomes larger then 10 to the minus 0.5 power, the analysis with the assumption of point scattering can be applied with the mean free path E sup 2. However, when the ratio is smaller than 10 to the minus 0.5 power, we need a more complicated analysis or simulation. Assuming the turbulence scale of magnetic fields of the Galaxy is 10-30pc and the mean magnetic field strength is 3 micro gauss, the energy of cosmic ray with that gyro-radius is about 10 to the 16.5 power eV.

  19. Cosmic ray biannual variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attolini, M. R.; Cecchini, S.; Cinicastagnoli, G.; Galli, M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the cosmic ray (CR) power spectrum has revealed a significant variation with a period around 2 yr that cannot be explained as a high order harmonic of the 11 yr solar cycle. Comparative study of the correlation on different time scales between CR intensity and Rz, aa, high speed streams and polar hole size has put in evidence that a high degree of coherency exists between each couple of variables at 1.58 to 1.64 yr, except between CR and Rz. On the other hand cyclic variation on a short time scale, around 26 months, has been claimed to be present in the neutrino flux. Critical tests of this hypothesis are considered and a preliminary result seems to indicate that the hypothesis of the existence of a 1.6 yr periodicity in the neutrino data during the measurement time interval, has a significance or = 99.9%. The possible origin of this variation as due to a contribution either of CR interactions in the upper atmosphere or to the solar dynamics, are discussed.

  20. The Cosmic Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longair, Malcolm S.

    2013-04-01

    Part I. Stars and Stellar Evolution up to the Second World War: 1. The legacy of the nineteenth century; 2. The classification of stellar spectra; 3. Stellar structure and evolution; 4. The end points of stellar evolution; Part II. The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe, 1900-1939: 5. The Galaxy and the nature of spiral nebulae; 6. The origins of astrophysical cosmology; Part III. The Opening up of the Electromagnetic Spectrum: 7. The opening up of the electromagnetic spectrum and the new astronomies; Part IV. The Astrophysics of Stars and Galaxies since 1945: 8. Stars and stellar evolution; 9. The physics of the interstellar medium; 10. The physics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies; 11. High-energy astrophysics; Part V. Astrophysical Cosmology since 1945: 12. Astrophysical cosmology; 13. The determination of cosmological parameters; 14. The evolution of galaxies and active galaxies with cosmic epoch; 15. The origin of galaxies and the large-scale structure of the Universe; 16. The very early Universe; References; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  1. The Cosmic Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longair, Malcolm S.

    2006-06-01

    Part I. Stars and Stellar Evolution up to the Second World War: 1. The legacy of the nineteenth century; 2. The classification of stellar spectra; 3. Stellar structure and evolution; 4. The end points of stellar evolution; Part II. The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe, 1900-1939: 5. The Galaxy and the nature of spiral nebulae; 6. The origins of astrophysical cosmology; Part III. The Opening up of the Electromagnetic Spectrum: 7. The opening up of the electromagnetic spectrum and the new astronomies; Part IV. The Astrophysics of Stars and Galaxies since 1945: 8. Stars and stellar evolution; 9. The physics of the interstellar medium; 10. The physics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies; 11. High-energy astrophysics; Part V. Astrophysical Cosmology since 1945: 12. Astrophysical cosmology; 13. The determination of cosmological parameters; 14. The evolution of galaxies and active galaxies with cosmic epoch; 15. The origin of galaxies and the large-scale structure of the Universe; 16. The very early Universe; References; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  2. Cosmic string wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Silk, Joseph; Brandenberger, Robert; Turok, Neil

    1987-01-01

    Accretion of matter onto wakes left behind by horizon-sized pieces of cosmic string is investigated, and the effects of wakes on the large-scale structure of the universe are determined. Accretion of cold matter onto wakes, the effects of a long string on fluids with finite velocity dispersion or sound speeds, the interactions between loops and wakes, and the conditions for wakes to survive disruption by loops are discussed. It is concluded that the most important wakes are those which were formed at the time of equal matter and radiation density. This leads to sheetlike overdense regions of galaxies with a mean separation in agreement with the scale of the bubbles of de Lapparent, Geller, and Huchra (1986). However, for the value of G(mu) favored from galaxy formation considerations in a universe with cold dark matter, a wake accretes matter from a distance of only about 1.5 Mpc, which is much less than the distance between the wakes.

  3. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  4. Propagation in 3D spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distribution models and secondary particle production using PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissmann, R.; Werner, M.; Reimer, O.; Strong, A. W.

    2015-10-01

    We study the impact of possible spiral-arm distributions of Galactic cosmic-ray sources on the flux of various cosmic-ray nuclei throughout our Galaxy. We investigate model cosmic-ray spectra at the nominal position of the sun and at different positions within the Galaxy. The modelling is performed using the recently introduced numerical cosmic ray propagation code PICARD. Assuming non-axisymmetric cosmic-ray source distributions yields new insights on the behaviour of primary versus secondary nuclei. We find that primary cosmic rays are more strongly confined to the vicinity of the sources, while the distribution of secondary cosmic rays is much more homogeneous compared to the primaries. This leads to stronger spatial variation in secondary to primary ratios when compared to axisymmetric source distribution models. A good fit to the cosmic-ray data at Earth can be accomplished in different spiral-arm models, although leading to decisively different spatial distributions of the cosmic-ray flux. These lead to different cosmic ray anisotropies, where even reproducing the data becomes possible. Consequently, we advocate directions to seek best fit propagation parameters that take into account the higher complexity introduced by the spiral-arm structure on the cosmic-ray distribution. We specifically investigate whether the flux at Earth is representative for a large fraction of the Galaxy. The variance among possible spiral-arm models allows us to quantify the spatial variation of the cosmic-ray flux within the Galaxy in presence of non-axisymmetric source distributions.

  5. Assumed oxygen consumption based on calculation from dye dilution cardiac output: an improved formula.

    PubMed

    Bergstra, A; van Dijk, R B; Hillege, H L; Lie, K I; Mook, G A

    1995-05-01

    This study was performed because of observed differences between dye dilution cardiac output and the Fick cardiac output, calculated from estimated oxygen consumption according to LaFarge and Miettinen, and to find a better formula for assumed oxygen consumption. In 250 patients who underwent left and right heart catheterization, the oxygen consumption VO2 (ml.min-1) was calculated using Fick's principle. Either pulmonary or systemic flow, as measured by dye dilution, was used in combination with the concordant arteriovenous oxygen concentration difference. In 130 patients, who matched the age of the LaFarge and Miettinen population, the obtained values of oxygen consumption VO2(dd) were compared with the estimated oxygen consumption values VO2(lfm), found using the LaFarge and Miettinen formulae. The VO2(lfm) was significantly lower than VO2(dd); -21.8 +/- 29.3 ml.min-1 (mean +/- SD), P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -26.9 to -16.7, limits of agreement (LA) -80.4 to 36.9. A new regression formula for the assumed oxygen consumption VO2(ass) was derived in 250 patients by stepwise multiple regression analysis. The VO2(dd) was used as a dependent variable, and body surface area BSA (m2). Sex (0 for female, 1 for male), Age (years), Heart rate (min-1) and the presence of a left to right shunt as independent variables. The best fitting formula is expressed as: VO2(ass) = (157.3 x BSA + 10.0 x Sex - 10.5 x In Age + 4.8) ml.min-1, where ln Age = the natural logarithm of the age. This formula was validated prospectively in 60 patients. A non-significant difference between VO2(ass) and VO2(dd) was found; mean 2.0 +/- 23.4 ml.min-1, P = 0.771, 95% Cl = -4.0 to +8.0, LA -44.7 to +48.7. In conclusion, assumed oxygen consumption values, using our new formula, are in better agreement with the actual values than those found according to LaFarge and Miettinen's formulae. PMID:7588904

  6. Cosmic ray exposure ages of iron meteorites, complex irradiation and the constancy of cosmic ray flux in the past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lavielle, B.; Regnier, S.

    1984-01-01

    While previous calculations of potassium ages assumed a constant cosmic ray flux and a single stage (no change in size) exposure of iron meteorites, present calculations relaxed these constancy assumptions and the results reveal multistage irradiations for some 25% of the meteorites studied, implying multiple breakup in space. The distribution of exposure ages suggests several major collisions (based on chemical composition and structure), although the calibration of age scales is not yet complete. It is concluded that shielding-corrected (corrections which depend on size and position of sample) production rates are consistent for the age bracket of 300 to 900 years. These production rates differ in a systematic way from those calculated for present day fluxes of cosmic rays (such as obtained for the last few million years).

  7. An efficient Mindlin finite strip plate element based on assumed strain distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A simple two node, linear, finite strip plate bending element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory for the analysis of very thin to thick bridges, plates, and axisymmetric shells is presented. The new transverse shear strains are assumed for constant distribution in the two node linear strip. The important aspect is the choice of the points that relate the nodal displacements and rotations through the locking transverse shear strains. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and ease in computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for analyzing plates with different supports, loading conditions, and a wide range of thicknesses are given. The results show no sign of the shear locking phenomenon.

  8. An assumed pdf approach for the calculation of supersonic mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.; Drummond, J. P.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to predict the effect that turbulent mixing has on the extent of combustion, a one-equation turbulence model is added to an existing Navier-Stokes solver with finite-rate chemistry. To average the chemical-source terms appearing in the species-continuity equations, an assumed pdf approach is also used. This code was used to analyze the mixing and combustion caused by the mixing layer formed by supersonic coaxial H2-air streams. The chemistry model employed allows for the formation of H2O2 and HO2. Comparisons are made with recent measurements using laser Raman diagnostics. Comparisons include temperature and its rms, and concentrations of H2, O2, N2, H2O, and OH. In general, good agreement with experiment was noted.

  9. Distance fields on unstructured grids: Stable interpolation, assumed gradients, collision detection and gap function

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Sebastian; Bucher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a novel approach to collision detection based on distance fields. A novel interpolation ensures stability of the distances in the vicinity of complex geometries. An assumed gradient formulation is introduced leading to a C1-continuous distance function. The gap function is re-expressed allowing penalty and Lagrange multiplier formulations. The article introduces a node-to-element integration for first order elements, but also discusses signed distances, partial updates, intermediate surfaces, mortar methods and higher order elements. The algorithm is fast, simple and robust for complex geometries and self contact. The computed tractions conserve linear and angular momentum even in infeasible contact. Numerical examples illustrate the new algorithm in three dimensions. PMID:23888088

  10. Challenging residents to assume maximal responsibilities in homes for the aged.

    PubMed

    Rodstein, M

    1975-07-01

    A program for activating residents of homes for the aged to assume maximal responsibilities is described. Promoting maximal physical and mental health through various modalities including activity programs, appropriate exercise and participation in democratic self-government mechanisms, will result in a happier, healthier population of residents in institutions for the aged. The increased demands on staff time and patience will be compensated for by relief of the too-frequent feelings of hopelessness and boredom endemic among the staff of long-term care facilities. Such programs demand constant effort by all staff members, patients, volunteers and relatives because if they succumb to the usual human dislike of persistency, short-term gains can easily be lost. PMID:1141631

  11. Analysis of an object assumed to contain “Red Mercury”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhođaš, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Blagus, Saša; Valković, Vladivoj

    2007-08-01

    After having been informed about an attempt of illicit trafficking, the Organized Crime Division of the Zagreb Police Authority confiscated in November 2003 a hand size metal cylinder suspected to contain "Red Mercury" (RM). The sample assumed to contain RM was analyzed with two nondestructive analytical methods in order to obtain information about the nature of the investigated object, namely, activation analysis with 14.1 MeV neutrons and EDXRF analysis. The activation analysis with 14.1 MeV neutrons showed that the container and its contents were characterized by the following chemical elements: Hg, Fe, Cr and Ni. By using EDXRF analysis, it was shown that the elements Fe, Cr and Ni were constituents of the capsule. Therefore, it was concluded that these three elements were present in the capsule only, while the content of the unknown material was Hg. Antimony as a hypothetical component of red mercury was not detected.

  12. Estimating option values of solar radiation management assuming that climate sensitivity is uncertain.

    PubMed

    Arino, Yosuke; Akimoto, Keigo; Sano, Fuminori; Homma, Takashi; Oda, Junichiro; Tomoda, Toshimasa

    2016-05-24

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) might play a role as an emergency geoengineering measure, its potential risks remain uncertain, and hence there are ethical and governance issues in the face of SRM's actual deployment. By using an integrated assessment model, we first present one possible methodology for evaluating the value arising from retaining an SRM option given the uncertainty of climate sensitivity, and also examine sensitivities of the option value to SRM's side effects (damages). Reflecting the governance challenges on immediate SRM deployment, we assume scenarios in which SRM could only be deployed with a limited degree of cooling (0.5 °C) only after 2050, when climate sensitivity uncertainty is assumed to be resolved and only when the sensitivity is found to be high (T2x = 4 °C). We conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis with constraining temperature rise as the objective. The SRM option value is originated from its rapid cooling capability that would alleviate the mitigation requirement under climate sensitivity uncertainty and thereby reduce mitigation costs. According to our estimates, the option value during 1990-2049 for a +2.4 °C target (the lowest temperature target level for which there were feasible solutions in this model study) relative to preindustrial levels were in the range between $2.5 and $5.9 trillion, taking into account the maximum level of side effects shown in the existing literature. The result indicates that lower limits of the option values for temperature targets below +2.4 °C would be greater than $2.5 trillion. PMID:27162346

  13. POLARBEAR constraints on cosmic birefringence and primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, Peter A. R.; Arnold, Kam; Atlas, Matt; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Boettger, David; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Dobbs, Matt; Ducout, Anne; Dunner, Rolando; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Feng, Chang; Gilbert, Adam; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Halverson, Nils W.; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Holzapfel, William L.; Hori, Yasuto; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaehnig, Gregory C.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kaufman, Jonathan P.; Keating, Brian; Kermish, Zigmund; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Le Jeune, Maude; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Leon, David; Li, Yun; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Matsumura, Tomotake; Miller, Nathan; Montgomery, Josh; Myers, Michael J.; Navaroli, Martin; Nishino, Haruki; Okamura, Takahiro; Paar, Hans; Peloton, Julien; Pogosian, Levon; Poletti, Davide; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Christopher; Rebeiz, Gabriel; Reichardt, Christian L.; Richards, Paul L.; Ross, Colin; Rotermund, Kaja M.; Schenck, David E.; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shimon, Meir; Shirley, Ian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smecher, Graeme; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Suzuki, Aritoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Tikhomirov, Alexei; Tomaru, Takayuki; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wilson, Brandon; Yadav, Amit; Zahn, Alex; Zahn, Oliver; Polarbear Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity E -mode and odd-parity B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARization of the Background Radiation (POLARBEAR) experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity-violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. The POLARBEAR nondetection translates into a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit of 93 nanogauss (nG) on the amplitude of an equivalent primordial magnetic field inclusive of systematic uncertainties. This four-point correlation constraint on Faraday rotation is about 15 times tighter than the upper limit of 1380 nG inferred from constraining the contribution of Faraday rotation to two-point correlations of B -modes measured by Planck in 2015. Metric perturbations sourced by primordial magnetic fields would also contribute to the B -mode power spectrum. Using the POLARBEAR measurements of the B -mode power spectrum (two-point correlation), we set a 95% C.L. upper limit of 3.9 nG on primordial magnetic fields assuming a flat prior on the field amplitude. This limit is comparable to what was found in the Planck 2015 two-point correlation analysis with both temperature and polarization. We perform a set of systematic error tests and find no evidence for contamination. This work marks the first time that anisotropic cosmic birefringence or primordial magnetic fields have been constrained from the ground at subdegree scales.

