Science.gov

Sample records for astd remote deployment

  1. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  2. ASTD's 1974 Conference--Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training and Development Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Highlights of speeches presented at the 30th ASTD National Conference in San Francisco are given: S.I. Hayakawa outlined developments in higher education during the 1970's; Joe Batten called for life enrichment, not just job enrichment; and Dorothy Jongeward discussed transactional analysis as a tool for more effective interpersonal relationships.…

  3. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R.

    2014-02-01

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  4. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R.; Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G.

    2014-02-18

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  5. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  6. Structures for remotely deployable precision antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions such as the Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESGP) will require highly accurate antennas with apertures that cannot be launched fully formed. The operational orbits are often inaccessible to manned flight and will involve expendable launch vehicles such as the Delta or Titan. There is therefore a need for completely deployable antenna reflectors of large size capable of efficiently handling millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation. The parameters for the type of mission are illustrated. The logarithmic plot of frequency versus aperture diameter shows the regions of interest for a large variety of space antenna applications, ranging from a 1500-meter-diameter radio telescope for low frequencies to a 20-meter-diameter infrared telescope. For the ESGP, a major application is the microwave radiometry at high frequencies for atmospheric sounding. Almost all existing large antenna reflectors for space employ a mesh-type reflecting surface. Examples are shown and discussed which deal with the various structural concepts for mesh antennas. Fortunately, those concepts are appropriate for creating the very large apertures required at the lower frequencies for good resolution. The emphasis is on the structural concepts and technologies that are appropriate to fully automated deployment of dish-type antennas with solid reflector surfaces. First the structural requirements are discussed. Existing concepts for fully deployable antennas are then described and assessed relative to the requirements. Finally, several analyses are presented that evaluate the effects of beam steering and segmented reflector design on the accuracy of the antenna.

  7. ASTD 1979-80: A Time of Challenge!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Jan

    1979-01-01

    The 1979 American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) President, Jan Margolis, discusses the organization's challenges and role. Identifies 1979-80 ASTD goals which cluster in four areas: representation and leadership in the human resource field, professionalism, member and leadership development, and maintaining a healthy organization.…

  8. UAV Deployed Sensor System for Arctic Ocean Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S. E.; Lawrence, D.; Weibel, D.; LoDolce, G.; Krist, S.; Crocker, I.; Maslanik, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment (MIZOPEX), is an Arctic field project scheduled for summer 2013. The goals of the project are to understand how warming of the marginal ice zone affects sea ice melt and if this warming has been over or underestimated by satellite measurements. To achieve these goals calibrated physical measurements, both remote and in-situ, of the marginal ice zone over scales of square kilometers with a resolution of square meters is required. This will be accomplished with a suite of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped with both remote sensing and in-situ instruments, air deployed microbuoys, and ship deployed buoys. In this talk we will present details about the air-deployed micro-buoy (ADMB) and self-deployed surface-sonde (SDSS) components of the MIZOPEX project, developed at the University of Colorado. These systems were designed to explore the potential of low-cost, on-demand access to high-latitude areas of important scientific interest. Both the ADMB and SDSS share a common measurement suite with the capability to measure water temperature at three distinct depths and provide position information via GPS. The ADMBs are dropped from the InSitu ScanEagle UAV and expected to operate and log ocean temperatures for 14 days. The SDSS are micro UAVs that are designed to fly one-way to a region of interest and land at specified coordinates, thereafter becoming a surface sensor similar to the ADMB. A ScanEagle will periodically return to the deployment zone to gather ADMB/SDSS data via low power radio links. Design decisions based upon operational constraints and the current status of the ADMB and SDSS will be presented.

  9. Field Deployable Tritium Assay System Remote Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-05-12

    The FDTASREM software is a command control based application for the Field Deployable Tritium Assay System (FDTAS-Invention Disclosure SRS-96-091 has been submitted). The program runs on the Remote computer which is located at the field site with the FDTAS sampling and analysis components. The application executes commands received over the connected phone line from the operator via the FDTAS Host GUI running in the laboratory some distance away. The FDTASREM controls interface with the FDTASmore » auto sampler and the analysis systems. It tells the sampler to take a sample from a specified location and send it to the analyzer. Once the sample is sent to the analyzer, FDTASREM sequences the internal valves and pumps to deliver the sample and cocktail to the counting chamber. Once the analysis is complete, the program can execute the clean command and prepare the system for the next sample.« less

  10. A Remotely Deployed Laser System for Viewing/Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Herndon, J.N.; Menon, M.M.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1999-04-25

    A metrology system is being developed for in-vessel inspection of present day experimental, and next generation fusion reactors. It requires accurate measuring capability to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy for next generation reactors must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system that is capable of correcting for environmental vibration meets these requirements. The metrologyhiewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units, that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism configured for a next generation reactor was telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the metrology/viewing system having precision ranging and surface mapping capability, and discusses the results of various environmental tests.

  11. Deployable large aperture optics system for remote sensing applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John A.; Macke, Benjamin T.; Massad, Jordan Elias; Chaplya, Pavel Mikhail

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes research into effects of electron gun control on piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) structures. The experimental apparatus specific to the electron gun control of this structure is detailed, and the equipment developed for the remote examination of the bimorph surface profile is outlined. Experiments conducted to determine the optimum electron beam characteristics for control are summarized. Clearer boundaries on the bimorphs control output capabilities were determined, as was the closed loop response. Further controllability analysis of the bimorph is outlined, and the results are examined. In this research, the bimorph response was tested through a matrix of control inputs of varying current, frequency, and amplitude. Experiments also studied the response to electron gun actuation of piezoelectric bimorph thin film covered with multiple spatial regions of control. Parameter ranges that yielded predictable control under certain circumstances were determined. Research has shown that electron gun control can be used to make macrocontrol and nanocontrol adjustments for PVDF structures. The control response and hysteresis are more linear for a small range of energy levels. Current levels needed for optimum control are established, and the generalized controllability of a PVDF bimorph structure is shown.

  12. Scarab III Remote Vehicle Deployment for Waste Retrieval and Tank Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, B.L.; Falter, D.D.; Noakes, M.; Vesco, D.

    1999-04-25

    The Robotics Technology Development Program now known as the Robotics Crosscut Program, funded the development and deployment of a small remotely operated vehicle for inspection and cleanout of small horizontal waste storage tanks that have limited access. Besides the advantage of access through tank risers as small as 18-in. diameter, the small robotic system is also significantly less expensive to procure and to operate than larger remotely operated vehicle (ROV) systems. The vehicle specified to support this activity was the ROV Technologies, Inc., Scarab. The Scarab is a tracked vehicle with an independently actuated front and rear ''toe'' degree-of-freedom which allows the stand-off and angle of the vehicle platform with respect to the floor to be changed. The Scarab is a flexible remote tool that can be used for a variety of tasks with its primary uses targeted for inspection and small scale waste retrieval. The vehicle and any necessary process equipment are mounted in a deployment and containment enclosure to simplify deployment and movement of the system from tank to tank. This paper outlines the technical issues related to the Scarab vehicle and its deployment for use in tank inspection and waste retrieval operation

  13. Austere, remote, and disaster medicine missions: an operational mnemonic can help organize a deployment.

    PubMed

    Macias, Darryl J; Williams, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Medical care in resource-limited environments (austere settings) can occur in the context of a disaster, wilderness, or a tactical field operation. Regardless of the type of environment, there are common organizational themes in most successful humanitarian missions that occur in harsh natural or manmade environmental conditions. These principles prioritize the initiation and execution of any given deployment in austere or remote settings, diverging from priorities that would occur in a situation in which change to the existing medical structure is intact and operating well. Attention to these priorities not only helps providers to deliver medical care to people in need during a period of resource limitations but it also can keep providers, teams, the public, and patients safe during and after a deployment. PMID:23263320

  14. TARZAN: A REMOTE TOOL DEPLOYMENT SYSTEM FOR THE WEST VALLEY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce R. Thompson; James Veri

    1999-09-30

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. undertook a development project to build Tarzan, a Remote Tool Delivery system to work inside nuclear waste storage tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The removal of waste deposits from large storage tanks poses significant challenges during tank operations and closure. Limited access, the presence of chemical, radiological, and /or explosive hazards, and the need to deliver retrieval equipment to all regions of the tank exceed the capabilities of most conventional methods and equipment. Remotely operated devices for mobilizing and retrieving waste materials are needed. Some recent developments have been made in this area. However, none of these developments completely and cost-effectively address tanks that are congested with internal structures (e.g., support columns, cooling coils, fixed piping, etc.). The Tarzan system consists of the following parts: Locomotor which is deployed in the tank for inspection and cleanup; Hydraulic power unit providing system power for the locomotor and deployment unit; and Control system providing the man machine interface to control, coordinate and monitor the system. This document presents the final report on the Tarzan project.

  15. Taiwan HRD Practitioner Competencies: An Application of the ASTD WLP Competency Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Angela Shin-yih; Bian, Min-dau; Hom, Yi-ming

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims to identify Taiwan HRD practitioners' perceived competency levels, and to evaluate the importance of 52 workplace learning and performance (WLP) competencies. The conceptual framework is adapted from the American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) models for WLP conducted by Rothwell, Sanders and Soper (1999). The survey…

  16. Payload installation and deployment aid for space shuttle orbiter spacecraft remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, T. O.

    1982-01-01

    An aid concept known as the PIDA (Payload Installation and Deployment Aid) is presented as a way to assist the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) by relaxing the accuracy required during payload handling in the payload bay. The aid concept was designed and developed to move payloads through a prescribed path between the confined quarters of the payload bay and a position outside the critical maneuvering area of the Orbiter. An androgynous docking mechanism is used at the payload/PIDA interfaces for normal docking functions that also serves as the structural connection between the payload and the Orbiter, that is capable of being loosened to prevent transfer of loads between a stowed payload and the PIDA structure. A gearmotor driven drum/cable system is used in the docking mechanism in a unique manner to center the attenuator assembly, align the ring and guide assembly (docking interface) in roll, pitch, and yaw, and rigidize the mechanism at a nominal position. A description of the design requirements and the modes of operation of the various functions of the deployment and the docking mechanisms are covered.

  17. A remotely operated, field deployable tritium analysis system for surface and groundwater measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, P.R.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Beals, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Collins, S.L.; Noakes, J.E.; Spaulding, J.D.; Neary, M.P.; Peterson, R.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype system for the remote, in situ analysis of tritium in surface and ground waters has been developed at the Savannah River Site through the combined efforts of university, private industry, and government laboratory personnel under a project funded by the DOE/OTD. Using automated liquid scintillation counting techniques, the Field Deployable Tritium Analysis System (FDTAS) has been shown in laboratory and limited field tests to have sufficient sensitivity to measure tritium in water samples at environmental levels (10 Bq/L [{approximately}300 pCi/L] for a 100-minute count) on a near-real time basis. These limits are well below the EPA drinking water standard for tritium at 740 Bq/L (1) and lower than the normal upstream Savannah River tritium concentration of {approximately}40 Bq/L (2). The FDTAS consists of a fixed volume sampler (50 mL), an on-line water purification system, and a stop-flow liquid scintillation counter for detecting tritium in the purified sample. All operations are controlled and monitored by a remote computer using standard telephone line modem communications. The FDTAS offers a cost-effective alternative to the expensive and time-consuming methods of field sample collection and laboratory analyses for tritium in contaminated groundwater.

  18. Building and Deploying Remotely Operated Vehicles in the First-Year Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien-Gayes, A.; Fuss, K.; Gayes, P.

    2007-12-01

    Coastal Carolina University has committed to improving student retention and success in Mathematics and Science through a pilot program to engage first-year students in an applied and investigative project as part of the University's First-Year Experience (FYE). During the fall 2007 semester, five pilot sections of FYE classes, consisting of students from the College of Natural and Applied Sciences are building and deploying Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). These ROV-based classes are designed to: accelerate exploration of the broad fields of science and mathematics; enlist interest in technology by engaging students in a multi-stepped, interdisciplinary problem solving experience; explore science and mathematical concepts; institute experiential learning; and build a culture of active learners to benefit student success across traditional departmental boundaries. Teams of three students (forty teams total) will build, based on the MIT Sea Perch design, and test ROVs in addition to collecting data with their ROVs. Various accessories attached to the vehicles for data collection will include temperature and light sensors, plankton nets and underwater cameras. The first-year students will then analyze the data, and the results will be documented as part of their capstone projects. Additionally, two launch days will take place on two campus ponds. Local middle and high school teachers and their students will be invited to observe this event. The teams of students with the most capable and successful ROVs will participate in a workshop held in November 2007 for regional elementary, middle and high school teachers. These students will give a presentation on the building of the ROVs and also provide a hands-on demonstration for the workshop participants. These activities will ensure an incorporation of service learning into the first semester of the freshmen experience. The desired outcomes of the ROV-based FYE classes are: increased retention at the postsecondary

  19. Experience with procuring, deploying and maintaining hardware at remote co-location centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärring, O.; Bonfillou, E.; Clement, B.; Coelho Dos Santos, M.; Dore, V.; Gentit, A.; Grossir, A.; Salter, W.; Valsan, L.; Xafi, A.

    2014-05-01

    In May 2012 CERN signed a contract with the Wigner Data Centre in Budapest for an extension to CERN's central computing facility beyond its current boundaries set by electrical power and cooling available for computing. The centre is operated as a remote co-location site providing rack-space, electrical power and cooling for server, storage and networking equipment acquired by CERN. The contract includes a 'remote-hands' services for physical handling of hardware (rack mounting, cabling, pushing power buttons, ...) and maintenance repairs (swapping disks, memory modules, ...). However, only CERN personnel have network and console access to the equipment for system administration. This report gives an insight to adaptations of hardware architecture, procurement and delivery procedures undertaken enabling remote physical handling of the hardware. We will also describe tools and procedures developed for automating the registration, burn-in testing, acceptance and maintenance of the equipment as well as an independent but important change to the IT assets management (ITAM) developed in parallel as part of the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure project. Finally, we will report on experience from the first large delivery of 400 servers and 80 SAS JBOD expansion units (24 drive bays) to Wigner in March 2013. Changes were made to the abstract file on 13/06/2014 to correct errors, the pdf file was unchanged.

  20. The deployment and training of teachers for remote rural schools in less-developed countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankrah-Dove, Linda

    1982-03-01

    In less-developed countries schools in remote rural areas are likely to be poor in quality. One important aspect of this in certain contexts is the comparatively low quality of teachers and the high rate of teacher turnover in rural schools in these areas. It is likely that contributory factors are the ways in which posting and transfer procedures operate, inadequate preparation and support for teachers, and their own characteristics, values and interests. For purposes of analysis, two models are suggested which illuminate the policy assumptions behind different strategies used to try to remedy the situation. The rural deficit model tends to encourage the use of compulsory posting and incentives while the rural challenge model searches for better ways of preparing teachers for service in remote rural schools. From analysis of the literature, the author suggests that there are four inter-related features of contemporary teacher-education programmes which have potential and should be developed if good teachers are to be attracted to and retained in remote rural schools. These are field-based preparation, teamwork in training, community support of training and the recruitment and preparation of local teachers. A few examples of schemes employing these principles are described briefly.

  1. Seismic-monitoring changes and the remote deployment of seismic stations (seismic spider) at Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 7 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McChesney, Patrick J.; Couchman, Marvin R.; Moran, Seth C.; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Swinford, Kelly J.; LaHusen, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The instruments in place at the start of volcanic unrest at Mount St. Helens in 2004 were inadequate to record the large earthquakes and monitor the explosions that occurred as the eruption developed. To remedy this, new instruments were deployed and the short-period seismic network was modified. A new method of establishing near-field seismic monitoring was developed, using remote deployment by helicopter. The remotely deployed seismic sensor was a piezoelectric accelerometer mounted on a surface-coupled platform. Remote deployment enabled placement of stations within 250 m of the active vent.

  2. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF SYSTEMS FOR THE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING OF REMOTE-HANDLED SLUDGE FROM HANFORD K-WEST FUEL STORAGE BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    RAYMOND RE

    2011-12-27

    In 2011, significant progress was made in developing and deploying technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 105-K West Fuel Storage Basin on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The sludge in the 105-K West Basin is an accumulation of degraded spent nuclear fuel and other debris that collected during long-term underwater storage of the spent fuel. In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was used to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from 10 submerged temporary storage containers in the K West Basin. In 2011, a full-scale prototype facility was completed for use in technology development, design qualification testing, and operator training on systems used to retrieve, transport, and store highly radioactive K Basin sludge. In this facility, three separate systems for characterizing, retrieving, pretreating, and processing remote-handled sludge were developed. Two of these systems were successfully deployed in 2011. One of these systems was used to pretreat knockout pot sludge as part of the 105-K West Basin cleanup. Knockout pot sludge contains pieces of degraded uranium fuel ranging in size from 600 {mu}m to 6350 {mu}m mixed with pieces of inert material, such as aluminum wire and graphite, in the same size range. The 2011 pretreatment campaign successfully removed most of the inert material from the sludge stream and significantly reduced the remaining volume of knockout pot product material. Removing the inert material significantly minimized the waste stream and reduced costs by reducing the number of transportation and storage containers. Removing the inert material also improved worker safety by reducing the number of remote-handled shipments. Also in 2011, technology development and final design were completed on the system to remove knockout pot material from the basin and transport the material to an onsite facility for interim storage. This system is

  3. DEPLOYMENT OF INNOVATIVE CHARACTERIZATION TECHNOLOGIES AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARSSIM PROCESS AT RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED SITES.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB,P.D.; MILIAN,L.; LUCKETT,L.; WATTERS,D.; MILLER,K.M.; GOGOLAK,C.

