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Sample records for astronomical spectrograph calibration

  1. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, F.; Diddams, S. A.; Ycas, G.; Osterman, S.

    2010-06-15

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is {approx}350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by {+-}30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of {+-}5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR.

  2. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, F; Ycas, G; Osterman, S; Diddams, S A

    2010-06-01

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is approximately 350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by +/-30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of +/-5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR. PMID:20590223

  3. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, F.; Ycas, G.; Osterman, S.; Diddams, S. A.

    2010-06-01

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is ~350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by +/-30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of +/-5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR.

  4. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  5. Astronomical capabilities of the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of scientific observing programs planned with the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope are presented. An overview of the spectrograph design and operation is presented. The expected astronomical performance of the instrument is described in some detail.

  6. WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE HAMILTON ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Zhao, G.

    2013-10-01

    We present the wavelength calibration of the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. The main problem with the calibration of this spectrograph arises from the fact that thorium lines are absent in the spectrum of the presumed ThAr hollow-cathode lamp now under operation; numerous unknown strong lines, which have been identified as titanium lines, are present in the spectrum. We estimate the temperature of the lamp's gas which permits us to calculate the intensities of the lines and to select a large number of relevant Ti I and Ti II lines. The resulting titanium line list for the Lick hollow-cathode lamp is presented. The wavelength calibration using this line list was made with an accuracy of about 0.006 Å.

  7. Modelling high resolution Echelle spectrographs for calibrations: Hanle Echelle spectrograph, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanumolu, Anantha; Jones, Damien; Thirupathi, Sivarani

    2015-06-01

    We present a modelling scheme that predicts the centroids of spectral line features for a high resolution Echelle spectrograph to a high accuracy. Towards this, a computing scheme is used, whereby any astronomical spectrograph can be modelled and controlled without recourse to a ray tracing program. The computations are based on paraxial ray trace and exact corrections added for certain surface types and Buchdahl aberration coefficients for complex modules. The resultant chain of paraxial ray traces and corrections for all relevant components is used to calculate the location of any spectral line on the detector under all normal operating conditions with a high degree of certainty. This will allow a semi-autonomous control using simple in-house, programming modules. The scheme is simple enough to be implemented even in a spreadsheet or in any scripting language. Such a model along with an optimization routine can represent the real time behaviour of the instrument. We present here a case study for Hanle Echelle Spectrograph. We show that our results match well with a popular commercial ray tracing software. The model is further optimized using Thorium Argon calibration lamp exposures taken during the preliminary alignment of the instrument. The model predictions matched the calibration frames at a level of 0.08 pixel. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to show the photon noise effect on the model predictions.

  8. A spectrograph for exoplanet observations calibrated at the centimetre-per-second level.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Tobias; Curto, Gaspare Lo; Probst, Rafael A; Steinmetz, Tilo; Manescau, Antonio; Pasquini, Luca; González Hernández, Jonay I; Rebolo, Rafael; Hänsch, Theodor W; Udem, Thomas; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2012-05-31

    The best spectrographs are limited in stability by their calibration light source. Laser frequency combs are the ideal calibrators for astronomical spectrographs. They emit a spectrum of lines that are equally spaced in frequency and that are as accurate and stable as the atomic clock relative to which the comb is stabilized. Absolute calibration provides the radial velocity of an astronomical object relative to the observer (on Earth). For the detection of Earth-mass exoplanets in Earth-like orbits around solar-type stars, or of cosmic acceleration, the observable is a tiny velocity change of less than 10 cm s(-1), where the repeatability of the calibration--the variation in stability across observations--is important. Hitherto, only laboratory systems or spectrograph calibrations of limited performance have been demonstrated. Here we report the calibration of an astronomical spectrograph with a short-term Doppler shift repeatability of 2.5 cm s(-1), and use it to monitor the star HD 75289 and recompute the orbit of its planet. This repeatability should make it possible to detect Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of star or even to measure the cosmic acceleration directly. PMID:22660320

  9. Calibration and operation of the Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R.; Beaver, E.; Burbidge, E.; Hier, R.; Allen, R.; Angel, R.; Bartko, F.; Bohlin, R.; Ford, H.; Davidson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The design and basic performance characteristics of the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS), one of five instruments built for use on the Space Telescope observatory, is summarized briefly. The results of the recently completed instrument-level calibration are presented with special emphasis on issues affecting plans for FOS astronomical observations. Examples include such fundamental characteristics as: limiting magnitudes (system sensitivity and noise figures), spectral coverage and resolution, scattered light properties, and instrumental polarization and modulation efficiencies. Also gated toward intended users, a rather detailed description of FOS operating modes is given. The discussion begins with the difficulties anticipated during target acquisition and their hoped-for resolution. Both the 'normal' spectroscopic operating modes of the FOS and its 'exotic' features (e.g. spectropolarimetric, time-tagged, and time-resolved modes) are presented. The paper concludes with an overview of the activities to assure proper alignment and operation of the FOS within the entire Space Telescope system (orbital and ground-based).

  10. Performance of a laser frequency comb calibration system with a high-resolution solar echelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Kentischer, T. J.; Steinmetz, T.; Probst, R. A.; Franz, M.; Holzwarth, R.; Udem, Th.; Hänsch, T. W.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-09-01

    Laser frequency combs (LFC) provide a direct link between the radio frequency (RF) and the optical frequency regime. The comb-like spectrum of an LFC is formed by exact equidistant laser modes, whose absolute optical frequencies are controlled by RF-references such as atomic clocks or GPS receivers. While nowadays LFCs are routinely used in metrological and spectroscopic fields, their application in astronomy was delayed until recently when systems became available with a mode spacing and wavelength coverage suitable for calibration of astronomical spectrographs. We developed a LFC based calibration system for the high-resolution echelle spectrograph at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), located at the Teide observatory, Tenerife, Canary Islands. To characterize the calibration performance of the instrument, we use an all-fiber setup where sunlight and calibration light are fed to the spectrograph by the same single-mode fiber, eliminating systematic effects related to variable grating illumination.

  11. Astronomical optical frequency comb generation and test in a fiber-fed MUSE spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Boggio, J. M.; Fremberg, T.; Moralejo, B.; Rutowska, M.; Hernandez, E.; Zajnulina, M.; Kelz, A.; Bodenmüller, D.; Sandin, C.; Wysmolek, M.; Sayinc, H.; Neumann, J.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2014-07-01

    We here report on recent progress on astronomical optical frequency comb generation at innoFSPEC-Potsdam and present preliminary test results using the fiber-fed Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectrograph. The frequency comb is generated by propagating two free-running lasers at 1554.3 and 1558.9 nm through two dispersionoptimized nonlinear fibers. The generated comb is centered at 1590 nm and comprises more than one hundred lines with an optical-signal-to-noise ratio larger than 30 dB. A nonlinear crystal is used to frequency double the whole comb spectrum, which is efficiently converted into the 800 nm spectral band. We evaluate first the wavelength stability using an optical spectrum analyzer with 0.02 nm resolution and wavelength grid of 0.01 nm. After confirming the stability within 0.01 nm, we compare the spectra of the astro-comb and the Ne and Hg calibration lamps: the astro-comb exhibits a much larger number of lines than lamp calibration sources. A series of preliminary tests using a fiber-fed MUSE spectrograph are subsequently carried out with the main goal of assessing the equidistancy of the comb lines. Using a P3d data reduction software we determine the centroid and the width of each comb line (for each of the 400 fibers feeding the spectrograph): equidistancy is confirmed with an absolute accuracy of 0.4 pm.

  12. Absolute calibration of vacuum ultraviolet spectrograph system for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M.; Kubota, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Saito, M.; Numada, N.; Nakashima, Y.; Cho, T.; Koguchi, H.; Yagi, Y.; Yamaguchi, N.

    2004-10-01

    A space- and time-resolving vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrograph system has been applied to diagnose impurity ions behavior in plasmas produced in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10 and the reversed field pinch TPE-RX. We have carried out ray tracing calculations for obtaining the characteristics of the VUV spectrograph and calibration experiments to measure the absolute sensitivities of the VUV spectrograph system for the wavelength range from 100 to 1100 A. By changing the incident angle, 50.6 deg. -51.4 deg., to the spectrograph whose nominal incident angle is 51 deg., we can change the observing spectral range of the VUV spectrograph. In this article, we show the ray tracing calculation results and absolute sensitivities when the angle of incidence into the VUV spectrograph is changed, and the results of VUV spectroscopic measurement in both GAMMA 10 and TPE-RX plasmas.

  13. Calibration of an astrophysical spectrograph below 1 m/s using a laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Glenday, Alexander G.; Li, Chih-Hao; Cramer, Claire; Furesz, Gabor; Chang, Guoqing; Benedick, Andrew J.; Chen, Li-Jin; Kärtner, Franz X.; Korzennik, Sylvain; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2012-06-01

    We deployed two wavelength calibrators based on laser frequency combs ("astro-combs") at an astronomical telescope. One astro-comb operated over a 100 nm band in the deep red (∼ 800 nm) and a second operated over a 20 nm band in the blue (∼ 400 nm). We used these red and blue astro-combs to calibrate a high-resolution astrophysical spectrograph integrated with a 1.5 m telescope, and demonstrated calibration precision and stability suffici ent to enable detection of changes in stellar radial velocity < 1 m/s.

  14. Calibration of an astrophysical spectrograph below 1 m/s using a laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David F; Glenday, Alexander G; Li, Chih-Hao; Cramer, Claire; Furesz, Gabor; Chang, Guoqing; Benedick, Andrew J; Chen, Li-Jin; Kärtner, Franz X; Korzennik, Sylvain; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2012-06-18

    We deployed two wavelength calibrators based on laser frequency combs ("astro-combs") at an astronomical telescope. One astro-comb operated over a 100 nm band in the deep red (∼ 800 nm) and a second operated over a 20 nm band in the blue (∼ 400 nm). We used these red and blue astro-combs to calibrate a high-resolution astrophysical spectrograph integrated with a 1.5 m telescope, and demonstrated calibration precision and stability sufficient to enable detection of changes in stellar radial velocity < 1 m/s. PMID:22714437

  15. Internal calibration of astronomical photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunclark, P. S.

    Photographic plates have enormous advantages over other two-dimensional detectors in that they have largely uniform sensitivity over a large area. Unfortunately they are dogged by lack of dynamic range and complex response functions. This paper describes a successful method of internal calibration (ie. using only information contained in the images on the plate) which for stars gives a dynamic range of fourteen magnitudes and allows correct photometry of those extended objects which are not saturated.

  16. Astro-comb calibration of an Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.-H.; Phillips, D. F.; Glenday, A. G.; Benedick, A. J.; Chang, G.; Chen, L.-J.; Cramer, C.; Furesz, G.; Kärtner, F. X.; Sasselov, D.; Szentgyorgyi, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2010-07-01

    We describe recent work calibrating a cross-dispersed spectrograph with an "astro-comb" i.e., a high repetition rate, octave spanning femtosecond laser frequency comb; and a filter cavity suppressing laser modes to match the resolution of the spectrograph. Our astro-comb provides ~1500 evenly spaced (~0.6 A) calibration lines of roughly 100 nW per line between 7800 and 8800 Angstroms. The calibration lines of the laser are stabilized to atomic clocks which can be referenced to GPS providing intrinsic stability of the source laser below 1 cm/s in stellar radial velocity sensitivity, as well as long term stability and reproducibility over years. We present calibration of the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5 m telescope at the Fred L Whipple Observatory below 1 m/s radial velocity sensitivity in six orders from 7800-8800 A.

  17. Line profile analysis of an astronomical spectrograph with a laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fei; Zhao, Gang; Lo Curto, Gaspare; Wang, Hui-Juan; Liu, Yu-Juan; Wang, Liang; Wang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the spectral line shape associated with a High Resolution Spectrograph on the 2.16 m telescope at the Xinglong Observing Station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This measurement is based on modeling the instrumental line shape obtained by unresolved modes from a Yb-fiber mode-locked laser frequency comb. With the current repetition rate of 250 MHz and 26 GHz mode spacing on the spectrograph, we find the absolute variation of the line center, 0.0597 pixel in the direction of the CCDs, and 0.00275 pixel (~3 m s-1) for relative variation in successive exposures on a short timescale. A novel double-Gaussian model is presented to improve the quality of the fit by a factor of 2.47 in a typical single exposure. We also use analysis with raw moments and central moments to characterize the change in line shape across the detector. A trend in charge transfer efficiency can be found on the E2V 4096 × 4096 CCD that provides a correction for wavelength calibration aiming to reach a level of precision for radial velocity below 1 ms-1.

  18. Calibration of an Astrophysical Spectrograph with an Astro-comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Glenday, Alex; Li, Chih-Hao; Cramer, Claire; Korzennik, Sylvain; Noah Chang, Guoqing; Chen, Li-Jin; Benedick, Andrew; Kaertner, Franz X.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2010-03-01

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar lines are approaching Earth-like planet sensitivity. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earth-like orbit, an order of magnitude improvement in state-of-the-art radial velocity spectroscopy is necessary. An astro-comb, the combination of an ocatve-spanning laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Perot cavity, producing evenly spaced frequency markers with the potential for large wavelength coverage is a promising avenue towards improved wavelength calibration. Here we demonstrate the calibration of a high-resolution astrophysical spectrograph below the 1 m/s level in the 800-900 nm spectral band using an octave-spanning Ti:Sapphire laser and an ultra-low dispersion Fabry-Perot filter cavity adjusted for a mode spacing of approximately 31 GHz. Modeling of spectrograph response function and overall system stability and reproducibility will be described.

  19. Calibrating echelle spectrographs with Fabry-Pérot etalons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F. F.; Zechmeister, M.; Reiners, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Over the past decades hollow-cathode lamps have been calibration standards for spectroscopic measurements. Advancing to cm/s radial velocity precisions with the next generation of instruments requires more suitable calibration sources with more lines and fewer dynamic range problems. Fabry-Pérot interferometers provide a regular and dense grid of lines and homogeneous amplitudes, which makes them good candidates for next-generation calibrators. Aims: We investigate the usefulness of Fabry-Pérot etalons in wavelength calibration, present an algorithm to incorporate the etalon spectrum in the wavelength solution, and examine potential problems. Methods: The quasi-periodic pattern of Fabry-Pérot lines was used along with a hollow-cathode lamp to anchor the numerous spectral features on an absolute scale. We tested our method with the HARPS spectrograph and compared our wavelength solution to the one derived from a laser frequency comb. Results: The combined hollow-cathode lamp/etalon calibration overcomes large distortion (50 m/s) in the wavelength solution of the HARPS data reduction software. The direct comparison to the laser frequency comb shows differences of only 10 m/s at most. Conclusions: Combining hollow-cathode lamps with Fabry-Pérot interferometers can lead to substantial improvements in the wavelength calibration of echelle spectrographs. Etalons can provide economical alternatives to the laser frequency comb, especially for smaller projects.

  20. Precision spectroscopy with a frequency-comb-calibrated solar spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of the velocity field of the plasma at the solar surface is a standard diagnostic tool in observational solar physics. Detailed information about the energy transport as well as on the stratification of temperature, pressure and magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere are encoded in Doppler shifts and in the precise shape of the spectral lines. The available instruments deliver data of excellent quality and precision. However, absolute wavelength calibration in solar spectroscopy was so far mostly limited to indirect methods and in general suffers from large systematic uncertainties of the order of 100 m/s. During the course of this thesis, a novel wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb was deployed to the solar Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Tenerife, with the goal of enabling highly accurate solar wavelength measurements at the level of 1 m/s on an absolute scale. The frequency comb was developed in a collaboration between the Kiepenheuer-Institute for Solar Physics, Freiburg, Germany and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, Garching, Germany. The efforts cumulated in the new prototype instrument LARS (Lars is an Absolute Reference Spectrograph) for solar precision spectroscopy which is in preliminary scientific operation since~2013. The instrument is based on the high-resolution echelle spectrograph of the VTT for which feed optics based on single-mode optical fibres were developed for this project. The setup routinely achieves an absolute calibration accuracy of 60 cm/s and a repeatability of 2.5 cm/s. An unprecedented repeatability of only 0.32 cm/s could be demonstrated with a differential calibration scheme. In combination with the high spectral resolving power of the spectrograph of 7x10^5 and virtually absent internal scattered light, LARS provides a spectral purity and fidelity that previously was the domain of Fourier-transform spectrometers only. The instrument therefore provides unique capabilities for

  1. SPRED spectrograph upgrade: high resolution grating and improved absolute calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Ramsey, A.T.

    1986-05-01

    Two improvements to the SPRED multichannel VUV spectrographs used on the TFTR and PBX tokamaks have been made: (1) A new 2100-g/mm grating covering the 100 to 320 A region with 0.4 A resolution (FWHM) has been added to the existing 450 g/mm grating (100 to 1100 A with 2 A resolution), and (2) the TFTR SPRED has been absolutely calibrated using synchrotron radiation from the NBS SURF II facility, while the PBX system has been calibrated using conventional branching ratios along with line ratios from charge-exchange-recombination-excited lines. The availability of high resolution spectra in the 100 to 320 A range provides improved measurements of metallic ion emissions and, when the instrument views across a neutral beam as in PBX, allows carbon and oxygen densities to be measured via charge exchange recombination spectroscopy.

  2. Astronomical age calibration in the Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackleton, N. J.; Roehl, U.; Raffi, I.

    2001-05-01

    and the astronomical age (13.54 Ma) are secure. The base of the Langian is transgressive and post-dates the first appearance of P. sicana in European sections. It is often approximated in open ocean records by the LO of Helicosphaera ampliaperta (15.8 Ma published age) or by the FO of Discoaster signus (which often coincides with the end of an abundance acme of D. deflandrei; 16.2 Ma published age). The boundary is generally supposed to be close to C5Cn, although the normally magnetised material in the Moria Section must represent C5Dn if the radiometric dates have any credibility. In Leg 154 material the LO of Helicosphaera ampliaperta has an age close to 15.0 Ma; the FO of Discoaster signus is at about 15.6 Ma, and the FO of P. sicana older than 17 Ma making this a very insecurely calibrated boundary. We have correlated the record of DSDP holes 521 and 521A, which have an excellent magnetostratigraphy for C5Cn to C5Bn, to the ODP Leg 154 material, enabling us to estimate the age of the young end of C5Cn as about 15.9 Ma (cf 16.014 in CK95) and the old end of C5Bn as about 15.1 Ma (cf 15.155 in CK95). This interval is characterised by a strong response to eccentricity cycles (both in ODP Leg 154 sites and in DSDP521). After about 14.6 Ma there are very strongly expressed 40-ka dissolution cycles associated with a very shallow CCD until about 14.0 Ma. Published stable isotope data suggest that there was a significant cooling and/or antarctic ice build up at about 14.0 Ma.

  3. Design of a radial velocity spectrograph for the Moletai Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgenson, Colby A.; Fischer, Debra A.; McCracken, Tyler M.; Stoll, Rebecca A.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Giguere, Matt J.; Santoro, Fernando G.; Muller, Gary

    2014-07-01

    The Yale Exoplanet Laboratory is under contract to design, build, and deliver a high-resolution (R = 60,000) echelle spectrograph for the Moletai Astronomical Observatory 1.65-meter telescope at the Vilnius University. We present a fiber-fed, white-pupil architecture that will operate from 400 to 880nm. The optomechanical design implements a modular approach for stability and ease of alignment that can be reproduced for other telescopes. It will utilize highperformance off-the-shelf optical components with a custom designed refractive camera for high throughput and good image quality.

  4. The assembly, calibration, and preliminary results from the Colorado high-resolution Echelle stellar spectrograph (CHESS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Keri; France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kane, Robert; Schultz, Ted; Beasley, Matthew; Green, James; Kulow, Jen; Kersgaard, Eliot; Fleming, Brian

    2014-07-01

    The Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS) is a far ultraviolet (FUV) rocket-borne experiment designed to study the atomic-to-molecular transitions within translucent interstellar clouds. CHESS is an objective echelle spectrograph operating at f/12.4 and resolving power of 120,000 over a band pass of 100 - 160 nm. The echelle flight grating is the product of a research and development project with LightSmyth Inc. and was coated at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) with Al+LiF. It has an empirically-determined groove density of 71.67 grooves/mm. At the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA) at the University of Colorado (CU), we measured the efficiencies of the peak and adjacent dispersion orders throughout the 90 - 165 nm band pass to characterize the behavior of the grating for pre-flight calibrations and to assess the scattered-light behavior. The crossdispersing grating, developed and ruled by Horiba Jobin-Yvon, is a holographically-ruled, low line density (351 grooves/mm), powered optic with a toroidal surface curvature. The CHESS cross-disperser was also coated at GSFC; Cr+Al+LiF was deposited to enhance far-UV efficiency. Results from final efficiency and reflectivity measurements of both optics are presented. We utilize a cross-strip anode microchannel plate (MCP) detector built by Sensor Sciences to achieve high resolution (25 μm spatial resolution) and data collection rates (~ 106 photons/second) over a large format (40mm round, digitized to 8k x 8k) for the first time in an astronomical sounding rocket flight. The CHESS instrument was successfully launched from White Sands Missile Range on 24 May 2014. We present pre-flight sensitivity, effective area calculations, lab spectra and calibration results, and touch on first results and post-flight calibration plans.

  5. The ERA2 facility: towards application of a fibre-based astronomical spectrograph for imaging spectroscopy in life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin M.; Zenichowski, Karl; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Adelhelm, Silvia; Stolz, Marvin; Kelz, Andreas; Sandin, Christer; Bauer, Svend-Marian; Fechner, Thomas; Jahn, Thomas; Popow, Emil; Roth, Bernhard; Singh, Paul; Srivastava, Mudit; Wolter, Dieter

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical instrumentation is most of the time faced with challenging requirements in terms of sensitivity, stability, complexity, etc., and therefore leads to high performance developments that at first sight appear to be suitable only for the specific design application at the telescope. However, their usefulness in other disciplines and for other applications is not excluded. The ERA2 facility is a lab demonstrator, based on a high-performance astronomical spectrograph, which is intended to explore the innovation potential of fiber-coupled multi-channel spectroscopy for spatially resolved spectroscopy in life science, material sciences, and other areas of research.

  6. ASTROMETRY.NET: BLIND ASTROMETRIC CALIBRATION OF ARBITRARY ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Dustin; Mierle, Keir; Roweis, Sam; Hogg, David W.; Blanton, Michael

    2010-05-15

    We have built a reliable and robust system that takes as input an astronomical image, and returns as output the pointing, scale, and orientation of that image (the astrometric calibration or World Coordinate System information). The system requires no first guess, and works with the information in the image pixels alone; that is, the problem is a generalization of the 'lost in space' problem in which nothing-not even the image scale-is known. After robust source detection is performed in the input image, asterisms (sets of four or five stars) are geometrically hashed and compared to pre-indexed hashes to generate hypotheses about the astrometric calibration. A hypothesis is only accepted as true if it passes a Bayesian decision theory test against a null hypothesis. With indices built from the USNO-B catalog and designed for uniformity of coverage and redundancy, the success rate is >99.9% for contemporary near-ultraviolet and visual imaging survey data, with no false positives. The failure rate is consistent with the incompleteness of the USNO-B catalog; augmentation with indices built from the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog brings the completeness to 100% with no false positives. We are using this system to generate consistent and standards-compliant meta-data for digital and digitized imaging from plate repositories, automated observatories, individual scientific investigators, and hobbyists. This is the first step in a program of making it possible to trust calibration meta-data for astronomical data of arbitrary provenance.

  7. Calibrating the Astronomical Extinction Spectrophotometer for NIST Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, P. C.; Karle, J.; Zirzow, D. C.; Cramer, C.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    The NIST Stars program is currently creating a new generation of absolutely calibrated spectroradiometric standard stars traceable to NIST laboratory standards. A fundamental task required to accomplish this is the transfer of the laboratory irradiance standard to telescopes in the field. We describe the system for calibration transfer for the Astronomical Extinction Spectrophotometer (AESOP), a 100mm diameter objective grating spectrometer designed to precisely and accurately measure the spectral energy distribution of bright (V<6) stars. The transfer standard for AESoP is a nearly identical 100mm diameter optical system with no dispersive element, CAL, which is co-mounted with AESoP but can be easily removed and taken to NIST for calibration in their Telescope Calibration Facility (TCF). CAL is designed to measure one wavelength at a time using a novel technique where CAL’s input pupil is imaged onto a CCD read out in TDI mode. The row read rate and on-chip binning can be modulated to match a very large dynamic range, from 100aW at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 per second to 1nW at a signal-to-noise of >20000 per second. Moreover, CAL never observes the sky, only calibration sources and otherwise has its aperture covered to prevent dust accumulation. In the TCF, CAL measures a wavelength-tunable source that is simultaneous monitored using a NIST working standard photodiode. The responsivity of the photodiode and its distance from the source is accurately known. The distance from CAL to the source, of the order 50m, is also accurately known, as is CAL’s collecting area, allowing highly accurate transfer of the diode calibration to CAL. In AESoP’s mobile calibration lab, CAL and AESoP are mounted side-by-side with apertures aligned and both observe a collimated, tunable source that simultaneously illuminates both systems. AESoP and CAL are currently under field testing. We present calibration data and some initial stellar spectral energy distribution

  8. A flux calibration device for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Simona; Aldering, Greg; Hoffmann, Akos; Kowalski, Marek; Kuesters, Daniel; Reif, Klaus; Rigault, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Observational cosmology employing optical surveys often require precise flux calibration. In this context we present SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. SCALA consists of a hexagonal array of 18 small parabolic mirrors distributed over the face of, and feeding parallel light to, the telescope entrance pupil. The mirrors are illuminated by integrating spheres and a wavelength-tunable (from UV to IR) light source, generating light beams with opening angles of 1°. These nearly parallel beams are flat and flux-calibrated at a subpercent level, enabling us to calibrate our "telescope + SNIFS system" at the required precision.

  9. A Laser Frequency Comb System for Absolute Calibration of the VTT Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Steinmetz, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Kentischer, T.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-10-01

    A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve can be derived from the known frequencies of the comb modes that is suitable for absolute calibration at the meters per second level. We briefly summarize some topics in solar physics that benefit from absolute spectroscopy and point out the advantages of LFC compared to traditional calibration techniques. We also sketch the basic setup of the VTT calibration system and its integration with the existing echelle spectrograph.

  10. The solar-stellar spectrograph: Project description, data calibration, and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.; Lockwood, G. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (SSS) is a project initiated in the 1980s by scientists from the High Altitude Observatory, Lowell Observatory, the Pennsylvania State Universty, and the Sacramento Peak Observatory. The instrument is comprised of two spectrographs: one is an echelle covering the wavelength range lambda lambda 5000-9200, while the second is a Littrow spectrograph covering the Ca II and H and K region around lambda 3950. This project is designed to address a broad range of outstanding questions regarding the nature of stellar activity cycles. The unique capability of the spectrograph is its ability to record both solar and stellar spectra, allowing more accurate placement of the Sun in the stellar context than has been feasible previously. In this report we discuss the motivation for this project, the instrumental characteristics, the observing programs, the methods being used to reduce, calibrate, and analyze the data, and the connection of our databases to extant databases. A central part of the discussion is the connection of the Sun with the stars both in terms of existing solar and stellar activity indices as well as physical flux. This work resolves a long-standing discrepancy in this area and establishes a protocol for relating the large set of observations from the Mount Wilson Ca II H and K project to physical flux, in preparation for future comparison to our observations and results from theory.

  11. Astronomical Spectroscopy: Calibration Sources for the Near Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Aldenius, Maria; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Ralchenko, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) operates a multitude of telescopes and instruments at its La Silla Paranal Observatory in Chile. The most powerful ones are the four 8-m telescopes of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). ESO is currently studying an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) with a diameter of the primary mirror of 42 m. This telescope will make use of various techniques of adaptive optics (AO) to counter the perturbing effect of Earth's atmosphere. Due to the wavelength dependent performance of AO the European ELT (E-ELT) will be most powerful in the near-infrared (IR) domain. A collaboration of ESO and the US Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) has successfully established wavelength standards in the emission spectrum of Th-Ar hollow cathode lamps for high resolution spectroscopy. This has been a major advancement for near-IR astronomy, which has traditionally relied on atmospheric features for wavelength calibration. ESO and NIST report on joint efforts to identify and establish the best sources for wavelength calibration for the 2nd generation of VLT instrument and for the E-ELT. To this end we are studying the near-IR spectra of various elements. With the focus of astronomy moving toward IR wavelengths the astronomical community will have a need for a large amount of atomic and molecular data in order to perform the scientific analysis of their data. It will be essential that the long-standing and fruitful collaboration between astrophysics and the atomic and molecular physics community continues in the future.