  14. Nearest Cosmic Mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Discovery of quadruply lensed quasar with Einstein ring Summary Using the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla (Chile), an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a complex cosmic mirage in the southern constellation Crater (The Cup). This "gravitational lens" system consists of (at least) four images of the same quasar as well as a ring-shaped image of the galaxy in which the quasar resides - known as an "Einstein ring". The more nearby lensing galaxy that causes this intriguing optical illusion is also well visible. The team obtained spectra of these objects with the new EMMI camera mounted on the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT), also at the La Silla observatory. They find that the lensed quasar [2] is located at a distance of 6,300 million light-years (its "redshift" is z = 0.66 [3]) while the lensing elliptical galaxy is rougly halfway between the quasar and us, at a distance of 3,500 million light-years (z = 0.3). The system has been designated RXS J1131-1231 - it is the closest gravitationally lensed quasar discovered so far . PR Photo 20a/03 : Image of the gravitational lens system RXS J1131-1231 (ESO 3.6m Telescope). PR Photo 20b/03 : Spectra of two lensed images of the source quasar and the lensing galaxy. Cosmic mirages The physical principle behind a "gravitational lens" (also known as a "cosmic mirage") has been known since 1916 as a consequence of Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity . The gravitational field of a massive object curves the local geometry of the Universe, so light rays passing close to the object are bent (like a "straight line" on the surface of the Earth is necessarily curved because of the curvature of the Earth's surface). This effect was first observed by astronomers in 1919 during a total solar eclipse. Accurate positional measurements of stars seen in the dark sky near the eclipsed Sun indicated an apparent displacement in the direction opposite to the Sun, about as much as predicted by Einstein

  15. A Cosmic Searchlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A Cosmic Searchlight Streaming out from the center of the galaxy M87 like a cosmic searchlight is one of nature's most amazing phenomena, a black-hole- powered jet of electrons and other sub-atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light. In this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image, the blue of the jet contrasts with the yellow glow from the combined light of billions of unseen stars and the yellow, point-like globular clusters that make up this galaxy. At first glance, M87 (also known as NGC 4486) appears to be an ordinary giant elliptical galaxy; one of many ellipticals in the nearby Virgo cluster of galaxies. However, as early as 1918, astronomer H.D. Curtis noted a 'curious straight ray' protruding from M87. In the 1950s when the field of radio was blossoming, one of the brightest radio sources in the sky, Virgo A, was discovered to be associated with M87 and its jet. After decades of study, prompted by these discoveries, the source of this incredible amount of energy powering the jet has become clear. Lying at the center of M87 is a supermassive black hole, which has swallowed up a mass equivalent to 2 billion times the mass of our Sun. The jet originates in the disk of superheated gas swirling around this black hole and is propelled and concentrated by the intense, twisted magnetic fields trapped within this plasma. The light that we see (and the radio emission) is produced by electrons twisting along magnetic field lines in the jet, a process known as synchrotron radiation, which gives the jet its bluish tint. M87 is one of the nearest and is the most well-studied extragalactic jet, but many others exist. Wherever a massive black hole is feeding on a particularly rich diet of disrupted stars, gas, and dust, the conditions are right for the formation of a jet. Interestingly, a similar phenomenon occurs around young stars, though at much smaller scales and energies. At a distance of 50 million light-years, M87 is too distant for Hubble to discern

  16. Cosmic Microwave Background spectral distortions from cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthonisen, Madeleine; Brandenberger, Robert; Laguë, Alex; Morrison, Ian A.; Xia, Daixi

    2016-02-01

    Cosmic string loops contain cusps which decay by emitting bursts of particles. A significant fraction of the released energy is in the form of photons. These photons are injected non-thermally and can hence cause spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Under the assumption that cusps are robust against gravitational back-reaction, we compute the fractional energy density released as photons in the redshift interval where such non-thermal photon injection causes CMB spectral distortions. Whereas current constraints on such spectral distortions are not strong enough to constrain the string tension, future missions such as the PIXIE experiment will be able to provide limits which rule out a range of string tensions between G μ ~ 10-15 and G μ ~ 10-12, thus ruling out particle physics models yielding these kind of intermediate-scale cosmic strings.

  17. Fitting cosmic microwave background data with cosmic strings and inflation.

    PubMed

    Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Urrestilla, Jon

    2008-01-18

    We perform a multiparameter likelihood analysis to compare measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra with predictions from models involving cosmic strings. Adding strings to the standard case of a primordial spectrum with power-law tilt ns, we find a 2sigma detection of strings: f10=0.11+/-0.05, where f10 is the fractional contribution made by strings in the temperature power spectrum (at l=10). CMB data give moderate preference to the model ns=1 with cosmic strings over the standard zero-strings model with variable tilt. When additional non-CMB data are incorporated, the two models become on a par. With variable ns and these extra data, we find that f10<0.11, which corresponds to Gmicro<0.7x10(-6) (where micro is the string tension and G is the gravitational constant). PMID:18232848

  18. Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiante, R.; Matteucci, F.; Recchi, S.; Calura, F.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates, namely the frequency of Type Ia supernovae per unit time in a unitary volume of the Universe. Our main goal in this work is to predict the Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We compute the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates in different scenarios for galaxy formation and predict the expected number of explosions at high redshift ( z⩾2). Moreover, we adopt various progenitor models in order to compute the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of initial luminous masses of 1010M⊙,1011M⊙ and 1012M⊙, and compute the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. In this analysis we assume that Type Ia supernovae are caused by thermonuclear explosions of C-O white dwarfs in binary systems and we consider the most popular frameworks: the single degenerate and the double degenerate scenarios. The two competing schemes for the galaxy formation, namely the monolithic collapse and the hierarchical clustering, are also taken into account, by considering the histories of star formation increasing and decreasing with redshift, respectively. We calculate the Type Ia supernova rates through an analytical formulation which rests upon the definition of the SN Ia rate following an instantaneous burst of star formation as a function of the time elapsed from the birth of the progenitor system to its explosion as a Type Ia supernova (i.e. the delay time). What emerges from this work is that: (i) we confirm the result of previous papers that it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; (ii) the monolithic collapse scenario for galaxy formation

  19. Cosmic Concordance and Quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limin; Caldwell, R. R.; Ostriker, J. P.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2000-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the observational constraints on spatially flat cosmological models containing a mixture of matter and quintessence-a time-varying, spatially inhomogeneous component of the energy density of the universe with negative pressure. Our study also includes the limiting case of a cosmological constant. We classify the observational constraints by redshift: low-redshift constraints include the Hubble parameter, baryon fraction, cluster abundance, the age of the universe, bulk velocity and the shape of the mass power spectrum; intermediate-redshift constraints are due to probes of the redshift-luminosity distance based on Type Ia supernovae, gravitational lensing, the Lyα forest, and the evolution of large-scale structure; high-redshift constraints are based on measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy. Mindful of systematic errors, we adopt a conservative approach in applying these observational constraints. We determine that the range of quintessence models in which the ratio of the matter density to the critical density is 0.2<~Ωm<~0.5, and the effective, density-averaged equation of state is -1<=w<~-0.2, is consistent with the most reliable, current low-redshift and microwave background observations at the 2 σ level. Factoring in the constraint due to the recent measurements of Type Ia supernovae, the range for the equation of state is reduced to -1<=w<~-0.4, where this range represents models consistent with each observational constraint at the 2 σ level or better (concordance analysis). A combined maximum likelihood analysis suggests a smaller range, -1<=w<~-0.6. We find that the best-fit and best-motivated quintessence models lie near Ωm~0.33, h~0.65, and spectral index ns=1, with an effective equation of state w~-0.65 for ``tracker'' quintessence and w=-1 for ``creeper'' quintessence.

  20. A Cosmic Magnifying Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Scanning the heavens for the first time since the successful December 1999 servicing mission, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged a giant, cosmic magnifying glass, a massive cluster of galaxies called Abell 2218. This 'hefty' cluster resides in the constellation Draco, some 2 billion light-years from Earth. The cluster is so massive that its enormous gravitational field deflects light rays passing through it, much as an optical lens bends light to form an image. This phenomenon, called gravitational lensing, magnifies, brightens, and distorts images from faraway objects. The cluster's magnifying powers provides a powerful 'zoom lens' for viewing distant galaxies that could not normally be observed with the largest telescopes. The picture is dominated by spiral and elliptical galaxies. Resembling a string of tree lights, the biggest and brightest galaxies are members of the foreground cluster. Researchers are intrigued by a tiny red dot just left of top center. This dot may be an extremely remote object made visible by the cluster's magnifying powers. Further investigation is needed to confirm the object's identity. The color picture already reveals several arc-shaped features that are embedded in the cluster and cannot be easily seen in the black-and- white image. The colors in this picture yield clues to the ages, distances, and temperatures of stars, the stuff of galaxies. Blue pinpoints hot young stars. The yellow-white color of several of the galaxies represents the combined light of many stars. Red identifies cool stars, old stars, and the glow of stars in distant galaxies. This view is only possible by combining Hubble's unique image quality with the rare lensing effect provided by the magnifying cluster.

  1. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  2. Cosmic logic: a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-02-01

    We initiate a formal study of logical inferences in context of the measure problem in cosmology or what we call cosmic logic. We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or Gödel number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies that it is impossible to construct CM machines to compute probabilities on the set of all CO machines using cut-off prescriptions. The cut-off measures can still be used if the set is reduced to include only machines which halt after a finite and predetermined number of steps.

  3. The microphysics and macrophysics of cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2013-05-15

    This review paper commemorates a century of cosmic ray research, with emphasis on the plasma physics aspects. Cosmic rays comprise only ∼10{sup −9} of interstellar particles by number, but collectively their energy density is about equal to that of the thermal particles. They are confined by the Galactic magnetic field and well scattered by small scale magnetic fluctuations, which couple them to the local rest frame of the thermal fluid. Scattering isotropizes the cosmic rays and allows them to exchange momentum and energy with the background medium. I will review a theory for how the fluctuations which scatter the cosmic rays can be generated by the cosmic rays themselves through a microinstability excited by their streaming. A quasilinear treatment of the cosmic ray–wave interaction then leads to a fluid model of cosmic rays with both advection and diffusion by the background medium and momentum and energy deposition by the cosmic rays. This fluid model admits cosmic ray modified shocks, large scale cosmic ray driven instabilities, cosmic ray heating of the thermal gas, and cosmic ray driven galactic winds. If the fluctuations were extrinsic turbulence driven by some other mechanism, the cosmic ray background coupling would be entirely different. Which picture holds depends largely on the nature of turbulence in the background medium.

  4. Gravitational entropy of local cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Roberto A.; Larena, Julien

    2015-08-01

    We undertake a non-perturbative study of the evolution of the ‘gravitational entropy’ proposed by Clifton, Ellis and Tavakol (CET) on local expanding cosmic CDM voids of ˜50-100 Mpc size described as spherical under-dense regions with negative spatial curvature, whose dynamics is determined by Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models asymptotic to three different types of FLRW background: ΛCDM, Einstein-de Sitter and ‘open’ FLRW with Λ =0 and negative spatial curvature. By assuming generic nearly spatially flat and linear initial conditions at the last scattering time, we examine analytically and numerically the CET entropy evolution into a fully nonlinear regime in our present cosmic time and beyond. Both analytic and numerical analysis reveal that the late time CET entropy growth is determined by the amplitude of initial fluctuations of spatial curvature at the last scattering time. This entropy growth decays to zero in the late asymptotic time range for all voids, but at a faster rate in voids with ΛCDM and open FLRW backgrounds. However, only for voids in a ΛCDM background is this suppression sufficiently rapid for the CET entropy itself to reach a terminal equilibrium (or ‘saturation’) value. The CET gravitational temperature vanishes asymptotically if Λ =0 and becomes asymptotically proportional to Λ for voids in a ΛCDM background. In the linear regime of the LTB evolution our results coincide, qualitatively and quantitatively, with previous results based on linear perturbation theory.

  5. Causality and cosmic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Trodden, Mark

    2000-01-15

    In the context of inflationary models with a pre-inflationary stage, in which the Einstein equations are obeyed, the null energy condition is satisfied, and spacetime topology is trivial, we argue that homogeneity on super-Hubble scales must be assumed as an initial condition. Models in which inflation arises from field dynamics in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background fall into this class but models in which inflation originates at the Planck epoch may evade this conclusion. Our arguments rest on causality and general relativistic constraints on the structure of spacetime. We discuss modifications to existing scenarios that may avoid the need for initial large-scale homogeneity. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  6. Anisotropies of the cosmic background radiation by domain wall networks

    SciTech Connect

    Nambu, Yasusada; Ishihara, Hideki; Gouda, Naoteru; Sugiyama, Naoshi )

    1991-06-01

    This paper discusses cosmological effects by domain wall formation associated with a late time phase transition after decoupling. Assuming the existence of rigid domain wall networks, a simple one-dimensional model is constructed and the quadrupole anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) is calculated. Contrary to expectation, the gravitational potential of a domain wall itself does not disturb the isotropy of CBR. Estimating the quadrupole anisotropy of CBR induced by the wall-driven growth of matter density perturbations, a 100/h Mpc periodic wall structure is found to be consistent with the observed upper bound. 12 refs.

  7. Search for Linear Polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1978-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (3 deg K blackbody) radiation. These ground-based measurements are made at 9 mm wavelength. We find no evidence for linear polarization, and set an upper limit for a polarized component of 0.8 m deg K with a 95% confidence level. This implies that the present rate of expansion of the Universe is isotropic to one part in 10{sup 6}, assuming no re-ionization of the primordial plasma after recombination

  8. Cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies in brane worlds.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2003-11-28

    We propose a new formulation to calculate the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum in the Randall-Sundrum two-brane model based on recent progress in solving the bulk geometry using a low energy approximation. The evolution of the anisotropic stress imprinted on the brane by the 5D Weyl tensor is calculated. An impact of the dark radiation perturbation on the CMB spectrum is investigated in a simple model assuming an initially scale-invariant adiabatic perturbation. The dark radiation perturbation induces isocurvature perturbations, but the resultant spectrum can be quite different from the prediction of simple mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations due to Weyl anisotropic stress. PMID:14683226

  9. Translational invariance and the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean M.; Tseng, C.-Y.; Wise, Mark B.

    2010-04-15

    Primordial quantum fluctuations produced by inflation are conventionally assumed to be statistically homogeneous, a consequence of translational invariance. In this paper we quantify the potentially observable effects of a small violation of translational invariance during inflation, as characterized by the presence of a preferred point, line, or plane. We explore the imprint such a violation would leave on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, and provide explicit formulas for the expected amplitudes of the spherical-harmonic coefficients.

  10. Is cosmic acceleration slowing down?

    SciTech Connect

    Shafieloo, Arman; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the course of cosmic expansion in its recent past using the Constitution SN Ia sample, along with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Allowing the equation of state of dark energy (DE) to vary, we find that a coasting model of the universe (q{sub 0}=0) fits the data about as well as Lambda cold dark matter. This effect, which is most clearly seen using the recently introduced Om diagnostic, corresponds to an increase of Om and q at redshifts z < or approx. 0.3. This suggests that cosmic acceleration may have already peaked and that we are currently witnessing its slowing down. The case for evolving DE strengthens if a subsample of the Constitution set consisting of SNLS+ESSENCE+CfA SN Ia data is analyzed in combination with BAO+CMB data. The effect we observe could correspond to DE decaying into dark matter (or something else)

  11. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  12. Cosmic necklaces from string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Leblond, Louis; Wyman, Mark

    2007-06-15

    We present the properties of a cosmic superstring network in the scenario of flux compactification. An infinite family of strings, the (p,q) strings, are allowed to exist. The flux compactification leads to a string tension that is periodic in p. Monopoles, appearing here as beads on a string, are formed in certain interactions in such networks. This allows bare strings to become cosmic necklaces. We study network evolution in this scenario, outlining what conditions are necessary to reach a cosmologically viable scaling solution. We also analyze the physics of the beads on a cosmic necklace, and present general conditions for which they will be cosmologically safe, leaving the network's scaling undisturbed. In particular, we find that a large average loop size is sufficient for the beads to be cosmologically safe. Finally, we argue that loop formation will promote a scaling solution for the interbead distance in some situations.