    2001-05-01

    The success of this Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project is measured on several levels. First, the deployment of this innovative approach using in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM was successfully established for all three phases of D and D characterization, i.e., pre-job scoping, on-going disposition of waste, and final status surveys upon completion of the activity. Unlike traditional D and D projects, since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project (BGRR-DP) is operating on an accelerated schedule, much of the work is being carried out simultaneously. Rather than complete a full characterization of the facility before D and D work begins, specific removal actions require characterization as the activity progresses. Thus, the need for rapid and cost-effective techniques for characterization is heightened. Secondly, since the approach used for this ASTD project was not thoroughly proven prior to deployment, a large effort was devoted to demonstrating technical comparability to project managers, regulators and stakeholders. During the initial phases, large numbers of replicate samples were taken and analyzed by conventional baseline techniques to ensure that BGRR-DP quality assurance standards were met. ASTD project staff prepared comparisons of data gathered using ISOCS and BetaScint with traditional laboratory methods and presented this information to BGRR-DP staff and regulators from EPA Region II, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Suffolk County Board of Health. As the results of comparability evaluations became available, approval for these methods was received and the techniques associated with in situ characterization, portable field laboratory measurements, and implementation of MARSSIM were gradually integrated into BGRR-DP procedures.

  4. Development of a Remotely Operated, Field-Deployable Tritium Analysis System for Surface and Ground Water Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Cable, P.R.; Noakes, J.E.; Spaulding, J.D.; Neary, M. P.; Wasyl, M.S.

    1996-06-20

    The environmental contamination resulting from decades of testing and manufacturing of nuclear materials for a national defense purposes is a problem now being faced by the United States. The Center for Applied Isotope Studies at the University of Georgia, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Packard Instrument Company, have developed a prototype unit for remote, near real time, in situ analysis of tritium in surface and ground water samples.

  5. Ground-Based Fabry-Perot Interferometry of the Terrestrial Nightglow with a Bare Charge-Coupled Device: Remote Field Site Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niciejewski, Rick; Killeen, Timothy L.; Turnbull, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) to the study of upper atmosphere thermodynamics has largely been restricted by the very low light levels in the terrestrial airglow as well as the limited range in wavelength of photomultiplier tube (PMT) technology. During the past decade, the development of the scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) has progressed to the stage in which this detector has become the logical replacement for the PMT. Small fast microcomputers have made it possible to "upgrade" our remote field sites with bare CCDs and not only retain the previous capabilities of the existing FPls but expand the data coverage in both temporal and wavelength domains. The problems encountered and the solutions applied to the deployment of a bare CCD, with data acquisition and image reduction techniques, are discussed. Sample geophysical data determined from the FPI fringe profiles are shown for our stations at Peach Mountain, Michigan, and Watson Lake, Yukon Territory.

  6. Ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometry of the terrestrial nightglow with a bare charge-coupled device: remote field site deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niciejewski, Rick J.; Killeen, Timothy L.; Turnbull, Matthew

    1994-02-01

    The application of Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) to the study of upper atmosphere thermodynamics has largely been restricted by the very low light levels in the terrestrial airglow as well as the limited range in wavelength of photomultiplier tube (PMT) technology. During the past decade, the development of the scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) has progressed to the stage in which this detector has become the logical replacement for the PMT. Small fast microcomputers have made it possible to 'upgrade' our remote field sites with bare CCDs and not only retain the previous capabilities of the existing FPIs but expand the data coverage in both temporal and wavelength domains. The problems encountered and the solutions applied to the deployment of a bare CCD, with data acquisition and image reduction techniques, are discussed. Sample geophysical data determined from the FPI fringe profiles are shown for our stations at Peach Mountain, Michigan, and Watson Lake, Yukon Territory.

  7. THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERMAN,B.S.; ADAMS,J.W.; HEISER,J.; KALB,P.D.; LOCKWOOD,A.

    2003-04-01

    As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd{sup 3} of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd{sup 3}) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd{sup 3} units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd{sup 3} ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east, south and west, and

  8. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  9. ASTD Update: Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainer, Lei

    As the 16-24 age group, the traditional source of entry level workers, shrinks, employers increasingly have to hire the less advantaged to staff their entry-level work force; they must, therefore, hire people with deficient skills. At the same time, a mix of technical changes and heightened competition is increasing the skill level needed for work…

  10. Report on Development of Concepts for the Advanced Casting System in Support of the Deployment of a Remotely Operable Research Scale Fuel Fabrication Facility for Metal Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Marsden

    2007-03-01

    Demonstration of recycle processes with low transuranic losses is key to the successful implementation of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership strategy to manage spent fuel. It is probable that these recycle processes will include remote fuel fabrication. This report outlines the strategy to develop and implement a remote metal fuel casting process with minimal transuranic losses. The approach includes a bench-scale casting system to develop materials, methods, and perform tests with transuranics, and an engineering-scale casting system to demonstrate scalability and remote operability. These systems will be built as flexible test beds allowing exploration of multiple fuel casting approaches. The final component of the remote fuel fabrication demonstration culminates in the installation of an advanced casting system in a hot cell to provide integrated remote operation experience with low transuranic loss. Design efforts and technology planning have begun for the bench-scale casting system, and this will become operational in fiscal year 2008, assuming appropriate funding. Installation of the engineering-scale system will follow in late fiscal year 2008, and utilize materials and process knowledge gained in the bench-scale system. Assuming appropriate funding, the advanced casting system will be installed in a remote hot cell at the end of fiscal year 2009.

  11. Interim Status of the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    A. M Smith; G. E. Matthern; R. H. Meservey

    1998-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) teamed to establish the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (ID&D) project to increase the use of improved technologies in D&D operations. The project is making the technologies more readily available, providing training, putting the technologies to use, and spreading information about improved performance. The improved technologies are expected to reduce cost, schedule, radiation exposure, or waste volume over currently used baseline methods. They include some of the most successful technologies proven in the large-scale demonstrations and in private industry. The selected technologies are the Pipe Explorer, the GammaCam, the Decontamination Decommissioning and Remediation Optimal Planning System (DDROPS), the BROKK Demolition Robot, the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS), the Oxy-Gasoline Torch, the Track-Mounted Shear, and the Hand-Held Shear.

  12. Sequentially deployable maneuverable tetrahedral beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Crawford, R. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A tetrahedral beam that can be compactly stowed, sequentially deployed, and widely manipulated to provide a structurally sound yet highly maneuverable truss structure is comprised of a number of repeating units of tandem tetralhedral sharing common sides. Fixed length battens are jointed into equilateral triangles called batten frames. Apexes of adjacent triangles are interconnected by longerons having a mid-point folding hinge. Joints, comprised of gussets pivotabley connected by links, permit two independent degrees of rotational freedom between joined adjacent batten frames, and provide a stable structure from packaged configuration to complete deployment. The longerons and joints can be actuated in any sequence, independently of one another. The beam is suited to remote actuation. Longerons may be provided with powered mid-point hinges enabling beam erection and packaging under remote control. Providing one or more longerons with powered telescoping segments permits the shape of the beam central axis to be remotely manipulated so that the beam may function as a remote manipulator arm.

  13. Sequentially deployable maneuverable tetrahedral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Crawford, R. F.

    1985-12-01

    A tetrahedral beam that can be compactly stowed, sequentially deployed, and widely manipulated to provide a structurally sound yet highly maneuverable truss structure is comprised of a number of repeating units of tandem tetralhedral sharing common sides. Fixed length battens are jointed into equilateral triangles called batten frames. Apexes of adjacent triangles are interconnected by longerons having a mid-point folding hinge. Joints, comprised of gussets pivotabley connected by links, permit two independent degrees of rotational freedom between joined adjacent batten frames, and provide a stable structure from packaged configuration to complete deployment. The longerons and joints can be actuated in any sequence, independently of one another. The beam is suited to remote actuation. Longerons may be provided with powered mid-point hinges enabling beam erection and packaging under remote control. Providing one or more longerons with powered telescoping segments permits the shape of the beam central axis to be remotely manipulated so that the beam may function as a remote manipulator arm.

  14. Laser Remote Sensing at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing active remote sensors to monitor the health of Planet Earth and for exploration of other planets. Development and deployment of these remote sensors can have a huge economic impact. Lasers for these active remote sensors span the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the mid infrared spectral regions. Development activities range from quantum mechanical modeling and prediction of new laser materials to the design, development, and demonstration be deployed in the field.

  15. Launch Deployment Assembly Human Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the human engineering analysis performed by the Systems Branch in support of the 6A cargo element design. The human engineering analysis is limited to the extra vehicular activities (EVA) which are involved in removal of various cargo items from the LDA and specific activities concerning deployment of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).

  16. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  17. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells (for WM'03 - abstract included)

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2003-01-28

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. This paper highlights the application of several remotely deployed technologies enabling the deactivation tasks.

  18. Tether Deployer And Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  19. Deployable geodesic truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Simonton, J. Wayne (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A deployable geodesic truss structure which can be deployed from a stowed state to an erected state is described. The truss structure includes a series of bays, each bay having sets of battens connected by longitudinal cross members which give the bay its axial and torsional stiffness. The cross members are hinged at their mid point by a joint so that the cross members are foldable for deployment or collapsing. The bays are deployed and stabilized by actuator means connected between the mid point joints of the cross members. Hinged longerons may be provided to also connect the sets of battens and to collapse for stowing with the rest of the truss structure.

  20. ROBODEXS: multi-robot deployment and extraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Mason, James R.; Patterson, Michael S.; Skalny, Matthew W.

    2012-06-01

    The importance of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV's) in the Military's operations is continually increasing. All Military branches now rely on advanced robotic technologies to aid in their missions' operations. The integration of these technologies has not only enhanced capabilities, but has increased personnel safety by generating larger standoff distances. Currently most UGV's are deployed by an exposed dismounted Warfighter because the Military possess a limited capability to do so remotely and can only deploy a single UGV. This paper explains the conceptual development of a novel approach to remotely deploy and extract multiple robots from a single host platform. The Robotic Deployment & Extraction System (ROBODEXS) is a result of our development research to improve marsupial robotic deployment at safe standoff distances. The presented solution is modular and scalable, having the ability to deploy anywhere from two to twenty robots from a single deployment mechanism. For larger carrier platforms, multiple sets of ROBODEXS modules may be integrated for deployment and extraction of even greater numbers of robots. Such a system allows mass deployment and extraction from a single manned/unmanned vehicle, which is not currently possible with other deployment systems.

  1. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  2. Deployable Geodesic Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Rhodes, M. D.; Simonton, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Efficiently packaged structure deployed or retracted easily. In preliminary two-bay model each bay has sets of battens connected by two longitudinal crossed members that give bay axial and torsional stiffness. Cross-members hinged in center to fold for packaging. Bays deployed and stabilized by actuators connected between center hinges of cross-members.

  3. Deployment of Smart 3D Subsurface Contaminant Characterization at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.; Heiser, J.; Kalb, P.; Milian, L.; Newson, C.; Lilimpakas, M.; Daniels, T.

    2002-02-26

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Historical Site Assessment (BNL 1999) identified contamination inside the Below Grade Ducts (BGD) resulting from the deposition of fission and activation products from the pile on the inner carbon steel liner during reactor operations. Due to partial flooding of the BGD since shutdown, some of this contamination may have leaked out of the ducts into the surrounding soils. The baseline remediation plan for cleanup of contaminated soils beneath the BGD involves complete removal of the ducts, followed by surveying the underlying and surrounding soils, then removing soil that has been contaminated above cleanup goals. Alternatively, if soil contamination around and beneath the BGD is either non-existent/minimal (below cleanup goals) or is very localized and can be ''surgically removed'' at a reasonable cost, the BGD can be decontaminated and left in place. The focus of this Department of Energy Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (DOE ASTD) project was to determine the extent (location, type, and level) of soil contamination surrounding the BGD and to present this data to the stakeholders as part of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) process. A suite of innovative characterization tools was used to complete the characterization of the soil surrounding the BGD in a cost-effective and timely fashion and in a manner acceptable to the stakeholders. The tools consisted of a tracer gas leak detection system that was used to define the gaseous leak paths out of the BGD and guide soil characterization studies, a small-footprint Geoprobe to reach areas surrounding the BGD that were difficult to access, two novel, field-deployed, radiological analysis systems (ISOCS and BetaScint) and a three-dimensional (3D) visualization system to facilitate data analysis/interpretation. All of the technologies performed as well or better than expected and the characterization could not have been completed in the same time or at

  4. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  5. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  6. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  7. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, K. A.; Hostick, D. J.; Belzer, D. B.; Livingston, O. V.

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  8. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  9. Investigation of technical problems related to deployment and retrieval of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a three-year research effort on retrieval and deployment problems associated with orbiting payloads are summarized. Answers to several basic questions about rendezvous, docking, and deployment dynamics and controls were obtained. A basic retrieval mission profile was formulated in order to develop relevant technology. A remotely controlled retrieval package was conceived. Special deployment dynamics problems associated with high altitude deployment were investigated, and new knowledge of payload spin reorientation was obtained.

  10. Radar Remote Sensing of the Lower Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, Ali

    Non-standard radio wave propagation in the atmosphere is caused by anomalous changes of the atmospheric refractivity index. These changes, if not accounted for, can cause major problems in detection of the location of flying targets. Direct sensing of the atmospheric refractivity index by measuring humidity and temperature has been common practice in past. Refractivity from clutter (RFC) was developed in recent years to complement traditional ways of measuring the refractivity profile in maritime environments. The ability to track the refractivity profile in time and space, together with a lower cost and convenience of operations have been the promising factors that brought RFC under consideration. Presented is an overview of the basic concepts, research and achievements in the field of RFC. A multiple angle clutter model is derived that is constructed by angular spectral estimation on the propagating power. This model is shown to perform better than conventional clutter models in remote sensing applications. Examples are either based on synthetically generated radar clutter or a set of S-band radar measurements from Wallops Island, 1998. Finally, an approach for fusing RFC output with evaporation duct characterization based on ensemble forecasts from a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model is examined. Relative humidity at a reference height and air-sea temperature difference (ASTD) are identified as state variables. Probability densities of atmospheric parameters and propagation factor obtained from an NWP ensemble, RFC, and joint inversions are compared. It is demonstrated that characterization of the near surface atmosphere by combining RFC and NWP reduces the estimation uncertainty of the refractivity index structure in an evaporation duct using either method alone.

  11. Umbilical Deployment Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Gallon, John C.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2011-01-01

    The landing scheme for NASA's next-generation Mars rover will encompass a novel landing technique (see figure). The rover will be lowered from a rocket-powered descent stage and then placed onto the surface while hanging from three bridles. Communication between the rover and descent stage will be maintained through an electrical umbilical cable, which will be deployed in parallel with structural bridles. The -inch (13-mm) umbilical cable contains a Kevlar rope core, around which wires are wrapped to create a cable. This cable is helically coiled between two concentric truncated cones. It is deployed by pulling one end of the cable from the cone. A retractable mechanism maintains tension on the cable after deployment. A break-tie tethers the umbilical end attached to the rover even after the cable is cut after touchdown. This break-tie allows the descent stage to develop some velocity away from the rover prior to the cable releasing from the rover deck, then breaks away once the cable is fully extended. The descent stage pulls the cable up so that recontact is not made. The packaging and deployment technique can store a long length of cable in a relatively small volume while maintaining compliance with the minimum bend radius requirement for the cable being deployed. While the packaging technique could be implemented without the use of break-ties, they were needed in this design due to the vibratory environment and the retraction required by the cable. The break-ties used created a series of load-spikes in the deployment signature. The load spikes during the deployment of the initial three coils of umbilical showed no increase between the different temperature trials. The cold deployment did show an increased load requirement for cable extraction in the region where no break-ties were used. This increase in cable drag was superimposed on the loads required to rupture the last set of break-ties, and as such, these loads saw significant increase when compared to

  12. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Curtis, Leslie (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The summary of activity during this reporting period, most of which was covered by a no-cost extension of the grant, is as follows: 1) Participation in remote and in-situ (at MSFC EDAC facility) mission operation simulations; 2) Analysis of the decay rate of ProSEDS when starting the mission at a lower altitude; 3) Analysis of the deployment control law performance when deploying at a lower altitude.