  12. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  13. Transferring the Rb+ hyperfine-structure stability to a Fabry-Perot resonator used as a frequency standard for astronomical spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huke, Philipp; Holzhüter, Hanno; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-06-01

    We report on the experimental realization of locking a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) onto a stabilized diode laser for the calibration of astronomical spectrographs. The external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is stabilized to the 85Rb+ F* = 2 --> F = 3 transition with a pump-probe setup. The stability of the 85Rb+ reached between optical clocks is on the order of 10-13.1 and can be used to reduce the linewidth / drift of the ECDL to a few kHz.2 The measured linewidth of the transition is around 20 MHz due to unavoidable misalignment between pump- and probe-beam, power- and Doppler-broadening at room temperature.2 The aim is to transfer this stability to a FPI that can be used as optical frequency standard: Therefore the phase of the light reflected from the FPI is observed using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. The theoretically reachable stability of a few mHz/Hz3 is limited by different noise factors. In order to identify these noise factors we a) follow the calculation of noise factors given by, 4 b) calculate the contribution of misalignment and insufficient mode matching by applying the generalized matrix-formalism, 5 and c) estimate the contribution of the initial laser linewidth and the present electronic noise sources.

  14. Calibration of high accuracy radial velocity spectrographs: beyond the Th-Ar lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildi, Francois; Pepe, Francesco; Lovis, Christophe; Chazelas, Bruno; Wilken, Tobias; Manescau, Antonio; Pasquini, Luca; Holzwarth, Ronald; Stenimetz, Tilo; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor; Lo Curto, Gaspare

    2009-08-01

    Since its first light in 2003, the HARPS radial velocity spectrograph (RVS) has performed exquisitely well on the 3.6m ESO telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile). It now routinely exhibits a measurement noise of 0.5 m/s or 1.7 10-9 on a relative scale. Despite innovative work by Lovis and colleagues [14] to improve the accuracy obtained with the calibration lamps used, there is evidence that still better performance could be achieved by using more stable wavelength standards. In this paper, we present two methods are aim at overcoming the shortcoming of present day calibrators and that could satisfy the need for a cm/s -level calibrator like we are planning on using on the 2nd generation instruments at the VLT and on the ELT instrumentation. A temperature-stabilized Fabry-Perot interferometer has the promise of being stable to a few cm/s and has very uniform line levels and spacings, while a laser comb has already achieved a precision better than 15 cm/s, despite using only one of the 72 orders of the spectrographs.

  15. Calibration of an echelle spectrograph with an astro-comb: a laser frequency comb with very high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Glenday, Alex; Li, Chih-Hao; Furesz, Gabor; Benedick, Andrew J.; Chang, Guoqing N.; Chen, Li-Jin; Korzennik, Sylvain; Sasselov, Dimitar; Kaertner, Franz X.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2012-09-01

    Searches for extrasolar planets using precision radial velocity (PRV) techniques are approaching Earth-like planet sensitivity, however require an improvement of one order of magnitude to identify earth-mass planets in the habitable zone of sun-like stars. A key limitation is spectrograph calibration. An astro-comb, an octave-spanning laser frequency comb and a Fabry-Pérot cavity, producing evenly spaced frequencies with large wavelength coverage, is a promising tool for improved wavelength calibration. We demonstrate the calibration of a high-resolution astrophysical spectrograph below the 1 m/s level in the 8000-9000 Å and 4200 Å spectral bands.

  16. A calibration of the Naval Postgraduate School middle ultraviolet spectrograph and an analysis of the OII 2470 A emission obtained by the middle ultraviolet spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hymas, Hewitt M.

    1994-06-01

    The NPS middle ultraviolet spectrograph, MUSTANG, instrument was tested using standard techniques to determine the wavelength calibration and overall sensitivity. The instrument was launched on March 10, 1994 on a NASA sounding rocket from Poker Flats, Alaska. Post-flight calibration indicates the wavelength calibration did not change as a result of the launch and no significant change in the sensitivity calibration. Ultraviolet dayglow spectra of the earth's ionosphere from 1800 A to 3400 A were obtained during a similar launch on March 19, 1992 from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. Data were obtained on the downleg of this earlier experiment and range in altitude from 115 km to 320 km. Analysis of the data from 2420 A to 2490 A was conducted to obtain the intensity profile of the OII 2470.4 A multiplet. The analysis used synthetic spectra generated for the N2 Vegard-Kaplan and the nitric-oxide gamma band emissions.

  17. Automated model-based calibration of short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrographs.

    PubMed

    Kosec, Matjaž; Bürmen, Miran; Tomaževič, Dejan; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-10-01

    Among the variety of available hyperspectral imaging systems, the line-scan technique stands out for its short acquisition time and good signal-to-noise ratio. However, due to imperfections in the camera lens and, in particular, optical components of the imaging spectrograph, the acquired images are spatially and spectrally distorted, which can significantly degrade the accuracy of the subsequent hyperspectral image analysis. In this work, we propose and evaluate an automated method for correction of spatial and spectral distortions introduced by a line-scan hyperspectral imaging system operating in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) spectral range from 1000 nm to 2500 nm. The proposed method is based on non-rigid registration of the distorted and reference images corresponding to two passive calibration objects. The results of the validation show that the proposed method is accurate, efficient, and applicable for calibration of line-scan hyperspectral imaging systems. Moreover, the design of the method and of the calibration objects allows integration with systems operating in diffuse reflectance or transmittance modes. PMID:23031695

  18. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, R. A.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Woods, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. ( Solar Phys., 2010, doi:10.1007/s11207-009-9485-8). In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  19. Pre-Flight Calibration Results for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, III. Optical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, C.; Gull, T.; Kimble, R.; Woodgate, B.; Kaiser, M.; Hartig, G.; Valenti, J.; Hood, D.; Sullivan, J.; Standley, C.; Beck, T.; Plait, P.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-12-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) is a versatile, multi-purpose instrument which operates from the ultraviolet to near infrared (115-1000nm) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). An internal, two mirror relay system replaces COSTAR correcting the spherical aberration and astigmatism present at the STIS field position, about 6 arcminutes from the HST field center. The various STIS modes permit low and medium spectroscopy throughout the spectral range and over the 25 arc-second ultraviolet and 52 arcsecond visible fields. High resolution (30-100,000) echelle spectroscopy capability is provided in the ultraviolet (115-310nm). Broad band imaging is also possible over the complete spectral range and fields and a small selection of narrow and passband filters is available. A wide selection of slits and apertures permits various resolution and spatial scales to be selected in all modes. Coronagraphic stops are provided to permit observations in the visible (310 - 1000nm). On board calibration lamps permit wavelength calibration and flat fields to be obtained. Pre-flight calibration of STIS has been completed. We summarize the optical performance of STIS including measured resolution, scattering and encircled energy characterization in this paper.

  20. The lick-index calibration of the Gemini multi-object spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Puzia, Thomas H.; Miller, Bryan W.; Trancho, Gelys; Basarab, Brett; Mirocha, Jordan T.; Butler, Karen E-mail: bmiller@gemini.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the calibration of the spectroscopic Lick/IDS standard line-index system for measurements obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs known as GMOS-North and GMOS-South. We provide linear correction functions for each of the 25 standard Lick line indices for the B600 grism and two instrumental setups, one with 0.''5 slit width and 1 × 1 CCD pixel binning (corresponding to ∼2.5 Å spectral resolution) and the other with 0.''75 slit width and 2 × 2 binning (∼4 Å). We find small and well-defined correction terms for the set of Balmer indices Hβ, Hγ {sub A}, and Hδ {sub A} along with the metallicity sensitive indices Fe5015, Fe5270, Fe5335, Fe5406, Mg{sub 2}, and Mgb that are widely used for stellar population diagnostics of distant stellar systems. We find other indices that sample molecular absorption bands, such as TiO{sub 1} and TiO{sub 2}, with very wide wavelength coverage or indices that sample very weak molecular and atomic absorption features, such as Mg{sub 1}, as well as indices with particularly narrow passband definitions, such as Fe4384, Ca4455, Fe4531, Ca4227, and Fe5782, which are less robustly calibrated. These indices should be used with caution.

  1. Radiometric calibration of the vacuum-ultraviolet spectrograph SUMER on the SOHO spacecraft with the B detector.

    PubMed

    Schühle, U; Curdt, W; Hollandt, J; Feldman, U; Lemaire, P; Wilhelm, K

    2000-01-20

    The Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) vacuum-ultraviolet spectrograph was calibrated in the laboratory before the integration of the instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft in 1995. During the scientific operation of the SOHO it has been possible to track the radiometric calibration of the SUMER spectrograph since March 1996 by a strategy that employs various methods to update the calibration status and improve the coverage of the spectral calibration curve. The results for the A Detector were published previously [Appl. Opt. 36, 6416 (1997)]. During three years of operation in space, the B detector was used for two and one-half years. We describe the characteristics of the B detector and present results of the tracking and refinement of the spectral calibration curves with it. Observations of the spectra of the stars alpha and rho Leonis permit an extrapolation of the calibration curves in the range from 125 to 149.0 nm. Using a solar coronal spectrum observed above the solar disk, we can extrapolate the calibration curves by measuring emission line pairs with well-known intensity ratios. The sensitivity ratio of the two photocathode areas can be obtained by registration of many emission lines in the entire spectral range on both KBr-coated and bare parts of the detector's active surface. The results are found to be consistent with the published calibration performed in the laboratory in the wavelength range from 53 to 124 nm. We can extrapolate the calibration outside this range to 147 nm with a relative uncertainty of ?30% (1varsigma) for wavelengths longer than 125 nm and to 46.5 nm with 50% uncertainty for the short-wavelength range below 53 nm. PMID:18337910

  2. Precise astronomical flux calibration and its impact on studying the nature of the dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Christopher W.; Brown, Yorke J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the luminosity of Type Ia supernovae versus redshift provided the original evidence for the accelerating expansion of the Universe and the existence of dark energy. Despite substantial improvements in survey methodology, systematic uncertainty in flux calibration dominates the error budget for this technique, exceeding both statistics and other systematic uncertainties. Consequently, any further collection of Type Ia supernova data will fail to refine the constraints on the nature of dark energy unless we also improve the state of the art in astronomical flux calibration to the order of 1%. We describe how these systematic errors arise from calibration of instrumental sensitivity, atmospheric transmission and Galactic extinction, and discuss ongoing efforts to meet the 1% precision challenge using white dwarf stars as celestial standards, exquisitely calibrated detectors as fundamental metrologic standards, and real-time atmospheric monitoring.

  3. Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Tadashi; Ozaki, Shinobu; Hattori, Takashi; Ishii, M.; Sasaki, Minoru; Takeyama, Norihide

    1998-07-01

    We are building the second version of the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph (Ohtani et al., this symposium). This will be mounted on the MAGNUM, a 2-m telescope under construction at Haleakala, and also on the SUBARU. The spectrograph has four observational modes: Fabry-Perot imager, integral field spectrograph (IFS) with a microlens array, long-slit spectrograph, and filter-imaging modes. The new spectrograph is significantly better than the first version in several ways. The IFS has as many as 37 X 37 microlenses, each of which subtends 0' .39 at the MAGNUM. The optics is designed to be used in wide wavelength ranges from 360 nm to 900 nm. The transmission at any wavelength between 370 and 900 nm is designed to exceed 50% for the collimator plus camera system, and to reach almost 40% even at 360 nm. In order to achieve high efficiency at short wavelengths, we use an anti- reflection coated backside-illuminated 2K X 2K CCD. We are also planning a further improvement by using multi-layer anti- reflection coatings for lenses, in collaboration with National Astronomical Observatory, Japan. In order to assure good image quality under a severe weight limit of 150 kg for this instrument, we have carried out mechanical design by calculating the flexure of the instrument for all telescope attitudes with finite element analysis, and succeeded in limiting the maximum flexure to 30 micrometer. This does not degrade image quality. The movements on the CCD of the light from the center of the focal plane have also been simulated, depending on the telescope attitudes. This is important to obtain not only a good image, but also a correct flat field and wavelength calibration in the IFS mode. The movements are expected to be confined almost within one pixel for an attitude, which is considered to be small enough.

  4. Supporting Evidence for the Astronomically Calibrated Age of Fish Canyon Sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T. A.; Storey, M.; Zeeden, C.; Kuiper, K.; Hilgen, F.

    2010-12-01

    The relative nature of the 40Ar/39Ar radio-isotopic dating technique requires that the age and error of the monitor mineral be accurately known. The most widely accepted monitor for Cenozoic geochronology is the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs), whose recommended published ages have varied by up to 2% over the past two decades. To reconcile the discrepancy among recommended ages, researchers have turned to the use of (i) intercalibration experiments with primary argon standards, (ii) cross-calibration with U-Pb ages, and (iii) cross-calibration with sanidine-hosted tephras present in astronomically tuned stratigraphic sections. The increasingly robust quality of the astronomical timescale, with precision better than 0.1% for the last 10 million years, suggests this method of intercalibration as the best way to proceed with addressing the true age of FCs. Recently, Kuiper, et al. (2008) determined an astronomically calibrated age of 28.201 ± 0.046 Ma (2σ), based upon the Moroccan Melilla Basin Messâdit section. Here, we provide independent verification for the Kuiper, et al. (2008) FCs age using sanidines extracted from a tephra intercalated in another Mediterranean-based astronomically tuned section. The direct tuning of this section was achieved through correlation to long (~400 kyr) and short (~100 kyr) eccentricity, followed by tuning of basic sedimentary cycles to precession and summer insolation, using the La2004(1,1) astronomical solution (Laskar, et al., 2004). We employed a Nu Instruments Noblesse multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometer for the 40Ar/39Ar experiments, analyzing single crystals of FCs relative to sanidines from the astronomically dated tephra. The use of the multi-collector instrument allowed us to obtain high precision analyses with a level of precision for fully propagated external errors for FCs near the 0.1% goal of EARTHTIME. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework

  5. Astronomical calibration of the geological timescale: closing the middle Eocene gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Frederichs, T.; Bohaty, S. M.; Zachos, J. C.

    2015-09-01

    To explore cause and consequences of past climate change, very accurate age models such as those provided by the astronomical timescale (ATS) are needed. Beyond 40 million years the accuracy of the ATS critically depends on the correctness of orbital models and radioisotopic dating techniques. Discrepancies in the age dating of sedimentary successions and the lack of suitable records spanning the middle Eocene have prevented development of a continuous astronomically calibrated geological timescale for the entire Cenozoic Era. We now solve this problem by constructing an independent astrochronological stratigraphy based on Earth's stable 405 kyr eccentricity cycle between 41 and 48 million years ago (Ma) with new data from deep-sea sedimentary sequences in the South Atlantic Ocean. This new link completes the Paleogene astronomical timescale and confirms the intercalibration of radioisotopic and astronomical dating methods back through the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.930 Ma) and the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (66.022 Ma). Coupling of the Paleogene 405 kyr cyclostratigraphic frameworks across the middle Eocene further paves the way for extending the ATS into the Mesozoic.

  6. Development of Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometers as Stable Near-infrared Calibration Sources for High Resolution Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Hearty, Fred; Wilson, John; Holtzman, Jon; Redman, Stephen; Nave, Gillian; Nidever, David; Nelson, Matt; Venditti, Nick; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Fleming, Scott

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the ongoing development of single-mode fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) Interferometers as precise astrophotonic calibration sources for high precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs. FFPs are simple, inexpensive, monolithic units that can yield a stable and repeatable output spectrum. An FFP is a unique alternative to a traditional etalon, as the interferometric cavity is made of single-mode fiber rather than an air-gap spacer. This design allows for excellent collimation, high spectral finesse, rigid mechanical stability, insensitivity to vibrations, and no need for vacuum operation. The device we have tested is a commercially available product from Micron Optics.10 Our development path is targeted toward a calibration source for the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HPF), a near-infrared spectrograph designed to detect terrestrial-mass planets around low-mass stars, but this reference could also be used in many existing and planned fiber-fed spectrographs as we illustrate using the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) instrument. With precise temperature control of the fiber etalon, we achieve a thermal stability of 100 μK and associated velocity uncertainty of 22 cm s-1. We achieve a precision of ≈2 m s-1 in a single APOGEE fiber over 12 hr using this new photonic reference after removal of systematic correlations. This high precision (close to the expected photon-limited floor) is a testament to both the excellent intrinsic wavelength stability of the fiber interferometer and the stability of the APOGEE instrument design. Overall instrument velocity precision is 80 cm s-1 over 12 hr when averaged over all 300 APOGEE fibers and after removal of known trends and pressure correlations, implying the fiber etalon is intrinsically stable to significantly higher precision.

  7. Component Radiometric Calibrations of the EUV Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    The EUV Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) is a sounding rocket experiment that will investigate the energetics of the solar corona and hotter transition region through high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with a rapid (2 s) cadence. EUNIS features independent optical systems to record spatially co-aligned spectra simultaneously over its two bandpasses of 170--205 and 300--370 Å. All the components in the detection chain have been characterized, including multilayer telescope mirrors, lithographic slits, multilayer diffraction gratings, microchannel-plate intensifiers, and active-pixel sensors. The results demonstrate that EUNIS is the most sensitive solar EUV spectrograph in existence. Its first flight is scheduled for 2005 November. EUNIS is supported by NASA RTOP 432-03-31.

  8. A laser locked Fabry-Perot etalon with 3 cm/s stability for wavelength calibration of Doppler spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christian; Gurevich, Yulia; Stuermer, Julian; Fuehrer, Thorsten; Lamoreaux, Steve; Walther, Thomas; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Superior wavelength calibration is a major component in attaining Doppler precision of 10 cm/s and better with high resolution spectrographs. To achieve this goal, current calibration methods like thorium-argon lamps and iodine cells need to be replaced by more precise techniques. The ideal wavelength calibrator has a grid of densely spaced, narrow lines of equal brightness and works over a wide wavelength range. Laser frequency combs have received much attention recently, but they are complex and costly. We present an alternative method that builds on the success of passively stabilized Fabry-Perot etalons: we actively stabilize the etalon to an atomic transition, which provides an absolute frequency reference. We use saturated absorption laser spectroscopy to detect the hyperfine transitions of rubidium at 780 nm, a well-established frequency standard. Then we tune an etalon parameter (for instance, temperature) to keep one etalon peak coincident with the rubidium transition. Our setup is designed to be simple and robust, adaptable to various etalons, and to work in the infrared as well as the visible spectral range. We achieve a locking precision that is equivalent to a Doppler precision of better than 3 cm/s over any reasonable integration time.

  9. Astronomical calibration and global correlation of the Santonian (Cretaceous) based on the marine carbon isotope record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, N.; Jarvis, I.; Voigt, S.; Gale, A. S.; Attree, K.; Jenkyns, H. C.

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution records of bulk carbonate carbon isotopes have been generated for the Upper Coniacian to Lower Campanian interval of the sections at Seaford Head (southern England) and Bottaccione (central Italy). An unambiguous stratigraphic correlation is presented for the base and top of the Santonian between the Boreal and Tethyan realms. Orbital forcing of carbon and oxygen isotopes at Seaford Head points to the Boreal Santonian spanning five 405 kyr cycles (Sa1 to Sa5). Correlation of the Seaford Head time scale to that of the Niobrara Formation (Western Interior Basin) permits anchoring these records to the La2011 astronomical solution at the Santonian-Campanian (Sa/Ca) boundary, which has been recently dated to 84.19 ± 0.38 Ma. Among the five tuning options examined, option 2 places the Sa/Ca at the 84.2 Ma 405 kyr insolation minimum and appears as the most likely. This solution indicates that minima of the 405 kyr filtered output of the resistivity in the Niobrara Formation correlate to 405 kyr insolation minima in the astronomical solution and to maxima in the filtered δ13C of Seaford Head. We suggest that variance in δ13C is driven by climate forcing of the proportions of CaCO3 versus organic carbon burial on land and in oceanic basins. The astronomical calibration generates a 200 kyr mismatch of the Coniacian-Santonian boundary age between the Boreal Realm in Europe and the Western Interior, due either to diachronism of the lowest occurrence of the inoceramid Cladoceramus undulatoplicatus between the two regions or to remaining uncertainties of radiometric dating and cyclostratigraphic records.

  10. Echelle spectrograph calibration with a frequency comb based on a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser: a proposal.

    PubMed

    McFerran, J J

    2009-05-10

    Details for constructing an astronomical frequency comb suitable as a wavelength reference for échelle spectrographs associated with optical telescopes are outlined. The source laser for the frequency comb is a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser with a central wavelength of 1.56 microm. The means of producing a repetition rate greater than 7 GHz and a peak optical power of approximately 8 kW are discussed. Conversion of the oscillator light into the visible can occur through a two-step process of (i) nonlinear conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate and (ii) spectral broadening in photonic crystal fiber. While not necessarily octave spanning in spectral range to permit the use of an f -to- 2f interferometer for offset frequency control, the frequency comb can be granted accuracy by linking the mode spacing and a comb tooth to separate frequency references. The design avoids the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity to increase the mode spacing of the frequency comb; however, the level of supermode suppression and sideband asymmetry in the fiber oscillator and in the subsequent frequency conversion stages are aspects that need to be experimentally tested. PMID:19424399

  11. Echelle spectrograph calibration with a frequency comb based on a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser: a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    McFerran, J. J.

    2009-05-10

    Details for constructing an astronomical frequency comb suitable as a wavelength reference for echelle spectrographs associated with optical telescopes are outlined. The source laser for the frequency comb is a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser with a central wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m. The means of producing a repetition rate greater than 7 GHz and a peak optical power of {approx}8 kW are discussed. Conversion of the oscillator light into the visible can occur through a two-step process of (i) nonlinear conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate and (ii) spectral broadening in photonic crystal fiber. While not necessarily octave spanning in spectral range to permit the use of an f -to- 2f interferometer for offset frequency control, the frequency comb can be granted accuracy by linking the mode spacing and a comb tooth to separate frequency references. The design avoids the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity to increase the mode spacing of the frequency comb; however, the level of supermode suppression and sideband asymmetry in the fiber oscillator and in the subsequent frequency conversion stages are aspects that need to be experimentally tested.

  12. Toward a continuous 405-kyr-calibrated Astronomical Time Scale for the Mesozoic Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnov, Linda; Ogg, James; Huang, Chunju

    2010-05-01

    Mesozoic cyclostratigraphy is being assembled into a continuous Astronomical Time Scale (ATS) tied to the Earth's cyclic orbital parameters. Recognition of a nearly ubiquitous, dominant ~400-kyr cycling in formations throughout the era has been particularly striking. Composite formations spanning contiguous intervals up to 50 myr clearly express these long-eccentricity cycles, and in some cases, this cycling is defined by third- or fourth-order sea-level sequences. This frequency is associated with the 405-kyr orbital eccentricity cycle, which provides a basic metronome and enables the extension of the well-defined Cenozoic ATS to scale the majority of the Mesozoic Era. This astronomical calibration has a resolution comparable to the 1% to 0.1% precision for radioisotope dating of Mesozoic ash beds, but with the added benefit of providing continuous stratigraphic coverage between dated beds. Extended portions of the Mesozoic ATS provide solutions to long-standing geologic problems of tectonics, eustasy, paleoclimate change, and rates of seafloor spreading.

  13. A catalogue of photometric sequences (suppl. 3). [for astronomical photograph calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argue, A. N.; Miller, E. W.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In stellar photometry studies, certain difficulties have arisen because of the lack of suitable photometric sequences for calibrating astronomical photographs. In order to eliminate these difficulties, active observers were contacted with a view to drawing up lists of suitable sequences. Replies from 63 authors offering data on 412 sequences were received. Most data were in the UBV system and had been obtained between 1968 and 1973. These were included in the original catalogue. The Catalogue represents a continuation of the earlier Photometric Catalogue compiled by Sharov and Jakimova (1970). A small supplement containing 69 sequences was issued in 1973. Supplement 2 was produced in 1976 and contained 320 sequences. Supplement 3 has now been compiled. It contains 1271 sequences.

  14. Calibration of a cylindrical RF capacitance probe. [for radio astronomical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The calibration is considered of an RF antenna capacitance probe carried aboard the RAE-1 spacecraft and the correction of the probe for external effects, believed to be primarily due to local positive ion sheaths and/or photoelectron sheaths surrounding the antenna. The RAE-1 spacecraft was launched in July 1968 into a 5850-km. Circular orbit of 121-degree inclination and carried several antenna and radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz for radio astronomical studies. The RF capacitance probe measurements discussed utilized a 37-meter electric dipole antenna formed by two monopoles made of silver-coated beryllium-copper alloy tapes formed into hollow cylindrical tubes 1.3 cm in diameter.

  15. Near-infrared wavelength calibration of astrophysical spectrographs with the emission spectrum of the CN molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Bernath, Peter F.; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Many astrophysical applications require precise wavelength calibration of high resolution spectra. Calibration sources for this purpose at near-infrared wavelengths are sparse. We present an experimental setup for an electrodeless microwave discharge lamp that produces molecular band emission spectra. The discharge is sustained inside a glass cell filled with a combination of different gases producing CN molecules with many spectral lines in the wavelength range between 1 μm and 2.5 μm. We investigate this lamp in terms of its usability for wavelength calibration in high resolution spectroscopy. In this conference contribution, we present the experimental setup and the characterization of the calibration source in terms of line identification, line intensities, and line density. We find approximately 20,000 lines in the spectral region of 1 - 2 μm with relative peak intensities in a range of two orders of magnitude. The results from a first endurance test show that the durability of the spectrum requires careful attention in the course of further development.

  16. Current Calibration Efforts and Performance of the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph: Echelle Flux Calibration, the BAR5 Occulter, and Lamp Lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Debes, John H.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Lockwood, Sean A.; Peeples, Molly S.; Proffitt, Charles R.; Riley, Allyssa; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2016-06-01

    The variety of operating modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) continues to allow STIS users to obtain unique, high quality observations and cutting-edge results 19 years after its installation on HST. STIS is currently the only instrument available to the astronomy community that allows high spectral and spatial resolution spectroscopy in the FUV and NUV, including echelle modes. STIS also supports solar-blind imaging in the FUV. In the optical, STIS provides long-slit, first-order spectra that take advantage of HST's superb spatial resolution, as well as several unique unfiltered coronagraphic modes, which continue to benefit the exoplanet and debris-disk communities. The STIS instrument team monitors the instrument’s health and performance over time to characterize the effects of radiation damage and continued use of the detectors and optical elements. Additionally, the STIS team continues to improve the quality of data products for the user community. We present updates on efforts to improve the echelle flux calibration of overlapping spectral orders due to changes in the grating blaze function since HST Servicing Mission 4, and efforts to push the contrast limit and smallest inner working angle attainable with the coronagraphic BAR5 occulter. We also provide updates on the performance of the STIS calibration lamps, including work to maintain the accuracy of the wavelength calibration for all modes.

  17. Astronomical calibration of the Boreal Santonian (Cretaceous) based on the marine carbon isotope record and correlation to the tropical realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Jarvis, Ian; Voigt, Silke; Gale, Andy; Attree, Kevin; Jenkyns, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    New high-resolution records of bulk carbonate carbon isotopes have been generated for the Upper Coniacian to Lower Campanian interval of the reference sections at Seaford Head (southern England) and Bottaccione (Gubbio, central Italy). These records allow for a new and unambiguous stratigraphic correlation of the base and top of the Santonian between the Boreal and Tethyan realms. Orbital forcing of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes can be highlighted in the Seaford Head dataset, and a floating astronomical time scale is presented for the Santonian of the section, which spans five 405 kyr cycles (Sa1 to Sa5). Macro-, micro- and nannofossil biostratigraphy of the Seaford section is integrated along with magnetostratigraphy, carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy. Correlation of the Seaford Head astronomical time scale to that of the Niobrara Formation (U.S. Western Interior Basin) allows for anchoring these records to the La2011 astronomical solution at the Santonian-Campanian (Sa/Ca) boundary, which has been recently dated to 84.19±0.38 Ma. Five different astronomical tuning options are examined. The astronomical calibration generates a c. 200 kyr mismatch of the Coniacian-Santonian boundary age between the Boreal Realm in Europe and the Western Interior, likely due either to slight diachronism of the first occurrence of the inoceramid Cladoceramus undulatoplicatus between the two regions, or to remaining uncertainties of radiometric dating and the cyclostratigraphic records.

