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Sample records for assurance sampling method

  1. QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCEDURES: METHOD 5G DETERMINATION OF PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM WOOD HEATERS FROM A DILUTION TUNNEL SAMPLING LOCATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality assurance procedures are contained in this comprehensive document intended to be used as an aid for wood heater manufacturers and testing laboratories in performing particulate matter sampling of wood heaters according to EPA protocol, Method 5G. These procedures may be u...

  2. Quality-assurance procedures: Method 5G determination of particulate emissions from wood heaters from a dilution tunnel sampling location

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.E.; Hartman, M.W.; Olin, R.C.; Rives, G.D.

    1989-06-01

    Quality-assurance procedures are contained in this comprehensive document intended to be used as an aid for wood-heater manufacturers and testing laboratories in performing particulate matter sampling of wood heaters according to EPA protocol, Method 5G. These procedures may be used in research and development, and as an aid in auditing and certification testing. A detailed, step-by-step quality assurance guide is provided to aid in the procurement and assembly of testing apparatus, to clearly describe the procedures, and to facilitate data collection and reporting. Suggested data sheets are supplied that can be used as an aid for both recordkeeping and certification applications. Throughout the document, activity matrices are provided to serve as a summary reference. Checklists are also supplied that can be used by testing personnel. Finally, for the purposes of ensuring data quality, procedures are outlined for apparatus operation, maintenance, and traceability. These procedures combined with the detailed description of the sampling and analysis protocol will help ensure the accuracy and reliability of Method 5G emission-testing results.

  3. Performance of the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling Method Compared to Surveillance for Identifying Inadequately-performing Areas in Matlab, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hanifi, S.M.A.; Roy, Nikhil; Streatfield, P. Kim

    2007-01-01

    This paper compared the performance of the lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) method in identifying inadequately-performing health work-areas with that of using health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) data and examined the feasibility of applying the method by field-level programme supervisors. The study was carried out in Matlab, the field site of ICDDR,B, where a HDSS has been in place for over 30 years. The LQAS method was applied in 57 work-areas of community health workers in ICDDR,B-served areas in Matlab during July-September 2002. The performance of the LQAS method in identifying work-areas with adequate and inadequate coverage of various health services was compared with those of the HDSS. The health service-coverage indicators included coverage of DPT, measles, BCG vaccination, and contraceptive use. It was observed that the difference in the proportion of work-areas identified to be inadequately performing using the LQAS method with less than 30 respondents, and the HDSS was not statistically significant. The consistency between the LQAS method and the HDSS in identifying work-areas was greater for adequately-performing areas than inadequately-performing areas. It was also observed that the field managers could be trained to apply the LQAS method in monitoring their performance in reaching the target population. PMID:17615902

  4. Comparative validation study to demonstrate the equivalence of a minor modification to AOAC Official Method 2005.05 Assurance GDS shiga Toxin Genes (O157) method to the reference culture method: 375 gram sample size.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip T; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Roa, Nerie; Kaur, Mandeep; Kerr, David E; Lienau, Andrew H; Jucker, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The Assurance GDS Shiga Toxin Genes (0157), AOAC Official MethodsM 2005.05, has been modified to include a larger sample size of 375 g. A methods comparison study was conducted to demonstrate the equivalence of this modification to the reference culture method. Ninety samples and controls, representing three foods, were analyzed. Results show no statistically detectable difference between the Assurance GDS Escherichia coli O157:H7 assay and the reference culture methods for the detection of E. coli O157:H7, other than the low level of inoculation for leaf lettuce for which the GDS gave noticeably higher recovery [difference in Probability of Detection between candidate methods (dPODc = +0.45)]. There were also suggestions of moderate differences (dPODc = +0.15 to +0.20) for ground beef and the high level of leaf lettuce, but the study size was too small to detect differences of this size. Results showed that the Assurance GDS Shiga Toxin Genes (0157) method is equivalent to the reference culture methods for the detection of Shiga toxigenic E. coli O157:H7. PMID:24000752

  5. Comparative validation study to demonstrate the equivalence of a minor modification to AOAC official method 2005.04 assurance GdS E. coli 0157:H7 method to the reference culture method: 375 gram sample size.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip T; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Roa, Nerie; Kaur, Mandeep; Lienau, Andrew H; Jucker, Markus; Kerr, David E

    2013-01-01

    The Assurance GDS Escherichia coli (E. col) O157:H7, AOAC Official Method 2005.04, has been modified to include a larger sample size of 375 g. A methods comparison study was conducted to demonstrate the equivalence of this modification to the reference culture method. Ninety samples and controls, representing three foods, were analyzed. Results show no statistically detectable difference between the Assurance GDS E. coli O157:H7 assay and the reference culture methods for the detection of E. coli O157:H7, other than the low level of inoculation for leaf lettuce, for which the GDS gave noticeably higher recovery [difference in probability of detection between candidate methods (dPODc = +0.45)]. There were also suggestions of moderate differences (dPODc = +0.15 to +0.20) for ground beef and the high level of leaf lettuce, but the study size was too small to detect differences of this size. Results showed that the Assurance GDS E. coli O157:H7 method is equivalent to reference culture methods for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:24000751

  6. Chesapeake Bay coordinated split sample program annual report, 1990-1991: Analytical methods and quality assurance workgroup of the Chesapeake Bay program monitoring subcommittee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Program is a federal-state partnership with a goal of restoring the Chesapeake Bay. Its ambient water quality monitoring programs, started in 1984, sample over 150 monitoring stations once or twice a month a month. Due to the size of the Bay watershed (64,000 square miles) and the cooperative nature of the CBP, these monitoring programs involve 10 different analytical laboratories. The Chesapeake Bay Coordinated Split Sample Program (CSSP), initialed in 1988, assesses the comparability of the water quality results from these laboratories. The report summarizes CSSP results for 1990 and 1991, its second and third full years of operation. The CSSP has two main objectives: identifying parameters with low inter-organization agreement, and estimating measurement system variability. The identification of parmeters with low agreement is used as part of the overall Quality Assurance program. Laboratory and program personnel use the information to investigate possible causes of the differences, and take action to increase agreement if possible. Later CSSP results will document any improvements in inter-organization agreement. The variability estimates are most useful to data analysts and modelers who need confidence estimates for monitoring data.

  7. SOIL SAMPLING QUALITY ASSURANCE USER'S GUIDE--SECOND EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of the first edition of the "Soil Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide" as a text in a series of seminars conducted at various U.S. EPA Regional Offices elicited many constructive comments for improvements from seminar attendees. Many of these suggested improvements have b...

  8. Authentication Assurance Level Application to the Inventory Sampling Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, Mike M.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Hansen, Randy R.; Geelhood, Bruce D.

    2001-09-06

    This document concentrates on the identification of a standardized assessment approach for the verification of security functionality in specific equipment, the Inspection Sampling Measurement System (ISMS) being developed for MAYAK. Specifically, an Authentication Assurance Level 3 is proposed to be reached in authenticating the ISMS.

  9. Choosing a Cluster Sampling Design for Lot Quality Assurance Sampling Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Lauren; Bedrick, Edward J.; Pagano, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) surveys are commonly used for monitoring and evaluation in resource-limited settings. Recently several methods have been proposed to combine LQAS with cluster sampling for more timely and cost-effective data collection. For some of these methods, the standard binomial model can be used for constructing decision rules as the clustering can be ignored. For other designs, considered here, clustering is accommodated in the design phase. In this paper, we compare these latter cluster LQAS methodologies and provide recommendations for choosing a cluster LQAS design. We compare technical differences in the three methods and determine situations in which the choice of method results in a substantively different design. We consider two different aspects of the methods: the distributional assumptions and the clustering parameterization. Further, we provide software tools for implementing each method and clarify misconceptions about these designs in the literature. We illustrate the differences in these methods using vaccination and nutrition cluster LQAS surveys as example designs. The cluster methods are not sensitive to the distributional assumptions but can result in substantially different designs (sample sizes) depending on the clustering parameterization. However, none of the clustering parameterizations used in the existing methods appears to be consistent with the observed data, and, consequently, choice between the cluster LQAS methods is not straightforward. Further research should attempt to characterize clustering patterns in specific applications and provide suggestions for best-practice cluster LQAS designs on a setting-specific basis. PMID:26125967

  10. Extending cluster Lot Quality Assurance Sampling designs for surveillance programs

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Lauren; Pagano, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) has a long history of applications in industrial quality control. LQAS is frequently used for rapid surveillance in global health settings, with areas classified as poor or acceptable performance based on the binary classification of an indicator. Historically, LQAS surveys have relied on simple random samples from the population; however, implementing two-stage cluster designs for surveillance sampling is often more cost-effective than simple random sampling. By applying survey sampling results to the binary classification procedure, we develop a simple and flexible non-parametric procedure to incorporate clustering effects into the LQAS sample design to appropriately inflate the sample size, accommodating finite numbers of clusters in the population when relevant. We use this framework to then discuss principled selection of survey design parameters in longitudinal surveillance programs. We apply this framework to design surveys to detect rises in malnutrition prevalence in nutrition surveillance programs in Kenya and South Sudan, accounting for clustering within villages. By combining historical information with data from previous surveys, we design surveys to detect spikes in the childhood malnutrition rate. PMID:24633656

  11. Extending cluster lot quality assurance sampling designs for surveillance programs.

    PubMed

    Hund, Lauren; Pagano, Marcello

    2014-07-20

    Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) has a long history of applications in industrial quality control. LQAS is frequently used for rapid surveillance in global health settings, with areas classified as poor or acceptable performance on the basis of the binary classification of an indicator. Historically, LQAS surveys have relied on simple random samples from the population; however, implementing two-stage cluster designs for surveillance sampling is often more cost-effective than simple random sampling. By applying survey sampling results to the binary classification procedure, we develop a simple and flexible nonparametric procedure to incorporate clustering effects into the LQAS sample design to appropriately inflate the sample size, accommodating finite numbers of clusters in the population when relevant. We use this framework to then discuss principled selection of survey design parameters in longitudinal surveillance programs. We apply this framework to design surveys to detect rises in malnutrition prevalence in nutrition surveillance programs in Kenya and South Sudan, accounting for clustering within villages. By combining historical information with data from previous surveys, we design surveys to detect spikes in the childhood malnutrition rate. PMID:24633656

  12. Triangle area water supply monitoring project, October 1988 through September 2001, North Carolina -- description of the water-quality network, sampling and analysis methods, and quality-assurance practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger, Carolyn J.

    2004-01-01

    The Triangle Area Water Supply Monitoring Project was initiated in October 1988 to provide long-term water-quality data for six area water-supply reservoirs and their tributaries. In addition, the project provides data that can be used to determine the effectiveness of large-scale changes in water-resource management practices, document differences in water quality among water-supply types (large multiuse reservoir, small reservoir, run-of-river), and tributary-loading and in-lake data for water-quality modeling of Falls and Jordan Lakes. By September 2001, the project had progressed in four phases and included as many as 34 sites (in 1991). Most sites were sampled and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Some sites were already a part of the North Carolina Division of Water Quality statewide ambient water-quality monitoring network and were sampled by the Division of Water Quality. The network has provided data on streamflow, physical properties, and concentrations of nutrients, major ions, metals, trace elements, chlorophyll, total organic carbon, suspended sediment, and selected synthetic organic compounds. Project quality-assurance activities include written procedures for sample collection, record management and archive, collection of field quality-control samples (blank samples and replicate samples), and monitoring the quality of field supplies. In addition to project quality-assurance activities, the quality of laboratory analyses was assessed through laboratory quality-assurance practices and an independent laboratory quality-control assessment provided by the U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Quality Systems through the Blind Inorganic Sample Project and the Organic Blind Sample Project.

  13. Assure

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Assure ; CASRN 76578 - 14 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  14. Using lot quality-assurance sampling and area sampling to identify priority areas for trachoma control: Viet Nam.

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, Mark; Mai, Nguyen Phuong; Quynh, Nguyen Quang; Nga, Nguyen Huy; Tai, Ha Huy; Long, Nguyen Hung; Minh, Tran Hung; Limburg, Hans

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the use of lot quality-assurance sampling (LQAS) surveys undertaken within an area-sampling framework to identify priority areas for intervention with trachoma control activities in Viet Nam. METHODS: The LQAS survey method for the rapid assessment of the prevalence of active trachoma was adapted for use in Viet Nam with the aim of classifying individual communes by the prevalence of active trachoma among children in primary school. School-based sampling was used; school sites to be sampled were selected using an area-sampling approach. A total of 719 communes in 41 districts in 18 provinces were surveyed. FINDINGS: Survey staff found the LQAS survey method both simple and rapid to use after initial problems with area-sampling methods were identified and remedied. The method yielded a finer spatial resolution of prevalence than had been previously achieved in Viet Nam using semiquantitative rapid assessment surveys and multistage cluster-sampled surveys. CONCLUSION: When used with area-sampling techniques, the LQAS survey method has the potential to form the basis of survey instruments that can be used to efficiently target resources for interventions against active trachoma. With additional work, such methods could provide a generally applicable tool for effective programme planning and for the certification of the elimination of trachoma as a blinding disease. PMID:16283052

  15. Development of quality assurance methods for epoxy graphite prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. S.; Hunter, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    Quality assurance methods for graphite epoxy/prepregs were developed. Liquid chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and gel permeation chromatography were investigated. These methods were applied to a second prepreg system. The resin matrix formulation was correlated with mechanical properties. Dynamic mechanical analysis and fracture toughness methods were investigated. The chromatography and calorimetry techniques were all successfully developed as quality assurance methods for graphite epoxy prepregs. The liquid chromatography method was the most sensitive to changes in resin formulation. The were also successfully applied to the second prepreg system.

  16. Using lot quality assurance sampling to improve immunization coverage in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Y.; Hoque, S.; Siddiqi, M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine areas of low vaccination coverage in five cities in Bangladesh (Chittagong, Dhaka, Khulna, Rajshahi, and Syedpur). METHODS: Six studies using lot quality assurance sampling were conducted between 1995 and 1997 by Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival and the Bangladesh National Expanded Programme on Immunization. FINDINGS: BCG vaccination coverage was acceptable in all lots studied; however, the proportion of lots rejected because coverage of measles vaccination was low ranged from 0% of lots in Syedpur to 12% in Chittagong and 20% in Dhaka's zones 7 and 8. The proportion of lots rejected because an inadequate number of children in the sample had been fully vaccinated varied from 11% in Syedpur to 30% in Dhaka. Additionally, analysis of aggregated, weighted immunization coverage showed that there was a high BCG vaccination coverage (the first administered vaccine) and a low measles vaccination coverage (the last administered vaccine) indicating a high drop-out rate, ranging from 14% in Syedpur to 36% in Dhaka's zone 8. CONCLUSION: In Bangladesh, where resources are limited, results from surveys using lot quality assurance sampling enabled managers of the National Expanded Programme on Immunization to identify areas with poor vaccination coverage. Those areas were targeted to receive focused interventions to improve coverage. Since this sampling method requires only a small sample size and was easy for staff to use, it is feasible for routine monitoring of vaccination coverage. PMID:11436470

  17. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  18. QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCEDURES: METHOD 28 CERTIFICATION AND AUDITING OF WOOD HEATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality assurance procedures are contained in this comprehensive document intended to be used as an aid for wood heater manufacturers and testing laboratories in performing particulate matter sampling of wood heaters according to EPA protocol, Method 28. These procedures may be u...

  19. Chapter 5: Quality assurance/quality control in stormwater sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling the quality of stormwater presents unique challenges because stormwater flow is relatively short-lived with drastic variability. Furthermore, storm events often occur with little advance warning, outside conventional work hours, and under adverse weather conditions. Therefore, most stormwat...

  20. 42 CFR 440.260 - Methods and standards to assure quality of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methods and standards to assure quality of services... and Limits Applicable to All Services § 440.260 Methods and standards to assure quality of services. The plan must include a description of methods and standards used to assure that services are of...

  1. ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIAL IN SCHOOL BUILDINGS: BULK SAMPLE ANALYSIS QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM: BULK SAMPLE ROUNDS 16, 17, AND 18

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the performance results of laboratories participating in the 16th, 17th, and 18th rounds of the Bulk Sample Analysis Quality Assurance Program sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ny commercial or noncommercial organization wi...

  2. Improved Sampling Method Reduces Isokinetic Sampling Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karels, Gale G.

    The particulate sampling system currently in use by the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco, California is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The method represents a practical, inexpensive tool that can…

  3. Cool-Water Coal Gasification Program: Environmental Monitoring Plan Commissioning Phase, final report. Volume 1. Technical report. Volume 2. Appendix A - HRSG (heat recovery steam generator) stack-testing results. Volume 3. Appendix B - analytical results. Appendix C - sampling analytical methods. Appendix D - ambient air monitoring data. Volume 4. Appendix E - quality assurance/quality control. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-11

    The Cool Water Coal Gasification Program (CWCGP) began electrical production under the terms of the Price Guarantee Commitment with the U.S. Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) on June 24, 1984. An Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) approved by the SFC was initiated at that time. The Commissioning Phase, the first of four phases of the EMP, was conducted from June 24 through December 31, 1984. Sampling and analysis of compliance and supplemental parameters produced over 1100 samples and 8500 data points from 17 aqueous, ten gaseous, and four solid sampling streams. The technical report includes a description of the CWCGP process as it was operated during the Commissioning Phase, a summary of process changes that occurred during the period, their effect on the environmental monitoring effort, and details of pollution-control testing (Appendix A), data calculations (Appendix B), analytical methods and results (Appendix C), ambient-air-monitoring data (Appendix D), and quality-assurance/quality-control program results (Appendix E).

  4. Methods of control for hospital quality assurance systems.

    PubMed Central

    Restuccia, J D; Holloway, D C

    1982-01-01

    The major failure of hospital quality assurance systems is the failure to influence physicians' therapeutic decision making in a way that will ensure their ordering necessary and only necessary services. The primary reason for this is insufficient recognition of the "intensive" technology used to treat acute patients, a technology characterized by the interdependence of therapeutic services and the patient's response to these services. In such situations, the appropriate method of achieving quality control is to provide performance feedback to the physician on a regular basis. To the extent that there is uncertainty about the impact of therapeutic services on the patient's response, the physician should be allowed discretion over the therapeutic process. In contrast, when process-outcome relations in the therapeutic process are relatively certain, feedback should be reinforced with sanctions. PMID:7118544

  5. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L; Lyles, Brad F; Purcell, Richard G; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2014-05-20

    An apparatus and method for supporting a tubing bundle during installation or removal. The apparatus includes a clamp for securing the tubing bundle to an external wireline. The method includes deploying the tubing bundle and wireline together, The tubing bundle is periodically secured to the wireline using a clamp.

  6. Quality Assurance in Online Content Literacy Methods Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Josephine P.; Lammers, Jayne C.; Alvermann, Donna E.

    2012-01-01

    As institutions offer more online courses in their teacher certification and literacy master's programs, research is needed to address issues of quality assurance in online instruction. This multicase study analyzes qualitatively elements for addressing quality assurance of the implementation of an online content literacy teacher education course…

  7. QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR WET DEPOSITION SAMPLING AND CHEMICAL ANALYSES FOR THE NATIONAL TRENDS NETWORK.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, LeRoy J.; Malo, Bernard A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the National Trends Network is to delineate the major inorganic constituents in the wet deposition in the United States. The approach chosen to monitor the Nation's wet deposition is to install approximately 150 automatic sampling devices with at least one collector in each state. Samples are collected at one week intervals, removed from collectors, and transported to an analytical laboratory for chemical analysis. The quality assurance program has divided wet deposition monitoring into 5 parts: (1) Sampling site selection, (2) sampling device, (3) sample container, (4) sample handling, and (5) laboratory analysis. Each of these five components is being examined using existing designs or new designs. Each existing or proposed sampling site is visited and a criteria audit is performed.

  8. Modified aerospace reliability and quality assurance method for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The safety, reliability, and quality assurance (SR&QA) approach developed for the first large wind turbine generator project is described. The SR&QA approach was used to assure that the machine would not be hazardous to the public or operating personnel, would operate unattended on a utility grid, would demonstrate reliable operation and would help establish the quality assurance and maintainability requirements for future wind turbine projects. A modified failure modes and effects analysis during the design phase, minimal hardware inspections during parts fabrication, and three simple documents to control activities during machine construction and operation were presented.

