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Sample records for astrophysical large-scale dynamos

  1. Synthesis of small and large scale dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    Using a closure model for the evolution of magnetic correlations, we uncover an interesting plausible saturated state of the small-scale fluctuation dynamo (SSD) and a novel analogy between quantum mechanical tunnelling and the generation of large-scale fields. Large scale fields develop via the α-effect, but as magnetic helicity can only change on a resistive timescale, the time it takes to organize the field into large scales increases with magnetic Reynolds number. This is very similar to the results which obtain from simulations using the full MHD equations.

  2. On large-scale dynamo action at high magnetic Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the generation of magnetic activity—dynamo waves—in the astrophysical limit of very large magnetic Reynolds number. We consider kinematic dynamo action for a system consisting of helical flow and large-scale shear. We demonstrate that large-scale dynamo waves persist at high Rm if the helical flow is characterized by a narrow band of spatial scales and the shear is large enough. However, for a wide band of scales the dynamo becomes small scale with a further increase of Rm, with dynamo waves re-emerging only if the shear is then increased. We show that at high Rm, the key effect of the shear is to suppress small-scale dynamo action, allowing large-scale dynamo action to be observed. We conjecture that this supports a general 'suppression principle'—large-scale dynamo action can only be observed if there is a mechanism that suppresses the small-scale fluctuations.

  3. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects. PMID:26551120

  4. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic naturemore » of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.« less

  5. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-20

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Furthermore, given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  6. Large-Scale Astrophysical Visualization on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Gheller, C.; Grillo, A.; Krokos, M.; Petta, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays digital sky surveys and long-duration, high-resolution numerical simulations using high performance computing and grid systems produce multidimensional astrophysical datasets in the order of several Petabytes. Sharing visualizations of such datasets within communities and collaborating research groups is of paramount importance for disseminating results and advancing astrophysical research. Moreover educational and public outreach programs can benefit greatly from novel ways of presenting these datasets by promoting understanding of complex astrophysical processes, e.g., formation of stars and galaxies. We have previously developed VisIVO Server, a grid-enabled platform for high-performance large-scale astrophysical visualization. This article reviews the latest developments on VisIVO Web, a custom designed web portal wrapped around VisIVO Server, then introduces VisIVO Smartphone, a gateway connecting VisIVO Web and data repositories for mobile astrophysical visualization. We discuss current work and summarize future developments.

  7. Role of large-scale velocity fluctuations in a two-vortex kinematic dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, E. J.; Brown, B. P.; Rahbarnia, K.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Dudley-James two-vortex flow, which inspired several laboratory-scale liquid-metal experiments, in order to better demonstrate its relation to astrophysical dynamos. A coordinate transformation splits the flow into components that are axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric relative to the induced magnetic dipole moment. The reformulation gives the flow the same dynamo ingredients as are present in more complicated convection-driven dynamo simulations. These ingredients are currents driven by the mean flow and currents driven by correlations between fluctuations in the flow and fluctuations in the magnetic field. The simple model allows us to isolate the dynamics of the growing eigenvector and trace them back to individual three-wave couplings between the magnetic field and the flow. This simple model demonstrates the necessity of poloidal advection in sustaining the dynamo and points to the effect of large-scale flow fluctuations in exciting a dynamo magnetic field.

  8. Radially dependent large-scale dynamos in global cylindrical shear flows and the local cartesian limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-06-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large-scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced electromotive force that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard `Ω effect' (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in discs and corona. To connect with previous work on large-scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large-scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large-scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations - even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  9. Spontaneous Formation of Surface Magnetic Structure from Large-scale Dynamo in Strongly Stratified Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masada, Youhei; Sano, Takayoshi

    2016-05-01

    We report the first successful simulation of spontaneous formation of surface magnetic structures from a large-scale dynamo by strongly stratified thermal convection in Cartesian geometry. The large-scale dynamo observed in our strongly stratified model has physical properties similar to those in earlier weakly stratified convective dynamo simulations, indicating that the α 2-type mechanism is responsible for the dynamo. In addition to the large-scale dynamo, we find that large-scale structures of the vertical magnetic field are spontaneously formed in the convection zone (CZ) surface only in cases with a strongly stratified atmosphere. The organization of the vertical magnetic field proceeds in the upper CZ within tens of convective turnover time and band-like bipolar structures recurrently appear in the dynamo-saturated stage. We consider several candidates to be possibly be the origin of the surface magnetic structure formation, and then suggest the existence of an as-yet-unknown mechanism for the self-organization of the large-scale magnetic structure, which should be inherent in the strongly stratified convective atmosphere.

  10. A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Mösta, Philipp; Ott, Christian D; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-12-17

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 10(15) gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. PMID:26618868

  11. A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mösta, Philipp; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 1015 gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae.

  12. Generation and Properties of Large-Scale Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Fields by Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, Valery; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale non-axisymmetric magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo, and presumably responsible for the phenomenon of "active longitudes", play an important role in the distribution of solar activity and flares. By calculating 3D mean-field dynamo models, we show that nonlinear coupling between axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes, e.g. due to the magnetic feedback on the alpha-effect (see, e.g., [1]), can maintain a large-scale non-axisymmetric dynamo process. Non-axisymmetric random fluctuations of dynamo parameters can be another source for the non-axisymmetric magnetic fields on the Sun. Such fluctuations can provide a mechanism of the magnetic energy transfer from the global field to the non-axisymmetric modes. It is shown that the rotational periods of the non-axisymmetric field correspond to the dynamo process operating in the subsurface shear layer which is located in the range of depths 0.85-0.95R. We find that the magnetic helicity conservation quenches generation of the non-axisymmetric dynamo modes as well as it does for the axisymmetric dynamo. It is concluded that the 3D mean-field non-axisymmetric dynamo models can potentially explain the observed distribution of the solar magnetic activity.1. Moss, D.,Non-axisymmetric solar magnetic fields, 1999, MNRAS, 306, 300On 3/18/2015 2:29 PM, Valery Pipin wrote:

  13. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  14. Energy transfers in large-scale and small-scale dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtaney, Ravi; Kumar, Rohit; Verma, Mahendra

    2015-11-01

    We present the energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers in small-scale dynamo (SSD) and large-scale dynamo (LSD) using numerical simulations of MHD turbulence for Pm = 20 (SSD) and for Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid. For SSD, we demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers move towards lower wavenumbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason for the growth of the magnetic fields at the large scales. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. For LSD, we show that the magnetic energy growth takes place via energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field. We observe forward U2U and B2B energy flux, similar to SSD.

  15. Destruction of large-scale magnetic field in non-linear simulations of the shear dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teed, Robert J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun's magnetic field exhibits coherence in space and time on much larger scales than the turbulent convection that ultimately powers the dynamo. In the past the α-effect (mean-field) concept has been used to model the solar cycle, but recent work has cast doubt on the validity of the mean-field ansatz under solar conditions. This indicates that one should seek an alternative mechanism for generating large-scale structure. One possibility is the recently proposed `shear dynamo' mechanism where large-scale magnetic fields are generated in the presence of a simple shear. Further investigation of this proposition is required, however, because work has been focused on the linear regime with a uniform shear profile thus far. In this paper we report results of the extension of the original shear dynamo model into the non-linear regime. We find that whilst large-scale structure can initially persist into the saturated regime, in several of our simulations it is destroyed via large increase in kinetic energy. This result casts doubt on the ability of the simple uniform shear dynamo mechanism to act as an alternative to the α-effect in solar conditions.

  16. The magnetic shear-current effect: Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-03-14

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. Here, the effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo – in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean fieldmore » $${\\it\\alpha}$$coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.« less

  17. Precession-driven dynamos in a full sphere and the role of large scale cyclonic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yufeng; Marti, Philippe; Noir, Jerome; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Precession has been proposed as an alternative power source for planetary dynamos. Previous hydrodynamic simulations suggested that precession can generate very complex flows in planetary liquid cores [Y. Lin, P. Marti, and J. Noir, "Shear-driven parametric instability in a precessing sphere," Phys. Fluids 27, 046601 (2015)]. In the present study, we numerically investigate the magnetohydrodynamics of a precessing sphere. We demonstrate precession driven dynamos in different flow regimes, from laminar to turbulent flows. In particular, we highlight the magnetic field generation by large scale cyclonic vortices, which has not been explored previously. In this regime, dynamos can be sustained at relatively low Ekman numbers and magnetic Prandtl numbers, which paves the way for planetary applications.

  18. Effects of Large-scale Non-axisymmetric Perturbations in the Mean-field Solar Dynamo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R⊙ has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number Rm. In the range of Rm = 104-106 the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  19. Delving Deeper into the Solar Dynamo Mechanism: Alpha Effect, Parity Selection and Large Scale Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D.

    2003-05-01

    Visible manifestations of the 22 year solar magnetic cycle have been the subject of study spanning centuries starting with the telescopic observations of sunspots by Johann Fabricius, Christoph Scheiner and Galileo Galilei in the early 1600s. Coupled with these observations of magnetic features on the solar surface, the advent of the field of helioseismology in recent years has made it possible to map large scale flows in the solar interior - believed to play a crucial role in sustaining the solar cycle. However, a complete understanding of the hydromagnetic dynamo mechanism that powers this solar cycle remains elusive. Here we report studies of the solar dynamo addressing some of the important unresolved questions regarding the nature and location of the alpha effect, solar magnetic parity selection and the role of large scale flows and their variation, with a goal to understand the exact means by which the Sun generates its magnetic cycle. This study was supported by NASA through SR&T grant NAG5-6110.

  20. Cosmological and astrophysical consequences from the magnetic dynamo equation in torsioned spacetime and teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, L. C. G.

    2016-01-01

    A generalized dynamo equation in the first order torsion Garcia de Andrade L C (2012 Phys. Lett. B 711 143) has previously been derived. From this equation it is shown that for the 10 kpc scale, torsion gravity is not able to help seed galactic dynamos since the dynamo time is not long enough to take into account structure formation. In this paper, the dynamo equation is extended to second-order torsion terms—but unfortunately, the situation is even worse and the torsion does not seem to help dynamo efficiency. Nevertheless, in the intergalactic magnetic field scale of 1 mpc, the efficiency of the self-induction equation with torsion changes, and even in the first-order torsion case, one obtains large-scale magnetic fields with 109 yr dynamo efficiency. Dynamo efficiency in the case of interstellar matter (ISM) reaches a diffusion time of 1013 yr. This seems to be in contrast with a recent investigation by Bamba et al (2012 J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. JCAP05(2010)08) where they obtained, from another type of torsion theory called teleparallelism (A Einstein, Math Annalen (1922)), a large scale intergalactic magnetic field of 10-9 G. If this is not a model-dependent result, there is an apparent contradiction that has to be addressed. It is shown that for dynamo efficiency in astrophysical flow without shear, a strong seed field of 10-11 G is obtained, which is suitable for seeding galactic dynamos. As an example of a non-parity-violating dynamo equation, a magnetic field of the order of 10-27G is obtained as a seed field for the galactic dynamo from the theory of Einstein’s unified teleparallelism. This shows that in certain gravity models, torsion is able to enhance cosmological magnetic fields in view of obtaining better dynamo efficiency. To better compare our work with Bamba et al (2012 J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. JCAP05(2010)08), we consider the slow decay of magnetic fields in the teleparallel model. This observation is due to an anonymous referee who

  1. Modeling the effects of large scale turbulence in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Elliot; Clark, Mike; Rahbarnia, Kian; Nornberg, Mark; Taylor, Zane; Rasmus, Alex; Forest, Cary; Spence, Erik

    2011-10-01

    Early experiments in the Madison Dynamo Experiment (MDE) demonstrated the existence of electric curresnt which correspond to the α and β effects of mean field MHD, i.e. currents driven parallel to B, and turbulent resistivity respectively. A magnetic dipole moment was measured parallel to the symmetry axis of the flow (α) and the induced toroidal field was less than half what would be expected from the mean flow (β). Traditionally, mean field theory requires a large separation in scale between the mean magnetic field and turbulent eddies in the conductive medium. However, the recent campaign on the MDE eliminated these effects when a baffle was added to eliminate the largest scale turbulent eddies. A model is presented that builds α- and β- like effects from these large scale eddies without any assumption of scale separation. Early experiments in the Madison Dynamo Experiment (MDE) demonstrated the existence of electric curresnt which correspond to the α and β effects of mean field MHD, i.e. currents driven parallel to B, and turbulent resistivity respectively. A magnetic dipole moment was measured parallel to the symmetry axis of the flow (α) and the induced toroidal field was less than half what would be expected from the mean flow (β). Traditionally, mean field theory requires a large separation in scale between the mean magnetic field and turbulent eddies in the conductive medium. However, the recent campaign on the MDE eliminated these effects when a baffle was added to eliminate the largest scale turbulent eddies. A model is presented that builds α- and β- like effects from these large scale eddies without any assumption of scale separation. CMSO

  2. Interactive stereoscopic visualization of large-scale astrophysical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehler, Ralf; Abel, Tom

    2012-03-01

    In the last decades three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations have become a standard tool in astrophysics and cosmology. This gave rise to a growing demand for analysis methods that are tailored to this type of simulation data, for example high-quality visualization approaches such as direct volume rendering and the display of stream lines. The modelled phenomena in numerical astrophysics usually involve complex spatial and temporal structures, and stereoscopic display techniques have proven to be particularly beneficial to clarify the spatial relationships of the relevant features. In this paper we present a flexible software framework for interactive stereoscopic visualizations of large time-dependent, three-dimensional astrophysical and cosmological simulation datasets. It is designed to enable fast and intuitive creation of complete rendering workflows, from importing datasets, the definition of various parameters, including camera paths and stereoscopic settings, to the storage of the final images in various output formats. It leverages the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) and supports high-quality floating-point precision throughout the whole rendering pipeline. All functionality is scriptable through Javascript. We give several application examples, including sequences produced for a number of planetarium shows.

  3. Reduction of Large-scale Turbulence and Optimization of Flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Z.

    2011-10-01

    large-scale flow.

  4. Simulations of cloud-radiation interaction using large-scale forcing derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO northern sounding array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, A. M.; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michelle L.

    2015-09-26

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large scale forcing dataset derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly-periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-Polka radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single moment (1M) and double moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested.

  5. Moffatt-drift-driven large-scale dynamo due to fluctuations with non-zero correlation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theory of large-scale dynamo action in a turbulent flow that has stochastic, zero-mean fluctuations of the $\\alpha$ parameter. Particularly interesting is the possibility of the growth of the mean magnetic field due to Moffatt drift, which is expected to be finite in a statistically anisotropic turbulence. We extend the Kraichnan-Moffatt model to explore effects of finite memory of $\\alpha$ fluctuations, in a spirit similar to that of Sridhar & Singh (2014), hereafter SS14. Using the first-order smoothing approximation, we derive a linear integro-differential equation governing the dynamics of the large-scale magnetic field, which is non-perturbative in the $\\alpha$-correlation time $\\tau_{\\alpha}$. We recover earlier results in the exactly solvable white-noise (WN) limit where the Moffatt drift does not contribute to the dynamo growth/decay. To study finite memory effects, we reduce the integro-differential equation to a partial differential equation by assuming that the $\\tau_{\\alpha}$ be small but nonzero and the large-scale magnetic field is slowly varying. We derive the dispersion relation and provide explicit expression for the growth rate as a function of four independent parameters. When $\\tau_{\\alpha}\

  6. An analytical dynamo solution for large-scale magnetic fields of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamandy, Luke

    2016-08-01

    We present an effectively global analytical asymptotic galactic dynamo solution for the regular magnetic field of an axisymmetric thin disc in the saturated state. This solution is constructed by combining two well-known types of local galactic dynamo solution, parameterized by the disc radius. Namely, the critical (zero growth) solution obtained by treating the dynamo equation as a perturbed diffusion equation is normalized using a non-linear solution that makes use of the `no-z' approximation and the dynamical α-quenching non-linearity. This overall solution is found to be reasonably accurate when compared with detailed numerical solutions. It is thus potentially useful as a tool for predicting observational signatures of magnetic fields of galaxies. In particular, such solutions could be painted onto galaxies in cosmological simulations to enable the construction of synthetic polarized synchrotron and Faraday rotation measure (RM) datasets. Further, we explore the properties of our numerical solutions, and their dependence on certain parameter values. We illustrate and assess the degree to which numerical solutions based on various levels of approximation, common in the dynamo literature, agree with one another.