  13. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  14. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  15. Parametric Cost Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis is a mathematical approach to estimating cost. Parametric cost analysis uses non-cost parameters, such as quality characteristics, to estimate the cost to bring forth, sustain, and retire a product. This paper reviews parametric cost analysis and shows how it can be used within the cost deployment process.

  16. Deployable video conference table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor); Lissol, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A deployable table is presented. The table is stowed in and deployed from a storage compartment based upon a non-self rigidizing, 4-hinge, arch support structure that folds upon itself to stow and that expands to deploy. The work surfaces bypass each other above and below to allow the deployment mechanism to operate. This assembly includes the following: first and second primary pivot hinges placed at the opposite ends of the storage compartment; first and second lateral frame members with proximal ends connected to the first and second pivot hinges; a medial frame member offset from and pivotally connected to distal ends of the first and second members through third and fourth medial pivot hinges; and left-side, right-side, and middle trays connected respectively to the first, second, and third frame members and being foldable into and out of the storage compartment by articulation of the first, second, third, and fourth joints. At least one of the third and fourth joints are locked to set the first, second, and third frame members in a desired angular orientation with respect to each other.

  17. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  18. Remote Sensing of the Arctic Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, W. F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines remote sensing of the arctic seas by discussing: (1) passive microwave sensors; (2) active microwave sensors; (3) other types of sensors; (4) the future deployment of sensors; (5) data buoys; and (6) future endeavors. (JN)

  19. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  20. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-06

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  1. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  2. Deployable tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  3. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Deployable Crew Quarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    The deployable crew quarters (DCQ) have been designed for the International Space Station (ISS). Each DCQ would be a relatively inexpensive, deployable boxlike structure that is designed to fit in a rack bay. It is to be occupied by one crewmember to provide privacy and sleeping functions for the crew. A DCQ comprises mostly hard panels, made of a lightweight honeycomb or matrix/fiber material, attached to each other by cloth hinges. Both faces of each panel are covered with a layer of Nomex cloth and noise-suppression material to provide noise isolation from ISS. On Earth, the unit is folded flat and attached to a rigid pallet for transport to the ISS. On the ISS, crewmembers unfold the unit and install it in place, attaching it to ISS structural members by use of soft cords (which also help to isolate noise and vibration). A few hard pieces of equipment (principally, a ventilator and a smoke detector) are shipped separately and installed in the DCQ unit by use of a system of holes, slots, and quarter-turn fasteners. Full-scale tests showed that the time required to install a DCQ unit amounts to tens of minutes. The basic DCQ design could be adapted to terrestrial applications to satisfy requirements for rapid deployable emergency shelters that would be lightweight, portable, and quickly erected. The Temporary Early Sleep Station (TeSS) currently on-orbit is a spin-off of the DCQ.

  5. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  6. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel; Plum, Martin Michael

    1999-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE -owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that the treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem.

  7. Large Deployable Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Huang, John; Lou, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses a 7-meter-diameter reflectarray antenna that has been conceived in a continuing effort to develop large reflectarray antennas to be deployed in outer space. Major underlying concepts were reported in three prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Inflatable Reflectarray Antennas" (NPO-20433), Vol. 23, No. 10 (October 1999), page 50; "Tape-Spring Reinforcements for Inflatable Structural Tubes" (NPO-20615), Vol. 24, No. 7 (July 2000), page 58; and "Self-Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflectarray Antenna" (NPO-30662), Vol. 28, No. 1 (January 2004), page 61. Like previous antennas in the series, the antenna now proposed would include a reflectarray membrane stretched flat on a frame of multiple inflatable booms. The membrane and booms would be rolled up and folded for compact stowage during transport. Deployment in outer space would be effected by inflating the booms to unroll and then to unfold the membrane, thereby stretching the membrane out flat to its full size. The membrane would achieve the flatness for a Ka-band application. The report gives considerable emphasis to designing the booms to rigidify themselves upon deployment: for this purpose, the booms could be made as spring-tape-reinforced aluminum laminate tubes like those described in two of the cited prior articles.

  8. Newly Deployed Sojourner Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 8-image mosaic was acquired during the late afternoon (near 5pm LST, note the long shadows) on Sol 2 as part of the predeploy 'insurance panorama' and shows the newly deployed rover sitting on the Martian surface. This color image was generated from images acquired at 530,600, and 750 nm. The insurance panorama was designed as 'insurance' against camera failure upon deployment. Had the camera failed, the losslessly-compressed, multispectral insurance panorama would have been the main source of image data from the IMP.

    However, the camera deployment was successful, leaving the insurance panorama to be downlinked to Earth several weeks later. Ironically enough, the insurance panorama contains some of the best quality image data because of the lossless data compression and relatively dust-free state of the camera and associated lander/rover hardware on Sol 2.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  9. Field Deployable Tritium Assay System Host Graphical User Interface Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-05-12

    The FDTASHOST software is a Graphical User Interface for the Field Deployable Tritium Assay System (FDTAS - Invention Disclosure SRS-96-09-091 has been submitted). The program runs on the Host computer which is located in the Laboratory and connected to the FDTAS remote field system via a modem over a phone line. The operator receives status information and messages from the Remote system. The operator can enter in commands to be executed by the remote systemmore » using the mouse and a pull down menu.« less

  10. Astronaut Story Musgrave deploys HST solar array panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut F. Story Musgrave, anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Shuttle Endeavour's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm, aids the deployment of one of the solar array panels on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The action came during the final of five STS-61 space walks.

  11. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  12. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  13. Deployable robotic woven wire structures and joints for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahinpoor, MO; Smith, Bradford

    1991-01-01

    Deployable robotic structures are basically expandable and contractable structures that may be transported or launched to space in a compact form. These structures may then be intelligently deployed by suitable actuators. The deployment may also be done by means of either airbag or spring-loaded typed mechanisms. The actuators may be pneumatic, hydraulic, ball-screw type, or electromagnetic. The means to trigger actuation may be on-board EPROMS, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that trigger actuation based on some input caused by the placement of the structure in the space environment. The actuation may also be performed remotely by suitable remote triggering devices. Several deployable woven wire structures are examined. These woven wire structures possess a unique form of joint, the woven wire joint, which is capable of moving and changing its position and orientation with respect to the structure itself. Due to the highly dynamic and articulate nature of these joints the 3-D structures built using them are uniquely and highly expandable, deployable, and dynamic. The 3-D structure naturally gives rise to a new generation of deployable three-dimensional spatial structures.

  14. When Loved Ones Get Deployed

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? When Loved Ones Get Deployed KidsHealth > For Teens > When Loved Ones Get Deployed Print A A A Text Size ... for you and your family while your loved one is away. If your parent is deployed, you ...

  15. Joint for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, N. D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A joint is described for connecting a pair of beams to pivot them between positions in alignment or beside one another, which is of light weight and which operates in a controlled manner. The joint includes a pair of fittings and at least one center link having opposite ends pivotally connected to opposite fittings and having axes that pass through centerplates of the fittings. A control link having opposite ends pivotally connected to the different fittings controls their relative orientations, and a toggle assemly holds the fittings in the deployed configuration wherein they are aligned. The fittings have stops that lie on one side of the centerplane opposite the toggle assembly.

  16. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  17. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  18. ALMR deployment economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This analysis seeks to model and evaluate the economics of the use of Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors (ALMR) as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel). While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

  19. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  20. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papasin, Richard; Gawdiak, Yuri; Maluf, David A.; Leidich, Christopher; Tran, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    Remote Tower Sensor Systems (RTSS) are proof-of-concept prototypes being developed by NASA/Ames Research Center (NASA/ARC) with collaboration with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration). RTSS began with the deployment of an Airport Approach Zone Camera System that includes real-time weather observations at San Francisco International Airport. The goal of this research is to develop, deploy, and demonstrate remotely operated cameras and sensors at several major airport hubs and un-towered airports. RTSS can provide real-time weather observations of airport approach zone. RTSS will integrate and test airport sensor packages that will allow remote access to realtime airport conditions and aircraft status.

  1. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  2. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  3. Forward Deployed Robotic Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2000-07-01

    Forward Deployed Robotic Unit (FDRU) is a core science and technology objective of the US Army, which will demonstrate the impact of autonomous systems on all phases of future land warfare. It will develop, integrate and demonstrate technology required to achieve robotic and fire control capabilities for future land combat vehicles, e.g., Future Combat Systems, using a system of systems approach that culminates in a field demonstration in 2005. It will also provide the required unmanned assets and conduct the demonstration. Battle Lab Warfighting Experiments and data analysis required to understand the effects of unmanned assets on combat operations. The US Army Tank- Automotive & Armaments Command and the US Army Research Laboratory are teaming in an effort to leverage prior technology achievements in the areas of autonomous mobility, architecture, sensor and robotics system integration; advance the state-of-the-art in these areas; and to provide field demonstration/application of the technologies.

  4. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  5. Collaborating with McGregor and ASTD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Joan E.; Freeland, D. Kim

    A descriptive study using survey research techniques investigated the degree to which managerial philosophy was related to training and development professionals' acceptance and practice of those adult learning principles that support the collaborative teaching-learning mode. Data were collected from a random sample of 400 members of the American…

  6. ASTD Technical and Skills Training Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Leslie, Ed.

    This handbook is intended to serve as a hands-on reference for technical trainers, many of whom are resident experts in corporations who have been recruited from within the organization rather than individuals with training background. It contains 23 chapters by experts in the field: (1) The History of Technical Training (Richard A. Swanson and…

  7. Introduction to deployable recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.

    1985-08-01

    This report provides an introduction to deployable recovery systems for persons with little or no background in parachutes but who are knowledgeable in aerodynamics. A historical review of parachute development is given along with a description of the basic components of most deployable recovery systems. Descriptions are given of the function of each component and of problems that occur if a component fails to perform adequately. Models are presented for deployable recovery systems. Possible directions for future work are suggested in the summary.

  8. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  9. Tracking B-31 iceberg with two aircraft-deployed sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. H.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2015-06-01

    Icebergs are a natural hazard to maritime operations in polar regions. Iceberg populations are increasing, as is the demand for access to both Arctic and Antarctic seas. Soon the ability to reliably track icebergs may become a necessity for continued operational safety. The temporal and spatial coverage of remote sensing instruments is limited, and must be supplemented with in situ measurements. In this paper we describe the design of a tracking sensor that can be deployed from a fixed-wing aircraft during surveys of Antarctic icebergs, and detail the results of its first deployment operation on iceberg B-31.

  10. Two Concepts for Deployable Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Two concepts that could be applied separately or together have been suggested to enhance the utility of deployable truss structures. The concepts were intended originally for application to a truss structure to be folded for compact stowage during transport and subsequently deployed in outer space. The concepts may also be applicable, with some limitations, to deployable truss structures designed to be used on Earth. The first concept involves a combination of features that would help to maximize reliability of a structure while minimizing its overall mass, the complexity of its deployment system, and the expenditure of energy for deployment. The deployment system would be integrated into the truss: some of the truss members would contain folding/unfolding-detent mechanisms similar to those in umbrellas; other truss members would contain shape-memory-alloy (SMA) coil actuators (see Figure 1). Upon exposure to sunlight, the SMA actuators would be heated above their transition temperature, causing them to extend to their deployment lengths. The extension of the actuators would cause the structure to unfold and, upon completion of unfolding, the umbrellalike mechanisms would lock the unfolded truss in the fully deployed configuration. The use of solar heating to drive deployment would eliminate the need to carry a deployment power source. The actuation scheme would offer high reliability in that the truss geometry would be such that deployment could be completed even if all actuators were not functioning. Of course, in designing for operation in normal Earth gravitation, it would be necessary to ensure that the SMA actuators could apply forces large enough to overcome the deploymentresisting forces attributable to the weights of the members. The second concept is that of an improved design for the joints in folding members. Before describing this design,

  11. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  12. Brazil's remote sensing activities in the Eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, M. A.; Pereiradacunha, R.; Novaes, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the remote sensing activities in Brazil have been conducted by the Institute for Space Research (INPE). This report describes briefly INPE's activities in remote sensing in the last years. INPE has been engaged in research (e.g., radiance studies), development (e.g., CCD-scanners, image processing devices) and applications (e.g., crop survey, land use, mineral resources, etc.) of remote sensing. INPE is also responsible for the operation (data reception and processing) of the LANDSATs and meteorological satellites. Data acquisition activities include the development of CCD-Camera to be deployed on board the space shuttle and the construction of a remote sensing satellite.

  13. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  14. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    development of the new system using Java Enterprise technologies can better benefit from existing libraries to build up the single tokens implementing the IVOA standards. Each component can be built from single standards and each deployed service (i.e. service components instantiations) can consume the other components' exposed methods and services without the need of homogenizing them in dedicated libraries. Scalability can be achieved in an easier way by deploying components or sets of services on a distributed environment and using JNDI (Java Naming and Directory Interface) and RMI (Remote Method Invocation) technologies. Single service configuration will not be significantly different from the VO-Dance solution given that Java class instantiation that benefited from Java Reflection will only be moved to Java EJB pooling (and not, e.g. embedded in bundles for subsequent deployment).

  15. Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor for Deployable Reflector Antennas (SAMS DRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Specifications, system configurations, and concept tests for surface measurement sensors for deployable reflector antennas are presented. Two approaches toward the optical measurement of remote target displacements are discussed: optical ranging, in which the basic measurement is target-to-sensor range; and in particular, optical angular sensing, in which the principle measurements are of target angular displacements lateral to the line of sight. Four representative space antennas are examined.

  16. SMAP Launch and Deployment Sequence

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video combines file footage of a Delta II rocket and computer animation to depict the launch and deployment of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite. SMAP is scheduled to launch on Nov...

  17. High acceleration cable deployment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canning, T. N.; Barns, C. E.; Murphy, J. P.; Gin, B.; King, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A deployment system that will safely pay one cable from a ballistic forebody when the forebody is separated from an afterbody (to which the cable is secured and when the separation is marked by high acceleration and velocity) is described.

  18. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  19. Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  20. Using GPS Reflections for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickler, David

    2000-01-01

    GPS signals that have reflected off of the ocean's surface have shown potential for use in oceanographic and atmospheric studies. The research described here investigates the possible deployment of a GPS reflection receiver onboard a remote sensing satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The coverage and resolution characteristics of this receiver are calculated and estimated. This mission analysis examines using reflected GPS signals for several remote sensing missions. These include measurement of the total electron content in the ionosphere, sea surface height, and ocean wind speed and direction. Also discussed is the potential test deployment of such a GPS receiver on the space shuttle. Constellations of satellites are proposed to provide adequate spatial and temporal resolution for the aforementioned remote sensing missions. These results provide a starting point for research into the feasibility of augmenting or replacing existing remote sensing satellites with spaceborne GPS reflection-detecting receivers.

  1. The parenting cycle of deployment.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Ellen R; Ross, Abigail

    2012-02-01

    Parents of dependent children comprise approximately 42% of Active Duty and National Guard/Reserve military members serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recent estimates indicate that more than two million children have experienced parental deployment since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. This article seeks to characterize the impact of the deployment life cycle on parenting roles among service members and at-home partners/caregivers of dependent children. Specifically, a new conceptual framework is presented for considering the ways in which parenting and co-parenting processes are affected by the demands and transitions inherent in contemporary deployment to a war zone. Although the phase-based emotional cycle of deployment continues to offer an instructive description of the broad challenges faced by military couples, a parenting cycle of deployment model shifts the perspective to the critical and largely ignored processes of parenting in the context of deployment and war, and to the realities faced by parents serving in the U.S. military. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research related to military families are addressed. PMID:22360065

  2. Centrifugal regulator for control of deployment rates of deployable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermalle, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements, design, and performance of a centrifugal regulator aimed at limiting deployment rates of deployable elements are discussed. The overall mechanism is comprised of four distinct functional parts in a machined housing: (1) the centrifugal brake device, which checks the payout of a deployment cable; (2) the reducing gear, which produces the spin rate necesary for the braking device; (3) the payout device, which allows the unwinding of the cable; and (4) the locking device, which prevents untimely unwinding. The centrifugal regulator is set into operation by a threshold tension of the cable which unlocks the mechanism and allows unwinding. The pulley of the windout device drives the centrifugal brake with the help of the reducing gear. The centrifugal force pushes aside weights that produce friction of the studs in a cylindrical housing. The mechanism behaved well at qualification temperature and vibrations.