  18. On-orbit calibration of the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Scanning Imager (SSUSI): a far-UV imaging spectrograph on DMSP F-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Daniel; Paxton, Larry J.; Humm, David C.; Wolven, Brian; Kil, Hyosub; Zhang, Yongliang; Ogorzalek, Bernard S.; Meng, Ching-I.

    2002-01-01

    The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) is currently slated for launch on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-16 in November 2001. This instrument consists of a scanning imaging spectrograph (SIS) whose field-of-view is scanned from horizon-to-horizon and a nadir-looking photometer system (NPS). It will provide operational information about the state of the atmosphere above 100 km. The unique problems incurred by the observational requirements (e.g. that we be able to make daytime and nighttime observations) and the design trade-offs needed to meet those requirements were strong drivers on calibration requirements. Those design trade-offs and the expectation that the instrument calibration will change appreciably in-flight have led to the requirement to perform a large instrument characterization in-flight using only natural sources. We focus, in this paper, on the flight characterization of the SSUSI instrument. This includes discussions of the stellar calibration approach for radiometric calibration, measurements of internally scattered light, sensitivity to the South Atlantic Anomaly, measurements of changing pulse height distributions, and measuring changing reflectivity of a nadir viewing scan mirror. In addition, the calibration of the NPS system using natural sources is addressed.

  19. An astronomically calibrated early Paleocene magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy at Zumaia (Basque Basin, Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinarès-Turell, J.; Baceta, J. I.; Pujalte, V.; Orue-Etxebarria, X.; Bernaola, G.; Lorito, S.

    2003-04-01

    .22 m corresponds to the ~110 ky eccentricity cycle. We have used a band-pass filter on the coded lithologic series in the depth domain to extract the latest cycle and subsequently tuned the filter output assuming a value of 110 ky for the period of this eccentricity cycle target and then have re-evaluated the wavelet spectral content. The ~400 ky eccentricity cycle and modulations at longer periods are not significantly present. We provide a cycle-tuned duration for all intervening early Paleocene polarity chrons and estimate relative ages for bioevents. Our chronology is more complete and slightly different but compatible with an astronomically calibrated magnetostratigraphy from ODP Sites 1001A (Caribbean Sea) and 1050C (western North Atlantic) (Röhl et al, 2001), and partly with the standard GPTS of Cande and Kent (1995), which seem to have overestimated the duration of chrons C28 and C27 by 14 and 23% respectively with respect to our cycle-tuned durations. Our data may prove useful in the redefinition of the boundary between the Danian and Selandian stages.

  20. Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    Commercial spectrographic systems are usually supplied with some wave-length calibration, but it is essential that the experimenter performs his own calibration for reliable measurements. A number of sources emitting well-known emission lines are available, and the best values of their wavelengths may be taken from data banks accessible on the internet. Data have been critically evaluated for many decades by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the USA [13], see also p. 3. Special data bases have been established by the astronomy and fusion communities (Appendix B).

  1. GRACES: Gemini remote access to CFHT ESPaDOnS spectrograph through the longest astronomical fiber ever made: experimental phase completed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, André-Nicolas; Padzer, John; Barrick, Gregory; Anthony, Andre; Benedict, Tom; Duncan, Dave; Gigoux, Pedro; Kleinman, Scot; Malo, Lison; Martioli, Eder; Moutou, Claire; Placco, Vinicius; Reshetovand, Vladimir; Rhee, Jaehyon; Roth, Katherine; Schiavon, Ricardo; Tollestrup, Eric V.; Vermeulen, Tom A.; White, John; Wooff, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The Gemini Remote Access to CFHT ESPaDONS Spectrograph has achieved first light of its experimental phase in May 2014. It successfully collected light from the Gemini North telescope and sent it through two 270 m optical fibers to the the ESPaDOnS spectrograph at CFHT to deliver high-resolution spectroscopy across the optical region. The fibers gave an average focal ratio degradation of 14% on sky, and a maximum transmittance of 85% at 800nm. GRACES achieved delivering spectra with a resolution power of R = 40,000 and R = 66,000 between 400 and 1,000 nm. It has a ~8% throughput and is sensitive to target fainter than 21st mag in 1 hour. The average acquisition time of a target is around 10 min. This project is a great example of a productive collaboration between two observatories on Maunakea that was successful due to the reciprocal involvement of the Gemini, CFHT, and NRC Herzberg teams, and all the staff involved closely or indirectly.

  2. THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WISE/NEOWISE: COMPARISON WITH INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; Walker, R.; McMillan, R. S.

    2011-08-10

    With thermal infrared observations detected by the NEOWISE project, we have measured diameters for 1742 minor planets that were also observed by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). We have compared the diameters and albedo derived by applying a spherical thermal model to the objects detected by NEOWISE and find that they are generally in good agreement with the IRAS values. We have shown that diameters computed from NEOWISE data are often less systematically biased than those found with IRAS. This demonstrates that the NEOWISE data set can provide accurate physical parameters for the >157,000 minor planets that were detected by NEOWISE.

  3. Laser frequency comb techniques for precise astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Locke, Clayton R.; Light, Philip S.; Luiten, Andre N.; Lawrence, Jon S.

    2012-05-01

    Precise astronomical spectroscopic analyses routinely assume that individual pixels in charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have uniform sensitivity to photons. Intra-pixel sensitivity (IPS) variations may already cause small systematic errors in, for example, studies of extra-solar planets via stellar radial velocities and cosmological variability in fundamental constants via quasar spectroscopy, but future experiments requiring velocity precisions approaching ˜1 cm s-1 will be more strongly affected. Laser frequency combs have been shown to provide highly precise wavelength calibration for astronomical spectrographs, but here we show that they can also be used to measure IPS variations in astronomical CCDs in situ. We successfully tested a laser frequency comb system on the Ultra-High-Resolution Facility spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. By modelling the two-dimensional comb signal recorded in a single CCD exposure, we find that the average IPS deviates by <8 per cent if it is assumed to vary symmetrically about the pixel centre. We also demonstrate that a series of comb exposures with absolutely known offsets between them can yield tighter constraints on symmetric IPS variations from ˜100 pixels. We discuss measurement of asymmetric IPS variations and absolute wavelength calibration of astronomical spectrographs and CCDs using frequency combs.

  4. Calibration of radio-astronomical data on the cloud. LOFAR, the pathway to SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Sánchez-Expósito, S.; Garrido, J.; Ruiz, J. E.; Best, P. N.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2015-05-01

    The radio interferometer LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) is fully operational now. This Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinder allows the observation of the sky at frequencies between 10 and 240 MHz, a relatively unexplored region of the spectrum. LOFAR is a software defined telescope: the data is mainly processed using specialized software running in common computing facilities. That means that the capabilities of the telescope are virtually defined by software and mainly limited by the available computing power. However, the quantity of data produced can quickly reach huge volumes (several Petabytes per day). After the correlation and pre-processing of the data in a dedicated cluster, the final dataset is handled to the user (typically several Terabytes). The calibration of these data requires a powerful computing facility in which the specific state of the art software under heavy continuous development can be easily installed and updated. That makes this case a perfect candidate for a cloud infrastructure which adds the advantages of an on demand, flexible solution. We present our approach to the calibration of LOFAR data using Ibercloud, the cloud infrastructure provided by Ibergrid. With the calibration work-flow adapted to the cloud, we can explore calibration strategies for the SKA and show how private or commercial cloud infrastructures (Ibercloud, Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine, etc.) can help to solve the problems with big datasets that will be prevalent in the future of astronomy.

  5. Updated Status and Performance for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joanna M.; De Rosa, Gisella; Debes, John H.; Ely, Justin; Fix, Mees B.; Fox, Andrew; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Lockwood, Sean A.; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Peeples, Molly S.; Penton, Steven V.; Plesha, Rachel; Proffitt, Charles R.; Roman-Duval, Julia; Sahnow, David J.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Walborn, Nolan R.; White, James

    2016-06-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009. COS is designed to perform high-sensitivity medium- and low-resolution spectroscopy of astronomical objects in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) wavelength regimes. We present updates on the time-dependent sensitivities of both the NUV and FUV detectors. Additionally, we discuss the appearance and mitigation of transient, isolated regions of increased count rates on the COS FUV detector called “hot spots”. We also present updates to the COS calibration pipeline, CalCOS, that provide improvements to COS data products.

  6. Panchromatic Calibration of Astronomical Observations with State-of-the-Art White Dwarf Model Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of white dwarfs provide a powerful tool for cross-calibration and sensitivity control of instruments from the far infrared to the X-ray energy range. Such SEDs can be calculated from fully metal-line blanketed NLTE model-atmospheres that are e.g. computed by the Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP) that has arrived at a high level of sophistication. TMAP was successfully employed for the reliable spectral analysis of many hot, compact post-AGB stars. High-quality stellar spectra obtained over a wide energy range establish a data base with a large number of spectral lines of many successive ions of different species. Their analysis allows to determine effective temperatures, surface gravities, and element abundances of individual (pre-)white dwarfs with very small error ranges. We present applications of TMAP SEDs for spectral analyses of hot, compact stars in the parameter range from (pre-) white dwarfs to neutron stars and demonstrate the improvement of flux calibration using white-dwarf SEDs that are e.g. available via registered services in the Virtual Observatory.

  7. Updates to the Performance and Calibration of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin; Becker, George; Biretta, John; Debes, John; Fox, Andrew; Lockwood, sean; Massa, Derck; Monroe, TalaWanda; Oliveira, Cristina; Jedrzejekski, Robert; Peeples, Molly; Penton, Steven Victor; Plesha, Rachel; Proffitt, Charles; Roman-Duval, Julia; Sahnow, David; Sana, Hugues; Sonnentrucker, Paule G.; Taylor, Joanna; Walborn, Nolan

    2015-08-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has been on orbit for approximately 18 years and continues to produce high quality scientific results using a diverse complement of operating modes. These include spatially resolved spectroscopy in the UV and optical, high spatial resolution echelle spectroscopy in the UV, and solar-blind imaging in the UV. In addition, STIS possesses unique visible-light coronagraphic modes that keep the instrument at the forefront of exoplanet and debris-disk research. As the instrument's characteristics evolve over the instrument’s lifetime, the instrument team at Space Telescope Science Institute monitors its performance and works towards improving the quality of its products. Here we present updates on the status of the STIS CCD and FUV &NUV MAMA detectors, as well as changes to the CalSTIS reduction pipeline and available instrument modes. As the STIS CCD detector continues to suffer from charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) due to prolonged radiation damage, we also present an update on the on-going effort to develop a stand-alone tool to perform a pixel-based CTI correction on the STIS CCD, for distribution to the community.

  8. New method for atmospheric calibration at the Pierre Auger Observatory using FRAM, a robotic astronomical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trávníček, Petr; Benzvi, Segev; Boháčová, Martina; Connolly, Brian; Grygar, Jiří; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Kárová, Tatiana; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Nosek, Dalibor; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; sPech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Šmída, Radomír; Vitale, Primo; Westerhoff, Stefan

    FRAM - F/(Ph)otometric Robotic Atmospheric Monitor is the latest addition to the atmospheric monitoring instruments of the Pierre Auger Observatory. An optical telescope equipped with CCD camera and photometer, it automatically observes a set of selected standard stars and a calibrated terrestrial source. Primarily, the wavelength dependence of the attenuation is derived and the comparison between its vertical values (for stars) and horizontal values (for the terrestrial source) is made. Further, the integral vertical aerosol optical depth can be obtained. A secondary program of the instrument, the detection of optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts, has already proven successful. The hardware setup, software system, data taking procedures, and first analysis results are described in this paper.

  9. Update to the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph FUV Calibration: Improved Characterization Below 1150 Angstroms and Improved Absolute Flux Calibration at all Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, Paule; Bostroem, K. A.; Ely, J.; Debes, J. H.; DiFelice, A.; Hernandez, S.; Hodge, P. E.; Lindsay, K.; Lockwood, S. A.; Massa, D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Roman-Duval, J.; Penton, S. V.; Proffitt, C. R.; Taylor, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    As of Cycle 20, the three COS/FUV "Blue Mode" wavelength settings at G130M/1055, 1096 and 1222, have become available as regular observing modes. We provide updates on the wavelength and flux calibration of these new Blue Mode settings, which allow medium-resolution spectroscopy down to 900A with effective areas comparable to those of FUSE. We discuss also recent improvements to the COS/FUV flux and flat-field calibrations and present the most recent time-dependent sensitivity trends of the FUV and NUV channels.

  10. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-01-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard–Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating. PMID:23112159

  11. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-11-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard-Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating.

  12. Wavelength calibration from 1-5μm for the CRIRES+ high-resolution spectrograph at the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, U.; Anglada-Escude, G.; Baade, D.; Bristow, P.; Dorn, R. J.; Follert, R.; Gojak, D.; Grunhut, J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Heiter, U.; Ives, D. J.; Jeep, P.; Jung, Y.; Käufl, H.-U.; Kerber, F.; Klein, B.; Lizon, J.-L.; Lockhart, M.; Löwinger, T.; Marquart, T.; Oliva, E.; Paufique, J.; Piskunov, N.; Pozna, E.; Reiners, A.; Smette, A.; Smoker, J.; Stempels, E.; Valenti, E.

    2014-08-01

    CRIRES at the VLT is one of the few adaptive optics enabled instruments that offer a resolving power of 105 from 1 - 5 μm. An instrument upgrade (CRIRES+) is proposed to implement cross-dispersion capabilities, spectro-polarimetry modes, a new detector mosaic, and a new gas absorption cell. CRIRES+ will boost the simultaneous wavelength coverage of the current instrument (~ γ/70 in a single-order) by a factor of 10 in the cross-dispersed configuration, while still retaining a ~> 10 arcsec slit suitable for long-slit spectroscopy. CRIRES+ dramatically enhances the instrument's observing efficiency, and opens new scientific opportunities. These include high-precision radial-velocity studies on the 3 m/s level to characterize extra-solar planets and their athmospheres, which demand for specialized, highly accurate wavelength calibration techniques. In this paper, we present a newly developed absorption gas-cell to enable high-precision wavelength calibration for CRIRES+. We also discuss the strategies and developments to cover the full operational spectral range (1 - 5 μµm), employing cathode emission lamps, Fabry-Perot etalons, and absorption gas-cells.

  13. ECHARPE: a fiber-fed echelle spectrograph for the Pico dos Dias Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, Tania P.; Castilho, Bruno; Gneiding, Clemens D.; Delabre, Bernard A.; Macanhan, Vanessa B. P.; de Arruda, Marcio V.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Melendez, Jorge; Vaz, Luiz P. R.; Corradi, Wagner J. B.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; do Nascimento, Jose D.; Quast, Germano R.; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.

    2012-09-01

    At least during the last ten years, the Brazilian astronomical community has been asking for an echelle spectrograph for the 1.6 m telescope installed at Pico dos Dias Observatory (Brazópolis, MG, Brazil, OPD/MCTI/LNA). Among the scientific cases are topics related to the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, asteroseismology, chemical composition and chromospheric activities of solar type stars and the relations between solar analogues and terrestrial planets. During 2009 the project finally got started. The called ECHARPE spectrograph (Espectrógrafo ECHelle de Alta Resolução para o telescópio Perkin-Elmer) is being projected to offer a spectral resolution of R ~ 50000, in the range 390-900 nm and with a single exposition. It will be a bench spectrograph with two channels: blue and red, fed by two optical fibers (object, sky or calibration) with aperture of 1.5 or 2.0 arcseconds. The instrument will be placed in one of the telescope pillar ramification, in the originals installations of a Coudé spectrograph and in a specially created environment controlled room. In this work we will present the scientific motivations, the conceptual optical design, the expected performance of the spectrograph, and the status of its development. ECHARPE is expected to be delivered to the astronomical community in 2014, fully prepared and optimized for remote operations.

  14. Development of compact and ultra-high-resolution spectrograph with multi-GHz optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Mamoru; Sukegawa, Takashi; Silva, Alissa; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, a calibration method for an astronomical spectrograph using an optical frequency comb (OFC) with a repetition rate of more than ten GHz has been developed successfully [1-5]. But controlling filtering cavities that are used for thinning out longitudinal modes precludes long term stability. The super-mode noise coming from the fundamental repetition rate is an additional problem. We developed a laser-diode pumped Yb:Y2O3 ceramic oscillator, which enabled the generation of 4-GHz (maximum repetition rate of 6.7 GHz) pulse trains directly with a spectrum width of 7 nm (full-width half-maximum, FWHM), and controlled its optical frequency within a MHz level of accuracy using a beat note between the 4-GHz laser and a 246-MHz Yb-fiber OFC. The optical frequency of the Yb-fiber OFC was phase locked to a Rb clock frequency standard. Furthermore we also built a table-top multi-pass spectrograph with a maximum frequency resolution of 600 MHz and a bandwidth of 1 nm using a large-size high-efficiency transmission grating. The resolution could be changed by selecting the number of passes through the grating. This spectrograph could resolve each longitudinal mode of our 4-GHz OFC clearly, and more than 10% throughput was obtained when the resolution was set to 600 MHz. We believe that small and middle scale astronomical observatories could easily implement such an OFC-calibrated spectrograph.

  15. Methods in Astronomical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörsäter, S.

    A Brief Introductory Note History of Astronomical Imaging Astronomical Image Data Images in Various Formats Digitized Image Data Digital Image Data Philosophy of Astronomical Image Processing Properties of Digital Astronomical Images Human Image Processing Astronomical vs. Computer Science Image Processing Basic Tools of Astronomical Image Processing Display Applications Calibration of Intensity Scales Calibration of Length Scales Image Re-shaping Feature Enhancement Noise Suppression Noise and Error Analysis Image Processing Packages: Design of AIPS and MIDAS AIPS MIDAS Reduction of CCD Data Bias Subtraction Clipping Preflash Subtraction Dark Subtraction Flat Fielding Sky Subtraction Extinction Correction Deconvolution Methods Rebinning/Combining Summary and Prospects for the Future

  16. Astronomical timescale calibration for the Permian-Triassic boundary transition interval from global correlation of cyclic marine sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Hinnov, L. A.; Tong, J.; Chen, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The mass extinctions near the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) resulted in the greatest dying of life on Earth. The cause of this catastrophe remains enigmatic. High-resolution chronology is crucial to understanding the recorded pattern of biotic evolution and possible causes for the extinctions. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data from Shangsi, South China shows evidence for astronomical forcing through the PTB interval, with strong 405-kyr cycling. This allows development of an astrochronology for the PTB interval based on the 405-kyr orbital eccentricity metronome that has been proposed for the Mesozoic timescale. Radioisotope dating combined with the 405-kyr tuned MS series from Shangsi shows that the 405-kyr-cycle predominates throughout the PTB interval. In the Permian segment, ~100-kyr cyclicity dominates, and the 100-kyr-scale MS maxima correlate with high-amplitude precession-scale MS variations. Minima in the ~1.5-Myr, 405-kyr and ~100-kyr cycles converge at 252.6 Ma, approximately 200 kyr before the onset of the main mass extinction near the PTB. In the Triassic aftermath, the recorded astronomical signal is different, with predominant 405-kyr cycles and loss of 100 kyr cyclicity, and appearance of ~33 kyr (obliquity scale) cyclicity; 100-kyr cyclicity strengthens again 2 Myr later. This pattern indicates a change in the response of the depositional environment (or magnetic susceptibility) to astronomical forcing before and after the mass extinction interval. The astrochronology interpolates the timescale between the radioisotopically determined absolute dates; this facilitates estimation of ages for specific events in the PTB crisis, including magnetic reversals, biozone boundaries, and the mass extinctions. An estimated ~700 kyr duration for the Mass Extinction Interval (MEI) at Shangsi based on the 405-kyr tuning is supported by eccentricity-tuned estimates of three other sections in China (Meishan, Huangzhishan, and Heping), and two Alpine sections

  17. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-line Calibration Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  18. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  19. Structure of the spectrograph ESOPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, G.; Farah, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Pedrayes, M.; Arroyo, M.; Avila, G.; Cobos, F.; Colorado, E.; Córdova, A.; Costero, R.; Chapa, O.; Echevarria, J.; García, B.; Garfias, F.; Guisa, G.; Granados, F.; Luna, E.; Martínez, B.; Michel, R.; Murillo, F.; Murillo, J.; Quechol, S.; Quiroz, F.; Tejada, C.

    2008-07-01

    The structure of the spectrograph ESOPO is the stiff mount that will maintain fixed all optics elements, electronics and mechanical subsystems. The ESOPO spectrograph is a project of the "Instituto de Astronomia de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico" (IAUNAM) to upgrade its 2.1m telescope as a competitive facility for the next decade. The scientific purpose is to obtain a modern high efficient intermediate-low dispersion spectrograph optimized for the 3500 - 9000 Å spectral interval with a spectral resolution of 500 <= R <= 5000. It is to be used at the cassegrain f/7.5 focus of the 2.1 m telescope for general astronomical purposes. This work presents the mechanical design process and the form in which the structure was verified to comply with the ESOPO's top level image quality and stability requirements. The latter was not a lineal process. The way we resolved it is to run FEAs on the complete system and with the instrument in different operation positions during a normal cycle of observations. These results are validated through the error budget of the ESOPO. The structure is currently under construction.

  20. Untangling the Palaeocene climatic rhythm: an astronomically calibrated Early Palaeocene magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy at Zumaia (Basque basin, northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinarès-Turell, Jaume; Baceta, Juan Ignacio; Pujalte, Victoriano; Orue-Etxebarria, Xabier; Bernaola, Gilen; Lorito, Stefano

    2003-12-01

    forcing at the Milankovitch band masking the full expression of the low-frequency astronomical periods. We provide a cycle-tuned duration for all intervening Early Palaeocene polarity chrons and estimate relative ages for bioevents. The cycle-tuned chronology indicates that the CK95 GPTS overestimates the duration of chrons C28 and C27 by 20 and 26% respectively. Our data may prove useful to better constrain Early Palaeocene biostratigraphy of calcareous plankton and in the redefinition of the boundary between the Danian and Selandian stages.

  1. Curved VPH gratings for novel spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, J. Christopher; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Dunlap, Bart H.

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings into astronomy over a decade ago opened new possibilities for instrument designers. In this paper we describe an extension of VPH grating technology that will have applications in astronomy and beyond: curved VPH gratings. These devices can disperse light while simultaneously correcting aberrations. We have designed and manufactured two different kinds of convex VPH grating prototypes for use in off-axis reflecting spectrographs. One type functions in transmission and the other in reflection, enabling Offnerstyle spectrographs with the high-efficiency and low-cost advantages of VPH gratings. We will discuss the design process and the tools required for modelling these gratings along with the recording layout and process steps required to fabricate them. We will present performance data for the first convex VPH grating produced for an astronomical spectrograph.

  2. Astronomical calibration of the Toarcian Stage: Implications for sequence stratigraphy and duration of the early Toarcian OAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulila, Slah; Galbrun, Bruno; Huret, Emilia; Hinnov, Linda A.; Rouget, Isabelle; Gardin, Silvia; Bartolini, Annachiara

    2014-01-01

    The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) of the early Jurassic period involves one of the largest perturbations of the carbon cycle in the past 250 Ma, recorded by a pronounced negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE). Numerous studies have focused on potential causes of the T-OAE and CIE, but are hampered by an uncertain timescale. Here we present high-resolution (∼2 kyr) magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements from the marine marls of the Sancerre-Couy drill-core, southern Paris Basin, spanning the entire Toarcian Stage. The MS variations document a rich series of sub-Milankovitch to Milankovitch frequencies (precession, obliquity and eccentricity) with the periodic g2-g5 (405 kyr) and quasi-periodic g4-g3 (∼2.4 Myr Cenozoic mean periodicity) eccentricity terms being the most prominent. The MS-related g4-g3 variation reflects third-order eustatic sequences, and constrains the sequence stratigraphic framework of the Toarcian Stage. In addition, MS variations reveal a modulation of g2-g5 by g4-g3 eccentricity related cycles, suggesting that sea-level change was the main control on the deposition of the Toarcian Sancerre marls, in tune with the astro-climatic frequencies. The stable 405 kyr cyclicity constrains a minimum duration of the Toarcian Stage to ∼8.3 Myr, and the well documented CIE, associated with the T-OAE, to ∼300 to 500 kyr. The 405 kyr MS timescale calibrates the periodicity of the prominent high-frequency δC13 cycles that occur in the decreasing part of the CIE to 30 to 34 kyr, consistent with the Toarcian obliquity period predicted for an Earth experiencing sustained tidal dissipation.

  3. Updated Status and Performance for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph Onboard the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joanna M.; Aloisi, A.; Bacinski, J.; Bostroem, K. A.; Debes, J. H.; Roman-Duval, J.; Ely, J.; DiFelice, A.; Hernandez, S.; Kriss, G. A.; Hodge, P.; Lindsay, K.; Lockwood, S. A.; Massa, D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Osten, R. A.; Penton, S. V.; Proffitt, C. R.; Sahnow, D. J.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Wheeler, T.

    2013-06-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope in May 2009. Although COS was initially designed to perform high-sensitivity medium- and low-resolution spectroscopy of astronomical objects in the 1150-3200 Å wavelength range, new wavelength settings have recently become available that allow medium-resolution spectroscopy down to 900 Å, at effective areas comparable to those of FUSE. Here we provide an update on the implementation of the new short wavelength settings G130M/1222, 1096, and 1055. We discuss changes to the Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) and Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) dark rates, FUV pulse height filtering, new and improved flux calibrations for FUV Lifetime Positions 1 and 2, changes in sensitivity for both the NUV and FUV channels, and give a general overview of the calibration projects undertaken in Cycles 19 and 20.

  4. ESOPO a Medium Resolution Optical Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, A.; Chapa, O.; Cobos, F.; Colorado, E.; Costero, R.; Echevarria, J.; García, B.; Garfias, F.; González, J.; Granados, F.; Guisa, G.; Luna, E.; Martínez, B.; Murillo, F.; Pedrayes, M.; Pérez, F.; Quirós, F.; Tejada, C.; Sierra, G.

    2009-05-01

    The Instituto de Astronomía, of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, after an internal licitation, determined to design and manufacture a Medium Resolution Optical Spectrograph. The instrument will be attached to the 2.1 m telescope at the National Astronomical Observatory at San Pedro Mártir, México. The project was granted to the ESOPO group, winner of the call for proposals. The basic purpose of the project is to equip the observatory with a modern and more efficient spectrograph. Its main goal is to solve astronomical problems that require an ample optical range with a spectral resolution between 500 and 5000. These projects include observations of extended stellar objects, external galaxies, and stars inside our galaxy. In this work we present the scientific goals of ESOPO spectrograph, its translation to high level requirements, its optical design as well as its mechanical design and optomechanics for 24 lenses. The error budget for image quality and motion are included. Finally, management, organization, and first light date of the project are described.

  5. NRES: The Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siverd, Robert; Eastman, Jason D.; Brown, Timothy M.; Hygelund, John; Henderson, Todd; Tufts, Joseph; Van Eyken, Julian C.; Barnes, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Network (LCOGT) is building the Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs (NRES), which will consist of six identical, optical (390 - 860 nm) high-precision spectrographs, each fiber-fed simultaneously by two 1 meter telescopes and a thorium argon calibration source, one at each of our observatory sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Thus, NRES will be a single, globally-distributed, autonomous observing facility using twelve 1-m telescopes. Simulations suggest we will achieve long-term radial velocity precision of better than 3 m/s in less than an hour for stars brighter than V = 12. We have been funded with NSF MRI and ATI grants, and expect our first spectrograph to be deployed in mid 2015, with the full network operation of all 6 units beginning in 2016. We will discuss the NRES design, goals, robotic operation, and status, as well as the early results from our prototype spectrograph.