  7. Simulations of a magnetic fluctuation driven large-scale dynamo and comparison with a two-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kiwan; Blackman, E. G.

    2012-07-01

    Models of large-scale (magnetohydrodynamic) dynamos (LSDs) which couple large-scale field growth to total magnetic helicity evolution best predict the saturation of LSDs seen in simulations. For the simplest so-called 'α2' LSDs in periodic boxes, the electromotive force driving LSD growth depends on the difference between the time-integrated kinetic and current helicity associated with fluctuations. When the system is helically kinetically forced (KF), the growth of the large-scale helical field is accompanied by growth of small-scale magnetic (and current) helicity which ultimately quench the LSD. Here, using both simulations and theory, we study the complementary magnetically forced (MF) case in which the system is forced with an electric field that supplies magnetic helicity. For this MF case, the kinetic helicity and turbulent diffusion terms comprise the backreaction that saturates the LSD. Simulations of both MF and KF cases can be approximately modelled with the same equations of magnetic helicity evolution, but with complementary initial conditions. A key difference between KF and MF cases is that the helical large-scale field in the MF case grows with the same sign of injected magnetic helicity, whereas the large- and small-scale magnetic helicities grow with opposite sign for the KF case. The MF case can arise even when the thermal pressure is approximately smaller than the magnetic pressure, and requires only that helical small-scale magnetic fluctuations dominate helical velocity fluctuations in LSD driving. We suggest that LSDs in accretion discs and Babcock models of the solar dynamo are actually MF LSDs.

  8. The Conversion of Large-Scale Turbulent Energy to Plasma Heat In Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of violent events and instabilities at large scales into plasma heat. The turbulent cascade transfers this energy from the large scales at which the motions are driven down to small scales, and this essentially fluid process can be understood in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions. At sufficiently small scales, for which the dynamics is often weakly collisional, collisionless mechanisms damp the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, and this essentially kinetic process can be understood in terms of linear wave-particle interactions. In this talk, I will summarize the possible channels of the turbulent dissipation in a weakly collisional plasma, and present recent results from kinetic numerical simulations of plasma turbulence. Finally, I will discuss strategies for the definitive identification of the dominant dissipation channels using spacecraft measurements of turbulence in the solar wind.

  9. Kinematic Dynamo Action in the Presence of a Large Scale Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. C.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se investiga la influencia de Un campo de velocidades de ran escala sobre la acci6n del tur bulento. Usando Un proceso de expansi6n, las soluciones se encuentran en el del movimiento lobal y de cizalla pequeflo y para randes de Reynolds. Se calcula la re jeneraci6n tica hasta un orden en el de expansi6n usando convectivas ciclotr6nicas para el campo turbulento de velocidad. ABSTRACT. The influence a scale velocity field upon the kinernatic turbulent dynamo action is . Usinj an expansion process, the solutions are found in the limit of small bulk motion and shear, and for Reynolds number. The majnetic is calculated up to second order in the expansion parameter usin cyclonic convective cells for the turbulent velocity field. Key o'td : HYDROMAGNETICS

  10. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  11. Simulations of Cloud-Radiation Interaction Using Large-Scale Forcing Derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO Northern Sounding Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large-scale forcing data set derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-PolKa radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single-moment (1M) and double-moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested. The 1M schemes tend to underestimate radiative flux anomalies in the active phases of the MJO events, while the 2M schemes perform better, but can overestimate radiative flux anomalies. All the tested microphysics schemes exhibit biases in the shapes of the histograms of radiative fluxes and radar reflectivity. Histograms of radiative fluxes and brightness temperature indicate that radiative biases are not evenly distributed; the most significant bias occurs in rainy areas with OLR less than 150 W/ cu sq in the 2M schemes. Analysis of simulated radar reflectivities indicates that this radiative flux uncertainty is closely related to the simulated stratiform cloud coverage. Single-moment schemes underestimate stratiform cloudiness by a factor of 2, whereas 2M schemes simulate much more stratiform cloud.

  12. Simulations of cloud-radiation interaction using large-scale forcing derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO northern sounding array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-09-01

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large-scale forcing data set derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-PolKa radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single-moment (1M) and double-moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested. The 1M schemes tend to underestimate radiative flux anomalies in the active phases of the MJO events, while the 2M schemes perform better, but can overestimate radiative flux anomalies. All the tested microphysics schemes exhibit biases in the shapes of the histograms of radiative fluxes and radar reflectivity. Histograms of radiative fluxes and brightness temperature indicate that radiative biases are not evenly distributed; the most significant bias occurs in rainy areas with OLR less than 150 W/m2 in the 2M schemes. Analysis of simulated radar reflectivities indicates that this radiative flux uncertainty is closely related to the simulated stratiform cloud coverage. Single-moment schemes underestimate stratiform cloudiness by a factor of 2, whereas 2M schemes simulate much more stratiform cloud.

  13. A potential thermal dynamo and its astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that thermal turbulence, not unlike the standard kinetic and magnetic turbulence, can be an effective driver of a mean-field dynamo. In simple models, such as hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, both vorticity and induction equations can have strong thermal drives that resemble the α and γ effects in conventional dynamo theories; the thermal drives are likely to be dominant in systems that are endowed with subsonic, low-β turbulence. A pure thermal dynamo is quite different from the conventional dynamo in which the same kinetic/magnetic mix in the ambient turbulence can yield a different ratio of macroscopic magnetic/vortical fields. The possible implications of the similarities and differences between the thermal and non-thermal dynamos are discussed. The thermal dynamo is shown to be highly important in the stellar and planetary context, and yields results broadly consistent with other theoretical and experimental approaches.

  14. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. We find that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a very strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the quasi-linear model exhibits the same qualitative scaling of angular momentum transport with Pm as fully nonlinear turbulence. This demonstrates the relationship of recent convergence problems to the large scale dynamo and suggests possible methods for studying astrophysically relevant regimes at very low or high Pm.

  15. A STUDY OF THE DYNAMO TRANSITION IN A SELF-CONSISTENT NONLINEAR DYNAMO MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Giuseppina; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2011-10-20

    We develop a nonlinear dynamo model that couples the evolution of a large-scale magnetic field with the turbulent dynamics of a magnetofluid system in the small scale by electromotive force. Because the dynamo effect takes place in astrophysical objects characterized by a range of dynamical parameters (Reynolds numbers, Prandtl number, etc.) which is beyond the current possibilities of direct numerical simulations, we describe the nonlinear behavior of the system at small scales by using a shell model. Under specific conditions of the turbulent state, the field fluctuations at small scales are able to trigger the dynamo instability. The stability curve derived from our simulations allows us to gain some insight not only into the regime of parameters analyzed up to this point but also for very large Prandtl numbers. Moreover, from our analysis, it is shown that the large-scale dynamo transition displays a hysteretic behavior revealing its subcritical nature. The system, undergoing dynamo transition, can reach different dynamo regimes depending on the Reynolds numbers of the magnetic flow. This points out the critical role that turbulence plays in the dynamo phenomenon. Moreover, in this Letter, we show the presence of the natural ordering of dynamo regimes (oscillatory-reversing-steady dynamos) observed in the large-scale magnetic field for increasing magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, the signature of these regimes is also found in the small-scale dynamo by looking at the scaling properties of magnetic fluctuation energy as a function of magnetic Reynolds number.

  16. Astrophysical dynamos and the growth of magnetic fields in high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Michael; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-08-01

    The origin and evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe is still an open question. Observations of galaxies at high-redshift give evidence for strong galactic magnetic fields even in the early Universe which are consistently measured at later times up to the present age. However, primordial magnetic fields and seed field generation by battery processes cannot explain such high field strengths, suggesting the presence of a rapid growth mechanism in those high-redshift galaxies and subsequent maintenance against decay. Astrophysical dynamo theory provides efficient means of field amplification where even weak initial fields can grow exponentially on sufficiently fast timescales, driving the conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic energy. We investigate the role which feedback mechanisms play in the creation of the turbulence necessary for dynamos to operate. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cooling halos of dwarf and Milky Way-like high-redshift progenitors, we compare the magnetic field evolution of weak seed fields with various topologies and stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that strong feedback can drive galactic gas turbulence which gives rise to velocity fields with fast exponential magnetic field growth. The simulations display a high gas fraction and a clumpy morphology with kinematics resembling Kolmogorov turbulence and magnetic energy spectra as predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. Magnetic fields reach equipartition with $\\mu$G field strength. In a final quiescent phase where feedback is turned off, gas turbulence is reduced and a quadrupole symmetry is observed in the magnetic field. These findings support the theory of rapid magnetic field amplification inside high-redshift galaxies, when the Universe was still young.

  17. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C. M.; Brookhart, M.; Collins, C.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B.; Wallace, J.; Clark, M.; Flanagan, K.; Li, Y.; Nonn, P.; Ding, W. X.; Whyte, D. G.; Zweibel, E.

    2014-01-15

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-β phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ∼14 m{sup 3} of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB{sub 6} cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J × B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10 < Re < 1000, in the regime where the kinetic energy of the flow exceeds the magnetic energy (M{sub A}{sup 2}=(v/v{sub A}){sup 2}>1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  18. HELICITY CONSERVATION IN NONLINEAR MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Sokoloff, D. D.; Zhang, H.; Kuzanyan, K. M.

    2013-05-01

    It is believed that magnetic helicity conservation is an important constraint on large-scale astrophysical dynamos. In this paper, we study a mean-field solar dynamo model that employs two different formulations of the magnetic helicity conservation. In the first approach, the evolution of the averaged small-scale magnetic helicity is largely determined by the local induction effects due to the large-scale magnetic field, turbulent motions, and the turbulent diffusive loss of helicity. In this case, the dynamo model shows that the typical strength of the large-scale magnetic field generated by the dynamo is much smaller than the equipartition value for the magnetic Reynolds number 10{sup 6}. This is the so-called catastrophic quenching (CQ) phenomenon. In the literature, this is considered to be typical for various kinds of solar dynamo models, including the distributed-type and the Babcock-Leighton-type dynamos. The problem can be resolved by the second formulation, which is derived from the integral conservation of the total magnetic helicity. In this case, the dynamo model shows that magnetic helicity propagates with the dynamo wave from the bottom of the convection zone to the surface. This prevents CQ because of the local balance between the large-scale and small-scale magnetic helicities. Thus, the solar dynamo can operate in a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers up to 10{sup 6}.

  19. Prototyping a large-scale distributed system for the Great Observatories era - NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a distributed information system intended to support research in the Great Observatories era, to simplify access to data, and to enable simultaneous analyses of multispectral data sets. Here, the user agent and interface, its functions, and system components are examined, and the system architecture and infrastructure is addressed. The present status of the system and related future activities are examined.

  20. Rotation of a Pulsed Jet, or Plume, in a Rotating Flow: A Source of Helicity for an α-ω Astrophysical Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckley, Howard F.; Colgate, Stirling A.; Romero, Van D.; Ferrel, Ragnar

    2003-12-01

    A fluid-flow experiment was performed in water to investigate how an expanding pulsed jet rotates when injected off-axis into a rotating annular flow. The pulsed jet simulates a large-scale rising plume in a stellar or accretion disk environment. In the experiment, the pulsed jet was injected parallel to, but radially displaced from, the axis of rotation. The jet was observed to counterrotate Δφ~π/2 to π rad relative to the rotating frame before dispersing into the background flow. The counterrotation of an expanding pulsed jet in a rotating frame is the key result of the experiment. The counterrotation of the jet occurs because of the increased moment of inertia due to its expansion and conserved angular momentum. Rapid turbulent entrainment of the pulsed jet with the background flow during radial divergence when striking the end wall limits the net rotation of the jet. Shear within the differentially rotating background flow enhances the net rotation of the jet. Naturally occurring buoyant plumes in rotating flows should exhibit this same coherent nature, i.e., the same direction of rotation, the same vertical motion, and the same finite angle of rotation for every plume. This should make pulsed jets, or plumes, when occurring in a conducting medium, nearly ideal for producing helicity for the α-ω dynamo. In the experiment, Couette flow was established in water between two coaxial cylinders with an outer radius R0=15 cm, an inner radius R1=7.5 cm, and height Z=10 cm. The Reynolds number of the experiment was Re~=105 in order to simulate the behavior of turbulent entrainment at high Reynolds number. The differential rotation of the background flow was varied from constant rotation, dΩ/dR=0, to Ω~1/R. The flow was made visible by pulsed hydrogen electrolysis from a tungsten wire and by dispersed guanidine in water. The flow was imaged using a digital video camcorder. These measurements are a precursor to the design and development of an α-ω dynamo

  1. Galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, David

    There is a broad agreement between the predictions of galactic dynamo theory and observations; although there are still some unresolved difficulties, the theory appears to be robust. Now attention is turning from generic models to studies of particular features of the large-scale magnetic fields, and also to models for specific galaxies. The effects of noncircular flows, for example driven by the interaction of spiral arms and galactic bars with the dynamo, are of current interest.

  2. Shear-driven Dynamo Waves in the Fully Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Nigro, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale dynamo action is well understood when the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is small, but becomes problematic in the astrophysically relevant large Rm limit since the fluctuations may control the operation of the dynamo, obscuring the large-scale behavior. Recent works by Tobias & Cattaneo demonstrated numerically the existence of large-scale dynamo action in the form of dynamo waves driven by strongly helical turbulence and shear. Their calculations were carried out in the kinematic regime in which the back-reaction of the Lorentz force on the flow is neglected. Here, we have undertaken a systematic extension of their work to the fully nonlinear regime. Helical turbulence and large-scale shear are produced self-consistently by prescribing body forces that, in the kinematic regime, drive flows that resemble the original velocity used by Tobias & Cattaneo. We have found four different solution types in the nonlinear regime for various ratios of the fluctuating velocity to the shear and Reynolds numbers. Some of the solutions are in the form of propagating waves. Some solutions show large-scale helical magnetic structure. Both waves and structures are permanent only when the kinetic helicity is non-zero on average.

  3. Spinning Unmagnetized Plasma for Laboratory Studies of Astrophysical Accretion Disks & Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Cami

    2015-11-01

    A technique for creating a large, fast-flowing, unmagnetized plasma has been demonstrated experimentally. This marks an important first step towards laboratory studies of phenomenon such as magnetic field generation through self-excited dynamos, or the magnetorotational instability (MRI), the mechanism of interest for its role in the efficient outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks. In the Plasma Couette Experiment (PCX), a sufficiently hot, steady-state plasma is confined in a cylindrical, axisymmetric multicusp magnetic field, with Te<10 eV, Ti<1 eV, and n<1011 cm-3. Azimuthal flows are driven by JxB torque using toroidally localized, biased hot cathodes in the magnetized edge region. Measurements show that momentum couples viscously from the magnetized edge to the unmagnetized core, and the core rotates when collisional ion viscosity overcomes the drag due to ion-neutral collisions. Torque can be applied at the inner or outer boundaries, resulting in controlled, differential rotation. Maximum speeds are observed (He ~ 12 km/s, Ne ~ 4 km/s, Ar ~ 3.2 km/s, Xe ~ 1.4 km/s), consistent with a critical ionization velocity limit reported to occur in partially ionized plasmas. PCX has achieved magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm ~ 65 and magnetic Prandtl numbers of Pm ~ 0.2-10, which are approaching regimes shown to excite the MRI in a global Hall-MHD stability analysis. Ion-neutral collisions effectively add a body force that undesirably changes the flow profile shape. Recent upgrades have increased the ionization fraction with an additional 6 kW of microwave heating power and stronger magnets that reduce loss area and increase plasma volume by 150%. In addition, an alternative scheme using volume-applied JxB force will maintain the shear profile and destabilize the MRI at more easily achievable plasma parameters.

  4. Linear astrophysical dynamos in rotating spheres Differential rotation, anisotropic turbulent magnetic diffusivity, and solar-stellar cycle magnetic parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, H.; Wang, Z.; Wu, F.