  9. Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for the Characterization of Tank 25F Saltcake Core Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C

    2005-08-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need for the characterization of High-Level Waste (HLW) saltcake in the Savannah River Site (SRS) F- and H-area tank farms to support upcoming salt processing activities. As part of the enhanced characterization efforts, Tank 25F will be sampled and the samples analyzed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan documents the planned activities for the physical, chemical, and radiological analysis of the Tank 25F saltcake core samples. This plan does not cover other characterization activities that do not involve core sample analysis and it does not address issues regarding sampling or sample transportation. The objectives of this report are: (1) Provide information useful in projecting the composition of dissolved salt batches by quantifying important components (such as actinides, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 90}Sr) on a per batch basis. This will assist in process selection for the treatment of salt batches and provide data for the validation of dissolution modeling. (2) Determine the properties of the heel resulting from dissolution of the bulk saltcake. Also note tendencies toward post-mixing precipitation. (3) Provide a basis for determining the number of samples needed for the characterization of future saltcake tanks. Gather information useful towards performing characterization in a manner that is more cost and time effective.

  10. SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLING METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response's (OSWER) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) needs innovative methods and techniques to solve new and difficult sampling and analytical problems found at the numerous Superfund sites throughout th...

  11. HDR quality assurance methods for personal digital assistants.

    PubMed

    Astrahan, Melvin A

    2004-01-01

    An important component of every clinical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy program is quality assurance (QA). One of the QA recommendations of the AAPM TG59 report is an independent verification on the results of treatment planning. It is desirable for the verification procedure to be as quick and easy to perform as possible and yet to have a high probability of detecting significant errors. The objective of this work is to describe the dosimetric methods and software developed to implement a departmental HDR QA program using personal digital assistants (PDAs). Verification of MammoSite treatment plans is presented as a practical example. PDAs that run the PalmOS were selected for their low cost and popularity among health care professionals. General-purpose applications were developed for linear sources, planar, and volume implants, that estimate the total dwell time of an HDR implant. This value can then be compared to the total dwell time calculated by the primary treatment planning system. The software incorporates the Paterson-Parker (PP) radium tables and the Greenfield-Tichman-Norman (GTN) version of the Quimby radium tables, which have been modified to a form more convenient for HDR calculations. A special purpose application based on the AAPM TG43 formalism was developed for the MammoSite breast applicator. For QA calculations perpendicular to the center of a single Iridium-192 (192I) HDR source, as exemplified by MammoSite treatments, linearly interpolating the PP or GTN tables is equivalent to applying the TG43 formalism at distances up to 5 cm from the source axis. The MammoSite-specific software also offers the option to calculate dosimetry based on the balloon volume. The PDA clock/calendar permits the software to automatically account for source decay. The touch-sensitive screen allows the familiar tabular format to be maintained while minimizing the effort required for calculations. The PP and GTN radium implant tables are easily modified to a form

  12. European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening: recommendations for collecting samples for conventional and liquid-based cytology.

    PubMed

    Arbyn, M; Herbert, A; Schenck, U; Nieminen, P; Jordan, J; Mcgoogan, E; Patnick, J; Bergeron, C; Baldauf, J-J; Klinkhamer, P; Bulten, J; Martin-Hirsch, P

    2007-06-01

    The current paper presents an annex in the second edition of the European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Cervical Cancer Screening. It provides guidance on how to make a satisfactory conventional Pap smear or a liquid-based cytology (LBC) sample. Practitioners taking samples for cytology should first explain to the woman the purpose, the procedure and how the result will be communicated. Three sampling methods are considered as acceptable for preparing conventional Pap smears: (i) the cervical broom; (ii) the combination of a spatula and an endocervical brush; and (iii) the extended tip spatula. Smear takers should take care to sample the entire circumference of the transformation zone, to quickly spread the cellular material over a glass slide, and to fix the preparation within a few seconds to avoid drying artefacts. According to local guidelines, one of these three methods may be preferred. Sampling with a cotton tip applicator is inappropriate. Similar procedures should be followed for sampling cells for LBC, but only plastic devices may be used. The collected cells should be quickly transferred into a vial with fixative liquid according to the instructions of the manufacturer of the LBC system. Subsequently, the slide or vial and the completed request form are sent to the laboratory for cytological interpretation. PMID:17573762

  13. Multiple Category-Lot Quality Assurance Sampling: A New Classification System with Application to Schistosomiasis Control

    PubMed Central

    Olives, Casey; Valadez, Joseph J.; Brooker, Simon J.; Pagano, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Background Originally a binary classifier, Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) has proven to be a useful tool for classification of the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni into multiple categories (≤10%, >10 and <50%, ≥50%), and semi-curtailed sampling has been shown to effectively reduce the number of observations needed to reach a decision. To date the statistical underpinnings for Multiple Category-LQAS (MC-LQAS) have not received full treatment. We explore the analytical properties of MC-LQAS, and validate its use for the classification of S. mansoni prevalence in multiple settings in East Africa. Methodology We outline MC-LQAS design principles and formulae for operating characteristic curves. In addition, we derive the average sample number for MC-LQAS when utilizing semi-curtailed sampling and introduce curtailed sampling in this setting. We also assess the performance of MC-LQAS designs with maximum sample sizes of n = 15 and n = 25 via a weighted kappa-statistic using S. mansoni data collected in 388 schools from four studies in East Africa. Principle Findings Overall performance of MC-LQAS classification was high (kappa-statistic of 0.87). In three of the studies, the kappa-statistic for a design with n = 15 was greater than 0.75. In the fourth study, where these designs performed poorly (kappa-statistic less than 0.50), the majority of observations fell in regions where potential error is known to be high. Employment of semi-curtailed and curtailed sampling further reduced the sample size by as many as 0.5 and 3.5 observations per school, respectively, without increasing classification error. Conclusion/Significance This work provides the needed analytics to understand the properties of MC-LQAS for assessing the prevalance of S. mansoni and shows that in most settings a sample size of 15 children provides a reliable classification of schools. PMID:22970333

  14. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Sampling and Analysis Methods Manual (Methods Manual) provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP.

  15. Quality assurance guidance for field sampling and measurement assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). These documents support the EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) and are based on applicable regulatory requirements and DOE Orders. They address requirements in DOE Orders by providing guidance that pertains specifically to environmental restoration and waste management sampling and analysis activities. DOE 5700.6C Quality Assurance (QA) defines policy and requirements to establish QA programs ensuring that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized. This is accomplished through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks imposed by the facility and the project. Every organization supporting EM`s environmental sampling and analysis activities must develop and document a QA program. Management of each organization is responsible for appropriate QA program implementation, assessment, and improvement. The collection of credible and cost-effective environmental data is critical to the long-term success of remedial and waste management actions performed at DOE facilities. Only well established and management supported assessment programs within each EM-support organization will enable DOE to demonstrate data quality. The purpose of this series of documents is to offer specific guidance for establishing an effective assessment program for EM`s environmental sampling and analysis (ESA) activities.

  16. Sediment laboratory quality-assurance project: studies of methods and materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Newland, C.A.; Gray, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    In August 1996 the U.S. Geological Survey initiated the Sediment Laboratory Quality-Assurance project. The Sediment Laboratory Quality Assurance project is part of the National Sediment Laboratory Quality-Assurance program. This paper addresses the fmdings of the sand/fme separation analysis completed for the single-blind reference sediment-sample project and differences in reported results between two different analytical procedures. From the results it is evident that an incomplete separation of fme- and sand-size material commonly occurs resulting in the classification of some of the fme-size material as sand-size material. Electron microscopy analysis supported the hypothesis that the negative bias for fme-size material and the positive bias for sand-size material is largely due to aggregation of some of the fine-size material into sand-size particles and adherence of fine-size material to the sand-size grains. Electron microscopy analysis showed that preserved river water, which was low in dissolved solids, specific conductance, and neutral pH, showed less aggregation and adhesion than preserved river water that was higher in dissolved solids and specific conductance with a basic pH. Bacteria were also found growing in the matrix, which may enhance fme-size material aggregation through their adhesive properties. Differences between sediment-analysis methods were also investigated as pan of this study. Suspended-sediment concentration results obtained from one participating laboratory that used a total-suspended solids (TSS) method had greater variability and larger negative biases than results obtained when this laboratory used a suspended-sediment concentration method. When TSS methods were used to analyze the reference samples, the median suspended sediment concentration percent difference was -18.04 percent. When the laboratory used a suspended-sediment concentration method, the median suspended-sediment concentration percent difference was -2

  17. Elaborating transition interface sampling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Erp, Titus S. van . E-mail: bolhuis@science.uva.nl

    2005-05-01

    We review two recently developed efficient methods for calculating rate constants of processes dominated by rare events in high-dimensional complex systems. The first is transition interface sampling (TIS), based on the measurement of effective fluxes through hypersurfaces in phase space. TIS improves efficiency with respect to standard transition path sampling (TPS) rate constant techniques, because it allows a variable path length and is less sensitive to recrossings. The second method is the partial path version of TIS. Developed for diffusive processes, it exploits the loss of long time correlation. We discuss the relation between the new techniques and the standard reactive flux methods in detail. Path sampling algorithms can suffer from ergodicity problems, and we introduce several new techniques to alleviate these problems, notably path swapping, stochastic configurational bias Monte Carlo shooting moves and order-parameter free path sampling. In addition, we give algorithms to calculate other interesting properties from path ensembles besides rate constants, such as activation energies and reaction mechanisms.

  18. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ted; Zignol, Matteo; Nyakan, Edwin; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L.; Gardner, Adrian; Kamle, Lydia; Injera, Wilfred; Carter, E. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. Design The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance. Results This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains. Conclusion Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints. PMID:27167381

  19. Equivalence of assurance Gold Enzyme Immunoassay for visual or instrumental detection of motile and nonmotile Salmonella in all foods to AOAC culture method: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, P T; Mui, L A; Forgey, R L; Kerr, D E

    2000-01-01

    Six foods representative of a wide variety of processed, dried powder processed, and raw food types were analyzed by the Assurance Gold Salmonella Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) and AOAC INTERNATIONAL culture method. Paired samples of each food type were simultaneously analyzed; one sample by the Assurance method and one by the AOAC culture method. The results for Assurance method were read visually and instrumentally with a microplate reader. A total of 24 laboratories representing federal government agencies and private industry, in the United States and Canada, participated in this collaborative study. Food types were inoculated with species of Salmonella with the exception of raw ground chicken, which was naturally contaminated. No statistical differences (p < 0.05) were observed between Assurance Gold Salmonella EIA with either visual or instrumental interpretation and the AOAC culture method for any inoculation level of any food type or naturally contaminated food. The Assurance visual and instrumental options of reading sample reactions produced the same results for 1277 of the 1296 sample and controls analyzed. PMID:10995113

  20. Data Mining Methods Applied to Flight Operations Quality Assurance Data: A Comparison to Standard Statistical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolzer, Alan J.; Halford, Carl

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, multiple regression techniques were applied to Flight Operations Quality Assurance-derived data to develop parsimonious model(s) for fuel consumption on the Boeing 757 airplane. The present study examined several data mining algorithms, including neural networks, on the fuel consumption problem and compared them to the multiple regression results obtained earlier. Using regression methods, parsimonious models were obtained that explained approximately 85% of the variation in fuel flow. In general data mining methods were more effective in predicting fuel consumption. Classification and Regression Tree methods reported correlation coefficients of .91 to .92, and General Linear Models and Multilayer Perceptron neural networks reported correlation coefficients of about .99. These data mining models show great promise for use in further examining large FOQA databases for operational and safety improvements.

  1. A method for evaluating quality assurance needs in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huq, M Saiful; Fraass, Benedick A; Dunscombe, Peter B; Gibbons, John P; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Medin, Paul M; Mundt, Arno; Mutic, Sassa; Palta, Jatinder R; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F; Yorke, Ellen D

    2008-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed. PMID:18406920

  2. A Method for Evaluating Quality Assurance Needs in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, M. Saiful Fraass, Benedick A.; Dunscombe, Peter B.; Gibbons, John P.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Medin, Paul M.; Mundt, Arno; Mutic, Sassa; Palta, Jatinder R.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2008-05-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed.

  3. Experience with Formal Methods techniques at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from a quality assurance perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, John C.; Covington, Rick

    1993-01-01

    Recent experience with Formal Methods (FM) in the Software Quality Assurance Section at the Jet Propulsion Lab is presented. An integrated Formal Method process is presented to show how related existing requirements analysis and FM techniques complement one another. Example application of FM techniques such as formal specifications and specification animators are presented. The authors suggest that the quality assurance organization is a natural home for the Formal Methods specialist, whose expertise can then be used to best advantage across a range of projects.

  4. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grabbe, R.R.

    1995-03-02

    The objective of this Quality Assurance Plan is to provide quality assurance (QA) guidance, implementation of regulatory QA requirements, and quality control (QC) specifications for analytical service. This document follows the Department of Energy (DOE)-issued Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) and additional federal [10 US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830.120] QA requirements that HASQAP does not cover. This document describes how the laboratory implements QA requirements to meet the federal or state requirements, provides what are the default QC specifications, and/or identifies the procedural information that governs how the laboratory operates. In addition, this document meets the objectives of the Quality Assurance Program provided in the WHC-CM-4-2, Section 2.1. This document also covers QA elements that are required in the Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (QAPPs), (QAMS-004), and Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Product Plans (QAMS-005) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A QA Index is provided in the Appendix A.

  5. ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS IN SCHOOL BUILDINGS: BULK SAMPLE ANALYSIS QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM-BULK SAMPLE ROUNDS 9, 10, 11 AND BLIND ROUND 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of laboratories participating in the nineth, tenth, eleventh and second blind round(s) of the bulk sample analysis quality assurance program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Two hundred fifty-four, 320, 318, and 50 laboratorie...

  6. ASBESTOS CONTAINING MATERIALS IN SCHOOL BUILDINGS: BULK SAMPLE ANALYSIS QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM. BULK SAMPLE ROUNDS 12, 13 AND BLIND ROUND III

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of laboratories participating in the twelveth, thirteenth and third (III) blind round of the bulk sample analysis quality assurance program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Three hundred twenty-three, 386 and 51 laboratories w...

  7. RESEARCH AND QUALITY ASSURANCE METHODS USED IN THE EMAP PRAIRIE WETLANDS PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides an interim summary of the research methods and quality assurance (QA) activities used during the Prairie Wetlands Pilot Study, which is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). he Prair...

  8. Quality assurance flood source and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Alexander, David L [West Richland, WA; Satz, Stanley [Surfside, FL

    2002-12-03

    Disclosed is a is an improved flood source, and method of making the same, which emits an evenly distributed flow of energy from a gamma emitting radionuclide dispersed throughout the volume of the flood source. The flood source is formed by filling a bottom pan with a mix of epoxy resin with cobalt-57, preferably at 10 to 20 millicuries and then adding a hardener. The pan is secured to a flat, level surface to prevent the pan from warping and to act as a heat sink for removal of heat from the pan during the curing of the resin-hardener mixture.

  9. Quality assurance manual plutonium liquid scintillation methods and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nose swipe analysis is a very important tool for Radiation Protection personnel. Nose swipe analysis is a very fast and accurate method for (1) determining if a worker has been exposed to airborne plutonium contamination and (2) Identifying the area where there has been a possible plutonium release. Liquid scintillation analysis techniques have been effectively applied to accurately determine the plutonium alpha activity on nose swipe media. Whatman-40 paper and Q-Tips are the only two media which have been evaluated and can be used for nose swipe analysis. Presently, only Q-Tips are used by Group HSE-1 Radiation Protection Personnel. However, both swipe media will be discussed in this report.

  10. Assessing Local Risk of Rifampicin-Resistant Tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Heidebrecht, Christine L.; Podewils, Laura J.; Pym, Alexander; Mthiyane, Thuli; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Background KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) has the highest burden of notified multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB cases in South Africa. A better understanding of spatial heterogeneity in the risk of drug-resistance may help to prioritize local responses. Methods Between July 2012 and June 2013, we conducted a two-way Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) study to classify the burden of rifampicin (RIF)-resistant TB among incident TB cases notified within the catchment areas of seven laboratories in two northern and one southern district of KZN. Decision rules for classification of areas as having either a high- or low-risk of RIF resistant TB (based on proportion of RIF resistance among all TB cases) were based on consultation with local policy makers. Results We classified five areas as high-risk and two as low-risk. High-risk areas were identified in both Southern and Northern districts, with the greatest proportion of RIF resistance observed in the northernmost area, the Manguzi community situated on the Mozambique border. Conclusion Our study revealed heterogeneity in the risk of RIF resistant disease among incident TB cases in KZN. This study demonstrates the potential for LQAS to detect geographic heterogeneity in areas where access to drug susceptibility testing is limited. PMID:27050561

  11. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  12. Apparatus and method for handheld sampling

    DOEpatents

    Staab, Torsten A.

    2005-09-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus, and corresponding method, for taking a sample. The apparatus is built around a frame designed to be held in at least one hand. A sample media is used to secure the sample. A sample media adapter for securing the sample media is operated by a trigger mechanism connectively attached within the frame to the sample media adapter.

  13. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  14. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  15. Quality assuring HIV point of care testing using whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Dare-Smith, Raellene; Badrick, Tony; Cunningham, Philip; Kesson, Alison; Badman, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The Royal College of Pathologists Australasia Quality Assurance Programs (RCPAQAP), have offered dedicated external quality assurance (EQA) for HIV point of care testing (PoCT) since 2011. Prior to this, EQA for these tests was available within the comprehensive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) module. EQA testing for HIV has typically involved the supply of serum or plasma, while in the clinic or community based settings HIV PoCT is generally performed using whole blood obtained by capillary finger-stick collection. RCPAQAP has offered EQA for HIV PoCT using stabilised whole blood since 2014. A total of eight surveys have been undertaken over a period of 2 years from 2014 to 2015. Of the 962 responses received, the overall consensus rate was found to be 98% (941/962). A total of 21 errors were detected. The majority of errors were attributable to false reactive HIV p24 antigen results (9/21, 43%), followed by false reactive HIV antibody results (8/21, 38%). There were 4/21 (19%) false negative HIV antibody results and no false negative HIV p24 antigen results reported. Overall performance was observed to vary minimally between surveys, from a low of 94% up to 99% concordant. Encouraging levels of testing proficiency for HIV PoCT are indicated by these data, but they also confirm the need for HIV PoCT sites to participate in external quality assurance programs to ensure the ongoing provision of high quality patient care. PMID:27306578

  16. A method for critical software event execution reliability in high assurance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, M.E.C.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents a method for Critical Software Event Execution Reliability (Critical SEER). The Critical SEER method is intended for high assurance software that operates in an environment where transient upsets could occur, causing a disturbance of the critical software event execution order, which could cause safety or security hazards. The method has a finite automata based module that watches (hence SEER) and tracks the critical events and ensures they occur in the proper order or else a fail safe state is forced. This method is applied during the analysis, design and implementation phases of software engineering.

  17. An improved sampling method of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qi; Ding, Xintong; Pan, Feng; Li, Weixing

    2014-12-01

    Sampling subnet is an important topic of complex network research. Sampling methods influence the structure and characteristics of subnet. Random multiple snowball with Cohen (RMSC) process sampling which combines the advantages of random sampling and snowball sampling is proposed in this paper. It has the ability to explore global information and discover the local structure at the same time. The experiments indicate that this novel sampling method could keep the similarity between sampling subnet and original network on degree distribution, connectivity rate and average shortest path. This method is applicable to the situation where the prior knowledge about degree distribution of original network is not sufficient.

  18. Toward cost-efficient sampling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Peng; Li, Yongli; Wu, Chong; Zhang, Guijie

    2015-09-01

    The sampling method has been paid much attention in the field of complex network in general and statistical physics in particular. This paper proposes two new sampling methods based on the idea that a small part of vertices with high node degree could possess the most structure information of a complex network. The two proposed sampling methods are efficient in sampling high degree nodes so that they would be useful even if the sampling rate is low, which means cost-efficient. The first new sampling method is developed on the basis of the widely used stratified random sampling (SRS) method and the second one improves the famous snowball sampling (SBS) method. In order to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of two new sampling methods, we compare them with the existing sampling methods in three commonly used simulation networks that are scale-free network, random network, small-world network, and also in two real networks. The experimental results illustrate that the two proposed sampling methods perform much better than the existing sampling methods in terms of achieving the true network structure characteristics reflected by clustering coefficient, Bonacich centrality and average path length, especially when the sampling rate is low.