  13. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2008-01-24

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  14. Nonlinear Cosmic Ray Diffusion Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalchi, Andreas

    Within cosmic ray transport theory, we investigate the interaction between energetic charged particles like electrons, protons, or heavy ions and astrophysical plasmas such as the solar wind or the interstellar medium. These particles interact with a background magnetic field B 0 and with turbulent electric and magnetic fields ýE and ýB, and they therefore experience scattering parallel and perpendicular to B 0. In this introductory chapter, general properties of cosmic rays are discussed, as well as the unperturbed motion of the particles. Furthermore, the physics of parallel and perpendicular scattering is investigated. At the end of this chapter, we consider observed mean free paths of cosmic rays in the heliosphere and in the interstel- lar medium. One aim of this book is to demonstrate that a nonlinear description of particle transport is necessary to reproduce these measurements.

  15. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  16. The Heliosphere and Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heliosphere deflects galactic cosmic rays from entering the system. Galactic cosmic rays are a very high energy form of particle radiation that are extremely difficult to shield against and are...

  17. Epidemiology of child pedestrian casualty rates: can we assume spatial independence?

    PubMed

    Hewson, Paul J

    2005-07-01

    Child pedestrian injuries are often investigated by means of ecological studies, yet are clearly part of a complex spatial phenomena. Spatial dependence within such ecological analyses have rarely been assessed, yet the validity of basic statistical techniques rely on a number of independence assumptions. Recent work from Canada has highlighted the potential for modelling spatial dependence within data that was aggregated in terms of the number of road casualties who were resident in a given geographical area. Other jurisdictions aggregate data in terms of the number of casualties in the geographical area in which the collision took place. This paper contrasts child pedestrian casualty data from Devon County UK, which has been aggregated by both methods. A simple ecological model, with minimally useful covaraties relating to measures of child deprivation, provides evidence that data aggregated in terms of the casualty's home location cannot be assumed to be spatially independent and that for analysis of these data to be valid there must be some accounting for spatial auto-correlation within the model structure. Conversely, data aggregated in terms of the collision location (as is usual in the UK) was found to be spatially independent. Whilst the spatial model is clearly more complex it provided a superior fit to that seen with either collision aggregated or non-spatial models. Of more importance, the ecological level association between deprivation and casualty rate is much lower once the spatial structure is accounted for, highlighting the importance using appropriately structured models. PMID:15949456

  18. Automated Assume-Guarantee Reasoning for Omega-Regular Systems and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaki, Sagar; Gurfinkel, Arie

    2010-01-01

    We develop a learning-based automated Assume-Guarantee (AG) reasoning framework for verifying omega-regular properties of concurrent systems. We study the applicability of non-circular (AGNC) and circular (AG-C) AG proof rules in the context of systems with infinite behaviors. In particular, we show that AG-NC is incomplete when assumptions are restricted to strictly infinite behaviors, while AG-C remains complete. We present a general formalization, called LAG, of the learning based automated AG paradigm. We show how existing approaches for automated AG reasoning are special instances of LAG.We develop two learning algorithms for a class of systems, called infinite regular systems, that combine finite and infinite behaviors. We show that for infinity-regular systems, both AG-NC and AG-C are sound and complete. Finally, we show how to instantiate LAG to do automated AG reasoning for infinite regular, and omega-regular, systems using both AG-NC and AG-C as proof rules

  19. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Jennifer D; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Evans, Sarah E; Waldrop, Mark P; Cotner, James B; Nemergut, Diana R; Graham, Emily B; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-08-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes. PMID:25535936

  20. Assume-Guarantee Verification of Source Code with Design-Level Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Cobleigh, Jamieson M.

    2004-01-01

    Model checking is an automated technique that can be used to determine whether a system satisfies certain required properties. To address the 'state explosion' problem associated with this technique, we propose to integrate assume-guarantee verification at different phases of system development. During design, developers build abstract behavioral models of the system components and use them to establish key properties of the system. To increase the scalability of model checking at this level, we have developed techniques that automatically decompose the verification task by generating component assumptions for the properties to hold. The design-level artifacts are subsequently used to guide the implementation of the system, but also to enable more efficient reasoning at the source code-level. In particular we propose to use design-level assumptions to similarly decompose the verification of the actual system implementation. We demonstrate our approach on a significant NASA application, where design-level models were used to identify; and correct a safety property violation, and design-level assumptions allowed us to check successfully that the property was presented by the implementation.

  1. iRhom2 (Uncv) mutation blocks bulge stem cells assuming the fate of hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Leilei; Li, Wenlong; Liu, Bing; Wang, Shaoxia; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Yang

    2016-09-01

    iRhom2 is necessary for maturation of TNFα-converting enzyme, which is required for the release of tumor necrosis factor. In the previous study, we found that the iRhom2 (Uncv) mutation in N-terminal cytoplasmic domain-encoding region (iRhom2 (Uncv) ) leads to aberrant hair shaft and inner root sheath differentiation, thus results in a hairless phenotype in homozygous iRhom2 (Uncv/Uncv) BALB/c mice. In this study, we found iRhom2 mutation decreased hair matrix proliferation, however, iRhom2 (Uncv/Uncv) mice displayed hyperproliferation and hyperkeratosis in the interfollicular epidermis along with hypertrophy in the sebaceous glands. The number of bulge SCs was not altered and the hair follicle cycle is normal in iRhom2 (Uncv/Uncv) mice. The decreased proliferation in hair matrix but increased proliferation in epidermis and sebaceous glands in iRhom2 (Uncv/Uncv) mice may implying that iRhom2 (Uncv) mutation blocks bugle stem cells assuming the fate of hair follicle. This study identifies iRhom2 as a novel regulator for determination of keratinocyte lineages. PMID:27393687

  2. Bilateral Painful Ophthalmoplegia: A Case of Assumed Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kastirr, Ilko; Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a man of 47 years with vertical and horizontal paresis of view combined with periorbital pain that developed initially on the right side but extended after 3-4 days to the left. Gadolinum uptaking tissue in the cavernous sinus was shown by MRI of the orbital region in the T1 spin echo sequence with fat saturation (SEfs) with a slice thickness of 2 mm. As no other abnormalities were found and the pain resolved within 72 hours of treatment with cortison a bilateral Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (THS) was assumed. THS is an uncommon cause for Painful Ophthalmoglegia (PO) and only few cases of bilateral appearance have been reported. Even though the diagnostic criteria for THS oblige unilateral symptoms we suggest that in patients with bilateral PO THS should not be excluded as a differential diagnosis. Further more when using MRI to detect granulomatous tissue in the orbital region the chosen sequence should be T1 SEfs and slice thickness should possibly be as low as 2 mm, as granulomas are often no larger than 1-2 mm. PMID:27134970

  3. Assumed--stress hybrid elements with drilling degrees of freedom for nonlinear analysis of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop assumed-stress hybrid elements with rotational degrees of freedom for analyzing composite structures. During the first year of the three-year activity, the effort was directed to further assess the AQ4 shell element and its extensions to buckling and free vibration problems. In addition, the development of a compatible 2-node beam element was to be accomplished. The extensions and new developments were implemented in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed COMET. An assessment was performed to verify the implementation and to assess the performance of these elements in terms of accuracy. During the second and third years, extensions to geometrically nonlinear problems were developed and tested. This effort involved working with the nonlinear solution strategy as well as the nonlinear formulation for the elements. This research has resulted in the development and implementation of two additional element processors (ES22 for the beam element and ES24 for the shell elements) in COMET. The software was developed using a SUN workstation and has been ported to the NASA Langley Convex named blackbird. Both element processors are now part of the baseline version of COMET.

  4. Approximate natural vibration analysis of rectangular plates with openings using assumed mode method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Dae Seung; Vladimir, Nikola; Choi, Tae MuK

    2013-09-01

    Natural vibration analysis of plates with openings of different shape represents an important issue in naval architecture and ocean engineering applications. In this paper, a procedure for vibration analysis of plates with openings and arbitrary edge constraints is presented. It is based on the assumed mode method, where natural frequencies and modes are determined by solving an eigenvalue problem of a multi-degree-of-freedom system matrix equation derived by using Lagrange's equations of motion. The presented solution represents an extension of a procedure for natural vibration analysis of rectangular plates without openings, which has been recently presented in the literature. The effect of an opening is taken into account in an intuitive way, i.e. by subtracting its energy from the total plate energy without opening. Illustrative numerical examples include dynamic analysis of rectangular plates with rectangular, elliptic, circular as well as oval openings with various plate thicknesses and different combinations of boundary conditions. The results are compared with those obtained by the finite element method (FEM) as well as those available in the relevant literature, and very good agreement is achieved.

  5. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Jennifer D; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Evans, Sarah E; Waldrop, Mark P; Cotner, James B; Nemergut, Diana R; Graham, Emily B; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes. PMID:25535936

  6. Wetware, Hardware, or Software Incapacitation: Observational Methods to Determine When Autonomy Should Assume Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2014-01-01

    Control-theoretic modeling of human operator's dynamic behavior in manual control tasks has a long, rich history. There has been significant work on techniques used to identify the pilot model of a given structure. This research attempts to go beyond pilot identification based on experimental data to develop a predictor of pilot behavior. Two methods for pre-dicting pilot stick input during changing aircraft dynamics and deducing changes in pilot behavior are presented This approach may also have the capability to detect a change in a subject due to workload, engagement, etc., or the effects of changes in vehicle dynamics on the pilot. With this ability to detect changes in piloting behavior, the possibility now exists to mediate human adverse behaviors, hardware failures, and software anomalies with autono-my that may ameliorate these undesirable effects. However, appropriate timing of when au-tonomy should assume control is dependent on criticality of actions to safety, sensitivity of methods to accurately detect these adverse changes, and effects of changes in levels of auto-mation of the system as a whole.

  7. Defining modeling parameters for juniper trees assuming pleistocene-like conditions at the NTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tarbox, S.R.; Cochran, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper addresses part of Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) efforts to assess the long-term performance of the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Of issue is whether the GCD site complies with 40 CFR 191 standards set for transuranic (TRU) waste burial. SNL has developed a radionuclide transport model which can be used to assess TRU radionuclide movement away from the GCD facility. An earlier iteration of the model found that radionuclide uptake and release by plants is an important aspect of the system to consider. Currently, the shallow-rooted plants at the NTS do not pose a threat to the integrity of the GCD facility. However, the threat increases substantially it deeper-rooted woodland species migrate to the GCD facility, given a shift to a wetter climate. The model parameters discussed here will be included in the next model iteration which assumes a climate shift will provide for the growth of juniper trees at the GCD facility. Model parameters were developed using published data and wherever possible, data were taken from juniper and pinon-juniper studies that mirrored as many aspects of the GCD facility as possible.

  8. From the Kochen-Specker theorem to noncontextuality inequalities without assuming determinism.

    PubMed

    Kunjwal, Ravi; Spekkens, Robert W

    2015-09-11

    The Kochen-Specker theorem demonstrates that it is not possible to reproduce the predictions of quantum theory in terms of a hidden variable model where the hidden variables assign a value to every projector deterministically and noncontextually. A noncontextual value assignment to a projector is one that does not depend on which other projectors-the context-are measured together with it. Using a generalization of the notion of noncontextuality that applies to both measurements and preparations, we propose a scheme for deriving inequalities that test whether a given set of experimental statistics is consistent with a noncontextual model. Unlike previous inequalities inspired by the Kochen-Specker theorem, we do not assume that the value assignments are deterministic and therefore in the face of a violation of our inequality, the possibility of salvaging noncontextuality by abandoning determinism is no longer an option. Our approach is operational in the sense that it does not presume quantum theory: a violation of our inequality implies the impossibility of a noncontextual model for any operational theory that can account for the experimental observations, including any successor to quantum theory. PMID:26406812

  9. Molecular relativistic corrections determined in the framework where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not assumed.

    PubMed

    Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we describe how the energies obtained in molecular calculations performed without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation can be augmented with corrections accounting for the leading relativistic effects. Unlike the conventional BO approach, where these effects only concern the relativistic interactions between the electrons, the non-BO approach also accounts for the relativistic effects due to the nuclei and due to the coupling of the coupled electron-nucleus motion. In the numerical sections, the results obtained with the two approaches are compared. The first comparison concerns the dissociation energies of the two-electron isotopologues of the H2 molecule, H2, HD, D2, T2, and the HeH(+) ion. The comparison shows that, as expected, the differences in the relativistic contributions obtained with the two approaches increase as the nuclei become lighter. The second comparison concerns the relativistic corrections to all 23 pure vibrational states of the HD(+) ion. An interesting charge asymmetry caused by the nonadiabatic electron-nucleus interaction appears in this system, and this effect significantly increases with the vibration excitation. The comparison of the non-BO results with the results obtained with the conventional BO approach, which in the lowest order does not describe the charge-asymmetry effect, reveals how this effect affects the values of the relativistic corrections. PMID:23679131

  10. Modeling of Hydraulic Hractures with Poromechanical Coupling Using an Assumed Enhanced Strain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; White, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    When modeling hydraulic fractures, it is often necessary to include tightly coupled interaction between fluid-filled fractures and the porous host rock. Further, the numerical scheme must accurately discretize processes taking place both in the rock volume and along growing fracture surfaces. This work presents a three-dimensional scheme for handling these challenging numerical issues. Solid deformation and fluid pressure in the host rock are modeled using a mixed finite-element/finite-volume scheme. The continuum formulation is enriched with an assumed enhanced strain (AES) method to represent discontinuities in the displacement field due to fractures. Fractures can be arbitrarily oriented and located with respect to the underlying mesh, and no re-meshing is necessary during fracture propagation. Flow along the fracture is modeled using a locally conservative finite volume scheme. Leak-off coupling allows for fluid exchange between the porous matrix and the fracture. We describe an efficient and scalable preconditioning process that leads to rapid convergence of the resulting discrete system. The scheme is validated using analytical examples and monitoring data from a real fractured reservoir.

  11. The Cosmic Shoreline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    in 2004 when there were just two transiting exoplanets to consider. The trend was well-defined by late 2007. Figure 1 shows how matters stood in Dec 2012 with approx.240 exoplanets. The figure shows that the boundary between planets with and without active volatiles - the cosmic shoreline, as it were - is both well-defined and follows a power law.

  12. Fun Times with Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Who would have thought cosmic rays could be so hip? Although discovered 90 years ago on death-defying manned balloon flights hip even by twenty-first-century extremesport standards cosmic rays quickly lost popularity as way-cool telescopes were finding way-too-cool phenomena across the electromagnetic spectrum. Yet cosmic rays are back in vogue, boasting their own set of superlatives. Scientists are tracking them down with new resolve from the Arctic to Antarctica and even on the high western plains of Argentina. Theorists, too, now see cosmic rays as harbingers of funky physics. Cosmic rays are atomic and subatomic particles - the fastest moving bits of matter in the universe and the only sample of matter we have from outside the solar system (with the exception of interstellar dust grains). Lower-energy cosmic rays come from the Sun. Mid-energy particles come from stellar explosions - either spewed directly from the star like shrapnel, or perhaps accelerated to nearly the speed of light by shock waves. The highest-energy cosmic rays, whose unequivocal existence remains one of astronomy's greatest mysteries, clock in at a staggering 10(exp 19) to 10(exp 22) electron volts. This is the energy carried in a baseball pitch; seeing as how there are as many atomic particles in a baseball as there are baseballs in the Moon, that s one powerful toss. No simple stellar explosion could produce them. At a recent conference in Albuquerque, scientists presented the first observational evidence of a possible origin for the highest-energy variety. A team led by Elihu Boldt at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center found that five of these very rare cosmic rays (there are only a few dozen confirmed events) come from the direction of four 'retired' quasar host galaxies just above the arm of the Big Dipper, all visible with backyard telescopes: NGC 3610, NGC 3613, NGC 4589, and NGC 5322. These galaxies are billions of years past their glory days as the brightest beacons in the universe

  13. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-01

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  14. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-15

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  15. Evolution of cosmic string networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    Results on cosmic strings are summarized including: (1) the application of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to cosmic string evolution; (2) a simple one scale model for the long strings which has a great deal of predictive power; (3) results from large scale numerical simulations; and (4) a discussion of the observational consequences of our results. An upper bound on G mu of approximately 10(-7) emerges from the millisecond pulsar gravity wave bound. How numerical uncertainties affect this are discussed. Any changes which weaken the bound would probably also give the long strings the dominant role in producing observational consequences.