    1984-05-01

    Differential rotation dependence of the selection mechanism for magnetic parity of solar and stellar cycles is studied by assuming various differential rotation profiles in the dynamo equation. The parity selection depends on propagation direction of oscillating magnetic fields in the form of dynamo waves which propagate along isorotation surfaces. When there is any radial gradient in the differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate either equatorward or poleward. In the former case, field systems of the two hemispheres approach each other and collide at the equator. Then, odd parity is selected. In the latter case, field systems of the two hemispheres recede from each other and do not collide at the equator, and even parity is selected. Thus the equatorial migration of wings of the butterfly diagram of the solar cycle and its odd parity are intrinsically related. In the case of purely latitudinal differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate purely radially and growth rates of odd and even modes are nearly the same even when dynamo strength is weak when the parity selection mechanism should work most efficiently. In this case, anisotropy of turbulent diffusivity is a decisive factor to separate odd and even modes. Unlike in the case of radial-gradient-dominated differential rotation in which any difference between diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields enhances the parity selection without changing the parity, the parity selection in the case of latitudinal-gradient-dominated differential rotation depends on the difference of diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields. When diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields, odd parity is selected; and when diffusivity for toroidal fields is larger, even parity is selected. This suggests that diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields in the solar convection zone where magnetic parity is odd and where radial gradient influence on the parity selection

  5. A Model of the Turbulent Electric Dynamo in Multi-Phase Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyeva, Svetlana; Mareev, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Many terrestrial and astrophysical phenomena witness the conversion of kinetic energy into electric energy (the energy of the quasi-stationary electric field) in conducting media, which is natural to treat as manifestations of electric dynamo by analogy with well-known theory of magnetic dynamo. Such phenomena include thunderstorms and lightning in the Earth's atmosphere and atmospheres of other planets, electric activity caused by dust storms in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres, snow storms, electrical discharges occurring in technological setups, connected with intense mixing of aerosol particles like in the milling industry. We have developed a model of the large-scale turbulent electric dynamo in a weakly conducting medium, containing two heavy-particle components. We have distinguished two main classes of charging mechanisms (inductive and non-inductive) in accordance with the dependence or independence of the electric charge, transferred during a particle collision, on the electric field intensity and considered the simplified models which demonstrate the possibility of dynamo realization and its specific peculiarities for these mechanisms. Dynamo (the large-scale electric field growth) appears due to the charge separation between the colliding and rebounding particles. This process is may be greatly intensified by the turbulent mixing of particles with different masses and, consequently, different inertia. The particle charge fluctuations themselves (small-scale dynamo), however, do not automatically mean growth of the large-scale electric field without a large-scale asymmetry. Such an asymmetry arises due to the dependence of the transferred charge magnitude on the electric field intensity in the case of the inductive mechanism of charge separation, or due to the gravity and convection for non-inductive mechanisms. We have found that in the case of the inductive mechanism the large-scale dynamo occurs if the medium conductivity is small enough while the

  6. Theory and Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamos and Faraday Rotation for Plasmas of General Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kiwan

    2013-03-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena depend on the underlying dynamics of magnetic fields. The observations of accretion disks and their jets, stellar coronae, and the solar corona are all best explained by models where magnetic fields play a central role. Understanding these phenomena requires studying the basic physics of magnetic field generation, magnetic energy transfer into radiating particles, angular momentum transport, and the observational implications of these processes. Each of these topics comprises a large enterprise of research. However, more practically speaking, the nonlinearity in large scale dynamo is known to be determined by magnetic helicity(>), the topological linked number of knotted magnetic field. Magnetic helicity, which is also observed in solar physics, has become an important tool for observational and theoretical study. The first part of my work addresses one aspect of the observational implications of magnetic fields, namely Faraday rotation. It is shown that plasma composition affects the interpretation of Faraday rotation measurements of the field, and in turn how this can be used to help constrain unknown plasma composition. The results are applied to observations of astrophysical jets. The thesis then focuses on the evolution of magnetic fields. In particular, the dynamo amplification of large scale magnetic fields is studied with an emphasis on the basic physics using both numerical simulations and analytic methods. In particular, without differential rotation, a two and three scale mean field (large scale value + fluctuation scales) dynamo theory and statistical methods are introduced. The results are compared to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Pencil code, which utilizes high order finite difference methods. Simulations in which the energy is initially driven into the system in the form of helical kinetic energy (via kinetic helicity) or helical magnetic energy (via magnetic helicity) reveal the exponential growth of

  7. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  8. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  9. The Global Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Dikpati, M.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-02-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  10. Large Scale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiluppi, Paolo

    2005-04-01

    Large Scale Computing is acquiring an important role in the field of data analysis and treatment for many Sciences and also for some Social activities. The present paper discusses the characteristics of Computing when it becomes "Large Scale" and the current state of the art for some particular application needing such a large distributed resources and organization. High Energy Particle Physics (HEP) Experiments are discussed in this respect; in particular the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Experiments are analyzed. The Computing Models of LHC Experiments represent the current prototype implementation of Large Scale Computing and describe the level of maturity of the possible deployment solutions. Some of the most recent results on the measurements of the performances and functionalities of the LHC Experiments' testing are discussed.

  11. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  12. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  13. Broken Symmetries and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Phase space symmetries inherent in the statistical theory of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are known to be broken dynamically to produce large-scale coherent magnetic structure. Here, results of a numerical study of decaying MHD turbulence are presented that show large-scale coherent structure also arises and persists in the presence of dissipation. Dynamically broken symmetries in MHD turbulence may thus play a fundamental role in the dynamo process.

  14. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  15. Turbulent dynamo action in axisymmetric linear machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Reva, V. B.; Sokolov, V. G.

    1997-11-01

    Generation of large-scale magnetic fields by turbulent motion of an electrically conducting fluids plays an important role not only for astrophysical applications, but also for magnetic fusion confinement phenomena. The well-studied turbulent dynamo α-effect comes from helical properties of turbulent motion. Under this dynamo the mean electric current is produced in the direction parallel or antiparallel to the mean magnetic field. In particular, the α-effect leads to the generation of plasma current along the magnetic field in reversed field pinches. We have shown that the α-effect takes place also in axisymmetric linear machines. In axisymmetric mirror traps AMBAL-M and MAL (BINP) the electrostatic turbulence, having mean helicity h≈ 6\\cdot 10^6 m/s^2, caused as a result of unstable differential rotation of plasma column in crossed E×B fields. By manipulating the trap's magnetic and plasma conditions, we can obtain both the parallel and the antiparallel B electric current to the order of 100 A/cm^2 (total current up to 6 kA) in the plasma. The measured mean electromotive force F_em= has linear growth with turbulent diffusion coefficient DT and reaches up to 50 V/m.

  16. Numerical simulations of turbulent dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel

    Using a periodic box calculation it is shown that, owing to helicity conservation, a large scale field can only develop on a resistive timescale. This behaviour can be reproduced by a mean-field dynamo with α and ηt quenchings that are equally strong and "catastrophic".

  17. Dynamo Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M. K.; Yadav, R.; Chandra, M.; Paul, S.; Wahi, P.

    2010-11-23

    In this article we review the experimental and numerical results related to the dynamo transitions. Recent experiments of Von Karman Sodium (VKS) exhibit various dynamo states including constant, time-periodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. Similarly pseudospectral simulations of dynamo show constant, time-periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. One of the windows for the magnetic Prandtl number of unity shows period doubling route to chaos. Quasiperiodic route to chaos has been reported for the Prandtl number of 0.5. The dynamo simulations also reveal coexisting multiple attractors that were obtained for different initial conditions.

  18. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  19. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L.; Rickert, M.

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The Solar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, F.

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic activity on the Sun presents us with an interesting dichotomy. On large spatial and temporal scales the solar magnetic field displays a remarkable degree of organization. The 11 years cadence of the solar cycle, Hales' polarity law, and the systematic drift of the regions of emergence of active regions towards the equator throughout the solar cycle are all indicative of a powerful organizing process. On small spatial and temporal scales, the Solar magnetic field appears random and chaotic. It is interesting that recent advances in dynamo theory provide us with a unified approach to solar magnetic activity whereby both large and small scales emerge naturally as dynamo processes associated with rotationally constrained and unconstrained scales of motions in the convection zone (or directly below it). According to this view all coherent scales of motions produce magnetic structures of comparable coherence length. Those that are further endowed with lack of reflectional symmetry by virtue of being rotationally constrained are further associated with inverse cascades that can generate magnetic structures on larger scales still. The picture that emerges is one in which dynamo action proceeds on different time scales all over the convection zone. But only in very special regions, like for instance the solar tachocline, is the magnetic field organized on large scales. This idea provides a natural explanation for the origin of active regions, ephemeral regions, and intra--network fields.

  1. A shell model for turbulent dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, G.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.

    2011-06-01

    A self-consistent nonlinear dynamo model is presented. The nonlinear behavior of the plasma at small scale is described by using a MHD shell model for fields fluctuations; this allow us to study the dynamo problem in a large parameter regime which characterizes the dynamo phenomenon in many natural systems and which is beyond the power of supercomputers at today. The model is able to reproduce dynamical situations in which the system can undergo transactions to different dynamo regimes. In one of these the large-scale magnetic field jumps between two states reproducing the magnetic polarity reversals. From the analysis of long time series of reversals we infer results about the statistics of persistence times, revealing the presence of hidden long-time correlations in the chaotic dynamo process.

  2. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  3. Kinematic dynamo action in square and hexagonal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, B.; Proctor, M. R. E.

    2013-11-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection just above onset. The velocity is constrained to have either a square or a hexagonal pattern. For the square pattern, large-scale dynamo action is observed at onset, with most of the magnetic energy being contained in the horizontally averaged component. As the magnetic Reynolds number increases, small-scale dynamo action becomes possible, reducing the overall growth rate of the dynamo. For the hexagonal pattern, the breaking of symmetry between up and down flows results in an effective pumping velocity. For intermediate rotation rates, this additional effect can prevent the growth of any mean-field dynamo, so that only a small-scale dynamo is eventually possible at large enough magnetic Reynolds number. For very large rotation rates, this pumping term becomes negligible, and the dynamo properties of square and hexagonal patterns are qualitatively similar. These results hold for both perfectly conducting and infinite magnetic permeability boundary conditions.

  4. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  5. Onset of a planetesimal dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Weiss, B. P.; Wang, J.; Chen-Wiegart, Y. C. K.; Downey, B. G.; Suavet, C. R.; Andrade Lima, E.; Zucolotto, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    The paleomagnetism of achondritic meteorites provides evidence for advecting metallic core dynamos and large-scale differentiation on their parent planetesimals. The small sizes of these bodies (~102 km) enable a new opportunity to understand the physics of dynamo generation in a size regime with distinct thermal evolution parameters that are more accessible to model than planets. One key unknown about planetesimal dynamos is their onset time. Theoretical studies have suggested that it might occur instantaneously after large-scale melting (Weiss et al. 2008, Elkins-Tanton et al. 2011) while others have argued that a dynamo could be delayed by ~6 My (Sterenborg and Crowley 2013) or longer. Here we present the first paleomagnetic study that has constrained the onset time of a planetesimal dynamo, which has key implications for the physics of core formation, planetary thermal evolution and dynamo generation mechanisms. Our study focused on angrites, a group of ancient basaltic achondrites from near the surface of an early differentiated planetesimal. With unshocked, unbrecciated textures and Pb/Pb ages ranging from only ~3-10 My younger than the formation of calcium aluminum inclusions (CAIs), they are among the oldest known and best preserved planetary igneous rocks. We used a new CO2 + H2 gas mixture system (Suavet et al. 2014) for controlled oxygen fugacity thermal paleointensity experiments on two of the oldest angrites (D'Orbigny and SAH 99555; 4564.4 Ma) and a younger angrite (Angra dos Reis; 4557.7 Ma). For D'Orbigny and SAH 99555, we found that the natural remanence (NRM) demagnetizes at much lower temperatures than lab-applied thermoremanence (TRM), indicating that their NRMs are dominantly overprints from the Earth's field and hand magnets. In contrast, the NRM of Angra dos Reis behaves similarly to a TRM, confirming its thermal origin. We estimate the paleointensities to be < 0.2 µT for D'Orbigny and SAH 99555 and ~10 µT for Angra dos Reis. This indicates

  6. Experiences from Participants in Large-Scale Group Practice of the Maharishi Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Programs and Parallel Principles of Quantum Theory, Astrophysics, Quantum Cosmology, and String Theory: Interdisciplinary Qualitative Correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Eric Johan

    Participants on the Invincible America Assembly in Fairfield, Iowa, and neighboring Maharishi Vedic City, Iowa, practicing Maharishi Transcendental Meditation(TM) (TM) and the TM-Sidhi(TM) programs in large groups, submitted written experiences that they had had during, and in some cases shortly after, their daily practice of the TM and TM-Sidhi programs. Participants were instructed to include in their written experiences only what they observed and to leave out interpretation and analysis. These experiences were then read by the author and compared with principles and phenomena of modern physics, particularly with quantum theory, astrophysics, quantum cosmology, and string theory as well as defining characteristics of higher states of consciousness as described by Maharishi Vedic Science. In all cases, particular principles or phenomena of physics and qualities of higher states of consciousness appeared qualitatively quite similar to the content of the given experience. These experiences are presented in an Appendix, in which the corresponding principles and phenomena of physics are also presented. These physics "commentaries" on the experiences were written largely in layman's terms, without equations, and, in nearly every case, with clear reference to the corresponding sections of the experiences to which a given principle appears to relate. An abundance of similarities were apparent between the subjective experiences during meditation and principles of modern physics. A theoretic framework for understanding these rich similarities may begin with Maharishi's theory of higher states of consciousness provided herein. We conclude that the consistency and richness of detail found in these abundant similarities warrants the further pursuit and development of such a framework.

  7. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  8. Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos."

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-11-06

    predicted from laminar flow modeling to be at peak flow speeds of 5 m/s. Liquid metals tend to have viscosities similar to that of water yielding inviscid flows. Whereas the timescale for the dynamo instability is on the resistive dissipation time, the timescale for hydrodynamic instability of the shear layer is quite short meaning that the shear layer required to generate the magnetic eld is broken up by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The eddies generated by large-scale flow drive instabilities at progressively smaller scale giving rise to a cascade of turbulent eddies driven at the largest scale of the experiment. The major contribution of the Madison Dynamo Experiment has been quantifying the role this turbulence plays in the generation of magnetic elds. Overall, the Madison Dynamo Experiment has now operated for about 1 decade and carried out experiments related to magnetic fi eld generation by turbulent flows of liquid metal. The principle thrust of research and indeed the main scienti fic outcomes are related to how turbulent flows create and transport magnetic fi elds.

  9. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-06-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  10. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  11. Fluctuations of Electrical Conductivity: A New Source for Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétrélis, F.; Alexakis, A.; Gissinger, C.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the generation of a magnetic field by the flow of a fluid for which the electrical conductivity is nonuniform. A new amplification mechanism is found which leads to dynamo action for flows much simpler than those considered so far. In particular, the fluctuations of the electrical conductivity provide a way to bypass antidynamo theorems. For astrophysical objects, we show through three-dimensional global numerical simulations that the temperature-driven fluctuations of the electrical conductivity can amplify an otherwise decaying large scale equatorial dipolar field. This effect could play a role for the generation of the unusually tilted magnetic field of the iced giants Neptune and Uranus.

  12. Fluctuations of Electrical Conductivity: A New Source for Astrophysical Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Pétrélis, F; Alexakis, A; Gissinger, C

    2016-04-22

    We consider the generation of a magnetic field by the flow of a fluid for which the electrical conductivity is nonuniform. A new amplification mechanism is found which leads to dynamo action for flows much simpler than those considered so far. In particular, the fluctuations of the electrical conductivity provide a way to bypass antidynamo theorems. For astrophysical objects, we show through three-dimensional global numerical simulations that the temperature-driven fluctuations of the electrical conductivity can amplify an otherwise decaying large scale equatorial dipolar field. This effect could play a role for the generation of the unusually tilted magnetic field of the iced giants Neptune and Uranus. PMID:27152784

  13. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Jui; Finn, John; Pariev, Vladimir; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Zeb; Klein, Brianna

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  14. Electrically driving large magnetic Reynolds number flows on the Madison plasma dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, David; Wallace, John; Peterson, Ethan; Endrezzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary B.; Desangles, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Electrically-driven plasma flows, predicted to excite a large-scale dynamo instability, have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX), at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory. Numerical simulations show that certain topologies of these simply-connected flows may be optimal for creating a plasma dynamo and predict critical thresholds as low as Rmcrit =μ0 σLV = 250 . MPDX plasmas are shown to exceed this critical Rm , generating large (L = 1 . 4 m), warm (Te > 10 eV), unmagnetized (MA > 1) plasmas where Rm < 600 . Plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive LaB6 cathodes which generate a J × B torque in Helium plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies will be presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field, and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force (χ ~ 1 / (ντin)), and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce stronger velocity shear, and is characterized by the radial potential gradient as determined by global charge balance.