  6. Rocket instrument for far-UV spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Fastie, W. G.; Davidsen, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive sounding rocket instrument for moderate (about 10-A) resolution far-UV (1160-1750-A) spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects has been developed. The instrument employes a photon-counting microchannel plate imaging detector and a concave grating spectrograph behind a 40-cm Dall-Kirkham telescope. A unique remote-control pointing system, incorporating an SIT vidicon aspect camera, two star trackers, and a tone-encoded command telemetry link, permits the telescope to be oriented to within 5 arc sec of any target for which suitable guide stars can be found. The design, construction, calibration, and flight performance of the instrument are discussed.

  7. Rocket instrument for far-UV spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects.

    PubMed

    Hartig, G F; Fastie, W G; Davidsen, A F

    1980-03-01

    A sensitive sounding rocket instrument for moderate (~10-A) resolution far-UV (lambda1160-lambda1750-A) spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects has been developed. The instrument employs a photon-counting microchannel plate imaging detector and a concave grating spectrograph behind a 40-cm Dall-Kirkham telescope. A unique remote-control pointing system, incorporating an SIT vidicon aspect camera, two star trackers, and a tone-encoded command telemetry link, permits the telescope to be oriented to within 5 arc sec of any target for which suitable guide stars can be found. The design, construction, calibration, and flight performance of the instrument are discussed. PMID:20220923

  8. A high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer for astronomical observations and development of wavelength standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Ulrike; Reiners, Ansgar; Schäfer, Sebastian

    2012-09-01

    At the Institute for Astrophysics Goettingen (IAG), we are purchasing a high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrograph (FTS) for astronomical observations and development of calibration standards aiming at high wavelength precision. Astronomical spectrographs that work in the regime of very high resolution (resolving powers λ/δλ>=105) now achieve unprecedented precision and stability. Precise line shifts can be investigated to conclude for an objects radial velocity relative to the observer. As a long-term scientific goal, the evolution of galaxy redshift due to dark energy can be monitored. Also, the detection of lower mass, down to Earth-like planets will become feasible. Here, M-dwarfs are promising objects where an orbiting exo-Earth can cause a wavelength shift large enough to be detected. Emitting mainly in the near infrared (NIR), these objects require novel calibration standards. Current schemes under consideration are gas cathode lamps (e.g. CN, UNe) and a highly stable Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) to act as a cost-efficient alternative to the laser frequency comb (LFC, [1]). In addition to experiments exploring novel wavelength calibration types, light will be fed from our telescopes at IAG. A Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) for solar observations and the 50 cm Cassegrain telescope allow to investigate stellar and spatially resolved light at our facilities.

  9. Production-line assembly of 150+ VIRUS spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. L.; Vattiat, Brian; DePoy, D. L.; Hill, Gary J.; Collins, Amanda D.; Lee, Hanshin; Allen, Richard D.; Kelz, Andreas; Bauer, Svend M.; Popow, Emil

    2010-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is being built to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) project. The instrument consists of 150+ identical fiber-fed integral field optical spectrographs. This instrument provides a unique challenge in astronomical instrumentation: each of the 150+ instruments must be identical and each component must be interchangeable amongst every other spectrograph in order to ease assembly and maintenance of the instrument. In this paper we describe plans for the production-line assembly of the spectrographs. In particular, we discuss the assembly procedures and design choices that will ensure uniformity of the spectrographs and support the project schedule.

  10. Astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

  11. Elliptical x-ray analyzer spectrograph application to a laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.J.; Palmer, M.A.; Henke, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    This spectrograph was designed to record a range of 100 to 2000 eV x-rays on calibrated Kodak Rar-2497 film. Using point calibrations and theoretical models, the spectrograph efficiency was predicted. Basic spectrograph geometry and photographic calibrations are presented in companion papers. A 20 J, 6 ns duration Nd:glass laser pulse was focussed upon planar targets of gold, aluminum, teflon and boron carbide. Sample spectra for line and x-ray yields analysis are presented.

  12. Blind Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The phrase "blind astronomer” is used as an allegorical oxymoron. However, there were and are blind astronomers. What of famous blind astronomers? First, it must be stated that these astronomers were not martyrs to their craft. It is a myth that astronomers blind themselves by observing the Sun. As early as France's William of Saint-Cloud (circa 1290) astronomers knew that staring at the Sun was ill-advised and avoided it. Galileo Galilei did not invent the astronomical telescope and then proceed to blind himself with one. Galileo observed the Sun near sunrise and sunset or through projection. More than two decades later he became blind, as many septuagenarians do, unrelated to their profession. Even Isaac Newton temporarily blinded himself, staring at the reflection of the Sun when he was a twentysomething. But permanent Sun-induced blindness? No, it did not happen. For instance, it was a stroke that left Scotland's James Gregory (1638-1675) blind. (You will remember the Gregorian telescope.) However, he died days later. Thus, blindness little interfered with his occupation. English Abbot Richard of Wallingford (circa 1291 - circa 1335) wrote astronomical works and designed astronomical instruments. He was also blind in one eye. Yet as he further suffered from leprosy, his blindness seems the lesser of Richard's maladies. Perhaps the most famous professionally active, blind astronomer (or almost blind astronomer) is Dominique-Francois Arago (1786-1853), director until his death of the powerful nineteenth-century Paris Observatory. I will share other _ some poignant _ examples such as: William Campbell, whose blindness drove him to suicide; Leonhard Euler, astronomy's Beethoven, who did nearly half of his life's work while almost totally blind; and Edwin Frost, who "observed” a total solar eclipse while completely sightless.

  13. A tunable laser system for precision wavelength calibration of spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Claire

    2010-02-01

    We present a novel laser-based wavelength calibration technique that improves the precision of astronomical spectroscopy, and solves a calibration problem inherent to multi-object spectroscopy. We have tested a prototype with the Hectochelle spectrograph at the MMT 6.5 m telescope. The Hectochelle is a high-dispersion, fiber-fed, multi-object spectrograph capable of recording up to 240 spectra simultaneously with a resolving power of 40000. The standard wavelength calibration method uses of spectra from ThAr hollow-cathode lamps shining directly onto the fibers. The difference in light path between calibration and science light as well as the uneven distribution of spectral lines are believed to introduce errors of up to several hundred m/s in the wavelength scale. Our tunable laser wavelength calibrator is bright enough for use with a dome screen, allowing the calibration light path to better match the science light path. Further, the laser is tuned in regular steps across a spectral order, creating a comb of evenly-spaced lines on the detector. Using the solar spectrum reflected from the atmosphere to record the same spectrum in every fiber, we show that laser wavelength calibration brings radial velocity uncertainties down below 100 m/s. We also present results from studies of globular clusters, and explain how the calibration technique can aid in stellar age determinations, studies of young stars, and searches for dark matter clumping in the galactic halo. )

  14. Designing Echelle Spectrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzler, A.

    1987-01-01

    Performance numbers and output maps computed from inputs supplied by user. Echelle Spectrograph Design Aid program (EGRAM) aids in design of spectrographic systems that utilize echelle/first-order crossdisperser combinations. Optical combination causes two-dimensional echellogram to fall on detector. Describes echellogram with enough detail to enable user to judge effectively feasibility of spectrograph design. By iteratively altering system parameters, desired echellogram achieved without making physical model. Calculates system parameters accurately to first order and compare favorably to results from raytracing techniques. EGRAM written in two versions. FORTRAN 77, and Microsoft BASIC A.

  15. Combining laser frequency combs and iodine cell calibration techniques for Doppler detection of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, Kerri; Fischer, Debra; Spronck, Julien; DeMille, David

    2010-07-01

    Exoplanets can be detected from a time series of stellar spectra by looking for small, periodic shifts in the absorption features that are consistent with Doppler shifts caused by the presence of an exoplanet, or multiple exoplanets, in the system. While hundreds of large exoplanets have already been discovered with the Doppler technique (also called radial velocity), our goal is to improve the measurement precision so that many Earth-like planets can be detected. The smaller mass and longer period of true Earth analogues require the ability to detect a reflex velocity of ~10 cm/s over long time periods. Currently, typical astronomical spectrographs calibrate using either Iodine absorptive cells or Thorium Argon lamps and achieve ~10 m/s precision, with the most stable spectrographs pushing down to ~2 m/s. High velocity precision is currently achieved at HARPS by controlling the thermal and pressure environment of the spectrograph. These environmental controls increase the cost of the spectrograph, and it is not feasible to simply retrofit existing spectrometers. We propose a fiber-fed high precision spectrograph design that combines the existing ~5000-6000 A Iodine calibration system with a high-precision Laser Frequency Comb (LFC) system from ~6000-7000 A that just meets the redward side of the Iodine lines. The scientific motivation for such a system includes: a 1000 A span in the red is currently achievable with LFC systems, combining the two calibration methods increases the wavelength range by a factor of two, and moving redward decreases the "noise" from starspots. The proposed LFC system design employs a fiber laser, tunable serial Fabry-Perot cavity filters to match the resolution of the LFC system to that of standard astronomical spectrographs, and terminal ultrasonic vibration of the multimode fiber for a stable point spread function.

  16. Women Astronomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Deborah Jean

    1979-01-01

    Traces the role of women in the scientific community in the United States since the mid-nineteenth century. Specific concern is directed towards the education and career opportunities of female astronomers. (MA)

  17. Multiple object fiber optics spectrograph feed for the Hale telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, E. F.; Goss, W. C.; Cohen, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary design for a computer-controlled fiber-optics feed linking the 5-m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory to the entrance slit of an astronomical spectrograph is presented. A 76-mm square field will be divided into ten strips containing two movable fibers each; the fibers can be moved by stepper-motor-driven lead screws to any position on the strip. The device is designed to allow the simultaneous spectrographic observation of many astronomical objects in a small angular field. A prototype feed using two fibers and manually commanded digital control is described in detail. Test observations of two bright O stars made in April, 1981 using the prototype with the Hale telescope are considered sufficiently positive to warrant construction of the 20-fiber feed, which would enhance the spectrographic-survey effectiveness of the telescope by a factor of ten.

  18. Airborne spectrograph for the thermal IR: Broadband Array Spectrograph System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.; Hackwell, John; Lynch, David; Mazuk, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies in the 'fingerprint' region of the thermal IR from 3 to 14 microns of celestial dust components and the overall energy distribution of the sources are best served by moderate spectral resolution (R = lambda/Delta lambda approximately 30 to 200), high sensitivity observations. Spectral purity and the reproducibility of the spectral shape are critical as well, when using the spectral shape to assign temperatures to dust grains or to gas clouds based on the wavelength and shape of molecular bands. These sensor attributes are also important to the use of wavelengths and ratios of solid state features to derive compositions of dust grains in celestial sources. The advent of high quality linear arrays of blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors of Si:As permitted the development of a state-of-the-art, patented, cooled prism spectrograph. Developed at The Aerospace Corporation largely with in-house funds, the Broadband Array Spectrograph System (BASS) has been used for a variety of remote sensing applications, but especially for IR astronomical studies on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). The attributes of the spectrograph, specifically having the pupil imaged onto the 2 linear 58 element detector arrays so that the effects of guiding errors are minimized, being able to maximally exploit the limited observing time by acquiring all 116 spectral channels simultaneously, and having all spectral channels imaged through the same aperture so that spectral mapping is readily and reliably accomplished, afford the scientist with a unique opportunity to conduct both surveys of examples of many different types of sources as well as in-depth studies of a given class of object by thoroughly sampling the class members. This duality was demonstrated with the BASS through a combination of KAO flights where spectral maps were obtained as part of in-depth studies of specific source regions (such as Orion and W3) and

  19. Observations of Resolved Stellar Populations with the JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST's sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec's full wavelength coverage over 1 to 5 micrometers will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We present a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in external galaxies. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We discuss how this and other use cases are being used to guide development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  20. The Near Infrared Spectrograph on the James Webb Space Telescope: Instrument Overview and User Interface Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Beck, Tracy; Karakla, Diane M.; Kassin, Susan; Keyes, Tony; Muzerolle, James; Pavlovsky, Cheryl; Soderblom, David; Ubeda, Leonardo

    2015-08-01

    The Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space Telescope will provide astronomers the ability to observe through fixed slits, the integral field unit, or in multi-object mode with the micro-shutter array, at spectral resolutions of R ˜ 100, 1000, and 2700. The combination of JWST’s sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec’s full wavelength coverage from 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We will provide a general overview of the NIRSpec instrument and the user interface development, including proposal planning and the data calibration and reduction pipeline. We will discuss the capabilities of NIRSpec for survey science, and introduce the science use cases that are being used to drive development of the NIRSpec user interfaces.

  1. NRES: The Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siverd, Robert; Brown, Timothy M.; Henderson, Todd; Hygelund, John; Tufts, Joseph; Eastman, Jason; Barnes, Stuart; Van Eyken, Julian C.

    2016-06-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Network (LCOGT) is building the Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs (NRES), which will consist of six identical, optical (390 - 860 nm) high-precision spectrographs, each fiber-fed simultaneously by up to two 1-meter telescopes and a thorium argon calibration source. We plan to install one at up to 6 observatory sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, creating a single, globally-distributed, autonomous spectrograph facility using up to twelve 1-m telescopes. Simulations suggest we will achieve long-term radial velocity precision of 3 m/s in less than an hour for stars brighter than V = 12. We have been funded with NSF MRI and ATI grants, and expect to deploy the first spectrograph in fall 2016, with the full network operation of 5 or 6 units beginning in 2017. We will briefly overview the NRES design, goals, robotic operation, and status. In addition, we will discuss early results from our prototype spectrograph, the laboratory and on-sky performance of our first production unit, initial science results, and the ongoing software development effort to bring this resource online.

  2. NRES: The Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siverd, Robert; Brown, Timothy M.; Hygelund, John; Henderson, Todd; Tufts, Joseph; Eastman, Jason; Van Eyken, Julian C.; Barnes, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Network (LCOGT) is building the Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs (NRES), which will consist of six identical, optical (390 - 860 nm) high-precision spectrographs, each fiber-fed simultaneously by up to two 1-meter telescopes and a thorium argon calibration source. We plan to install one at up to 6 observatory sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, creating a single, globally-distributed, autonomous spectrograph facility using up to twelve 1-m telescopes. Simulations suggest we will achieve long-term radial velocity precision of 3 m/s in less than an hour for stars brighter than V = 12. We have been funded with NSF MRI and ATI grants, and expect our first spectrograph to be deployed in early 2016, with the full network operation of 5 or 6 units beginning in 2017. We will briefly overview the NRES design, goals, robotic operation, and status. In addition, we will discuss early results from our prototype spectrograph, the laboratory and on-sky performance of our first production unit, and the ongoing software development effort to bring this resource online.

  3. Astronomical kaleidoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2005-10-01

    The entry contains two Moon eclipses (a picture of a total eclipse and a photo of a penumbral one), photographs of monuments of few greatest astronomers: Nikolay Kopernik, Tiho Brahe and Johannes Kepler, a photo from the JENAM-1995 (Catania, Sicily) as well as photographs of few astronomers related with Moldova and Romania: V. Grigorevskii, N. Donitch, V.Nadolschi, D. Mangeron, two nice clocks in Prague, as well as a map of the Sanctuary in Orheiul -Vechi (Bessarabia) with an supposed ancient calendar.

  4. Astronomical Polarimetry : new concepts, new instruments, new measurements & observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snik, F.

    2009-10-01

    All astronomical sources are polarized to some degree. Polarimetry is therefore a powerful astronomical technique. It furnishes unique diagnostics of e.g. magnetic fields and scattering media. This thesis presents new polarimetric concepts, instruments, and measurements targeting astronomical science questions. The first part of the thesis describes three novel polarimetric concepts. -A dedicated passive liquid crystal device known as a theta cell is introduced to enable one-shot observations of astronomical targets exhibiting a centrosymmetric polarization pattern. -A new passive measurement concept for broad-band linear polarization is introduced. It is based on a sinusoidal modulation of the spectrum, and is particularly suitable for instruments for which classical spatial and/or temporal polarization modulation is unfavorable. -Calibration of polarimetric instruments is usually limited by non-ideal effects of the calibration optics themselves. A mathematical frame-work based on Fourier analysis is introduced to tackle various non-ideal effects in polarimetric calibration. The second part of the thesis presents the designs and first results of three very different astronomical polarimeters. -The ultra-stable high-resolution HARPS spectrograph is successfully upgraded with a dual-beam polarimetric module. It furnishes direct observations of magnetic fields on stars. -The Small Synoptic Second Solar Spectrum Telescope (S5T) is designed to accurately monitor the variation of weak, turbulent magnetic fields on the Sun during a solar cycle. Such measurements are crucial for the understanding of local dynamo action in the solar photosphere. The prototype shows the feasibility of the instrument concept. -The Spectropolarimeter for Planetary EXpolaration (SPEX) is designed to study a planet's or moon's atmosphere from orbit. The additional information from the polarization measurement of scattered sunlight allows for determination of microphysical properties of

  5. Sky subtraction with fiber spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrini, C.; Cristiani, S.; La Franca, F.

    1994-11-01

    The sky-subtraction performance of multifiber spectrographs is discussed, analyzing in detail the case of the OPTOPUS system at the 3.6-m European Space Observatory (ESO) telescope at La Silla. A standard technique, based on flat fields obtained with a uniformly illuminated screen on the dome, provides poor results. A new method has been developed, using the (O I) emission line at 5577 A as a calibrator of the fiber transmittance, taking into account the diffuse light and the influence of each fiber on the adjacent ones, and correcting for the effects of the image distortions on the sky sampling. In this way the accuracy of the sky subtraction improves from 2%-8% to 1.3%-1.6%.

  6. PRISM Spectrograph Optical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to explore optical design concepts for the PRISM spectrograph and produce a preliminary optical design. An exciting optical configuration has been developed which will allow both wavelength bands to be imaged onto the same detector array. At present the optical design is only partially complete because PRISM will require a fairly elaborate optical system to meet its specification for throughput (area*solid angle). The most complex part of the design, the spectrograph camera, is complete, providing proof of principle that a feasible design is attainable. This camera requires 3 aspheric mirrors to fit inside the 20x60 cm cross-section package. A complete design with reduced throughput (1/9th) has been prepared. The design documents the optical configuration concept. A suitable dispersing prism material, CdTe, has been identified for the prism spectrograph, after a comparison of many materials.

  7. Immersion echelle spectrograph

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A small spectrograph containing no moving components and capable of providing high resolution spectra of the mid-infrared region from 2 microns to 4 microns in wavelength. The resolving power of the spectrograph exceeds 20,000 throughout this region and at an optical throughput of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.2 sr. The spectrograph incorporates a silicon immersion echelle grating operating in high spectral order combined with a first order transmission grating in a cross-dispersing configuration to provide a two-dimensional (2-D) spectral format that is focused onto a two-dimensional infrared detector array. The spectrometer incorporates a common collimating and condensing lens assembly in a near aberration-free axially symmetric design. The spectrometer has wide use potential in addition to general research, such as monitoring atmospheric constituents for air quality, climate change, global warming, as well as monitoring exhaust fumes for smog sources or exhaust plumes for evidence of illicit drug manufacture.

  8. Astronomical Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, D. E.; Finkenbinder, L. R.

    2004-05-01

    Just as quetzals and jaguars require specific ecological habitats to survive, so too must planets occupy a tightly constrained astronomical habitat to support life as we know it. With this theme in mind we relate the transferable features of our elementary astronomy course, "The Astronomical Basis of Life on Earth." Over the last five years, in a team-taught course that features a spring break field trip to Costa Rica, we have introduced astronomy through "astronomical ecosystems," emphasizing astronomical constraints on the prospects for life on Earth. Life requires energy, chemical elements, and long timescales, and we emphasize how cosmological, astrophysical, and geological realities, through stabilities and catastrophes, create and eliminate niches for biological life. The linkage between astronomy and biology gets immediate and personal: for example, studies in solar energy production are followed by hikes in the forest to examine the light-gathering strategies of photosynthetic organisms; a lesson on tides is conducted while standing up to our necks in one on a Pacific beach. Further linkages between astronomy and the human timescale concerns of biological diversity, cultural diversity, and environmental sustainability are natural and direct. Our experience of teaching "astronomy as habitat" strongly influences our "Astronomy 101" course in Oklahoma as well. This "inverted astrobiology" seems to transform our student's outlook, from the universe being something "out there" into something "we're in!" We thank the SNU Science Alumni support group "The Catalysts," and the SNU Quetzal Education and Research Center, San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, for their support.

  9. User Support for the HST Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnella, A. M.; Christensen, J. A.; Hulbert, S. J.

    1997-12-01

    Plans for user support of the HST spectrographs include the two archival instruments, GHRS and FOS, as well as the currently operational STIS. Support for users of STIS covers the range of proposal preparation, calibration and visits to the institute, whereas support for the archival instruments is not as broad. We describe the ways in which an observer can find support through our extensive World Wide Web resources and the Space Telescope help desk.

  10. Single Mode, Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christian; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Betters, Christopher H.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2014-04-01

    The `holy grail' of exoplanet research today is the detection of an earth-like planet: a rocky planet in the habitable zone around a main-sequence star. Extremely precise Doppler spectroscopy is an indispensable tool to find and characterize earth-like planets; however, to find these planets around solar-type stars, we need nearly one order of magnitude better radial velocity (RV) precision than the best current spectrographs provide. Recent developments in astrophotonics (Bland-Hawthorn & Horton 2006, Bland-Hawthorn et al. 2010) and adaptive optics (AO) enable single mode fiber (SMF) fed, high resolution spectrographs, which can realize the next step in precision. SMF feeds have intrinsic advantages over multimode fiber or slit coupled spectrographs: The intensity distribution at the fiber exit is extremely stable, and as a result the line spread function of a well-designed spectrograph is fully decoupled from input coupling conditions, like guiding or seeing variations (Ihle et al. 2010). Modal noise, a limiting factor in current multimode fiber fed instruments (Baudrand & Walker 2001), can be eliminated by proper design, and the diffraction limited input to the spectrograph allows for very compact instrument designs, which provide excellent optomechanical stability. A SMF is the ideal interface for new, very precise wavelength calibrators, like laser frequency combs (Steinmetz et al. 2008, Osterman et al. 2012), or SMF based Fabry-Perot Etalons (Halverson et al. 2013). At near infrared wavelengths, these technologies are ready to be implemented in on-sky instruments, or already in use. We discuss a novel concept for such a spectrograph.

  11. An Opto-MEMS Multiobject Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, K.; Ninkov, Z.; Zwarg, D.

    2000-05-01

    Optical MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Structures) are an enabling technology for a new class of optical instrumentation designs. An opto-MEMS device consists of an array of microfabricated structures, each of which modulates the phase and/or amplitude of an incident light beam. Typically the devices consist of an array of moveable micromirrors - each of which reflects an incident beam in a unique direction (tilt), or with a unique phase shift (piston). One widely available opto-MEMS device is the Texas Instruments' Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). The DMD is an array of 16 micron x 16 micron square mirrors postioned on a 17 micron pitch. Each mirror can tilt +/- 10 degrees from the normal - reflecting a normally incident light beam +/- 20 degrees. By positioning the DMD in an intermediate image plane in an optical system, portions of the image can be directed into- or out-of the input pupil of the follow-on imaging optics. RIT is utilizing the DMD to construct a prototype multiobject spectrograph (RIT-MOS) for visible observations with terrestrial telescopes. The DMD array replaces the input slit of an imaging spectrograph, forming a 'virtual', programmable slit assembly. By acquiring a pre-image of the astronomical field, it is possible to select a multidude of objects, and to program the DMD to pass only those objects into the input optics of the imaging spectrograph. We will report on the design and characterizatotion of the RIT-MOS, as well as preliminary imaging results.

  12. Astronomical superhighways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, D. C.

    1995-08-01

    The expansion of data supply has been prolific over the past decade. Publishers of text are only just beginning to consider what the aim of their publications should be in the light of competition from computer databases. Increasingly sources of data are becoming linked into a global network. The modem has revolutionised the way many astronomers interact with the outside world and each other. Access to data sources world wide can now be undertaken with a simple telephone call and a desktop computer.

  13. Astronomical instruments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. N.

    Indian astronomers have devised a number of instruments and the most important of these is the armillary sphere. The earliest armillary spheres were very simple instruments. Ptolemy in his Almagest enumerates at least three. The simplest of all was the equinoctial armilla. They had also the solstitial armilla which was a double ring, erected in the plane of the meridian with a rotating inner circle. This was used to measure the solar altitude.

  14. The GlobalJetWatch spectrographs: a fibre-fed spectrograph for small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Fraser J.; Gosling, Andrew J.; Doolin, Sam; Goodall, Paul; Perez, Sebastian; Pattinson, Paul; Makin, Rick; Blundell, Katherine M.

    2008-07-01

    The GlobalJetWatch project (www.globaljetwatch.net) will place small (0.5-metre) commerical telescopes in four schools around the world. Each telescope will be equipped with a custom designed spectrograph, currently being built by the Astrophysics sub-department of the University of Oxford. The scientific goal of the project is to provide continual monitoring of a rosetta stone object, the micro-quasar SS433. In addition, the project has a significant out-reach element, aiming to involve school children on four-continents in front-line astronomical research. The spectrograph is a fibre-fed fixed format cross-dispersed echellete design providing R~6000 spectra from 4300-8500 in a single exposure. The spectrograph is built almost entirely from off-the-shelf components. The four GlobalJetWatch sites (Australia, India, South Africa, Chile) will be commissioned in 2008/09. Here we present the baseline design of the spectrograph, and initial results from the prototype on-sky commissioning in Oxford.

  15. CEOI microslice spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Content, Robert; Blake, Simon; Dunlop, Colin; Nandi, David; Sharples, Ray; Talbot, Gordon; Shanks, Tom; Donoghue, Danny; Galiatsatos, Nikolaos; Luke, Peter

    2012-09-01

    We developed the technology of microslice integral field units some years ago as the next step in SAURON type microlens IFU design with typically 5 times more spatial elements (spaxels) for the same spectrograph and spectral length aiming at 1,000,000 spaxels IFUs. A full instrument for laboratory demonstration composed of the fore-optics, the IFU, the spectrograph and the detector has now been built and tested. It has about 10,000 spatial elements and spectra 150 pixel long. Our IFU has 5 cylindrical microlens arrays along the optical axis as opposed to one hexagonal array in the previous design. Instead of imaging pupils on the spectrograph input focal plane, our IFU images short slitlets 17 pixel long that keep the spatial information along the spatial direction then giving 17 spaxels per slitlet instead of one in pupil imaging. This removes most of the lost space between spectra leaving place for more and keeps the spatial information over the element size while pupil images lose it. The fore-optics re-images the field on the input of the IFU. They are made of cylindrical optics to get the desired different magnifications in both directions. All the optics and detector fit in a cylinder 35 mm in diameter and 280 mm long. With a different set of fore-optics on a 4-m telescope, a field of 43" x 6.7" with spatial elements of 0.14" x 0.22" could be observed so 12 of these mini-spectrographs would cover a field surface area of about 1 arcmin2 and 120,000 spaxels.

  16. Immersion echelle spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.G.; Thomas, N.L.

    2000-06-20

    A small spectrograph is disclosed containing no moving components and capable of providing high resolution spectra of the mid-infrared region from 2 microns to 4 microns in wavelength. The resolving power of the spectrograph exceeds 20,000 throughout this region and at an optical throughput of about 10{sup {minus}5}cm{sup 2}sr. The spectrograph incorporates a silicon immersion echelle grating operating in high spectral order combined with a first order transmission grating in a cross-dispersing configuration to provide a two-dimensional (2-D) spectral format that is focused onto a two-dimensional infrared detector array. The spectrometer incorporates a common collimating and condensing lens assembly in a near aberration-free axially symmetric design. The spectrometer has wide use potential in addition to general research, such as monitoring atmospheric constituents for air quality, climate change, global warming, as well as monitoring exhaust fumes for smog sources or exhaust plumes for evidence of illicit drug manufacture.

  17. The Science of Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  18. A nonmarine record of eccentricity forcing through the Upper Triassic of southwest England and its correlation with the Newark Basin astronomically calibrated geomagnetic polarity time scale from North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, David B.; Coe, Angela L.