  16. Cosmic strings and ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    1989-01-01

    The flux is calculated of ultrahigh energy protons due to the process of cusp evaporation from cosmic string loops. For the standard value of the dimensionless cosmic string parameter epsilon is identical to G(sub mu) approx. = 10(exp -6), the flux is several orders of magnitude below the observed cosmic ray flux of ultrahigh energy protons. However, the flux at any energy initially increases as the value of epsilon is decreased. This at first suggests that there may be a lower limit on the value of epsilon, which would imply a lower limit on the temperature of a cosmic string forming phase transition in the early universe. However, the calculation shows that this is not the case -- the particle flux at any energy reaches its highest value at epsilon approx. = 10(exp -15) and it then decreases for further decrease of the value of epsilon. This is due to the fact that for too small values of epsilon (less than 10(exp -15)), the energy loss of the loops through the cusp evaporation process itself (rather than gravitational energy loss of the loops) becomes the dominant factor that controls the behavior of the number density of the loops at the relevant times of emission of the particles. The highest flux at any energy remains at least four orders of magnitude below the observed flux. There is thus no lower limit on epsilon.

  17. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  18. Cosmic ray variations during PCA type absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozin, I. D.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown based on data on the cosmic-ray neutron component, ionospheric soundings, and measurements of cosmic radio-emission absorption at Vostok station (Antarctica) that the ionization of the lower ionosphere increases during low intensity of Forbush-type cosmic rays. This is manifested in increased absorption and the appearance of strong sporadic layers in the E-region.

  19. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Engineering evaluation of alternatives: Managing the assumed leak from single-shell Tank 241-T-101

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Jenkins, C.

    1996-02-01

    At mid-year 1992, the liquid level gage for Tank 241-T-101 indicated that 6,000 to 9,000 gal had leaked. Because of the liquid level anomaly, Tank 241-T-101 was declared an assumed leaker on October 4, 1992. SSTs liquid level gages have been historically unreliable. False readings can occur because of instrument failures, floating salt cake, and salt encrustation. Gages frequently self-correct and tanks show no indication of leak. Tank levels cannot be visually inspected and verified because of high radiation fields. The gage in Tank 241-T-101 has largely corrected itself since the mid-year 1992 reading. Therefore, doubt exists that a leak has occurred, or that the magnitude of the leak poses any immediate environmental threat. While reluctance exists to use valuable DST space unnecessarily, there is a large safety and economic incentive to prevent or mitigate release of tank liquid waste into the surrounding environment. During the assessment of the significance of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid level gage readings, Washington State Department of Ecology determined that Westinghouse Hanford Company was not in compliance with regulatory requirements, and directed transfer of the Tank 241-T-101 liquid contents into a DST. Meanwhile, DOE directed WHC to examine reasonable alternatives/options for safe interim management of Tank 241-T-101 wastes before taking action. The five alternatives that could be used to manage waste from a leaking SST are: (1) No-Action, (2) In-Tank Stabilization, (3) External Tank Stabilization, (4) Liquid Retrieval, and (5) Total Retrieval. The findings of these examinations are reported in this study.

  1. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, H; Jensen, S; Hoff, M; Holik, J; Plaetke, R; Reimherr, F; Wender, P; Leppert, M; Byerley, W

    1993-01-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as "bipolar affective disorder," is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, we ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has > 97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has > 73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores < -2.0 at recombination fraction (theta) = .0, 174 DNA loci produced lod scores < -2.0 at theta = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores > 1 (chromosome 5--D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11--D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores > 1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, our linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. PMID:8503452

  2. The Effects on Tsunami Hazard Assessment in Chile of Assuming Earthquake Scenarios with Spatially Uniform Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Matías; Gubler, Alejandra

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effect that along-dip slip distribution has on the near-shore tsunami amplitudes and on coastal land-level changes in the region of central Chile (29°-37°S). Here and all along the Chilean megathrust, the seismogenic zone extends beneath dry land, and thus, tsunami generation and propagation is limited to its seaward portion, where the sensitivity of the initial tsunami waveform to dislocation model inputs, such as slip distribution, is greater. We considered four distributions of earthquake slip in the dip direction, including a spatially uniform slip source and three others with typical bell-shaped slip patterns that differ in the depth range of slip concentration. We found that a uniform slip scenario predicts much lower tsunami amplitudes and generally less coastal subsidence than scenarios that assume bell-shaped distributions of slip. Although the finding that uniform slip scenarios underestimate tsunami amplitudes is not new, it has been largely ignored for tsunami hazard assessment in Chile. Our simulations results also suggest that uniform slip scenarios tend to predict later arrival times of the leading wave than bell-shaped sources. The time occurrence of the largest wave at a specific site is also dependent on how the slip is distributed in the dip direction; however, other factors, such as local bathymetric configurations and standing edge waves, are also expected to play a role. Arrival time differences are especially critical in Chile, where tsunamis arrive earlier than elsewhere. We believe that the results of this study will be useful to both public and private organizations for mapping tsunami hazard in coastal areas along the Chilean coast, and, therefore, help reduce the risk of loss and damage caused by future tsunamis.

  3. Hyporheic Temperature Dynamics: Predicting Hyporheic Temperatures Based on Travel Time Assuming Instantaneous Water-Sediment Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraseski, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently developed conceptual frameworks and new observations have improved our understanding of hyporheic temperature dynamics and their effects on channel temperatures. However, hyporheic temperature models that are both simple and useful remain elusive. As water moves through hyporheic pathways, it exchanges heat with hyporheic sediment through conduction, and this process dampens the diurnal temperature wave of the water entering from the channel. This study examined the mechanisms underlying this behavior, and utilized those findings to create two simple models that predict temperatures of water reentering the channel after traveling through hyporheic pathways for different lengths of time. First, we developed a laboratory experiment to represent this process and determine conduction rates for various sediment size classes (sand, fine gravel, coarse gravel, and a proportional mix of the three) by observing the time series of temperature changes between sediment and water of different initial temperatures. Results indicated that conductions rates were near-instantaneous, with heat transfer being completed on the scale of seconds to a few minutes of the initial interaction. Heat conduction rates between the sediment and water were therefore much faster than hyporheic flux rates, rendering reasonable an assumption of instantaneous conduction. Then, we developed two simple models to predict time series of hyporheic water based on the initial diurnal temperature wave and hyporheic travel distance. The first model estimates a damping coefficient based on the total water-sediment heat exchange through each diurnal cycle. The second model solves the heat transfer equation assuming instantaneous conduction using a simple finite difference algorithm. Both models demonstrated nearly complete damping of the sine wave over the distance traveled in four days. If hyporheic exchange is substantial and travel times are long, then hyporheic damping may have large effects on

  4. A Degree-Scale Measurement of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Ed; Jarosik, Norm; Netterfield, Barth; Page, Lyman; Wilkinson, David

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection of anisotropy in the microwave sky at 3O GHz and at l deg angular scales. The most economical interpretation of the data is that the fluctuations are intrinsic to the cosmic microwave background. However, galactic free-free emission is ruled out with only 90% confidence. The most likely root-mean-squared amplitude of the fluctuations, assuming they are described by a Gaussian auto-correlation function with a coherence angle of 1.2 deg, is 41(+16/-13) (mu)K. We also present limits on the anisotropy of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background.

  5. Art and the Cosmic Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Whitney H.; Aiello, Monica Petty; Macdonald, Reeves; Asplund, Shari

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary unit described in this article utilizes "Art and the Cosmic Connection," a free program conceived of by artists Monica and Tyler Aiello and developed by the artists, scientists, and educators through NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs, to inspire learners to explore mysterious worlds in our solar…

  6. The Resurgence of Cosmic Storytellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swimme, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Brian Swimme's insights about the Story of the Universe look to the unifying impact of a "cosmic story" that speaks to all cultures and nations. Swimme suggests that humans are now able, through science and narrative, to present a story which will make us all a "cohesive tribe" while answering the universal questions of…

  7. The Cosmic Ray Electron Excess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible sources for the apparent excess of Cosmic Ray Electrons. The presentation reviews the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument, the various parts, how cosmic ray electrons are measured, and shows graphs that review the results of the ATIC instrument measurement. A review of Cosmic Ray Electrons models is explored, along with the source candidates. Scenarios for the excess are reviewed: Supernova remnants (SNR) Pulsar Wind nebulae, or Microquasars. Each of these has some problem that mitigates the argument. The last possibility discussed is Dark Matter. The Anti-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) mission is to search for evidence of annihilations of dark matter particles, to search for anti-nuclei, to test cosmic-ray propagation models, and to measure electron and positron spectra. There are slides explaining the results of Pamela and how to compare these with those of the ATIC experiment. Dark matter annihilation is then reviewed, which represent two types of dark matter: Neutralinos, and kaluza-Kline (KK) particles, which are next explained. The future astrophysical measurements, those from GLAST LAT, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and HEPCAT are reviewed, in light of assisting in finding an explanation for the observed excess. Also the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could help by revealing if there are extra dimensions.

  8. Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The 6 flights of the Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) balloon payload over Antarctica accumulated 161 days of exposure. The instrument is configured with complementary and redundant particle detectors for direct measurements of high energy cosmic ray elemental spectra. The calorimeter and Silicon Charge Detectors (SCD) from one of the two instruments are being re-configured for the International Space Station, dubbed ISS-CREAM. The other calorimeter and detectors that are too large to fit in the ISS Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility envelope are kept for balloon flights. The large area Timing Charged Detector (TCD) and newly developed Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) will be used for studying the propagation history of cosmic rays by measuring relative abundances of secondary particles, e.g., Boron. This Boron and Carbon Cosmic Rays in the Upper Stratosphere (BACCUS) balloon payload will provide in-flight cross calibration of the calorimeter and TRD for Z > 3 particles. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation will be reported.

  9. Dark matter and cosmic acceleration from Wesson's IMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelit, Mark

    2009-12-01

    In the present work a procedure is build up, that allows obtaining dark matter (DM) and cosmic acceleration in our 4D universe embedded in a 5D manifold. Both, DM and the factor causing cosmic acceleration, as well ordinary matter are induced in the 4D space-time by a warped, but empty from matter, 5D bulk. The procedure is carried out in the framework of the Weyl-Dirac version (Israelit, Found Phys 35:1725, 2005; Israelit, Found Phys 35:1769, 2005) of Paul Wesson’s Induced Matter Theory (Wesson, Space-time matter, 1999) enriched by Rosen’s approach (Found Phys 12:213, 1982). Considering chaotically oriented Weyl vector fields, which exist in microscopic cells, we obtain cold dark matter (CDM) consisting of weylons, massive bosons having spin 1. Assuming homogeneity and isotropy at large scale we derive cosmological equations in which luminous matter, CDM and dark energy may be considered separately. Making in the given procedure use of present observational data one can develop a model of the Universe with conventional matter, DM and cosmic acceleration, induced by the 5D bulk.

  10. Landau quantization in the spinning cosmic string spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, C.R.; Bezerra, V.B.; Cunha, M.S.

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the quantum phenomenon arising from the interaction of a spinless charged particle with a rotating cosmic string, under the action of a static and uniform magnetic field parallel to the string. We calculate the energy levels of the particle in the non-relativistic approach, showing how these energies depend on the parameters involved in the problem. In order to do this, we solve the time independent Schrödinger equation in the geometry of the spinning cosmic string, taking into account that the coupling between the rotation of the spacetime and the angular momentum of the particle is very weak, such that makes sense to apply the Schrödinger equation in a curved background whose metric has an off diagonal term which involves time and space. It is also assumed that the particle orbits sufficiently far from the boundary of the region of closed timelike curves which exist around this topological defect. Finally, we find the Landau levels of the particle in the presence of a spinning cosmic string endowed with internal structure, i.e., having a finite width and uniformly filled with both material and vacuum energies. - Highlights: • Solution of the wave equation characterizing the problem. • Energy levels of the particle in spacetime of the structureless string. • Expression for an analogous of the quadratic Zeeman effect. • Energy levels of the particle in spacetime of the string with internal structure. • Evidence of the string structure by the internal existence of the vacuum energy.

  11. Constraining the efficiency of cosmic ray acceleration by cluster shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Wittor, D.; Gheller, C.; Eckert, D.; Stubbe, M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the acceleration of cosmic rays by collisionless structure formation shocks with ENZO grid simulations. Data from the Fermi satellite enable the use of galaxy clusters as a testbed for particle acceleration models. Based on advanced cosmological simulations that include different prescriptions for gas and cosmic rays physics, we use the predicted γ-ray emission to constrain the shock acceleration efficiency. We infer that the efficiency must be on average ≤10-3 for cosmic shocks, particularly for the M ˜ 2-5 merger shocks that are mostly responsible for the thermalization of the intracluster medium (ICM). These results emerge, both, from non-radiative and radiative runs including feedback from active galactic nuclei, as well as from zoomed resimulations of a cluster resembling MACSJ1752.0+0440. The limit on the acceleration efficiency we report is lower than what has been assumed in the literature so far. Combined with the information from radio emission in clusters, it appears that a revision of the present understanding of shock acceleration in the ICM is unavoidable.

  12. Cosmic acceleration in a model of fourth order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shreya; Jayswal, Nilesh; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate a fourth order model of gravity, having a free length parameter, and no cosmological constant or dark energy. We consider cosmological evolution of a flat Friedmann universe in this model for the case that the length parameter is of the order of the present Hubble radius. By making a suitable choice for the present value of the Hubble parameter, and the value of the third derivative of the scale factor (the jerk), we find that the model can explain cosmic acceleration to the same degree of accuracy as the standard concordance model. If the free length parameter is assumed to be time dependent, and of the order of the Hubble parameter of the corresponding epoch, the model can still explain cosmic acceleration, and provides a possible resolution of the cosmic coincidence problem. We work out the effective equation of state, and its time evolution, in our model. The fourth order correction terms are proportional to the metric, and hence mimic the cosmological constant. We also compare redshift drift in our model, with that in the standard model. The equation of state and the redshift drift serve to discriminate our model from the standard model.

  13. Internal Structure and Mineralogy of Differentiated Asteroids Assuming Chondritic Bulk Composition: The Case of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Forni, O.; Monnereau, M.; Prettyman, T. H.; McSween, H. Y.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk composition (including oxygen content) is a primary control on the internal structure and mineralogy of differentiated asteroids. For example, oxidation state will affect core size, as well as Mg# and pyroxene content of the silicate mantle. The Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite class of meteorites (HED) provide an interesting test-case of this idea, in particular in light of results of the Dawn mission which provide information on the size, density and differentiation state of Vesta, the parent body of the HED's. In this work we explore plausible bulk compositions of Vesta and use mass-balance and geochemical modelling to predict possible internal structures and crust/mantle compositions and mineralogies. Models are constrained to be consistent with known HED samples, but the approach has the potential to extend predictions to thermodynamically plausible rock types that are not necessarily present in the HED collection. Nine chondritic bulk compositions are considered (CI, CV, CO, CM, H, L, LL, EH, EL). For each, relative proportions and densities of the core, mantle, and crust are quantified. Considering that the basaltic crust has the composition of the primitive eucrite Juvinas and assuming that this crust is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the residual mantle, it is possible to calculate how much iron is in metallic form (in the core) and how much in oxidized form (in the mantle and crust) for a given bulk composition. Of the nine bulk compositions tested, solutions corresponding to CI and LL groups predicted a negative metal fraction and were not considered further. Solutions for enstatite chondrites imply significant oxidation relative to the starting materials and these solutions too are considered unlikely. For the remaining bulk compositions, the relative proportion of crust to bulk silicate is typically in the range 15 to 20% corresponding to crustal thicknesses of 15 to 20 km for a porosity-free Vesta-sized body. The mantle is predicted to be largely

  14. Benthic grazers and suspension feeders: Which one assumes the energetic dominance in Königshafen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, H.