  19. Quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.M.; Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the quality assurance and quality control practices of Hanford Site environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. Samples are analyzed according to documented standard analytical procedures. This section discusses specific measures taken to ensure quality in project management, sample collection, and analytical results.

  20. Paediatric Rehabilitation Treatment Standards: A Method for Quality Assurance in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Ahnert, Jutta; Löffler, Stefan; Müller, Jochen; Lukasczik, Matthias; Brüggemann, Silke; Vogel, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, the German Pension Insurance has implemented a new method of quality assurance for inpatient rehabilitation of children and adolescents diagnosed with bronchial asthma, obesity, or atopic dermatitis: the so-called rehabilitation treatment standards (RTS). They aim at promoting a comprehensive and evidence-based care in rehabilitation. Furthermore, they are intended to make the therapeutic processes in medical rehabilitation as well as potential deficits more transparent. The development of RTS was composed of five phases during which current scientific evidence, expert knowledge, and patient expectations were included. Their core element is the specification of evidence-based treatment modules that describe a good rehabilitation standard for children diagnosed with bronchial asthma, obesity, or atopic dermatitis. Opportunities and limitations of the RTS as a tool for quality assurance are discussed. Significance for public health The German pension insurance’s rehabilitation treatment standards (RTS) for inpatient rehabilitation of children and adolescents aim at contributing to a comprehensive and evidence-based care in paediatric rehabilitation. As a core element, they comprise evidence-based treatment modules that describe a good rehabilitation standard for children diagnosed with bronchial asthma, obesity, or atopic dermatitis. Although the RTS have been developed for the specific context of the German health care system, they may be referred to as a more general starting point regarding the development of health care and quality assurance standards in child/adolescent medical rehabilitative care. PMID:25343137

  1. Countdown to 2015: Tracking Maternal and Child Health Intervention Targets Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling in Bauchi State Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving maternal and child health remains a top priority in Nigeria’s Bauchi State in the northeastern region where the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and infant mortality rate (IMR) are as high as 1540 per 100,000 live births and 78 per 1,000 live births respectively. In this study, we used the framework of the continuum of maternal and child care to evaluate the impact of interventions in Bauchi State focused on improved maternal and child health, and to ascertain progress towards the achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5. Methods At baseline (2012) and then at follow-up (2013), we randomly sampled 340 households from 19 random locations in each of the 20 Local Government Areas (LGA) of Bauchi State in Northern Nigeria, using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) technique. Women residents in the households were interviewed about their own health and that of their children. Estimated LGA coverage of maternal and child health indicators were aggregated across the State. These values were then compared to the national figures, and the differences from 2012 to 2014 were calculated. Results For several of the indicators, a modest improvement from baseline was found. However, the indicators in the continuum of care neither reached the national average nor attained the 90% globally recommended coverage level. The majority of the LGA surveyed were classifiable as high priority, thus requiring intensified efforts and programmatic scale up. Conclusions Intensive scale-up of programs and interventions is needed in Bauchi State, Northern Nigeria, to accelerate, consolidate and sustain the modest but significant achievements in the continuum of care, if MDGs 4 and 5 are to be achieved by the end of 2015. The intentional focus of LGAs as the unit of intervention ought to be considered a condition precedent for future investments. Priority should be given to the re-allocating resources to program areas and regions where coverage has been

  2. A Novel Method for Quality Assurance of the Cyberknife Iris Variable Aperture Collimator

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Nikolaus; Fürweger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize a novel method for field-size quality assurance of a variable approximately circular aperture collimator by means of dose-area product measurements and to validate its practical use over two years of clinical application. Methods:  To assess methodical limitations, we analyze measurement errors due to change in linac output, beam tuning, uncertainty in MU delivery, daily factors, inherent uncertainty of the large-area parallel-plate ionisation chamber, and misalignment of the large-area parallel-plate ionisation chamber relative to the primary beam axis. To establish a baseline for quality assurance, the dose-area product is measured with the large-area parallel-plate ionisation chamber for all 12 clinical iris apertures in relation to the 60 mm fixed reference aperture. To evaluate the long-term stability of the Iris collimation system, deviation from baseline data is assessed monthly and compared to a priori derived tolerance levels. Results: Only chamber misalignment, variation in output, and uncertainty in MU delivery contribute to a combined error that is estimated at 0.2 % of the nominal field size. This is equivalent to a resolution of 0.005 mm for the 5 mm, and 0.012 mm for the 60 mm field. The method offers ease of use, small measurement time commitment, and is independent of most error sources. Over the observed period, the Iris accuray is within the tolerance levels. Conclusions:  The method is an advantageous alternative to film quality assurance with a high reliability, short measurement time, and superior accuracy in field-size determination. PMID:27382526

  3. ESTIMATION OF DIFFUSION LOSSES WHEN SAMPLING DIESEL AEROSOL: A QUALITY ASSURANCE MEASURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fundamental component of the QA work for the assessment of instruments and sampling system performance was the investigation of particle losses in sampling lines. Along the aerosol sample pathway from its source to the collection media or measuring instrument, some nano-size p...

  4. Subrandom methods for multidimensional nonuniform sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Methods of nonuniform sampling that utilize pseudorandom number sequences to select points from a weighted Nyquist grid are commonplace in biomolecular NMR studies, due to the beneficial incoherence introduced by pseudorandom sampling. However, these methods require the specification of a non-arbitrary seed number in order to initialize a pseudorandom number generator. Because the performance of pseudorandom sampling schedules can substantially vary based on seed number, this can complicate the task of routine data collection. Approaches such as jittered sampling and stochastic gap sampling are effective at reducing random seed dependence of nonuniform sampling schedules, but still require the specification of a seed number. This work formalizes the use of subrandom number sequences in nonuniform sampling as a means of seed-independent sampling, and compares the performance of three subrandom methods to their pseudorandom counterparts using commonly applied schedule performance metrics. Reconstruction results using experimental datasets are also provided to validate claims made using these performance metrics.

  5. Subrandom methods for multidimensional nonuniform sampling.

    PubMed

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Methods of nonuniform sampling that utilize pseudorandom number sequences to select points from a weighted Nyquist grid are commonplace in biomolecular NMR studies, due to the beneficial incoherence introduced by pseudorandom sampling. However, these methods require the specification of a non-arbitrary seed number in order to initialize a pseudorandom number generator. Because the performance of pseudorandom sampling schedules can substantially vary based on seed number, this can complicate the task of routine data collection. Approaches such as jittered sampling and stochastic gap sampling are effective at reducing random seed dependence of nonuniform sampling schedules, but still require the specification of a seed number. This work formalizes the use of subrandom number sequences in nonuniform sampling as a means of seed-independent sampling, and compares the performance of three subrandom methods to their pseudorandom counterparts using commonly applied schedule performance metrics. Reconstruction results using experimental datasets are also provided to validate claims made using these performance metrics. PMID:27301071

  6. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOEpatents

    Odell, Daniel M. C.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  7. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  8. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components. PMID:21626190

  9. Mixed Methods Sampling: A Typology with Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teddlie, Charles; Yu, Fen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a discussion of mixed methods (MM) sampling techniques. MM sampling involves combining well-established qualitative and quantitative techniques in creative ways to answer research questions posed by MM research designs. Several issues germane to MM sampling are presented including the differences between probability and…

  10. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  11. Direct method for second-order sensitivity analysis of modal assurance criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheng; Mao, Kuanmin; Li, Li; Xiao, Weiwei; Li, Bin

    2016-08-01

    A Lagrange direct method is proposed to calculate the second-order sensitivity of modal assurance criterion (MAC) values of undamped systems. The eigenvalue problem and normalizations of eigenvectors, which augmented by using some Lagrange multipliers, are used as the constraints of the Lagrange functional. Once the Lagrange multipliers are determined, the sensitivities of MAC values can be evaluated directly. The Lagrange direct method is accurate, efficient and easy to implement. A simply supported beam is utilized to check the accuracy of the proposed method. A frame is adopted to validate the predicting capacity of the first- and second-order sensitivities of MAC values. It is shown that the computational costs of the proposed method can be remarkably reduced in comparison with those of the indirect method without loss of accuracy.

  12. SAMPLING AND DATA HANDLING METHODS FOR INHALABLE PARTICULATE SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report reviews the objectives of a research program on sampling and measuring particles in the inhalable particulate (IP) size range in emissions from stationary sources, and describes methods and equipment required. A computer technique was developed to analyze data on parti...

  13. A method for assurance of image integrity in CAD-PACS integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng

    2007-03-01

    Computer Aided Detection/Diagnosis (CAD) can greatly assist in the clinical decision making process, and therefore, has drawn tremendous research efforts. However, integrating independent CAD workstation results with the clinical diagnostic workflow still remains challenging. We have presented a CAD-PACS integration toolkit that complies with DICOM standard and IHE profiles. One major issue in CAD-PACS integration is the security of the images used in CAD post-processing and the corresponding CAD result images. In this paper, we present a method for assuring the integrity of both DICOM images used in CAD post-processing and the CAD image results that are in BMP or JPEG format. The method is evaluated in a PACS simulator that simulates clinical PACS workflow. It can also be applied to multiple CAD applications that are integrated with the PACS simulator. The successful development and evaluation of this method will provide a useful approach for assuring image integrity of the CAD-PACS integration in clinical diagnosis.

  14. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Suermann, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits.

  15. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts. PMID:26763302

  16. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Benner, Henry W.; Dzenitis, John M.

    2016-06-21

    Provided herein are fluidics platforms and related methods for performing integrated sample collection and solid-phase extraction of a target component of the sample all in one tube. The fluidics platform comprises a pump, particles for solid-phase extraction and a particle-holding means. The method comprises contacting the sample with one or more reagents in a pump, coupling a particle-holding means to the pump and expelling the waste out of the pump while the particle-holding means retains the particles inside the pump. The fluidics platform and methods herein described allow solid-phase extraction without pipetting and centrifugation.

  17. Dynamic Method for Identifying Collected Sample Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John

    2008-01-01

    G-Sample is designed for sample collection missions to identify the presence and quantity of sample material gathered by spacecraft equipped with end effectors. The software method uses a maximum-likelihood estimator to identify the collected sample's mass based on onboard force-sensor measurements, thruster firings, and a dynamics model of the spacecraft. This makes sample mass identification a computation rather than a process requiring additional hardware. Simulation examples of G-Sample are provided for spacecraft model configurations with a sample collection device mounted on the end of an extended boom. In the absence of thrust knowledge errors, the results indicate that G-Sample can identify the amount of collected sample mass to within 10 grams (with 95-percent confidence) by using a force sensor with a noise and quantization floor of 50 micrometers. These results hold even in the presence of realistic parametric uncertainty in actual spacecraft inertia, center-of-mass offset, and first flexibility modes. Thrust profile knowledge is shown to be a dominant sensitivity for G-Sample, entering in a nearly one-to-one relationship with the final mass estimation error. This means thrust profiles should be well characterized with onboard accelerometers prior to sample collection. An overall sample-mass estimation error budget has been developed to approximate the effect of model uncertainty, sensor noise, data rate, and thrust profile error on the expected estimate of collected sample mass.

  18. Quality assurance for synovial fluid examination for crystals: an improved method

    PubMed Central

    McGill, N.; McGill, V.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the best method of preparing synovial fluid specimens for use in quality assurance (QA) surveys designed to assess accuracy of crystal identification.
METHODS—A previously published method (A) was compared with a new method (B) in the setting of a QA survey. Ten Australian, one New Zealand, and one Hong Kong hospital laboratories took part in the survey. Each laboratory examined six different synovial fluid specimens prepared using method A (first round) and a separate six specimens using method B (second round). In method A, a drop of synovial fluid on a glass slide was surrounded by a rim of Ultramount, sealed with a coverslip, and distributed. The participating laboratory did not need to perform any processing of the specimen before examination. In method B, a capillary tip was filled with synovial fluid, heat sealed, and distributed. The fluid was expelled onto a glass slide in preparation for examination after arrival in the participating laboratory.
RESULTS—Using method A 36 of 71 (51%) of the specimens were rated as satisfactory, compared with 53 of 61 (87%) of the specimens using method B (Fisher's exact test, p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—An improved method of preparation of synovial fluid specimens for QA surveys is described. Using the new method it is feasible to perform a synovial fluid QA survey covering a large area (Australasia).

 PMID:9306876

  19. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1992-04-01

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized.

  20. Systems and methods for sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Guangtao; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-01-13

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for sample analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample that includes a probe including a material connected to a high voltage source, a device for generating a heated gas, and a mass analyzer.

  1. Systems and methods for sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Guangtao; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-10-20

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for sample analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample that includes a probe including a material connected to a high voltage source, a device for generating a heated gas, and a mass analyzer.

  2. QUALITY ASSURANCE UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of the air pollution quality assurance program as implemented by EMSL/RTP is presented. The discussion includes method standardization operations for both ambient air and stationary source measurements, the quality assurance audit program, the ambient air equivalency ...

  3. Private sector delivery of health services in developing countries: a mixed-methods study on quality assurance in social franchises

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Across the developing world health care services are most often delivered in the private sector and social franchising has emerged, over the past decade, as an increasingly popular method of private sector health care delivery. Social franchising aims to strengthen business practices through economies of scale: branding clinics and purchasing drugs in bulk at wholesale prices. While quality is one of the established goals of social franchising, there is no published documentation of how quality levels might be set in the context of franchised private providers, nor what quality assurance measures can or should exist within social franchises. The aim of this study was to better understand the quality assurance systems currently utilized in social franchises, and to determine if there are shared standards for practice or quality outcomes that exist across programs. Methods The study included three data sources and levels of investigation: 1) Self-reported program data; 2) Scoping telephone interviews; and 3) In-depth field interviews and clinic visits. Results Social Franchises conceive of quality assurance not as an independent activity, but rather as a goal that is incorporated into all areas of franchise operations, including recruitment, training, monitoring of provider performance, monitoring of client experience and the provision of feedback. Conclusions These findings are the first evidence to support the 2002 conceptual model of social franchising which proposed that the assurance of quality was one of the three core goals of all social franchises. However, while quality is important to franchise programs, quality assurance systems overall are not reflective of the evidence to-date on quality measurement or quality improvement best practices. Future research in this area is needed to better understand the details of quality assurance systems as applied in social franchise programs, the process by which quality assurance becomes a part of the

  4. PREPARATION OF SOIL SAMPLING PROTOCOLS: SAMPLING TECHNIQUES AND STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document serves as a companion document to the Soil Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide, Second Edition. he two documents together provide methods, techniques, and procedures for designing a variety of soil measurement programs and associated Quality Assurance Program Pla...

  5. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    DOEpatents

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  6. A method of setting limits for the purpose of quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-10-01

    The result from any assurance measurement needs to be checked against some limits for acceptability. There are two types of limits; those that define clinical acceptability (action limits) and those that are meant to serve as a warning that the measurement is close to the action limits (tolerance limits). Currently, there is no standard procedure to set these limits. In this work, we propose an operational procedure to set tolerance limits and action limits. The approach to establish the limits is based on techniques of quality engineering using control charts and a process capability index. The method is different for tolerance limits and action limits with action limits being categorized into those that are specified and unspecified. The procedure is to first ensure process control using the I-MR control charts. Then, the tolerance limits are set equal to the control chart limits on the I chart. Action limits are determined using the Cpm process capability index with the requirements that the process must be in-control. The limits from the proposed procedure are compared to an existing or conventional method. Four examples are investigated: two of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) point dose quality assurance (QA) and two of routine linear accelerator output QA. The tolerance limits range from about 6% larger to 9% smaller than conventional action limits for VMAT QA cases. For the linac output QA, tolerance limits are about 60% smaller than conventional action limits. The operational procedure describe in this work is based on established quality management tools and will provide a systematic guide to set up tolerance and action limits for different equipment and processes. PMID:24043363

  7. A method of setting limits for the purpose of quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-10-01

    The result from any assurance measurement needs to be checked against some limits for acceptability. There are two types of limits; those that define clinical acceptability (action limits) and those that are meant to serve as a warning that the measurement is close to the action limits (tolerance limits). Currently, there is no standard procedure to set these limits. In this work, we propose an operational procedure to set tolerance limits and action limits. The approach to establish the limits is based on techniques of quality engineering using control charts and a process capability index. The method is different for tolerance limits and action limits with action limits being categorized into those that are specified and unspecified. The procedure is to first ensure process control using the I-MR control charts. Then, the tolerance limits are set equal to the control chart limits on the I chart. Action limits are determined using the Cpm process capability index with the requirements that the process must be in-control. The limits from the proposed procedure are compared to an existing or conventional method. Four examples are investigated: two of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) point dose quality assurance (QA) and two of routine linear accelerator output QA. The tolerance limits range from about 6% larger to 9% smaller than conventional action limits for VMAT QA cases. For the linac output QA, tolerance limits are about 60% smaller than conventional action limits. The operational procedure describe in this work is based on established quality management tools and will provide a systematic guide to set up tolerance and action limits for different equipment and processes.

  8. AOAC Official MethodSM Matrix Extension Validation Study of Assurance GDSTM for the Detection of Salmonella in Selected Spices.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip; Kaur, Mandeep; Shah, Khyati; Immerman, Amy; Jucker, Markus; Lienau, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Assurance GDSTM for Salmonella Tq has been validated according to the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Methods Committee Guidelines for Validation of Microbiological Methods for Food and Environmental Surfaces for the detection of selected foods and environmental surfaces (Official Method of AnalysisSM 2009.03, Performance Tested MethodSM No. 050602). The method also completed AFNOR validation (following the ISO 16140 standard) compared to the reference method EN ISO 6579. For AFNOR, GDS was given a scope covering all human food, animal feed stuff, and environmental surfaces (Certificate No. TRA02/12-01/09). Results showed that Assurance GDS for Salmonella (GDS) has high sensitivity and is equivalent to the reference culture methods for the detection of motile and non-motile Salmonella. As part of the aforementioned validations, inclusivity and exclusivity studies, stability, and ruggedness studies were also conducted. Assurance GDS has 100% inclusivity and exclusivity among the 100 Salmonella serovars and 35 non-Salmonella organisms analyzed. To add to the scope of the Assurance GDS for Salmonella method, a matrix extension study was conducted, following the AOAC guidelines, to validate the application of the method for selected spices, specifically curry powder, cumin powder, and chili powder, for the detection of Salmonella. PMID:26268975

  9. [Spectrum recovery methods for nonuniform sampling interferogram].

    PubMed

    Yao, Tao; Lü, Qun-Bo; Xiangli, Bin; Yuan, Yan

    2010-05-01

    The interferogram acquired by imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) can't be used directly and must be recovered. The spectrum recovery processes based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) is the traditional method which is used widely. For some IFTS, the nonuniform sampling of the interferogram is often occurrs. When the aliasing is neglected, the spectrum recovered by traditional method is often distorted. When the spectrum recovery processes based on Fourier transform are used, the precision of the recovered spectrum can be ensured, but the real-time processing requirement can't be satisfied. In order to acquire the precise recovered spectrum of the nonuniform sampled interferogram, the interpolation method and nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) method were adopted. For the oversampled interferogram and partial undersampled interferogram, the spectrum recovery methods based on interpolation and NUFFT were presented respectively, and the applicability of these two methods is given. Finally, the computer simulation was performed, and the results indicate that NUFFT method is preferable to interpolation method not for undersampled interferogram but for oversampled interferogram. PMID:20672649

  10. A Method of Separation Assurance for Instrument Flight Procedures at Non-Radar Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila R.; Consiglio, Maria

    2002-01-01

    A method to provide automated air traffic separation assurance services during approach to or departure from a non-radar, non-towered airport environment is described. The method is constrained by provision of these services without radical changes or ambitious investments in current ground-based technologies. The proposed procedures are designed to grant access to a large number of airfields that currently have no or very limited access under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), thus increasing mobility with minimal infrastructure investment. This paper primarily addresses a low-cost option for airport and instrument approach infrastructure, but is designed to be an architecture from which a more efficient, albeit more complex, system may be developed. A functional description of the capabilities in the current NAS infrastructure is provided. Automated terminal operations and procedures are introduced. Rules of engagement and the operations are defined. Results of preliminary simulation testing are presented. Finally, application of the method to more terminal-like operations, and major research areas, including necessary piloted studies, are discussed.