    2007-11-01

    The Late Triassic was a time of major environmental change, yet the precise chronology of events is poorly constrained owing to the nonmarine nature of most preserved Upper Triassic strata and the difficulty in correlating sections. St. Audrie's Bay, southwest England, has been the focus of many studies on this interval of time and is one of the proposed sections for the base Jurassic global stratotype section and point (GSSP). In this study, lacustrine deposits exposed at St. Audrie's Bay have been used to construct a floating astronomical time scale for ˜3.7 m.y. of the Late Triassic based on the recognition of ˜100 k.y. eccentricity cycles in rock color. In addition, we have correlated this time scale with an existing magnetostratigraphy through the same succession and produced an astronomically calibrated record of geomagnetic polarity. Using a novel statistical procedure, we have determined the correlation between this succession and the Late Triassic geomagnetic polarity time scale of the Newark Basin, North America, on which the current (2004) geological time scale is based. Our results show unequivocally that the studied St. Audrie's Bay succession represents part of the Norian and we demonstrate for the first time that cyclostratigraphy can be used in the correlation of Mesozoic strata between North America and Europe.

  19. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S.; Welsh, Barry; and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  20. A new mass spectrograph.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Ishihara, M

    1993-05-01

    The optical designs of two new types of mass spectrographs were studied. The first is a system that possesses a specially shaped magnet output boundary to satisfy the double-focusing condition for a wide mass range. The focal plane is usually curved. The second system is one in which a parallel ion beam is generated before the magnet, forming a straight double-focusing line. By introducing a quadrupole lens doublet such that the ion beam may be deflected in the same direction through the electric and magnetic fields, the overall image magnification can be arbitrarily controlled and stigmatic focusing achieved for the median ray. PMID:24234934

  1. Construction and status of the CHARIS high contrast imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. J.; Limbach, Mary A.; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Loomis, Craig; Jarosik, Norm; Mede, Kyle; McElwain, Michael W.; Janson, Markus; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Martinache, Frantz; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2014-07-01

    Princeton University is building the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), an integral field spectrograph (IFS) for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS is funded by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and is designed to take high contrast spectra of brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets in the coronagraphic image provided by the Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) and the AO188 adaptive optics systems. The project is now in the build and test phase at Princeton University. Once laboratory testing has been completed CHARIS will be integrated with SCExAO and AO188 in the winter of 2016. CHARIS has a high-resolution characterization mode in J, H, and K bands. The average spectral resolution in J, H, and K bands are R82, R68, and R82 respectively, the uniformity of which is a direct result of a new high index material, L-BBH2. CHARIS also has a second low-resolution imaging mode that spans J,H, and K bands with an average spectral resolution of R19, a feature unique to this instrument. The field of view in both imaging modes is 2.07x2.07 arcseconds. SCExAO+CHARIS will detect objects five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star down to an 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle. The primary challenge with exoplanet imaging is the presence of quasi-static speckles in the coronagraphic image. SCExAO has a wavefront control system to suppress these speckles and CHARIS will address their impact on spectral crosstalk through hardware design, which drives its optical and mechanical design. CHARIS constrains crosstalk to be below 1% for an adjacent source that is a full order of magnitude brighter than the neighboring spectra. Since CHARIS is on the Nasmyth platform, the optical alignment between the lenslet array and prism is highly stable. This improves the stability of the spectra and their orientation on the detector and results in greater stability in the wavelength solution for the data pipeline. This means less

  2. Design and Construction of VUES: The Vilnius University Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgenson, Colby; Fischer, Debra; McCracken, Tyler; Sawyer, David; Giguere, Matt; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Santoro, Fernando; Muller, Gary

    2016-03-01

    In February 2014, the Yale Exoplanet Laboratory was commissioned to design, build, and deliver a high resolution (R=60,000) spectrograph for the 1.65m telescope at the Molėtai Astronomical Observatory. The observatory is operated by the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy at Vilnius University. The Vilnius University Echelle Spectrograph (VUES) is a white-pupil design that is fed via an octagonal fiber from the telescope and has an operational bandpass from 400nm to 880nm. VUES incorporates a novel modular optomechanical design that allows for quick assembly and alignment on commercial optical tables. This approach allowed the spectrograph to be assembled and commissioned at Yale using lab optical tables and then reassembled at the observatory on a different optical table with excellent repeatability. The assembly and alignment process for the spectrograph was reduced to a few days, allowing the spectrograph to be completely disassembled for shipment to Lithuania, and then installed at the observatory during a 10-day period in June of 2015.

  3. The Faulkes Telescope Optical Spectrographs and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul

    The Faulkes Telescope project funded primarily by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust is currently constructing two 2-m robotic telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Australia. These will be the largest and most powerful telescopes ever built dedicated for use by schools and colleges. We have been awarded funding to build two optical spectrographs to be permanently mounted on these telescopes by the end of 2003. At this time an astronomical satellite called Swift will be launched by NASA. Swift is dedicated to the study of gamma-ray bursts the most powerful explosive events in the Universe. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester has provided the X-ray camera for Swift and is a partner in the Faulkes Telescopes project. To enhance both projects we intend to use the Faulkes Telescope optical spectrographs to study the gamma-ray bursts identified by Swift. These data will also be made available to schools thereby raising the profile of physics and astronomy in the educational community.

  4. Spectrographic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Michael D.; Treado, Patrick J.

    1991-01-01

    An imaging system for providing spectrographically resolved images. The system incorporates a one-dimensional spatial encoding mask which enables an image to be projected onto a two-dimensional image detector after spectral dispersion of the image. The dimension of the image which is lost due to spectral dispersion on the two-dimensional detector is recovered through employing a reverse transform based on presenting a multiplicity of different spatial encoding patterns to the image. The system is especially adapted for detecting Raman scattering of monochromatic light transmitted through or reflected from physical samples. Preferably, spatial encoding is achieved through the use of Hadamard mask which selectively transmits or blocks portions of the image from the sample being evaluated.

  5. The Robotic FLOYDS Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, D.

    I will discuss the twin FLOYDS robotic spectrographs, operating at the 2m Faulkes Telescopes North and South. The FLOYDS instruments were designed with supernova classification and monitoring in mind, with a very large wavelength coverage (˜320 to 1000 nm) and a resolution (R ˜ 300 - 500, wavelength dependent) well-matched to the broad features of these and other transient and time domain events. Robotic acquisition of spectroscopic targets is the key ingredient for making robotic spectroscopy possible, and FLOYDS uses a slit-viewing camera with a ˜ 4‧ × 6‧ field to either do direct world coordinate system fitting or standard blind offsets to automatically place science targets into the slit. Future work includes an 'all-electronic' target of opportunity mode, which will allow for fast transient spectroscopy with no human necessary, even for inputting information into a phase 2 GUI. Initial science highlights from FLOYDS will also be presented.

  6. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  7. Echelle spectrograph software design aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzler, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method for mapping, to first order, the spectrograms that result from echelle spectrographic systems is discussed. An in-depth description of the principles behind the method are given so that software may be generated. Such software is an invaluable echelle spectrograph design aid. Results from two applications are discussed.

  8. Interferometric resolution boosting for spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2004-05-25

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) is a technique for enhancing the performance of spectrographs for wide bandwidth high resolution spectroscopy and Doppler radial velocimetry. By placing a small angle-independent interferometer near the slit of a spectrograph, periodic fiducials are embedded on the recorded spectrum. The multiplication of the stellar spectrum times the sinusoidal fiducial net creates a moir{acute e} pattern, which manifests high detailed spectral information heterodyned down to detectably low spatial frequencies. The latter can more accurately survive the blurring, distortions and CCD Nyquist limitations of the spectrograph. Hence lower resolution spectrographs can be used to perform high resolution spectroscopy and radial velocimetry. Previous demonstrations of {approx}2.5x resolution boost used an interferometer having a single fixed delay. We report new data indicating {approx}6x Gaussian resolution boost (140,000 from a spectrograph with 25,000 native resolving power), taken by using multiple exposures at widely different interferometer delays.

  9. Compact low resolution spectrograph, an imaging and long slit spectrograph for robotic telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Rabaza, O.; Zeman, J.; Hudec, R.; Sabau-Graziati, L.

    2013-11-15

    The COmpact LOw REsolution Spectrograph (COLORES) is a compact and lightweight (13 kg) f/8 imaging spectrograph designed for robotic telescopes, now installed and operating on the TELMA, a rapid-slewing 60 cm telescope of the BOOTES-2 observatory in Málaga (Spain). COLORES is a multi-mode instrument that enables the observer to seamlessly switch between low-dispersion spectroscopy and direct imaging modes during an observation. In this paper, we describe the instrument and its development, from the initial scientific requirements through the optical design process to final configuration with theoretical performance calculations. The mechanical and electronic design is described, methods of calibration are discussed and early laboratory and scientific results are shown.

  10. Compact low resolution spectrograph, an imaging and long slit spectrograph for robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaza, O.; Jelinek, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Zeman, J.; Hudec, R.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Ruedas-Sánchez, J.

    2013-11-01

    The COmpact LOw REsolution Spectrograph (COLORES) is a compact and lightweight (13 kg) f/8 imaging spectrograph designed for robotic telescopes, now installed and operating on the TELMA, a rapid-slewing 60 cm telescope of the BOOTES-2 observatory in Málaga (Spain). COLORES is a multi-mode instrument that enables the observer to seamlessly switch between low-dispersion spectroscopy and direct imaging modes during an observation. In this paper, we describe the instrument and its development, from the initial scientific requirements through the optical design process to final configuration with theoretical performance calculations. The mechanical and electronic design is described, methods of calibration are discussed and early laboratory and scientific results are shown.

  11. A new fiber slit assembly for the FOCES spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Hanna; Grupp, Frank; Brucalassi, Anna; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Franik, Christian; Hopp, Ulrich; Bender, Ralf

    2015-09-01

    After successful operation at the Calar Alto telescope until 2009, and extensive lab tests at the Munich University Observatory the high resolution Échelle spectrograph FOCES (Fiber Optics Cassegrain Échelle Spectrograph) is now about to be reinstalled at the 2 m Wendelstein Observatory in the German Alps. For this new phase of operation FOCES will be equipped with new components that will improve time stability and wavelength calibration. With these modifications FOCES will meet the requirements for performing precision radial velocity measurements on a competitive level. One of the key features of the upgraded spectrograph is the new calibration system, which uses a laser frequency comb as reference light source. Another aspect is the possibility to perform simultaneous wavelength calibration, while recording science data. For this purpose a new 4-fiber slit has been developed, which opens up the possibility to feed light from different sources at the same time through the entrance slit of the spectrograph. We present a detailed characterization of this new device, based on the results of extensive lab tests performed at the Munich University Observatory.

  12. Update on the Gemini High-Resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheim, Steven J.; Ghost Instrument Team

    2015-01-01

    The Gemini High-Resolution Opitcal SpecTrograph (GHOST) is under development for the Gemini telescopes in collaboration with the Austrailian Astronomical Observatory (AAO), the NRC-Herzberg in Canada, and the Australian National University (ANU). The latest design and project plan will be presented and the scientific role of the instrument will be discussed.

  13. Efficiently mating fibers to spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Donnelly, R. H.; Epps, Harland W.; Radovan, Matthew V.; Craig, William W.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the conversion of an existing f/8 Cassegrain spectrograph to a floor-mounted spectrograph fed by 94 fibers from the f/5 prime focus of the Shane 3-meter telescope at Lick Observatory. The spectrography forms part of the automated Multi- Object Spectrograph system developed as a collaboration between UCO/Lick Observatory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Fibers from a robotic fiber-positioner at prime focus degrade the f/5.5 beam from the telescope (after it has passed through a wide-field prime focus corrector) into roughly a f/4.5 beam. If the 4/8 spectrograph were fed directly with this f/4.5 beam approximately 68% of the light would be lost. A simple optical system has been designed that converts the light from the fibers into the f/ratio expected by the spectrograph. The conversion optics are mounted at the entrance to the spectrograph. We describe focal ratio degradation tests of a variety of optical fibers and the design of the `pseudoslit' which mounts the fibers in a line at the input to the conversion optics.

  14. Astronomical application of IR CID technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rank, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A portable microcomputer data system was developed to test a 2 x 64-element Si:Bi charge injection device (CID) infrared detector array on the Lick Observatory Shane telescope. An existing 0.5 m spectrograph was used for the tests after modification, and a spectral resolution of 1000 was achieved. Slow device response, due to the low background conditions in the spectrograph were shown. Astronomical data were later obtained, and a device read noise on the order of a few hundred electrons was achieved. The signal to noise ratios of the resulting spectra were about a factor of five lower than what could have been achieved with discrete photoconductive detectors. It is concluded that the CID array is competitive for applications in backgrounds lower than those used in the tests.

  15. Astronomical Institute of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Astronomical Institute of Athens is the oldest research institute of modern Greece (it faces the Parthenon). The Astronomical Institute (AI) of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) started its observational projects in 1847. The modern computer and research center are housed at the Penteli Astronomical Station with major projects and international collaborations focused on extragalactic ...

  16. The development of ground-based infrared multi-object spectrograph based on the microshutter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Graham, James R.; Roy, Aishwarya

    2014-07-01

    We report on our development of a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for ground-based applications using the micro-shutter array, which was originally developed for the Near Infrared Spectrograph of the James Webb Space Telescope. The micro-shutter array in this case acts as a source selector at a reimaged telescope focal plane. The developed spectrograph will be implemented either with ground-layer adaptive optics system or multi-conjugate adaptive optics system on a large telescope. This will enable for the first time fully reconfigurable infrared multi-object spectroscopy with adaptive optics systems. We envision studying diverse astronomical objects with our spectrograph, including high-redshift galaxies, galaxy clusters and super star clusters.

  17. LOTUS: a low-cost, ultraviolet spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, I. A.; Marchant, J. M.; Jermak, H. E.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bates, S. D.; Clay, N. R.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Jehin, E.; Jones, G.; Mottram, C. J.; Smith, R. J.; Snodgrass, C.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the design, construction and commissioning of LOTUS; a simple, low-cost long-slit spectrograph for the Liverpool Telescope. The design is optimized for near-UV and visible wavelengths and uses all transmitting optics. It exploits the instrument focal plane field curvature to partially correct axial chromatic aberration. A stepped slit provides narrow (2.5x95 arcsec) and wide (5x25 arcsec) options that are optimized for spectral resolution and flux calibration respectively. On sky testing shows a wavelength range of 3200-6300 Angstroms with a peak system throughput (including detector quantum efficiency) of 15 per cent and wavelength dependant spectral resolution of R=225-430. By repeated observations of the symbiotic emission line star AG Peg we demonstrate the wavelength stability of the system is less than 2 Angstroms rms and is limited by the positioning of the object in the slit. The spectrograph is now in routine operation monitoring the activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during its current post-perihelion apparition.

  18. LOTUS: A low cost, ultraviolet spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, I. A.; Marchant, J. M.; Jermak, H. E.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bates, S. D.; Clay, N. R.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Jehin, E.; Jones, G.; Mottram, C. J.; Smith, R. J.; Snodgrass, C.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design, construction and commissioning of LOTUS; a simple, low-cost long-slit spectrograph for the Liverpool Telescope. The design is optimized for near-UV and visible wavelengths and uses all transmitting optics. It exploits the instrument focal plane field curvature to partially correct axial chromatic aberration. A stepped slit provides narrow (2.5 × 95 arcsec) and wide (5 × 25 arcsec) options that are optimized for spectral resolution and flux calibration respectively. On sky testing shows a wavelength range of 3200-6300 Å with a peak system throughput (including detector quantum efficiency) of 15 per cent and wavelength dependant spectral resolution of R = 225 - 430. By repeated observations of the symbiotic emission line star AG Peg we demonstrate the wavelength stability of the system is <2 Å rms and is limited by the positioning of the object in the slit. The spectrograph is now in routine operation monitoring the activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during its current post-perihelion apparition.

  19. LOTUS: a low-cost, ultraviolet spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, I. A.; Marchant, J. M.; Jermak, H. E.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bates, S. D.; Clay, N. R.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Jehin, E.; Jones, G.; Mottram, C. J.; Smith, R. J.; Snodgrass, C.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the design, construction and commissioning of a simple, low-cost long-slit spectrograph for the Liverpool Telescope. The design is optimized for near-UV and visible wavelengths and uses all transmitting optics. It exploits the instrument focal plane field curvature to partially correct axial chromatic aberration. A stepped slit provides narrow (2.5 × 95 arcsec) and wide (5 × 25 arcsec) options that are optimized for spectral resolution and flux calibration, respectively. On sky testing shows a wavelength range of 3200-6300 Å with a peak system throughput (including detector quantum efficiency) of 15 per cent and wavelength dependent spectral resolution of R = 225-430. By repeated observations of the symbiotic emission line star AG Peg, we demonstrate the wavelength stability of the system is <2 Å rms and is limited by the positioning of the object in the slit. The spectrograph is now in routine operation monitoring the activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during its current post-perihelion apparition.

  20. Extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; McBride, R. D.; Jackson, D. P.; Hammer, D. A.

    2006-10-15

    A new configuration for a two-dimensional (2D) imaging x-ray spectrograph based on a conically bent crystal is introduced: extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph (ELICS). The ELICS configuration has important advantages over spectrographs that are based on cylindrically and spherically bent crystals. The main advantages are that a wide variety of large-aperture crystals can be used, and any desired magnification in the spatial direction (the direction orthogonal to spectral dispersion) can be achieved by the use of different experimental arrangements. The ELICS can be set up so that the detector plane is almost perpendicular to the incident rays, a good configuration for time-resolved spectroscopy. ELICSs with mica crystals of 45x90 mm{sup 2} aperture have been successfully used for imaging on the XP and COBRA pulsed power generators, yielding spectra with spatial resolution in 2D of Z pinches and X pinches.

  1. Radioastronomy at the National Astronomical Observatory of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Gómez, J. C.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Colombia is located in the northern tip of South America close to the amazon rain forest. This makes astronomical observations in the visible range very challenging, as cloud coverage is relatively high. Hence, radio astronomy becomes a natural and good choice. We present the design, characterization and first results of the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional solar radio spectrograph. This instrument is a Log-Periodic Dipole Array Antenna (LPDA) working between 100 MHz and 1 GHz optimized for solar observations. The radio spectrograph is a working prototype for a more ambitious solar radio interferometer, that will be the first instrument of this kind in Colombia.

  2. MMT and Magellan infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Brian A.; Fabricant, Daniel; Geary, John; Martini, Paul; Nystrom, George; Elston, Richard; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Epps, Harland

    2004-09-01

    We present the preliminary design for the MMT and Magellan Infrared Spectrograph (MMIRS). MMIRS is a fully refractive imager and multi-object spectrograph that uses a 2048x2048 pixel Hawaii2 HgCdTe array. It offers a 7'x7' imaging field of view and a 4'x7' field of view for multi-object spectroscopy. Dispersion is provided by a set of 5 grisms providing R=3000 at J, H, or K, or R=1300 in J+H or H+K.

  3. X-ray spectrograph design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    An aberration theory is applied to spectrograph design. The initial system considered has a toroidal mirror in front of a concave grating spectrograph, giving spatial resolution perpendicular to the dispersion direction. The accuracy of the theory is shown by comparison of spot diagrams obtained from the aberrations with those produced by raytracing. The major aberrations affecting the vignetting at the intermediate slit and the spatial resolution are identified. A new system, using a holographic grating to give a flat focal plane, is then designed and optimized. It has increased spatial resolution over the wavelength range and is particularly suitable for microchannel array detectors.

  4. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observatory's 2dF1 instrument with two observing plates, one of which is observing the sky while other is being reconfigured by a robotic fibre positioner. It will be capable of acquiring more than 10000 star or galaxy spectra a night. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). This presents additional constraints and complications for the software that determines the optimal path from one configuration to the next, particularly given the large number of fibre crossings implied by the 1000 fibre multiplex. This paper describes the algorithms and programming techniques used in the prototype implementations of the field configuration tool and the fibre positioner robot controller developed to support the detailed design of WEAVE.

  5. Kyoto tridimensional spectrograph II: progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Shinobu; Hattori, Takashi; Ishii, Motomi; Ishigaki, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Tadashi; Sasaki, Minoru; Takeyama, Norihide

    2000-08-01

    We are building the Kyoto tridimensional spectrograph II and are planning to mount it on Subaru telescope. The spectrograph has four observational modes: Fabry-Perot imager, integral field spectrograph (IFS) with a microlens array, long-slit spectrograph, and filter-imaging modes. The optics is designed to be used in wide wavelength range from 360 nm to 900 nm. The design well matches with high spatial resolution of Subaru: 0 inch .06 pixel-1 in Fabry- Perot mode, for which we actually will use binning before adaptive optics at optical wavelengths becomes available, and 0 inch .1 lens-1 in microlens array mode. These well sample image sizes obtained by Subaru, which are about 0 inch .4 in relatively good conditions. We have evaluated a point spread function of our cylindrical microlens array and found that it consists of a diffraction pattern and more extended component which probably comes from border regions between microlenses. With a suitable mask at the micro pupil position, the crosstalk between spectra will be limited down to a few percent. With a suitable mask at the micro pupil position, the crosstalk between spectra will be limited down to a few percent. We have succeeded in synchronizing frequency switching of Fabry-Perot etalons with the movement of charge on the CCD. This technique enables to average out all temporal variations between each passband.

  6. Holographic spectrograph for space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Lysenko, Sergiy; Crenshaw, Melissa

    2013-09-01

    A spectrograph is described which is made with dual Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) which are identical and parallel to each other. Both optics are collimating transmission HOEs with focal points that are at equal and opposite distances from each other. The identical HOEs are formed by the interference of a plane wave parallel to the grating plane with an off-axis spherical wave originating in the near-field. In playback, a spectrum can be formed from a point source radiator placed at the position of the recording spherical wave. If played back at an arbitrary wavelength other than the recording wavelength, the image exhibits coma. This spectrograph is intended for an unusual configuration where many nearly monochromatic sources of known wavelengths are separately positioned relative to the first HOE. The special application is in a space telescope capable of resolving spectra from habitable planets within 10 pc. HOEs of this type could be fabricated on membrane substrates with a low areal mass and stowable on rolls for insertion into the second Lagrange point. The intended application is for a 50 x 10 meter class primary objective holographic space telescope with 50 x 10 m HOEs in the spectrograph. We present a computer model of the spectrograph.. Experimental results are compared with predictions from theory. A single HOE is shown to perform over a wider bandwidth and is demonstrated.

  7. Armenian Astronomical Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    A review is given on the Armenian Astronomical Heritage from ancient times to nowadays. Armenian ancient astronomy includes the division of the skies into constellations, rock art, ancient Armenian calendar, ancient observatories (such as Metsamor and Karahunge), records of astronomical events (such as Halley's Comet recorded on Tigranes the Great's coin), ancient names of celestial bodies (planets, stars, constellations), etc. The Medieval Armenian astronomy includes two more calendars, Anania Shirakatsi's scientific heritage, the record of 1054 Supernova, sky maps by Luca Vanandetsi and Mkhitar Sebastatsi, etc. Modern Armenian astronomical heritage first of all consists of the famous Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory founded in 1946 by Viktor Ambartsumian, as well as Yerevan Astronomical Observatory, Armenian Astronomical Society, Armenian Virtual Observatory, Yerevan State University Department of Astrophysics, Astrofizika journal, and brilliant young students who systematically win high positions at International Astronomical Olympiads.

  8. Effective Area of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph below 1150 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; France, K.; Osterman, S.; Green, J. C.; McPhate, J. B.; Wilkinson, E.; COS

    2010-01-01

    The G140L segment B channel (R 2,000) of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) recently installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has an effective area consistent with 10 cm2 in the bandpass between the Lyman edge at 912 Å and Lyβ. It has a slight plateau of 20 cm2 near 1050 Å and rises to a peak in excess of 1100 cm2 longward of 1140 Å. Up until now the general astronomical community has had only limited access to a low resolving power R 2,000 far-UV spectrograph, extending down to the Lyman limit, in the form of the shuttle carried instruments; the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope and the Berkeley Extreme and Far-UV Spectrograph. The low resolving power provides a unique capability to reach extremely faint flux limits and will enable new science investigations, such as those seeking to quantify the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons from galaxies at low redshift, study the He II Gunn-Peterson effect in the redshift range 2 < z < 2.8, measure CO/H2 in dense interstellar environments, or make observations of the O VI λλ 1032, 1038 doublet. Observations of point sources will have the highest spectral resolution, since the small 2."5 diameter entrance aperture of COS is not optimized for extended source observations.

  9. The Astronomical Telescope of New York: a new 12-meter astronomical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebring, T.; Junquist, R.; Stutzki, C.; Sebring, P.; Baum, S.

    2012-09-01

    The Astronomical Corporation of New York has commissioned a study of a 12-meter class telescope to be developed by a group of NY universities. The telescope concept builds on the basic principles established by the Keck telescopes; segmented primary mirror, Ritchey Chretien Nasmyth instrument layout, and light weight structures. New, lightweight, and low cost approaches are proposed for the primary mirror architecture, dome structure and mechanisms, telescope mount approach, and adaptive optics. Work on the design is supported by several NY based corporations and universities. The design offers a substantially larger aperture than any existing Visible/IR wavelength telescope at historically low cost. The concept employs an adaptive secondary mirror and laser guide star adaptive optics. Two First Light instruments are proposed; A High resolution near infrared spectrograph and a near infrared Integral field spectrograph/imager.

  10. Optical Comb from a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator for Spectroscopy and Astronomy Instruments Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nam; Thompson, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The most accurate astronomical data is available from space-based observations that are not impeded by the Earth's atmosphere. Such measurements may require spectral samples taken as long as decades apart, with the 1 cm/s velocity precision integrated over a broad wavelength range. This raises the requirements specifically for instruments used in astrophysics research missions -- their stringent wavelength resolution and accuracy must be maintained over years and possibly decades. Therefore, a stable and broadband optical calibration technique compatible with spaceflights becomes essential. The space-based spectroscopic instruments need to be calibrated in situ, which puts forth specific requirements to the calibration sources, mainly concerned with their mass, power consumption, and reliability. A high-precision, high-resolution reference wavelength comb source for astronomical and astrophysics spectroscopic observations has been developed that is deployable in space. The optical comb will be used for wavelength calibrations of spectrographs and will enable Doppler measurements to better than 10 cm/s precision, one hundred times better than the current state-of-the- art.

  11. KIDSpec: an MKID based medium resolution integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Kieran; Thatte, Niranjan; Mazin, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel concept for a highly sensitive, medium spectral resolution optical through near-IR spectrograph. KIDSpec, the Kinetic Inductance Detector Spectrograph, uses the intrinsic energy resolving capability of an array of optical/IR-sensitive MKIDs to distinguish multiple orders from a low line-density (echelle) grating. MKID arrays have a wide bandpass (0.1-2.5um) and good quantum efficiency, making them strong candidates for replacing CCDs in many astronomical instruments. By acting as an `order resolver', the MKID array replaces the cross-disperser in an echelle spectrograph. This greatly simplifies the optical layout of the spectrograph and enables longer slits than are possible with cross-dispersed instruments. KIDSpec would have similar capabilities to ESO's X-shooter instrument. It would provide an R=4000-10,000 spectrum covering the entire optical and near-IR spectral range. In addition to a `long-slit' mode, the IFU would provide a small (~50 spaxel) field-of-view for spatially resolved sources. In addition, the photon-counting operation of MKIDs and their photon-energy resolving ability enable a read-noise free spectrum with perfect cosmic ray removal. The spectral resolution would be sufficient to remove the bright night-sky lines without the additional pixel noise, making the instrument more sensitive than an equivalent semiconductor-based instrument. KIDSpec would enhance many existing high-profile science cases, including transient (GRB, SNe, etc.) follow-up, redshift determination of faint objects and transit spectroscopy of exoplanets. In addition it will enable unique science cases, such as dynamical mass estimates of the compact objects in ultra-compact binaries.

  12. The development of WIFIS: a wide integral field infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Ma, Ke; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Chun, Moo-Young; Kim, Sang Chul; Raines, Steven N.; Eisner, Joshua

    2012-09-01

    We present the current results from the development of a wide integral field infrared spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS offers an unprecedented combination of etendue and spectral resolving power for seeing-limited, integral field observations in the 0.9 - 1.8 μm range and is most sensitive in the 0.9 - 1.35 μ,m range. Its optical design consists of front-end re-imaging optics, an all-reflective image slicer-type, integral field unit (IFU) called FISICA, and a long-slit grating spectrograph back-end that is coupled with a HAWAII 2RG focal plane array. The full wavelength range is achieved by selecting between two different gratings. By virtue of its re-imaging optics, the spectrograph is quite versatile and can be used at multiple telescopes. The size of its field-of-view is unrivalled by other similar spectrographs, offering a 4.511x 1211 integral field at a 10-meter class telescope (or 2011 x 5011 at a 2.3-meter telescope). The use of WIFIS will be crucial in astronomical problems which require wide-field, two-dimensional spectroscopy such as the study of merging galaxies at moderate redshift and nearby star/planet-forming regions and supernova remnants. We discuss the final optical design of WIFIS, and its predicted on-sky performance on two reference telescope platforms: the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope and the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We also present the results from our laboratory characterization of FISICA. IFU properties such as magnification, field-mapping, and slit width along the entire slit length were measured by our tests. The construction and testing of WIFIS is expected to be completed by early 2013. We plan to commission the instrument at the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope at Kitt Peak, USA in Spring 2013.