  15. Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busse, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    The MAGSAT-program has added significantly to our knowledge of planetary magnetism. The accuracy of observations has been improved such that a reliable extrapolation of the magnetic field to the core surface is now much more feasible than it has been before, and the prospect of further MAGSAT missions raises the expectation that the time dependence of the geomagnetic field will be known with similar accuracy in the future. In the research support it has been attempted to develop dynamo theory with these applications in mind.

  16. Fluctuations of electrical conductivity: a new source for astrophysical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissinger, Christophe; Petrelis, Francois; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2016-04-01

    We consider the generation of magnetic field by the flow of a fluid for which the electrical conductivity is nonuniform. We calculate the properties of this effect both analytically and numerically, and find a new amplification mechanism leading to dynamo action for flows much simpler than those considered so far. In particular, the fluctuations of the electrical conductivity provide a way to bypass anti-dynamo theorems. For astrophysical objects, we show through three-dimensional global numerical simulations that the temperature-driven fluctuations of the electrical conductivity can amplify an otherwise decaying large scale equatorial dipolar field. This effect could play a role for the generation of the unusually tilted magnetic field of the iced giants Neptune and Uranus.

  17. Special issue on current research in astrophysical magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Lundstedt, Henrik; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-06-01

    Rogachevskii Growth rate of small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers 5. Erico L Rempel, Abraham C-L Chian and Axel Brandenburg Lagrangian chaos in an ABC-forced nonlinear dynamo 6. J E Snellman, M Rheinhardt, P J Käpylä, M J Mantere and A Brandenburg Mean-field closure parameters for passive scalar turbulence Research in dynamo theory has been actively pursued for over half a century. It started by trying to understand the large-scale magnetic fields of the Sun and the Earth, and subsequently also in galaxies. Such large-scale fields can nowadays be understood in terms of mean-field dynamo theory that explains the possibility of large-scale field generation under anisotropic conditions lacking mirror symmetry. However, even when none of this is the case, dynamos can still work, and they are called small-scale dynamos that were referred to in paper 2. This was studied originally under the assumption that the flow is smooth compared with the magnetic field, but in the Sun the opposite is the case. This is because viscosity is much smaller than magnetic diffusivity, i.e., their ratio, which is the magnetic Prandtl number, is small. In that case the physics of small-scale dynamos changes, but dynamos still exist even then (paper 4). Tracing the flow lines in nonlinear small-scale dynamos is important for understanding their mixing properties (paper 5). Turbulent mixing is a generic concept that applies not only to magnetic field, but also to passive scalars which are often used as a prototype for studying this. Turbulence simulations have helped tremendously in quantifying the ability of turbulent flows to mix, but the more we know, the more complicated it becomes. It turns out that spatial and temporal coupling is an important consideration for allowing accurate comparison between numerical simulations and mean-field theory (paper 6). (C) The large-scale solar cycle 7. V V Pipin and D D Sokoloff The fluctuating α-effect and Waldmeier relations in the nonlinear dynamo

  18. Dipolar dynamos in stratified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, R.; Petitdemange, L.; Dormy, E.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of low-mass stars reveal a variety of magnetic field topologies ranging from large-scale, axial dipoles to more complex magnetic fields. At the same time, three-dimensional spherical simulations of convectively driven dynamos reproduce a similar diversity, which is commonly obtained either with Boussinesq models or with more realistic models based on the anelastic approximation, which take into account the variation of the density with depth throughout the convection zone. Nevertheless, a conclusion from different anelastic studies is that dipolar solutions seem more difficult to obtain as soon as substantial stratifications are considered. In this paper, we aim at clarifying this point by investigating in more detail the influence of the density stratification on dipolar dynamos. To that end, we rely on a systematic parameter study that allows us to clearly follow the evolution of the stability domain of the dipolar branch as the density stratification is increased. The impact of the density stratification both on the dynamo onset and the dipole collapse is discussed and compared to previous Boussinesq results. Furthermore, our study indicates that the loss of the dipolar branch does not ensue from a specific modification of the dynamo mechanisms related to the background stratification, but could instead result from a bias as our observations naturally favour a certain domain in the parameter space characterized by moderate values of the Ekman number, owing to current computational limitations. Moreover, we also show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number of the dipolar branch is scarcely modified by the increase of the density stratification, which provides an important insight into the global understanding of the impact of the density stratification on the stability domain of the dipolar dynamo branch.

  19. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  20. Tidally Driven Dynamos in a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R.

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker & Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  1. Double Dynamo Signatures in a Global MHD Simulation and Mean-field Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Patrice; Simard, Corinne; Cossette, Jean-François; Charbonneau, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The 11 year solar activity cycle is the most prominent periodic manifestation of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) large-scale dynamo operating in the solar interior, yet longer and shorter (quasi-) periodicities are also present. The so-called “quasi-biennial” signal appearing in many proxies of solar activity has been gaining increasing attention since its detection in p-mode frequency shifts, which suggests a subphotospheric origin. A number of candidate mechanisms have been proposed, including beating between co-existing global dynamo modes, dual dynamos operating in spatially separated regions of the solar interior, and Rossby waves driving short-period oscillations in the large-scale solar magnetic field produced by the 11 year activity cycle. In this article, we analyze a global MHD simulation of solar convection producing regular large-scale magnetic cycles, and detect and characterize shorter periodicities developing therein. By constructing kinematic mean-field α 2Ω dynamo models incorporating the turbulent electromotive force (emf) extracted from that same simulation, we find that dual-dynamo behavior materializes in fairly wide regions of the model’s parameters space. This suggests that the origin of the similar behavior detected in the MHD simulation lies with the joint complexity of the turbulent emf and differential rotation profile, rather that with dynamical interactions such as those mediated by Rossby waves. Analysis of the simulation also reveals that the dual dynamo operating therein leaves a double-period signature in the temperature field, consistent with a dual-period helioseismic signature. Order-of-magnitude estimates for the magnitude of the expected frequency shifts are commensurate with helioseismic measurements. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the solar quasi-biennial oscillations are associated with a secondary dynamo process operating in the outer reaches of the solar convection zone.

  2. Future Large - Scale Projects and Programmes in Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, I.

    2004-03-01

    This workshop was proposed by Germany, which invited ESO to act as host, and took place on December 1-3, at the Deutsches Museum (December 1) and at the Ludwig- Maximilians-Universität (December 2, 3). It was attended by government-appointed delegates from fifteen Global Science Forum Member countries and Observers, three non- OECD countries, representatives of ESO, the President of the International Astronomical Union, invited speakers, and the OECD secretariat, and was chaired by Ian Corbett of ESO.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Boundary-Driven Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K.; Brummell, N.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    An important topic of physics research is how magnetic fields are generated and maintained in the many astrophysical bodies where they are ubiquitously observed. Of particular interest, are reversals of magnetic fields of planets and stars, especially those of the Earth and the Sun. In an attempt to provide intuition on this problem, numerous physical dynamo experiments have been performed in different configurations. Recently, a tremendous breakthrough was made in the Von Karman sodium (VKS) experiments in France when the most realistic laboratory fluid dynamo to date was produced by driving an unconstrained flow in a cylinder of liquid sodium (Monchaux et al, 2007, PRL). One of the curiosities of the VKS experiment however is the effect of the composition of the impellers that drive the flow. Steel blades failed to produce a dynamo, but soft iron impellers, which have much higher magnetic permeability, succeeded. The role of the magnetic properties of the boundaries in boundary-driven dynamos is therefore clearly of interest. Kinematic and laminar numerical dynamo simulations (Giesecke et al, 2010, PRL & Gissinger et al, 2008 EPL) have shed some light but turbulent, nonlinear simulations are necessary. Roberts, Glatzmaier & Clune 2010 created a simplified model of the VKS setup by using three-dimensional numerical simulations in a spherical geometry with differential zonal motions of the boundary replacing the driving impellers of the VKS experiment. We have extended these numerical simulations further towards a more complete understanding of such boundary-forced dynamos. In particular, we have examined the effect of the magnetic boundary conditions - changes in the wall thickness, the magnetic permeability, and the electrical conductivity - on the mechanisms responsible for dynamo generation. Enhanced permeability, conductivity and wall thickness all help dynamo action to different degrees. We are further extending our investigations to asymmetric forcing to

  4. Microfluidic large-scale integration.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Todd; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2002-10-18

    We developed high-density microfluidic chips that contain plumbing networks with thousands of micromechanical valves and hundreds of individually addressable chambers. These fluidic devices are analogous to electronic integrated circuits fabricated using large-scale integration. A key component of these networks is the fluidic multiplexor, which is a combinatorial array of binary valve patterns that exponentially increases the processing power of a network by allowing complex fluid manipulations with a minimal number of inputs. We used these integrated microfluidic networks to construct the microfluidic analog of a comparator array and a microfluidic memory storage device whose behavior resembles random-access memory. PMID:12351675

  5. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  6. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  7. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas. PMID:27035981

  8. Theory and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Alcock, Charles; Allamandola, Lou; Chevalier, Roger A.; Cline, David B.; Dalgarno, Alexander; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Fall, S. Michael; Ferland, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    Science opportunities in the 1990's are discussed. Topics covered include the large scale structure of the universe, galaxies, stars, star formation and the interstellar medium, high energy astrophysics, and the solar system. Laboratory astrophysics in the 1990's is briefly surveyed, covering such topics as molecular, atomic, optical, nuclear and optical physics. Funding recommendations are given for the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Department of Energy. Recommendations for laboratory astrophysics research are given.

  9. The breakdown of dipolar magnetic field generation in planetary dynamo models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; King, E. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic field measurements show that each dynamo in our solar system is distinct with field strengths that differ by many orders of magnitude and morphologies that range from titled dipoles to nearly axisymmetric dipole-quadrupoles to non-axisymmetric multipoles. The characteristics of stellar and astrophysical magnetic fields are similarly wide-ranging. Towards understanding the diversity of this dynamo zoo, we investigate the breakdown of dipole-dominated magnetic fields in a suite of planetary dynamo and otherwise identical non-magnetic simulations where the convective vigor and rotation rate are varied systematically. This survey considers models with Prandtl number Pr=1, magnetic Prandtl numbers up to Pm = 5, Ekman numbers in the range 1e-3 <= E <= 1e-5, and Rayleigh numbers from near onset to more than 1000 times critical. A sharp transition from dipolar to multipolar dynamos is observed in models with moderate to high Ekman numbers. This breakdown of the dipole happens when inertial and viscous forces become comparable and coincides with a degradation of helicity in the flow, which also occurs when no magnetic field is present. Large-scale poloidal magnetic fields in these models then appear to be generated by a viscously controlled, macro-scale alpha-effect. Our lowest Ekman number cases, however, suggest that the dynamics may be changing as the viscous force decreases. Since viscosity is expected to be negligible in planetary and stellar interiors, an extrapolation of our results implies that moderate Ekman number models may not simulate the physical mechanisms of magnetic field generation in these bodies correctly.

  10. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  11. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  12. Mean field dynamo saturation: toward understanding conflicting results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Field, George B.

    Mean field dynamos may explain the origin of large scale magnetic fields of galaxies, but controversy arises over the extent of dynamo quenching by the growing field. Here we explain how apparently conflicting results may be mutually consistent, by showing the role of magnetic helicity conservation and boundary terms usually neglected. We estimate the associated magnetic energy flowing out of the Galaxy but emphasize that the mechanism of field escape needs to be addressed.

  13. Large scale topography of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, R. W.; Synnott, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the large scale topography of the Jovian satellite Io, both limb observations and stereographic techniques applied to landmarks are used. The raw data for this study consists of Voyager 1 images of Io, 800x800 arrays of picture elements each of which can take on 256 possible brightness values. In analyzing this data it was necessary to identify and locate landmarks and limb points on the raw images, remove the image distortions caused by the camera electronics and translate the corrected locations into positions relative to a reference geoid. Minimizing the uncertainty in the corrected locations is crucial to the success of this project. In the highest resolution frames, an error of a tenth of a pixel in image space location can lead to a 300 m error in true location. In the lowest resolution frames, the same error can lead to an uncertainty of several km.

  14. Challenges for Large Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    With computational approaches becoming ubiquitous the growing impact of large scale computing on research influences both theoretical and experimental work. I will review a few examples in condensed matter physics and quantum optics, including the impact of computer simulations in the search for supersolidity, thermometry in ultracold quantum gases, and the challenging search for novel phases in strongly correlated electron systems. While only a decade ago such simulations needed the fastest supercomputers, many simulations can now be performed on small workstation clusters or even a laptop: what was previously restricted to a few experts can now potentially be used by many. Only part of the gain in computational capabilities is due to Moore's law and improvement in hardware. Equally impressive is the performance gain due to new algorithms - as I will illustrate using some recently developed algorithms. At the same time modern peta-scale supercomputers offer unprecedented computational power and allow us to tackle new problems and address questions that were impossible to solve numerically only a few years ago. While there is a roadmap for future hardware developments to exascale and beyond, the main challenges are on the algorithmic and software infrastructure side. Among the problems that face the computational physicist are: the development of new algorithms that scale to thousands of cores and beyond, a software infrastructure that lifts code development to a higher level and speeds up the development of new simulation programs for large scale computing machines, tools to analyze the large volume of data obtained from such simulations, and as an emerging field provenance-aware software that aims for reproducibility of the complete computational workflow from model parameters to the final figures. Interdisciplinary collaborations and collective efforts will be required, in contrast to the cottage-industry culture currently present in many areas of computational

  15. Large-scale magnetic topologies of early M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Morin, J.; Petit, P.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Aurière, M.; Cabanac, R.; Dintrans, B.; Fares, R.; Gastine, T.; Jardine, M. M.; Lignières, F.; Paletou, F.; Ramirez Velez, J. C.; Théado, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present here additional results of a spectropolarimetric survey of a small sample of stars ranging from spectral type M0 to M8 aimed at investigating observationally how dynamo processes operate in stars on both sides of the full convection threshold (spectral type M4). The present paper focuses on early M stars (M0-M3), that is above the full convection threshold. Applying tomographic imaging techniques to time series of rotationally modulated circularly polarized profiles collected with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter, we determine the rotation period and reconstruct the large-scale magnetic topologies of six early M dwarfs. We find that early-M stars preferentially host large-scale fields with dominantly toroidal and non-axisymmetric poloidal configurations, along with significant differential rotation (and long-term variability); only the lowest-mass star of our subsample is found to host an almost fully poloidal, mainly axisymmetric large-scale field resembling those found in mid-M dwarfs. This abrupt change in the large-scale magnetic topologies of M dwarfs (occurring at spectral type M3) has no related signature on X-ray luminosities (measuring the total amount of magnetic flux); it thus suggests that underlying dynamo processes become more efficient at producing large-scale fields (despite producing the same flux) at spectral types later than M3. We suspect that this change relates to the rapid decrease in the radiative cores of low-mass stars and to the simultaneous sharp increase of the convective turnover times (with decreasing stellar mass) that models predict to occur at M3; it may also be (at least partly) responsible for the reduced magnetic braking reported for fully convective stars. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL), operated by the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France. E-mail: donati@ast.obs-mip.fr (J-FD); jmorin@ast.obs-mip.fr (JM); petit

  16. DYNAMO EFFICIENCY WITH SHEAR IN HELICAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-jin

    2009-05-10

    To elucidate the influence of shear flow on the generation of magnetic fields through the modification of turbulence property, we consider the case where a large-scale magnetic field is parallel to a large-scale shear flow without direct interaction between the two in the kinematic limit where the magnetic field does not backreact on the velocity. By nonperturbatively incorporating the effect of shear in a helically forced turbulence, we show that turbulence intensity and turbulent transport coefficients (turbulent viscosity, {alpha} and {beta} effect) are enhanced by a weak shear, while strongly suppressed for strong shear. In particular, {beta} is shown to be much more strongly suppressed than {alpha} effect. We discuss its important implications for dynamo efficiency, i.e., on the scaling of the dynamo number with differential rotation.

  17. Large-scale flow generation by inhomogeneous helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, N.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of kinetic helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation) on turbulent momentum transport is investigated. The turbulent kinetic helicity (pseudoscalar) enters the Reynolds stress (mirror-symmetric tensor) expression in the form of a helicity gradient as the coupling coefficient for the mean vorticity and/or the angular velocity (axial vector), which suggests the possibility of mean-flow generation in the presence of inhomogeneous helicity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect, which was previously confirmed at the level of a turbulence- or closure-model simulation, is examined with the aid of direct numerical simulations of rotating turbulence with nonuniform helicity sustained by an external forcing. The numerical simulations show that the spatial distribution of the Reynolds stress is in agreement with the helicity-related term coupled with the angular velocity, and that a large-scale flow is generated in the direction of angular velocity. Such a large-scale flow is not induced in the case of homogeneous turbulent helicity. This result confirms the validity of the inhomogeneous helicity effect in large-scale flow generation and suggests that a vortex dynamo is possible even in incompressible turbulence where there is no baroclinicity effect.