  3. The THOSE remote interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawon, Kevin; Gold, Josh; Bachman, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    The DIA, in conjunction with the Army Research Lab (ARL), wants to create an Unmanned Ground Sensor (UGS) controller that is (a) interoperable across all controller platforms, (b) capable of easily adding new sensors, radios, and processes and (c) backward compatible with existing UGS systems. To achieve this, a Terra Harvest controller was created that used Java JRE 1.6 and an Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi) platform, named Terra Harvest Open Software Environment (THOSE). OSGi is an extensible framework that provides a modularized environment for deploying functionality in "bundles". These bundles can publish, discover, and share services available from other external bundles or bundles provided by the controller core. With the addition of a web GUI used for interacting with THOSE, a natural step was then to create a common remote interface that allows 3rd party real-time interaction with the controller. This paper provides an overview of the THOSE system and its components as well as a description of the architectural structure of the remote interface, highlighting the interactions occurring between the controller and the remote interface and its role in providing a positive user experience for managing UGSS functions.

  4. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  5. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  6. Deployment of an Alternative Closure Cover and Monitoring System at the Mixed Waste Disposal Unit U-3ax/bl at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, D.G.; Fitzmaurice, T.M.

    2001-02-01

    In October 2000, final closure was initiated of U-3ax/bl, a mixed waste disposal unit at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The application of approximately 30 cm of topsoil, composed of compacted native alluvium onto an operational cover, seeding of the topsoil, installation of soil water content sensors within the cover, and deployment of a drainage lysimeter facility immediately adjacent to the disposal unit initiated closure. This closure is unique in that it required the involvement of several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) groups: Waste Management (WM), Environmental Restoration (ER), and Technology Development (TD). Initial site characterization of the disposal unit was conducted by WM. Regulatory approval for closure of the disposal unit was obtained by ER, closure of the disposal unit was conducted by ER, and deployment of the drainage lysimeter facility was conducted by WM and ER, with funding provided by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment ( ASTD) program, administered under TD. In addition, this closure is unique in that a monolayer closure cover, also known as an evapotranspiration (ET) cover, consisting of native alluvium, received regulatory approval instead of a traditional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) multi-layered cover. Recent studies indicate that in the arid southwestern United States, monolayer covers may be more effective at isolating waste than layered covers because of the tendency of clay layers to desiccate and crack, and subsequently develop preferential pathways. The lysimeter facility deployed immediately adjacent to the closure cover consists of eight drainage lysimeters with three surface treatments: two were left bare; two were revegetated with native species; two were allowed to revegetate with invader species; and two are reserved for future studies. The lysimeters are constructed such that any drainage through the bottoms of the lysimeters can be measured. Sensors installed in the

  7. View of the Palapa-B and the Shuttle Challenger after deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    View of the Palapa-B and the Shuttle Challenger begining their separation after deployment of the communications satellite. This view is from the aft windows on the flight deck. The Shuttle pallet satellite (SPAS-01A) is partly visible at lower center. The Canadian-built remote manipulator system (RMS) arm is in its stowed position at lower right. Both shields for the Palapa and the Westar VI satellite were opened for the deployment.

  8. Sample acquisition and instrument deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing the Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID) system, a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. The systems have been fabricated and tested in environmental chambers, as well as soil testing and robotic control testing.

  9. Future Radiometer Systems for Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Njoku, Eni G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper will describe a new exciting concept for using microwave systems for Earth remote sensing. This concept will use a 6-m diameter mesh deployable antenna with active and passive systems to provide moderate spatial resolution images at L and S-band microwave frequencies.

  10. Deployment of MAGDAS in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, G.; Yumoto, K.; Kakinami, Y.; Tokunaga, T.; Fujimoto, A.; Ikeda, A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Abe, S.; Sakai, M.; Eto, N.; Terada, H.; Shinohara, M.; Fujita, Y.; Matsuyama, K.

    2011-12-01

    The deployment of MAGDAS (MAGnetic Data Acquisition System) began in Africa in the Year 2006 with installations along the dip equator (or "geomagnetic equator") in three countries. In 2008, the 96 Deg. MM Chain was established, running from Hermanus, South Africa, to Fayum, Egypt. In 2010, a major upgrade was performed on the equatorial stations of MAGDAS.

  11. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains deploy) to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the CHEM structure can be rigidified by cooling below Tg to the glassy state. The structure could be subsequently reheated above Tg and recompacted. The compaction/deployment/rigidification cycle could be repeated as many times as needed.

  12. Optimal deployment of solar index

    SciTech Connect

    Croucher, Matt

    2010-11-15

    There is a growing trend, generally caused by state-specific renewable portfolio standards, to increase the importance of renewable electricity generation within generation portfolios. While RPS assist with determining the composition of generation they do not, for the most part, dictate the location of generation. Using data from various public sources, the authors create an optimal index for solar deployment. (author)

  13. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  14. Military Deployments: Evaluating Teacher Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the possible influence of a military deployment online tutorial on teacher knowledge. DoDEA and public school teachers were the two groups used for the study. From this exploratory study, the researcher also wanted to explore if teachers would find professional development provided in an online tutorial relevant…

  15. SATWG networked quality function deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Don

    1992-01-01

    The initiative of this work is to develop a cooperative process for continual evolution of an integrated, time phased avionics technology plan that involves customers, technologists, developers, and managers. This will be accomplished by demonstrating a computer network technology to augment the Quality Function Deployment (QFD). All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  16. Remote Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolch, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Imagine school district staff inputting school data and sharing it in real time, managing teacher absences and arranging substitutes from the comfort of home, or deploying IT personnel to the right site at the right time to tackle the highest-priority jobs first. The concept of managing applications from anywhere with a network connection, known…

  17. Packaging, deployment, and panel design concepts for a truss-stiffened 7-panel precision deployable reflector with feed boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Collins, Timothy J.; Dyess, James W.; Kenner, Scott; Bush, Harold G.

    1993-01-01

    A concept is presented for achieving a remotely deployable truss-stiffened reflector consisting of seven integrated sandwich panels that form the reflective surface, and an integrated feed boom. The concept has potential for meeting aperture size and surface precision requirements for some high-frequency microwave remote sensing applications. The packaged reflector/feed boom configuration is a self-contained unit that can be conveniently attached to a spacecraft bus. The package has a cylindrical envelope compatible with typical launch vehicle shrouds. Dynamic behavior of a deployed configuration having a 216-inch focal length and consisting of 80-inch-diameter, two-inch-thick panels is examined through finite-element analysis. Results show that the feed boom and spacecraft bus can have a large impact on the fundamental frequency of the deployed configuration. Two candidate rib-stiffened sandwich panel configurations for this application are described, and analytical results for panel mass and stiffness are presented. Results show that the addition of only a few rib stiffeners, if sufficiently deep, can efficiently improve sandwich panel stiffness.

  18. Digface characterization test plan (remote testing)

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, K.; Hyde, R.; Allen, S.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the Digface Characterization (DFC) Remote Testing project is to remotely deploy a sensor head (Mini-Lab) across a digface to determine if it can characterize the contents below the surface. The purpose of this project is to provide a robotics technology that allows removal of workers from hazards, increases speed of operations, and reduces life cycle costs compared to alternate methods and technologies. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of DFC. This document describes the test plan for the DFC remote deployment demonstration for the BWID. The purposes of the test plan are to establish test parameters so that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and perform the demonstration in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements.

  19. Deployable aerospace PV array based on amorphous silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Walter, Lee; Dobias, David; Flaisher, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The development of the first commercial, ultralight, flexible, deployable, PV array for aerospace applications is discussed. It is based on thin-film, amorphous silicon alloy, multijunction, solar cells deposited on a thin metal or polymer by a proprietary, roll-to-roll process. The array generates over 200 W at AM0 and is made of 20 giant cells, each 54 cm x 29 cm (1566 sq cm in area). Each cell is protected with bypass diodes. Fully encapsulated array blanket and the deployment mechanism weigh about 800 and 500 g, respectively. These data yield power per area ratio of over 60 W/sq m specific power of over 250 W/kg (4 kg/kW) for the blanket and 154 W/kg (6.5 kg/kW) for the power system. When stowed, the array is rolled up to a diameter of 7 cm and a length of 1.11 m. It is deployed quickly to its full area of 2.92 m x 1.11 m, for instant power. Potential applications include power for lightweight space vehicles, high altitude balloons, remotely piloted and tethered vehicles. These developments signal the dawning of a new age of lightweight, deployable, low-cost space arrays in the range from tens to tens of thousands of watts for near-term applications and the feasibility of multi-100 kW to MW arrays for future needs.

  20. Rapidly deployable emergency communication system

    DOEpatents

    Gladden, Charles A.; Parelman, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A highly versatile, highly portable emergency communication system which permits deployment in a very short time to cover both wide areas and distant isolated areas depending upon mission requirements. The system employs a plurality of lightweight, fully self-contained repeaters which are deployed within the mission area to provide communication between field teams, and between each field team and a mobile communication control center. Each repeater contains a microcomputer controller, the program for which may be changed from the control center by the transmission of digital data within the audible range (300-3,000 Hz). Repeaters are accessed by portable/mobile transceivers, other repeaters, and the control center through the transmission and recognition of digital data code words in the subaudible range.

  1. Arusha Rover Deployable Medical Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Tyrone; Hopson, Sonya; Marzette, Russell; Monroe, Gilena; Mustafa, Ruqayyah

    2014-01-01

    The NSBE Arusha rover concept offers a means of human transport and habitation during long-term exploration missions on the moon. This conceptual rover calls for the availability of medical supplies and equipment for crew members in order to aid in mission success. This paper addresses the need for a dedicated medical work station aboard the Arusha rover. The project team investigated multiple options for implementing a feasible deployable station to address both the medical and workstation layout needs of the rover and crew. Based on layout specifications and medical workstation requirements, the team has proposed a deployable workstation concept that can be accommodated within the volumetric constraints of the Arusha rover spacecraft

  2. Lunar roving vehicle deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, A. B.; Spacey, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    The space support equipment that supports the lunar roving vehicle during the flight to the moon and permits the vehicle to be deployed from the lunar module onto the lunar surface with a minimum amount of astronaut participation is discussed. The design and evolution of the equipment are reviewed. The success of the overall lunar roving vehicle design, including the space support equipment, was demonstrated on the Apollo 15 and 16 missions.

  3. Deployable M-Braced Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Tension/compression and shear separated structurally in deployable beam. M-Braced Sections Packaged using combination of hinges and telescoping sections. When upper sections telescope into base, diagonals hinge, telescope, and rotate along batten. Components of M-braced truss fabricated from conventional metallic materials or nonmetallic materials such as graphite/epoxy. Applications include masts for antenna feed horns and ribs for solar array blankets.

  4. Deployment of the Syncom IV (Leasat-2) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Deployment of the Syncom IV (Leasat-2) satellite by the STS 41-D crew. From the extreme aft portion of Discovery's cargo bay the Syncom IV satellite begins to separate, like a frisbee, from the shuttle orbiter. Other payloads and/or their support hardware in the payload bay (foreground to aft) are the OAST-1 package and the protective shield for the now vacated SBS-4 satellite. The Canadian-built remote manipulator system (RMS) arm rests at right. The earth's horizon can be seen at the top of the frame.

  5. Expected Deployment Dynamics of Proseds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M. L.; Welzyn, K.

    2003-01-01

    The control law for The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployment System (ProSEDS) deployment is a modification of the control routine that was successfully used in the flight of SEDS-II. Unlike SEDS, the tether of ProSEDS consists of different sections with different mechanical characteristics. A non-linear control trajectory in phase-space (i.e., the reference profile) is fed forward to the controller to guide the satellite, at the tether tip, to the desired final state under nominal conditions and no external perturbations. A linear feedback control is applied by the brake to keep the actual trajectory as close as possible to the reference. The paper also shows the results of simulations of deployment dynamics with and without noise. The control law has thus far been developed and tested on the ground for the original ProSEDS tether configuration of 15 km. A new reference will have to be designed and tested for other tether configurations.

  6. A programmable autosampler for a field deployable tritium analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Cable, P.R.; Beals, D.M.; Jones, J.

    1996-08-01

    Researchers in the Environmental Technology Section of the Savannah River Technology Center, in cooperation with Sampling Systems, Inc. are developing a fully programmable, remotely operated, fixed volume, automatic sampler for use with the field deployable tritium analysis system currently under development at U. of GA`s Center for Applied Isotope Studies. The sampler will collect a limited-volume sample and perform on-line sample purification for tritium analyses from multiple collection sites. Pneumatically operated stainless steel samplers operate satisfactorily upon remote activation. The one-step purification system removes all impurities with interfere with tritium analysis by liquid scintillation. Field testing has confirmed system operation. The autosampler may act as a stand-alone device and is enclosed in a rugged, field-portable case with wheels. The system weighs about 40 lbs.

  7. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  8. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  9. Deployable Molecular Detection of Arboviruses in the Australian Outback.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bradbury, Richard S; McInnes, Russell L; Frances, Stephen P; Merritt, Adam J; Levy, Avram; Nicholson, Jay; Neville, Peter J; Lindsay, Michael; Smith, David W

    2016-09-01

    The most common causes of human infection from the arboviruses that are endemic in Australia are the arthritogenic alphaviruses: Ross River virus (RRV) and Barmah Forest virus (BFV). The most serious infections are caused by the neurotropic flaviviruses, Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) and the Kunjin subtype of West Nile virus. The greatest individual risk of arbovirus infection occurs in tropical/subtropical northern Australia because of the warm, wet summer conditions from December to June, where conventional arbovirus surveillance is difficult due to a combination of low population density, large distances between population centers, poor roads, and seasonal flooding. Furthermore, virus detection requires samples to be sent to Perth up to 2,000 km away for definitive analysis, causing delays of days to weeks before test results are available and public health interventions can be started. We deployed a portable molecular biology laboratory for remote field detection of endemic arboviruses in northern Queensland, then in tropical Western Australia and detected BFV, MVEV, and RRV RNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of extracts from mosquitoes trapped in Queensland. We then used a field-portable compact real-time thermocycler for the samples collected in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Real-time field PCR assays enabled concurrent endemic arbovirus distribution mapping in outback Queensland and Western Australia. Our deployable laboratory method provides a concept of operations for future remote area arbovirus surveillance. PMID:27402516

  10. Supporting Knowledge Transfer in IS Deployment Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönström, Mikael

    To deploy new information systems is an expensive and complex task, and does seldom result in successful usage where the system adds strategic value to the firm (e.g. Sharma et al. 2003). It has been argued that innovation diffusion is a knowledge integration problem (Newell et al. 2000). Knowledge about business processes, deployment processes, information systems and technology are needed in a large-scale deployment of a corporate IS. These deployments can therefore to a large extent be argued to be a knowledge management (KM) problem. An effective deployment requires that knowledge about the system is effectively transferred to the target organization (Ko et al. 2005).

  11. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Deployment-Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) being positioned for release from the Space Shuttle orbiter by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS). The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is 42.5-feet (13- meters) long and weighs about 25,000 pounds (11,600 kilograms). The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  13. Deployment of the CMS software on the WLCG Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenhoff, W.; Wissing, C.; Kim, B.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Maes, J.; Maes, M.; Van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Vanelderen, L.

    2011-12-01

    The CMS Experiment is taking high energy collision data at CERN. The computing infrastructure used to analyse the data is distributed round the world in a tiered structure. In order to use the 7 Tier-1 sites, the 50 Tier-2 sites and a still growing number of about 30 Tier-3 sites, the CMS software has to be available at those sites. Except for a very few sites the deployment and the removal of CMS software is managed centrally. Since the deployment team has no local accounts at the remote sites all installation jobs have to be sent via Grid jobs. Via a VOMS role the job has a high priority in the batch system and gains write privileges to the software area. Due to the lack of interactive access the installation jobs must be very robust against possible failures, in order not to leave a broken software installation. The CMS software is packaged in RPMs that are installed in the software area independent of the host OS. The apt-get tool is used to resolve package dependencies. This paper reports about the recent deployment experiences and the achieved performance.

  14. Pediatric diseases and operational deployments.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2000-04-01

    Many nations now export military health as a proactive arm of the nation's contribution to the maintenance of international peace in trouble regions of the world; and all nations are called upon from time to time in emergency and disaster situations to help out in their regions of interest. Children and young teenagers constitute some 50% of war-stricken populations. This paper explores this increasingly important role of military medicine from the point of view of a practicing pediatrician and career doctor-soldier. Many international operational deployments undertaken in the last 5 years have required the insertion of pediatric clinical and preventive health resources. Deployments to Rwanda, the countries of the former Yugoslavia, Somalia, Bougainville (in Papua New Guinea), Irian Jaya (in Indonesia), and the Aitape tsunami disaster response (the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea) have all necessitated major pediatric interventions. In some operational deployments, in excess of one-third of patient and clinical contacts have involved the care of children, including clinical treatments ranging from life-saving resuscitation to the care of children with both tropical and subtropical illnesses. They have also involved mass immunization campaigns (e.g., in Rwanda) to prevent measles and meningococcal septicemia. In developing countries, at any time approximately 1 to 4 teenage and adult women is pregnant; and of these, 1 in 15 is suffering a miscarriage during any 2-week period. The implications of this audit are that service members must be multi-skilled not only in the traditional aspects of military medicine and nursing but also in (a) the developmental aspects of childhood; (b) the prevention of infectious childhood diseases by immunization and other means; (c) the recognition and management of diseases of childhood; and (d) the management of the normal neonate and infant, especially those orphaned in refugee disaster and other emergency situations. Doctor

  15. Method for deploying multiple spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharer, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for deploying multiple spacecraft is disclosed. The method can be used in a situation where a first celestial body is being orbited by a second celestial body. The spacecraft are loaded onto a single spaceship that contains the multiple spacecraft and the spacecraft is launched from the second celestial body towards a third celestial body. The spacecraft are separated from each other while in route to the third celestial body. Each of the spacecraft is then subjected to the gravitational field of the third celestial body and each of the spacecraft assumes a different, independent orbit about the first celestial body. In those situations where the spacecraft are launched from Earth, the Sun can act as the first celestial body, the Earth can act as the second celestial body and the Moon can act as the third celestial body.