  11. Monitoring maternal, newborn, and child health interventions using lot quality assurance sampling in Sokoto State of northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa; Shoretire, Kamil; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Mohammed, Zainab; Abdulazeez, Jumare; Gwamzhi, Ringpon; Ganiyu, Akeem

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality ratio and infant mortality rate are as high as 1,576 per 100,000 live births and 78 per 1,000 live births, respectively, in Nigeria's northwestern region, where Sokoto State is located. Using applicable monitoring indicators for tracking progress in the UN/WHO framework on continuum of maternal, newborn, and child health care, this study evaluated the progress of Sokoto toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 by December 2015. The changes in outcomes in 2012–2013 associated with maternal and child health interventions were assessed. Design We used baseline and follow-up lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) data obtained in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In each of the surveys, data were obtained from 437 households sampled from 19 LQAS locations in each of the 23 local government areas (LGAs). The composite state-level coverage estimates of the respective indicators were aggregated from estimated LGA coverage estimates. Results None of the nine indicators associated with the continuum of maternal, neonatal, and child care satisfied the recommended 90% coverage target for achieving MDGs 4 and 5. Similarly, the average state coverage estimates were lower than national coverage estimates. Marginal improvements in coverage were obtained in the demand for family planning satisfied, antenatal care visits, postnatal care for mothers, and exclusive breast-feeding. Antibiotic treatment for acute pneumonia increased significantly by 12.8 percentage points. The majority of the LGAs were classifiable as low-performing, high-priority areas for intensified program intervention. Conclusions Despite the limited time left in the countdown to December 2015, Sokoto State, Nigeria, is not on track to achieving the MDG 90% coverage of indicators tied to the continuum of maternal and child care, to reduce maternal and childhood mortality by a third by 2015. Targeted health system investments at the primary care level remain a

  12. Bayesian individualization via sampling-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, J

    1996-02-01

    We consider the situation where we wish to adjust the dosage regimen of a patient based on (in general) sparse concentration measurements taken on-line. A Bayesian decision theory approach is taken which requires the specification of an appropriate prior distribution and loss function. A simple method for obtaining samples from the posterior distribution of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the patient is described. In general, these samples are used to obtain a Monte Carlo estimate of the expected loss which is then minimized with respect to the dosage regimen. Some special cases which yield analytic solutions are described. When the prior distribution is based on a population analysis then a method of accounting for the uncertainty in the population parameters is described. Two simulation studies showing how the methods work in practice are presented. PMID:8827585

  13. Are Patent Medicine Vendors Effective Agents in Malaria Control? Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Assess Quality of Practice in Jigawa, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Berendes, Sima; Adeyemi, Olusegun; Oladele, Edward Adekola; Oresanya, Olusola Bukola; Okoh, Festus; Valadez, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patent medicine vendors (PMV) provide antimalarial treatment and care throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and can play an important role in the fight against malaria. Their close-to-client infrastructure could enable lifesaving artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) to reach patients in time. However, systematic assessments of drug sellers’ performance quality are crucial if their role is to be managed within the health system. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) could be an efficient method to monitor and evaluate PMV practice, but has so far never been used for this purpose. Methods In support of the Nigeria Malaria Booster Program we assessed PMV practices in three Senatorial Districts (SDs) of Jigawa, Nigeria. A two-stage LQAS assessed whether at least 80% of PMV stores in SDs used national treatment guidelines. Acceptable sampling errors were set in consultation with government officials (alpha and beta <0.10). The hypergeometric formula determined sample sizes and cut-off values for SDs. A structured assessment tool identified high and low performing SDs for quality of care indicators. Findings Drug vendors performed poorly in all SDs of Jigawa for all indicators. For example, all SDs failed for stocking and selling first-line antimalarials. PMV sold no longer recommended antimalarials, such as Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine and oral Artesunate monotherapy. Most PMV were ignorant of and lacked training about new treatment guidelines that had endorsed ACTs as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Conclusion There is urgent need to regularly monitor and improve the availability and quality of malaria treatment provided by medicine sellers in Nigeria; the irrational use of antimalarials in the ACT era revealed in this study bears a high risk of economic loss, death and development of drug resistance. LQAS has been shown to be a suitable method for monitoring malaria-related indicators among PMV, and should be applied in Nigeria

  14. Methods for Sampling of Airborne Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Summary: To better understand the underlying mechanisms of aerovirology, accurate sampling of airborne viruses is fundamental. The sampling instruments commonly used in aerobiology have also been used to recover viruses suspended in the air. We reviewed over 100 papers to evaluate the methods currently used for viral aerosol sampling. Differentiating infections caused by direct contact from those caused by airborne dissemination can be a very demanding task given the wide variety of sources of viral aerosols. While epidemiological data can help to determine the source of the contamination, direct data obtained from air samples can provide very useful information for risk assessment purposes. Many types of samplers have been used over the years, including liquid impingers, solid impactors, filters, electrostatic precipitators, and many others. The efficiencies of these samplers depend on a variety of environmental and methodological factors that can affect the integrity of the virus structure. The aerodynamic size distribution of the aerosol also has a direct effect on sampler efficiency. Viral aerosols can be studied under controlled laboratory conditions, using biological or nonbiological tracers and surrogate viruses, which are also discussed in this review. Lastly, general recommendations are made regarding future studies on the sampling of airborne viruses. PMID:18772283

  15. Methods for sampling of airborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Daniel; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2008-09-01

    To better understand the underlying mechanisms of aerovirology, accurate sampling of airborne viruses is fundamental. The sampling instruments commonly used in aerobiology have also been used to recover viruses suspended in the air. We reviewed over 100 papers to evaluate the methods currently used for viral aerosol sampling. Differentiating infections caused by direct contact from those caused by airborne dissemination can be a very demanding task given the wide variety of sources of viral aerosols. While epidemiological data can help to determine the source of the contamination, direct data obtained from air samples can provide very useful information for risk assessment purposes. Many types of samplers have been used over the years, including liquid impingers, solid impactors, filters, electrostatic precipitators, and many others. The efficiencies of these samplers depend on a variety of environmental and methodological factors that can affect the integrity of the virus structure. The aerodynamic size distribution of the aerosol also has a direct effect on sampler efficiency. Viral aerosols can be studied under controlled laboratory conditions, using biological or nonbiological tracers and surrogate viruses, which are also discussed in this review. Lastly, general recommendations are made regarding future studies on the sampling of airborne viruses. PMID:18772283

  16. Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi,Shanavaz; Langlois, Richard G.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.

    2011-07-05

    Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM.TM. on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA.TM., on the 5' end.

  17. Flow cytometric detection method for DNA samples

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Langlois, Richard G.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.

    2006-08-01

    Disclosed herein are two methods for rapid multiplex analysis to determine the presence and identity of target DNA sequences within a DNA sample. Both methods use reporting DNA sequences, e.g., modified conventional Taqman.RTM. probes, to combine multiplex PCR amplification with microsphere-based hybridization using flow cytometry means of detection. Real-time PCR detection can also be incorporated. The first method uses a cyanine dye, such as, Cy3.TM., as the reporter linked to the 5' end of a reporting DNA sequence. The second method positions a reporter dye, e.g., FAM, on the 3' end of the reporting DNA sequence and a quencher dye, e.g., TAMRA, on the 5' end.

  18. National dioxin study: Analytical procedures and quality assurance plan for the analysis of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in Tier 3-7 samples of the US Environmental Protection Agency National Dioxin Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Analytical methodology used by EMSL-RTP, ECL-BSL, and ERL-D in the analysis of samples for the study of Tiers 3-7 in the U.S. EPA National Dioxin Strategy is provided. The methods are based on low- and high-resolution mass spectrometry using stable-isotope-labeled internal standards. The methods were peer reviewed by the Quality Assurance Committee for the National Dioxin Strategy, as revised in November 1984. The methods are to serve only as a guideline for these analyses and may be modified as required to successfully meet target detection limits.

  19. EVALUATION OF SAMPLING METHODS FOR GASEOUS ATMOSPHERIC SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research program was conducted to test and evaluate several alternatives for collecting and transferring samples from the collection site to the laboratory for the analysis of a variety of toxic organic pollutants by gas chromatography (GC). Sample storage media included three ...

  20. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in Great Lakes areas of concern, 2010 to 2011-Collection methods, analyses methods, quality assurance, and data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Smith, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) cooperated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on a study to identify the occurrence of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in water and bottom-sediment samples collected during 2010–11 at sites in seven areas of concern (AOCs) throughout the Great Lakes. Study sites include tributaries to the Great Lakes in AOCs located near Duluth, Minn.; Green Bay, Wis.; Roches­ter, N.Y.; Detroit, Mich.; Toledo, Ohio; Milwaukee, Wis.; and Ashtabula, Ohio. This report documents the collection meth­ods, analyses methods, quality-assurance data and analyses, and provides the data for this study. Water and bottom-sediment samples were analyzed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., for a broad suite of CECs. During this study, 135 environmental and 23 field dupli­cate samples of surface water and wastewater effluent, 10 field blank water samples, and 11 field spike water samples were collected and analyzed. Sixty-one of the 69 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 4433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 11.2 micrograms per liter. Twenty-eight of the 48 pharmaceuticals (research method 8244) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.0029 to 22.0 micro­grams per liter. Ten of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols analyzed (research method 4434) were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.16 to 10,000 nanograms per liter. During this study, 75 environmental, 13 field duplicate samples, and 9 field spike samples of bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for a wide variety of CECs. Forty-seven of the 57 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 5433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.921 to 25,800 nanograms per gram. Seventeen of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols (research method 6434) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.006 to 8,921 nanograms per gram. Twelve of

  1. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schalla, Ronald; Smith, Ronald M.; Hall, Stephen H.; Smart, John E.; Gustafson, Gregg S.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  2. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  3. Alternate calibration method of radiochromic EBT3 film for quality assurance verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soah; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Hwang, Taejin; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Koo, Taeryool; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me Yeon; Bae, Hoonsik; Kim, Kyoung Ju

    2016-07-01

    EBT3 film is utilized as a dosimetry quality assurance tool for the verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments. In this work, we suggest a percentage-depth-dose (PDD) calibration method that can calibrate several EBT3 film pieces together at different dose levels because photon beams provide different dose levels at different depths along the axis of the beam. We investigated the feasibility of the film PDD calibration method based on PDD data and compared the results those from the traditional film calibration method. Photon beams at 6 MV were delivered to EBT3 film pieces for both calibration methods. For the PDD-based calibration, the film pieces were placed on solid phantoms at the depth of maximum dose (dmax) and at depths of 3, 5, 8, 12, 17, and 22 cm, and a photon beam was delivered twice, at 100 cGy and 400 cGy, to extend the calibration dose range under the same conditions. Fourteen film pieces, to maintain their consistency, were irradiated at doses ranging from approximately 30 to 400 cGy for both film calibrations. The film pieces were located at the center position on the scan bed of an Epson 1680 flatbed scanner in the parallel direction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were created, and their dose distributions were delivered to the film. The dose distributions for the traditional method and those for the PDD-based calibration method were evaluated using a Gamma analysis. The PDD dose values using a CC13 ion chamber and those obtained by using a FC65-G Farmer chamber and measured at the depth of interest produced very similar results. With the objective test criterion of a 1% dosage agreement at 1 mm, the passing rates for the four cases of the three IMRT plans were essentially identical. The traditional and the PDD-based calibrations provided similar plan verification results. We also describe another alternative for calibrating EBT3 films, i.e., a PDD-based calibration method that provides an easy and time-saving approach

  4. Field evaluation of a VOST sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D.; Johnson, L.D.; Fuerst, R.G.; McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    The VOST (SW-846 Method 0030) specifies the use of Tenax{reg_sign} and a particular petroleum-based charcoal (SKC Lot 104, or its equivalent), that is no longer commercially available. In field evaluation studies of VOST methodology, a replacement petroleum-based charcoal has been used: candidate replacement sorbents for charcoal were studied, and Anasorb{reg_sign} 747, a carbon-based sorbent, was selected for field testing. The sampling train was modified to use only Anasorb{reg_sign} in the back tube and Tenax{reg_sign} in the two front tubes to avoid analytical difficulties associated with the analysis of the sequential bed back tube used in the standard VOST train. The standard (SW-846 Method 0030) and the modified VOST methods were evaluated at a chemical manufacturing facility using a quadruple probe system with quadruple trains. In this field test, known concentrations of the halogenated volatile organic compounds, that are listed in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Title 3, were introduced into the VOST train and the modified VOST train, using the same certified gas cylinder as a source of test compounds. Statistical tests of the comparability of methods were performed on a compound-by-compound basis. For most compounds, the VOST and modified VOST methods were found to be statistically equivalent.

  5. Experience with modified aerospace reliability and quality assurance method for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    The SR&QA approach assures that the machine is not hazardous to the public or operating personnel, can operate unattended on a utility grid, demonstrates reliability operation, and helps establish the quality assurance and maintainability requirements for future wind turbine projects. The approach consisted of modified failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) during the design phase, minimal hardware inspection during parts fabrication, and three simple documents to control activities during machine construction and operation. Five years experience shows that this low cost approach works well enough that it should be considered by others for similar projects.

  6. A Quality Assurance Method that Utilizes 3D Dosimetry and Facilitates Clinical Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Juang, Titania; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Adamovics, John; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new three-dimensional (3D) quality assurance (QA) method that provides comprehensive dosimetry verification and facilitates evaluation of the clinical significance of QA data acquired in a phantom. Also to apply the method to investigate the dosimetric efficacy of base-of-skull (BOS) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment. Methods and Materials: Two types of IMRT QA verification plans were created for 6 patients who received BOS IMRT. The first plan enabled conventional 2D planar IMRT QA using the Varian portal dosimetry system. The second plan enabled 3D verification using an anthropomorphic head phantom. In the latter, the 3D dose distribution was measured using the DLOS/Presage dosimetry system (DLOS = Duke Large-field-of-view Optical-CT System, Presage Heuris Pharma, Skillman, NJ), which yielded isotropic 2-mm data throughout the treated volume. In a novel step, measured 3D dose distributions were transformed back to the patient's CT to enable calculation of dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose overlays. Measured and planned patient DVHs were compared to investigate clinical significance. Results: Close agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was observed for all 6 cases. For gamma criteria of 3%, 2 mm, the mean passing rate for portal dosimetry was 96.8% (range, 92.0%-98.9%), compared to 94.9% (range, 90.1%-98.9%) for 3D. There was no clear correlation between 2D and 3D passing rates. Planned and measured dose distributions were evaluated on the patient's anatomy, using DVH and dose overlays. Minor deviations were detected, and the clinical significance of these are presented and discussed. Conclusions: Two advantages accrue to the methods presented here. First, treatment accuracy is evaluated throughout the whole treated volume, yielding comprehensive verification. Second, the clinical significance of any deviations can be assessed through the generation of DVH curves and dose overlays on the patient

  7. Guidelines for the processing and quality assurance of benthic invertebrate samples collected as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, T.F.; Gurtz, M.E.; Meador, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate samples are collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. This is a perennial, multidisciplinary program that integrates biological, physical, and chemical indicators of water quality to evaluate status and trends and to develop an understanding of the factors controlling observed water quality. The Program examines water quality in 60 study units (coupled ground- and surface-water systems) that encompass most of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii. Study-unit teams collect and process qualitative and semi-quantitative invertebrate samples according to standardized procedures. These samples are processed (elutriated and subsampled) in the field to produce as many as four sample components: large-rare, main-body, elutriate, and split. Each sample component is preserved in 10-percent formalin, and two components, large-rare and main-body, are sent to contract laboratories for further processing. The large-rare component is composed of large invertebrates that are removed from the sample matrix during field processing and placed in one or more containers. The main-body sample component consists of the remaining sample materials (sediment, detritus, and invertebrates) and is subsampled in the field to achieve a volume of 750 milliliters or less. The remaining two sample components, elutriate and split, are used for quality-assurance and quality-control purposes. Contract laboratories are used to identify and quantify invertebrates from the large-rare and main-body sample components according to the procedures and guidelines specified within this document. These guidelines allow the use of subsampling techniques to reduce the volume of sample material processed and to facilitate identifications. These processing procedures and techniques may be modified if the modifications provide equal or greater levels of accuracy and precision. The intent of sample processing is to

  8. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY METHODS DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is engaged in the development, demonstration, and validation of new or newly adapted methods of analysis for environmentally related samples. Recognizing that a "one size fits all" approach to qu...

  9. System and Method for Isolation of Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye (Inventor); Wu, Honglu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for isolating samples are provided. The system comprises a first membrane and a second membrane disposed within an enclosure. First and second reservoirs can also be disposed within the enclosure and adapted to contain one or more reagents therein. A first valve can be disposed within the enclosure and in fluid communication with the first reservoir, the second reservoir, or both. The first valve can also be in fluid communication with the first or second membranes or both. The first valve can be adapted to selectively regulate the flow of the reagents from the first reservoir, through at least one of the first and second membranes, and into the second reservoir.

  10. A Review of Quality Assurance Methods to Assist Professional Record Keeping: Implications for Providers of Interpersonal Violence Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Kelsey M.; Donohue, Brad; Wilks, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    Errors have been found to frequently occur in the management of case records within mental health service systems. In cases involving interpersonal violence, such errors have been found to negatively impact service implementation and lead to significant trauma and fatalities. In an effort to ensure adherence to specified standards of care, quality assurance programs (QA) have been developed to monitor and enhance service implementation. These programs have generally been successful in facilitating record management. However, these systems are rarely disseminated, and not well integrated. Therefore, within the context of interpersonal violence, we provide an extensive review of evidence supported record keeping practices, and methods to assist in assuring these practices are implemented with adherence. PMID:24976786

  11. The Halving Method for Sample Quartiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2003-01-01

    An attempt is made to put the notion of sample quartiles on a mathematical footing in the light of ranks of observations, and equisegmentation property that the quartiles divide ordered sample observations into four segments leaving the same number of observations in each if all the observations are distinct. Sample quartiles provided by the…

  12. Methods, quality assurance, and data for assessing atmospheric deposition of pesticides in the Central Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zamora, Celia; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey monitored atmospheric deposition of pesticides in the Central Valley of California during two studies in 2001 and 2002–04. The 2001 study sampled wet deposition (rain) and storm-drain runoff in the Modesto, California, area during the orchard dormant-spray season to examine the contribution of pesticide concentrations to storm runoff from rainfall. In the 2002–04 study, the number and extent of collection sites in the Central Valley were increased to determine the areal distribution of organophosphate insecticides and other pesticides, and also five more sample types were collected. These were dry deposition, bulk deposition, and three sample types collected from a soil box: aqueous phase in runoff, suspended sediment in runoff, and surficial-soil samples. This report provides concentration data and describes methods and quality assurance of sample collection and laboratory analysis for pesticide compounds in all samples collected from 16 sites. Each sample was analyzed for 41 currently used pesticides and 23 pesticide degradates, including oxygen analogs (oxons) of 9 organophosphate insecticides. Analytical results are presented by sample type and study period. The median concentrations of both chloryprifos and diazinon sampled at four urban (0.067 micrograms per liter [μg/L] and 0.515 μg/L, respectively) and four agricultural sites (0.079 μg/L and 0.583 μg/L, respectively) during a January 2001 storm event in and around Modesto, Calif., were nearly identical, indicating that the overall atmospheric burden in the region appeared to be fairly similar during the sampling event. Comparisons of median concentrations in the rainfall to those in the McHenry storm-drain runoff showed that, for some compounds, rainfall contributed a substantial percentage of the concentration in the runoff; for other compounds, the concentrations in rainfall were much greater than in the runoff. For example, diazinon concentrations in rainfall were about

  13. Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, A.B.; Craig, H.D.; Jenkins, T.F.; Sisk, W.E.