  18. Helicity-vorticity turbulent pumping of magnetic fields in the solar dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    The interaction of helical convective motions and differential rotation in the solar convection zone results in turbulent drift of a large-scale magnetic field. We discuss the pumping mechanism and its impact on the solar dynamo.

  19. Comparisons and connections between mean field dynamo theory and accretion disc theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of large scale magnetic fields in astrophysical rotators, and the conversion of gravitational energy into radiation near stars and compact objects via accretion have been subjects of active research for a half century. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence makes both problems highly nonlinear, so both subjects have benefitted from numerical simulations.However, understanding the key principles and practical modeling of observations warrants testable semi-analytic mean field theories that distill the essential physics. Mean field dynamo (MFD) theory and alpha-viscosity accretion disc theory exemplify this pursuit. That the latter is a mean field theory is not always made explicit but the combination of turbulence and global symmetry imply such. The more commonly explicit presentation of assumptions in 20th century textbook MFDT has exposed it to arguably more widespread criticism than incurred by 20th century alpha-accretion theory despite complementary weaknesses. In the 21st century however, MFDT has experienced a breakthrough with a dynamical saturation theory that consistently agrees with simulations. Such has not yet occurred in accretion disc theory, though progress is emerging. Ironically however, for accretion engines, MFDT and accretion theory are presently two artificially uncoupled pieces of what should be a single coupled theory. Large scale fields and accretion flows are dynamically intertwined because large scale fields likely play a key role in angular momentum transport. I discuss and synthesize aspects of recent progress in MFDT and accretion disc theory to suggest why the two likely conspire in a unified theory.

  20. Large Scale Homing in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Mario; Zhu, Hong; Tautz, Jürgen; Zhang, Shaowu

    2011-01-01

    Honeybee foragers frequently fly several kilometres to and from vital resources, and communicate those locations to their nest mates by a symbolic dance language. Research has shown that they achieve this feat by memorizing landmarks and the skyline panorama, using the sun and polarized skylight as compasses and by integrating their outbound flight paths. In order to investigate the capacity of the honeybees' homing abilities, we artificially displaced foragers to novel release spots at various distances up to 13 km in the four cardinal directions. Returning bees were individually registered by a radio frequency identification (RFID) system at the hive entrance. We found that homing rate, homing speed and the maximum homing distance depend on the release direction. Bees released in the east were more likely to find their way back home, and returned faster than bees released in any other direction, due to the familiarity of global landmarks seen from the hive. Our findings suggest that such large scale homing is facilitated by global landmarks acting as beacons, and possibly the entire skyline panorama. PMID:21602920

  1. Astrophysical cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe. 47 refs.

  2. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  3. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  4. On the resilience of helical magnetic fields to turbulent diffusion and the astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2013-02-01

    The extent to which large-scale magnetic fields are susceptible to turbulent diffusion is important for interpreting the need for in situ large-scale dynamos in astrophysics and for observationally inferring field strengths compared to kinetic energy. By solving coupled evolution equations for magnetic energy and magnetic helicity in a system initialized with isotropic turbulence and an arbitrarily helical large-scale field, we quantify the decay rate of the latter for a bounded or periodic system. The magnetic energy associated with the non-helical large-scale field decays at least as fast as the kinematically estimated turbulent diffusion rate, but the decay rate of the helical part depends on whether the ratio of its magnetic energy to the turbulent kinetic energy exceeds a critical value given by M1, c = (k1/k2)2, where k1 and k2 are the wavenumbers of the large and forcing scales. Turbulently diffusing helical fields to small scales while conserving magnetic helicity requires a rapid increase in total magnetic energy. As such, only when the helical field is subcritical can it so diffuse. When supercritical, it decays slowly, at a rate determined by microphysical dissipation even in the presence of macroscopic turbulence. In effect, turbulent diffusion of such a large-scale helical field produces small-scale helicity whose amplification abates further turbulent diffusion. Two curious implications are that (1) standard arguments supporting the need for in situ large-scale dynamos based on the otherwise rapid turbulent diffusion of large-scale fields require re-thinking since only the large-scale non-helical field is so diffused in a closed system. Boundary terms could however provide potential pathways for rapid change of the large-scale helical field. (2) Since M1, c ≪ 1 for k1 ≪ k2, the presence of long-lived ordered large-scale helical fields as in extragalactic jets do not guarantee that the magnetic field dominates the kinetic energy.

  5. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  6. What controls the large-scale magnetic fields of M dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Morin, J.; Duarte, L.; Reiners, A.; Christensen, U.; Wicht, J.

    2014-08-01

    Observations of active M dwarfs show a broad variety of large-scale magnetic fields encompassing dipole-dominated and multipolar geometries. We detail the analogy between some anelastic dynamo simulations and spectropolarimetric observations of 23 M stars. In numerical models, the relative contribution of inertia and Coriolis force -estimated by the so-called local Rossby number- is known to have a strong impact on the magnetic field geometry. We discuss the relevance of this parameter in setting the large-scale magnetic field of M dwarfs.

  7. Nonmodal growth and the magnetorotational dynamo instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    Unravelling the important dynamo processes in magnetized rotating shear flows remains fundamental in understanding turbulent transport in astrophysical disks. We consider the dynamo of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in its simplest possible form, studying the unstratified shearing box without a mean magnetic field. Despite the lack of spectral instability, sustained turbulence and dynamo is possible in this system, with the non-normality of the linear operator playing an important role. An analysis of the MRI from this non-normal perspective has proved enlightening, illustrating that the fastest growing non-axisymmetric disturbances are very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). With the goal of understanding the core dynamo process, we evolve an statistical ensemble of shear waves in a quasi-linear version of the shearing box system. Among the most interesting ideas resulting from this approach is the existence of a mean field dynamo instability of homogenous background turbulence. The instability saturates at levels consistent with fully nonlinear turbulence simulations and depends strongly on magnetic Prandtl number. This work was supported by Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and U.S. DOE (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  8. Dynamo theory and liquid metal MHD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lielausis, O.

    1994-06-01

    High values of magnetic Reynolds number Rm are characteristic not only to astrophysics, but also to other interesting objects, including liquid metal (LM) flows. LM experiments have been performed illustrating important predictions of the dynamo theory, for example, about the existence and features of the alpha effect. Consideration of so called 'laminar' dynamos provides a theoretical base for direct experimental realization and examination of the dynamo process. First step results, gathered a subcritical conditions, confirm the statement that self-excitation in LM experiments can be achieved practically today. In such devices as LM (sodium) cooled fast breeders Rm can reach values of up to 50 and specific MHD phenomena have been observed in operating fast reactors. Cautions against crisis like processes have been expressed. It is important for the dynamo theory to understand what kind of perturbed motion is able to coexist with the generated magnetic field. Fundamentally new ideas here are issuing from the theory of 2D MHD turbulence. LM MHD served for the first direct proves, confirming, that the predicted surprising features of 2D turbulence can be observed in reality. It is worth incorporating these already not new ideas in the dynamo theory. In such a way a field for new solutions could be established.

  9. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias & Riotto and Peloso & Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space.

  10. Radiative shocks on large scale lasers. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Bouquet, S.; Stehle, C.; Barroso, P.; Batani, D.; Benuzzi, A.; Cathala, B.; Chièze, J.-P.; Fleury, X.; Grandjouan, N.; Grenier, J.; Hall, T.; Henry, E.; Koenig, M.; Lafon, J. P. J.; Malka, V.; Marchet, B.; Merdji, H.; Michaut, C.; Poles, L.; Thais, F.

    2001-05-01

    Radiative shocks, those structure is strongly influenced by the radiation field, are present in various astrophysical objects (circumstellar envelopes of variable stars, supernovae ...). Their modeling is very difficult and thus will take benefit from experimental informations. This approach is now possible using large scale lasers. Preliminary experiments have been performed with the nanosecond LULI laser at Ecole Polytechnique (France) in 2000. A radiative shock has been obtained in a low pressure xenon cell. The preparation of such experiments and their interpretation is performed using analytical calculations and numerical simulations.

  11. The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, C. B.; Flanagan, K.; Brookhart, M.; Clark, M.; Cooper, C. M.; Désangles, V.; Egedal, J.; Endrizzi, D.; Khalzov, I. V.; Li, H.; Miesch, M.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Olson, J.; Peterson, E.; Roesler, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Schmitz, O.; Siller, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stemo, A.; Wallace, J.; Weisberg, D.; Zweibel, E.

    2015-10-01

    > provide an ideal testbed for a range of astrophysical experiments, including self-exciting dynamos, collisionless magnetic reconnection, jet stability, stellar winds and more. This article describes the capabilities of WiPAL, along with several experiments, in both operating and planning stages, that illustrate the range of possibilities for future users.

  12. Solar Magnetic Field Reversals and the Role of Dynamo Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRosa, M. L.; Brun, A. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  13. SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSALS AND THE ROLE OF DYNAMO FAMILIES

    SciTech Connect

    DeRosa, M. L.

    2012-09-20

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  14. Large-Scale Reform Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of large-scale education reform and makes the case that large-scale or whole system reform policies and strategies are becoming increasingly evident. The review briefly addresses the pre 1997 period concluding that while the pressure for reform was mounting that there were very few examples of deliberate or…

  15. Large-scale infrared scene projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Darin A.

    1999-07-01

    Large-scale infrared scene projectors, typically have unique opto-mechanical characteristics associated to their application. This paper outlines two large-scale zoom lens assemblies with different environmental and package constraints. Various challenges and their respective solutions are discussed and presented.

  16. Effect of small scale motions on dynamo actions generated by the Beltrami-like flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingtian

    2016-08-01

    The geodynamo and solar dynamo are driven by the turbulent flows which involve motions of various scales. Of particular interest is what role is played by the small scale motions in these dynamos. In this paper, the integral equation approach is employed to investigate the effect of the small scale motions on dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows in a cylindrical vessel. The result shows that some small scale motions can trigger a transition of a dynamo from a steady to an unsteady state. Our results also show that when the poloidal components of the small and large scale flows share the same direction in the equatorial plane, the small scale flows have more positive or less detrimental effect on the onsets of the dynamo actions in comparison with the case that the poloidal components have different directions. These findings shed light on the effect of the small scale turbulence on dynamo actions.

  17. A Multiscale Dynamo Model Driven by Quasi-geostrophic Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Keith; Calkins, Michael; Tobias, Steve; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    A convection-driven multiscale dynamo model is discussed for the plane layer geometry in the limit of low Rossby number. The small-scale fluctuating dynamics are described by a magnetically-modified quasi-geostrophic equation set, and the large-scale mean dynamics are governed by a diagnostic thermal wind balance. The model utilizes three timescales that respectively characterize the convective timescale, the large-scale magnetic diffusion timescale, and the large-scale thermal diffusion timescale. It is shown that in limit of low magnetic Prandtl number the model is characterized by a magnetic to kinetic energy ratio that is asymptotically large, with ohmic dissipation dominating viscous dissipation on the large-scales. For the order one magnetic Prandtl number model the magnetic and kinetic energies are equipartitioned and both ohmic and viscous dissipation are weak on the large-scales. For both cases the Elsasser number is small. The new models can be considered fully nonlinear, generalized versions of the dynamo model originally developed by Childress and Soward. These models may be useful for understanding the dynamics of convection-driven dynamos in regimes that are only just becoming accessible to simulations of the full set of governing equations. NSF EAR #1320991, NSF EAR CSEDI 1067944.

  18. The lunar dynamo.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Tikoo, Sonia M

    2014-12-01

    The inductive generation of magnetic fields in fluid planetary interiors is known as the dynamo process. Although the Moon today has no global magnetic field, it has been known since the Apollo era that the lunar rocks and crust are magnetized. Until recently, it was unclear whether this magnetization was the product of a core dynamo or fields generated externally to the Moon. New laboratory and spacecraft measurements strongly indicate that much of this magnetization is the product of an ancient core dynamo. The dynamo field persisted from at least 4.25 to 3.56 billion years ago (Ga), with an intensity reaching that of the present Earth. The field then declined by at least an order of magnitude by ∼3.3 Ga. The mechanisms for sustaining such an intense and long-lived dynamo are uncertain but may include mechanical stirring by the mantle and core crystallization. PMID:25477467

  19. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    analysis yields exact integral relationships between the mean emf induced by the wave packets and the large-scale dipole and azimuthal field. Combining these local and integral equations yields a kinematic model for an α2-dynamo driven by helical waves. Order-of-magnitude estimates based on these equations suggest that such a dynamo is indeed feasible.

  20. An ancient core dynamo in asteroid Vesta.

    PubMed

    Fu, Roger R; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Suavet, Clément; Lima, Eduardo A; Li, Luyao; Kuan, Aaron T

    2012-10-12

    The asteroid Vesta is the smallest known planetary body that has experienced large-scale igneous differentiation. However, it has been previously uncertain whether Vesta and similarly sized planetesimals formed advecting metallic cores and dynamo magnetic fields. Here we show that remanent magnetization in the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001 formed during cooling on Vesta 3.69 billion years ago in a surface magnetic field of at least 2 microteslas. This field most likely originated from crustal remanence produced by an earlier dynamo, suggesting that Vesta formed an advecting liquid metallic core. Furthermore, the inferred present-day crustal fields can account for the lack of solar wind ion-generated space weathering effects on Vesta. PMID:23066077

  1. Evolution of helicities in dynamo problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The properties of wavelet spectra of kinetic and magnetic energies, as well as of helicities, are considered by the example of a three-dimensional dynamo model in a rapidly rotating a plane layer and heated from below. It is shown that the transition from the kinematic mode to the full dynamo mode is accompanied by a decrease in the magnetic energy of the system. The hydrodynamic helicity changes its sign by height and has the same sign for all scales. The current and magnetic helicities also have the dipole form of symmetry in the physical space; however, their sign at small and large scales is different—the so-called effect of separation in scales. The cross-helicity has no separation in scales, but it can change the sign with time so that its averaged value is small.

  2. Simple Model of the (alpha)(omega) Dynamo: Self-Excited Spheromaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    2010-01-26

    The astrophysical {alpha}{omega} dynamo converting angular momentum to magnetic energy can be interpreted as a self-excited Faraday dynamo together with magnetic relaxation coupling the dynamo poloidal field to the toroidal field produced by dynamo currents. Since both toroidal and poloidal fields are involved, the system can be modeled as helicity creation and transport, in a spheromak plasma configuration in quasi-equilibrium on the time scale of changes in magnetic energy. Neutral beams or plasma gun injection across field lines could create self-excited spheromaks in the laboratory.

  3. An Empirical Relation between the Large-scale Magnetic Field and the Dynamical Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Martinsson, T. P. K.; Knapen, J. H.; Beckman, J. E.; Koribalski, B.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2016-02-01

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic fields on the evolution of galaxies are unknown. Though not without challenges, the dynamo theory can explain the large-scale coherent magnetic fields that govern galaxies, but observational evidence for the theory is so far very scarce. Putting together the available data of non-interacting, non-cluster galaxies with known large-scale magnetic fields, we find a tight correlation between the integrated polarized flux density, SPI, and the rotation speed, vrot, of galaxies. This leads to an almost linear correlation between the large-scale magnetic field \\bar{B} and vrot, assuming that the number of cosmic-ray electrons is proportional to the star formation rate, and a super-linear correlation assuming equipartition between magnetic fields and cosmic rays. This correlation cannot be attributed to an active linear α-Ω dynamo, as no correlation holds with global shear or angular speed. It indicates instead a coupling between the large-scale magnetic field and the dynamical mass of the galaxies, \\bar{B}˜ \\{M}{{dyn}}0.25-0.4. Hence, faster rotating and/or more massive galaxies have stronger large-scale magnetic fields. The observed \\bar{B}-{v}{{rot}} correlation shows that the anisotropic turbulent magnetic field dominates \\bar{B} in fast rotating galaxies as the turbulent magnetic field, coupled with gas, is enhanced and ordered due to the strong gas compression and/or local shear in these systems. This study supports a stationary condition for the large-scale magnetic field as long as the dynamical mass of galaxies is constant.

  4. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-15

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  5. Large scale anisotropy of UHECRs for the Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, E.