  16. Ultrasonic inspection and deployment apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Mech, Jr., Stephen J.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic inspection apparatus for the inspection of metal structures, especially installed pipes. The apparatus combines a specimen inspection element, an acoustical velocity sensing element, and a surface profiling element, all in one scanning head. A scanning head bellows contains a volume of oil above the pipe surface, serving as acoustical couplant between the scanning head and the pipe. The scanning head is mounted on a scanning truck which is mobile around a circular track surrounding the pipe. The scanning truck has sufficient motors, gears, and position encoders to allow the scanning head six degrees of motion freedom. A computer system continually monitors acoustical velocity, and uses that parameter to process surface profiling and inspection data. The profiling data is used to automatically control scanning head position and alignment and to define a coordinate system used to identify and interpret inspection data. The apparatus is suitable for highly automated, remote application in hostile environments, particularly high temperature and radiation areas.

  17. Relatchable launch restraint mechanism for deployable booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A new Relatchable Launch Mechanism was developed which enables a deployable system to be restrained and released repeatedly rather than the normal one shot release systems of the past. The deployable systems are of the self extending type which rely on a lanyard attached to a drive motor to control the deployment and retraction. The Relatch Mechanism uses the existing drive motor to also actuate the latch. The design and kinematics of the Relatch Mechanism as used on two flight programs are described.

  18. Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing is measuring something without touching it. Most methods measure a portion of the electro-magnetic spectrum using energy reflected from or emitted by a material. Moving the instrument away makes it easier to see more at one time. Airplanes are good but satellites are much better. Many things can not be easily measured on the scale of an individual person. Example - measuring all the vegetation growing at one time in even the smallest country. A satellite can see things over large areas repeatedly and in a consistent way. Data from the detector is reported as digital values for a grid that covers some portion of the Earth. Because it is digital and consistent a computer can extract information or enhance the data for a specific purpose.

  19. Deployment mechanisms on Pioneer Venus probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, W. L.; Miyakawa, R. H.; Meadows, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    Deployment mechanisms were developed to position scientific instruments during probe descent into the Venus atmosphere. Each mechanism includes a provision for pyrotechnic release of the enclosure door, negator springs for positive deployment torque, and an active damper using a shunted dc motor. The deployment time requirement is under 2 seconds, and the deployment shock must be less than 100 g's. The mechanism is completely dry lubricated and constructed mainly of titanium for high strength and high temperature stability. The mechanism was qualified for descent decelerations up to 565 g's and for instrument alignment up to 940 F. The mechanism requirements, the hardware design details, the analytical simulations, and the qualification testing are described.

  20. Deployable and retractable telescoping tubular structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new deployable and retractable telescoping boom capable of high deployed stiffness and strength is described. Deployment and retraction functions are controlled by simple, reliable, and fail-safe latches between the tubular segments. The latch and a BI-STEM (Storable Tubular Extendible Member) actuator work together to eliminate the need for the segments to overlap when deployed. This yields an unusually lightweight boom and compact launch configuration. An aluminum space-flight prototype with three joints displays zero structural deadband, low hysteresis, and high damping. The development approach and difficulties are discussed. Test results provide a joint model for sizing flight booms of any diameter and length.

  1. GPM Solar Array Gravity Negated Deployment Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, Jonathan; Johnson, Chris; Lewis, Jesse; Dear, Trevin; Stewart, Alphonso

    2014-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) successfully developed a g-negation support system for use on the solar arrays of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Satellite. This system provides full deployment capability at the subsystem and observatory levels. In addition, the system provides capability for deployed configuration first mode frequency verification testing. The system consists of air pads, a support structure, an air supply, and support tables. The g-negation support system was used to support all deployment activities for flight solar array deployment testing.

  2. KOMPSAT Satellite Launch and Deployment Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Myung-Jin; Chang, Young-Keun; Lee, Jin-Ho

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, KOMPSAT satellite launch and deployment operations are discussed. The U.S. Taurus launch vehicle delivers KOMPSAT satellite into the mission orbit directly. Launch and deployment operations is monitored and controlled by several international ground stations including Korean Ground Station (KGS). After separation from launch vehicle, KOMPSAT spacecraft deploys solar array by on-board autonomous stored commands without ground inter-vention and stabilizes the satellite such that solar arrays point to the sun. Autonomous ground communication is designed for KOMPSAT for the early orbit ground contact. KOMPSAT space-craft has capability of handing contingency situation by on-board fault management design to retry deployment sequence.

  3. VisPortal: Deploying grid-enabled visualization tools through a web-portal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, Wes; Siegerist, Cristina; Shalf, John; Shetty, Praveenkumar; Jankun-Kelly, T.J.; Kreylos, Oliver; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2003-06-09

    The LBNL/NERSC Visportal effort explores ways to deliver advanced Remote/Distributed Visualization (RDV) capabilities through a Grid-enabled web-portal interface. The effort focuses on latency tolerant distributed visualization algorithms, GUI designs that are more appropriate for the capabilities of web interfaces, and refactoring parallel-distributed applications to work in a N-tiered component deployment strategy. Most importantly, our aim is to leverage commercially-supported technology as much as possible in order to create a deployable, supportable, and hence viable platform for delivering grid-based visualization services to collaboratory users.

  4. Family adjustment of deployed and non-deployed mothers in families with a parent deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; McMorris, Barbara J.; Hanson, Sheila; Davis, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    Almost nothing is known about the family and individual adjustment of military mothers who have deployed to the conflicts in Iraq or Afghanistan (Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn; OIF, OEF, OND), constituting a gap in psychologists’ knowledge about how best to help this population. We report baseline data on maternal, child, parenting, and couple adjustment for mothers in 181 families in which a parent deployed to OIF/OEF/OND. Among this sample, 34 mothers had deployed at least once, and 147 mothers had experienced the deployment of a male spouse/partner. Mothers completed self-report questionnaires assessing past year adverse life events, war experiences (for deployed mothers only), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, difficulties in emotion regulation, parenting, couple adjustment, and child functioning. Mothers who had deployed reported greater distress than non-deployed mothers (higher scores on measures of PTSD and depression symptoms), and slightly more past year adverse events. A moderate number of war experiences (combat and post-battle aftermath events) were reported, consistent with previous studies of women in current and prior conflicts. However, no differences were found between the two groups on measures of couple adjustment, parenting, or child functioning. Results are discussed in terms of the dearth of knowledge about deployed mothers, and implications for psychologists serving military families. PMID:25663739

  5. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.; Killian, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  6. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.; Killian, M.A.

    1993-03-02

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  7. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  8. Mechanically scanned deployable antenna study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Mechanically Scanned Deployable Antenna which is launched by the STS (Space Shuttle) to provide radiometric brightness temperature maps of the Earth and oceans at selected frequency bands in the frequency range of 1.4 GHz to 11 GHz is presented. Unlike previous scanning radiometric systems, multiple radiometers for each frequency are required in order to fill in the resolution cells across the swath created by the 15 meter diameter spin stabilized system. This multiple beam radiometric system is sometimes designated as a ""whiskbroom'' system in that it combines the techniques of the scanning and ""pushbroom'' type systems. The definition of the feed system including possible feed elements and location, determination of the fundamental reflector feed offset geometry including offset angles and f/D ratio, preliminary estimates of the beam efficiency of the feed reflector system, a summary of reflector mesh losses at the proposed radiometric frequency bands, an overall conceptual configuration design and preliminary structural and thermal analyses are included.

  9. Smart Cards and remote entrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussel, Jean-Daniel; D'Annoville, Jerome; Castillo, Laurent; Durand, Stephane; Fabre, Thierry; Lu, Karen; Ali, Asad

    Smart cards are widely used to provide security in end-to-end communication involving servers and a variety of terminals, including mobile handsets or payment terminals. Sometime, end-to-end server to smart card security is not applicable, and smart cards must communicate directly with an application executing on a terminal, like a personal computer, without communicating with a server. In this case, the smart card must somehow trust the terminal application before performing some secure operation it was designed for. This paper presents a novel method to remotely trust a terminal application from the smart card. For terminals such as personal computers, this method is based on an advanced secure device connected through the USB and consisting of a smart card bundled with flash memory. This device, or USB dongle, can be used in the context of remote untrusting to secure portable applications conveyed in the dongle flash memory. White-box cryptography is used to set the secure channel and a mechanism based on thumbprint is described to provide external authentication when session keys need to be renewed. Although not as secure as end-to-end server to smart card security, remote entrusting with smart cards is easy to deploy for mass-market applications and can provide a reasonable level of security.

  10. Multiple node remote messaging

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-08-31

    A method for passing remote messages in a parallel computer system formed as a network of interconnected compute nodes includes that a first compute node (A) sends a single remote message to a remote second compute node (B) in order to control the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message. The method includes various steps including controlling a DMA engine at first compute node (A) to prepare the single remote message to include a first message descriptor and at least one remote message descriptor for controlling the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message, including putting the first message descriptor into an injection FIFO at the first compute node (A) and sending the single remote message and the at least one remote message descriptor to the second compute node (B).

  11. Self-deploying photovoltaic power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A lightweight flexible photovoltaic (PV) blanket is attached to a support structure of initially stowed telescoping members. The deployment mechanism comprises a series of extendable and rotatable columns. As these columns are extended the PV blanket is deployed to its proper configuration.

  12. Military Children: When Parents Are Deployed Overseas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimons, Virginia M.; Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Armed Services and Reserve Unit Members, both male and female, are being deployed to distant lands for long periods of time, disrupting family life and causing stressful times for the adults and children in the family. Traditionally, the mother of the military family was left to be the caregiver after the deployment of the…

  13. Deployable System for Crash-Load Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    An externally deployable honeycomb structure is investigated with respect to crash energy management for light aircraft. The new concept utilizes an expandable honeycomb-like structure to absorb impact energy by crushing. Distinguished by flexible hinges between cell wall junctions that enable effortless deployment, the new energy absorber offers most of the desirable features of an external airbag system without the limitations of poor shear stability, system complexity, and timing sensitivity. Like conventional honeycomb, once expanded, the energy absorber is transformed into a crush efficient and stable cellular structure. Other advantages, afforded by the flexible hinge feature, include a variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid deployment methods. Radial deployment is utilized when omnidirectional cushioning is required. Linear deployment offers better efficiency, which is preferred when the impact orientation is known in advance. Several energy absorbers utilizing different deployment modes could also be combined to optimize overall performance and/or improve system reliability as outlined in the paper. Results from a series of component and full scale demonstration tests are presented as well as typical deployment techniques and mechanisms. LS-DYNA analytical simulations of selected tests are also presented.

  14. The Lab Without Walls: A Deployable Approach to Tropical Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Timothy J. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Laboratory Without Walls is a modular field application of molecular biology that provides clinical laboratory support in resource-limited, remote locations. The current repertoire arose from early attempts to deliver clinical pathology and public health investigative services in remote parts of tropical Australia, to address the shortcomings of conventional methods when faced with emerging infectious diseases. Advances in equipment platforms and reagent chemistry have enabling rapid progress, but also ensure the Laboratory Without Walls is subject to continual improvement. Although new molecular biology methods may lead to more easily deployable clinical laboratory capability, logistic and technical governance issues continue to act as important constraints on wider implementation. PMID:23553225

  15. A deployable telescope imaging system with coilable tensegrity structure for microsatellite application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chao; Li, Chuang; Zhou, Nan

    2013-08-01

    Microsatellites will be widely applied as an earth-observing platform in coming future for their low costs. Such satellite missions require optical payloads with low cost, low mass and small volume. In order to meet these requirements, one way is to develop deployable telescopes. They not only maintain the capabilities of the traditional non-deployable telescopes, but also have compacter launch volume and lighter weight. We investigate a telescope with precise deployable structure based on coilable tensegrity. Before launch, the secondary mirror support structure is coiled, and when the satellite is in orbit, the secondary mirror is deployed with the elastic strain energy from the coiled longerons. There are mainly three parts in this paper. Firstly, the telescope optics is presented. A Ritchey-Chretien (RC) type optical system with 150mm aperture is designed. Secondly, the deployable telescope structure is designed for the RC system. The deployable structure mainly consists of coilable longerons, batten rings, and diagonal stringers. The finite element method (FEM) is used to analyze the dynamics of the unfolded telescope structure. Thirdly, the adjusting mechanism for secondary mirror is discussed. Piezoelectric actuators can be used to achieve remote alignment to improve the performance of the imaging system.

  16. AIRSAR South American deployment: Operation plan, version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, M.

    1993-01-01

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Brazilian Commission for Space Activities (COBAE) are undertaking a joint experiment involving NASA's DC-8 research aircraft and the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) system during late May and June 1993. The research areas motivating these activities are: (1) fundamental research in the role of soils, vegetation, and hydrology in the global carbon cycle; and (2) in cooperation with South American scientists, airborne remote sensing research for the upcoming NASA Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR)-C/X-SAR flights on the Space Shuttle. A flight schedule and plans for the deployment that were developed are included. Maps of the site locations and schematic indications of flight routes and dates, plots showing swath locations derived from the flight requests and generated by flight planning software, and, most importantly, a calendar showing which sites will be imaged each day are included.

  17. A rapid-deployable imaging system for environmental system studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidley, Carl; Bachnak, Ray; Sadovski, Alexey; Mayfield, Chad; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes an Airborne Multi-Spectral Imaging System (AMIS) and the development of its system software. This system has been developed so as to be rapidly deployed in response to episodic events such as hurricanes and tropical storms which may occur year round in coastal zones. The system uses digital video cameras to provide high resolution images at a very high collection rate. The system is software controlled so as to provide a minimum distraction for the aircraft pilot by providing for the remote manipulation of the camera and the GPS receiver. The system is viable for many applications that require good resolution at low cost. Such applications include vegetation detection, oceanography, marine biology, and environmental coastal science analysis.

  18. Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1997-07-01

    An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges.

  19. A rapid-deployable imaging system for environmental system studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidley, Carl W.; Bachnak, Rafic; Dannelly, R. Stephen; Mayfield, Chad; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes an Airborne Multi-Spectral Imaging System (AMIS) and the development of its system software. This system has been developed so as to be rapidly deployed in response to episodic events such as hurricanes and tropical storms which may occur year round in coastal zones. The system uses digital video cameras to provide high resolution images at a very high collection rate. The system is software controlled so as to provide a minimum distraction for the aircraft pilot by providing for the remote manipulation of the camera and the GPS receiver. The system is viable for many applications that require good resolution at low cost. Such applications include vegetation detection, oceanography, marine biology, and environmental coastal science analysis.

  20. Rocket experiment on microwave power transmission with Furoshiki deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Nobuyuki; Iwashita, Masashi; Tanaka, Kohei; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Summerer, Leopold

    2009-07-01

    Huge antennas has many useful applications in space as well as on the ground, for example, Solar Power Satellite to provide electricity to the ground, telecommunication for cellular phones, radars for remote sensing, navigation and observation, and so on. The S-310-36 sounding rocket was successfully launched on 22 January 2006 to verify our newly proposed scheme to construct huge antennas under microgravity condition in space. The rocket experiment has three main objectives, the first objective of which is to verify the Furoshiki deployment system [S. Nakasuka, R. Funase, K. Nakada, N. Kaya, J. Mankins, Large membrane "FUROSHIKI Satellite" applied to phased array antenna and its sounding rocket experiment, in: Proceedings of the 54th International Astronautical Congress, 2003. [1

  1. STS-48 ESC closeup of UARS solar array unfolding during pre-deployment check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The partially deployed solar array (SA) of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) and the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm are documented in this electronic still camera (ESC) image. UARS, grappled by the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector (out of frame), is undergoing STS-48 pre-deployment checkout above the payload bay (PLB) of the earth-orbiting Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. At the top of the frames is UARS' solar stellar pointing platform (SSPP). This ESC image was documented as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography. The digital image was stored on a removable hard disk or small optical disk, and could be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission.