    1996-09-01

    A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

  14. Radiological sampling and analytical methods for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R L; Hahne, R M; Kahn, B; McCurdy, D; Mellor, R A; Moore, W S; Sedlet, J; Whittaker, E

    1985-05-01

    Radiological sampling and analysis performed under the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations were evaluated for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Drinking Water to consider whether any changes should be recommended. The authors reviewed the analytical screening scheme; sample collection, storage and analysis procedures; selection of analytical methods; reliability of results; and possible future needs. The main problem in the program has been dependence on a screening scheme of gross alpha-particle activity measurement and 226Ra analysis for predicting elevated 228Ra levels to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Ra. In some aquifers, 228Ra levels have been found to be unrelated to 226Ra levels. Several alternatives are discussed to eliminate this problem. A secondary problem is that the measurement for assuring compliance with the MCL for gross alpha-particle activity minus Ra, Rn and U uses chemical U analysis and assumes equilibrium of 238U and 234U. Because some ground waters are known to be at disequilibrium, radiometric U analysis is needed for those gross alpha-particle activities and chemical U values that could result in an erroneous conclusion relative to the MCL. In addition, studies were recommended for determining analytical uncertainties and assuring reliable sampling and sample maintenance; improvements in the system for accepting methods were suggested; and methods were identified for several radionuclides not currently in the analytical program that may be needed to assure absence of elevated radiation doses and could be useful for identifying trace contaminants. PMID:3988523

  15. System and method for extracting a sample from a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary; Covey, Thomas

    2015-06-23

    A system and method is disclosed for extracting a sample from a sample surface. A sample is provided and a sample surface receives the sample which is deposited on the sample surface. A hydrophobic material is applied to the sample surface, and one or more devices are configured to dispense a liquid on the sample, the liquid dissolving the sample to form a dissolved sample material, and the one or more devices are configured to extract the dissolved sample material from the sample surface.

  16. Selected quality assurance data for water samples collected by the US Geological Survey, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1980 to 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wegner, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Multiple water samples from 115 wells and 3 surface water sites were collected between 1980 and 1988 for the ongoing quality assurance program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The reported results from the six laboratories involved were analyzed for agreement using descriptive statistics. The constituents and properties included: tritium, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, -240 (undivided), strontium-90, americium-241, cesium-137, total dissolved chromium, selected dissolved trace metals, sodium, chloride, nitrate, selected purgeable organic compounds, and specific conductance. Agreement could not be calculated for purgeable organic compounds, trace metals, some nitrates and blank sample analyses because analytical uncertainties were not consistently reported. However, differences between results for most of these data were calculated. The blank samples were not analyzed for differences. The laboratory results analyzed using descriptive statistics showed a median agreement between all useable data pairs of 95%. (USGS)

  17. Automatic method for inspecting plywood shear samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avent, R. R., III; Conners, Richard W.

    1991-03-01

    A plywood panel is composed of several layers of wood bonded together by glue. The adhesive integrity of the glue formulation employed must surpass the structural integrity of wood used to make the panel. The American Plywood Association (APA) regularly tests plywood from manufacturing plants to ensure that this performance requirement is met. One of the procedures used is to saw a panel into a number of 1 X 3- 1/4 inch blocks called samples. These samples are then subjected to a number of treatments to simulate natural aging. The treated samples are then sheared into two halves. A 1 X 1 inch area on each of the two halves is then visually inspected to determine the percent wood failure that occurred during the shear. Roughly speaking a region of solid wood or a region of wood fibers embedded in glue is considered to be a region of wood failure while a region of glue is considered to be a region of glue failure. If the percent wood failure of sample from a significant number or panels from a plant is too low, the right to use the APA trademarks is withdrawn. The number of samples inspected annually by the APA is in the millions. The human inspectors are well trained, typically having years of experience, and are regularly tested. As in any human endeavor, the inspectors are subject to fatigue, boredom, etc. For these and other reasons an automatic inspection system could aid the APA in better performing its regulatory role.

  18. COAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS: METHODS AND MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides information on coal sampling and analysis (CSD) techniques and procedures and presents a statistical model for estimating SO2 emissions. (New Source Performance Standards for large coal-fired boilers and certain State Implementation Plans require operators to ...

  19. Topics in Research Methods: Survey Sampling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Tony; Rushton, Brian S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews a computer-assisted learning package (available from CONDUIT) which introduces survey and sampling techniques by pretending that the user is a pollster asking one of six questions of a more or less political nature. Documentation and performance are rated fair while ease of use is considered excellent. (JN)

  20. Measuring Book Availability: A Monthly Sampling Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Mick; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Demonstrates that by using barcodes to identify random lists of books, taking small monthly samples, and updating a simple control chart, one can effectively: (1) pinpoint reasons why library books are unavailable; (2) gauge if corrective actions or changes in procedure are needed; and (3) determine if such actions are successful. Contains two…

  1. 7 CFR 58.245 - Method of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Service, Dairy Programs, or Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Analytical Chemists or... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of sample analysis. 58.245 Section 58.245... Procedures § 58.245 Method of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable methods...

  2. METHODS FOR SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program surveyed and evaluated the methods and procedures used to identify and quantitate chemical constituents in human breath. Methods have been evaluated to determine their ease and rapidity, as well as cost, accuracy, and precision. During the evaluation, a secon...

  3. Conflict Prevention and Separation Assurance Method in the Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Carreno, Victor A.; Williams, Daniel M.; Munoz, Cesar

    2005-01-01

    A multilayer approach to the prevention of conflicts due to the loss of aircraft-to-aircraft separation which relies on procedures and on-board automation was implemented as part of the SATS HVO Concept of Operations. The multilayer system gives pilots support and guidance during the execution of normal operations and advance warning for procedure deviations or off-nominal operations. This paper describes the major concept elements of this multilayer approach to separation assurance and conflict prevention and provides the rationale for its design. All the algorithms and functionality described in this paper have been implemented in an aircraft simulation in the NASA Langley Research Center s Air Traffic Operation Lab and on the NASA Cirrus SR22 research aircraft.

  4. Quality Assurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. The booklet contains five sections that cover the following topics: (1) importance of reliability; (2) meaning of quality assurance; (3) historical development of quality assurance; (4) statistical…

  5. 19 CFR 151.70 - Method of sampling by Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of sampling by Customs. 151.70 Section 151.70 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Method of sampling by Customs. A general sample shall be taken from each sampling unit, unless it is...

  6. A Comparison of EPI Sampling, Probability Sampling, and Compact Segment Sampling Methods for Micro and Small Enterprises

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Li-Wei; Szrek, Helena; Peltzer, Karl; Ramlagan, Shandir; Fleming, Peter; Leite, Rui; Magerman, Jesswill; Ngwenya, Godfrey B.; Pereira, Nuno Sousa; Behrman, Jere

    2011-01-01

    Finding an efficient method for sampling micro- and small-enterprises (MSEs) for research and statistical reporting purposes is a challenge in developing countries, where registries of MSEs are often nonexistent or outdated. This lack of a sampling frame creates an obstacle in finding a representative sample of MSEs. This study uses computer simulations to draw samples from a census of businesses and non-businesses in the Tshwane Municipality of South Africa, using three different sampling methods: the traditional probability sampling method, the compact segment sampling method, and the World Health Organization’s Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) sampling method. Three mechanisms by which the methods could differ are tested, the proximity selection of respondents, the at-home selection of respondents, and the use of inaccurate probability weights. The results highlight the importance of revisits and accurate probability weights, but the lesser effect of proximity selection on the samples’ statistical properties. PMID:22582004

  7. Potassium bromide method of infrared sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milkey, R.G.

    1958-01-01

    In the preparation of potassium bromide pressed windows for use in the infrared analysis of solids, severe grinding of the potassium bromide powder may produce strong absorption bands that could interfere seriously with the spectra of the sample. These absorption bands appear to be due to some crystal alteration of the potassium bromide as a result of the grinding process. They were less apt to occur when the coarser powder, which had received a relatively gentle grinding, was used. Window blanks prepared from the coarser powders showed smaller adsorbed water peaks and generally higher over-all transmittance readings than windows pressed from the very fine powders.

  8. Procedure manual for the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentrations using the radon grab-sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center to provide standardization, calibration, comparability, verification of data, quality assurance, and cost-effectiveness for the measurement requirements of DOE remedial action programs. One of the remedial-action measurement needs is the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration. One method for accomplishing such estimations in support of DOE remedial action programs is the radon grab-sampling method. This manual describes procedures for radon grab sampling, with the application specifically directed to the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration (RDC) in highly ventilated structures. This particular application of the measurement method is for cases where RDC estimates derived from long-term integrated measurements under occupied conditions are below the standard and where the structure being evaluated is considered to be highly ventilated. The radon grab-sampling method requires that sampling be conducted under standard maximized conditions. Briefly, the procedure for radon grab sampling involves the following steps: selection of sampling and counting equipment; sample acquisition and processing, including data reduction; calibration of equipment, including provisions to correct for pressure effects when sampling at various elevations; and incorporation of quality-control and assurance measures. This manual describes each of the above steps in detail and presents an example of a step-by-step radon grab-sampling procedure using a scintillation cell.

  9. Modified electrokinetic sample injection method in chromatography and electrophoresis analysis

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, J. Courtney; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    A sample injection method for horizontal configured multiple chromatography or electrophoresis units, each containing a number of separation/analysis channels, that enables efficient introduction of analyte samples. This method for loading when taken in conjunction with horizontal microchannels allows much reduced sample volumes and a means of sample stacking to greatly reduce the concentration of the sample. This reduction in the amount of sample can lead to great cost savings in sample preparation, particularly in massively parallel applications such as DNA sequencing. The essence of this method is in preparation of the input of the separation channel, the physical sample introduction, and subsequent removal of excess material. By this method, sample volumes of 100 nanoliter to 2 microliters have been used successfully, compared to the typical 5 microliters of sample required by the prior separation/analysis method.

  10. Evaluation of Sampling Methods and Development of Sample Plans for Estimating Predator Densities in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost-reliability of five sampling methods (visual search, drop cloth, beat bucket, shake bucket and sweep net) was determined for predatory arthropods on cotton plants. The beat bucket sample method was the most cost-reliable while the visual sample method was the least cost-reliable. The beat ...

  11. Surface sampling methods for Bacillus anthracis spore contamination.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Hein, Misty J; Taylor, Lauralynn; Curwin, Brian D; Kinnes, Gregory M; Seitz, Teresa A; Popovic, Tanja; Holmes, Harvey T; Kellum, Molly E; McAllister, Sigrid K; Whaley, David N; Tupin, Edward A; Walker, Timothy; Freed, Jennifer A; Small, Dorothy S; Klusaritz, Brian; Bridges, John H

    2002-10-01

    During an investigation conducted December 17-20, 2001, we collected environmental samples from a U.S. postal facility in Washington, D.C., known to be extensively contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. Because methods for collecting and analyzing B. anthracis spores have not yet been validated, our objective was to compare the relative effectiveness of sampling methods used for collecting spores from contaminated surfaces. Comparison of wipe, wet and dry swab, and HEPA vacuum sock samples on nonporous surfaces indicated good agreement between results with HEPA vacuum and wipe samples. However, results from HEPA vacuum sock and wipe samples agreed poorly with the swab samples. Dry swabs failed to detect spores >75% of the time when they were detected by wipe and HEPA vacuum samples. Wipe samples collected after HEPA vacuum samples and HEPA vacuum samples collected after wipe samples indicated that neither method completely removed spores from the sampled surfaces. PMID:12396930

  12. A method for sampling waste corn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, R.B.; Klaas, E.E.; Baldassarre, G.A.; Reinecke, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    Corn had become one of the most important wildlife food in the United States. It is eaten by a wide variety of animals, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus ), raccoon (Procyon lotor ), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus , wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo ), and many species of aquatic birds. Damage to unharvested crops had been documented, but many birds and mammals eat waste grain after harvest and do not conflict with agriculture. A good method for measuring waste-corn availability can be essential to studies concerning food density and food and feeding habits of field-feeding wildlife. Previous methods were developed primarily for approximating losses due to harvest machinery. In this paper, a method is described for estimating the amount of waste corn potentially available to wildlife. Detection of temporal changes in food availability and differences caused by agricultural operations (e.g., recently harvested stubble fields vs. plowed fields) are discussed.

  13. 7 CFR 58.812 - Methods of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Methods of sample analysis. 58.812 Section 58.812... Procedures § 58.812 Methods of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable methods of laboratory analysis contained in either DA Instruction 918-RL, as issued by the USDA,...

  14. 7 CFR 58.245 - Method of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of sample analysis. 58.245 Section 58.245... Procedures § 58.245 Method of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable methods of laboratory analysis contained in either DA Instruction 918-RL as issued by the USDA, Agricultural...

  15. 7 CFR 58.812 - Methods of sample analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Marketing Service, Dairy Programs, or the Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Methods of sample analysis. 58.812 Section 58.812... Procedures § 58.812 Methods of sample analysis. Samples shall be tested according to the applicable...

  16. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Mariella, Raymond P.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  17. Evaluation of Environmental Sample Analysis Methods and Results Reporting in the National Children's Study Vanguard Study.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Maire S A; Khalaf, Abdisalam; Beard, Barbara; Viet, Susan M; Dellarco, Michael

    2016-05-01

    During the initial Vanguard phase of the U.S. National Children's Study (NCS), about 2000 tap water, surface wipe, and air samples were collected and analyzed immediately. The shipping conditions, analysis methods, results, and laboratory performance were evaluated to determine the best approaches for use in the NCS Main Study. The main conclusions were (1) to employ established sample analysis methods, when possible, and alternate methodologies only after careful consideration with method validation studies; (2) lot control and prescreening sample collection materials are important quality assurance procedures; (3) packing samples correctly requires careful training and adjustment of shipping conditions to local conditions; (4) trip blanks and spiked samples should be considered for samplers with short expiration times and labile analytes; (5) two study-specific results reports should be required: laboratory electronic data deliverables (EDD) of sample results in a useable electronic format (CSV or SEDD XML/CSV) and a data package with sample results and supporting information in PDF format. These experiences and lessons learned can be applied to any long-term study. PMID:27049443

  18. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Wise, Barry M.

    2003-08-12

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  19. Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Wise, Barry M [Manson, WA

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

  20. Access to Education for Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Uganda: A Multi-District, Cross-Sectional Study Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling from 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Nadine; Valadez, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study estimates the proportion of Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) attending school in 89 districts of Uganda from 2011 – 2013 and investigates the factors influencing OVC access to education among this population. Methods This study used secondary survey data from OVCs aged 5 – 17 years, collected using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling in 87 Ugandan districts over a 3-year period (2011 – 2013). Estimates of OVC school attendance were determined for the yearly time periods. Logistic regression was used to investigate the factors influencing OVC access to education. Results 19,354 children aged 5-17 were included in the analysis. We estimated that 79.1% (95% CI: 78.5% – 79.7%) of OVCs attended school during the 3-year period. Logistic regression revealed the odds of attending school were lower among OVCs from Western (OR 0.88; 95% CI: 0.79 – 0.99) and Northern (OR 0.64; 95% CI: 0.56 – 0.73) regions compared to the Central region. Female OVCs had a significantly higher odds of attending school (OR 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02 – 1.17) compared to their male counterparts. When adjusting for all variables simultaneously, we found the odds of school attendance reduced by 12% between 2011 and 2012 among all OVCs (OR 0.88; 95% CI: 0.81 – 0.97). Conclusion Our findings reinforce the need to provide continuing support to OVC in Uganda, ensuring they have the opportunity to attain an education. The data indicate important regional and gender variation that needs to be considered for support strategies and in social policy. The results suggest the need for greater local empowerment to address the needs of OVCs. We recommend further research to understand why OVC access to education and attendance varies between regions and improvement of district level mapping of OVC access to education, and further study to understand the particular factors impacting the lower school attendance of male OVCs. PMID:26181056

  1. Helium leak test for sterility assurance of a sealed bag. II: Establishing a test method for the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Miyako, Yasuhiro; Tai, Hideaki; Saitoh, Izumi; Ikeda, Kaori

    2003-01-01

    To establish a simpler and more reliable method for retaining the aseptic condition of freeze-dried bulk product of a drug substance, a helium leak test method was developed. The bulk product is for the new kit system for infusion of our antibiotic product. In manufacturing the kit system, the bulk product needs to be transported outside of the aseptic area. We had to use a proper container to enclose the bulk product under aseptic conditions and establish an appropriate method for sterility assurance of the container. We decided to use a flexible aluminum laminate bag as a container and to seal it in a polyethylene bag. To detect tears or pinholes in the bag, a helium leak test was considered. As a tear model, a pinhole of known diameter was made in the aluminum laminate bag which was then filled with helium and sealed in a polyethylene bag. Helium leaking from the pinholes was measured with a helium leak detector, and leakage from a pinhole of more than 50 microm in the aluminum laminate bag could be detected. The amount of leakage was strongly affected by the pinhole diameter, and we developed a scientific approach for measuring leakage using the Poiseiulle Equation. The detection sensitivity of our method was enough to retain an aseptic condition inside the aluminum laminate bag, confirmed by the results of the process simulation test using our helium leak test. We concluded that our helium leak test was useful for sterility assurance of the bulk product sealed in the aluminum laminate bag in the manufacturing process of our kit system for infusion of our antibiotic product. PMID:12877329

  2. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-30

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes.

  3. Method for sampling sub-micron particles

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.; McMillan, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar.RTM. and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis.

  4. 7 CFR 29.110 - Method of sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of sampling. 29.110 Section 29.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Inspectors, Samplers, and Weighers § 29.110 Method of sampling. In sampling...

  5. 7 CFR 29.110 - Method of sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of sampling. 29.110 Section 29.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Inspectors, Samplers, and Weighers § 29.110 Method of sampling. In sampling...

  6. 19 CFR 151.83 - Method of sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of sampling. 151.83 Section 151.83 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Cotton § 151.83 Method of sampling. For determining the staple length of any lot...

  7. Methods for collecting algal samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Stephen D.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic algae (periphyton) and phytoplankton communities are characterized in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program as part of an integrated physical, chemical, and biological assessment of the Nation's water quality. This multidisciplinary approach provides multiple lines of evidence for evaluating water-quality status and trends, and for refining an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. Water quality can be characterized by evaluating the results of qualitative and quantitative measurements of the algal community. Qualitative periphyton samples are collected to develop of list of taxa present in the sampling reach. Quantitative periphyton samples are collected to measure algal community structure within selected habitats. These samples of benthic algal communities are collected from natural substrates, using the sampling methods that are most appropriate for the habitat conditions. Phytoplankton samples may be collected in large nonwadeable streams and rivers to meet specific program objectives. Estimates of algal biomass (chlorophyll content and ash-free dry mass) also are optional measures that may be useful for interpreting water-quality conditions. A nationally consistent approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection, as well as information on methods and equipment for qualitative and quantitative sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data locally, regionally, and nationally.

  8. Quality assurance of solar spectral UV-measurements: methods and use of the SHICrivm software tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; den Outer, P. N.; Slaper, H.