    1994-06-01

    Size-frequency histograms of biomass, secondary production, respiration and energy flow of 4 dominant macrobenthic communities of the intertidal bay of Königshafen were analysed and compared. In the shallow sandy flats ( Nereis-Corophium-belt [ N.C.-belt], seagrass-bed and Arenicola-flat) a bimodal size-frequency histogram of biomass, secondary production, respiration and energy flow was found with a first peak formed by individuals within a size range of 0.10 to 0.32 mg ash free dry weight (AFDW). In this size range, the small prosobranch Hydrobia ulvae was the dominant species, showing maximal biomass as well as secondary production, respiration and energy flow in the seagrass-bed. The second peak on the size-frequency histogram was formed by the polychaete Nereis diversicolor with individual weights of 10 to 18 mg AFDW in the N.C.-belt, and by Arenicola marina with individual weights of 100 to 562 mg AFDW in both of the other sand flats. Biomass, productivity, respiration and energy flow of these polychaetes increased from the Nereis-Corophium-belt, to the seagrass-bed, and to the Arenicola-flat. Mussel beds surpassed all other communities in biomass and the functional parameters mentioned above. Size-frequency histograms of these parameters were distinctly unimodal with a maximum at an individual size of 562 to 1000 mg AFDW. This size group was dominated by adult specimens of Mytilus edulis. Averaged over the total area, the size-frequency histogram of energy flow of all intertidal flats of Königshafen showed one peak built by Hydrobia ulvae and a second one, mainly formed by M. edulis. Assuming that up to 10% of the intertidal area is covered by mussel beds, the maximum of the size-specific energy flow will be formed by Mytilus. When only 1% is covered by mussel beds, then the energy flow is dominated by H. ulvae. Both animals represent different trophic types and their dominance in energy flow has consequences for the food web and the carbon flow of the

  15. A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J.; Viero, M. P.; Bock, J.; Zahn, O.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H-M.; Conley, A.; George, E. M.; Halverson, N. W.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

  16. The effects of magnetic field modifications on the solar modulation of cosmic rays with a SDE-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raath, Jan-Louis; Toit Strauss, Du; Kopp, Andreas; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    The effects of modifying the heliospheric magnetic field, particularly in the polar regions of the heliosphere, are illustrated by utilizing a numerical model based on the solution of a set of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Because SDE-based models are especially well suited for such studies, we are able to gain new insights into this subject. The differences in the modulation brought about by each of three choices for the heliospheric magnetic field are studied as typical well-known cases; they are the unmodified Parker field, and the Smith-Bieber and Jokipii-Kóta modified fields. It is illustrated that both these modifications change the Parker field satisfactorily in the heliospheric polar regions, but that the modification of Smith and Bieber affects a larger reduction in cosmic ray drift effects in these regions. The general features of these two modifications are illustrated and the Smith-Bieber modified field is applied in a cosmic ray modulation model to reproduce observational proton spectra from the PAMELA mission during the solar minimum of 2006 - 2009. These SDE-based results are compared to the results from other studies and found to be in good qualitative agreement.

  17. Low-Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; ACE/CRIS Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV/nucleon have been measured with high precision as a result of experiments on the HEAO, Ulysses, and ACE spacecrafts. The observations provide energy spectra, elemental abundances, and isotopic composition for elements up through Z=30. They include both stable and radioactive nuclides that are synthesized in stars or are produced by nuclear fragmentation during diffusion at high energies through interstellar medium. From these data one obtains a rather detailed picture of the origin of low-energy cosmic rays. For refractory species, the cosmic-ray source composition closely resembles that of the Sun, suggesting that cosmic rays are accelerated from a well-mixed sample of interstellar matter. A chemical fractionation process has depleted the abundances of volatile elements relative to refractories. Using various radioactive clock isotopes it has been shown that particle acceleration occurs at least 105 years after supernova nucleosynthesis and that the accelerated particles diffuse in the Galaxy for approximately 15 Myr after acceleration. Energy spectra and secondary-to-primary ratios are reasonably well accounted for by models in which particles gain the bulk of their energy in a single encounter with a strong shock. Among the large number of species that have been measured, 22Ne stands out as the only nuclide with an abundance that is clearly much different than solar. To test models proposed to account for this anomaly, the data are being analyzed for predicted smaller effects on abundances of other nuclides. In addition to providing a detailed understanding of the origin and acceleration of low-energy cosmic rays, these data are providing constraints on the chemical evolution of interstellar matter. This work was supported by NASA at Caltech (under grant NAG5-6912), JPL, NASA/GSFC, and Washington U.

  18. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipari, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the "high energy universe" is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma-rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non-perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ˜ 1020 eV, or a nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  19. Actinides in the Source of Cosmic Rays and the Present Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.; Kratz, K. -L.

    2003-01-01

    The abundances of the actinide elements in the cosmic rays can provide critical constraints on the major sites of their acceleration. Using recent calculations of the r-process yields in core collapse supernovae, we have determined the actinide abundances averaged over various assumed time intervals for their supernova generation and their cosmic-ray acceleration. Using standard Galactic chemical evolution models, we have also determined the expected actinide abundances in the present interstellar medium. From these two components, we have calculated the U/Th and other actinide abundances expected in the supernova-active cores of superbubbles, as a function of their ages and mean metallicity resulting from dilution with interstellar cloud debris. Then, using observations of the fractions of Galactic supernovae that occur in superbubbles and in the rest of the interstellar medium, we calculate the expected actinide abundances in cosmic rays accelerated by Galactic supernovae. We find that the current measurements of actinide/Pt-group and preliminary estimates of the UPuCm/Th ratio in cosmic rays are all consistent with the expected values if superbubble cores have mean metallicities of around 3 times solar. Such metallicities are quite comparable to the superbubble core metallicities inferred from other cosmic-ray observations. Future, more precise measurements of these ratios with experiments such as ECCO are needed to provide a better measure of the mean source metallicity sampled by the local Galactic cosmic rays. Measurements of the cosmic- ray actinide abundances have been favorably compared with the protosolar ratio, inferred from present solar system abundances, to infer that the cosmic rays are accelerated from the general interstellar medium. We suggest, however, that such an inference is not valid because the expected actinide abundances in the present interstellar medium are very different from the protosolar values, which sampled the interstellar medium

  20. Production of Magnetic Turbulence by Cosmic Rays Drifting Upstream of Supernova Remnant Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroman, Thomas; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi

    2008-01-01

    I will present results of our recent two- and three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic-turbulence production by cosmic-ray ions drifting upstream of supernova remnant shocks. These studies' aim is twofold: test recent predictions of strong amplification in short wavelength, non-resonant wave modes, and study the subsequent evolution of the magnetic turbulence, including its backreaction on cosmic-ray trajectories. We confirm that the drifting cosmic rays give rise to a turbulent magnetic field, but show that an oblique filamentary mode grows more rapidly than the non-resonant parallel modes found in analytical theory. The field perturbations grow more slowly than estimated using a quasi-linear analytical approach for the parallel plane-wave mode, and saturate in amplitude at deltaB/B approximately equal to 1. The backreaction of the magnetic turbulence on the particles leads to an alignment of the bulk-flow velocities of the cosmic rays and the background medium. This is an essential characteristic of cosmic ray-modified shocks: the upstream flow speed is continuously changed by the cosmic rays. The reduction of relative drift between cosmic rays and background medium accounts for the saturation of the instability at only moderate magnetic-field amplitudes. It is possible that the prolonged magnetic field growth observed in recent MHD simulations results from a cosmic-ray current assumed to be constant and thus immune to the backreaction from the turbulent field. We speculate that the parallel plane-wave mode found in analytical treatments very quickly leads co filamentation, which we observe in our PIC modeling and is also apparent in the MHD simulations.

  1. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Prince, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is research in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology. The primary activities discussed involve the development of new instrumentation and techniques for future space flight. In many cases these instrumentation developments were tested in balloon flight instruments designed to conduct new investigations in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics. The results of these investigations are briefly summarized. Specific topics include a quantitative investigation of the solar modulation of cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei, a study of cosmic ray positron and electron spectra in interplanetary and interstellar space, the solar modulation of cosmic rays, an investigation of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of cosmic ray isotopic abundances, and a balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen.

  2. Cosmic Ray Observatories for Space Weather Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    The Mexican Space Weather Service (SCiESMEX) was created in October 2014. Some observatories measure data for the service at different frequencies and particles. Two cosmic ray observatories detect the particle variations attributed to solar emissions, and are an important source of information for the SCiESMEX. The Mexico City Cosmic Ray Observatory consists of a neutron monitor (6-NM-64) and a muon telescope, that detect the hadronic and hard component of the secondary cosmic rays in the atmosphere. It has been in continous operation since 1990. The Sierra Negra Cosmic Ray Observatory consists of a solar neutron telescope and the scintillator cosmic ray telescope. These telescopes can detect the neutrons, generated in solar flares and the hadronic and hard components of the secondary cosmic rays. It has been in continous operation since 2004. We present the two observatories and the capability to detect variations in the cosmic rays, generated by the emissions of the solar activity.

  3. Assumed-Competence Based on Undervaluing Others as a Determinant of Emotions: Focusing on Anger and Sadness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayamizu, Toshihiko; Kino, Kazuyo; Takagi, Kuniko; Tan, Eng-Hai

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether a new construct "Assumed-Competence based on undervaluing others (AC)" could be a determinant of anger and sadness for contemporary Japanese adolescents. A set of questionnaires was administered to 584 high school students, who rated ACS-2 (Assumed-Competence Scale, second version), Rosenberg's…

  4. 12 CFR Appendix L to Part 226 - Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates L Appendix L to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED..., App. L Appendix L to Part 226—Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix L to Part 1026 - Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates L Appendix L to Part 1026 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 1026, App. L Appendix L to Part 1026—Assumed Loan Periods...

  6. 12 CFR Appendix L to Part 226 - Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates L Appendix L to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED..., App. L Appendix L to Part 226—Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates...

  7. 12 CFR Appendix L to Part 1026 - Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates L Appendix L to Part 1026 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 1026, App. L Appendix L to Part 1026—Assumed Loan Periods...

  8. 42 CFR 423.908. - Phased-down State contribution to drug benefit costs assumed by Medicare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... costs assumed by Medicare. 423.908. Section 423.908. Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM VOLUNTARY MEDICARE... Provisions § 423.908. Phased-down State contribution to drug benefit costs assumed by Medicare. This...

  9. Drift Kinetic Theory and Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2009-11-11

    Starting from the Vlasov or Boltzmann equation for cosmic rays in a random and regular magnetic field, we introduce guiding center coordinates and transform the velocity to a frame moving at the electric field drift velocity. The resultant equation is written in terms of the parallel and perpendicular momentum and gyro-phase of the particle, and describes spatial particle transport in guiding center coordinates. Using the drift ordering in which the gyro-scale and gyro-period are assumed short compared to the background flow length and time scales, and averaging over the gyro-phase gives the drift kinetic equation in which the adiabatic moment and total particle energy in the inertial frame are used to describe the momentum and energy of the particle. If the parallel electric field is small, the adiabatic moment of the particles is conserved to lowest order in the drift ordering. The resultant drift kinetic equation properly takes into account the energy changes of the particles due to drifts along the electric field, and betatron acceleration, but contains only the lowest order approximation for the guiding center drift velocity to describe the spatial advection of the particles. A further transformation of variables, in which the particle momentum and pitch angle are specified in the local fluid frame, gives the focussed transport equation derived by Skilling to describe particle transport in a moving plasma medium, such as the solar wind. The connections to previous derivations of the Skilling's pitch angle focussed transport equation are discussed.

  10. Drift Kinetic Theory and Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2009-11-01

    Starting from the Vlasov or Boltzmann equation for cosmic rays in a random and regular magnetic field, we introduce guiding center coordinates and transform the velocity to a frame moving at the electric field drift velocity. The resultant equation is written in terms of the parallel and perpendicular momentum and gyro-phase of the particle, and describes spatial particle transport in guiding center coordinates. Using the drift ordering in which the gyro-scale and gyro-period are assumed short compared to the background flow length and time scales, and averaging over the gyro-phase gives the drift kinetic equation in which the adiabatic moment and total particle energy in the inertial frame are used to describe the momentum and energy of the particle. If the parallel electric field is small, the adiabatic moment of the particles is conserved to lowest order in the drift ordering. The resultant drift kinetic equation properly takes into account the energy changes of the particles due to drifts along the electric field, and betatron acceleration, but contains only the lowest order approximation for the guiding center drift velocity to describe the spatial advection of the particles. A further transformation of variables, in which the particle momentum and pitch angle are specified in the local fluid frame, gives the focussed transport equation derived by Skilling [1] to describe particle transport in a moving plasma medium, such as the solar wind. The connections to previous derivations of the Skilling's pitch angle focussed transport equation are discussed.

  11. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics: Cosmic physics portion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Schindler, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Research in particle astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology is supported under NASA Grant NAGW-1919. A three-year proposal for continuation of support was submitted a year ago and put into effect 1 October 1992. This report is the combined progress report and continuation application called for under the Federal Demonstration Project. Gamma-ray Astrophysics at SRL is separately supported under NAGW-1919 and will be separately summarized and proposed. This report will document progress and plans for our particle spectroscopy activities and for related data analysis, calibration, and community service activities. A bibliography and a budget will be attached as appendices. The Caltech SRL research program includes a heavy emphasis on elemental and isotopic spectroscopy of energetic particles in the cosmic radiation; in solar, interplanetary, and anomalous 'cosmic' radiation; and in planetary magnetospheres as discussed.

  12. Cosmic vacuum energy decay and creation of cosmic matter.

    PubMed

    Fahr, Hans-Jörg; Heyl, Michael

    2007-09-01

    In the more recent literature on cosmological evolutions of the universe, the cosmic vacuum energy has become a nonrenouncable ingredient. The cosmological constant Lambda, first invented by Einstein, but later also rejected by him, presently experiences an astonishing revival. Interestingly enough, it acts like a constant vacuum energy density would also do. Namely, it has an accelerating action on cosmic dynamics, without which, as it appears, presently obtained cosmological data cannot be conciliated with theory. As we are going to show in this review, however, the concept of a constant vacuum energy density is unsatisfactory for very basic reasons because it would claim for a physical reality that acts upon spacetime and matter dynamics without itself being acted upon by spacetime or matter. PMID:17457553

  13. A Simple Gravitational Lens Model for Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We present a simple gravitational lens model to illustrate the ease of using the embedded lensing theory when studying cosmic voids. It confirms the previously used repulsive lensing models for deep voids. We start by estimating magnitude fluctuations and weak-lensing shears of background sources lensed by large voids. We find that sources behind large (˜90 Mpc) and deep voids (density contrast about -0.9) can be magnified or demagnified with magnitude fluctuations of up to ˜0.05 mag and that the weak-lensing shear can be up to the ˜10-2 level in the outer regions of large voids. Smaller or shallower voids produce proportionally smaller effects. We investigate the “wiggling” of the primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies caused by intervening cosmic voids. The void-wiggling of primary CMB temperature gradients is of the opposite sign to that caused by galaxy clusters. Only extremely large and deep voids can produce wiggling amplitudes similar to galaxy clusters, ˜15 μK by a large void of radius ˜4° and central density contrast -0.9 at redshift 0.5 assuming a CMB background gradient of ˜10 μK arcmin-1. The dipole signal is spread over the entire void area, and not concentrated at the lens center as it is for clusters. Finally, we use our model to simulate CMB sky maps lensed by large cosmic voids. Our embedded theory can easily be applied to more complicated void models and used to study gravitational lensing of the CMB, to probe dark matter profiles, to reduce the lensing-induced systematics in supernova Hubble diagrams, and to study the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.