  13. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center is the largest astronomical institution in Poland, located in Warsaw and founded in 1956. At present it is a government-funded research institute supervised by the Polish Academy of Sciences and licensed by the government of Poland to award PhD and doctor habilitatus degrees in astronomy and astrophysics. In September 1999 staff included 21 senior scientist...

  14. Astronomers Working in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bless, Robert C.; King, Ivan R.

    1981-01-01

    Four scientists, trained as astronomers, describe their astronomical training and present careers in non-astronomy, industrial jobs. They recount some of the differences, positive and negative, between industrial and academic employment, and comment on some of the attitudes they perceive academic and industrial scientists hold toward each other.…

  15. Astronomical Software Directory Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; Payne, H.; Hayes, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report on the development of the Astronomical Software Directory Service (ASDS), a distributable, searchable, WWW-based database of software packages and their related documentation. ASDS provides integrated access to 56 astronomical software packages, with more than 16,000 URL's indexed for full-text searching.

  16. American Astronomical Society (AAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Founded in 1899, the AAS is a non-profit scientific society created to promote the advancement of astronomy and closely related branches of science. Its membership consists primarily of professional researchers in the astronomical sciences, but also includes educators, students and others interested in the advancement of astronomical research. About 85% of the membership is drawn from North Ame...

  17. EGRAM- ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH DESIGN AID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzler, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    EGRAM aids in the design of spectrographic systems that utilize an echelle-first order cross disperser combination. This optical combination causes a two dimensional echellogram to fall on a detector. EGRAM describes the echellogram with enough detail to allow the user to effectively judge the feasibility of the spectrograph's design. By iteratively altering system parameters, the desired echellogram can be achieved without making a physical model. EGRAM calculates system parameters which are accurate to the first order and compare favorably to results from ray tracing techniques. The spectrographic system modelled by EGRAM consists of an entrance aperture, collimator, echelle, cross dispersion grating, focusing options, and a detector. The system is assumed to be free of aberrations and the echelle, cross disperser, and detector should be planar. The EGRAM program is menu driven and has a HELP facility. The user is prompted for information such as minimum and maximum wavelengths, slit dimensions, ruling frequencies, detector geometry, and angle of incidence. EGRAM calculates the resolving power and range of order numbers covered by the echellogram. A numerical map is also produced. This tabulates the order number, slit bandpass, and high/middle/low wavelengths. EGRAM can also compute the centroid coordinates of a specific wavelength and order (or vice versa). EGRAM is written for interactive execution and is written in Microsoft BASIC A. It has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under DOS. EGRAM was developed in 1985.

  18. The Astronomical League

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. A.; Stevens, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    Founded over fifty years ago, the League is the largest general astronomy society in the world. It is a recognized non-profit, educational organization, promoting the science of astronomy. This includes astronomical education, research, individual observing of the heavens and coordination between the amateur and professional astronomy communities. The Astronomical League publishes a quarterly newsletter, the "Reflector", which details amateur activities and amateur collaboration with professional astronomers. The League's Observing Clubs hone the skills of the amateur astronomer in using their telescopes. These clubs provide awards to encourge observing and learning the sky. More general awards are presented to encourage amateur astronomy and the science of astronomy. These include the National Young Astronomer Award, amd the Horkheimer Planetary Imaging Award. They also sponsor conventions on both the National and Regional levels. This year's national is in Ventura, California, next year, near Washington, D.C.

  19. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  20. Odessa Astronomical Calendar-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karetnikov, V. G.; Mihalchuk, V. V.; Bazey, A. A.; Andronov, I. L.; Volyanskaya, M. Yu.; Garbuzov, G. A.; Komarov, N. S.; Koshkin, N. I.; Pozigun, V. A.; Ryabov, M. I.

    2002-10-01

    The Odessa Astronomical Calendar is intended for a wide range of readers, who are interested in the problems of astronomy and in the applications of the astronomical data. The items, of information, assembled in the Calendar may be useful to professional workers requiring a definition of time of sets and rises of the Sun and the Moon and approach of twilights, as well as to the amateurs astronomers and other citizens. The Calendar may be used for astronomical education at schools, hymnasia, lycea, colleges and institutes. In this issue of the Calendar, besides a description of the main astronomical events of the year and the tables of the positions of celestial bodies and time of observations of astronomical events on the celestial sphere, there are also included sketches on interesting problems of astronomy and, as the appendix, the instruction on observations of comets. The Odessa Astronomical Calendar is published in Russian and is intended for the inhabitants of southern region of Ukraine. The Calendar is published every year with a constant part and series of articles, which change every year.

  1. The Astronomers' Data Manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, R. P.

    2006-08-01

    A draft manifesto is presented for discussion. The manifesto sets out guidelines to which the astronomical community should aspire to maximise the rate and cost-effectiveness of scientific discovery. The challenges are not underestimated, but can still be overcome if astronomers, observatories, journals, data centres, and the Virtual Observatory Alliance work together to overcome the hurdles. The key points of the manifesto are: 1. All major tables, images, and spectra published in journals should appear in the astronomical data centres. 2. All data obtained with publicly-funded observatories should, after appropriate proprietary periods, be placed in the public domain. 3. In any new major astronomical construction project, the data processing, storage, migration, and management requirements should be built in at an early stage of the project plan, and costed along with other parts of the project. 4. Astronomers in all countries should have the same access to astronomical data and information. 5. Legacy astronomical data can be valuable, and high-priority legacy data should be preserved and stored in digital form in the data centres. 6. The IAU should work with other international organisations to achieve our common goals and learn from our colleagues in other fields.

  2. The Lifetimes of Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2015-08-01

    For members of the American Astronomical Society, I collected data on their lifetimes from (1) 489 obituaries published in 1991-2015, (2) about 127 members listed as deceased but without published obituaries, and (3) a sample of AAS members without obituaries or not known to the AAS as being deceased. These show that the most frequent lifetimes is 85 years. Of 674 deceased members with known lifetimes, 11.0 ± 1.3% lived to be 90 or more years. In comparison to the astronomers, the most frequent lifetime for the general population is 77 years, showing that astronomers live an average of 8 years longer than the general population.

  3. Astronomical Video Suites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco Salgado, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Astronomer and visual artist Jose Francisco Salgado has directed two astronomical video suites to accompany live performances of classical music works. The suites feature awe-inspiring images, historical illustrations, and visualizations produced by NASA, ESA, and the Adler Planetarium. By the end of 2009, his video suites Gustav Holst's The Planets and Astronomical Pictures at an Exhibition will have been presented more than 40 times in over 10 countries. Lately Salgado, an avid photographer, has been experimenting with high dynamic range imaging, time-lapse, infrared, and fisheye photography, as well as with stereoscopic photography and video to enhance his multimedia works.

  4. America's foremost early astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Rubincam, Milton, II

    1995-05-01

    The life of 18th century astronomer, craftsman, and patriot David Rittenhouse is detailed. As a craftsman, he distinguished himself as one of the foremost builders of clocks. He also built magnetic compasses and surveying instruments. The finest examples of his craftsmanship are considered two orreries, mechanical solar systems. In terms of astronomical observations, his best-known contribution was his observation of the transit of Venus in 1769. Rittenhouse constructed the first diffraction grating. Working as Treasurer of Pennsylvania throughout the Revolution, he became the first director of the Mint in 1792. Astronomical observations in later life included charting the position of Uranus after its discovery.

  5. Astronomical optical frequency comb generation in nonlinear fibres and ring resonators: optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Boggio, J. M.; Fremberg, T.; Bodenmüller, D.; Wysmolek, M.; Sanyic, H.; Fernando, H.; Neumann, J.; Kracht, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    We here discuss recent progress on astronomical optical frequency comb generation at innoFSPEC-Potsdam. Two different platforms (and approaches) are numerically and experimentally investigated targeting medium and low resolution spectrographs at astronomical facilities in which innoFSPEC is currently involved. In the first approach, a frequency comb is generated by propagating two lasers through three nonlinear stages - the first two stages serve for the generation of low-noise ultra-short pulses, while the final stage is a low-dispersion highly-nonlinear fibre where the pulses undergo strong spectral broadening. In our approach, the wavelength of one of the lasers can be tuned allowing the comb line spacing being continuously varied during the calibration procedure - this tuning capability is expected to improve the calibration accuracy since the CCD detector response can be fully scanned. The input power, the dispersion, the nonlinear coefficient, and fibre lengths in the nonlinear stages are defined and optimized by solving the Generalized Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation. Experimentally, we generate the 250GHz line-spacing frequency comb using two narrow linewidth lasers that are adiabatically compressed in a standard fibre first and then in a double-clad Er/Yb doped fibre. The spectral broadening finally takes place in a highly nonlinear fibre resulting in an astro-comb with 250 calibration lines (covering a bandwidth of 500 nm) with good spectral equalization. In the second approach, we aim to generate optical frequency combs in dispersion-optimized silicon nitride ring resonators. A technique for lowering and flattening the chromatic dispersion in silicon nitride waveguides with silica cladding is proposed and demonstrated. By minimizing the waveguide dispersion in the resonator two goals are targeted: enhancing the phase matching for non-linear interactions and producing equally spaced resonances. For this purpose, instead of one cladding layer our design

  6. H2O, CO2, and CH4 Monitoring at Astronomical Telescope Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausch, Wolfgang; Noll, Stefan; Szyszka, Cezary; Jones, Amy M.; Smette, Alain; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Barden, Marco; Sana, Hugues; Horst, Hannes

    2013-04-01

    Astronomical observatories that offer near-IR spectrographs can, in principle, be used as sites for monitoring greenhouse gases. In particular, observations for calibration purposes of so-called telluric standard stars are suitable. These are usually white dwarfs or hot stars, which show nearly no intrinsic spectral features in the required wavelength range. Therefore, absorption features in their spectrum arise mainly from the influence of the Earth's atmosphere and indicate its state and composition during the observation. Since calibration observations are taken several times per night, the temporal coverage is high. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) provides one of the world-wide largest telescope sites in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The Very Large Telescope located on Cerro Paranal (2635m) consists of four 8m class telescopes and a number of smaller ones incorporating a wide range of instruments. One of the most versatile instruments is X-Shooter, which has gone in operation in October 2009. It is a medium resolution spectrograph (R = 3000 - 18000) covering the entire wavelength range from 0.3 - 2.5μm simultaneously. Therefore, spectral features of water, oxygen, methane, and carbon dioxide are visible. We have taken all publically available X-Shooter spectra in the ESO data archive starting from October 2009 to establish a set of telluric standard star observations (~ 1400 per year). We have developed an algorithm which is able to determine molecular column densities by fitting spectral absorption features with the help of the LBLRTM radiative transfer code package and the HITRAN line database. By scaling molecular abundance profiles iteratively, a best fit is achieved incorporating a Levenberg-Marquard ?2-minimisation algorithm. A similar method based on spectroscopy and profile scaling is used by the TCCON network. This algorithm is applied to the X-Shooter spectra in order to determine a time-dependent evolution of the H2O, CH4, and CO2 content of

  7. An astronomical murder?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenkiy, Ari

    2010-04-01

    Ari Belenkiy examines the murder of Hypatia of Alexandria, wondering whether problems with astronomical observations and the date of Easter led to her becoming a casualty of fifth-century political intrigue.

  8. Decoding Astronomical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durisen, Richard H.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    Two astronomy professors, using the Decoding the Disciplines process, help their students use abstract theories to analyze light and to visualize the enormous scale of astronomical concepts. (Contains 5 figures.)

  9. Lunar orbital photography of astronomical phenomena.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, R. D.; Dunkelman, L.; Ross, C. L.; Worden, A.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reports further progress on photography of faint astronomical and geophysical phenomena accomplished during the recent Apollo missions. Command module pilots have been able to photograph such astronomical objects as the solar corona, zodiacal light-corona transition region, lunar libration region, and portions of the Milky Way. The methods utilized for calibration of the film by adaptation of the High Altitude Observatory sensitometer are discussed. Kodak 2485 high-speed recording film was used in both 35-mm and 70-mm formats. The cameras used were Nikon f/1.2 55-mm focal length and Hasselblad f/2.8 80-mm focal length. Preflight and postflight calibration exposures were included on both the flight and control films, corresponding to luminances extending from the inner solar corona to as faint as 1/10 of the luminance of the light of the night sky. The photographs obtained from unique vantage points available during lunar orbit are discussed.

  10. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Kaiser, M. E.; Keyes, C. D.; Ake, T. B.; Aloisi, A.; Friedman, S. D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Shaw, B.; Sahnow, D. J.; Penton, S. V.; Froning, C. S.; Beland, S.; Osterman, S.; Green, J.; COS/STIS STScI Team; IDT, COS

    2008-05-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, (Green, J, et al., 2000, Proc SPIE, 4013) will be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. This will be the most sensitive ultraviolet spectrograph ever flown aboard HST. The program (CALCOS) for pipeline calibration of HST/COS data has been developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute. As with other HST pipelines, CALCOS uses an association table to list the data files to be included, and it employs header keywords to specify the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to be used. COS includes both a cross delay line detector for the far ultraviolet (FUV) and a MAMA detector for the near ultraviolet (NUV). CALCOS uses a common structure for both channels, but the specific calibration steps differ. The calibration steps include pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. A 1-D spectrum will be extracted and flux calibrated. Data will normally be taken in TIME-TAG mode, recording the time and location of each detected photon, although ACCUM mode will also be supported. The wavelength calibration uses an on-board spectral line lamp. To enable precise wavelength calibration, default operations will simultaneously record the science target and lamp spectrum by executing brief (tag-flash) lamp exposures at least once per external target exposure.

  11. Calibration issues for MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelz, Andreas; Roth, Martin; Bauer, Svend; Gerssen, Joris; Hahn, Thomas; Weilbacher, Peter; Laux, Uwe; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; McDermid, Richard; Bacon, Roland

    2008-07-01

    The Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) is an integral-field spectrograph for the VLT for the next decade. Using an innovative field-splitting and slicing design, combined with an assembly of 24 spectrographs, MUSE will provide some 90,000 spectra in one exposure, which cover a simultaneous spectral range from 465 to 930nm. The design and manufacture of the Calibration Unit, the alignment tests of the Spectrograph and Detector sub-systems, and the development of the Data Reduction Software for MUSE are work-packages under the responsibility of the AIP, who is a partner in a European-wide consortium of 6 institutes and ESO, that is led by the Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon. MUSE will be operated and therefore has to be calibrated in a variety of modes, which include seeing-limited and AO-assisted operations, providing a wide and narrow-field-of-view. MUSE aims to obtain unprecedented ultra-deep 3D-spectroscopic exposures, involving integration times of the order of 80 hours at the VLT. To achieve the corresponding science goals, instrumental stability, accurate calibration and adequate data reduction tools are needed. The paper describes the status at PDR of the AIP related work-packages, in particular with respect to the spatial, spectral, image quality, and geometrical calibration and related data reduction aspects.

  12. Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope’s Near Infrared Spectrograph: Observing Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Beck, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST’s sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec’s full wavelength coverage from 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We give examples of how this and other use cases are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  13. The SAURON project - I. The panoramic integral-field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, R.; Copin, Y.; Monnet, G.; Miller, Bryan W.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Bureau, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Davies, Roger L.; Emsellem, Eric; Kuntschner, Harald; Peletier, Reynier F.; Verolme, E. K.; de Zeeuw, P. Tim

    2001-09-01

    A new integral-field spectrograph, SAURON, is described. It is based on the TIGER principle, and uses a lenslet array. SAURON has a large field of view and high throughput, and allows simultaneous sky subtraction. Its design is optimized for studies of the stellar kinematics, gas kinematics, and line-strength distributions of nearby early-type galaxies. The instrument design and specifications are described, as well as the extensive analysis software which was developed to obtain fully calibrated spectra, and the associated kinematic and line-strength measurements. A companion paper will report on the first results obtained with SAURON on the William Herschel Telescope.

  14. Optical filters on board the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffelt, Everett L.; Martella, Mark A.

    1996-11-01

    The space telescope imaging spectrograph (STIS) instrument is due to be installed on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 1997. STIS uses 20 filters located on a wheel that can rotate any one of 88 apertures or combination filter/aperture in to the beam path. The instrument incorporates a continuous range of spectral response from the VUV (115.0 nm) to 1 micrometer. Therefore, filters that perform in the VUV are discussed as well as filters that operate in the near infrared. Neutral density filters are also being used for on-board calibration from 300 nm to Lyman-Alpha (121.6 nm).

  15. Women Astronomers: Australia: Women astronomers in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhathal, Ragbir

    2001-08-01

    Ragbir Bhathal summarizes the role played by women astronomers in Australia's astronomy, now and in the past. Australia has a great tradition in astronomy, from the early observations of Aboriginal people through the colonial drive to explore and understand, culminating in the established excellence of research there today. Women have contributed to this achievement in no small way, yet their contribution has been unremarked, if not ignored. Here I summarize the historical and present state of affairs and look forward to a brighter and more equitable future.

  16. CUBES: cassegrain U-band Brazil-ESO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Bawden Macanhan, V.; Bristow, P.; Castilho, B.; Dekker, H.; Delabre, B.; Diaz, M.; Gneiding, C.; Kerber, F.; Kuntschner, H.; La Mura, G.; Maciel, W.; Meléndez, J.; Pasquini, L.; Pereira, C. B.; Petitjean, P.; Reiss, R.; Siqueira-Mello, C.; Smiljanic, R.; Vernet, J.

    2014-11-01

    CUBES is a high-efficiency, medium-resolution ( R˜20,000) ground based UV (300-400 nm) spectrograph, to be installed in the cassegrain focus of one of ESO's VLT unit telescopes in 2017/18. The CUBES project is a joint venture between ESO and IAG/USP, and LNA/MCTI. CUBES will provide access to a wealth of new and relevant information for stellar as well as extragalactic sources. Main science cases include the study of beryllium and heavy elements in metal-poor stars, the direct determination of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances by study of molecular bands in the UV range, as well as the study of active galactic nuclei and the quasar absorption lines. With a streamlined modern instrument design, high efficiency dispersing elements and UV-sensitive detectors, it will give a significant gain in sensitivity over existing ground based medium-high resolution spectrographs, enabling vastly increased sample sizes accessible to the astronomical community. We present here a brief overview of the project including the status, science cases and a discussion of the design options.

  17. Improved ground calibration results from Southwest Research Institute Ultraviolet Radiometric Calibration Facility (UV-RCF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.; Slater, David C.; Stern, S. Alan; Versteeg, Maarten H.

    2014-07-01

    Four compact planetary ultraviolet spectrographs have been built by Southwest Research Institute and successfully operated on different planetary missions. These spectrographs underwent a series of ground radiometric calibrations before delivery to their respective spacecraft. In three of the four cases, the in-flight measured sensitivity was approximately 50% lower than the ground measurement. Recent tests in the Southwest Research Institute Ultraviolet Radiometric Calibration Facility (UV-RCF) explain the discrepancy between ground and flight results. Revised ground calibration results are presented for the Rosetta-Alice, New Horizons-Alice, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Lyman- Alpha Mapping Project, and Juno-Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) and are then compared to the original ground and flight calibrations. The improved understanding of the calibration system reported here will result in improved ground calibration of the upcoming Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE)-UVS.

  18. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  19. Wide range magnetic electron spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Wang, L.-J.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    An electron spectrogrpah is described that covers electron energies from 400 eV to 200 keV with an energy resolution of 10 percent. This overlaps the range of electrostatic deflection devices at low energy and solid state detectors at high energy. The spectrograph uses magnetic deflection of the electrons to achieve energy separation and images the full range of energies on a single plane. The magnetic circuit uses the fringing field of two axially located magnets to attain the large energy range. Six separate electron beams can be dispersed in the field, each entering the circuit from a different angle. This is a particular advantage when measuring plasma electron three-dimensional velocity distributions. The angular response of the instrument is particularly favorable and the stray magnetic field is sufficiently low to meet spacecraft requirements.

  20. A near-infrared spectrograph for the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, H. G.; Dunham, E. W.; Bida, T. A.; Hall, J. C.; Degroff, W.

    2011-10-01

    Lowell Observatory is constructing the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) at Happy Jack, Arizona, approximately an hour from Lowell's main campus in Flagstaff, Arizona. The DCT is a 4.3-m optical/ infrared telescope. Construction of the telescope is complete and First Light of the DCT is planned for 2012Q2. In its initial configuration instruments will be co-mounted on a rotatable/selectable cube at the Cassegrain focus. Motorized deployable fold mirrors enable rapid switching amongst instruments. In the future the Nasmyth foci will be available for larger instruments as well. The first generation of instruments on DCT include: the Large Monolithic Imager (LMI), the Near-Infrared High-Throughput Spectrograph (NIHTS, pronounced "nights"), and the DeVeny optical spectrograph. The LMI contains a single large 6.1x6.1 K detector with a 12.5 arcmin2 FOV. NIHTS is a low resolution efficient near-infrared spectrograph and is the subject of this presentation. The DeVeny is Lowell's existing optical spectrograph with resolutions available between 500 and 4000. NIHTS is a low-resolution high-throughput infrared spectrograph covering 0.9-2.4 μm in a single fixed spectral setting at a resolution of »100. For simplicity and replicability NIHTS contains no moving parts. The science detector is a 10242 HAWAII-1 array. The fixed slit plate features an 80" long slit with several different slit widths (2,3,4 and 12 pixels) available along its length. The widest slit width is designed to allow accurate flux calibration, while the 3 and 4-pixel slits are closely matched to typical seeing at the DCT site (0.86" mean). Different resolutions will be rapidly selectable by dithering the telescope, and a typical observation is anticipated to involve a sequence of dithers both at the desired resolution and at SED resolution for calibration purposes. Offset guiding and wavefront sensing to control the active optics of the primary mirror are provided by the facility via deployable probes in

  1. Ultraviolet-visible spectrograph optics: ODIN project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Ian; Bewsher, Amanda

    1995-10-01

    We describe one of the possible designs for the UV-visible spectrograph optics to be employed in the ODIN project. The spectrograph will be used in a future satellite mission for aeronomy observations and will image a column of atmosphere just above the Earth's surface onto a two-dimensional CCD array with the spatial and spectral content aligned orthogonal to one another.

  2. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.W. III; Forney, R.W.; Carrabba, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    This project entails the development of a compact raman spectrograph for field screening and monitoring of a wide variety of wastes, pollutants, and corrosion products in tanks, and environmental materials. The design of a fiber optic probe for use with the spectrograph is also discussed.

  3. Photonic Spectrograph for new Technology Telescope (PSTT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H. R. A.; PSTT Colaboration

    We outline a high stability precision infrared spectrograph intended for the New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory. This spectrograph known as PSTT (Photonic Spectrograph for new Technology Telescope) is intended to incorporate a number of new technologies that have recently become available, e.g., reformatting photonic lanterns, broadband laser combs and 4k2 infrared arrays. Elements such as OH suppression and an integrated photonic spectrograph should also be considered. The intention is to deliver a high resolution infrared spectrograph that can deliver sub-m/s radial velocity precision to the ESO community. This will enable the opportunity to discover and characterise Earth-mass planets around nearby objects as well as follow-up on results from transit surveys from the ground and space.

  4. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  5. A Portable Ultra-Stable Calibration Source for Precision RV Measurements in NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Ge, J.; Wan, X.; Delgado, A.; Jakeman, H.

    2011-09-01

    In the next decade, astronomers are aiming at reaching 0.1 m/s RV precision, which will enable discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. However, the RV precision is currently limited by stellar activity, the stability and bandwidth of RV calibration sources. We proposed to use an ultra-stable monolithic Michelson interferometer as an RV calibration source. This monolithic interferometer source has several advantages over the conventional RV calibration sources: (1), it produces sinusoidal spectral features which can be easily processed, unlike gas absorption cells or emission lamps, which spectral line distributions are extremely nonuniform; (2), it has a wide spectral coverage from visible to near infrared (NIR); (3), it is designed to be thermal-stable (thermally compensated) so that the thermal induced RV drift is very small; (4), it is also field compensated to ensure a high optical efficiency so that a spatially incoherent continuum light source is suitable for producing bright calibration light (unlike the faint ThAr emission lamp); (5). it is extremely compact ( 10x10x10 cm3) and low cost compared to the bulky (more than 1x1x1 m3) and extremely high cost laser frequency combs. With the help of the proposed RV calibration source, the search of exoplanets around M dwarfs or even L, T dwarfs can be extended to the NIR band. The predicted sub m/s RV calibration precision will enable the discovery of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. The proposed calibration source may be quite useful for calibrating future space instruments for possible space RV exoplanet searches in the IR region where RV measurements are free of contamination of the Earth's telluric lines, which is a serious issue for ground-based IR RV observations. We will present our latest results of the calibration source on its application for both Echelle spectrograph and the instrument adopting DFDI method.

  6. NRAO Astronomer Honored by American Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), received the American Astronomical Society's (AAS) Helen B. Warner Prize on January 11, at the society's meeting in Seattle, Washington. The prize is awarded annually for "a significant contribution to observational or theoretical astronomy during the five years preceding the award." Presented by AAS President Debra Elmegreen, the prize recognized Ransom "for his astrophysical insight and innovative technical leadership enabling the discovery of exotic, millisecond and young pulsars and their application for tests of fundamental physics." "Scott has made landmark contributions to our understanding of pulsars and to using them as elegant tools for investigating important areas of fundamental physics. We are very proud that his scientific colleagues have recognized his efforts with this prize," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. A staff astronomer at the NRAO since 2004, Ransom has led efforts using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope and other facilities to study pulsars and use them to make advances in areas of frontier astrophysics such as gravitational waves and particle physics. In 2010, he was on a team that discovered the most massive pulsar yet known, a finding that had implications for the composition of pulsars and details of nuclear physics, gravitational waves, and gamma-ray bursts. Ransom also is a leader in efforts to find and analyze rapidly-rotating millisecond pulsars to make the first direct detection of the gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein. In other work, he has advanced observational capabilities for finding millisecond pulsars in globular clusters of stars and investigated how millisecond pulsars are formed. A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY, Ransom served as an artillery officer in the U.S. Army. After leaving the Army, he earned a Ph.D. at Harvard University in 2001, and was a postdoctoral fellow

  7. Nikolay N. Donitch - the astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex B.; Volyanskaya, M. Yu.

    1999-08-01

    The article is devoted to milestones of life and scientific activity of the eminent astronomer Nikolay Nikolaevich Donitch (Nicolae N. Donici) (1874-1956), a graduate from the Odessa (Novorossiski) university. He was a wellknown expert in the field of reseacrh of objects of Solar system. A person highly cultured, which built the first in Bessarabia (actually a part of the Republic of Moldova) observatory. He was borne in Kishinev (Chisinau) in a nobles family of notable Moldavian landersmen. N.D. graduated from the Richelieu lyceym in Odessa and afterwards, in 1897, graduated from the Odessa (Novorossiysky) University. A.K. Kononovich (1850-1910)headed the chair of astronomy and the Observatory at that time - a foremost authority in the field of astrophysics and stellar astronomy. Many of his disciples became eminent scientists of their time. N. Donitch was among them. N.D. worked till 1918 at Pulkovo Observatory and became a master in the field of studying of such phenomena as solar and lunar eclipses. To observe the Sun N.D., could afford to design and manufacture a spectroheliograph, the first in Russia, with the assistance of a famous Odessa mechanic J.A. Timchenko. This instrument enabled him to obtain topquality photos of the Sun's surface and prominences. It was mounted together with coelostat in the private observatory of N.D. , built in the village Staryie Doubossary in 1908. Besides the heliograoph, the observatory was equiped with a five inch refractor-equatorial with numerous instruments for various observations. Of the other instruments should be mentioned : "a comet triplet" - an instrument consisting of guiding refractor, a photographic camera and a spectrograph with an objective prism. N.D. was lucky enough to observe rare astronomical phenomena. He observed the transit of Mercury through the disk of the Sun on November 14, 1907 and showed the athmosphere absence around this planet, observed the Halley's comet in 1910, the bright Pons-Winneke comet

  8. A ground support electronic interface for the ionospheric spectroscopy and atmospheric chemistry (ISAAC) ultraviolet spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macquarrie, Jeffrey A.