    2003-04-01

    Ground-based UV-irradiance measurements are crucial for determining the long-term changes and trends in biologically and/or photo-chemically relevant solar UV-radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Such changes in UV-radiation levels have probably occurred and/or are expected due to ozone depletion and climate change. In order to analyse UV-irradiation levels in relation to atmospheric parameters and to facilitate an assessment of the European UV-climate a European database (EUVDatabase) has been set up within the EDUCE-project (EC-contract EVK2-CT-1999-00028). High quality UV-data-sets from across the continent are assessable from the EUVDatabase (http://uv.fmi.fi/uvdb/). An accurate analysis of the UV-climate and long term changes therein requires quality assurance of the spectral data. The SHICrivm software tool (http://www.rivm.nl/shicrivm) is developed to analyse several quality aspects of measured UV-spectra. The SHICrivm tool is applied to over one million spectra from the EUVDatabase and detects for each measured spectrum: the accuracy of the wavelength calibration from 290 up to 500 nm, the lowest detectable irradiance level, the occurrence of non-natural spikes in spectra, deviations in spectral shape, and identifies possible irradiance scale errors in the UV-range. In addition the SHIC-package can be used to correct wavelength scale errors and non-natural spectral spikes. A deconvolution and convolution algorithm is included to improve the comparibility of spectra obtained with different instruments, and to allow a fully comparable analysis of biologically weighted UV-dose for instruments with various spectral characteristics. Within the context of the EDUCE-project data from over 20 UV-monitoring stations are retrieved from the database and a quality assessment is performed using the SHIC-tool. The quality parameters are presented by means of a simple scheme of coloured quality flags. Spectra that meet the WMO-criteria for spectral measurements are

  9. Method Description, Quality Assurance, Environmental Data, and other Information for Analysis of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater-Treatment-Plant Effluents, Streamwater, and Reservoirs, 2004-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Smith, Steven G.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Wastewater-treatment-plant (WWTP) effluents are a demonstrated source of pharmaceuticals to the environment. During 2004-09, a study was conducted to identify pharmaceutical compounds in effluents from WWTPs (including two that receive substantial discharges from pharmaceutical formulation facilities), streamwater, and reservoirs. The methods used to determine and quantify concentrations of seven pharmaceuticals are described. In addition, the report includes information on pharmaceuticals formulated or potentially formulated at the two pharmaceutical formulation facilities that provide substantial discharge to two of the WWTPs, and potential limitations to these data are discussed. The analytical methods used to provide data on the seven pharmaceuticals (including opioids, muscle relaxants, and other pharmaceuticals) in filtered water samples also are described. Data are provided on method performance, including spike data, method detection limit results, and an estimation of precision. Quality-assurance data for sample collection and handling are included. Quantitative data are presented for the seven pharmaceuticals in water samples collected at WWTP discharge points, from streams, and at reservoirs. Occurrence data also are provided for 19 pharmaceuticals that were qualitatively identified. Flow data at selected WWTP and streams are presented. Between 2004-09, 35-38 effluent samples were collected from each of three WWTPs in New York and analyzed for seven pharmaceuticals. Two WWTPs (NY2 and NY3) receive substantial inflows (greater than 20 percent of plant flow) from pharmaceutical formulation facilities (PFF) and one (NY1) receives no PFF flow. Samples of effluents from 23 WWTPs across the United States were analyzed once for these pharmaceuticals as part of a national survey. Maximum pharmaceutical effluent concentrations for the national survey and NY1 effluent samples were generally less than 1 ug/L. Four pharmaceuticals (methadone, oxycodone

  10. Time efficient methods for scanning a fluorescent membrane with a fluorescent microscopic imager for the quality assurance of food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerm, Steffen; Holder, Silvio; Schellhorn, Mathias; Brückner, Peter; Linß, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    An important part of the quality assurance of meat is the estimation of germs in the meat exudes. The kind and the number of the germs in the meat affect the medical risk for the consumer of the meat. State-of-the-art analyses of meat are incubator test procedures. The main disadvantages of such incubator tests are the time consumption, the necessary equipment and the need of special skilled employees. These facts cause in high inspection cost. For this reason a new method for the quality assurance is necessary which combines low detection limits and less time consumption. One approach for such a new method is fluorescence microscopic imaging. The germs in the meat exude are caught in special membranes by body-antibody reactions. The germ typical signature could be enhanced with fluorescent chemical markers instead of reproduction of the germs. Each fluorescent marker connects with a free germ or run off the membrane. An image processing system is used to detect the number of fluorescent particles. Each fluorescent spot should be a marker which is connected with a germ. Caused by the small object sizes of germs, the image processing system needs a high optical magnification of the camera. However, this leads to a small field of view and a small depth of focus. For this reasons the whole area of the membrane has to be scanned in three dimensions. To minimize the time consumption, the optimal path has to be found. This optimization problem is influenced by features of the hardware and is presented in this paper. The traversing range in each direction, the step width, the velocity, the shape of the inspection volume and the field of view have influence on the optimal path to scan the membrane.

  11. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF METALS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen analytical methods covering 36 analytes which may be present in a ariety of environmental sample types are described in detail. hree of these methods are sample preparation procedures that require a separate determinate step found in other methods in this manual or elsew...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 261 - Representative Sampling Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Representative Sampling Methods I Appendix I to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pt. 261, App. I Appendix I to Part 261—Representative Sampling Methods The methods...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 261 - Representative Sampling Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Representative Sampling Methods I Appendix I to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pt. 261, App. I Appendix I to Part 261—Representative Sampling Methods The methods...

  14. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  15. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  16. Quality assurance and quality control in light stable isotope laboratories: A case study of Rio Grande, Texas, water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2009-01-01

    New isotope laboratories can achieve the goal of reporting the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty for the same material analysed decades apart by (1) writing their own acceptance testing procedures and putting them into their mass spectrometric or laser-based isotope-ratio equipment procurement contract, (2) requiring a manufacturer to demonstrate acceptable performance using all sample ports provided with the instrumentation, (3) for each medium to be analysed, prepare two local reference materials substantially different in isotopic composition to encompass the range in isotopic composition expected in the laboratory and calibrated them with isotopic reference materials available from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (4) using the optimum storage containers (for water samples, sealing in glass ampoules that are sterilised after sealing is satisfactory), (5) interspersing among sample unknowns local laboratory isotopic reference materials daily (internationally distributed isotopic reference materials can be ordered at three-year intervals, and can be used for elemental analyser analyses and other analyses that consume less than 1 mg of material) - this process applies to H, C, N, O, and S isotope ratios, (6) calculating isotopic compositions of unknowns by normalising isotopic data to that of local reference materials, which have been calibrated to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials, (7) reporting results on scales normalised to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials (where they are available) and providing to sample submitters the isotopic compositions of internationally distributed isotopic reference materials of the same substance had they been analysed with unknowns, (8) providing an audit trail in the laboratory for analytical results - this trail commonly will be in electronic format and might include a laboratory

  17. Quality assurance and quality control in light stable isotope laboratories: a case study of Rio Grande, Texas, water samples.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

    2009-06-01

    New isotope laboratories can achieve the goal of reporting the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty for the same material analysed decades apart by (1) writing their own acceptance testing procedures and putting them into their mass spectrometric or laser-based isotope-ratio equipment procurement contract, (2) requiring a manufacturer to demonstrate acceptable performance using all sample ports provided with the instrumentation, (3) for each medium to be analysed, prepare two local reference materials substantially different in isotopic composition to encompass the range in isotopic composition expected in the laboratory and calibrated them with isotopic reference materials available from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (4) using the optimum storage containers (for water samples, sealing in glass ampoules that are sterilised after sealing is satisfactory), (5) interspersing among sample unknowns local laboratory isotopic reference materials daily (internationally distributed isotopic reference materials can be ordered at three-year intervals, and can be used for elemental analyser analyses and other analyses that consume less than 1 mg of material) - this process applies to H, C, N, O, and S isotope ratios, (6) calculating isotopic compositions of unknowns by normalising isotopic data to that of local reference materials, which have been calibrated to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials, (7) reporting results on scales normalised to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials (where they are available) and providing to sample submitters the isotopic compositions of internationally distributed isotopic reference materials of the same substance had they been analysed with unknowns, (8) providing an audit trail in the laboratory for analytical results - this trail commonly will be in electronic format and might include a laboratory

  18. Systems and methods for self-synchronized digital sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, Jr., John R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods for self-synchronized data sampling are provided. In one embodiment, a system for capturing synchronous data samples is provided. The system includes an analog to digital converter adapted to capture signals from one or more sensors and convert the signals into a stream of digital data samples at a sampling frequency determined by a sampling control signal; and a synchronizer coupled to the analog to digital converter and adapted to receive a rotational frequency signal from a rotating machine, wherein the synchronizer is further adapted to generate the sampling control signal, and wherein the sampling control signal is based on the rotational frequency signal.

  19. A method for selecting training samples based on camera response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leihong; Li, Bei; Pan, Zilan; Liang, Dong; Kang, Yi; Zhang, Dawei; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-09-01

    In the process of spectral reflectance reconstruction, sample selection plays an important role in the accuracy of the constructed model and in reconstruction effects. In this paper, a method for training sample selection based on camera response is proposed. It has been proved that the camera response value has a close correlation with the spectral reflectance. Consequently, in this paper we adopt the technique of drawing a sphere in camera response value space to select the training samples which have a higher correlation with the test samples. In addition, the Wiener estimation method is used to reconstruct the spectral reflectance. Finally, we find that the method of sample selection based on camera response value has the smallest color difference and root mean square error after reconstruction compared to the method using the full set of Munsell color charts, the Mohammadi training sample selection method, and the stratified sampling method. Moreover, the goodness of fit coefficient of this method is also the highest among the four sample selection methods. Taking all the factors mentioned above into consideration, the method of training sample selection based on camera response value enhances the reconstruction accuracy from both the colorimetric and spectral perspectives.

  20. Methods for collecting benthic invertebrate samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate communities are evaluated as part of the ecological survey component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These biological data are collected along with physical and chemical data to assess water-quality conditions and to develop an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. The objectives of benthic invertebrate community characterizations are to (1) develop for each site a list of tax a within the associated stream reach and (2) determine the structure of benthic invertebrate communities within selected habitats of that reach. A nationally consistent approach is used to achieve these objectives. This approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection and methods and equipment for qualitative multihabitat sampling and semi-quantitative single habitat sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data within and among study units.

  1. SU-E-T-438: Commissioning of An In-Vivo Quality Assurance Method Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, O; Held, M; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) using arrays of detectors or film have been the standard approach to assure the correct treatment is delivered to the patient. This QA approach is expensive, labor intensive and does not guarantee or document that all remaining fractions were treated properly. The purpose of this abstract is to commission and evaluate the performance of a commercially available in-vivo QA software using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to record the daily treatments. Methods: The platform EPIgray V2.0.2 (Dosisoft), which machine model compares ratios of TMR with EPID signal to predict dose was commissioned for an Artiste (Siemens Oncology Care Systems) and a Truebeam (Varian medical systems) linear accelerator following the given instructions. The systems were then tested on three different phantoms (homogeneous stack of solid water, anthropomorphic head and pelvis) and on a library of patient cases. Simple and complex fields were delivered at different exposures and for different gantry angles. The effects of the table attenuation and the EPID sagging were evaluated. Gamma analysis of the measured dose was compared to the predicted dose for complex clinical IMRT cases. Results: Commissioning of the EPIgray system for two photon energies took 8 hours. The difference between the dose planned and the dose measured with EPIgray was better than 3% for all phantom scenarios tested. Preliminary results on patients demonstrate an accuracy of 5% is achievable in high dose regions for both 3DCRT and IMRT. Large discrepancies (>5%) were observed due to metallic structures or air cavities and in low dose areas. Flat panel sagging was visible and accounted for in the EPIgray model. Conclusion: The accuracy achieved by EPIgray is sufficient to document the safe delivery of complex IMRT treatments. Future work will evaluate EPIgray for VMAT and high dose rate deliveries. This work is supported by Dosisoft, Cachan, France.

  2. Passive Samplers for Investigations of Air Quality: Method Description, Implementation, and Comparison to Alternative Sampling Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Paper covers the basics of passive sampler design, compares passive samplers to conventional methods of air sampling, and discusses considerations when implementing a passive sampling program. The Paper also discusses field sampling and sample analysis considerations to ensu...

  3. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S C; McCulloch, M; Thomas, B L; Riley, R G; Sklarew, D S; Mong, G M; Fadeff, S K

    1994-04-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others.

  4. Comparison of Methods for Sampling Psocids in Stored Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Psocids are an emerging problem in stored grain and in grain processing facilities in the United States. We compared several methods for sampling psocids in wheat stored in steel bins – grain trier samples, cardboard refuges on the surface of the grain and near the bin hatch, and automated sampling ...

  5. Uniform Sampling Table Method and its Applications II--Evaluating the Uniform Sampling by Experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yibin; Chen, Jiaxi; Chen, Xuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A new method of uniform sampling is evaluated in this paper. The items and indexes were adopted to evaluate the rationality of the uniform sampling. The evaluation items included convenience of operation, uniformity of sampling site distribution, and accuracy and precision of measured results. The evaluation indexes included operational complexity, occupation rate of sampling site in a row and column, relative accuracy of pill weight, and relative deviation of pill weight. They were obtained from three kinds of drugs with different shape and size by four kinds of sampling methods. Gray correlation analysis was adopted to make the comprehensive evaluation by comparing it with the standard method. The experimental results showed that the convenience of uniform sampling method was 1 (100%), odds ratio of occupation rate in a row and column was infinity, relative accuracy was 99.50-99.89%, reproducibility RSD was 0.45-0.89%, and weighted incidence degree exceeded the standard method. Hence, the uniform sampling method was easy to operate, and the selected samples were distributed uniformly. The experimental results demonstrated that the uniform sampling method has good accuracy and reproducibility, which can be put into use in drugs analysis. PMID:26525264

  6. Understanding and Evaluating Assurance Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John; Xu, Xidong; Rangarajan, Murali; Weaver, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Assurance cases are a method for providing assurance for a system by giving an argument to justify a claim about the system, based on evidence about its design, development, and tested behavior. In comparison with assurance based on guidelines or standards (which essentially specify only the evidence to be produced), the chief novelty in assurance cases is provision of an explicit argument. In principle, this can allow assurance cases to be more finely tuned to the specific circumstances of the system, and more agile than guidelines in adapting to new techniques and applications. The first part of this report (Sections 1-4) provides an introduction to assurance cases. Although this material should be accessible to all those with an interest in these topics, the examples focus on software for airborne systems, traditionally assured using the DO-178C guidelines and its predecessors. A brief survey of some existing assurance cases is provided in Section 5. The second part (Section 6) considers the criteria, methods, and tools that may be used to evaluate whether an assurance case provides sufficient confidence that a particular system or service is fit for its intended use. An assurance case cannot provide unequivocal "proof" for its claim, so much of the discussion focuses on the interpretation of such less-than-definitive arguments, and on methods to counteract confirmation bias and other fallibilities in human reasoning.

  7. Quality-assurance audits for the ARB (Air Resources Board)-sponsored Carbonaceous Species Methods Comparison Study at Citrus College, Glendora, California, August 12-21, 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Countess, R.J.

    1987-09-21

    A series of quality-assurance tasks were performed in support of the Air Resources Board-sponsored Carbonaceous Species Methods Comparison Study, conducted at Citrus College in Glendora, CA, August 1986. The project summarizes the quality assurance efforts for the study, which included: (1) flow rate audits for all samplers deployed in the nine day field study; (2) preparation and supplies of carbonaceous reference materials for an interlaboratory round-robin study; and (3) analysis of the reference materials as well as 20% of the ambient particulate samples collected by each of the study participants for both organic and elemental carbon. The final task was done in order to assess the influence of samplers upon collected particulate carbon.

  8. In-depth analysis of sampling optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Habets, Boris; Buhl, Stefan; Guhlemann, Steffen; Rößiger, Martin; Bellmann, Enrico; Kim, Seop

    2016-03-01

    High order overlay and alignment models require good coverage of overlay or alignment marks on the wafer. But dense sampling plans are not possible for throughput reasons. Therefore, sampling plan optimization has become a key issue. We analyze the different methods for sampling optimization and discuss the different knobs to fine-tune the methods to constraints of high volume manufacturing. We propose a method to judge sampling plan quality with respect to overlay performance, run-to-run stability and dispositioning criteria using a number of use cases from the most advanced lithography processes.

  9. Method and apparatus for imaging a sample on a device

    DOEpatents

    Trulson, Mark; Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter; Rava, Richard; Walton, Ian; Fodor, Stephen P. A.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for imaging a sample are provided. An electromagnetic radiation source generates excitation radiation which is sized by excitation optics to a line. The line is directed at a sample resting on a support and excites a plurality of regions on the sample. Collection optics collect response radiation reflected from the sample I and image the reflected radiation. A detector senses the reflected radiation and is positioned to permit discrimination between radiation reflected from a certain focal plane in the sample and certain other planes within the sample.

  10. Engineering Study of 500 ML Sample Bottle Transportation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-25

    This engineering study reviews and evaluates all available methods for transportation of 500-mL grab sample bottles, reviews and evaluates transportation requirements and schedules and analyzes and recommends the most cost-effective method for transporting 500-mL grab sample bottles.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF SAMPLING METHODS FOR SOURCE PM10 EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an investigation of the needs and available techniques for in-stack PM-10 sampling. Discussion includes the conceptualization, development, documentation, and testing of two candidate methods. The first method, Constant Sampling Rate (CSR), is a procedural ap...

  12. GROUND WATER PURGING AND SAMPLING METHODS: HISTORY VS. HYSTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been over 10 years since the low-flow ground water purging and sampling method was initially reported in the literature. The method grew from the recognition that well purging was necessary to collect representative samples, bailers could not achieve well purging, and high...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 261 - Representative Sampling Methods

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix I to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pt. 261, App. I Appendix I to Part 261—Representative Sampling Methods The methods and equipment used for sampling waste materials will vary with...

  14. Rapid method for sampling metals for materials identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    Nondamaging process similar to electrochemical machining is useful in obtaining metal samples from places inaccessible to conventional sampling methods or where methods would be hazardous or contaminating to specimens. Process applies to industries where metals or metal alloys play a vital role.

  15. A method and fortran program for quantitative sampling in paleontology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tipper, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The Unit Sampling Method is a binomial sampling method applicable to the study of fauna preserved in rocks too well cemented to be disaggregated. Preliminary estimates of the probability of detecting each group in a single sampling unit can be converted to estimates of the group's volumetric abundance by means of correction curves obtained by a computer simulation technique. This paper describes the technique and gives the FORTRAN program. ?? 1976.

  16. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Volume 2, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

    1995-03-01

    J-Field encompasses about 460 acres at the southern end of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of APG (Figure 2.1). Since World War II, the Edgewood Area of APG has been used to develop, manufacture, test, and destroy chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). For the purposes of this project, J-Field has been divided into eight geographic areas or facilities that are designated as areas of concern (AOCs): the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP), the White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP), the Riot Control Burning Pit (RCP), the Robins Point Demolition Ground (RPDG), the Robins Point Tower Site (RPTS), the South Beach Demolition Ground (SBDG), the South Beach Trench (SBT), and the Prototype Building (PB). The scope of this project is to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and ecological risk assessment to evaluate the impacts of past disposal activities at the J-Field site. Sampling for the RI will be carried out in three stages (I, II, and III) as detailed in the FSP. A phased approach will be used for the J-Field ecological risk assessment (ERA).

  17. Quality assurance using outlier detection on an automatic segmentation method for the cerebellar peduncles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Ye, Chuyang; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar peduncles (CPs) are white matter tracts connecting the cerebellum to other brain regions. Automatic segmentation methods of the CPs have been proposed for studying their structure and function. Usually the performance of these methods is evaluated by comparing segmentation results with manual delineations (ground truth). However, when a segmentation method is run on new data (for which no ground truth exists) it is highly desirable to efficiently detect and assess algorithm failures so that these cases can be excluded from scientific analysis. In this work, two outlier detection methods aimed to assess the performance of an automatic CP segmentation algorithm are presented. The first one is a univariate non-parametric method using a box-whisker plot. We first categorize automatic segmentation results of a dataset of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans from 48 subjects as either a success or a failure. We then design three groups of features from the image data of nine categorized failures for failure detection. Results show that most of these features can efficiently detect the true failures. The second method—supervised classification—was employed on a larger DTI dataset of 249 manually categorized subjects. Four classifiers—linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression (LR), support vector machine (SVM), and random forest classification (RFC)—were trained using the designed features and evaluated using a leave-one-out cross validation. Results show that the LR performs worst among the four classifiers and the other three perform comparably, which demonstrates the feasibility of automatically detecting segmentation failures using classification methods.