    2011-09-22

    The origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) is one of the most interesting questions in astroparticle physics. Despite of the efforts by other previous measurements, there is no consensus of both of the origin and the mechanism of UHECRs generation and propagation yet. In this context, Telescope Array (TA) experiment is expected to play an important role as the largest detector in the northern hemisphere which consists of an array of surface particle detectors (SDs) and fluorescence detectors (FDs) and other important calibration devices. We searched for large scale anisotropy using SD data of TA. UHECRs are expected to be restricted in GZK horizon when the composition of UHECRs is proton, so the observed arrival directions are expected to exhibit local large scale anisotropy if UHECR sources are some astrophysical objects. We used the SD data set from 11 May 2008 to 7 September 2010 to search for large-scale anisotropy. The discrimination power between LSS and isotropy is not enough yet, but the statistics in TA is expected to discriminate between those in about 95% confidence level on average in near future.

  6. A Global Galactic Dynamo with a Corona Constrained by Relative Helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Mangalam, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for a global axisymmetric turbulent dynamo operating in a galaxy with a corona that treats the parameters of turbulence driven by supernovae and by magneto-rotational instability under a common formalism. The nonlinear quenching of the dynamo is alleviated by the inclusion of small-scale advective and diffusive magnetic helicity fluxes, which allow the gauge-invariant magnetic helicity to be transferred outside the disk and consequently to build up a corona during the course of dynamo action. The time-dependent dynamo equations are expressed in a separable form and solved through an eigenvector expansion constructed using the steady-state solutions of the dynamo equation. The parametric evolution of the dynamo solution allows us to estimate the final structure of the global magnetic field and the saturated value of the turbulence parameter αm, even before solving the dynamical equations for evolution of magnetic fields in the disk and the corona, along with α-quenching. We then solve these equations simultaneously to study the saturation of the large-scale magnetic field, its dependence on the small-scale magnetic helicity fluxes, and the corresponding evolution of the force-free field in the corona. The quadrupolar large-scale magnetic field in the disk is found to reach equipartition strength within a timescale of 1 Gyr. The large-scale magnetic field in the corona obtained is much weaker than the field inside the disk and has only a weak impact on the dynamo operation.

  7. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  8. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  9. Coherent nonhelical shear dynamos driven by magnetic fluctuations at low Reynolds numbers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-28

    Nonhelical shear dynamos are studied with a particular focus on the possibility of coherent dynamo action. The primary results—serving as a follow up to the results of Squire & Bhattacharjee—pertain to the "magnetic shear-current effect" as a viable mechanism to drive large-scale magnetic field generation. This effect raises the interesting possibility that the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo could drive large-scale dynamo action, and is likely to be important in the unstratified regions of accretion disk turbulence. In this paper, the effect is studied at low Reynolds numbers, removing the complications of small-scale dynamo excitation and aiding analysis bymore » enabling the use of quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. In addition to the magnetically driven dynamo, new results on the kinematic nonhelical shear dynamo are presented. Furthermore, these illustrate the relationship between coherent and incoherent driving in such dynamos, demonstrating the importance of rotation in determining the relative dominance of each mechanism.« less

  10. Coherent nonhelical shear dynamos driven by magnetic fluctuations at low Reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-28

    Nonhelical shear dynamos are studied with a particular focus on the possibility of coherent dynamo action. The primary results—serving as a follow up to the results of Squire & Bhattacharjee—pertain to the "magnetic shear-current effect" as a viable mechanism to drive large-scale magnetic field generation. This effect raises the interesting possibility that the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo could drive large-scale dynamo action, and is likely to be important in the unstratified regions of accretion disk turbulence. In this paper, the effect is studied at low Reynolds numbers, removing the complications of small-scale dynamo excitation and aiding analysis by enabling the use of quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. In addition to the magnetically driven dynamo, new results on the kinematic nonhelical shear dynamo are presented. Furthermore, these illustrate the relationship between coherent and incoherent driving in such dynamos, demonstrating the importance of rotation in determining the relative dominance of each mechanism.

  11. Magnetic flux concentrations from dynamo-generated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.; Losada, I. R.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The mean-field theory of magnetized stellar convection gives rise to two distinct instabilities: the large-scale dynamo instability, operating in the bulk of the convection zone and a negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI) operating in the strongly stratified surface layers. The latter might be important in connection with magnetic spot formation. However, as follows from theoretical analysis, the growth rate of NEMPI is suppressed with increasing rotation rates. On the other hand, recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) have shown a subsequent increase in the growth rate. Aims: We examine quantitatively whether this increase in the growth rate of NEMPI can be explained by an α2 mean-field dynamo, and whether both NEMPI and the dynamo instability can operate at the same time. Methods: We use both DNS and mean-field simulations (MFS) to solve the underlying equations numerically either with or without an imposed horizontal field. We use the test-field method to compute relevant dynamo coefficients. Results: DNS show that magnetic flux concentrations are still possible up to rotation rates above which the large-scale dynamo effect produces mean magnetic fields. The resulting DNS growth rates are quantitatively reproduced with MFS. As expected for weak or vanishing rotation, the growth rate of NEMPI increases with increasing gravity, but there is a correction term for strong gravity and large turbulent magnetic diffusivity. Conclusions: Magnetic flux concentrations are still possible for rotation rates above which dynamo action takes over. For the solar rotation rate, the corresponding turbulent turnover time is about 5 h, with dynamo action commencing in the layers beneath.

  12. THE SUBSURFACE-SHEAR-SHAPED SOLAR {alpha}{Omega} DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a solar dynamo model distributed in the bulk of the convection zone with toroidal magnetic-field flux concentrated in a near-surface layer. We show that if the boundary conditions at the top of the dynamo region allow the large-scale toroidal magnetic fields to penetrate close to the surface, then the modeled butterfly diagram for the toroidal magnetic field in the upper convection zone is formed by the subsurface rotational shear layer. The model is in agreement with observed properties of the magnetic solar cycle.

  13. Astrophysics and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brinks, Elias; Khanna, Ramon

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysics and Space Science publishes original contributions and invited reviews covering the entire range of astronomy, astrophysics, astrophysical cosmology, planetary and space science, and the astrophysical aspects of astrobiology. This includes both observational and theoretical research, the techniques of astronomical instrumentation and data analysis, and astronomical space instrumentation. We particularly welcome papers in the general fields of high-energy astrophysics, astrophysical and astrochemical studies of the interstellar medium including star formation, planetary astrophysics, the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Papers in mathematical physics or in general relativity which do not establish clear astrophysical applications will not longer be considered.The journal also publishes topical collections consisting of invited reviews and original research papers selected special issues in research fields of particular scientific interest. These consist of both invited reviews and original research papers.Conference proceedings will not be considered. All papers published in the journal are subject to thorough and strict peer-reviewing.Astrophysics and Space Science has an Impact Factor of 2.4 and features short editorial turnaround times as well as short publication times after acceptance, and colour printing free of charge. Published by Springer the journal has a very wide online dissemination and can be accessed by researchers at a very large number of institutes worldwide.

  14. Properties of magnetic helicity flux in turbulent dynamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vishniac, Ethan T.; Shapovalov, Dmitry E-mail: dmsh@jhu.edu

    2014-01-10

    We study the flux of small-scale magnetic helicity in simulations of driven statistically homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a periodic box with an imposed large-scale shear. The simulations show that in the regime of strong dynamo action the eddy-scale magnetic helicity flux has only two significant terms: advective motion driven by the large-scale velocity field and the Vishniac-Cho (VC) flux which moves helicity across the magnetic field lines. The contribution of all the other terms is negligible. The VC flux is highly correlated with the large-scale electromotive force and is responsible for large-scale dynamo action, while the advective term is not. The VC flux is driven by the anisotropy of the turbulence. We derive analytical expressions for it in terms of the small-scale velocity or magnetic field. These expressions are used to predict the existence and strength of dynamo action for different turbulent anisotropies and tested against the results of the simulations.

  15. An Experimental MHD Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C. B.

    2002-11-15

    The project is designed to understand current and magnetic field generation in plasmas and other magnetohydrodynamic systems. The experiments will investigate the generation of a dynamo using liquid Na.

  16. Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, 11th, Austin, TX, December 12-17, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. S. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Various papers on relativistic astrophysics are presented. The general subjects addressed include: particle physics and astrophysics, general relativity, large-scale structure, big bang cosmology, new-generation telescopes, pulsars, supernovae, high-energy astrophysics, and active galaxies.

  17. The Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Tuominen, Ilkka

    The traditional -dynamo as a model for the solar cycle has been successful in explaining the butterfly diagram, phase relations between poloidal and toroidal field, and polar branch migration features. Observational and theoretical achievements in recent years have however shaken this picture. The current trend is towards dynamos operating in the overshoot region of the convection zone. Nevertheless, there are many open questions and a consistent picture has not been established. In this paper we compare recent approaches and discuss remaining problems.

  18. Large-scale magnetic fields, dark energy, and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-15

    Cosmological magnetic fields are being observed with ever increasing correlation lengths, possibly reaching the size of superclusters, therefore disfavoring the conventional picture of generation through primordial seeds later amplified by galaxy-bound dynamo mechanisms. In this paper we put forward a fundamentally different approach that links such large-scale magnetic fields to the cosmological vacuum energy. In our scenario the dark energy is due to the Veneziano ghost (which solves the U(1){sub A} problem in QCD). The Veneziano ghost couples through the triangle anomaly to the electromagnetic field with a constant which is unambiguously fixed in the standard model. While this interaction does not produce any physical effects in Minkowski space, it triggers the generation of a magnetic field in an expanding universe at every epoch. The induced energy of the magnetic field is thus proportional to cosmological vacuum energy: {rho}{sub EM{approx_equal}}B{sup 2{approx_equal}}(({alpha}/4{pi})){sup 2{rho}}{sub DE}, {rho}{sub DE} hence acting as a source for the magnetic energy {rho}{sub EM}. The corresponding numerical estimate leads to a magnitude in the nG range. There are two unique and distinctive predictions of our proposal: an uninterrupted active generation of Hubble size correlated magnetic fields throughout the evolution of the Universe; the presence of parity violation on the enormous scales 1/H, which apparently has been already observed in CMB. These predictions are entirely rooted into the standard model of particle physics.

  19. The precession dynamo experiment at HZDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesecke, A.; Gundrum, T.; Herault, J.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.

    2015-12-01

    In a next generation dynamo experiment currently under development atthe Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) a fluid flow of liquidsodium, solely driven by precession, will be considered as a possiblesource for magnetic field generation. The experiment is mainlymotivated by alternative concepts for astrophysical dynamos that arebased on mechanical flow driving. For example, it has long beendiscussed whether precession may be a complementary power source forthe geodynamo (Malkus, Science 1968) or for the ancient lunar dynamodue to the Earth-driven precession of the lunar spin axis (Dwyer, Nature 2011).We will present the current state of development of the dynamoexperiment together with results from non-linear hydrodynamicsimulations with moderate precessional forcing. Our simulations reveala non-axisymmetric forced mode with an amplitude of up to one fourthof the rotation velocity of the cylindrical container confirming thatprecession provides a rather efficient flow driving mechanism even atmoderate precession rates.More relevant for dynamo action might be free Kelvin modes (thenatural flow eigenmodes in a rotating cylinder) with higher azimuthalwave number. These modes may become relevant when constituting atriadic resonance with the fundamental forced mode, i.e., when theheight of the container matches their axial wave lengths. We findtriadic resonances at aspect ratios close to those predicted by thelinear theory except around the primary resonance of the forcedmode. In that regime we still identify free Kelvin modes propagatingin retrograde direction but none of them can be assigned to a triade.Our results will enter into the development of flow models that willbe used in kinematic simulations of the electromagnetic inductionequation in order to determine whether a precession driven flow willbe capable to drive a dynamo at all and to limit the parameter spacewithin which the occurrence of dynamo action is most promising.

  20. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  1. Large-scale inhomogeneities and galaxy statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    The density fluctuations associated with the formation of large-scale cosmic pancake-like and filamentary structures are evaluated using the Zel'dovich approximation for the evolution of nonlinear inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. It is shown that the large-scale nonlinear density fluctuations in the galaxy distribution due to pancakes modify the standard scale-invariant correlation function xi(r) at scales comparable to the coherence length of adiabatic fluctuations. The typical contribution of pancakes and filaments to the J3 integral, and more generally to the moments of galaxy counts in a volume of approximately (15-40 per h Mpc)exp 3, provides a statistical test for the existence of large scale inhomogeneities. An application to several recent three dimensional data sets shows that despite large observational uncertainties over the relevant scales characteristic features may be present that can be attributed to pancakes in most, but not all, of the various galaxy samples.

  2. Penetration of Large Scale Electric Field to Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Fok, M. C. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    The direct penetration of large scale global electric field to the inner magnetosphere is a critical element in controlling how the background thermal plasma populates within the radiation belts. These plasma populations provide the source of particles and free energy needed for the generation and growth of various plasma waves that, at critical points of resonances in time and phase space, can scatter or energize radiation belt particles to regulate the flux level of the relativistic electrons in the system. At high geomagnetic activity levels, the distribution of large scale electric fields serves as an important indicator of how prevalence of strong wave-particle interactions extend over local times and radial distances. To understand the complex relationship between the global electric fields and thermal plasmas, particularly due to the ionospheric dynamo and the magnetospheric convection effects, and their relations to the geomagnetic activities, we analyze the electric field and cold plasma measurements from Van Allen Probes over more than two years period and simulate a geomagnetic storm event using Coupled Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Model (CIMI). Our statistical analysis of the measurements from Van Allan Probes and CIMI simulations of the March 17, 2013 storm event indicate that: (1) Global dawn-dusk electric field can penetrate the inner magnetosphere inside the inner belt below L~2. (2) Stronger convections occurred in the dusk and midnight sectors than those in the noon and dawn sectors. (3) Strong convections at multiple locations exist at all activity levels but more complex at higher activity levels. (4) At the high activity levels, strongest convections occur in the midnight sectors at larger distances from the Earth and in the dusk sector at closer distances. (5) Two plasma populations of distinct ion temperature isotropies divided at L-Shell ~2, indicating distinct heating mechanisms between inner and outer radiation belts. (6) CIMI

  3. MEAN-FIELD MODELING OF AN α{sup 2} DYNAMO COUPLED WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF RIGIDLY ROTATING CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Sano, Takayoshi E-mail: sano@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-10

    The mechanism of large-scale dynamos in rigidly rotating stratified convection is explored by direct numerical simulations (DNS) in Cartesian geometry. A mean-field dynamo model is also constructed using turbulent velocity profiles consistently extracted from the corresponding DNS results. By quantitative comparison between the DNS and our mean-field model, it is demonstrated that the oscillatory α{sup 2} dynamo wave, excited and sustained in the convection zone, is responsible for large-scale magnetic activities such as cyclic polarity reversal and spatiotemporal migration. The results provide strong evidence that a nonuniformity of the α-effect, which is a natural outcome of rotating stratified convection, can be an important prerequisite for large-scale stellar dynamos, even without the Ω-effect.

  4. Fast-dynamo action in unsteady flows and maps in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayly, B. J.; Childress, S.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady fast-dynamo action is obtained in a family of stretch-fold-shear maps applied to a spatially periodic magnetic field in three dimensions. Exponential growth of a mean field in the limit of vanishing diffusivity is demonstrated by a numerical method which alternates instantaneous deformations with molecular diffusion over a finite time interval. Analysis indicates that the dynamo is a coherent feature of the large scales, essentially independent of the cascade of structure to small scales.

  5. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, with support from NASA, we used a large collection of data from GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS networks which span the Westem U.S. Cordillera (WUSC) to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work was roughly divided into an analysis of these space geodetic observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone, and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics. Following the determination of the first generation WUSC velocity solution, we placed high priority on the dissemination of the velocity estimates. With in-kind support from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we constructed a web-site which allows anyone to access the data, and to determine their own velocity reference frame.

  6. Large Scale Deformation of the Western U.S. Cordillera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, with support from NASA, we used a large collection of data from GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS networks which span the Western U.S. Cordillera (WUSC) to precisely quantify present-day large-scale crustal deformations in a single uniform reference frame. Our work was roughly divided into an analysis of these space geodetic observations to infer the deformation field across and within the entire plate boundary zone, and an investigation of the implications of this deformation field regarding plate boundary dynamics. Following the determination of the first generation WUSC velocity solution, we placed high priority on the dissemination of the velocity estimates. With in-kind support from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we constructed a web-site which allows anyone to access the data, and to determine their own velocity reference frame.