    1994-12-01

    This thesis details the design and development of an electronic Ground Support Equipment (GSE) interface for the Naval Postgraduate School's (NPS) Ionospheric Spectroscopy and Atmospheric Chemistry (ISAAC) spectrograph. The ISAAC spectrograph, which was designed at NPS and built by Research Support Instruments, Inc., is intended to observe atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions in the ultraviolet (1800A to 3300A) wavelength region. It is to be included as one of several sensors flown onboard the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS), which is scheduled for an early 1996 launch. The GSE was developed in order to allow ground testing and calibration of the instrument prior to and during integration with the satellite bus. The GSE includes hardware to provide the connections between various components of the spectrograph and a Macintosh computer with an installed I/O card. The GSE also includes a user-friendly software interface written with LabVIEW 2.2 that provides the ability to view spectra obtained from the instrument and to remotely control mechanical functions of the spectrograph. An initial wavelength calibration of the spectrograph has been performed using the completed GSE.

  9. Updated Status and Performance of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Michael A.; Dixon, W. V.; Mason, E.; Proffitt, C.; Aloisi, A.; Oliveira, C.; Bohlin, R. C.; Osten, R.; Bostroem, K. A.; Zheng, W.; Pascucci, I.; Niemi, S.; York, B.; Sonnentracker, P.; Diaz, R.; Ely, J. C.

    2011-05-01

    A description is provided of the overall performance of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph after Cycle 17 and through the first half of Cycle 18. Most aspects of performance are still found to be consistent with extrapolations of the trends seen during Cycle 17 calibrations. Many of the characteristics of the instrument have changed over time, and we present here an update on its current performance based on the latest Cycle 18 calibration observations. We discuss changes in the CCD and MAMA dark currents, provide updates on the sensitivity of STIS modes, echelle blaze function, discuss changes, if any, in number of hot pixels, flat fields, charge transfer inefficiency, read noise, and spurious charge.

  10. Misconceptions of Astronomical Distances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brian W.; Brewer, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies using multiple-choice procedures have suggested that there are misconceptions about the scale of astronomical distances. The present study provides a quantitative estimate of the nature of this misconception among US university students by asking them, in an open-ended response format, to make estimates of the distances…

  11. Astronomical education in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulmaa, A.; Tsolmon, R.; Lkhagvajav, Ch.; Jargalsuren, Sh.; Bayartungalag, B.; Zaya, M.

    2011-06-01

    The history, current situation, education and future directions of modern Mongolian space science and astronomy is reviewed. This paper discusses recent efforts to develop astronomy education and research capacity in Mongolia with cooperation of the International Astronomical Union. Various capacity-building initiatives in space science including remote sensing in Mongolia are discussed.

  12. Ancient Chinese Astronomical Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jennifer Robin

    2004-05-01

    I am interested in the astronomical advances of the Ancient Chinese in measuring the solar day. Their development of gnomon & ruler, sundial, and water clock apparatuses enabled Chinese astronomers to measure the annual solar orbit and solar day more precisely than their contemporaries. I have built one of each of these devices to use in collecting data from Olympia, Washington. I will measure the solar day in the Pacific Northwest following the methodology of the ancient Chinese. I will compare with my data, the available historical Chinese astronomical records and current records from the United States Naval Observatory Master Clock. I seek to understand how ancient Chinese investigations into solar patterns enabled them to make accurate predictions about the movement of the celestial sphere and planets, and to develop analytic tests of their theories. Mayall, R. Newton; Sundials: their construction and use. Dover Publications 2000 North, John; The Norton History of Astronomy and Cosmology W.W. Norton& Co. 1995 Zhentao Xu, David W. Pankenier, Yaotiao Jiang; East Asian archaeoastronomy : historical records of astronomical observations of China, Japan and Korea Published on behalf of the Earth Space Institute by Gordon and Breach Science Publishers, c2000

  13. Astronomical Microdensitometry Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinglesmith, D. A. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The status of the current microdensitometers used for digitizing astronomical imagery is discussed. The tests and improvements that have and can be made to the Photometric Data System PDS microdensitometer are examined. The various types of microdensitometers that currently exist in the world are investigated. Papers are presented on the future needs and the data processing problems associated with digitizing large images.

  14. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  15. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  16. Korean Astronomical Calendar, Chiljeongsan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Hee

    In fifteenth century Korea, there was a grand project for the astronomical calendar and instrument making by the order of King Sejong 世宗 (1418-1450). During this period, many astronomical and calendrical books including Islamic sources in Chinese versions were imported from Ming 明 China, and corrected and researched by the court astronomers of Joseon 朝鮮 (1392-1910). Moreover, the astronomers and technicians of Korea frequently visited China to study astronomy and instrument making, and they brought back useful information in the form of new published books or specifications of instruments. As a result, a royal observatory equipped with 15 types of instrument was completed in 1438. Two types of calendar, Chiljeongsan Naepyeon 七政算內篇 and Chiljeongsan Oepyeon 七政算外篇, based on the Chinese and Islamic calendar systems, respectively, were published in 1444 with a number of calendrical editions such as corrections and example supplements (假令) including calculation methods and results for solar and lunar eclipses.

  17. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  18. The Knorre astronomers' dynasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinigin, G.

    2009-06-01

    We attempt to throw light upon the poorly known astronomical dynasty of Knorre and describe its contribution to astronomy. The founder of the dynasty, Ernst Christoph Friedrich Knorre (1759-1810), was born in Germany in 1759, and since 1802 he was a Professor of Mathematics at the Tartu University, and observer at its temporary observatory. He determined the first coordinates of Tartu by stellar observations. Karl Friedrich Knorre (1801-1883) was the first director of the Naval Observatory in Nikolaev since the age of 20, provided the Black Sea navy with accurate time and charts, trained mariners in astronomical navigation, and certified navigation equipment. He compiled star maps and catalogues, and determined positions of comets and planets. He also participated in Bessel's project of the Academic Star Charts, and was responsible for Hora 4, published by the Berlin Academy of Sciences. This sheet permitted to discover two minor planets, Astraea and Flora. Viktor Knorre (1840-1919) was born in Nikolaev. In 1862 he left for Berlin to study astronomy. After defending his thesis for a doctor's degree, he went to Pulkovo as an astronomical calculator in 1867. Since 1873 Viktor worked as an observer of the Berlin Observatory Fraunhofer refractor. His main research focussed on minor planets, comets and binary stars. He discovered the minor planets Koronis, Oenone, Hypatia and Penthesilea. Viktor Knorre also worked on improving astronomical instrumentation, e.g. the Knorre / Heele equatorial telescope mounting.

  19. Panchromatic spectrograph with supporting monochromatic imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.; Sandel, B. R.; Knecht, D.; Viereck, R.; Murad, E.

    1992-01-01

    The Arizona Imager/Spectrograph is a set of imaging spectrographs and 2D imagers for space flight. Nine nearly identical spectrographs record wavelengths from 114 to 1090 nm with a resolution of 0.5-1.3 nm. The spatial resolution along the slit is electronically selectable and can reach 192 elements. Twelve passband imagers cover wavelengths in the 160-900-nm range and have fields of view from 2 to 21 deg. The spectrographs and imagers rely on intensified CCD detectors to achieve substantial capability in an instrument of minimum mass and size. By use of innovative coupling techniques only two CCDs are required to record images from 12 imagers, and single CCDs record spectra from pairs of spectrographs. The fields of view of the spectrographs and imagers are coaligned, and all spectra and images can be exposed simultaneously. A scan platform can rotate the sensor head about two orthogonal axes. The Arizona imager/spectrograph is designed for investigations of the interaction between the Space Shuttle and its environment. It is scheduled for flight on a Shuttle subsatellite.

  20. The League of Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nancy H.; Brandel, A.; Paat, A. M.; Schmitz, D.; Sharma, R.; Trujillo, J.; Laws, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    The League of Astronomers is committed to engaging the University of Washington (UW) and the greater Seattle communities through outreach, research, and events. Since its re-founding two years ago, the LOA has provided a clear connection between the UW Astronomy Department, undergraduate students, and members of the public. Weekly outreach activities such as public star parties and planetarium talks in both the UW Planetarium and the Mobile Planetarium have connected enthusiastic LOA volunteers with hundreds of public observers. In addition, collaboration with organizations like the Seattle Astronomical Society and the UW Society of Physics Students has allowed the LOA to reach an even greater audience. The club also provides opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in research projects. The UW Student Radio Telescope (SRT) and the Manastash Ridge Observatory (MRO) both allow students to practice collecting their own data and turning it into a completed project. Students have presented many of these research projects at venues like the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium and meetings of the American Astronomical Society. For example, the LOA will be observing newly discovered globular clusters at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria, B.C. and constructing color-magnitude diagrams. The LOA also helps engage students with the Astronomy major through a variety of events. Bimonthly seminars led by graduate students on their research and personal experiences in the field showcase the variety of options available for students in astronomy. Social events hosted by the club encourage peer mentoring and a sense of community among the Astronomy Department’s undergraduate and graduate students. As a part of one of the nation’s largest undergraduate astronomy programs, members of the League of Astronomers have a unique opportunity to connect and interact with not only the Seattle public but also the greater astronomical community.

  1. Astronomical Data in Undergraduate courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, William I.; Swift, Carrie; Hughes, Kelli; Burke, Christopher J. F.; Burgess, Colin C.; Elrod, Aunna V.; Howard, Brittany; Stahl, Lucas; Matzke, David; Bord, Donald J.

    2016-06-01

    We present status and plans for our ongoing efforts to develop data analysis and problem-solving skills through Undergraduate Astronomy instruction. While our initiatives were developed with UM-Dearborn’s student body primarily in mind, they should be applicable for a wide range of institution and of student demographics. We focus here on two strands of our effort.Firstly, students in our Introductory Astronomy (ASTR 130) general-education course now perform several “Data Investigations”, in which they interrogate the Hubble Legacy Archive to illustrate important course concepts. This was motivated in part by the realization that typical public data archives now include tools to interrogate the observations that are sufficiently accessible that introductory astronomy students can use them to perform real science, albeit mostly at a descriptive level. We are continuing to refine these investigations, and, most importantly, to critically assess their effectiveness in terms of the student learning outcomes we wish to achieve. This work is supported by grant HST-EO-13758, provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.Secondly, at the advanced-undergraduate level, students taking courses in our Astronomy minor are encouraged to gain early experience in techniques of astronomical observation and analysis that are used by professionals. We present two example projects from the Fall 2015 iteration of our upper-division course ASTR330 (The Cosmic Distance Ladder), one involving Solar System measurements, the second producing calibrated aperture photometry. For both projects students conducted, analysed, and interpreted observations using our 0.4m campus telescope, and used many of the same analysis tools as professional astronomers. This work is supported partly from a Research Initiation and Seed grant from the

  2. The Schmidt-Czerny-Turner spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Jason P.

    2014-09-01

    Since the invention of the CCD detector in 1969 by George Smith and Willard Boyle, incremental innovations to the dispersive imaging spectrograph have slowly materialized in response the abounding advances in CCD detector technology. The modern Czerny-Turner type spectrograph, arguably the most commonly used instrument in optical spectroscopy, fails to uphold the ever increasing needs today's researchers demand, let alone tomorrow's. This paper discusses an innovative solution to the Czerny-Turner imaging spectrograph bridging a more than 20 year gap in development and understanding. A manifold of techniques in optical spectroscopy both advantaged and enabled by this innovation are expounded upon.

  3. High School Teachers as Astronomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sather, Robert

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a joint research program between several high school teachers and solar system astronomers in which data were collected on photoelectric observations of asteroids and minor planets via astronomical telescopes. (MLH)

  4. Thomas Kuhn's Influence on Astronomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the astronomical community on their familiarity with the work of Thomas Kuhn. Finds that for some astronomers, Kuhn's thought resonated well with their picture of how science is done and provided perspectives on their scientific careers. (Author/CCM)

  5. Successful "First Light" for VLT High-Resolution Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Great Research Prospects with UVES at KUEYEN A major new astronomical instrument for the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal (Chile), the UVES high-resolution spectrograph, has just made its first observations of astronomical objects. The astronomers are delighted with the quality of the spectra obtained at this moment of "First Light". Although much fine-tuning still has to be done, this early success promises well for new and exciting science projects with this large European research facility. Astronomical instruments at VLT KUEYEN The second VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope, KUEYEN ("The Moon" in the Mapuche language), is in the process of being tuned to perfection before it will be "handed" over to the astronomers on April 1, 2000. The testing of the new giant telescope has been successfully completed. The latest pointing tests were very positive and, from real performance measurements covering the entire operating range of the telescope, the overall accuracy on the sky was found to be 0.85 arcsec (the RMS-value). This is an excellent result for any telescope and implies that KUEYEN (as is already the case for ANTU) will be able to acquire its future target objects securely and efficiently, thus saving precious observing time. This work has paved the way for the installation of large astronomical instruments at its three focal positions, all prototype facilities that are capable of catching the light from even very faint and distant celestial objects. The three instruments at KUEYEN are referred to by their acronyms UVES , FORS2 and FLAMES. They are all dedicated to the investigation of the spectroscopic properties of faint stars and galaxies in the Universe. The UVES instrument The first to be installed is the Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) that was built by ESO, with the collaboration of the Trieste Observatory (Italy) for the control software. Complete tests of its optical and mechanical components, as well as of its CCD detectors and of the complex

  6. GRASSP (GRAnada Sprite Spectrograph and Polarimeter). Design and implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passas, María; Sánchez, Justo; Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Luque, Alejandro; Parra-Rojas, Francisco C.

    2013-04-01

    Transient luminous events (TLEs) are short optical emissions that occur in the upper atmosphere above storm systems. They appear between 15 and 90 km altitude and last between less than a millisecond to up to two seconds. So far there are no polarization studies of TLEs, nor high-resolution spectroscopy results which could help us to understand the kinetics and electrodynamics of these kind of optical emissions. The GRASSP (Granada Sprite Spectrograph and Polarimeter) instrument has been developed to measure simultaneously the polarization and the spectra of the light emitted from these TLEs with medium spectral resolution (0.45nm). By consulting a real-time lightning database, the telescope aims automatically to the region of the sky where a TLE is predicted to appear. The instrument is located outside the 2.2 m dome of the German-Spanish Astronomical Center at Calar Alto, Sierra de Los Filabres, north of Almería (Andalucía, Southern Spain), at 2168 meters above mean sea level. From this location we can observe the western Mediterranean Sea zone (37°-45°N; 2°W-6°E) with an elevation of 10°-35° above the horizon, a region where the most TLE activity in Europe takes place. GRASSP is a prototype which consists of a spectrograph and a polarimeter, both installed on a telescope mount. The 6-channel imaging polarimeter will cover a spectral range from 500 - 750 nm, with a polarized / unpolarized sensitivity smaller than 5 %. It will present a circular field of view of 5° and a CCD of 2000 × 2000 pixels with a FOV of 15 µm/px. The goal is to find the 4 Stokes parameters in a single shot. To do so, the polarimeter consists of seven circular windows disposed over a telescope surface, six of them are located around the border of the circle and the last one is located in the center. This single window will show the unfiltered image and the six remaining ones include a different polarizer ( 0° 45° 90° 180° linear polarizers and left and right circular

  7. Astronomers without borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mike

    2011-06-01

    ``Astronomers Without Borders'' is a new global organisational dedicated to furthering understanding and goodwill across national and cultural boundaries using the universal appeal of astronomy and space science. A growing network of affiliate organisations brings together clubs, magazines and other organizations involved in astronomy and space science. Forums, galleries, video conferences and other interactive technologies are used to connect participants around the world. Sharing of resources and direct connections through travel programs are also planned. One project, ``The World at Night'' (TWAN), has become an Special Project of IYA2009. TWAN creates wide-angle images of the night sky in important natural and historic settings around the world, dramatically demonstrating the universal nature and appeal of the night sky. ``Astronomers Without Borders'' is also a leader of the 100 Hours of Astronomy IYA2009 Global Cornerstone Project.

  8. Astronomers as Software Developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pildis, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomers know that their research requires writing, adapting, and documenting computer software. Furthermore, they often have to learn new computer languages and figure out how existing programs work without much documentation or guidance and with extreme time pressure. These are all skills that can lead to a software development job, but recruiters and employers probably won't know that. I will discuss all the highly useful experience that astronomers may not know that they already have, and how to explain that knowledge to others when looking for non-academic software positions. I will also talk about some of the pitfalls I have run into while interviewing for jobs and working as a developer, and encourage you to embrace the curiosity employers might have about your non-standard background.

  9. Misconceptions about astronomical magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Eric; Cox, Caroline V.

    1997-10-01

    The present system of astronomical magnitudes was created as an inverse scale by Claudius Ptolemy in about 140 A.D. and was defined to be logarithmic in 1856 by Norman Pogson, who believed that human eyes respond logarithmically to the intensity of light. Although scientists have known for some time that the response is instead a power law, astronomers continue to use the Pogson magnitude scale. The peculiarities of this system make it easy for students to develop numerous misconceptions about how and why to use magnitudes. We present a useful exercise in the use of magnitudes to derive a cosmologically interesting quantity (the mass-to-light ratio for spiral galaxies), with potential pitfalls pointed out and explained.

  10. Astronomical Fourier spectropolarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, F. F.; Fymat, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectra of the Stokes polarization parameters of Venus (resolution 0.5 per cm) are presented. They were obtained at the Cassegrain focus of the 154-cm telescope of the National Mexican Observatory, Baja California, Mexico, July 12 and 13, 1972, with the Fourier Interferometer Polarimeter (FIP). A preliminary, limited analysis of four spectral features and of the CO2 rotational band structures at 6080 and 6200 per cm has demonstrated that spectral polarization is indeed present. These experimental results, confirmed by two series of observations, provide substantiation for this theoretically predicted phenomenon. They also tend to show that the FIP represents a novel astronomical tool for variable spectral resolution studies of both the intensity and the state of polarization of astronomical light sources.

  11. Microcomputers and astronomical navigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin-Jouan, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Experienced navigators remember ancient astronomical navigation and its limitations. Using microcomputers in small packages and selecting up-to-date efficient methods will overcome many of these limitations. Both features lead to focus on observations, and encourage an increase in their numbers. With no intention of competing with satellite navigation, sextant navigation in the open sea can then be accessed again by anybody. It can be considered for demonstrative use or as a complement to the GPS.

  12. The simulated space proton environment for radiation effects on Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, Jacob; Fowler, Walter

    1992-01-01

    The space telescope imaging spectrograph (STIS) is a second generation instrument planned for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) which is currently in orbit. Candidate glasses and other transmitting materials are being considered for order sorters, in-flight calibration filters, detector windows, and calibration lamps. The glasses for in-flight calibration filters showed significant drop in UV transmission, but can probably still be used on STIS. The addressed topics include the Hubble radiation environment, simulation of orbital exposure at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, measurement of spectral transmission, and comments on individual samples.

  13. Astrobiology: An astronomer's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-12-08

    In this review we explore aspects of the field of astrobiology from an astronomical viewpoint. We therefore focus on the origin of life in the context of planetary formation, with additional emphasis on tracing the most abundant volatile elements, C, H, O, and N that are used by life on Earth. We first explore the history of life on our planet and outline the current state of our knowledge regarding the delivery of the C, H, O, N elements to the Earth. We then discuss how astronomers track the gaseous and solid molecular carriers of these volatiles throughout the process of star and planet formation. It is now clear that the early stages of star formation fosters the creation of water and simple organic molecules with enrichments of heavy isotopes. These molecules are found as ice coatings on the solid materials that represent microscopic beginnings of terrestrial worlds. Based on the meteoritic and cometary record, the process of planet formation, and the local environment, lead to additional increases in organic complexity. The astronomical connections towards this stage are only now being directly made. Although the exact details are uncertain, it is likely that the birth process of star and planets likely leads to terrestrial worlds being born with abundant water and organics on the surface.

  14. Cosmic Origins Spectrograph: Servicing Mission Observatory Verification Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles D.; Sahnow, D.; Aloisi, A.; Biagetti, C.; Osterman, S.; Froning, C.; Penton, S.; Green, J.; Oliveira, C.; Osten, R.; Niemi, S.; STScI COS Team; COS IDT Team

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) was installed onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May, 2009 as part of the most recent servicing mission (SM4). COS is optimized for observing faint point sources at moderate spectral resolutions and is the most sensitive UV spectrograph ever flown on HST. The FUV channel, which is 10 to 30 times more sensitive than STIS, covers the wavelength range from 1150 to 1800 A with medium resolution gratings (G130M/G160M) and from 900 to 2400 A. with a low resolution grating (G140L). The medium resolution gratings in the NUV channel (G185M/G225M/G285M) cover 1700 to 3200 A., while the low resolution grating (G230L) covers 1700 to 3200 A. As part of the overall HST Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV), COS on-orbit functionality was verified via an extensive set of 34 observing programs comprising nearly 2800 individual exposures. We present a thorough discussion of the organization, inter-relationships, and dependencies of the programs in the verification plan. Sequential activities were executed that concentrated on the general areas of initial instrument checkout; detector HV turn-on and operation; initial detector characterization; NUV focus and alignment; FUV focus and alignment; initial target acquisition verification; wavelength calibration; and thorough target acquisition assessment, all leading to enabling of basic science functionality. Finally science-related calibrations and verifications were performed including flux calibration, flat field characterization, spectroscopic performance verification, high S/N operation, and thermal and structural stability measurements. Several companion presentations describe results from specific programs and verification areas in more detail.

  15. On Tokugawa Bakufu's astronomical officials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Keiji

    2005-06-01

    Tokugawa Bakufu's astronomical office, established in 1684, is the post for calendar reform. The reform was conducted when the calendar did not predict peculiar celestial phenomena, such as solar or lunar eclipses. It was, so to speak, the theme of the ancient astronomy. From removal of the embargo on importing western science books in 1720, Japanese astronomers studied European astronomy and attempted to apply its knowledge to calendar making. Moreover, they knew the Copernican system and also faced several modern astronomical subjects. The French astronomer Lalande's work "ASTRONOMY" exerted particularly strong influence on astronomers. This paper overviews the activities of Paris observatory and French astronomers in the 17th and 18th centuries, and survey what modern astronomical subjects were. Finally, it sketches a role of the Edo observatory played in the Japanese cultural history.

  16. Astronomical Software Directory Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, Robert J.; Payne, Harry; Hayes, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    With the support of NASA's Astrophysics Data Program (NRA 92-OSSA-15), we have developed the Astronomical Software Directory Service (ASDS): a distributed, searchable, WWW-based database of software packages and their related documentation. ASDS provides integrated access to 56 astronomical software packages, with more than 16,000 URLs indexed for full-text searching. Users are performing about 400 searches per month. A new aspect of our service is the inclusion of telescope and instrumentation manuals, which prompted us to change the name to the Astronomical Software and Documentation Service. ASDS was originally conceived to serve two purposes: to provide a useful Internet service in an area of expertise of the investigators (astronomical software), and as a research project to investigate various architectures for searching through a set of documents distributed across the Internet. Two of the co-investigators were then installing and maintaining astronomical software as their primary job responsibility. We felt that a service which incorporated our experience in this area would be more useful than a straightforward listing of software packages. The original concept was for a service based on the client/server model, which would function as a directory/referral service rather than as an archive. For performing the searches, we began our investigation with a decision to evaluate the Isite software from the Center for Networked Information Discovery and Retrieval (CNIDR). This software was intended as a replacement for Wide-Area Information Service (WAIS), a client/server technology for performing full-text searches through a set of documents. Isite had some additional features that we considered attractive, and we enjoyed the cooperation of the Isite developers, who were happy to have ASDS as a demonstration project. We ended up staying with the software throughout the project, making modifications to take advantage of new features as they came along, as well as

  17. Summary of the COS Cycle 20 Calibration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bostroem, K. Azalee; Ely, Justin; Holland, Stephen; Lockwood, Sean; Oliveira, Cristina; Penton, Steven; Proffitt, Charles; Sahnow, David; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Welty, Alan D.; Wheeler, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    We summarize the Cycle 20 calibration program for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, covering the time period from November 2012 through October 2013. We give an overview of the Calibration plan and status summaries for each of the individual proposals comprising the C20 Calibration program.

  18. Summary of the COS Cycle 21 Calibration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues; Fox, Andrew; Roman-Duval, Julia; Ely, Justin; Bostroem, K. Azalee; Lockwood, Sean; Oliveira, Cristina; Penton, Steve; Proffitt, Charles; Sahnow, David; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Welty, Alan D.; Wheeler, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We summarize the Cycle 21 calibration program for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, covering the time period from November 2013 through October 2014. We give an overview of the Calibration plan and status summaries for each of the individual proposals comprising the C21 Calibration program.

  19. Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Catalogs and Atlases. Explanatory Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C. A. (Editor); Neugebauer, G. (Editor); Habing, H. J. (Editor); Clegg, P. E. (Editor); Chester, T. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) mission is described. An overview of the mission, a description of the satellite and its telescope system, and a discussion of the mission design, requirements, and inflight modifications are given. Data reduction, flight tests, flux reconstruction and calibration, data processing, and the formats of the IRAS catalogs and atlases are also considered.

  20. MEGARA: a new generation optical spectrograph for GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil de Paz, A.; Gallego, J.; Carrasco, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Cedazo, R.; Vílchez, J. M.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Arrillaga, X.; Carrera, M. A.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.; Ferrusca, D.; González-Guardia, E.; Lefort, B.; Maldonado, M.; Marino, R. A.; Martínez-Delgado, I.; Morales Durán, I.; Mujica, E.; Páez, G.; Pascual, S.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Sánchez-Penim, A.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Tulloch, S.; Velázquez, M.; Zamorano, J.; Aguerri, A. L.; Barrado y Naváscues, D.; Bertone, E.; Cardiel, N.; Cava, A.; Cenarro, J.; Chávez, M.; García, M.; Guichard, J.; Gúzman, R.; Herrero, A.; Huélamo, N.; Hughes, D.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Kehrig, C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mayya, Y. D.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Mollá, M.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Peimbert, M.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Pérez Montero, E.; Rodríguez, M.; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L.; Rosa-González, D.; Sánchez-Almeida, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Sánchez Moreno, F. M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Sarajedini, A.; Serena, F.; Silich, S.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Terlevich, E.; Terlevich, R.; Torres-Peimbert, S.; Trujillo, I.; Tsamis, Y.; Vega, O.; Villar, V.

    2014-07-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is an optical Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) designed for the GTC 10.4m telescope in La Palma. MEGARA offers two IFU fiber bundles, one covering 12.5x11.3 arcsec2 with a spaxel size of 0.62 arcsec (Large Compact Bundle; LCB) and another one covering 8.5x6.7 arcsec2 with a spaxel size of 0.42 arcsec (Small Compact Bundle; SCB). The MEGARA MOS mode will allow observing up to 100 objects in a region of 3.5x3.5 arcmin2 around the two IFU bundles. Both the LCB IFU and MOS capabilities of MEGARA will provide intermediate-to-high spectral resolutions (RFWHM~6,000, 12,000 and 18,700, respectively for the low-, mid- and high-resolution Volume Phase Holographic gratings) in the range 3650-9700ÅÅ. These values become RFWHM~7,000, 13,500, and 21,500 when the SCB is used. A mechanism placed at the pseudo-slit position allows exchanging the three observing modes and also acts as focusing mechanism. The spectrograph is a collimator-camera system that has a total of 11 VPHs simultaneously available (out of the 18 VPHs designed and being built) that are placed in the pupil by means of a wheel and an insertion mechanism. The custom-made cryostat hosts an E2V231-84 4kx4k CCD. The UCM (Spain) leads the MEGARA Consortium that also includes INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain), and UPM (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under a contract between GRANTECAN and UCM. The detailed design, construction and AIV phases are now funded and the instrument should be delivered to GTC before the end of 2016.