  18. Evaluation of common methods for sampling invertebrate pollinator assemblages: net sampling out-perform pan traps.

    PubMed

    Popic, Tony J; Davila, Yvonne C; Wardle, Glenda M

    2013-01-01

    Methods for sampling ecological assemblages strive to be efficient, repeatable, and representative. Unknowingly, common methods may be limited in terms of revealing species function and so of less value for comparative studies. The global decline in pollination services has stimulated surveys of flower-visiting invertebrates, using pan traps and net sampling. We explore the relative merits of these two methods in terms of species discovery, quantifying abundance, function, and composition, and responses of species to changing floral resources. Using a spatially-nested design we sampled across a 5000 km(2) area of arid grasslands, including 432 hours of net sampling and 1296 pan trap-days, between June 2010 and July 2011. Net sampling yielded 22% more species and 30% higher abundance than pan traps, and better reflected the spatio-temporal variation of floral resources. Species composition differed significantly between methods; from 436 total species, 25% were sampled by both methods, 50% only by nets, and the remaining 25% only by pans. Apart from being less comprehensive, if pan traps do not sample flower-visitors, the link to pollination is questionable. By contrast, net sampling functionally linked species to pollination through behavioural observations of flower-visitation interaction frequency. Netted specimens are also necessary for evidence of pollen transport. Benefits of net-based sampling outweighed minor differences in overall sampling effort. As pan traps and net sampling methods are not equivalent for sampling invertebrate-flower interactions, we recommend net sampling of invertebrate pollinator assemblages, especially if datasets are intended to document declines in pollination and guide measures to retain this important ecosystem service. PMID:23799127

  19. SAMSAN- MODERN NUMERICAL METHODS FOR CLASSICAL SAMPLED SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    SAMSAN was developed to aid the control system analyst by providing a self consistent set of computer algorithms that support large order control system design and evaluation studies, with an emphasis placed on sampled system analysis. Control system analysts have access to a vast array of published algorithms to solve an equally large spectrum of controls related computational problems. The analyst usually spends considerable time and effort bringing these published algorithms to an integrated operational status and often finds them less general than desired. SAMSAN reduces the burden on the analyst by providing a set of algorithms that have been well tested and documented, and that can be readily integrated for solving control system problems. Algorithm selection for SAMSAN has been biased toward numerical accuracy for large order systems with computational speed and portability being considered important but not paramount. In addition to containing relevant subroutines from EISPAK for eigen-analysis and from LINPAK for the solution of linear systems and related problems, SAMSAN contains the following not so generally available capabilities: 1) Reduction of a real non-symmetric matrix to block diagonal form via a real similarity transformation matrix which is well conditioned with respect to inversion, 2) Solution of the generalized eigenvalue problem with balancing and grading, 3) Computation of all zeros of the determinant of a matrix of polynomials, 4) Matrix exponentiation and the evaluation of integrals involving the matrix exponential, with option to first block diagonalize, 5) Root locus and frequency response for single variable transfer functions in the S, Z, and W domains, 6) Several methods of computing zeros for linear systems, and 7) The ability to generate documentation "on demand". All matrix operations in the SAMSAN algorithms assume non-symmetric matrices with real double precision elements. There is no fixed size limit on any matrix in any

  20. A Mixed Methods Sampling Methodology for a Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Julia L.; Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Drew, Sam; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The flexibility of mixed methods research strategies makes such approaches especially suitable for multisite case studies. Yet the utilization of mixed methods to select sites for these studies is rarely reported. The authors describe their pragmatic mixed methods approach to select a sample for their multisite mixed methods case study of a…

  1. QUALITY ASSURANCE METHODS MANUAL FOR FOREST SITE CLASSIFICATION AND FIELD MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this third version of this manual is to provide a set of standardized, technically sound and well documented, methods that would allow data or measurement precision and bias to be estimated and controlled, and thus promote the comparabiLity of forestry fieLd...

  2. ANALYTICAL METHODS AND QUALITY ASSURANCE CRITERIA FOR LC/ES/MS DETERMINATION OF PFOS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    PFOS, perfluorooctanesulfonate, has recently received much attention from environmental researchers. Previous analytical methods were based upon complexing with a strong ion-pairing reagent and extraction into MTBE. Detection was done on a concentrate using negative ion LC/ES/MS/...

  3. Evaporation from weighing precipitation gauges: impacts on automated gauge measurements and quality assurance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. D.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation from a precipitation gauge can cause errors in the amount of measured precipitation. For automated weighing-bucket gauges, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests the use of evaporative suppressants and frequent observations to limit these biases. However, the use of evaporation suppressants is not always feasible due to environmental hazards and the added cost of maintenance, transport, and disposal of the gauge additive. In addition, research has suggested that evaporation prior to precipitation may affect precipitation measurements from auto-recording gauges operating at sub-hourly frequencies. For further evaluation, a field campaign was conducted to monitor evaporation and its impacts on the quality of precipitation measurements from gauges used at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) stations. Two Geonor gauges were collocated, with one gauge using an evaporative suppressant (referred to as Geonor-NonEvap) and the other with no suppressant (referred to as Geonor-Evap) to evaluate evaporative losses and evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. From June to August, evaporative losses from the Geonor-Evap gauge exceeded accumulated precipitation, with an average loss of 0.12 mm h-1. The impact of evaporation on precipitation measurements was sensitive to the choice of calculation method. In general, the pairwise method that utilized a longer time series to smooth out sensor noise was more sensitive to gauge evaporation (-4.6% bias with respect to control) than the weighted-average method that calculated depth change over a smaller window (<+1% bias). These results indicate that while climate and gauge design affect gauge evaporation rates, computational methods also influence the magnitude of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. This study can be used to advance quality insurance (QA) techniques used in other automated networks to mitigate the impact of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements.

  4. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 05: The Development of Quality Assurance Methods for Trajectory based Cranial SRS Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B; Duzenli, C; Gete, E; Teke, T

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate non-planar linac beam trajectories defined by the dynamic motion of the gantry, couch, jaws, collimator and MLCs. This was conducted on the Varian TrueBeam linac by taking advantage of the linac's advanced control features in a non-clinical mode (termed developers mode). In this work, we present quality assurance methods that we have developed to test for the positional and temporal accuracy of the linac's moving components. The first QA method focuses on the coordination of couch and gantry. For this test, we developed a cylindrical phantom which has a film insert. Using this phantom we delivered a plan with dynamic motion of the couch and gantry. We found the mean absolute deviation of the entrance position from its expected value to be 0.5mm, with a standard deviation of 0.5mm. This was within the tolerances set by the machine's mechanical accuracy and the setup accuracy of the phantom. We also present an altered picket fence test which has added dynamic and simultaneous rotations of the couch and the collimator. While the test was shown to be sensitive enough to discern errors 1° and greater, we were unable to identify any errors in the coordination of the linacs collimator and couch. When operating under normal conditions, the Varian TrueBeam linac was able to pass both tests and is within tolerances acceptable for complex trajectory based treatments.

  5. QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCEDURES: METHOD 28A MEASUREMENT OF AIR TO FUEL RATIO AND MINIMUM BURN RATE FOR WOOD-FIRED APPLIANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality assurance procedures are contained in this comprehensive document intended to be used as an aid for wood heater manufacturers and testing laboratories in performing measurement of air-to-fuel ratio and minimum burn rate determinations according to EPA protocol, Method 28A...

  6. Rapid screening methods for beta-emitters in food samples.

    PubMed

    Vos van Avezathe, A; Brandhoff, P N; van Bourgondiën, M J; Krijger, G C

    2015-03-01

    In case of a nuclear emergency, many samples need to be measured in a short time period. Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a quick and reliable (screening)method. Most methods to determine total beta activity are time-consuming because of extensive sample preparation, such as ashing. In this article three different rapid screening methods for beta emitting nuclides in agriculture, livestock and fishery products were tested and compared to each other, and to an accurate but more time consuming reference method. The goal was to find the method with the optimal trade-off between accuracy, speed and minimal detectable activity (MDA). All of the methods rely on liquid scintillation counting (LSC) or Cerenkov counting, and differ mainly in sample preparation. For matrices with little or no colour, the direct LSC-method is the most accurate and fastest option, while for darker coloured samples this method is not suitable because of high colour quenching. For such samples, two additional methods using a microwave digestion during sample preparation, produced good results. PMID:25577324

  7. Application of the SAMR method to high magnetostrictive samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, P.; Lopez, E.; Trujillo, M. C. Sanchez; Aroca, C.

    1988-12-01

    Magnetostriction measurement by using the small angle magnetization rotation method (SAMR) has been performed in high magnetostrictive amorphous samples. To apply the SAMR method to these samples, a theoritical model about the influence of the internal stresses and magnetization distribution has been proposed. The dependence of the magnetostriction, λ s, with the temperature and applied stress was measured in as-cast and in different annealed samples. In the as-cast samples the existence of a stray field and a dependence of λ s with the applied stress has been observed.

  8. Method for using polarization gating to measure a scattering sample

    DOEpatents

    Baba, Justin S.

    2015-08-04

    Described herein are systems, devices, and methods facilitating optical characterization of scattering samples. A polarized optical beam can be directed to pass through a sample to be tested. The optical beam exiting the sample can then be analyzed to determine its degree of polarization, from which other properties of the sample can be determined. In some cases, an apparatus can include a source of an optical beam, an input polarizer, a sample, an output polarizer, and a photodetector. In some cases, a signal from a photodetector can be processed through attenuation, variable offset, and variable gain.

  9. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. Methods We describe a stratified random sampling method using geographical information system (GIS) software and global positioning system (GPS) technology for application in a health survey in a rural region of Guatemala, as well as a qualitative study of the enumeration process. Results This method offers an alternative sampling technique that could reduce opportunities for bias in household selection compared to cluster methods. However, its use is subject to issues surrounding survey preparation, technological limitations and in-the-field household selection. Application of this method in remote areas will raise challenges surrounding the boundary delineation process, use and translation of satellite imagery between GIS and GPS, and household selection at each survey point in varying field conditions. This method favors household selection in denser urban areas and in new residential developments. Conclusions Random spatial sampling methodology can be used to survey a random sample of population in a remote region of a developing nation. Although this method should be further validated and compared with more established methods to determine its utility in social survey applications, it shows promise for use in developing nations with resource-challenged environments where detailed geographic and human census data are less available. PMID:24716473

  10. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  11. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  12. Methods for collection and analysis of water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainwater, Frank Hays; Thatcher, Leland Lincoln

    1960-01-01

    This manual contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze water samples. Throughout, the emphasis is on obtaining analytical results that accurately describe the chemical composition of the water in situ. Among the topics discussed are selection of sampling sites, frequency of sampling, field equipment, preservatives and fixatives, analytical techniques of water analysis, and instruments. Seventy-seven laboratory and field procedures are given for determining fifty-three water properties.

  13. Methods for sample size determination in cluster randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Rutterford, Clare; Copas, Andrew; Eldridge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of cluster randomized trials (CRTs) is increasing, along with the variety in their design and analysis. The simplest approach for their sample size calculation is to calculate the sample size assuming individual randomization and inflate this by a design effect to account for randomization by cluster. The assumptions of a simple design effect may not always be met; alternative or more complicated approaches are required. Methods: We summarise a wide range of sample size methods available for cluster randomized trials. For those familiar with sample size calculations for individually randomized trials but with less experience in the clustered case, this manuscript provides formulae for a wide range of scenarios with associated explanation and recommendations. For those with more experience, comprehensive summaries are provided that allow quick identification of methods for a given design, outcome and analysis method. Results: We present first those methods applicable to the simplest two-arm, parallel group, completely randomized design followed by methods that incorporate deviations from this design such as: variability in cluster sizes; attrition; non-compliance; or the inclusion of baseline covariates or repeated measures. The paper concludes with methods for alternative designs. Conclusions: There is a large amount of methodology available for sample size calculations in CRTs. This paper gives the most comprehensive description of published methodology for sample size calculation and provides an important resource for those designing these trials. PMID:26174515

  14. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices by the U. S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of four selected mosquito insecticides and a synergist in water using liquid-liquid extraction and gas chrom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Strahan, A.P.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed for the determination of four mosquito insecticides (malathion, metho-prene, phenothrin, and resmethrin) and one synergist (piperonyl butoxide) in water. The analytical method uses liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated in reagent water, urban surface water, and ground water. The mean accuracies as percentages of the true compound concentrations from water samples spiked at 10 and 50 nanograms per liter ranged from 68 to 171 percent, with standard deviations in concentrations of 27 nanograms per liter or less. The method detection limit for all compounds was 5.9 nanograms per liter or less for 247-milliliter samples. This method is valuable for acquiring information about the fate and transport of these mosquito insecticides and one synergist in water.

  15. Field Evaluation of Personal Sampling Methods for Multiple Bioaerosols

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T.; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. PMID:25799419

  16. Field evaluation of personal sampling methods for multiple bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. PMID:25799419

  17. Method of soil sampling following subsurface banding of solid manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil sampling guidelines do not exist for fields fertilized with solid manures applied in bands. The objective of this work was to describe the distribution of mineral nutrients and total C and propose a method of taking soil samples that reflects the fertility level of a field following manure app...

  18. Nominal Weights Mean Equating: A Method for Very Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Ben; Albano, Anthony; Raymond, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The authors introduced nominal weights mean equating, a simplified version of Tucker equating, as an alternative for dealing with very small samples. The authors then conducted three simulation studies to compare nominal weights mean equating to six other equating methods under the nonequivalent groups anchor test design with sample sizes of 20,…

  19. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Melody K.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory.

  20. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, M K; Shadduck, D J; Goldberg, D R; Samuel, M D

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory. PMID:9476245

  1. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  2. Probability Sampling Method for a Hidden Population Using Respondent-Driven Sampling: Simulation for Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    When there is no sampling frame within a certain group or the group is concerned that making its population public would bring social stigma, we say the population is hidden. It is difficult to approach this kind of population survey-methodologically because the response rate is low and its members are not quite honest with their responses when probability sampling is used. The only alternative known to address the problems caused by previous methods such as snowball sampling is respondent-driven sampling (RDS), which was developed by Heckathorn and his colleagues. RDS is based on a Markov chain, and uses the social network information of the respondent. This characteristic allows for probability sampling when we survey a hidden population. We verified through computer simulation whether RDS can be used on a hidden population of cancer survivors. According to the simulation results of this thesis, the chain-referral sampling of RDS tends to minimize as the sample gets bigger, and it becomes stabilized as the wave progresses. Therefore, it shows that the final sample information can be completely independent from the initial seeds if a certain level of sample size is secured even if the initial seeds were selected through convenient sampling. Thus, RDS can be considered as an alternative which can improve upon both key informant sampling and ethnographic surveys, and it needs to be utilized for various cases domestically as well. PMID:26107223

  3. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes}. {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes} methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy.

  4. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Barry H [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  5. Method and apparatus for imaging a sample on a device

    DOEpatents

    Trulson, Mark; Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter; Rava, Richard; Walton, Ian; Fodor, Stephen P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and systems for detecting a labeled marker on a sample located on a support. The imaging system comprises a body for immobilizing the support, an excitation radiation source and excitation optics to generate and direct the excitation radiation at the sample. In response, labeled material on the sample emits radiation which has a wavelength that is different from the excitation wavelength, which radiation is collected by collection optics and imaged onto a detector which generates an image of the sample.

  6. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    DOEpatents

    Riot, Vincent J

    2015-03-24

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  7. A quantitative evaluation of two methods for preserving hair samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roon, David A.; Waits, L.P.; Kendall, K.C.

    2003-01-01

    Hair samples are an increasingly important DNA source for wildlife studies, yet optimal storage methods and DNA degradation rates have not been rigorously evaluated. We tested amplification success rates over a one-year storage period for DNA extracted from brown bear (Ursus arctos) hair samples preserved using silica desiccation and -20C freezing. For three nuclear DNA microsatellites, success rates decreased significantly after a six-month time point, regardless of storage method. For a 1000 bp mitochondrial fragment, a similar decrease occurred after a two-week time point. Minimizing delays between collection and DNA extraction will maximize success rates for hair-based noninvasive genetic sampling projects.

  8. Convenient mounting method for electrical measurements of thin samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, L. G.; Summers, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for mounting thin samples for electrical measurements is described. The technique is based on a vacuum chuck concept in which the vacuum chuck simultaneously holds the sample and established electrical contact. The mounting plate is composed of a glass-ceramic insulating material and the surfaces of the plate and vacuum chuck are polished. The operation of the vacuum chuck is examined. The contacts on the sample and mounting plate, which are sputter-deposited through metal masks, are analyzed. The mounting method was utilized for van der Pauw measurements.

  9. The alias method: A fast, efficient Monte Carlo sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rathkopf, J.A.; Edwards, A.L. ); Smidt, R.K. )

    1990-11-16

    The alias method is a Monte Carlo sampling technique that offers significant advantages over more traditional methods. It equals the accuracy of table lookup and the speed of equal probable bins. The original formulation of this method sampled from discrete distributions and was easily extended to histogram distributions. We have extended the method further to applications more germane to Monte Carlo particle transport codes: continuous distributions. This paper presents the alias method as originally derived and our extensions to simple continuous distributions represented by piecewise linear functions. We also present a method to interpolate accurately between distributions tabulated at points other than the point of interest. We present timing studies that demonstrate the method's increased efficiency over table lookup and show further speedup achieved through vectorization. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Extending the alias Monte Carlo sampling method to general distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.L.; Rathkopf, J.A. ); Smidt, R.K. )

    1991-01-07

    The alias method is a Monte Carlo sampling technique that offers significant advantages over more traditional methods. It equals the accuracy of table lookup and the speed of equal probable bins. The original formulation of this method sampled from discrete distributions and was easily extended to histogram distributions. We have extended the method further to applications more germane to Monte Carlo particle transport codes: continuous distributions. This paper presents the alias method as originally derived and our extensions to simple continuous distributions represented by piecewise linear functions. We also present a method to interpolate accurately between distributions tabulated at points other than the point of interest. We present timing studies that demonstrate the method's increased efficiency over table lookup and show further speedup achieved through vectorization. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The Circle-Arc Method for Equating in Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Samuel A.; Kim, Sooyeon

    2009-01-01

    This article suggests a method for estimating a test-score equating relationship from small samples of test takers. The method does not require the estimated equating transformation to be linear. Instead, it constrains the estimated equating curve to pass through two pre-specified end points and a middle point determined from the data. In a…

  12. COMPARISON OF MACROINVERTEBRATE SAMPLING METHODS FOR NONWADEABLE STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioassessment of nonwadeable streams in the United States is increasing, but methods for these systems are not as well developed as for wadeable streams. In this study, we compared six benthic macroinvertebrate field sampling methods for nonwadeable streams based on those us...

  13. The Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression Sample Size Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.; Barcikowski, Robert S.

    The general purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of the Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression (PEAR) method for choosing appropriate sample sizes in regression studies used for precision. The PEAR method, which is based on the algebraic manipulation of an accepted cross-validity formula, essentially uses an effect size to…

  14. Standard methods for sampling North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonar, Scott A.; Hubert, Wayne A.; Willis, David W.

    2009-01-01

    This important reference book provides standard sampling methods recommended by the American Fisheries Society for assessing and monitoring freshwater fish populations in North America. Methods apply to ponds, reservoirs, natural lakes, and streams and rivers containing cold and warmwater fishes. Range-wide and eco-regional averages for indices of abundance, population structure, and condition for individual species are supplied to facilitate comparisons of standard data among populations. Provides information on converting nonstandard to standard data, statistical and database procedures for analyzing and storing standard data, and methods to prevent transfer of invasive species while sampling.

  15. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  16. Sample preparation methods for determination of drugs of abuse in hair samples: A review.

    PubMed

    Vogliardi, Susanna; Tucci, Marianna; Stocchero, Giulia; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Favretto, Donata

    2015-02-01

    Hair analysis has assumed increasing importance in the determination of substances of abuse, both in clinical and forensic toxicology investigations. Hair analysis offers particular advantages over other biological matrices (blood and urine), including a larger window of detection, ease of collection and sample stability. In the present work, an overview of sample preparation techniques for the determination of substances of abuse in hair is provided, specifically regarding the principal steps in hair sample treatment-decontamination, extraction and purification. For this purpose, a survey of publications found in the MEDLINE database from 2000 to date was conducted. The most widely consumed substances of abuse and psychotropic drugs were considered. Trends in simplification of hair sample preparation, washing procedures and cleanup methods are discussed. Alternative sample extraction techniques, such as head-space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPDE), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are also reported. PMID:25604816

  17. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  18. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McManus, G.J.; Motes, B.G.; Bird, S.K.; Kotter, D.K.

    1996-03-26

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, is composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method is described for obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant. 3 figs.

  19. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McManus, Gary J.; Motes, Billy G.; Bird, Susan K.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method of obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant.

  20. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  1. Characterizing lentic freshwater fish assemblages using multiple sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing fish assemblages in lentic ecosystems is difficult, and multiple sampling methods are almost always necessary to gain reliable estimates of indices such as species richness. However, most research focused on lentic fish sampling methodology has targeted recreationally important species, and little to no information is available regarding the influence of multiple methods and timing (i.e., temporal variation) on characterizing entire fish assemblages. Therefore, six lakes and impoundments (48–1,557 ha surface area) were sampled seasonally with seven gear types to evaluate the combined influence of sampling methods and timing on the number of species and individuals sampled. Probabilities of detection for species indicated strong selectivities and seasonal trends that provide guidance on optimal seasons to use gears when targeting multiple species. The evaluation of species richness and number of individuals sampled using multiple gear combinations demonstrated that appreciable benefits over relatively few gears (e.g., to four) used in optimal seasons were not present. Specifically, over 90 % of the species encountered with all gear types and season combinations (N = 19) from six lakes and reservoirs were sampled with nighttime boat electrofishing in the fall and benthic trawling, modified-fyke, and mini-fyke netting during the summer. Our results indicated that the characterization of lentic fish assemblages was highly influenced by the selection of sampling gears and seasons, but did not appear to be influenced by waterbody type (i.e., natural lake, impoundment). The standardization of data collected with multiple methods and seasons to account for bias is imperative to monitoring of lentic ecosystems and will provide researchers with increased reliability in their interpretations and decisions made using information on lentic fish assemblages.