  2. Multispectral remote sensing from unmanned aircraft: image processing workflows and applications for rangeland environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as remote sensing platforms offers the unique ability for repeated deployment for acquisition of high temporal resolution data at very high spatial resolution. Most image acquisitions from UAS have been in the visible bands, while multispectral remote sensing ap...

  3. Open Path Trace Gas Laser Sensors for UAV Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadman, S.; Mchale, L.; Rose, C.; Yalin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Novel trace gas sensors based on open-path Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy (CRDS) are being developed to enable remote and mobile deployments including on small unmanned aerial systems (UAS). Relative to established closed-path CRDS instruments, the use of open-path configurations allows removal of the bulky and power hungry vacuum and flow system, potentially enabling lightweight and low power instruments with high sensitivity. However, open path operation introduces new challenges including the need to maintain mirror cleanliness, mitigation of particle optical effects, and the need to measure spectral features that are relatively broad. The present submission details open-path CRDS instruments for ammonia and methane and their planned use in UAS studies. The ammonia sensor uses a quantum cascade laser at 10.3 mm in a configuration in which the laser frequency is continuously swept and a trigger circuit and acousto-optic modulator (AOM) extinguish the light when the laser is resonant with the cavity. Ring-down signals are measured with a two-stage thermoelectrically cooled MCT photodetector. The cavity mirrors have reflectivity of 0.9995 and a noise equivalent absorption of 1.5 ppb Hz-1/2 was demonstrated. A first version of the methane sensor operated at 1.7um with a telecom diode laser while the current version operates at 3.6 um with an interband cascade laser (stronger absorption). We have performed validation measurements against known standards for both sensors. Compact optical assemblies are being developed for UAS deployment. For example, the methane sensor head will have target mass of <4 kg and power draw <40 W. A compact single board computer and DAQ system is being designed for sensor control and signal processing with target mass <1 kg and power draw <10 W. The sensor size and power parameters are suitable for UAS deployment on both fixed wing and rotor style UAS. We plan to deploy the methane sensor to measure leakage and emission of methane from

  4. [Thematic Issue: Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Four of the articles in this publication discuss the remote sensing of the Earth and its resources by satellites. Among the topics dealt with are the development and management of remote sensing systems, types of satellites used for remote sensing, the uses of remote sensing, and issues involved in using information obtained through remote…

  5. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  6. Miniature field deployable terahertz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, Mark G.

    2006-05-01

    Developments in terahertz sources include compacted electron beam systems, optical mixing techniques, and multiplication of microwave frequencies. Although significant advances in THz science have been achieved, efforts continue to obtain source technologies that are more mobile and suitable for field deployment. Strategies in source development have approached generation from either end of the THz spectrum, from up-conversion of high-frequency microwave to down-conversion of optical frequencies. In this paper, we present the design of a THz source which employs an up-conversion method in an assembly that integrates power supply, electronics, and radiative component into a man-portable unit for situations in which a lab system is not feasible. This unit will ultimately evolve into a ruggedized package suitable for use in extreme conditions, e.g. temporary security check points or emergency response teams, in conditions where THz diagnostics are needed with minimal planning or logistical support. In order to meet design goals of reduced size and complexity, the inner workings of the unit ideally would be condensed into a monolithic active element, with ancillary systems, e.g. user interface and power, coupled to the element. To attain these goals, the fundamental component of our design is a THz source and lens array that may be fabricated with either printed circuit board or wafer substrate. To reduce the volume occupied by the source array, the design employs a metamaterial composed of a periodic lattice of resonant elements. Each resonant element is an LC oscillator, or tank circuit, with inductance, capacitance, and center frequency determined by dimensioning and material parameters. The source array and supporting electronics are designed so that the radiative elements are driven in-phase to yield THz radiation with a high degree of partial coherence. Simulation indicates that the spectral width of operation may be controlled by detuning of critical dimensions

  7. STS-46 MS-PLC Hoffman monitors EURECA deploy from OV-104's aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jeffrey A. Hoffman, wearing polarized goggles (sunglasses), monitors the European Retrievable Carrier 1L (EURECA-1L) satellite deploy from the aft flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The remote manipulator system arm's 'Canada' insignia is visible in aft flight deck viewing window W10. Hoffman's left hand is positioned at overhead window W8.

  8. ROI, Pitfalls and Best Practices with an Enterprise Smart Card Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Philip

    This paper will describe the highlights of the ActivIdentity sponsored Datamonitor study into Return On Investment (ROI) when implementing smart cards in the enterprise in the following areas: physical and logical access convergence, remote access when replacing OTP tokens and Enterprise Single Sign-On. It also provides additional information about the pitfalls to avoid when implementing smart cards and describes best practices for deployment.

  9. MARSIS antenna flight deployment anomaly and resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Douglas S.; Mobrem, Mehran

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the resolution of an in flight anomaly that occurred during the deployment of the first of three MARSIS antenna booms. Characteristics of this deployment are described, along with a correlation to finite element models and measured spacecraft inertias, which allowed the intermediate state of the boom to be accurately determined. Based on this information, a spacecraft maneuver was performed that warmed the stalled hinge and led to the first boom successfully locking into its designed geometry. The confirmed partially deployed boom shape was then used to develop a thermal model of the stalled hinge both in its initial solar attitude and during the successful spacecraft maneuver. Results from the hinge thermal model and component level testing were evaluated in order to determine the root cause of the anomaly and the probability of its recurrence on subsequent deployments. These conclusions were then utilized in planning mitigating actions that were implemented during the remaining two boom deployments. Final flight data are presented for both dipole booms indicating a correctly deployed and healthy antenna. The monopole boom deployment was detected but the final state of the boom is unknown.

  10. Remote-handling challenges in fusion research and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Rob; Loving, Antony

    2016-05-01

    Energy-producing nuclear fusion reactions taking place in tokamaks cause radiation damage and radioactivity. Remote-handling technology for repairing and replacing in-vessel components has evolved enormously over the past two decades -- and is now being deployed elsewhere too.

  11. High Speed Lunar Navigation for Crewed and Remotely Piloted Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, L.; Allan, M.; To, V.; Utz, H.; Wojcikiewicz, W.; Chautems, C.

    2010-01-01

    Increased navigation speed is desirable for lunar rovers, whether autonomous, crewed or remotely operated, but is hampered by the low gravity, high contrast lighting and rough terrain. We describe lidar based navigation system deployed on NASA's K10 autonomous rover and to increase the terrain hazard situational awareness of the Lunar Electric Rover crew.

  12. Solar Thermal Vacuum Test of Deployable Astromesh Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    On September 10, 2008, a 36-hour Solar Thermal Vacuum Test of a 5m deployable mesh reflector was completed in JPL's 25' Space Simulator by the Advanced Deployable Structures Group at JPL. The testing was performed under NASA's Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) as a risk reduction effort for two JPL Decadal Survey Missions: DESDynI and SMAP. The 5.0 m aperture Astromesh reflector was provided by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) Astro Aerospace, our IPP industry partner. The testing utilized a state-of-the-art photogrammetry system to measure deformation of the reflector under LN2 cold soak, 0.25 Earth sun, 0.5 sun and 1.0 sun. An intricate network of thermocouples (approximately 200 in total) was used to determine the localized temperature across the mesh as well as on the perimeter truss of the reflector. Half of the reflector was in a fixed shadow to maximize thermal gradients. A mobility system was built for remotely actuating the cryo-vacuum capable photogrammetry camera around the circumference of the Solar Simulator. Photogrammetric resolution of 0.025 mm RMS (0.001") was achieved over the entire 5 meter aperture for each test case. The data will be used for thermo-elastic model correlation and validation, which will benefit the planned Earth Science Missions.

  13. STS-48 ESC closeup of extended UARS solar array (SA) during pre-deploy check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The leading edge of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) solar array (SA), fully deployed, is recorded by the electronic still camera (ESC). UARS, grappled by the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector (out of frame), is undergoing STS-48 pre-deployment checkout above the payload bay (PLB) of the earth-orbiting Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. A hinge and the pyrotechnic bolts that enable the SA to deploy can be seen in this crisp image. This view demonstrates the capabilities of the ESC to provide high resolution views of hardware for review by ground controllers. This ESC image was documented as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography. The digital image was stored on a removable hard disk or small optical disk, and could be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission.

  14. Large deployable antenna program. Phase 1: Technology assessment and mission architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Craig A.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1991-01-01

    The program was initiated to investigate the availability of critical large deployable antenna technologies which would enable microwave remote sensing missions from geostationary orbits as required for Mission to Planet Earth. Program goals for the large antenna were: 40-meter diameter, offset-fed paraboloid, and surface precision of 0.1 mm rms. Phase 1 goals were: to review the state-of-the-art for large, precise, wide-scanning radiometers up to 60 GHz; to assess critical technologies necessary for selected concepts; to develop mission architecture for these concepts; and to evaluate generic technologies to support the large deployable reflectors necessary for these missions. Selected results of the study show that deployable reflectors using furlable segments are limited by surface precision goals to 12 meters in diameter, current launch vehicles can place in geostationary only a 20-meter class antenna, and conceptual designs using stiff reflectors are possible with areal densities of 2.4 deg/sq m.

  15. Starshade Shape Tolerances and Mechanical Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Dean; Glassman, T.; NWO Study Team

    2009-01-01

    Starshade Shape Tolerances and Mechanical Deployment Dean Dailey, Tiffany Glassman, NWO Study Team The primary purpose of the New Worlds Observer (NWO) Starshade is to suppress the light from a star to 10-10 without blocking the light from planets in the habitable zone of that star. In order to successfully deploy a properly functioning Starshade 10s of meters in diameter, we must know precisely how much the shape of the Starshade is allowed to deviate from the theoretical profile without causing its performance to fall below the established threshold. We use a simulation of the optical performance of the Starshade to establish the tolerance of the Starshade to various shape deformations. These Starshade shape tolerance terms are combined into a budget set of the maximum level of tolerable deformations. These budgets become the deployed dimensional stability requirements for structural engineering to use in accessing competing deployment concepts. The effects that we consider to determine if a deployment scheme will meet the shape tolerance requirements include: 1. Mechanical piece-part manufacturing error 2. Mechanical assembly errors 3. 1 G assembly shape verification error 4. Launch Shift 5. Deployment repeatability errors 6. Thermal distortion errors 7. On-orbit dynamics - jitter 8. CME errors (coefficient of moisture expansion) 9. Contamination errors Deployed dimensional stability performance margins can then be determined for each deployment concept over each shape distortion effect and a suitable deployment concept can be selected. Each of these effects are described along with the sensitivity analysis to their contribution to the overall performance.

  16. A Rover Deployed Ground Penetrating Radar on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Campbell, B. A.; Schutz, A. E.

    2001-01-01

    Radar is a fundamental tool capable of addressing a variety of geological problems on Mars via collection of data suitable for interpreting variations in surface morphology and reflectivity. Surface-deployed ground penetrating radar (GPR) can help further constrain the geology and structure of the near surface of Mars by directly measuring the range and character of in situ radar properties. In recognition of this potential, a miniaturized, easily modified GPR is being developed for possible deployment on a future Mars rover and will enable definition of radar stratigraphy at high spatial resolution to depths of 10-20 meters. Ongoing development of a Mars impulse GPR with industry partners at Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc., focuses on design and testing of a prototype transducer array (with both high frequency bistatic and low frequency monostatic components) in parallel with fabrication of a low power, mass, and volume control unit. The operational depth of 10-20 meters is geared towards definition of stratigraphy, subsurface blocks, and structure at the decimeter to meter scale that is critical for establishing the geologic setting of the rover. GPR data can also be used to infer the degree of any post-depositional pedogenic alteration or weathering that has subsequently taken place, thereby enabling assessment of pristine versus secondary morphology at the landing site. As is the case for most remote sensing instruments, a GPR may not detect water unambiguously. Nevertheless, any local, near-surface occurrence of liquid water will lead to large, easily detected dielectric contrasts. Moreover, definition of stratigraphy and setting will help in evaluating the history of aqueous activity and where any water might occur and be accessible. Most importantly perhaps, GPR can provide critical context for other rover and orbital instruments/data sets. Hence, GPR deployment along well positioned transects in the vicinity of a lander should enable 3-D mapping of

  17. Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities - MRW Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mathew; Bowen, Brian; Coles, Dwight; Cleal, Thomas; Quarles, Elliott; Gurule, Kaitlyn; Kagie, Matthew

    2014-09-18

    The Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities consists the these three components: MAD: Utility designed to automate the deployment of java applications to multiple java application servers. The product contains a front end web utility and backend deployment scripts. MAR: Web front end to maintain and update the components inside database. MWR-Encrypt: Web utility to convert a text string to an encrypted string that is used by the Oracle Weblogic application server. The encryption is done using the built in functions if the Oracle Weblogic product and is mainly used to create an encrypted version of a database password.

  18. Dynamic Deployment Simulations of Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of using Control Volume (CV) method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method in LSDYNA to simulate the dynamic deployment of inflatable space structures is investigated. The CV and ALE methods were used to predict the inflation deployments of three folded tube configurations. The CV method was found to be a simple and computationally efficient method that may be adequate for modeling slow inflation deployment sine the inertia of the inflation gas can be neglected. The ALE method was found to be very computationally intensive since it involves the solving of three conservative equations of fluid as well as dealing with complex fluid structure interactions.

  19. Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities - MRW Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-18

    The Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities consists the these three components: MAD: Utility designed to automate the deployment of java applications to multiple java application servers. The product contains a front end web utility and backend deployment scripts. MAR: Web front end to maintain and update the components inside database. MWR-Encrypt: Web utility to convert a text string to an encrypted string that is used by the Oracle Weblogic application server. The encryption is done usingmore » the built in functions if the Oracle Weblogic product and is mainly used to create an encrypted version of a database password.« less

  20. Deployable M-braced truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, M. M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, M. D. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A deployable M-braced truss structure, efficiently packaged into a compact stowed position and expandable to an operative position at the use site is described. The M-braced configuration effectively separates tension compression and shear in the structure and permits efficient structural design. Both diagonals and longerons telescope from an M-braced base unit and deploy either pneumatically, mechanically by springs or cables, or by powered reciprocating mechanisms. Upon full deployment, the diagonals and longerons lock into place with a simple latch mechanism.

  1. Mojave remote sensing field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Petroy, S. B.; Plaut, J. J.; Shepard, Michael K.; Evans, D.; Farr, T.; Greeley, Ronald; Gaddis, L.; Lancaster, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mojave Remote Sensing Field Experiment (MFE), conducted in June 1988, involved acquisition of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS); C, L, and P-band polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data; and simultaneous field observations at the Pisgah and Cima volcanic fields, and Lavic and Silver Lake Playas, Mojave Desert, California. A LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scene is also included in the MFE archive. TM-based reflectance and TIMS-based emissivity surface spectra were extracted for selected surfaces. Radiative transfer procedures were used to model the atmosphere and surface simultaneously, with the constraint that the spectra must be consistent with field-based spectral observations. AIRSAR data were calibrated to backscatter cross sections using corner reflectors deployed at target sites. Analyses of MFE data focus on extraction of reflectance, emissivity, and cross section for lava flows of various ages and degradation states. Results have relevance for the evolution of volcanic plains on Venus and Mars.

  2. Energy scavenging for long-term deployable wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Mathúna, Cian O; O'Donnell, Terence; Martinez-Catala, Rafael V; Rohan, James; O'Flynn, Brendan

    2008-05-15

    The coming decade will see the rapid emergence of low cost, intelligent, wireless sensors and their widespread deployment throughout our environment. While wearable systems will operate over communications ranges of less than a meter, building management systems will operate with inter-node communications ranges of the order of meters to tens of meters and remote environmental monitoring systems will require communications systems and associated energy systems that will allow reliable operation over kilometers. Autonomous power should allow wireless sensor nodes to operate in a "deploy and forget" mode. The use of rechargeable battery technology is problematic due to battery lifetime issues related to node power budget, battery self-discharge, number of recharge cycles and long-term environmental impact. Duty cycling of wireless sensor nodes with long "SLEEP" times minimises energy usage. A case study of a multi-sensor, wireless, building management system operating using the Zigbee protocol demonstrates that, even with a 1 min cycle time for an 864 ms "ACTIVE" mode, the sensor module is already in SLEEP mode for almost 99% of the time. For a 20-min cycle time, the energy utilisation in SLEEP mode exceeds the ACTIVE mode energy by almost a factor of three and thus dominates the module energy utilisation thereby providing the ultimate limit to the power system lifetime. Energy harvesting techniques can deliver energy densities of 7.5 mW/cm(2) from outdoor solar, 100 microW/cm(2) from indoor lighting, 100 microW/cm(3) from vibrational energy and 60 microW/cm(2) from thermal energy typically found in a building environment. A truly autonomous, "deploy and forget" battery-less system can be achieved by scaling the energy harvesting system to provide all the system energy needs. In the building management case study discussed, for duty cycles of less than 0.07% (i.e. in ACTIVE mode for 0.864 s every 20 min), energy harvester device dimensions of approximately 2 cm on a

  3. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  4. Cooler Deployment, GOES J on ATLAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video release presents footage of workcrews overseeing the cooler deployment on the GOES-J weather satellite that will be launched on the Atlas Centaur rocket from Complex 36 at the Cape Canaveral Air Station.