  1. Progress on the Gemini High-Resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST) design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael; Anthony, Andre; Burley, Greg; Chisholm, Eric; Churilov, Vladimir; Dunn, Jennifer; Frost, Gabriella; Lawrence, Jon; Loop, David; McGregor, Peter; Martell, Sarah; McConnachie, Alan; McDermid, Richard M.; Pazder, John; Reshetov, Vlad; Robertson, J. G.; Sheinis, Andrew; Tims, Julia; Young, Peter; Zhelem, Ross

    2014-07-01

    The Gemini High-Resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST) is the newest instrument being developed for the Gemini telescopes, in a collaboration between the Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO), the NRC - Herzberg in Canada and the Australian National University (ANU). We describe the process of design optimisation that utilizes the unique strengths of the new partner, NRC - Herzberg, the design and need for the slit viewing camera system, and we describe a simplification for the lenslet-based slit reformatting. Finally, we out- line the updated project plan, and describe the unique scientific role this instrument will have in an international context, from exoplanets through to the distant Universe.

  2. Apollo 16 far-ultraviolet camera/spectrograph - Instrument and operations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A far-ultraviolet camera/spectrograph experiment was designed and constructed for studies of the terrestrial upper atmosphere and geocorona, the interplanetary medium, and celestial objects from the lunar surface. The experiment was successfully operated during the Apollo 16 mission 21-23 April 1972. Discussed are the design and operating principles of the instrument, the actual events and operations during the Apollo 16 mission, and also anomalies encountered and suggested improvements for future experiments of this type. This experiment demonstrated the utility of the electronographic technique in space astronomy, as well as the great potential of the lunar surface as a base for astronomical observations.

  3. On astronomical drawing [1846

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Charles Piazzi

    Reprinted from the Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society 15, 1846, pp. 71-82. With annotations and illustrations added by Klaus Hentschel. The activities of the Astronomer Royal for Scotland, Charles Piazzi Smyth (1819-1900), include the triangulation of South African districts, landscape painting, day-to-day or tourist sketching, the engraving and lithographing of prominent architectural sites, the documentary photography of the Egyptian pyramids or the Tenerife Dragon tree, and `instant photographs' of the clouds above his retirement home in Clova, Ripon. His colorful records of the aurora polaris, and solar and terrestrial spectra all profited from his trained eye and his subtle mastery of the pen and the brush. As his paper on astronomical drawing, which we chose to reproduce in this volume, amply demonstrates, he was conversant in most of the print technology repertoire that the 19th century had to offer, and carefully selected the one most appropriate to each sujet. For instance, he chose mezzotint for the plates illustrating Maclear's observations of Halley's comet in 1835/36, so as to achieve a ``rich profundity of shadows, the deep obscurity of which is admirably adapted to reproduce those fine effects of chiaroscuro frequently found in works where the quantity of dark greatly predominates.'' The same expertise with which he tried to emulate Rembrandt's chiaroscuro effects he applied to assessing William and John Herschel's illustrations of nebulae, which appeared in print between 1811 and 1834. William Herschel's positive engraving, made partly by stippling and partly by a coarse mezzotint, receives sharp admonishment because of the visible ruled crossed lines in the background and the fact that ``the objects, which are also generally too light, [have] a much better definition than they really possess.'' On the other hand, John Herschel's illustration of nebulae and star clusters, given in negative, ``in which the lights are the darkest part of the

  4. A spectrograph instrument concept for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) on Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivès, Sébastien; Le Mignant, David; Madec, Fabrice; Jaquet, Marc; Prieto, Eric; Martin, Laurent; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Gunn, James; Carr, Michael; Smee, Stephen; Barkhouser, Robert; Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki

    2012-09-01

    We describe the conceptual design of the spectrograph opto-mechanical concept for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) being developed for the SUBARU telescope. The SuMIRe PFS will consist of four identical spectrographs, each receiving 600 fibers from a 2400 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph will have three channels covering in total, a wavelength range from 380 nm to 1300 nm. The requirements for the instrument are summarized in Section 1. We present the optical design and the optical performance and analysis in Section 2. Section 3 introduces the mechanical design, its requirements and the proposed concepts. Finally, the AIT phases for the Spectrograph System are described in Section 5.

  5. The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) Sounding Rocket Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Glenn T.; Hassler, Donald M.; Deforest, Craig; Slater, David D.; Thomas, Roger J.; Ayres, Thomas; Davis, Michael; de Pontieu, Bart; Diller, Jed; Graham, Roy; Michaelis, Harald; Schuele, Udo; Warren, Harry

    2016-03-01

    We present a summary of the solar observing Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) sounding rocket program including an overview of the design and calibration of the instrument, flight performance, and preliminary chromospheric results from the successful November 2014 launch of the RAISE instrument. The RAISE sounding rocket payload is the fastest scanning-slit solar ultraviolet imaging spectrograph flown to date. RAISE is designed to observe the dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona on time scales as short as 100-200ms, with arcsecond spatial resolution and a velocity sensitivity of 1-2km/s. Two full spectral passbands over the same one-dimensional spatial field are recorded simultaneously with no scanning of the detectors or grating. The two different spectral bands (first-order 1205-1251Å and 1524-1569Å) are imaged onto two intensified Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors whose focal planes are individually adjusted for optimized performance. RAISE reads out the full field of both detectors at 5-10Hz, recording up to 1800 complete spectra (per detector) in a single 6-min rocket flight. This opens up a new domain of high time resolution spectral imaging and spectroscopy. RAISE is designed to observe small-scale multithermal dynamics in Active Region (AR) and quiet Sun loops, identify the strength, spectrum and location of high frequency waves in the solar atmosphere, and determine the nature of energy release in the chromospheric network.

  6. Astronomical Fourier spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Connes, P; Michel, G

    1975-09-01

    A high resolution near ir Fourier spectrometer with the same general design as previously described laboratory instruments has been built for astronomical observations at a coudé focus. Present spectral range is 0.8-3.5 microm with PbS and Ge detectors and maximum path difference 1 m. The servo system can accommodate various recording modes: stepping or continuous scan, path difference modulation, sky chopping. A real time computer is incorporated into the system, which has been set up at the Hale 500-cm telescope on Mount Palomar. Samples of the results are given. PMID:20154966

  7. Astronomical Instruments in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  8. MUSE: feeding and mounting 24 spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklas, Harald; Seifert, Walter; Xu, Wenli; Hofmann, Denni; Köhler, Christof; Loupias, Magali

    2008-07-01

    The Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer MUSE is an integral field device containing 24 spectrographs at the Nasmyth focus of the VLT unit telescope. The total field size of 1'x1' needs to be split and separated into 24 sub-fields which are relayed along a central structure into the entrance aperture of the individual spectrographs. The realization of the optics for field splitting and separation as well as the relay optics to direct the light of the individual fields to the spectrographs is described here. A very tight link exists between the relay optics system layout and the mechanical arrangement of the spectrographs in the common central structure. A compact mounting is essential due to the restricted space for such a large instrument even on the VLT Nasmyth platform. A suitable arrangement of vertical and horizontal stacking of the spectrographs was found enabling their feeding from the unobstructed front side of the instrumental structure. The central instrument mount was designed as a stiff structure absorbing print-through effects due to thermal mismatch with the telescope platform but rigid enough to withstand earthquakes.

  9. MIRADAS - The Next-Generation Near-Infrared Spectrograph for the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, S. S.

    2013-05-01

    We describe the Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS) being developed by the MIRADAS Consortium institutions (including the University of Florida, Universidad de Barcelona, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya and Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México) for the Gran Telescopio Canarias. MIRADAS is the most powerful astronomical instrument of its kind ever envisioned. The combination of the collecting area of GTC and the multi-object mid-resolution near-infrared spectra provided by MIRADAS make its capabilities unparalleled for addressing some of the leading scientific challenges of the coming decades, with an observing efficiency more than an order of magnitude greater than current capabilities for 10-meter-class telescopes. We briefly review the science drivers for the instrument, the basic design features, and the current status of the instrument development.

  10. XXXVI Polish Astronomical Society Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, Agata; Bejger, Michał

    2014-12-01

    XXXVI meeting of Polish Astronomical Society was held in Warsaw on Sept. 11-14, 2013. The conference brought together 150 astronomers working in different institutes in Poland and abroad. The highlight of the Congress was the first awarding of the Paczynski's Medal. The first laureate of the Medal is Professor Martin Rees from University of Cambridge. Medal was given by the President of the Polish Astronomical Society prof. Bozena Czerny.

  11. Professional Ethics for Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.

    2005-05-01

    There is a growing recognition that professional ethics is an important topic for all professional scientists, especially physical scientists. Situations at the National Laboratories have dramatically proven this point. Professional ethics is usually only considered important for the health sciences and the legal and medical professions. However, certain aspects of the day to day work of professional astronomers can be impacted by ethical issues. Examples include refereeing scientific papers, serving on grant panels or telescope allocation committees, submitting grant proposals, providing proper references in publications, proposals or talks and even writing recommendation letters for job candidates or serving on search committees. This session will feature several speakers on a variety of topics and provide time for questions and answers from the audience. Confirmed speakers include: Kate Kirby, Director Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics - Professional Ethics in the Physical Sciences: An Overview Rob Kennicutt, Astrophysical Journal Editor - Ethical Issues for Publishing Astronomers Peggy Fischer, Office of the NSF Inspector General - Professional Ethics from the NSF Inspector General's Point of View

  12. Strasbourg's "First" astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2011-08-01

    The turret lantern located at the top of the Strasbourg Hospital Gate is generally considered as the first astronomical observatory of the city, but such a qualification must be treated with caution. The thesis of this paper is that the idea of a tower-observatory was brought back by a local scholar, Julius Reichelt (1637-1717), after he made a trip to Northern Europe around 1666 and saw the "Rundetårn" (Round Tower) recently completed in Copenhagen. There, however, a terrace allowed (and still allows) the full viewing of the sky, and especially of the zenith area where the atmospheric transparency is best. However, there is no such terrace in Strasbourg around the Hospital Gate lantern. Reichelt had also visited Johannes Hevelius who was then developing advanced observational astronomy in Gdansk, but nothing of the kind followed in Strasbourg. Rather, the Hospital Gate observatory was built essentially for the prestige of the city and for the notoriety of the university, and the users of this observing post did not make any significant contributions to the progress of astronomical knowledge. We conclude that the Hospital Gate observatory was only used for rudimentary viewing of bright celestial objects or phenomena relatively low on the horizon.

  13. Really Bad Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    What happens when even Percival Lowell stops believing in your Mars observations? History can be troubling. This I learned while editing the Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers (Springer, 2007). There have been astronomers who do not fit our commonly held, and clung to, conceptual model: a sociological system that sifts out generally like-minded and sensible colleagues. I refer to those individuals who (for at least a time) successfully entered the mainstream profession, but now disturb our worldview that says prosperity as a scientist usually is achieved by a rational being holding certain common values. My List of Shame includes examples from each of the last four centuries. Not "crack pot” cosmologists, these were hard-working observers for whom the end justified the means. And they all got away with it. Each person I discuss was vetted by the professional establishment of the day. Yet you will learn how to be fired from a major observatory, banned from prominent journals. But only after damage to the science is done. Be afraid.

  14. Grigor Narekatsi's astronomical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Samvel

    2015-07-01

    What stand out in the solid system of Gr. Narekatsi's naturalistic views are his astronomical insights on the material nature of light, its high speed and the Sun being composed of "material air". Especially surprising and fascinating are his views on stars and their clusters. What astronomers, including great Armenian academician V. Ambartsumian (scattering of stellar associations), would understand and prove with much difficulty thousand years later, Narekatsi predicted in the 10th century: "Stars appear and disappear untimely", "You who gather and scatter the speechless constellations, like a flock of sheep". Gr. Narekatsti's reformative views were manifested in all the spheres of the 10th century social life; he is a reformer of church life, great language constructor, innovator in literature and music, freethinker in philosophy and science. His ideology is the reflection of the 10th century Armenian Renaissance. During the 9th-10th centuries, great masses of Armenians, forced to migrate to the Balkans, took with them and spread reformative ideas. The forefather of the western science, which originated in the period of Reformation, is considered to be the great philosopher Nicholas of Cusa. The study of Gr. Narekatsti's logic and naturalistic views enables us to claim that Gr. Narekatsti is the great grandfather of European science.

  15. Astronomer's Proposal Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Astronomer's Proposal Tool (APT) is a computer program that assists astronomers in preparing their Phase 1 and Phase 2 Hubble Space Telescope science programs. APT is a successor to the Remote Proposal Submission System 2 (RPS2) program, which has been rendered obsolete by more recent advances in computer software and hardware. APT exploits advances associated with widespread use of the Internet, multiplatform visual development software tools, and overall increases in the power of desktop computer hardware, all in such a way as to make the preparation and submission of proposals more intuitive and make observatory operations less cumbersome. APT provides documentation and help that are friendly, up to date, and easily accessible to users of varying levels of expertise, while defining an extensible framework that is responsive to changes in both technology and observatory operations. APT consists of two major components: (1) a set of software tools that are intuitive, visual, and responsive and (2) an integrated software environment that unifies all the tools and makes them interoperable. The APT tools include the Visual Target Tuner, Proposal Editor, Exposure Planner, Bright Object Checker, and Visit Planner.

  16. Thermal gradient analysis for the ESOPO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, A.; González, J. Jesús; Sierra, G.; Hernández, J. V.; Pedrayes, M.; Echevarría, J.; Costero, R.; Avila, G.; Arroyo, M.; Cobos, F.; Colorado, E.; Cordova, A.; Chapa, O.; Garcia, B.; Garfias, F.; Granados, F.; Guisa, G.; Luna, E.; Martínez, B.; Michel, R.; Murillo, F.; Pérez, F.; Quechol, S.; Quirós, F.; Tejada, C.

    2008-07-01

    ESOPO will be a spectrograph of medium resolution for the 2.1 m telescope of the National Observatory at San Pedro Martir, Baja California, Mexico. It has been developed by the Instituto de Astronomia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (IA-UNAM). The main goal of this instrument is to modernize the capabilities of making science with that particular telescope. It is planned to achieve a spectral resolution between 500 and 5000. ESOPO is split into two arms; each one specialized in a specific wavelength range covering together all the visible light. A very important issue in spectrographs is to avoid inside thermal gradients. Different temperatures in the optical elements produce mechanical movements and image quality degradation during an exposition. The error budget analysis developed for ESOPO allows establishing the required limits for temperature gradients. In this paper is described the thermal analysis of the spectrograph, including specifications, finite element models, thermal equations and expected thermal gradients.

  17. An Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Esposito, L. W.; Pryor, W. R.; Stewart, A. I. F.; McClintock, W. E.; Hansen, C. J.

    2003-01-01

    It is vital to include an ultraviolet spectrograph as part of the JIMO payload to Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Ultraviolet measurements are key for understanding the atmospheres, auroral activity and surfaces of these icy satellites, and a UV imaging spectrograph will also complement a visible camera and near-IR spectrometer, to achieve full wavelength coverage in remote sensing of the icy satellites. The UV instrument proposed for JIMO will be similar to that currently on board the Cassini spacecraft. The design draws on the experience of building UV spectrometers for Mariner, Pioneer, Galileo and Cassini. It will have three spectrographic channels that provide images and spectra of the atmosphere, aurorae and surface: An EUV channel (800-110 nm), an FUV channel (110 to 190 nm) range, and an NUV channel (180 to 350 nm).

  18. Progress on LAMOST High Resolution Spectrograph Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, KaI

    2015-08-01

    To explore more science case, LAMOST doesn't only has strong power on celestial spectral survey but also reserves an access to high resolution spectrograph with a few optional fibers. This commissioned spectrograph gets high resolution of R=30,000 - 60,000 at a broad visible band from 370nm to 760nm. With the consideration about site seeing variation in future, single science fiber covers wider field on sky of 4.5arcsec instead of the present 3.3arcsec. An oversize Echelle R4 grating and a pre-slit image slicer are adopted to relieve the spectrograph resolution pressure. High resolution observation will parallel to the low resolution spectral survey at a small cost of losing a few fibers (10 - 20) on telescope focal plane. These science fibers will locate at the different sky areas for more approciate choice. The presentation will give the detailed design introduction and the current project status.

  19. National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimer, Randal M.; DesJardins, Angela; Shaw, Joseph A.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Palmer, Christopher; Springer, Larry; Key, Joey; Knighton, W. Berk; Repasky, Kevin S.; Pust, Nathan J.; Hobish, Mitchell K.; Wilson, Edmond W.; Fitzgerald, Carrie; Fitzgerald, Ryan; Trickel, Thomas; Jensen, Clyde; Dorsett, Skye; Anderson, Matt; Boger, Jim; McCrady, Nate; Naylor, Jaylene; Battle, Laurie

    2012-10-01

    The yearly National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition (NSSSC) is Montana Space Grant Consortium's Education and Public Outreach (EP/O) Program for NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission. The NSSSC is designed to give schools with less aerospace activity such as Minority Serving Institutions and Community Colleges an opportunity for hands on real world research experience. The NSSSC provides students from across the country the opportunity to work as part of an undergraduate interdisciplinary team to design, build and test a ground based solar spectrograph. Over the course of nine months, teams come up with their own science goals and then build an instrument to collect data in support of their goals. Teams then travel to Bozeman, MT to demonstrate their instruments and present their results in a competitive science fair environment. This paper and poster will discuss the 2011-2012 competition along with results as well as provide information on the 2012 -2013 competition opportunities.

  20. Getting Astronomers Involved in the IYA: Astronomer in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Kris

    2008-05-01

    The Astronomer in the Classroom program provides professional astronomers the opportunity to engage with 3rd-12th grade students across the nation in grade appropriate discussions of their recent research, and provides students with rich STEM content in a personalized forum, bringing greater access to scientific knowledge for underserved populations. 21st Century Learning and Interstellar Studios, the producer of the 400 Years of the Telescope documentary along with their educational partners, will provide the resources necessary to facilitate the Astronomer in the Classroom program, allowing students to interact with astronomers throughout the IYA2009. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION One of hundreds of astronomers will be available to interact with students via live webcast daily during Spring/Fall 2009. The astronomer for the day will conduct three 20-minute discussions (Grades 3-5 /6-8/9-12), beginning with a five-minute PowerPoint on their research or area of interest. The discussion will be followed by a question and answer period. The students will participate in real-time from their school computer(s) with the technology provided by 21st Century Learning. They will see and hear the astronomer on their screen, and pose questions from their keyboard. Teachers will choose from three daily sessions; 11:30 a.m., 12:00 p.m., 12:30 p.m. Eastern Time. This schedule overlaps all US time zones, and marginalizes bandwidth usage, preventing technological barriers to web access. The educational partners and astronomers will post materials online, providing easy access to information that will prepare teachers and students for the chosen discussion. The astronomers, invited to participate from the AAS and IAU, will receive a web cam shipment with instructions, a brief training and conductivity test, and prepaid postage for shipment of the web cam to the next astronomer on the list. The anticipated astronomer time required is 3-hours, not including the time to develop the PowerPoint.

  1. Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph SV/GTO Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbets, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Contract number NAS5-30433, known at Ball Aerospace as the GHRS SV/GTO project, supported our participation in the post-launch activities of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The period of performance was December 1988 through December 1998. The contract supported the involvement of Dr Dennis Ebbets in the work of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team, and several of the Ball people in the documentation and publication of results. Three main categories of tasks were covered by this contract; in-orbit calibration of the GHRS, guaranteed time observations, and education and public outreach. The nature and accomplishments of these tasks are described in the report. This summary makes many references to publications in the scientific and technical literature. Appendix A is extracted from a complete bibliography, and lists those papers that are directly related to work performed under this GHRS contract. The tasks related to the in-orbit calibration of the GHRS were by far the largest responsibility during the first six years of the project. During this period Dr. Ebbets was responsible for the definition of calibration requirements, design of experiments, preparation of observing proposals, tracking their implementation and execution, and coordinating the analysis and publication of the results. Prior to the launch of HST in 1990 the observing proposals were developed in cooperation with the scientists on the GHRS DDT, engineers at Ball Aerospace, the operations staff at the STScI, and project coordinators at GSFC.

  2. Integrating the HERMES spectrograph for the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, Jeroen; Asplund, Martin; Barden, Sam; Birchall, Michael; Carollo, Daniela; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brzeski, Jurek; Case, Scott; Churilov, Vladimir; Colless, Matthew; Dean, Robert; De Silva, Gayandhi; Farrell, Tony; Fiegert, Kristin; Freeman, Kenneth; Gers, Luke; Goodwin, Michael; Gray, Doug; Heald, Ron; Heng, Anthony; Jones, Damien; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Klauser, Urs; Kondrat, Yuriy; Lawrence, Jon; Lee, Steve; Mathews, Darren; Mayfield, Don; Miziarski, Stan; Monnet, Guy J.; Muller, Rolf; Pai, Naveen; Patterson, Robert; Penny, Ed; Orr, David; Sheinis, Andrew; Shortridge, Keith; Smedley, Scott; Smith, Greg; Stafford, Darren; Staszak, Nicholas; Vuong, Minh; Waller, Lewis; Whittard, Denis; Wylie de Boer, Elisabeth; Xavier, Pascal; Zheng, Jessica; Zhelem, Ross; Zucker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph, HERMES is an optical spectrograph designed primarily for the GALAH, Galactic Archeology Survey, the first major attempt to create a detailed understanding of galaxy formation and evolution by studying the history of our own galaxy, the Milky Way1. The goal of the GALAH survey is to reconstruct the mass assembly history of the of the Milky way, through a detailed spatially tagged abundance study of one million stars in the Milky Way. The spectrograph will be based at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) and be fed with the existing 2dF robotic fibre positioning system. The spectrograph uses VPH-gratings to achieve a spectral resolving power of 28,000 in standard mode and also provides a high resolution mode ranging between 40,000 to 50,000 using a slit mask. The GALAH survey requires a SNR greater than 100 aiming for a star brightness of V=14. The total spectral coverage of the four channels is about 100nm between 370 and 1000nm for up to 392 simultaneous targets within the 2 degree field of view. Current efforts are focused on manufacturing and integration. The delivery date of spectrograph at the telescope is scheduled for 2013. A performance prediction is presented and a complete overview of the status of the HERMES spectrograph is given. This paper details the following specific topics: The approach to AIT, the manufacturing and integration of the large mechanical frame, the opto-mechanical slit assembly, collimator optics and cameras, VPH gratings, cryostats, fibre cable assembly, instrument control hardware and software, data reduction.

  3. Initial results from VIRUS production spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Sarah E.; Allen, Richard D.; Chonis, Taylor S.; Cornell, Mark E.; DePoy, Darren L.; Hill, Gary J.; Lee, Hanshin; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Prochaska, Travis; Rafal, Marc D.; Savage, Richard D.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) uses a novel technique of replicated spectrographs (VIRUS) to measure dark energy at intermediate redshifts (2 < z < 4). VIRUS contains over 30,000 fibers and over 160 independent and identical channels. Here we report on the construction and characterization of the initial batch of VIRUS spectrograph cameras. Assembly of the first batch of 16 is in progress. A brief overview of the assembly is presented, and where available performance is compared to specification.

  4. Gauribidanur Low-Frequency Solar Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Rajalingam, M.; Barve, Indrajit V.

    2014-10-01

    A new radio spectrograph, dedicated to observe the Sun, has been recently commissioned by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) at the Gauribidanur Radio Observatory, about 100 km North of Bangalore. The instrument, called the Gauribidanur Low-frequency Solar Spectrograph (GLOSS), operates in the frequency range≈40 - 440 MHz. Radio emission in this frequency range originates close to the Sun, typically in the radial distance range r≈1.1 - 2.0 R⊙. This article describes the characteristics of the GLOSS and the first results.

  5. Mass producing an efficient NIR spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John C.; Henderson, Charles P.; Herter, Terry L.; Matthews, Keith; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Adams, Joseph D.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Smith, Roger; Gautier, Nick; Ressler, Michael; Soifer, B. T.; Lin, Sean; Howard, James; LaMarr, John; Stolberg, Todd M.; Zink, Jeff

    2004-09-01

    Four institutions are collaborating to design and build three near identical R ~2700 cross-dispersed near-infrared spectrographs for use on various 5-10 meter telescopes. The instrument design addresses the common observatory need for efficient, reliable near-infrared spectrographs through such features as broad wavelength coverage across 6 simultaneous orders (0.8 - 2.4 microns) in echelle format, real-time slit viewing through separate optics and detector, and minimal moving parts. Lastly, the collaborators are saving money and increasing the likelihood of success through economies of scale and sharing intellectual capital.

  6. The Spartan-281 Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Dufour, Reginald J.; Opal, Chet B.; Raymond, John C.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUVIS), currently under development for flight as a Spartan shuttle payload, is designed to perform spectroscopy of diffuse sources in the FUV with very high sensitivity and moderate spatial and spectral resolution. Diffuse nebulae, the general galactic background radiation, and artificially induced radiation associated with the Space Shuttle vehicle are sources of particular interest. The FUVIS instrument will cover the wavelength range of 970-2000 A with selectable resolutions of 5 and 30 A. It is a slit imaging spectrograph having 3 arcmin spatial resolution along its 2.7 deg long slit.

  7. Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Co-Investigator Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, Donna

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this contract has been to support investigation of astronomical problems primarily using data from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As a Co-investigator on STIS, I participated in several projects, which will be described below. The research resulted in 19 papers in refereed journals, 8 papers published in conference proceedings, and 27 papers presented at meetings. There are still at least four papers submitted or in press, as well as some additional research yet to be written up for publication. The research has also produced one master's thesis and two PhD dissertations currently underway, with one to be completed Spring 2003. Undergraduates have participated in the analysis of supporting observations. One student has published some of his results in a web- based refereed publication for undergraduate research (www.jyi.org). I have given several talks to the general public describing results from the HST as well as the results of my research. I have been named the UNLV Regents' Outstanding Faculty Member for 1995 and received the 2002 College of Science Distinguished Researcher's Award as a result of these activities.

  8. Astronomers against Newton.

    PubMed

    Higgitt, Rebekah

    2004-03-01

    Francis Baily's publication of the manuscripts of John Flamsteed, the first Astronomer Royal, provoked a furious response. Flamsteed had quarrelled with Isaac Newton, and described him in terms unforgivable to those who claimed him as a paragon of all virtues, both moral and scientific. Baily was condemned for putting Flamsteed's complaints in the public sphere. However, his supporters saw his work as a critique of the excessive hero-worship accorded to Newton. Written when the word 'scientist' had been newly coined, this work and the debates it provoked gives us an insight into contemporary views of the role of the man of science and of the use of science to back political, religious and moral positions. PMID:15036924

  9. Astronomical tides and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Mao, Wei; Huang, Yong

    2001-03-01

    A review on the studies of correlation between astronomical tides and earthquakes is given in three categories, including (1) earthquakes and the relative locations of the sun, the moon and the earth, (2) earthquakes and the periods and phases of tides and (3) earthquakes and the tidal stress. The first two categories mainly investigate whether or not there exist any dominant pattern of the relative locations of the sun, the moon and the earth during earthquakes, whether or not the occurrences of earthquakes are clustered in any special phase during a tidal period, whether or not there exists any tidal periodic phenomenon in seismic activities, By empasizing the tidal stress in seismic focus, the third category investigates the relationship between various seismic faults and the triggering effects of tidal stress, which reaches the crux of the issue. Possible reasons to various inconsistent investigation results by using various methods and samples are analyzed and further investigations are proposed.

  10. Immanuel Halton, the astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, P. M.

    1996-02-01

    Immanuel Halton was born in Cumberland, studied at Grays Inn, London during the later stages of the English Civil War and, during the Commonwealth, entered the service of Henry Howard, later 6th Duke of Norfolk. He pursued his mathematical and astronomical interests while auditor to the Duke of Norfolk. He met with John Flamsteed, encouraged the latter's interest in mathematics and astronomy and became his first patron, as well as contributing observations to Flamsteed's published works. Immanuel ended his days at Wingfield Manor, Derbyshire. A short biographical piece on Immanuel Halton appeared in the Journal in the early 1950s, consisting mostly of quotations from Flamsteed's 'Self Inspections' and Baily's 'Life of Flamsteed'. 1996 is the 350th anniversary of Flamsteed's birth, and it is hoped that this fuller account will flesh out the bones of his first patron.