  14. Very high energy antineutrinos from photo-disintegration of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nayantara

    2016-02-01

    The photo-disintegration of cosmic ray nuclei by starlight leads to the production of secondary antineutrinos. We have assumed that the flux of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei near the Galactic plane region is the same as that observed near the earth and calculated the antineutrino flux produced from their photo-disintegration. The IceCube detector has measured the neutrino/antineutrino flux in the TeV-PeV energy range. Our calculated secondary antineutrino flux in the energy range of 10-100 TeV is found to be much less compared to the flux detected by the IceCube collaboration. The upper limit on the intensity of the radiation field in the extragalactic medium is much lower than that near the Galactic center. If we extend our formalism to the extragalactic medium the contribution from the photo-disintegration of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray heavy nuclei remains insignificant due to their very low flux.

  15. Cosmic rays in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the relationship to our Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.; Sreekumar, P.

    1991-01-01

    Information on the cosmic rays in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds may be obtained from measurements of the synchrotron radiation related to the energetic electrons, which are believed to contain only about 1 percent of the cosmic rays energy. Assuming the same ratio as in our Galaxy between the cosmic ray electrons and nucleons, the energy density distribution may be estimated. This prediction is compared to that deduced from the matter density distribution, the concept of dynamic balance, and an appropriate coupling scale. For the LMC, the condition of quasi-equilibrium seems satisfied as is required for dynamic balance to be a valid concept, but for the SMC, this seems not to be the case.

  16. Null test of the cosmic curvature using H (z ) and supernovae data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Yang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a model-independent approach to the null test of the cosmic curvature, which is geometrically related to the Hubble parameter H (z ) and luminosity distance dL(z ). Combining the independent observations of H (z ) and dL(z ), we use the model-independent smoothing technique, Gaussian processes, to reconstruct them and determine the cosmic curvature ΩK(0 ) in the null test relation. The null test is totally geometrical and does not assume any cosmological model. We show that the cosmic curvature ΩK(0 )=0 is consistent with current observational data sets, falling within the 1 σ limit. To demonstrate the effect on the precision of the null test, we produce a series of simulated data of the models with different ΩK(0 ). Future observations in better quality can provide a greater improvement to constrain or refute the flat universe with ΩK(0 )=0 .

  17. Lead, platinum and other heavy elements in the primary cosmic radiation: HEAO-3 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Brewster, N. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    An observation of the abundances of cosmic-ray lead and platinum-group nuclei using data from the HEAO-3 Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HNE) which consisted of ion chambers mounted on both sides of a plastic Cherenkov counter (Binns et al., 1981) is reported. Further analysis with more stringent selections, inclusion of additional data, and a calibration at the LBL Bevalac, have allowed the determination of the abundance ratio of lead and the platinum group of elements for particles that had a cutoff rigidity R(c) 5 GV. The observed ratio for Pb/Pt is distinctly lower than that predicted by any of the standard models for cosmic ray sources. It is possible that the difference is not an indication that the cosmic ray source composition is greatly different from that of the solar system, but rather that there is less Pb in the solar system and in the r-process than is assumed in the standard models.

  18. Cosmic physics data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, R. Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    A data analysis program was carried out to investigate the intensity, propagation, and origin of primary Cosmic Ray Galactic electrons. Scanning was carried out on two new balloon flight experiments as well as the border area of previous experiments. The identification and evaluation of the energies of the primary electrons were carried out. A new analysis of these data were incorporated into an overall evaluation of the roll of electrons in the problem of the origin of cosmic rays. Recent measurements indicate that the earth may be within the expanding Geminga supernova shock wave which is expected to have a major effect upon the propagation and the energy spectrum of galactic electrons. Calculations with the Geminga model indicate that the cut-off energy may be very close to the observed highest energy electrons in our analysis.

  19. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-06

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. The small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurement technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.

  20. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-06

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. The small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurementmore » technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.« less

  1. Testing Gravity using Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Though general relativity is well-tested on small (Solar System) scales, the late-time acceleration of the Universe provides strong motivation to test GR on cosmological scales. The difference between the small and large scale behavior of gravity is determined by the screening mechanism in modified gravity theories. Dark matter halos are often screened in these models, especially in models with Vainshtein screening, motivating a search for signatures of modified gravity in cosmic voids. We explore density, force, and velocity profiles of voids found in N-body simulations, using both dark matter particles and dark matter halos to identify the voids. The prospect of testing gravity using cosmic voids may be limited by the sparsity of halos as tracers of the density field.

  2. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  3. Cosmic Revelation: Making Astroparticles Visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, T. O.; Haungs, A.; Schieler, H.; Weindl, A.

    2010-06-01

    Cosmic Revelation is a prime example of a successful art and science project connecting art and astroparticle physics. One of the main reasons for its success might be that the collaboration between the KArlsruhe Shower Core and Array DEtector (KASCADE) experiment and Tim Otto Roth is both a minimalist light art project and a scientific experiment. In a field of 16 flashing mirror sculptures connected to the KASCADE detector field at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany) the impact of high energy cosmic rays on Earth can be experienced directly. In just one year the project has developed from the initial concept to its first presentation in a public space in autumn 2008. We explain how the project developed, and also highlight the practical and conceptual conditions for its realisation.

  4. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. Furthermore, the small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurement technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.

  5. Cosmic censorship in Lovelock theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Edelstein, José D.

    2013-11-01

    In analyzing maximally symmetric Lovelock black holes with non-planar horizon topologies, many novel features have been observed. The existence of finite radius singularities, a mass gap in the black hole spectrum and solutions displaying multiple horizons are noteworthy examples. Naively, in all these cases, the appearance of naked singularities seems unavoidable, leading to the question of whether these theories are consistent gravity theories. We address this question and show that whenever the cosmic censorship conjecture is threaten, an instability generically shows up driving the system to a new configuration with presumably no naked singularities. Also, the same kind of instability shows up in the process of spherical black holes evaporation in these theories, suggesting a new phase for their decay. We find circumstantial evidence indicating that, contrary to many claims in the literature, the cosmic censorship hypothesis holds in Lovelock theory.

  6. Cosmic Ray research in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Zazyan, M.

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic Ray research on Mt. Aragats began in 1934 with the measurements of East-West anisotropy by the group from Leningrad Physics-Technical Institute and Norair Kocharian from Yerevan State University. Stimulated by the results of their experiments in 1942 Artem and Abraham Alikhanyan brothers organized a scientific expedition to Aragats. Since that time physicists were studying Cosmic Ray fluxes on Mt. Aragats with various particle detectors: mass spectrometers, calorimeters, transition radiation detectors, and huge particle detector arrays detecting protons and nuclei accelerated in most violent explosions in Galaxy. Latest activities at Mt. Aragats include Space Weather research with networks of particle detectors located in Armenia and abroad, and detectors of Space Education center in Yerevan.

  7. Antiprotons in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons were first detected three years ago by Golden et al. (1979) and Bogomolov et al. (1979). The measured flux at about 10 GeV was found to be a factor of 5 to 10 higher than expected in the leaky box model. More recently, an unexpected high antiproton flux has been measured by Buffington et al. (1981) at about 200 MeV, well below a low energy cut-off in the spectrum expected if the antiprotons are secondary. This paper briefly reviews calculations of the flux of secondary antiprotons expected for different models of cosmic ray propagation and discusses some of the primary origin hypotheses which have been proposed to account for the data.

  8. Cosmic microwave background theory

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in ℓ-space are consistent with a ΔT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are ∼(10−5)2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at ℓ ≳ 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Λ cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 ± 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 ± 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 ± 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 ± 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Λ and moderate constraints on Ωtot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant. PMID:9419321

  9. Charged Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachelrieß, M.

    2013-04-01

    High-energy neutrino astronomy has grown up, with IceCube as one of its main experiments having sufficient sensitivity to test "vanilla" models of astrophysical neutrinos. I review predictions of neutrino fluxes as well as the status of cosmic ray physics. I comment also briefly on an improvement of the Fermi-LAT limit for cosmogenic neutrinos and on the two neutrino events presented by IceCube first at "Neutrino 2012".

  10. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  11. Neutrino mass without cosmic variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, Marilena

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the absolute scale of the neutrino masses is one of the most exciting opportunities available with near-term cosmological data sets. Two quantities that are sensitive to neutrino mass, scale-dependent halo bias b (k ) and the linear growth parameter f (k ) inferred from redshift-space distortions, can be measured without cosmic variance. Unlike the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, which always has a finite error, the error on b (k ) and f (k ) continues to decrease as the number density of tracers increases. This paper presents forecasts for statistics of galaxy and lensing fields that are sensitive to neutrino mass via b (k ) and f (k ). The constraints on neutrino mass from the auto- and cross-power spectra of spectroscopic and photometric galaxy samples are weakened by scale-dependent bias unless a very high density of tracers is available. In the high-density limit, using multiple tracers allows cosmic variance to be beaten, and the forecasted errors on neutrino mass shrink dramatically. In practice, beating the cosmic-variance errors on neutrino mass with b (k ) will be a challenge, but this signal is nevertheless a new probe of neutrino effects on structure formation that is interesting in its own right.

  12. Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    2014-08-01

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for ~161 days in six flights over Antarctica. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from ~ 10^10 to > 10^14 eV at an average altitude of ~38.5 km with ~3.9 g/cm2 atmospheric overburden. Cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Building on success of the balloon flights, the payload is being reconfigured for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with the CREAM calorimeter for energy measurements, and four finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector layers for precise charge measurements. In addition, the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors (TCD and BCD) and Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) have been newly developed. The TCD and BCD are scintillator based segmented detectors to separate electrons from nuclei using the shower profile differences, while BSD distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. The project status including results from on-going analysis of existing data and future plans will be discussed.

  13. Dark ages and cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Tirthankar Roy

    2012-03-01

    About 300,000 years after the Big Bang, the protons and the electrons combined for the first time in the Universe to form hydrogen (and helium) atoms, which is known as the recombination epoch. Following that, the Universe entered a phase called the "dark ages" where no significant radiation sources existed. The dark ages ended once the first structures collapsed and luminous sources like stars and accreting black holes started forming. The radiation from these sources then ionized hydrogen atoms in the surrounding medium, a process known as "reionization". Reionization is thus the second major change in the ionization state of hydrogen (and helium) in the Universe (the first being the recombination). The study of dark ages and cosmic reionization has acquired increasing significance over the last few years because of various reasons. On the observational front, we now have good quality data of different types at high redshifts (quasar absorption spectra, radiation backgrounds at different frequencies, number counts of galaxies, cosmic microwave background polarization, Lyα emitters and so on). Theoretically, the importance of the reionization lies in its close coupling with the formation of first cosmic structures, and there have been numerous progresses in modeling the process. In this article, we introduce the basic concepts involving the formation of first structures and evolution of the ionization history of the Universe. We also discuss the possibility of constraining the reionization history by matching theoretical models with observations.

  14. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, Lukasz; Petrosian, Vahe; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-08-19

    Recent observations of cosmic ray electrons from several instruments have revealed various degrees of deviation in the measured electron energy distribution from a simple power-law, in a form of an excess around 0.1 to 1 TeV energies. An even more prominent deviation and excess has been observed in the fraction of cosmic ray positrons around 10 and 100 GeV energies. These observations have received considerable attention and many theoretical models have been proposed to explain them. The models rely on either dark matter annihilation/decay or specific nearby astrophysical sources, and involve several additional assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution or particle acceleration. In this paper we show that the observed excesses in the electron spectrum may be easily reproduced without invoking any unusual sources other than the general diffuse Galactic components of cosmic rays. The model presented here assumes a power-law injection of electrons (and protons) by supernova remnants, and evaluates their expected energy spectrum based on a simple kinetic equation describing the propagation of charged particles in the interstellar medium. The primary physical effect involved is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. With a very reasonable choice of the model parameters characterizing the local interstellar medium, we can reproduce the most recent observations by Fermi and HESS experiments. Interestingly, in our model the injection spectral index of cosmic ray electrons becomes comparable to, or even equal to that of cosmic ray protons. The Klein-Nishina effect may also affect the propagation of the secondary e{sup {+-}} pairs, and therefore modify the cosmic ray positron-to-electron ratio. We have explored this possibility by considering two mechanisms for production of e{sup {+-}} pairs within the Galaxy. The first is due to the decay of {pi}{sup {+-}}'s produced by interaction of cosmic ray nuclei with ambient protons

  15. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  16. Brane Inflation: From Superstring to Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, S.-H. Henry

    2004-12-10

    Brane inflation, where branes move towards each other in the brane world, has been shown to be quite natural in superstring theory. Inflation ends when branes collide and heat the universe, initiating the hot big bang. Cosmic strings (but not domain walls or monopoles) are copiously produced during the brane collision. Using the COBE data on the temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, the cosmic string tension {mu} is estimated to be around 10 -6 > G{mu} > 10-11, while the present observational bound is 7 x 10 -7 > G{mu}. This implies that the anisotropy that seeds structure formation comes mostly from inflation, but with a small component (< 10%) from cosmic string effects. This cosmic string effect should be testable in the near future via gravitational lensing, the cosmic microwave background radiation, and/or gravitational wave detectors like LIGO II/VIRGO.

  17. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  18. The elemental abundance ratios of interstellar secondary and primary cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. W.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    We report new observations of abundances in the charge range (Z) between 2 and 10, which were obtained with a dE/dx-Cerenkov detector launched into a polar orbit on OGO-6 as part of the Caltech Solar and Galactic Cosmic Ray Experiment. Integral rigidity spectra of all the elements observed have shapes similar to that of the helium spectrum in the rigidity range of 2 to 14 GV, approaching a power law with exponent -1.6 above 8 GV. Calculations of interstellar propagation assuming a steady-state model and including the presence of interstellar helium and the effects of solar modulation predict a variation with rigidity of ratios such as Be-O and B/O, which is not observed. The data can be explained by assuming a rigidity-dependent confinement of cosmic rays within the Galaxy.

  19. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  20. Underground measurements on secondary cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, A. G.; Wilson, C. W.; Fenton, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements made at the Poatina cosmic ray station (41.8 S 149.9 E, 347 m.w.e.) from August 1983 to July 1984 are summarized. The cosmic ray primary particles responsible for events detected at the station have a median primary energy of 1.2 TeV. The motivation for part of this work came from the reported detection of narrow angle anisotropies in the arrival direction of cosmic rays.

  1. Origin of high energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons and the chemical composition in the region of the 'knee' of the cosmic ray energy spectrum are discussed. The importance of a direct determination of the energy spectrum of each major component of cosmic radiation through the knee region is stressed, and the necessary kinds of experiments are described. It is emphasized that antiprotons are a unique probe of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the galaxy because of the high threshold for their production.

  2. Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, James A.

    2013-02-07

    From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

  3. Deuterium and He-3 in cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Observation of a large flux of antiprotons in cosmic rays prompted many to postulate new ideas relating to the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy, within the framework of the secondary hypothesis. Under this hypothesis, cosmic rays traverse a large amount of matter either in the source region or in the interstellar space. As a result, large amounts of deuterium and He-3 are also produced as a consequence of spallation of helium and heavier nuclei. In this paper, the spectra of these isotopes are derived, using various models for the propagation of cosmic rays and compare with the existing observations.

  4. Propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R. R.; Stephens, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a model for analyzing the propagation of cosmic rays are discussed. The requirements for analyzing the relevant observational data on cosmic rays are defines as: (1) the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays as a function of energy, (2) the flux and energy spectrum of the individual nucleonic components, (3) the flux and energy spectrum of the electronic component, (4) the cosmic ray prehistory, and (5) the degree of isotropy in their arrival directions as a function of energy. It is stated that the model which has been able to bring to pass the greatest measure of success is the galactic confinement model.

  5. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuppan, F.; Röken, C.; Fedrau, N.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-06-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies E ≲ 1 TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies Ep ≥ 280 MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies Ep < 280 MeV can be performed in order to study potential sources of (sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  6. Diffuse fluxes of cosmic high energy neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Production spectra of high-energy neutrinos from galactic cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray interactions with microwave black-body photons are presented and discussed. These production processes involve the decay of charged pions and are thus related to the production of cosmic gamma-rays from the decay of neutral pions. Estimates of the neutrino fluxes from various diffuse cosmic sources are then made and the reasons fro significant differences with previous estimates are discussed. Predicted event rates for a DUMAND type detection system are significantly lower than early estimates indicated.