  5. Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-05-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop, held on March 12–13, 2014, at Argonne National Laboratory.

  6. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55-m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  7. Coronary angioscopy before and after stent deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Scott J.; Schatz, Richard A.; Rocha-Singh, Krishna J.; Wong, S. Chiu; Morris, Nancy A.; Strumpf, Robert K.; Heuser, Richard R.; Teirstein, Paul

    1993-09-01

    Coronary angioscopy was used in an attempt to visualize the internal architecture of cardiac vessels before and after deployment of Palmaz-Schatz stents in 50 patients. The vessel was successfully visualized in 48 (96%) of these patients. In 24 patients, angioscopy was performed both after preliminary balloon angioplasty and then again after stent deployment. In all 24 patients the diameter of the lumen appeared larger after stent deployment as compared to after balloon angioplasty. In 16 of these 24 patients a dissection was documented by angioscopy after balloon angioplasty. The dissection was absent after stent deployment in all 16 patients. In seven patients, thrombus that was not apparent by angiography was visualized by angioscopy. Moreover, in four patients, thrombus that was suggested by angiography could not be confirmed by angioscopy.

  8. Deployable radiator with flexible line loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Bryan V. (Inventor); Lehtinen, Arthur Mathias (Inventor); McGee, Billy W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Radiator assembly (10) for use on a spacecraft (12) is provided including at least one radiator panel assembly (26) repeatably movable between a panel stowed position (28) and a panel deployed position (36), at least two flexible lines (40) in fluid communication with the at least one radiator panel assembly (26) and repeatably movable between a stowage loop (42) and a flattened deployed loop (44).

  9. The Galileo high gain antenna deployment anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    On April 11, 1991, the Galileo spacecraft executed a sequence that would open the spacecraft's High Gain Antenna. The Antenna's launch restraint had been released just after deployment sequence, the antenna, which opens like an umbrella, never reached the fully deployed position. The analyses and tests that followed allowed a conclusive determination of the likely failure mechanisms and pointed to some strategies to use for recovery of the high gain antenna.

  10. DRAGON - 8U Nanosatellite Orbital Deployer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolski, Marcin; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Kedziora, Bartosz; Tokarz, Marta; Borys, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) together with Astronika company have developed an Orbital Deployer called DRAGON for ejection of the Polish scientific nanosatellite BRITE-PL Heweliusz (Fig. 1). The device has three unique mechanisms including an adopted and scaled lock and release mechanism from the ESA Rosetta mission MUPUS instrument. This paper discusses major design restrictions of the deployer, unique design features, and lessons learned from development through testing.

  11. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, T.

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  12. New Antenna Deployment, Pointing and Supporting Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costabile, V.; Lumaca, F.; Marsili, P.; Noni, G.; Portelli, C.

    1996-01-01

    On ITALSAT Flight 2, the Italian telecommunications satellite, the two L-Ka antennas (Tx and Rx) use two large deployable reflectors (2000-mm diameter), whose deployment and fine pointing functions are accomplished by means of an innovative mechanism concept. The Antenna Deployment & Pointing Mechanism and Supporting Structure (ADPMSS) is based on a new configuration solution, where the reflector and mechanisms are conceived as an integrated, self-contained assembly. This approach is different from the traditional configuration solution. Typically, a rigid arm is used to deploy and then support the reflector in the operating position, and an Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM) is normally interposed between the reflector and the arm for steering operation. The main characteristics of the ADPMSS are: combined implementation of deployment, pointing, and reflector support; optimum integration of active components and interface matching with the satellite platform; structural link distribution to avoid hyperstatic connections; very light weight and; high performance in terms of deployment torque margin and pointing range/accuracy. After having successfully been subjected to all component-level qualification and system-level acceptance tests, two flight ADPMSS mechanisms (one for each antenna) are now integrated on ITALSAT F2 and are ready for launch. This paper deals with the design concept, development, and testing program performed to qualify the ADPMSS mechanism.

  13. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  14. A gendered perspective on military deployment.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia J; Nilsson, Johanna; Berkel, Laverne

    2014-01-01

    Military deployment, especially in combat or dangerous areas, can have a strong influence on subsequent mental health. This effect may be intensified as a result of the potential stigma that admission of mental health problems indicates weakness. Additional mental health issues exist for female soldiers from the National Guard who are pulled from non-military environments to work under dangerous conditions far from home and traditional social support. Minimal documentation is available about the day-to-day, gendered experiences of deployment for this group of female soldiers. To provide background for appropriate training and support, the aim of this study was to understand better the experiences of military deployment for women in the National Guard. We used content analysis to analyze individual, semi-structured interviews with a sample of 42 women from 7 U.S. National Guard units who were deployed in combat areas. Four general themes emerged about deployment experience: the general environment of stress, heterogeneous job responsibilities, home comes with you, and gendered stress. Military efforts are needed to address gender-specific issues associated with deployment and to develop resilience training that will optimize the mental health of female soldiers. PMID:24279913

  15. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction a nd ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror. Keywords: precision deployment, hinge joint, latch joint, deployable structures, fabrication, space telescopes, optical instruments, microdynamics.

  16. A module concept for a cable-mesh deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meguro, Akira

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacture, and deployment tests of a modular mesh deployable antenna. Reaction forces and moments created by a mesh and cable network are estimated using CASA. Deployment analysis is carried out using DADS. Three types of deployable antenna modules are developed and fabricated. Their design approach and deployment characteristics are also presented. Ground deployment tests are performed to verify design criteria.

  17. [Posttraumtic stress disorder after deployment of German soldiers : does the risk increase with deployment duration?].

    PubMed

    Trautmann, S; Schönfeld, S; Höfler, M; Heinrich, A; Hauffa, R; Zimmermann, P; Wittchen, H-U

    2013-07-01

    International studies suggest a growing risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with an increasing duration of deployment. There are no data available for the German armed forces that would allow an assessment of the average mission duration of about 4 months. Analyses are based on a stratified random sample of 1,483 ISAF soldiers. Standardized diagnostic interviews were conducted about 12 months after soldiers returned from mission. Deployment duration was categorized into 1-2 months, 3-5 months, and 5-8 months. Additionally, dimensional analyses of deployment duration were performed. Deployment duration was associated with the number of stressful and traumatic events. Notwithstanding, we found no linear relationship between mission duration and PTSD risk, neither in the total sample nor in the defined subgroups. However, we found a bimodal distribution suggesting an increased PTSD risk in the first 2 months and - less pronounced and limited to the Kunduz location - for deployment durations of at least 6 months. There was no general increase in PTSD risk with increasing deployment durations for German soldiers in this naturalistic study. The higher risk for soldiers with short deployments might be explained by selection of vulnerable subjects and different deployment characteristics. Further, there is some evidence of an increased PTSD risk for soldiers deployed for longer periods to high-risk locations (e.g., Kunduz). PMID:23712322

  18. Remote Laser Diffraction PSD Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Batcheller; G. M. Huestis; S. M. Bolton

    2000-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of radioactive slurry samples were obtained using a modified off-the-shelf classical laser light scattering particle size analyzer. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model La-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a hot cell (gamma radiation) environment. The general details of the modifications to this analyzer are presented in this paper. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not achievable - making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used previously. Remote deployment and utilization of this technology is in an exploratory stage. The risk of malfunction in this radiation environment is countered by gaining of this tremendously useful fundamental engineering data. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  19. Remote Laser Diffraction PSD Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2000-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of radioactive slurry samples were obtained using a modified "off-the-shelf" classical laser light scattering particle size analyzer. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model La-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a "hot cell" (gamma radiation) environment. The general details of the modifications to this analyzer are presented in this paper. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not achievable - making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used previously. Remote deployment and utilization of this technology is in an exploratory stage. The risk of malfunction in this radiation environment is countered by gaining of this tremendously useful fundamental engineering data. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  20. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  1. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  2. SUPERFUND REMOTE SENSING SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task provides remote sensing technical support to the Superfund program. Support includes the collection, processing, and analysis of remote sensing data to characterize hazardous waste disposal sites and their history. Image analysis reports, aerial photographs, and assoc...

  3. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  4. Lightweight, Self-Deploying Foam Antenna Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Levin, Steven; Rand, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight, deployable antennas for a variety of outer-space and terrestrial applications would be designed and fabricated according to the concept of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures, according to a proposal. Mechanically deployable antennas now in use are heavy, complex, and unreliable, and they utilize packaging volume inefficiently. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would be simple and would deploy themselves without need for any mechanisms and, therefore, would be more reliable. The proposed CHEM antenna structures would also weigh less, could be packaged in smaller volumes, and would cost less, relative to mechanically deployable antennas. The CHEM concept was described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56; and "Solar Heating for Deployment of Foam Structures" (NPO-20961), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 36. To recapitulate from the cited prior articles: The CHEM concept is one of utilizing opencell foams of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) to make lightweight, reliable, simple, and inexpensive structures that can be alternately (1) compressed and stowed compactly or (2) expanded, then rigidified for use. A CHEM structure is fabricated at full size from a block of SMP foam in its glassy state [at a temperature below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the SMP]. The structure is heated to the rubbery state of the SMP (that is, to a temperature above Tg) and compacted to a small volume. After compaction, the structure is cooled to the glassy state of the SMP. The compacting force can then be released and the structure remains compact as long as the temperature is kept below Tg. Upon subsequent heating of the structure above Tg, the simultaneous elastic recovery of the foam and its shape-memory effect cause the structure to expand to its original size and shape. Once thus deployed, the structure can be rigidified by

  5. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  6. Multifunctional Deployment Hinges Rigidified by Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Simburger, Edward J.; Matusmoto, James; Giants, Thomas W.; Garcia, Alexander; Perry, Alan; Rawal, Suraj; Marshall, Craig; Lin, John Kun Hung; Day, Jonathan Robert; Scarborough, Stephen Emerson

    2005-01-01

    Multifunctional hinges have been developed for deploying and electrically connecting panels comprising planar arrays of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. In the original intended application of these hinges, the panels would be facets of a 32-sided (and approximately spherical) polyhedral microsatellite (see figure), denoted a PowerSphere, that would be delivered to orbit in a compact folded configuration, then deployed by expansion of gas in inflation bladders. Once deployment was complete, the hinges would be rigidified to provide structural connections that would hold the panels in their assigned relative positions without backlash. Such hinges could also be used on Earth for electrically connecting and structurally supporting solar panels that are similarly shipped in compact form and deployed at their destinations. As shown in section A-A in the figure, a hinge of this type is partly integrated with an inflation bladder and partly integrated with the frame of a solar panel. During assembly of the hinge, strip extensions from a flexible circuit harness on the bladder are connected to corresponding thin-film conductors on the solar panel by use of laser welding and wrap-around contacts. The main structural component of the hinge is a layer of glass fiber impregnated with an ultraviolet-curable resin. After deployment, exposure to ultraviolet light from the Sun cures the resin, thereby rigidifying the hinge.

  7. REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGIES APPLICATIONS RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing technologies applications research supports the ORD Landscape Sciences Program (LSP) in two separate areas: operational remote sensing, and remote sensing research and development. Operational remote sensing is provided to the LSP through the use of current and t...

  8. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  9. Deploying Darter A Cray XC30 System

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Mark R; Budiardja, Reuben D; Crosby, Lonnie D; McNally, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    TheUniversityofTennessee,KnoxvilleacquiredaCrayXC30 supercomputer, called Darter, with a peak performance of 248.9 Ter- aflops. Darter was deployed in late March of 2013 with a very aggressive production timeline - the system was deployed, accepted, and placed into production in only 2 weeks. The Spring Experiment for the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) largely drove the accelerated timeline, as the experiment was scheduled to start in mid-April. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) project also needed access and was able to meet their tight deadlines on the newly acquired XC30. Darter s accelerated deployment and op- erations schedule resulted in substantial scientific impacts within the re- search community as well as immediate real-world impacts such as early severe tornado warnings

  10. Deployment of human-machine dialogue systems.

    PubMed Central

    Roe, D B

    1995-01-01

    The deployment of systems for human-to-machine communication by voice requires overcoming a variety of obstacles that affect the speech-processing technologies. Problems encountered in the field might include variation in speaking style, acoustic noise, ambiguity of language, or confusion on the part of the speaker. The diversity of these practical problems encountered in the "real world" leads to the perceived gap between laboratory and "real-world" performance. To answer the question "What applications can speech technology support today?" the concept of the "degree of difficulty" of an application is introduced. The degree of difficulty depends not only on the demands placed on the speech recognition and speech synthesis technologies but also on the expectations of the user of the system. Experience has shown that deployment of effective speech communication systems requires an iterative process. This paper discusses general deployment principles, which are illustrated by several examples of human-machine communication systems. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7479719

  11. Deployment of Galileo and the IUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft and its Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster were deployed from the cargo bay of STS-34 Atlantis. Deployment occurred at 7:15 P.M. EDT on October 18, 1989. Beginning an hour after deployment, two rocket stages of the IUS fired in succession. Galileo separated from the IUS' second stage at 9:05 P.M. and began its ballistic flight to Venus for the first of three gravity-assisted flybys, which will take Galileo to Jupiter.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA'is Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  12. Thermal static bending of deployable interlocked booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L.; Predmore, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Metal ribbons processed with a heat-forming treatment are enabled to form tubelike structures when deployed from a roll. Deployable booms of this have been utilized for gravity-gradient stabilization on the RAE, ATS, and Nimbus D satellites. An experimental thermal-mechanics test apparatus was developed to measure the thermal static bending and twist of booms up to 3 meters long. The apparatus was calibrated by using the correlation between calculated and observed thermal bending of a seamless tube. Thermal static bending values of 16 interlocked deployable booms were observed to be within a factor of 2.5 of the values calculated from seamless-tube theory. Out-of-Sun-plane thermal bending was caused by complex heat transfer across the interlocked seam. Significant thermal static twisting was not observed.

  13. Carousel deployment mechanism for coilable lattice truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.; Jones, P. Alan

    1989-01-01

    The development of a mechanism for instrumentation and solar-array deployment is discussed. One part of the technology consists of a smart motor which can operate in either an analog mode to provide high speed and torque, or in the stepper mode to provide accurate positioning. The second technology consists of a coilable lattice mast which is deployed and rotated about its axis with a common drive system. A review of the design and function of the system is presented. Structural and thermal test data are included.

  14. Magnetometer deployment mechanism for Pioneer Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    A three segment, 15-foot boom mechanism was developed to deploy magnetometers from the Pioneer Venus orbiter spinning shelf. The stowage mechanism is designed to contain the magnetometers during launch and to deploy these instruments by centrifugal force upon pyrotechnic release. Unique graphite-epoxy boom segments are used for a lightweight design with sufficient strength to withstand a 7.5 g orbit insertion force while extended. The detailed design is described along with the test methods developed for qualification in a one-g field.

  15. Magnetometer deployment mechanism for Pioneer Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    A three segment, 15-foot boom mechanism was developed to deploy magnetometers from the Pioneer Venus orbiter spinning shelf. The stowage mechanism is designed to contain the magnetometers during launch and to deploy these instruments by centrifugal force upon pyrotechnic release. Unique graphite-epoxy boom segments are used for a lightweight design with sufficient strength to withstand a 7.5 g orbit insertion force while extended. The detailed design is described, along with the test methods developed for qualification in a one-g field.

  16. Dynamics of spacecraft with deploying flexible appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, Janice D.; Park, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    A computational formulation for the dynamic analysis of spacecraft with deploying appendages is presented. The appendage model is based on a geometrically nonlinear beam formulation which accurately accounts for large rotational and large deformation motions. A moving finite element reference grid is incorporated within the nonlinear beam formulation to model the deployment motion. Hamilton's Law is used to formulate the general equations of motion, and a transient integration solution procedure is derived from a space-time finite element discretization of the Hamiltonian variational statement. Computational results of the methodology are presented for a classical gravity gradient stabilized satellite configuration.

  17. Mars pathfinder Rover egress deployable ramp assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian R.; Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Program is a NASA Discovery Mission, led by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to launch and place a small planetary Rover for exploration on the Martian surface. To enable safe and successful egress of the Rover vehicle from the spacecraft, a pair of flight-qualified, deployable ramp assemblies have been developed. This paper focuses on the unique, lightweight deployable ramp assemblies. A brief mission overview and key design requirements are discussed. Design and development activities leading to qualification and flight systems are presented.