  2. Marshall Island radioassay quality assurance program an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Conrado, C.L.; Hamilton, T.F.; Kehl, S.R.; Robison, W.L.; Stoker, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed an extensive quality assurance program to provide high quality data and assessments in support of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Program. Our quality assurance objectives begin with the premise of providing integrated and cost-effective program support (to meet wide-ranging programmatic needs, scientific peer review, litigation defense, and build public confidence) and continue through from design and implementation of large-scale field programs, sampling and sample preparation, radiometric and chemical analyses, documentation of quality assurance/quality control practices, exposure assessments, and dose/risk assessments until publication. The basic structure of our radioassay quality assurance/quality control program can be divided into four essential elements; (1) sample and data integrity control; (2) instrument validation and calibration; (3) method performance testing, validation, development and documentation; and (4) periodic peer review and on-site assessments. While our quality assurance objectives are tailored towards a single research program and the evaluation of major exposure pathways/critical radionuclides pertinent to the Marshall Islands, we have attempted to develop quality assurance practices that are consistent with proposed criteria designed for laboratory accre

  3. Comparison of pigment content of paint samples using spectrometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzcińska, Beata; Kowalski, Rafał; Zięba-Palus, Janina

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the paper was to evaluate the influence of pigment concentration and its distribution in polymer binder on the possibility of colour identification and paint sample comparison. Two sets of paint samples: one containing red and another one green pigment were prepared. Each set consisted of 13 samples differing gradually in the concentration of pigment. To obtain the sets of various colour shades white paint was mixed with the appropriate pigment in the form of a concentrated suspension. After solvents evaporation the samples were examined using spectrometric methods. The resin and main filler were identified by IR method. Colour and white pigments were identified on the base of Raman spectra. Colour of samples were compared based on Vis spectrometry according to colour theory. It was found that samples are homogenous (parameter measuring colour similarity ΔE < 3). The values of ΔE between the neighbouring samples in the set revealed decreasing linear function and between the first and following one - a logarithmic function.

  4. Off-axis angular spectrum method with variable sampling interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Oh, Himchan; Pi, Jae-Eun; Choi, Ji-Hun; Kim, Gi Heon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Ryu, Hojun; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2015-08-01

    We proposed a novel off-axis angular spectrum method (ASM) for simulating free space wave propagation with a large shifted destination plane. The off-axis numerical simulation took wave propagation between a parallel source and a destination plane, but a destination plane was shifted from a source plane. The shifted angular spectrum method was proposed for diffraction simulation with a shifted destination plane and satisfied the Nyquist condition for sampling by limiting a bandwidth of a propagation field to avoid an aliasing error due to under sampling. However, the effective sampling number of the shifted ASM decreased when the shifted distance of the destination plane was large which caused a numerical error in the diffraction simulation. To compensate for the decrease of an effective sampling number for the large shifted destination plane, we used a variable sampling interval in a Fourier space to maintain the same effective sampling number independent of the shifted distance of the destination plane. As a result, our proposed off-axis ASM with a variable sampling interval can produce simulation results with high accuracy for nearly every shifted distance of a destination plane when an off-axis angle is less than 75°. We compared the performances of the off-axis ASM using the Chirp Z transform and non-uniform FFT for implementing a variable spatial frequency in a Fourier space.

  5. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  6. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed. PMID:26753274

  7. On the Exploitation of Sensitivity Derivatives for Improving Sampling Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Yanzhao; Hussaini, M. Yousuff; Zang, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    Many application codes, such as finite-element structural analyses and computational fluid dynamics codes, are capable of producing many sensitivity derivatives at a small fraction of the cost of the underlying analysis. This paper describes a simple variance reduction method that exploits such inexpensive sensitivity derivatives to increase the accuracy of sampling methods. Three examples, including a finite-element structural analysis of an aircraft wing, are provided that illustrate an order of magnitude improvement in accuracy for both Monte Carlo and stratified sampling schemes.

  8. Evaluation of Stress Loaded Steel Samples Using Selected Electromagnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.

    2004-02-26

    In this paper the magnetic leakage flux and eddy current method were used to evaluate changes of materials' properties caused by stress. Seven samples made of ferromagnetic material with different level of applied stress were prepared. First, the leakage magnetic fields were measured by scanning the surface of the specimens with GMR gradiometer. Next, the same samples were evaluated using an eddy current sensor. A comparison between results obtained from both methods was carried out. Finally, selected parameters of the measured signal were calculated and utilized to evaluate level of the applied stress. A strong coincidence between amount of the applied stress and the maximum amplitude of the derivative was confirmed.

  9. NEW COLUMN SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY URINE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S; Brian Culligan, B

    2007-08-28

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2007 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2007. A new rapid column separation method was applied directly to the NRIP 2007 emergency urine samples, with only minimal sample preparation to reduce preparation time. Calcium phosphate precipitation, previously used to pre-concentrate actinides and Sr-90 in NRIP 2006 urine and water samples, was not used for the NRIP 2007 urine samples. Instead, the raw urine was acidified and passed directly through the stacked resin columns (TEVA+TRU+SR Resins) to separate the actinides and strontium from the NRIP urine samples more quickly. This improvement reduced sample preparation time for the NRIP 2007 emergency urine analyses significantly. This approach works well for small volume urine samples expected during an emergency response event. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and strontium-90 analyses for NRIP 2007 urine samples.

  10. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  11. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

  12. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  13. Comparative analysis of ACTH and corticosterone sampling methods in rats.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Torsten P; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Ostrander, Michelle M; Dolgas, C Mark; Elfers, Eileen E; Seeley, Randy J; D'Alessio, David A; Herman, James P

    2005-11-01

    A frequently debated question for studies involving the measurement of stress hormones in rodents is the optimal method for collecting blood with minimal stress to the animal. Some investigators prefer the implantation of indwelling catheters to allow for frequent sampling. Others argue that the implantation of a catheter creates a chronic stress to the animal that confounds stress hormone measures and therefore rely on tail vein sampling. Moreover, some investigators measure hormones in trunk blood samples obtained after anesthesia, a practice that may itself raise hormone levels. To address these controversies, we 1) compared plasma ACTH and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations in pre- and poststress rat blood samples obtained via previously implanted vena cava catheters, tail vein nicks, or clipping the tip off the tail and 2) compared plasma ACTH and Cort in rat blood samples obtained by decapitation with and without anesthesia. Rats sampled via indwelling catheters displayed lower prestress ACTH levels than those sampled by tail vein nick if the time to acquire samples was not limited; however, elevated basal ACTH was not observed in samples obtained by tail clip or tail nick when the samples were obtained within 3 min. Baseline Cort levels were similar in all groups. After restraint stress, the profile of the plasma ACTH and Cort responses was not affected by sampling method. Decapitation with prior administration of CO2 or pentobarbital sodium increased plasma ACTH levels approximately 13- and 2-fold, respectively, when compared with decapitation without anesthesia. These data indicate that tail vein nicking, tail clipping, or indwelling venous catheters can be used for obtaining plasma for ACTH and Cort during acute stress studies without confounding the measurements. However, the elevation in basal ACTH seen in the tail vein nick group at baseline suggests that sampling needs to be completed rapidly (<3 min) to avoid the initiation of the pituitary stress

  14. Spectrum recovery method analysis on nonuniform sampling interference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengzhen; Li, Jingzhen; Cao, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Temporally and Spatially Modulated Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometer (TSMFTIS) is a new imaging spectrometer without moving mirrors and slits. The interferogram of the target point can be consisted by sequentially arranging the interference information extracted from the same target point of the sequential images, and the spectrum can be recovered by using fast Fourier transform. In the practical application, there is nonuniform sampling in the interference data, and many researchers have carried out researches on nonuniform sampling with the fast Fourier transform algorithm. As to the issue of interference data in the nonuniform sampling, the nonuniform sampling degree's impact on the recovered spectrum precision is currently and mainly analyzed. This paper has adapted several typical nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) methods, carried out spectrum recovery precision comparison on the interferogram of the nonuniform sampling point with the above methods, and further analyzed the impact of kernel function type, oversampling ratio and kernel function width's on spectrum recovery precision in the above mentioned methods. The experiment result indicates that, when the oversampling ratio is 4 and the kernel function width is 4, the spectrum recovery precision with NUFFT based on Blackman type kernel function is optimal, however, the Gaussian kernel function is stable.

  15. Global metabolite analysis of yeast: evaluation of sample preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Højer-Pedersen, Jesper; Akesson, Mats; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-10-30

    Sample preparation is considered one of the limiting steps in microbial metabolome analysis. Eukaryotes and prokaryotes behave very differently during the several steps of classical sample preparation methods for analysis of metabolites. Even within the eukaryote kingdom there is a vast diversity of cell structures that make it imprudent to blindly adopt protocols that were designed for a specific group of microorganisms. We have therefore reviewed and evaluated the whole sample preparation procedures for analysis of yeast metabolites. Our focus has been on the current needs in metabolome analysis, which is the analysis of a large number of metabolites with very diverse chemical and physical properties. This work reports the leakage of intracellular metabolites observed during quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, the efficacy of six different methods for the extraction of intracellular metabolites, and the losses noticed during sample concentration by lyophilization and solvent evaporation. A more reliable procedure is suggested for quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, followed by extraction of intracellular metabolites by pure methanol. The method can be combined with reduced pressure solvent evaporation and therefore represents an attractive sample preparation procedure for high-throughput metabolome analysis of yeasts. PMID:16240456

  16. Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells

    DOEpatents

    Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

  17. METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CARPET SAMPLES FOR ASBESTOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing asbestos fiber contamination in a carpet is complicated by the nature of the carpeting – because of the pile’s rough surface and thickness, samples cannot be collected directly from carpet for analysis by TEM. Two indirect methods are currently used by laboratories when...

  18. FEASIBILITY OF DEVELOPING SOURCE SAMPLING METHODS FOR ASBESTOS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of developing methods for sampling asbestos in the emissions of major asbestos sources: (1) ore production and taconite production, (2) asbestos-cement production, (3) asbestos felt and paper production, and (4) the p...

  19. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS METHODS FOR AMBIENT PM-10 AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for obtaining ambient PM-10 aerosol data for use in receptor models. haracteristics of PM-10 sampling devices, filter media and laboratory analysis procedures are described. he latter include x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, optical spectroscopy, pyro...

  20. A General Linear Method for Equating with Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Research on equating with small samples has shown that methods with stronger assumptions and fewer statistical estimates can lead to decreased error in the estimated equating function. This article introduces a new approach to linear observed-score equating, one which provides flexible control over how form difficulty is assumed versus estimated…

  1. Periodicity detection method for small-sample time series datasets.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Time series of gene expression often exhibit periodic behavior under the influence of multiple signal pathways, and are represented by a model that incorporates multiple harmonics and noise. Most of these data, which are observed using DNA microarrays, consist of few sampling points in time, but most periodicity detection methods require a relatively large number of sampling points. We have previously developed a detection algorithm based on the discrete Fourier transform and Akaike's information criterion. Here we demonstrate the performance of the algorithm for small-sample time series data through a comparison with conventional and newly proposed periodicity detection methods based on a statistical analysis of the power of harmonics.We show that this method has higher sensitivity for data consisting of multiple harmonics, and is more robust against noise than other methods. Although "combinatorial explosion" occurs for large datasets, the computational time is not a problem for small-sample datasets. The MATLAB/GNU Octave script of the algorithm is available on the author's web site: http://www.cbrc.jp/%7Etominaga/piccolo/. PMID:21151841

  2. Development of an automated data processing method for sample to sample comparison of seized methamphetamines.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Jaesin; Choi, Hyeyoung; Park, Yujin; Lee, Heesang; Pyo, Jaesung; Jo, Jiyeong; Park, Yonghoon; Choi, Hwakyung; Kim, Suncheun

    2012-11-30

    The information about the sources of supply, trafficking routes, distribution patterns and conspiracy links can be obtained from methamphetamine profiling. The precursor and synthetic method for the clandestine manufacture can be estimated from the analysis of minor impurities contained in methamphetamine. Also, the similarity between samples can be evaluated using the peaks that appear in chromatograms. In South Korea, methamphetamine was the most popular drug but the total seized amount of methamphetamine whole through the country was very small. Therefore, it would be more important to find the links between samples than the other uses of methamphetamine profiling. Many Asian countries including Japan and South Korea have been using the method developed by National Research Institute of Police Science of Japan. The method used gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), DB-5 column and four internal standards. It was developed to increase the amount of impurities and minimize the amount of methamphetamine. After GC-FID analysis, the raw data have to be processed. The data processing steps are very complex and require a lot of time and effort. In this study, Microsoft Visual Basic Application (VBA) modules were developed to handle these data processing steps. This module collected the results from the data into an Excel file and then corrected the retention time shift and response deviation generated from the sample preparation and instruments analysis. The developed modules were tested for their performance using 10 samples from 5 different cases. The processed results were analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficient for similarity assessment and the correlation coefficient of the two samples from the same case was more than 0.99. When the modules were applied to 131 seized methamphetamine samples, four samples from two different cases were found to have the common origin and the chromatograms of the four samples were appeared visually identical

  3. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in the Great Lakes Basin, 2012: collection methods, analytical methods, quality assurance, and study data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Hansen, Donald S.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Choy, Steven J.; Moore, Jeremy N.; Banda, JoAnn; Gefell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    During this study, 53 environmental samples, 4 field duplicate samples, and 8 field spike samples of bottom sediment and laboratory matrix-spike samples were analyzed for a wide variety of CECs at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory using laboratory schedule 5433 for wastewater indicators; research method 6434 for steroid hormones, sterols, and bisphenol A; and research method 9008 for human-use pharmaceuticals and antidepressants. Forty of the 57 chemicals analyzed using laboratory schedule 5433 had detectable concentrations ranging from 1 to 49,000 micrograms per kilogram. Fourteen of the 20 chemicals analyzed using research method 6434 had detectable concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 24,940 nanograms per gram. Ten of the 20 chemicals analyzed using research method 9008 had detectable concentrations ranging from 0.59 to 197.5 micrograms per kilogr

  4. SU-E-I-60: Quality Assurance Testing Methods and Customized Phantom for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are to develop an magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI-MRS) fused phantom along with the inserts for metabolite quantification and to conduct quantitative analysis and evaluation of the layered vials of brain-mimicking solution for quality assurance (QA) performance, according to the localization sequence. Methods: The outer cylindrical phantom body is made of acrylic materials. The section other than where the inner vials are located was filled with copper sulfate and diluted with water so as to reduce the T1 relaxation time. Sodium chloride was included to provide conductivity similar to the human body. All measurements of MRI and MRS were made using a 3.0 T scanner (Achiva Tx 3.0 T; Philips Medical Systems, Netherlands). The MRI scan parameters were as follows: (1) spin echo (SE) T1-weighted image: repetition time (TR), 500ms; echo time (TE), 20ms; matrix, 256×256; field of view (FOV), 250mm; gap, 1mm; number of signal averages (NSA), 1; (2) SE T2-weighted image: TR, 2,500 ms; TE, 80 ms; matrix, 256×256; FOV, 250mm; gap, 1mm; NSA, 1; 23 slice images were obtained with slice thickness of 5mm. The water signal of each volume of interest was suppressed by variable pulse power and optimized relaxation delays (VAPOR) applied before the scan. By applying a point-resolved spectroscopy sequence, the MRS scan parameters were as follows: voxel size, 0.8×0.8×0.8 cm{sup 3}; TR, 2,000ms; TE, 35ms; NSA, 128. Results: Using the fused phantom, the results of measuring MRI factors were: geometric distortion, <2% and ±2 mm; image intensity uniformity, 83.09±1.33%; percent-signal ghosting, 0.025±0.004; low-contrast object detectability, 27.85±0.80. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio of N-acetyl-aspartate was consistently high (42.00±5.66). Conclusion: The MRI-MRS QA factors obtained simultaneously using the phantom can facilitate evaluation of both images and spectra, and provide guidelines for obtaining MRI and MRS QA

  5. Do Too Many Rights Make a Wrong? A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of a Sample of Malaysian and Singapore Private Higher Education Providers in Transnational Quality Assurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Fion Choon Boey

    2010-01-01

    Assuring the quality of transnational education has been an endeavour of increasing importance in the internationalisation of higher education but is also increasingly challenging given the involvement of many stakeholders. This paper focuses on the experiences of and challenges faced by private tertiary education providers in Malaysia and…

  6. Comparison of DNA preservation methods for environmental bacterial community samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Michael A.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2013-01-01

    Field collections of environmental samples, for example corals, for molecular microbial analyses present distinct challenges. The lack of laboratory facilities in remote locations is common, and preservation of microbial community DNA for later study is critical. A particular challenge is keeping samples frozen in transit. Five nucleic acid preservation methods that do not require cold storage were compared for effectiveness over time and ease of use. Mixed microbial communities of known composition were created and preserved by DNAgard™, RNAlater®, DMSO–EDTA–salt (DESS), FTA® cards, and FTA Elute® cards. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and clone libraries were used to detect specific changes in the faux communities over weeks and months of storage. A previously known bias in FTA® cards that results in lower recovery of pure cultures of Gram-positive bacteria was also detected in mixed community samples. There appears to be a uniform bias across all five preservation methods against microorganisms with high G + C DNA. Overall, the liquid-based preservatives (DNAgard™, RNAlater®, and DESS) outperformed the card-based methods. No single liquid method clearly outperformed the others, leaving method choice to be based on experimental design, field facilities, shipping constraints, and allowable cost.

  7. QADATA user's manual; an interactive computer program for the retrieval and analysis of the results from the external blind sample quality- assurance project of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucey, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts an external blind sample quality assurance project for its National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, based on the analysis of reference water samples. Reference samples containing selected inorganic and nutrient constituents are disguised as environmental samples at the Survey 's office in Ocala, Florida, and are sent periodically through other Survey offices to the laboratory. The results of this blind sample project indicate the quality of analytical data produced by the laboratory. This report provides instructions on the use of QADATA, an interactive, menu-driven program that allows users to retrieve the results of the blind sample quality- assurance project. The QADATA program, which is available on the U.S. Geological Survey 's national computer network, accesses a blind sample data base that contains more than 50,000 determinations from the last five water years for approximately 40 constituents at various concentrations. The data can be retrieved from the database for any user- defined time period and for any or all available constituents. After the user defines the retrieval, the program prepares statistical tables, control charts, and precision plots and generates a report which can be transferred to the user 's office through the computer network. A discussion of the interpretation of the program output is also included. This quality assurance information will permit users to document the quality of the analytical results received from the laboratory. The blind sample data is entered into the database within weeks after being produced by the laboratory and can be retrieved to meet the needs of specific projects or programs. (USGS)

  8. Comparison of aquatic macroinvertebrate samples collected using different field methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenz, Bernard N.; Miller, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Government agencies, academic institutions, and volunteer monitoring groups in the State of Wisconsin collect aquatic macroinvertebrate data to assess water quality. Sampling methods differ among agencies, reflecting the differences in the sampling objectives of each agency. Lack of infor- mation about data comparability impedes data shar- ing among agencies, which can result in duplicated sampling efforts or the underutilization of avail- able information. To address these concerns, com- parisons were made of macroinvertebrate samples collected from wadeable streams in Wisconsin by personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey- National Water Quality Assessment Program (USGS-NAWQA), the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service (USDA-FS), and volunteers from the Water Action Volunteer-Water Quality Monitoring Program (WAV). This project was part of the Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality (ITFM) Wisconsin Water Resources Coordination Project. The numbers, types, and environmental tolerances of the organ- isms collected were analyzed to determine if the four different field methods that were used by the different agencies and volunteer groups provide comparable results. Additionally, this study com- pared the results of samples taken from different locations and habitats within the same streams.

  9. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that contains both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.

  10. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-29

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that containsmore » both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.« less