  7. Anuradha and low-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Durgaprasad, N.; Mitra, Banashree; Dutta, A.

    1993-01-01

    After critically reviewing observational results obtained by astronomical spacecraft in the interplanetary medium for several aspects of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs), attention is given to spacecraft data gathered in the magnetosphere and a detailed description is given of the Anuradha cosmic-ray experiment carried by Spacelab-3. The Anuradha results discussed concern the orbit average flux and ionization state of ACRs, the origins of partially ionized galactic cosmic-ray sub-Fe and Fe ions, and the significance of enhanced abundance ratios of sub-Fe and Fe ions in GCRs inside the magnetosphere.

  8. A Journey Through Researches on Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Roy, M.; Barman, P.; Mukherjee, C. D.

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic ray causes hazards to microelectronic circuits. Presence of charged particles in the atmosphere was first noticed by Coloumb in 1785. But cosmic ray was discovered by Victor Hess in 1912. However new era of particle physics was started with the invention of neutron monitor in 1948 by John A. Simpson. New information regarding the energy spectrum, anisotropy, latitudinal, longitudinal and daily variation of cosmic ray has added the scientific yield one by one from the analysis of the data of different monitors over the globe. This paper is a brief account of the striking events of cosmic ray which may be the background of future researchers.

  9. Are cosmic strings gravitationally stable topological defects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleiser, Reinaldo; Pullin, Jorge

    1989-08-01

    A possible mechanism for the dissapearance of an open cosmic string into gravitational radiation is described. This involves the splitting of an infinite straight cosmic string into two pieces whose ends are traveling outward at the speed of light with the associated emission of a gravitational shock wave. This model can also be used to describe the following situations: (1) the development of a growing region of different string tension within a cosmic string, and (2) the creation of a cosmic string in an otherwise flat background.

  10. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  11. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic pulsars and the effect of their Galactic counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela V.

    2013-03-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy nuclei in fast spinning newborn pulsars can explain the observed spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the trend towards heavier nuclei for energies above 1019 eV as reported by the Auger Observatory. Pulsar acceleration implies a hard injection spectrum ( ~ E-1) due to pulsar spin down and a maximum energy Emax ~ Z 1019 eV due to the limit on the spin rate of neutron stars. We have previously shown that the escape through the young supernova remnant softens the spectrum, decreases slightly the maximum energy, and generates secondary nuclei. Here we show that the distribution of pulsar birth periods and the effect of propagation in the interstellar and intergalactic media modifies the combined spectrum of all pulsars. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300 ms, we show that the contribution of extragalactic pulsar births to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum naturally gives rise to a contribution to very high energy cosmic rays (VHECRs, between 1016 and 1018 eV) by Galactic pulsar births. The required injected composition to fit the observed spectrum depends on the absolute energy scale, which is uncertain, differing between Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The contribution of Galactic pulsar births can also bridge the gap between predictions for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and the observed spectrum just below the ankle, depending on the composition of the cosmic rays that escape the supernova remnant and the diffusion behavior of VHECRs in the Galaxy.

  12. On the large-scale structures formed by wakes of open cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Morioka, Shoji; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    Large-scale structures of the universe have been variously described as sheetlike, filamentary, cellular, bubbles or spongelike. Recently cosmic strings became one of viable candidates for a galaxy formation scenario, and some of the large-scale structures seem to be simply explained by the open cosmic strings. According to this scenario, sheets are wakes which are traces of moving open cosmic strings where dark matter and baryonic matter have accumulated. Filaments are intersections of such wakes and high density regions are places where three wakes intersect almost orthogonally. The wakes formed at t sub eq become the largest surface density among all wakes, where t sub eq is the epoch when matter density equals to radiation density. If we assume that there is one open cosmic string per each horizon, then it can be explained that the typical distances among wakes, filaments and clusters are also approx. 10(exp 2) Mpc. This model does not exclude a much more large scale structure. Open cosmic string may move even now and accumulate cold dark matter after its traces. However, the surface density is much smaller than the ones formed at t sub eq. From this model, it is expected that the typical high density region will have extended features such as six filaments and three sheets and be surrounded by eight empty regions (voids). Here, the authors are mainly concerned with such structures and have made numerical simulations for the formation of such large scale structures.

  13. Detectability and Parameter Estimation of Gravitational Waves from Cosmic String with Ground-Based Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzurihara, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    Cosmic string is one dimensional topological defects which might be formed at the phase transition in the early universe. Gravitational Wave (GW) waveform and its power spectrum from structure in closed cosmic string loop that is called as "cusp" are theoretically predicted. Cosmic string is thought to be described with two characteristic parameters: string tension μ and initial loop size α. We demonstrate numerical simulation for GWs from closed comic string loops to study detectability and parameter decision with ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA, advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo and LIGO-India. We employ characteristic parameters 10 - 13 < Gμ < 10 - 7 and 10 - 16 < α < 10 - 1, assuming uniform distribution of cosmic string in isotropic direction, at time epochs of loop forming and GW emission according to the universe model. We calculate waveform numerically in time domain of each GW from these distributed cosmic strings, and superpose waveforms to generate continuously observational signal on the ground-based GW detectors, including detector responses. We consider data analysis for stochastic background type gravitational wave signatures in the observation.

  14. Cosmic gamma-rays and cosmic nuclei above 1 TeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Work on cosmic gamma rays and cosmic nuclei above I TeV is described and evaluated. The prospect that gamma ray astronomy above I TeV will give new insights into high energy cosmic ray origin within our galaxy is particularly bright.

  15. High Energy Cosmic Electrons: Messengers from Nearby Cosmic Ray Sources or Dark Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the recent discoveries by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope in reference to high energy cosmic electrons, and whether their source is cosmic rays or dark matter. Specific interest is devoted to Cosmic Ray electrons anisotropy,

  16. Violation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin Cutoff: A Tempest in a (Magnetic) Teapot? Why Cosmic Ray Energies above 1020 eV May Not Require New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Glennys R.; Piran, Tsvi

    2000-04-01

    The apparent lack of suitable astrophysical sources for the observed highest energy cosmic rays within ~20 Mpc is the ``Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) paradox.'' We constrain representative models of the extragalactic magnetic field structure by Faraday rotation measurements; limits are at the μG level rather than the nG level usually assumed. In such fields, even the highest energy cosmic rays experience large deflections. This allows nearby active galactic nuclei (possibly quiet today) or gamma ray bursts to be the source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays without contradicting the GZK distance limit.

  17. Supersymmetric QCD and high energy cosmic rays: Fragmentation functions of supersymmetric QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corianò, Claudio; Faraggi, Alon E.

    2002-04-01

    The supersymmetric evolution of the fragmentation functions (or timelike evolution) within N=1 QCD is discussed and predictions for the fragmentation functions of the theory (into final protons) are given. We use a backward running of the supersymmetric DGLAP equations, using a method developed in previous works. We start from the usual QCD parametrizations at low energy and run the DGLAP back, up to an intermediate scale-assumed to be supersymmetric-where we switch-on supersymmetry. From there on we assume the applicability of an N=1 supersymmetric evolution (ESAP). We elaborate on the possible application of these results to high energy cosmic rays near the GZK cutoff.

  18. Cosmic radiation in commercial aviation.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Michael

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge of cosmic radiation and its applicability to commercial aviation. Galactic cosmic radiation emanates from outside the solar system, while occasionally a disturbance in the suns' atmosphere leads to a surge in radiation particles. Protection is provided by the suns' magnetic field, the earths' magnetic field, and the earths' atmosphere. Dose rates are dependent on the altitude, the geomagnetic latitude and the solar cycle. For occupational exposure to ionising radiation, which includes aircrew, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends maximum mean body effective dose limits of 20mSv/yr (averaged over 5 years, with a maximum in any 1 year of 50mSv). Radiation doses can be measured during flight or may be calculated using a computer-modelling program such as CARI, EPCARD, SIEVERT or PCAIRE. Mean ambient equivalent dose rates are consistently reported in the region of 4-5microSv/h for long-haul pilots and 1-3microSv/h for short-haul, giving an annual mean effective exposure of the order 2-3mSv for long-haul and 1-2mSv for short-haul pilots. Epidemiological studies of flight crew have not shown conclusive evidence for any increase in cancer mortality or cancer incidence directly attributable to ionising radiation exposure. Whilst there is no level of radiation exposure below which effects do not occur, current evidence indicates that the probability of airline crew or passengers suffering adverse health effects as a result of exposure to cosmic radiation is very low. PMID:18486066

  19. Observational probes of cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of “dark energy” with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein’s theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious efforts to understand its origin, with experiments that aim to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and the abundance of galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit “Stage IV” dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and direct measurements of the Hubble constant H0. We present extensive forecasts for constraints on the dark energy equation of state and parameterized deviations from General Relativity, achievable with Stage III and Stage IV experimental programs that incorporate supernovae, BAO, weak lensing, and cosmic microwave background data. We also show the level of precision required for clusters or other methods to provide constraints competitive with those of these fiducial programs. We emphasize the value of a balanced program that employs several of the most powerful methods in combination, both to cross-check systematic uncertainties and to take advantage of complementary information. Surveys to probe cosmic acceleration produce data sets that support a wide range of scientific investigations, and they continue the longstanding astronomical tradition of mapping the universe in ever greater detail over ever

  20. Cosmic bulk flow and the local motion from Cosmicflows-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Yehuda; Courtois, Hélène M.; Tully, R. Brent

    2015-06-01

    Full sky surveys of peculiar velocity are arguably the best way to map the large-scale structure (LSS) out to distances of a few × 100 h-1 Mpc. Using the largest and most accurate ever catalogue of galaxy peculiar velocities Cosmicflows-2, the LSS has been reconstructed by means of the Wiener filter (WF) and constrained realizations (CRs) assuming as a Bayesian prior model the Λ cold dark matter model with the WMAP inferred cosmological parameters. This paper focuses on studying the bulk flow of the local flow field, defined as the mean velocity of top-hat spheres with radii ranging out to R = 500 h-1 Mpc. The estimated LSS, in general, and the bulk flow, in particular, are determined by the tension between the observational data and the assumed prior model. A pre-requisite for such an analysis is the requirement that the estimated bulk flow is consistent with the prior model. Such a consistency is found here. At R = 50 (150) h-1 Mpc, the estimated bulk velocity is 250 ± 21 (239 ± 38) km s-1. The corresponding cosmic variance at these radii is 126 (60) km s-1, which implies that these estimated bulk flows are dominated by the data and not by the assumed prior model. The estimated bulk velocity is dominated by the data out to R ≈ 200 h-1 Mpc, where the cosmic variance on the individual supergalactic Cartesian components (of the rms values) exceeds the variance of the CRs by at least a factor of 2. The SGX and SGY components of the cosmic microwave background dipole velocity are recovered by the WF velocity field down to a very few km s-1. The SGZ component of the estimated velocity, the one that is most affected by the zone of avoidance, is off by 126 km s-1 (an almost 2σ discrepancy). The bulk velocity analysis reported here is virtually unaffected by the Malmquist bias and very similar results are obtained for the data with and without the bias correction.

  1. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A review the implications of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background for cosmology. Thermalization and processes generating spectral distortions are discussed. Anisotropy predictions are described and compared with observational constraints. If the evidence for large-scale power in the galaxy distribution in excess of that predicted by the cold dark matter model is vindicated, and the observed structure originated via gravitational instabilities of primordial density fluctuations, the predicted amplitude of microwave background anisotropies on angular scales of a degree and larger must be at least several parts in 10 exp 6.

  2. Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, M. S.

    The international heliospheric year (IHY) has the purpose to promote research on the Sun-Heliosphere system outward to the local interstellar medium - the new frontier. This includes fostering international scientific cooperation in the study of heliophysical phenomena now and in the future. Part of this process is to communicate research done on the heliosphere, especially to the scientific community in Africa. A short review is given of the numerical modeling of the heliosphere, and of the modulation of cosmic rays and how these particles are used to probe the heliosphere to understand its basic features. Projects of both a theoretical and numerical nature are proposed for the IHY.

  3. Traces of a cosmic catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuianov, V. A.

    1982-03-01

    It is suggested that the ecological crisis which led to the extinction of many animal species approximately 65-million years ago may have been caused by a cosmic phenomenon, the fall of a giant meteorite (approximately 10 km in diameter). The fall of such a meteorite would have released a vast amount of dust into the atmosphere, leading to radical climatic changes and the extinction of the aforementioned species. The so-called iridium anomaly is cited as possible evidence of such an event.

  4. Evolution of cosmic string networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the evolution and observable consequences of a network of cosmic strings is given. A simple model for the evolution of the string network is presented, and related to the statistical mechanics of string networks. The model predicts the long string density throughout the history of the universe from a single parameter, which researchers calculate in radiation era simulations. The statistical mechanics arguments indicate a particular thermal form for the spectrum of loops chopped off the network. Detailed numerical simulations of string networks in expanding backgrounds are performed to test the model. Consequences for large scale structure, the microwave and gravity wave backgrounds, nucleosynthesis and gravitational lensing are calculated.

  5. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Rafael Antonio; Moncada, Roberto; Guerra, Juan; Anchordoqui, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The search for the origin(s) of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) remains one of the cornerstones of high energy astrophysics. The previously proposed sources of acceleration for these UHECRs were gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their energetic activity and powerful jets. However, a problem arises between the acceleration method and the observed CR spectrum. The CRs from GRBs or AGN jets are assumed to undergo Fermi acceleration and a source injection spectrum proportional to E^-2 is expected. However, the most recent fits to the spectrum and nuclear composition suggest an injection spectrum proportional to E^-1. It is well known that such a hard spectrum is characteristic of unipolar induction of rotating compact objects. When this method is applied to the AGN cores, they prove to be much too luminous to accelerate CR nuclei without photodisintegrating, thus creating significant energy losses. Instead, here we re-examine the possibility of these particles being accelerated around the much less luminous quasar remnants, or dead quasars. We compare the interaction times of curvature radiation and photodisintegration, the two primary energy loss considerations with the acceleration time scale. We show that the energy losses at the source are not significant enough as to prevent these CRs from reaching the maximum observed energies. Using data from observatories in the northern and southern sky, the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory respectively, two hotspots have been discerned which have some associated quasar remnants that help to motivate our study.

  6. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  7. What Are You Assuming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Nadia Stoyanova

    2012-01-01

    Students are often encouraged to work on problems "like mathematicians"--to be persistent, to investigate different approaches, and to evaluate solutions. This behavior, regarded as problem solving, is an essential component of mathematical practice. Some crucial aspects of problem solving include defining and interpreting problems, working with…

  8. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, Aϕ, and Aθ) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (λ||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient Gθs pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and λ|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients α (=λ⊥/λ∥) and ωτ (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport

  9. Contributions to the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of cosmic radiation, its measurements and their patterns are presented. Measurement techniques and variations in solar cosmic ray patterns and calculations of elemental abundances are reviewed.

  10. Galactic and solar cosmic rays - Variations and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. V.; Blokh, Ia. L.; Gushchina, R. T.; Dorman, I. V.; Dorman, L. I.

    Past and current research efforts at IZMIRAN (the Soviet Institute for the Study of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and the Propagation of Radio Waves) on galactic and solar cosmic rays is reviewed. Particular attention is given to investigations of penumbra effects manifested in cosmic rays, long-term cosmic-ray variations, cosmic-ray anisotropy, cosmic-ray fluctuations, the possible relationship between cosmic-ray variations and atmospheric ozone, the stellar anisotropy of cosmic rays, and cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium.