  7. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  8. A Large Scale Computer Terminal Output Controller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Paul Thomas

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a large scale computer terminal output controller which supervises the transfer of information from a Control Data 6400 Computer to a PLATO IV data network. It discusses the cost considerations leading to the selection of educational television channels rather than telephone lines for…

  9. Large Scale Commodity Clusters for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pochinsky; W. Akers; R. Brower; J. Chen; P. Dreher; R. Edwards; S. Gottlieb; D. Holmgren; P. Mackenzie; J. Negele; D. Richards; J. Simone; W. Watson

    2002-06-01

    We describe the construction of large scale clusters for lattice QCD computing being developed under the umbrella of the U.S. DoE SciDAC initiative. We discuss the study of floating point and network performance that drove the design of the cluster, and present our plans for future multi-Terascale facilities.

  10. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  11. ARPACK: Solving large scale eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Rich; Maschhoff, Kristi; Sorensen, Danny; Yang, Chao

    2013-11-01

    ARPACK is a collection of Fortran77 subroutines designed to solve large scale eigenvalue problems. The package is designed to compute a few eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a general n by n matrix A. It is most appropriate for large sparse or structured matrices A where structured means that a matrix-vector product w

  12. Large-scale CFB combustion demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, P.T.; Hebb, J.L.; Aquino, R.

    1998-07-01

    The Jacksonville Electric Authority's large-scale CFB demonstration project is described. Given the early stage of project development, the paper focuses on the project organizational structure, its role within the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, and the projected environmental performance. A description of the CFB combustion process in included.

  13. Large-scale CFB combustion demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, P.T.; Hebb, J.L.; Aquino, R.

    1998-04-01

    The Jacksonville Electric Authority`s large-scale CFB demonstration project is described. Given the early stage of project development, the paper focuses on the project organizational structure, its role within the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, and the projected environmental performance. A description of the CFB combustion process is included.

  14. ORIGIN OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM: PRIMORDIAL OR ASTROPHYSICAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2014-12-20

    The origin of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters is still an unsolved problem that is largely due to our poor understanding of initial seed magnetic fields. If the seed magnetic fields have primordial origins, it is likely that large-scale pervasive magnetic fields were present before the formation of the large-scale structure. On the other hand, if they were ejected from astrophysical bodies, then they were highly localized in space at the time of injection. In this paper, using turbulence dynamo models for high magnetic Prandtl number fluids, we find constraints on the seed magnetic fields. The hydrodynamic Reynolds number based on the Spitzer viscosity in the intracluster medium (ICM) is believed to be less than O(10{sup 2}), while the magnetic Reynolds number can be much larger. In this case, if the seed magnetic fields have primordial origins, they should be stronger than O(10{sup –11})G, which is very close to the upper limit of O(10{sup –9})G set by the cosmic microwave background observations. On the other hand, if the seed magnetic fields were ejected from astrophysical bodies, any seed magnetic fields stronger than O(10{sup –9})G can safely magnetize the ICM. Therefore, it is less likely that primordial magnetic fields are the direct origin of present-day magnetic fields in the ICM.

  15. Formation of sheet plumes, current coils, and helical magnetic fields in a spherical magnetohydrodynamic dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    2011-07-01

    Aiming at understanding of magnetic field generation process in rapidly rotating stars and planets represented by the Earth, computer simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo were performed in a rotating spherical shell geometry. Thermal convection and dynamo process with Ekman number of the order of 10-7 were studied. New structures of convection motion, dynamo-generated electrical current, and magnetic field are found. The flow is organized as a set of thin, sheet-like plumes. The current is made of small-scale coil structure with magnetic flux tubes within each of the coil. These flux tubes are connected each other to form a large scale helical magnetic field structure.

  16. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers. PMID:27013727

  17. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2016-03-01

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲1012square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities—that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  18. Multitree Algorithms for Large-Scale Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, William B.; Ozakin, Arkadas; Lee, Dongryeol; Riegel, Ryan; Gray, Alexander G.

    2012-03-01

    this number every week, resulting in billions of objects. At such scales, even linear-time analysis operations present challenges, particularly since statistical analyses are inherently interactive processes, requiring that computations complete within some reasonable human attention span. The quadratic (or worse) runtimes of straightforward implementations become quickly unbearable. Examples of applications. These analysis subroutines occur ubiquitously in astrostatistical work. We list just a few examples. The need to cross-match objects across different catalogs has led to various algorithms, which at some point perform an AllNN computation. 2-point and higher-order spatial correlations for the basis of spatial statistics, and are utilized in astronomy to compare the spatial structures of two datasets, such as an observed sample and a theoretical sample, for example, forming the basis for two-sample hypothesis testing. Friends-of-friends clustering is often used to identify halos in data from astrophysical simulations. Minimum spanning tree properties have also been proposed as statistics of large-scale structure. Comparison of the distributions of different kinds of objects requires accurate density estimation, for which KDE is the overall statistical method of choice. The prediction of redshifts from optical data requires accurate regression, for which kernel regression is a powerful method. The identification of objects of various types in astronomy, such as stars versus galaxies, requires accurate classification, for which KDA is a powerful method. Overview. In this chapter, we will briefly sketch the main ideas behind recent fast algorithms which achieve, for example, linear runtimes for pairwise-distance problems, or similarly dramatic reductions in computational growth. In some cases, the runtime orders for these algorithms are mathematically provable statements, while in others we have only conjectures backed by experimental observations for the time being

  19. Fluctuation dynamo amplified by intermittent shear bursts in convectively driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Busse, A.; Müller, W.-C.

    2013-09-01

    Intermittent large-scale high-shear flows are found to occur frequently and spontaneously in direct numerical simulations of statistically stationary turbulent Boussinesq magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convection. The energetic steady state of the system is sustained by convective driving of the velocity field and small-scale dynamo action. The intermittent emergence of flow structures with strong velocity and magnetic shearing generates magnetic energy at an elevated rate on time scales that are longer than the characteristic time of the large-scale convective motion. The resilience of magnetic energy amplification suggests that intermittent shear bursts are a significant driver of dynamo action in turbulent magnetoconvection.

  20. Kinematic dynamo, supersymmetry breaking, and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V.; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-04-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry, and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as the stochastic generalization of the concept of dynamical chaos. As this supersymmetry breaking happens in both the diffusive and the nondiffusive cases, the necessity of the underlying SDE being chaotic is given in either case. The observed exponentially growing and oscillating KD modes prove physically that dynamical spectra of the STS evolution operator that break the topological supersymmetry exist with both real and complex ground state eigenvalues. Finally, we comment on the nonexistence of dynamos for scalar quantities.

  1. Fractals and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of galaxy-galaxy and cluster-cluster correlations as well as other large-scale structure can be fit with a 'limited' fractal with dimension D of about 1.2. This is not a 'pure' fractal out to the horizon: the distribution shifts from power law to random behavior at some large scale. If the observed patterns and structures are formed through an aggregation growth process, the fractal dimension D can serve as an interesting constraint on the properties of the stochastic motion responsible for limiting the fractal structure. In particular, it is found that the observed fractal should have grown from two-dimensional sheetlike objects such as pancakes, domain walls, or string wakes. This result is generic and does not depend on the details of the growth process.

  2. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  3. Dynamo Driven By Inertial Instabilities, Application to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebron, D.; Hollerbach, R.; Vantieghem, S.; Noir, J.; Schaeffer, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, large-scale, turbulent flows may also be driven by the combined action of boundary topography (i.e. departure from spherical geometry), and mechanical forcings (e.g. libration, tides). This has been previously proposed to explain the magnetic data we have on the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. In this work, we use theoretical analysis and global magneto-hydrodynamic simulations to show, for the first time, that: (i) the tidal forcing can generate a (dipole-dominated) large-scale magnetic field in global simulations, an hypothesis previously assumed by Le Bars et al. (2011) in their model of lunar magnetic history. (ii) latitudinal libration (i.e. an oscillation of the figure axis with respect to the mean rotation axis) can excite inertial instabilities, which may have driven dynamos in telluric bodies such as the Early Moon. We discuss our results in the light of magnetic observations. In particular, we propose here a new possible mechanism for the early Moon dynamo, based on latitudinal libration driven instabilities. This new scenario is evaluated by comparing the associated estimates of the surface magnetic field strength with the recent paleo-magnetic lunar measurements.

  4. Large-scale extraction of proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Teresa; Aires-Barros, Raquel

    2002-01-01

    The production of foreign proteins using selected host with the necessary posttranslational modifications is one of the key successes in modern biotechnology. This methodology allows the industrial production of proteins that otherwise are produced in small quantities. However, the separation and purification of these proteins from the fermentation media constitutes a major bottleneck for the widespread commercialization of recombinant proteins. The major production costs (50-90%) for typical biological product resides in the purification strategy. There is a need for efficient, effective, and economic large-scale bioseparation techniques, to achieve high purity and high recovery, while maintaining the biological activity of the molecule. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) allow process integration as simultaneously separation and concentration of the target protein is achieved, with posterior removal and recycle of the polymer. The ease of scale-up combined with the high partition coefficients obtained allow its potential application in large-scale downstream processing of proteins produced by fermentation. The equipment and the methodology for aqueous two-phase extraction of proteins on a large scale using mixer-settlerand column contractors are described. The operation of the columns, either stagewise or differential, are summarized. A brief description of the methods used to account for mass transfer coefficients, hydrodynamics parameters of hold-up, drop size, and velocity, back mixing in the phases, and flooding performance, required for column design, is also provided. PMID:11876297

  5. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  6. NONLINEAR SMALL-SCALE DYNAMOS AT LOW MAGNETIC PRANDTL NUMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-11-10

    Saturated small-scale dynamo solutions driven by isotropic non-helical turbulence are presented at low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pr{sub M} down to 0.01. For Pr{sub M} < 0.1, most of the energy is dissipated via Joule heat and, in agreement with earlier results for helical large-scale dynamos, kinetic energy dissipation is shown to diminish proportional to Pr{sup 1/2}{sub M} down to values of 0.1. In agreement with earlier work, there is, in addition to a short Golitsyn k {sup -11/3} spectrum near the resistive scale, also some evidence for a short k {sup -1} spectrum on larger scales. The rms magnetic field strength of the small-scale dynamo is found to depend only weakly on the value of Pr{sub M} and decreases by about a factor of two as Pr{sub M} is decreased from 1 to 0.01. The possibility of dynamo action at Pr{sub M} = 0.1 in the nonlinear regime is argued to be a consequence of a suppression of the bottleneck seen in the kinetic energy spectrum in the absence of a dynamo and, more generally, a suppression of kinetic energy near the dissipation wavenumber.

  7. Turbulent magnetohydrodynamic dynamo action in a spherically bounded von Kármán flow at small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Klaus; Jenko, Frank; Forest, Cary B.

    2011-07-01

    Turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo action in a spherically bounded electrically conducting flow is investigated numerically. A large-scale two-vortex flow driven by a constant body force is simulated. The numerical setup models the spherical Madison Dynamo Experiment, which uses an impeller-driven flow of liquid sodium. The study focuses on small magnetic Prandtl numbers (Pm), the regime relevant to liquid sodium experimental flows. The critical magnetic Reynolds number (Rmc) of the dynamo model is determined. It initially rises steeply quasi-linearly as a function of the Reynolds number (Re) by about a factor of 10. Finally, it starts to flatten for Pm <~ 0.1. Further investigations yield that the initial rise of the stability curve is caused in concert with large- and small-scale fluctuations of the velocity field. As an inertial range of turbulence develops with increasing Re, small-scale dynamo modes become unstable, indicating a transition from large-scale (dipolar) to small-scale dynamo action. It is argued that the flattening of the stability curve is related to a saturation of detrimental large-scale velocity fluctuations, the activation of small-scale dynamo action, and the separation of resistive and viscous cutoff scales for Pm < 1. Moreover, it is shown that only the turbulent fluctuations obtained by subtracting the precomputed mean flow from the dynamically evolving flow can act as a small-scale dynamo.

  8. Large-scale magnetic topologies of mid M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Petit, P.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Albert, L.; Aurière, M.; Cabanac, R.; Dintrans, B.; Fares, R.; Gastine, T.; Jardine, M. M.; Lignières, F.; Paletou, F.; Ramirez Velez, J. C.; Théado, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present in this paper, the first results of a spectropolarimetric analysis of a small sample (~20) of active stars ranging from spectral type M0 to M8, which are either fully convective or possess a very small radiative core. This study aims at providing new constraints on dynamo processes in fully convective stars. This paper focuses on five stars of spectral type ~M4, i.e. with masses close to the full convection threshold (~=0.35Msolar), and with short rotational periods. Tomographic imaging techniques allow us to reconstruct the surface magnetic topologies from the rotationally modulated time-series of circularly polarized profiles. We find that all stars host mainly axisymmetric large-scale poloidal fields. Three stars were observed at two different epochs separated by ~1 yr; we find the magnetic topologies to be globally stable on this time-scale. We also provide an accurate estimation of the rotational period of all stars, thus allowing us to start studying how rotation impacts the large-scale magnetic field. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). CFHT is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France (INSU/CNRS) and the University of Hawaii, while the TBL is operated by CNRS/INSU. E-mail: jmorin@ast.obs-mip.fr (JM); donati@ast.obs-mip.fr (J-FD); petit@ast.obs-mip.fr (PP); xavier.delfosse@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr (XD); thierry.forveille@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr (TF); albert@cfht.hawaii.edu (LA); auriere@ast.obs-mip.fr (MA); remi.cabanac@ast.obs-mip.fr (RC); dintrans@ast.obs-mip.fr (BD); rfares@ast.obs-mip.fr (RF); tgastine@ast.obs-mip.fr (TG); mmj@st-andrews.ac.uk (MMJ); ligniere@ast.obs-mip.fr (FL); fpaletou@ast.obs-mip.fr (FP); jramirez@mesiog.obspm.fr (JR); sylvie.theado@ast.obs-mip.fr (ST)

  9. Computing the universe: how large-scale simulations illuminate galaxies and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Brian

    2015-04-01

    High-performance and large-scale computing is absolutely to understanding astronomical objects such as stars, galaxies, and the cosmic web. This is because these are structures that operate on physical, temporal, and energy scales that cannot be reasonably approximated in the laboratory, and whose complexity and nonlinearity often defies analytic modeling. In this talk, I show how the growth of computing platforms over time has facilitated our understanding of astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, focusing primarily on galaxies and large-scale structure in the Universe.

  10. Compositionally Driven Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Schubert, G.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally believed that compositional convection driven by inner core solidification is the main driver of the geodynamo. Thermal evolution considerations make it likely that compositional convection is also behind the present dynamos of Mercury and Ganymede as well as the early dynamos in the Moon, Mars and smaller solar system bodies. Compositional buoyancy can arise in several different ways, for example, through inner core solidification and FeS flotation with upward mixing and through freezing out and sinking of iron snow near the core-mantle boundary or deeper within the core. The mode of core cooling and freezing depends on conditions of temperature and pressure in the core and the concentration of light elements such as sulfur. Different distributions of compositional buoyancy will give rise to different patterns of core convection and dynamo magnetic fields. We report here the first results of a systematic study of the distribution of compositional buoyancy on the dynamo-generated magnetic fields, with an emphasis on Mars' core evolution due to iron rain.

  11. Important plasma problems in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    In astrophysics, plasmas occur under very extreme conditions. For example there are ultra strong magnetic fields in neutron stars) relativistic plasmas around black holes and in jets, extremely energetic particles such as cosmic rays in the interstellar medium, extremely dense plasmas in accretion disks, and extremely large magnetic Reynold`s numbers in the interstellar medium. These extreme limits for astrophysical plasmas make plasma phenomena much simpler to analyze in astrophysics than in the laboratory. An understanding of such phenomena often results in an interesting way, by simply taking the extreme limiting case of a known plasma theory. I will describe one of the more exciting examples. I will attempt to convey the excitement I felt when I was first exposed to it. However, not all plasma astrophysical phenomena are so simple. There are certain important plasma phenomena in astrophysics, which have not been so easily resolved. In fact a resolution of them is blocking significant progress in astrophysical research. They have not yet yielded to attacks by theoretical astrophysicists nor to extensive numerical simulation. I will attempt to describe one of the more important of these plasma-astrophysical problems, and discuss why its resolution is so important to astrophysics. This significant example is fast, magnetic reconnection. Another significant example is the large-magnetic-Reynold`s-number MHD dynamos.