  18. Optical remote sensing of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Wellman, J. B.; Barnes, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    In the present assessment of the contributions of optical earth resources remote sensing in the 0.4-15.0 micron region, attention is given to underlying principles, applications to scientific disciplines such as geology, hydrology and oceanography, the recent development history of the requisite sensors, and sensor development trends. Development status characterizations are given for thematic mapping, modular optoelectronic multispectral scanning, the telescope/CCD 'SPOT' program of France, the thermal IR multispectral scanner for mineral signature identification, airborne imaging spectrometry, and the Advanced Visible and IR Imaging Spectrometer that is nearing deployment. Technology development trends and the capabilities they portend are projected.

  19. Remote Multispectral Imaging of Wildland Fires (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodacek, A.; Kremens, R.

    2010-12-01

    Wildland fires produce a variety of signal phenomenology that are remotely observable. These signals span a large portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and can be related to a variety of properties of wildland fires as they propagate. The deployment of multispectral sensors from aircraft provides a unique perspective on the fire and its interactions in the environment by repeated imaging over time. We describe a set of airborne imaging experiments, image processing methodologies and a workflow system for near real-time extraction of information on the fire and the immediate environment.

  20. Characterization of Vegetation using the UC Davis Remote Sensing Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, M.; Hart, Q. J.; Bowen, K. S.; Ustin, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensing provides information about the dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere with continuous spatial and temporal coverage on many different scales. We present the design and construction of a suite of instrument modules and network infrastructure with size, weight and power constraints suitable for small scale vehicles, anticipating vigorous growth in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other mobile platforms. Our approach provides the rapid deployment and low cost acquisition of high aerial imagery for applications requiring high spatial resolution and revisits. The testbed supports a wide range of applications, encourages remote sensing solutions in new disciplines and demonstrates the complete range of engineering knowledge required for the successful deployment of remote sensing instruments. The initial testbed is deployed on a Sig Kadet Senior remote controlled plane. It includes an onboard computer with wireless radio, GPS, inertia measurement unit, 3-axis electronic compass and digital cameras. The onboard camera is either a RGB digital camera or a modified digital camera with red and NIR channels. Cameras were calibrated using selective light sources, an integrating spheres and a spectrometer, allowing for the computation of vegetation indices such as the NDVI. Field tests to date have investigated technical challenges in wireless communication bandwidth limits, automated image geolocation, and user interfaces; as well as image applications such as environmental landscape mapping focusing on Sudden Oak Death and invasive species detection, studies on the impact of bird colonies on tree canopies, and precision agriculture.

  1. Implementation of IP Telemetry in Support of Portable Deployments for Earthquake Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, N.; Torrisi, J.; Austin, W.; Smith, K. D.; Biasi, G.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Slater, D.

    2008-12-01

    IP spread spectrum radios have revolutionized the operation of remote seismic networks. In two separate deployments this year, the Nevada Seismological Laboratory implemented 900 MHz point-to-multipoint IP radio systems for portable seismographs in response to two important Nevada earthquake sequences: the Mw 6.0 event that struck Wells on February 21, 2008; and an energetic earthquake swarm in urban Reno that began in mid-February (mainshock Mw 5.0, April 26, 2008, 06:40 UTC). In cooperation with the USGS, ten portable stations were deployed in the Wells area response. Also, 10 IRIS RAMP instruments were included in the urban Reno deployment. These instruments were outfitted with Motorola Canopy radios and integrated with the regional telemetry infrastructure. As configured, these radios will support a large deployment, high sample rate dataloggers, and a flexible network topology with a working range of at least 30 miles. Real time IP telemetry can improve portable network performance in the following areas: 1. Simplified data flow- Real-time data from portable deployments is integrated with the regional and national networks. Portable instrument data does not have to be retrieved from the field, extracted from mass storage, and separately incorporated into data archives. The need to reanalyze events as locally-recorded portable data becomes available is eliminated. 2. Improved real-time products- Real-time data from portable stations can be used to improve the precision and timeliness of data products (e.g., ShakeMap) for the public, the local and national media, and emergency managers. 3. State-of-health monitoring- Systems (power, memory, etc.) can be monitored, allowing for less frequent and better targeted maintenance visits. The monitoring of these parameters can then be assumed by software packages such as Nagios or SeisNetWatch. 4. Remote management- Datalogger parameters can be managed remotely. The radios can also be remotely managed, allowing for

  2. Symmetry properties in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the relations among polarimetric backscattering coefficients from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. Symmetry of geophysical media encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered for both reciprocal and nonreciprocal cases. On the basis of the invariance under symmetry transformations in the linear polarization basis, the scattering coefficients are related by a set of equations which restrict the number of independent parameters in the polarimetric covariance matrix. The properties derived under these transformations are general and apply to all scattering mechanisms in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the derived symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is discussed. As a practical application, the results from this paper provide new methods for the external calibration of polarimetric radars without the deployment of man-made calibration targets.

  3. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  4. Computer Based Training: Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Terence J.

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut training has traditionally been conducted at specific sites with specialized facilities. Because of its size and nature the training equipment is generally not portable. Efforts are now under way to develop training tools that can be taken to remote locations, including into orbit. Two of these efforts are the Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality projects. Field Deployable Trainer NASA has used the recent shuttle mission by astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian space station, Mir, as an opportunity to develop and test a prototype of an on-orbit computer training system. A laptop computer with a customized user interface, a set of specially prepared CD's, and video tapes were taken to the Mir by Ms. Lucid. Based upon the feedback following the launch of the Lucid flight, our team prepared materials for the next Mir visitor. Astronaut John Blaha will fly on NASA/MIR Long Duration Mission 3, set to launch in mid September. He will take with him a customized hard disk drive and a package of compact disks containing training videos, references and maps. The FDT team continues to explore and develop new and innovative ways to conduct offsite astronaut training using personal computers. Shared Virtual Reality Training NASA's Space Flight Training Division has been investigating the use of virtual reality environments for astronaut training. Recent efforts have focused on activities requiring interaction by two or more people, called shared VR. Dr. Bowen Loftin, from the University of Houston, directs a virtual reality laboratory that conducts much of the NASA sponsored research. I worked on a project involving the development of a virtual environment that can be used to train astronauts and others to operate a science unit called a Biological Technology Facility (BTF). Facilities like this will be used to house and control microgravity experiments on the space station. It is hoped that astronauts and instructors will ultimately be able to share

  5. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1999-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  6. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, A.M.

    1997-12-09

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  7. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1997-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  8. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1996-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  9. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, A.M.

    1996-08-06

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  10. Perception for a large deployable reflector telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. M.; Swanson, P. N.; Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Optical science and technology concepts for a large deployable reflector for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy from above the earth's atmosphere are discussed. Requirements given at the Asilomar Conference are reviewed. The technical challenges of this large-aperture (about 20-meter) telescope, which will be diffraction limited in the infrared, are highlighted in a brief discussion of one particular configuration.

  11. Military Deployment and Elementary Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Terri; Dunham, Mardis; Lyons, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact that military deployment has upon academic achievement of elementary school students. TerraNova test scores of 137 fourth and fifth grade students in two elementary schools with a high proportion of military dependent children were examined for two consecutive years. Although the academic test performance fell…

  12. Deployment of the Telstar communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Deployment of the Telstar communications satellite by the STS 41-D crew. The cylindrical spacecraft spins and rises past the shuttle stabilizer from its protective shield in the space shuttle payload bay. Behind it is another, closed protective cradle. Heavy clouds cover much of the water and land mass of earth in the background.

  13. Deployment of the SBS-4 communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Deployment of the SBS-4 communications satellite by the STS 41-D crew. The cylindrical spacecraft spins and rises from the its protective shield in the space shuttle payload bay. Behind it is another, closed protective cradle for the Syncom IV communications satllite. The earth's surface can be seen to the left of the frame.

  14. Diogenes, Dogfaced Soldiers, and Deployment Music Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Geoffrey; Williamson, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This webtext explores the cynical/kynical humor of soldier videos, suggesting that amateur videos paradoxically both undercut authority and honor effective leaders, both make light of and also publicly reveal deployment hardships, both distance the performers from military groupthink and celebrate unit camaraderie.

  15. Supporting Children and Families throughout Military Deployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    A military deployment is a challenging time for all family members. Young children are especially vulnerable, because they often do not have skills to handle all of the change and uncertainty and are still learning to manage their emotions and behaviors. They do not have a wealth of past experiences to rely on as adults do. They also do not have…

  16. Design, Implementation and Deployment of PAIRwise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Allan; Almeroth, Kevin; Bimber, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Increased access to the Internet has dramatically increased the sources from which students can deliberately or accidentally copy information. This article discusses our motivation to design, implement, and deploy an Internet based plagiarism detection system, called PAIRwise, to address this growing problem. We give details as to how we detect…

  17. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  18. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the United States without compromising the national security to the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct- use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring system, and discuss the impacts that remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  19. Deployment simulation for 3rd generation solar array GSR3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verne, C.; Rouchon, M.

    1989-01-01

    Deployment tests for different solar arrays are described. The Spacebus solar array deployment is tested in two dimensions. The Spot 4 array deployment is tested in three dimensions. A mock-up deployment test on an air cushion is compared to results obtained using simulation software. The third generation solar array concept equipped with Adele hinges is compared to previous solar array models. The need for greater accuracy and reliability in the deployment analysis of these third generation solar arrays is stressed.

  20. A remote laboratory for USRP-based software defined radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhinagar Ekanthappa, Rudresh; Escobar, Rodrigo; Matevossian, Achot; Akopian, David

    2014-02-01

    Electrical and computer engineering graduates need practical working skills with real-world electronic devices, which are addressed to some extent by hands-on laboratories. Deployment capacity of hands-on laboratories is typically constrained due to insufficient equipment availability, facility shortages, and lack of human resources for in-class support and maintenance. At the same time, at many sites, existing experimental systems are usually underutilized due to class scheduling bottlenecks. Nowadays, online education gains popularity and remote laboratories have been suggested to broaden access to experimentation resources. Remote laboratories resolve many problems as various costs can be shared, and student access to instrumentation is facilitated in terms of access time and locations. Labs are converted to homeworks that can be done without physical presence in laboratories. Even though they are not providing full sense of hands-on experimentation, remote labs are a viable alternatives for underserved educational sites. This paper studies remote modality of USRP-based radio-communication labs offered by National Instruments (NI). The labs are offered to graduate and undergraduate students and tentative assessments support feasibility of remote deployments.

  1. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are among the most promising technologies of the new millennium. The opportunities afforded by being able to program networks of small, lightweight, low-power, computation- and bandwidth-limited nodes have attracted a large community of researchers and developers. However, the unique set of capabilities offered by the technology produces an exciting but complex design space, which is often difficult to negotiate in an application context. Deploying sensing physical environments produces its own set of challenges, and can push systems into failure modes, thus revealing problems that can be difficult to discover or reproduce in simulation or the laboratory. Sustained efforts in the area of wireless networked sensing over the last 15 years have resulted in a large number of theoretical developments, substantial practical achievements, and a wealth of lessons for the future. It is clear that in order to bridge the gap between (on the one hand) visions of very large scale, autonomous, randomly deployed networks and (on the other) the actual performance of fielded systems, we need to view deployment as an essential component in the process of developing sensor networks: a process that includes hardware and software solutions that serve specific applications and end-user needs. Incorporating deployment into the design process reveals a new and different set of requirements and considerations, whose solutions require innovative thinking, multidisciplinary teams and strong involvement from end-user communities. This special feature uncovers and documents some of the hurdles encountered and solutions offered by experimental scientists when deploying and evaluating wireless sensor networks in situ, in a variety of well specified application scenarios. The papers specifically address issues of generic importance for WSN system designers: (i) data quality, (ii) communications availability and quality, (iii) alternative, low-energy sensing

  2. Remote reset circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, R.E.

    1985-09-12

    A remote reset circuit acts as a stand-along monitor and controller by clocking in each character sent by a terminal to a computer and comparing it to a given reference character. When a match occurs, the remote reset circuit activates the system's hardware reset line. The remote reset circuit is hardware based centered around monostable multivibrators and is unaffected by system crashes, partial serial transmissions, or power supply transients. 4 figs.

  3. Remote reset circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russell E.

    1987-01-01

    A remote reset circuit acts as a stand-alone monitor and controller by clocking in each character sent by a terminal to a computer and comparing it to a given reference character. When a match occurs, the remote reset circuit activates the system's hardware reset line. The remote reset circuit is hardware based centered around monostable multivibrators and is unaffected by system crashes, partial serial transmissions, or power supply transients.

  4. Deployment of the National Transparent Optical Network around the San Francisco Bay Area

    SciTech Connect

    McCammon, K.; Haigh, R.; Armstrong, G.

    1996-06-01

    We report on the deployment and initial operation of the National Transparent Optical Network, an experimental WDM network testbed around the San Francisco Bay Area, during the Optical Fiber Conference (OFC`96) held in San Jose, CA. The deployment aspects of the physical plant, optical and SONET layers are examined along with a discussion of broadband applications which utilized the network during the OFC`96 demonstration. The network features dense WDM technology, transparent optical routing technology using acousto- optic tunable filter based switches, and network modules with add/drop, multicast, and wavelength translation capabilities. The physical layer consisted of over 300 km of Sprint and Pacific Bell conventional single mode fiber which was amplified with I I optical amplifiers deployed in pre-amp, post-amp, and line amp configurations. An out-of-band control network provided datacom channels from remote equipment sites to the SONET network manager deployed at the San Jose Convention Center for the conference. Data transport over five wavelengths was achieved in the 1550 nm window using a variety of signal formats including analog and digital signal transmission on different wavelengths on the same fiber. The network operated throughout the week of OFC`96 and is still in operation today.

  5. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  6. Remote measurement of pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A summary of the major conclusions and recommendations developed by the panels on gaseous air pollution, water pollution, and particulate air pollution is presented. It becomes evident that many of the trace gases are amenable to remote sensing; that certain water pollutants can be measured by remote techniques, but their number is limited; and that a similar approach to the remote measurement of specific particulate pollutants will follow only after understanding of their physical, chemical, and radiative properties is improved. It is also clear that remote sensing can provide essential information in all three categories that can not be obtained by any other means.

  7. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.; Croessmann, C.D.; Horton, R.D.; Matter, J.C.; Czajkowski, A.F.; Sheely, K.B.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the US without compromising the national security of the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct-use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  8. STS-48 ESC closeup of UARS solar array (SA) and SA mechanism, pre-deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An extremely closeup view shows the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) solar array (SA) and SA mechanism prior to deploy of the satellite. UARS, grappled by the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector (out of frame), is undergoing STS-48 pre-deployment checkout above the payload bay (PLB) of the earth-orbiting Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. OV-103's vertical stabilizer can be seen in between the UARS hardware. This view demonstrates the capabilities of the Electronic Still Camera (ESC) to provide high resolution views of hardware for review by ground controllers. This ESC image was documented as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography. The digital image was stored on a removable hard disk or small optical disk, and could be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission.

  9. Field-deployed underwater mass spectrometers for investigations of transient chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Kibelka, Gottfried P G; Timothy Short, R; Toler, Strawn K; Edkins, John E; Byrne, Robert H

    2004-11-15

    The mass spectrometer developments and underwater deployments described in this work are directed toward observations of important reactive and influential inorganic and organic chemicals. Mass spectrometer systems for measurement of dissolved gases and volatile hydrocarbons were created by coupling a membrane analyte-introduction system with linear quadrupole and ion trap mass analyzers. For molecular masses up to 100amu, the in situ quadrupole system has detection limits on the order of 1-5ppb. For masses up to approximately 300amu, the underwater ion trap system detects many volatile hydrocarbons at concentrations below 1ppb. Both instruments can function autonomously or via interactive communications from a remote control site. Continuous operations can be sustained for up to approximately 12 days. Deployments have initially involved shallow water proof-of-concept operations at depths less than 30m. Future modifications are planned that will allow operational depths to 200m. PMID:18969697

  10. Juneau Airport Doppler Lidar Deployment: Extraction of Accurate Turbulent Wind Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Frehlich, Rod; Cornman, Larry; Goodrich, Robert; Norris, Douglas; Williams, John

    1999-01-01

    A 2 micrometer pulsed Doppler lidar was deployed to the Juneau Airport in 1998 to measure turbulence and wind shear in and around the departure and arrival corridors. The primary objective of the measurement program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of a pulsed coherent lidar to remotely and unambiguously measure wind turbulence. Lidar measurements were coordinated with flights of an instrumented research aircraft operated by representatives of the University of North Dakota (UND) under the direction of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The data collected is expected to aid both turbulence characterization as well as airborne turbulence detection algorithm development activities within NASA and the FAA. This paper presents a summary of the deployment and results of analysis and simulation which address important issues regarding the measurement requirements for accurate turbulent wind statistics extraction.