  11. Explaining TeV Cosmic-Ray Anisotropies with Non-diffusive Cosmic-Ray Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J. Patrick; Fryer, Chris L.; Mendel, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Constraining the behavior of cosmic ray data observed at Earth requires a precise understanding of how the cosmic rays propagate in the interstellar medium. The interstellar medium is not homogeneous; although turbulent magnetic fields dominate over large scales, small coherent regions of magnetic field exist on scales relevant to particle propagation in the nearby Galaxy. Guided propagation through a coherent field is significantly different from random particle diffusion and could be the explanation of spatial anisotropies in the observed cosmic rays. We present a Monte Carlo code to propagate cosmic particle through realistic magnetic field structures. We discuss the details of the model as well as some preliminary studies which indicate that coherent magnetic structures are important effects in local cosmic-ray propagation, increasing the flux of cosmic rays by over two orders of magnitude at anisotropic locations on the sky. The features induced by coherent magnetic structure could be the cause of the observed TeV cosmic-ray anisotropy.

  12. Nano-Particles in Cosmic Plasma Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Ingrid

    2008-09-07

    Astronomical observations and in-situ measurements point to the existence of cosmic nano-particles, but in most cases their material composition and structure are not known. Nano-dust interacts differently than larger dust with the cosmic radiation and plasma environment. Its dynamics and behavior upon collision is not well studied.

  13. Early history of cosmic rays at Chicago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, Gaurang B.

    2013-02-01

    Cosmic ray studies at the University of Chicago were started by Arthur Compton during the late 1920s. The high points of cosmic ray studies at Chicago under Compton and Marcel Schein are the focus of this report, which summarizes the research done at Chicago up to the end of World War II.

  14. History of cosmic ray research in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Valtonen, E.; Vainio, R.; Tanskanen, P. J.; Aurela, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    The history of cosmic ray research in Finland can be traced back to the end of 1950s, when first ground-based cosmic ray measurements started in Turku. The first cosmic ray station was founded in Oulu in 1964 performing measurements of cosmic rays by a muon telescope, which was later complemented by a neutron monitor. Since the 1990s, several research centers and universities, such as The Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki University of Technology, University of Oulu, University of Turku and University of Helsinki have been involved in space science projects, such as SOHO, AMS, Cluster, Cassini, BepiColombo, etc. At the same time, ground-based cosmic ray measurements have reached a new level, including a fully automatic on-line database in Oulu and a new muon measuring underground site in Pyhäsalmi. Research groups in Helsinki, Oulu and Turku have also extensive experience in theoretical investigations of different aspects of cosmic ray physics. Cosmic ray research has a 50-year long history in Finland, covering a wide range from basic long-running ground-based observations to high-technology space-borne instrumentation and sophisticated theoretical studies. Several generations of researchers have been involved in the study ensuring transfer of experience and building the recognized Finnish research school of cosmic ray studies.

  15. Cosmic strings from supersymmetric flat directions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yanou; Morrissey, David E.; Martin, Stephen P.; Wells, James D.

    2008-02-15

    Flat directions are a generic feature of the scalar potential in supersymmetric gauge field theories. They can arise, for example, from D-terms associated with an extra Abelian gauge symmetry. Even when supersymmetry is broken softly, there often remain directions in the scalar field space along which the potential is almost flat. Upon breaking a gauge symmetry along one of these almost-flat directions, cosmic strings may form. Relative to the standard cosmic string picture based on the Abelian Higgs model, these flat-direction cosmic strings have the extreme type-I properties of a thin gauge core surrounded by a much wider scalar field profile. We perform a comprehensive study of the microscopic, macroscopic, and observational characteristics of this class of strings. We find many differences from the standard string scenario, including stable higher winding-mode strings, the dynamical formation of higher mode strings from lower ones, and a resultant multitension scaling string network in the early universe. These strings are only moderately constrained by current observations, and their gravitational wave signatures may be detectable at future gravity wave detectors. Furthermore, there is the interesting but speculative prospect that the decays of cosmic string loops in the early universe could be a source of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays or nonthermal dark matter. We also compare the observational signatures of flat-direction cosmic strings with those of ordinary cosmic strings as well as (p,q) cosmic strings motivated by superstring theory.

  16. Anisotropy and corotation of galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Ayabe, S; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y-Q; Lu, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-10-20

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments. PMID:17053141

  17. Cosmic-Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    2013-07-01

    Cosmic-rays are subatomic particles of energies ranging between a few eV to hundreds of TeV. These particles register a power-law spectrum, and it seems that most of them originate from astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The shock acceleration in superalfvenic astrophysical plasmas, is believed to be the main mechanism responsible for the production of the non-thermal cosmic-rays. Especially, the importance of the very high energy cosmic-ray acceleration, with its consequent gamma-ray radiation and neutrino production in the shocks of the relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts, is a favourable theme of study. I will discuss the cosmic-ray shock acceleration mechanism particularly focusing on simulation studies of cosmic-ray acceleration occurring in the relativistic shocks of GRB jets.

  18. Investigation of Reacceleration on Cosmic Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuxi; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2016-03-01

    Cosmic rays are high energy charged particles, originating from outer space, that travel at nearly the speed of light and strike the Earth from all directions. One century after the discovery of cosmic rays, their origin and propagation processes remain obscure. GALPROP is a numerical code for calculating the propagation of relativistic charged particles and the diffuse emissions produced during their propagation in the Galaxy. I performed a preliminary study using two different propagation models with the GALPROP code in order to reproduce latest cosmic-ray nuclei measurements. I analyzed multiple propagation parameters for each model, studied their effect on cosmic-ray spectra, optimized and tried a preliminary modification of the code to fit cosmic-ray data such as BESS-Polar, AMS, CREAM, etc.

  19. Gamma rays, cosmic rays, and galactic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of cosmic and gamma radiation by SAS-2 satellite are summarized and analyzed to determine processes responsible for producing observed galactic radiation. In addition to the production of gamma rays in discrete galactic objects such as pulsars, there are three main mechanisms by which high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) radiation is produced by high-energy interactions involving cosmic rays in interstellar space. These processes, which produce what may be called diffuse galactic gamma-rays, are: (1) the decay of pi mesons produced by interactions of cosmic ray nucleons with interstellar gas nuclei; (2) the bremsstrahlung radiation produced by cosmic ray electrons interacting in the Coulomb fields of nuclei of interstellar gas atoms; and (3) Compton interactions between cosmic ray electrons and low-energy photons in interstellar space.

  20. Ultra heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. Robert

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the measurements of the ultraheavy cosmic ray abundances obtained by the Heavy Nuclei Experiment aboard the NASA High Energy Astronomy Observatory-3. It is found that the cosmic ray abundances are in broad agreement with solar system abundances with a step-FIP fractionation model applied although in detail there are some differences. In particular, Ge and Pb appear to be underabundant in the cosmic radiation. Although the platinum/lead ratio and the actinides are consistent with some r-process enhancement, the cosmic ray source is not dominated by the r-process up through the 50s as evidenced by the Sr/Rb ratio and by the abundance of Sn and Ba. The actinides are not greatly enhanced, ruling out freshly synthesized r-process production as the primary source of the heavy cosmic rays.

  1. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  2. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-02

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ∼My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  3. Cosmic vacuum and galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.

    2006-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the protogalactic perturbations must enter the nonlinear regime before the red shift z≈ 1; otherwise they would be destroyed by the antigravity of the vacuum dark energy at the subsequent epoch of the vacuum domination. At the zrrV={M/[(8π/3)ρV]}1/3, where M is the mass of a given over-density and ρV is the vacuum density. The criterion provides a new relation between the largest mass condensations and their spatial scales. All the real large-scale systems follow this relation definitely. It is also shown that a simple formula is possible for the key quantity in the theory of galaxy formation, namely the initial amplitude of the perturbation of the gravitational potential in the protogalactic structures. The amplitude is time independent and given in terms of the Friedmann integrals, which are genuine physical characteristics of the cosmic energies. The results suggest that there is a strong correspondence between the global design of the Universe as a whole and the cosmic structures of various masses and spatial scales.

  4. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  5. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  6. Nexus of the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the important unknowns of current cosmology concerns the effects of the large scale distribution of matter on the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and galaxies. One main difficulty in answering this question lies in the absence of a robust and natural way of identifying the large scale environments and their characteristics. This work summarizes the NEXUS+ formalism which extends and improves our multiscale scale-space MMF method. The new algorithm is very successful in tracing the Cosmic Web components, mainly due to its novel filtering of the density in logarithmic space. The method, due to its multiscale and hierarchical character, has the advantage of detecting all the cosmic structures, either prominent or tenuous, without preference for a certain size or shape. The resulting filamentary and wall networks can easily be characterized by their direction, thickness, mass density and density profile. These additional environmental properties allows to us to investigate not only the effect of environment on haloes, but also how it correlates with the environment characteristics.

  7. Quantum stabilization of cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2015-07-01

    In the standard model, stabilization of a classically unstable cosmic string may occur through the quantum fluctuations of a heavy fermion doublet. We review numerical results from a semiclassical expansion in a reduced version of the standard model. In this expansion, the leading quantum corrections emerge at one loop level for many internal degrees of freedom. The resulting vacuum polarization energy and the binding energies of occupied fermion energy levels are of the same order, and must therefore be treated on equal footing. Populating these bound states lowers the total energy compared to the same number of free fermions and assigns a charge to the string. Charged strings are already stabilized for a fermion mass only somewhat larger than the top quark mass. Though obtained in a reduced version, these results suggest that neither extraordinarily large fermion masses nor unrealistic couplings are required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Furthermore, we also review results for a quantum stabilization mechanism that prevents closed Nielsen-Olesen-type strings from collapsing.

  8. Inhomogeneous recombinations during cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobacchi, Emanuele; Mesinger, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    By depleting the ionizing photon budget available to expand cosmic H II regions, recombining systems (or Lyman limit systems) can have a large impact during (and following) cosmic reionization. Unfortunately, directly resolving such structures in large-scale reionization simulations is computationally impractical. Instead, here we implement a subgrid prescription for tracking inhomogeneous recombinations in the intergalactic medium. Building on previous work parametrizing photoheating feedback on star formation, we present large-scale, seminumeric reionization simulations which self-consistently track the local (subgrid) evolution of both sources and sinks of ionizing photons. Our simple, single-parameter model naturally results in both an extended reionization and a modest, slowly evolving emissivity, consistent with observations. Recombinations are instrumental in slowing the growth of large H II regions, and damping the rapid rise of the ionizing background in the late stages of (and following) reionization. As a result, typical H II regions are smaller by factors of ˜2 to 3 throughout reionization. The large-scale (k ≲ 0.2 Mpc-1) ionization power spectrum is suppressed by factors of ≳2-3 in the second half of reionization. Therefore properly modelling recombinations is important in interpreting virtually all reionization observables, including upcoming interferometry with the redshifted 21cm line. Consistent with previous works, we find the clumping factor of ionized gas to be C H II ˜ 4 at the end of reionization.

  9. Cosmic Ray Mantle Visibility on Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, Matt E.; Richardson, J. D.; Sturner, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    Optically red objects constitute the dynamically cold, old component of the Classical Kuiper Belt (40 - 47 AU) with heliocentric orbits of low eccentricity and inclination. The red colors likely arise from primordial mixed ices processed by irradiation to meters in surface depth over the past four billion years, since the time of giant planet migration and Kuiper Belt stirring, at relatively moderate dosages of 60 gigarads provided by galactic cosmic ray protons and heavier ions. The red cosmic ray mantle is uniformly visible on the cold classical objects beneath a minimally thin eroded layer of more neutrally colored material arising from cumulative effects of heliospheric particle irradiation. The radiation fluxes are lowest in the middle heliospheric region containing the Classical Kuiper Belt and increase from there both towards and away from the Sun. Despite increasing irradiation at various times of solar system history from increases in solar and interstellar ion fluxes, the red object region has apparently never reached sufficiently high dosage levels to neutralize in color the red mantle material. Erosion processes, including plasma sputtering and micrometeroid impacts, act continuously to reduce thickness of the upper neutral crust and expose the cosmic ray mantle. A deeper layer at tens of meters and more may consist of relatively unprocessed ices that can erupt to the surface by larger impacts or cryovolcanism and account for brighter surfaces of larger objects such as 2003 UB313. Surface colors among the Kuiper Belt and other icy objects of the outer solar system are then a function, assuming uniform primordial composition, of relative thickness for the three layers and of the resurfacing age dependent on the orbital and impact history of each object.

  10. Stochastic gravitational wave background from light cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    DePies, Matthew R.; Hogan, Craig J.

    2007-06-15

    Spectra of the stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds from cosmic strings are calculated and compared with present and future experimental limits. Motivated by theoretical expectations of light cosmic strings in superstring cosmology, improvements in experimental sensitivity, and recent demonstrations of large, stable loop formation from a primordial network, this study explores a new range of string parameters with masses lighter than previously investigated. A standard 'one-scale' model for string loop formation is assumed. Background spectra are calculated numerically for dimensionless string tensions G{mu}/c{sup 2} between 10{sup -7} and 10{sup -18}, and initial loop sizes as a fraction of the Hubble radius {alpha} from 0.1 to 10{sup -6}. The spectra show a low frequency power-law tail, a broad spectral peak due to loops decaying at the present epoch (including frequencies higher than their fundamental mode, and radiation associated with cusps), and a flat (constant energy density) spectrum at high frequencies due to radiation from loops that decayed during the radiation-dominated era. The string spectrum is distinctive and unlike any other known source. The peak of the spectrum for light strings appears at high frequencies, significantly affecting predicted signals. The spectra of the cosmic string backgrounds are compared with current millisecond pulsar limits and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) sensitivity curves. For models with large stable loops ({alpha}=0.1), current pulsar-timing limits exclude G{mu}/c{sup 2}>10{sup -9}, a much tighter limit on string tension than achievable with other techniques, and within the range of current models based on brane inflation. LISA may detect a background from strings as light as G{mu}/c{sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -16}, corresponding to field theory strings formed at roughly 10{sup 11} GeV.

  11. 9 CFR 72.15 - Owners assume responsibility; must execute agreement prior to dipping or treatment waiving all...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CATTLE § 72.15 Owners assume responsibility; must execute agreement prior to dipping or treatment waiving all claims against United States. When the cattle are to be dipped under APHIS supervision the owner of the cattle, offered for shipment, or his agent duly authorized thereto, shall first execute...

  12. Beyond an Assumed Mother-Child Symbiosis in Nutritional Guidelines: The Everyday Reasoning behind Complementary Feeding Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    Researchers question the implications of the way in which "motherhood" is constructed in public health discourse. Current nutritional guidelines for Danish parents of young children are part of this discourse. They are shaped by an assumed symbiotic relationship between the nutritional needs of the child and the interest and focus of the…

  13. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... new TERA covering the authority for the development of another energy resource it wishes to assume... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS TRIBAL ENERGY RESOURCE AGREEMENTS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL...

  14. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS TRIBAL ENERGY RESOURCE AGREEMENTS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT AND SELF DETERMINATION ACT...

  15. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... new TERA covering the authority for the development of another energy resource it wishes to assume... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS TRIBAL ENERGY RESOURCE AGREEMENTS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL...

  16. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... new TERA covering the authority for the development of another energy resource it wishes to assume... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS TRIBAL ENERGY RESOURCE AGREEMENTS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL...

  17. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... new TERA covering the authority for the development of another energy resource it wishes to assume... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS TRIBAL ENERGY RESOURCE AGREEMENTS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL...

  18. 42 CFR 137.300 - Since Federal environmental responsibilities are new responsibilities, which may be assumed by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal environmental responsibilities assumed by the Self-Governance Tribe. ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Since Federal environmental responsibilities are... additional funds available to Self-Governance Tribes to carry out these formerly inherently...

  19. 12 CFR Appendix L to Part 226 - Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Annual Loan Cost Rates L Appendix L to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 226, App. L Appendix L to Part 226—Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates (a)...

  20. 12 CFR Appendix L to Part 226 - Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Annual Loan Cost Rates L Appendix L to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 226, App. L Appendix L to Part 226—Assumed Loan Periods for Computations of Total Annual Loan Cost Rates (a)...