  12. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  13. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  14. Nonthermal Components in the Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2004-12-01

    I address the issue of nonthermal processes in the large scale structure of the universe. After reviewing the properties of cosmic shocks and their role as particle accelerators, I discuss the main observational results, from radio to γ-ray and describe the processes that are thought be responsible for the observed nonthermal emissions. Finally, I emphasize the important role of γ-ray astronomy for the progress in the field. Non detections at these photon energies have already allowed us important conclusions. Future observations will tell us more about the physics of the intracluster medium, shocks dissipation and CR acceleration.

  15. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  16. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  17. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  18. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  19. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  20. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  1. Atomic processes for astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badnell, N. R.; Del Zanna, G.; Fernández-Menchero, L.; Giunta, A. S.; Liang, G. Y.; Mason, H. E.; Storey, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this review we summarize the recent calculations and improvements of atomic data that we have carried out for the analysis of astrophysical spectroscopy within the atomic processes for astrophysical plasmas network. We briefly discuss the various methods used for the calculations, and highlight several issues that we have uncovered during such extensive work. We discuss the completeness and accuracy of the cross sections for ionic excitation by electron impact for the main isoelectronic sequences, which we have obtained with large-scale calculations. Given its astrophysical importance, we emphasize the work on iron. Some examples on the significant improvement that has been achieved over previous calculations are provided.

  2. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  3. Modeling the MJO rain rates using parameterized large scale dynamics: vertical structure, radiation, and horizontal advection of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Sobel, A. H.; Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) events were observed during October and November 2011 in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign. Precipitation rates and large-scale vertical motion profiles derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array are simulated in a small-domain cloud-resolving model using parameterized large-scale dynamics. Three parameterizations of large-scale dynamics --- the conventional weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation, vertical mode based spectral WTG (SWTG), and damped gravity wave coupling (DGW) --- are employed. The target temperature profiles and radiative heating rates are taken from a control simulation in which the large-scale vertical motion is imposed (rather than directly from observations), and the model itself is significantly modified from that used in previous work. These methodological changes lead to significant improvement in the results.Simulations using all three methods, with imposed time -dependent radiation and horizontal moisture advection, capture the time variations in precipitation associated with the two MJO events well. The three methods produce significant differences in the large-scale vertical motion profile, however. WTG produces the most top-heavy and noisy profiles, while DGW's is smoother with a peak in midlevels. SWTG produces a smooth profile, somewhere between WTG and DGW, and in better agreement with observations than either of the others. Numerical experiments without horizontal advection of moisture suggest that that process significantly reduces the precipitation and suppresses the top-heaviness of large-scale vertical motion during the MJO active phases, while experiments in which the effect of cloud on radiation are disabled indicate that cloud-radiative interaction significantly amplifies the MJO. Experiments in which interactive radiation is used produce poorer agreement with observation than those with imposed time-varying radiative heating. Our results highlight the

  4. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  5. Large-scale databases of proper names.

    PubMed

    Conley, P; Burgess, C; Hage, D

    1999-05-01

    Few tools for research in proper names have been available--specifically, there is no large-scale corpus of proper names. Two corpora of proper names were constructed, one based on U.S. phone book listings, the other derived from a database of Usenet text. Name frequencies from both corpora were compared with human subjects' reaction times (RTs) to the proper names in a naming task. Regression analysis showed that the Usenet frequencies contributed to predictions of human RT, whereas phone book frequencies did not. In addition, semantic neighborhood density measures derived from the HAL corpus were compared with the subjects' RTs and found to be a better predictor of RT than was frequency in either corpus. These new corpora are freely available on line for download. Potentials for these corpora range from using the names as stimuli in experiments to using the corpus data in software applications. PMID:10495803

  6. Estimation of large-scale dimension densities.

    PubMed

    Raab, C; Kurths, J

    2001-07-01

    We propose a technique to calculate large-scale dimension densities in both higher-dimensional spatio-temporal systems and low-dimensional systems from only a few data points, where known methods usually have an unsatisfactory scaling behavior. This is mainly due to boundary and finite-size effects. With our rather simple method, we normalize boundary effects and get a significant correction of the dimension estimate. This straightforward approach is based on rather general assumptions. So even weak coherent structures obtained from small spatial couplings can be detected with this method, which is impossible by using the Lyapunov-dimension density. We demonstrate the efficiency of our technique for coupled logistic maps, coupled tent maps, the Lorenz attractor, and the Roessler attractor. PMID:11461376

  7. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  8. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  9. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  10. Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with β”-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  11. Large scale water lens for solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Mondol, A S; Vogel, B; Bastian, G

    2015-06-01

    Properties of large scale water lenses for solar concentration were investigated. These lenses were built from readily available materials, normal tap water and hyper-elastic linear low density polyethylene foil. Exposed to sunlight, the focal lengths and light intensities in the focal spot were measured and calculated. Their optical properties were modeled with a raytracing software based on the lens shape. We have achieved a good match of experimental and theoretical data by considering wavelength dependent concentration factor, absorption and focal length. The change in light concentration as a function of water volume was examined via the resulting load on the foil and the corresponding change of shape. The latter was extracted from images and modeled by a finite element simulation. PMID:26072893

  12. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  13. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Katharina; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  14. The XMM Large Scale Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Marguerite

    2005-10-01

    We propose to complete, by an additional 5 deg2, the XMM-LSS Survey region overlying the Spitzer/SWIRE field. This field already has CFHTLS and Integral coverage, and will encompass about 10 deg2. The resulting multi-wavelength medium-depth survey, which complements XMM and Chandra deep surveys, will provide a unique view of large-scale structure over a wide range of redshift, and will show active galaxies in the full range of environments. The complete coverage by optical and IR surveys provides high-quality photometric redshifts, so that cosmological results can quickly be extracted. In the spirit of a Legacy survey, we will make the raw X-ray data immediately public. Multi-band catalogues and images will also be made available on short time scales.

  15. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  16. Estimation of large-scale dimension densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Kurths, Jürgen

    2001-07-01

    We propose a technique to calculate large-scale dimension densities in both higher-dimensional spatio-temporal systems and low-dimensional systems from only a few data points, where known methods usually have an unsatisfactory scaling behavior. This is mainly due to boundary and finite-size effects. With our rather simple method, we normalize boundary effects and get a significant correction of the dimension estimate. This straightforward approach is based on rather general assumptions. So even weak coherent structures obtained from small spatial couplings can be detected with this method, which is impossible by using the Lyapunov-dimension density. We demonstrate the efficiency of our technique for coupled logistic maps, coupled tent maps, the Lorenz attractor, and the Roessler attractor.

  17. Characterization of experimental dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peffley, Nicholas L.; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Cawthrone, A. B.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2000-07-01

    Laboratory models of geophysical magnetic field production require new experi-mental characterization methods. Self-generating liquid metal magnetic dynamos are explored using two new experiments. Kinematic dynamo studies lead us to charac-terize the magnetic field dynamics in terms of eigenvalues and eigenfrequencies of the induction equation. Observing the decay of magnetic field pulses indicates the real part of the leading eigenvalue of the induction equation, while a chirp magnetic field diagnoses the imaginary part of the eigenvalue. Finally, a single-frequency applied magnetic field characterizes the structure of the velocity field. These measurements provide a new means to characterize and measure the approach to self-generation. We present data from numerical simulations and laboratory experiments using these techniques.

  18. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  19. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  20. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  1. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  2. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  3. Evaluation of Model Operational Analyses during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Paul; Johnson, Richard

    2013-04-01

    A primary component of the observing system in the DYNAMO-CINDY2011-AMIE field campaign was an atmospheric sounding network comprised of two sounding quadrilaterals, one north and one south of the equator over the central Indian Ocean. During the experiment a major effort was undertaken to ensure the real-time transmission of these data onto the GTS (Global Telecommunication System) for dissemination to the operational centers (ECMWF, NCEP, JMA, etc.). Preliminary estimates indicate that ~95% of the soundings from the enhanced sounding network were successfully transmitted and potentially used in their data assimilation systems. Because of the wide use of operational and reanalysis products (e.g., in process studies, initializing numerical simulations, construction of large-scale forcing datasets for CRMs, etc.), their validity will be examined by comparing a variety of basic and diagnosed fields from two operational analyses (ECMWF and NCEP) to similar analyses based solely on sounding observations. Particular attention will be given to the vertical structures of apparent heating (Q1) and drying (Q2) from the operational analyses (OA), which are strongly influenced by cumulus parameterizations, a source of model infidelity. Preliminary results indicate that the OA products did a reasonable job at capturing the mean and temporal characteristics of convection during the DYNAMO enhanced observing period, which included the passage of two significant MJO events during the October-November 2011 period. For example, temporal correlations between Q2-budget derived rainfall from the OA products and that estimated from the TRMM satellite (i.e., the 3B42V7 product) were greater than 0.9 over the Northern Sounding Array of DYNAMO. However closer inspection of the budget profiles show notable differences between the OA products and the sounding-derived results in low-level (surface to 700 hPa) heating and drying structures. This presentation will examine these differences and

  4. Planetary magnetism. [emphasizing dynamo theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D.

    1974-01-01

    The origin and maintenance of planetary magnetic fields are discussed. The discussion is not limited to dynamo theories, although these are almost universally favored. Thermoelectric currents are found to be a possible alternative for Jupiter. Two energy sources for dynamos are considered: convection and precessionally induced fluid flow. The earth is the most favorable planet for precessionally driven dynamo, although Neptune is a possibility. Jupiter is likely to have a convectionally driven dynamo, as may Saturn, but the relevant properties of Saturn are not yet well known. Conclusions for each planet are given.

  5. Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity Cycles on Rotational Period in a Nonlinear Solar-type Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the turbulent generation of large-scale magnetic fields using nonlinear dynamo models for solar-type stars in the range of rotational periods from 14 to 30 days. Our models take into account nonlinear effects of dynamical quenching of magnetic helicity, and escape of magnetic field from the dynamo region due to magnetic buoyancy. The results show that the observed correlation between the period of rotation and the duration of activity cycles can be explained in the framework of a distributed dynamo model with a dynamical magnetic feedback acting on the turbulent generation from either magnetic buoyancy or magnetic helicity. We discuss implications of our findings for the understanding of dynamo processes operating in solar-like stars.

  6. Investigation of Coronal Large Scale Structures Utilizing Spartan 201 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1998-01-01

    Two telescopes aboard Spartan 201, a small satellite has been launched from the Space Shuttles, on April 8th, 1993, September 8th, 1994, September 7th, 1995 and November 20th, 1997. The main objective of the mission was to answer some of the most fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics-What accelerates the solar wind and what heats the corona? The two telescopes are 1) Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory which uses ultraviolet emissions from neutral hydrogen and ions in the corona to determine velocities of the coronal plasma within the solar wind source region, and the temperature and density distributions of protons and 2) White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which measures visible light to determine the density distribution of coronal electrons within the same region. The PI has had the primary responsibility in the development and application of computer codes necessary for scientific data analysis activities, end instrument calibration for the white-light coronagraph for the entire Spartan mission. The PI was responsible for the science output from the WLC instrument. PI has also been involved in the investigation of coronal density distributions in large-scale structures by use of numerical models which are (mathematically) sufficient to reproduce the details of the observed brightness and polarized brightness distributions found in SPARTAN 201 data.

  7. Evolution of Large-scale Solar Magnetic Fields in a Flux-Transport Model Including a Multi-cell Meridional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, E.; Dikpati, M.

    2003-12-01

    Advances in helioseismology over the past decade have enabled us to detect subsurface meridional flows in the Sun. Some recent helioseismological analysis (Giles 1999, Haber et al. 2002) has indicated a submerged, reverse flow cell occurring at high latitudes of the Sun's northern hemisphere between 1998 and 2001. Meridional circulation plays an important role in the operation of a class of large-scale solar dynamo, the so-called "flux-transport" dynamo. In such dynamo models, the poleward drift of the large-scale solar magnetic fields and the polar reversal process are explained by the advective-diffusive transport of magnetic flux by a meridional circulation with a poleward surface flow component. Any temporal and spatial variations in the meridional flow pattern are expected to greatly influence the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in a flux-transport dynamo. The aim of this paper is to explore the implications of a steady, multi-cell flow on the advection of weak, large-scale, magnetic flux. We present a simple, two-cell flux transport model operating in an r-theta cross-section of the northern hemisphere. Azimuthal symmetry is assumed. Performing numerical flux-transport simulations with a reverse flow cell at various latitudes, we demonstrate the effect of this cell on the evolutionary pattern of the large-scale diffuse fields. We also show how a flux concentration may occur at the latitude where the radial flows of the two cells are sinking downward. This work is supported by NASA grants W-19752, W-10107, and W-10175. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  8. Magnetized turbulent dynamo in protogalaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified from insignificant seed values to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action driven by the plasma turbulent motions in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no the back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory that has been well developed in the past. However, the applicability of the kinematic dynamo theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time because of the dynamo action, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity, and the magnetic field starts to strongly affect the turbulent motions on the viscous scales. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to energy equipartition between the field and the turbulence; and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. The main purpose of this thesis is to lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten time larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory, and this could lead to the dynamo creation of cluster fields. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy, which happens after the energy equipartition time.

  9. Gravity and large-scale nonlocal bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwan Chuen; Scoccimarro, Román; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-04-01

    For Gaussian primordial fluctuations the relationship between galaxy and matter overdensities, bias, is most often assumed to be local at the time of observation in the large-scale limit. This hypothesis is however unstable under time evolution, we provide proofs under several (increasingly more realistic) sets of assumptions. In the simplest toy model galaxies are created locally and linearly biased at a single formation time, and subsequently move with the dark matter (no velocity bias) conserving their comoving number density (no merging). We show that, after this formation time, the bias becomes unavoidably nonlocal and nonlinear at large scales. We identify the nonlocal gravitationally induced fields in which the galaxy overdensity can be expanded, showing that they can be constructed out of the invariants of the deformation tensor (Galileons), the main signature of which is a quadrupole field in second-order perturbation theory. In addition, we show that this result persists if we include an arbitrary evolution of the comoving number density of tracers. We then include velocity bias, and show that new contributions appear; these are related to the breaking of Galilean invariance of the bias relation, a dipole field being the signature at second order. We test these predictions by studying the dependence of halo overdensities in cells of fixed dark matter density: measurements in simulations show that departures from the mean bias relation are strongly correlated with the nonlocal gravitationally induced fields identified by our formalism, suggesting that the halo distribution at the present time is indeed more closely related to the mass distribution at an earlier rather than present time. However, the nonlocality seen in the simulations is not fully captured by assuming local bias in Lagrangian space. The effects on nonlocal bias seen in the simulations are most important for the most biased halos, as expected from our predictions. Accounting for these

  10. Large-Scale Statistics for Cu Electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, M.; Gall, M.; Hernandez, R.

    2009-06-01

    Even after the successful introduction of Cu-based metallization, the electromigration failure risk has remained one of the important reliability concerns for advanced process technologies. The observation of strong bimodality for the electron up-flow direction in dual-inlaid Cu interconnects has added complexity, but is now widely accepted. The failure voids can occur both within the via ("early" mode) or within the trench ("late" mode). More recently, bimodality has been reported also in down-flow electromigration, leading to very short lifetimes due to small, slit-shaped voids under vias. For a more thorough investigation of these early failure phenomena, specific test structures were designed based on the Wheatstone Bridge technique. The use of these structures enabled an increase of the tested sample size close to 675000, allowing a direct analysis of electromigration failure mechanisms at the single-digit ppm regime. Results indicate that down-flow electromigration exhibits bimodality at very small percentage levels, not readily identifiable with standard testing methods. The activation energy for the down-flow early failure mechanism was determined to be 0.83±0.02 eV. Within the small error bounds of this large-scale statistical experiment, this value is deemed to be significantly lower than the usually reported activation energy of 0.90 eV for electromigration-induced diffusion along Cu/SiCN interfaces. Due to the advantages of the Wheatstone Bridge technique, we were also able to expand the experimental temperature range down to 150° C, coming quite close to typical operating conditions up to 125° C. As a result of the lowered activation energy, we conclude that the down-flow early failure mode may control the chip lifetime at operating conditions. The slit-like character of the early failure void morphology also raises concerns about the validity of the Blech-effect for this mechanism. A very small amount of Cu depletion may cause failure even before a

  11. Turbulent magnetic dynamo excitation at low magnetic Prandtl number

    SciTech Connect

    Mininni, Pablo D.

    2006-05-15

    Planetary and stellar dynamos likely result from turbulent motions in magnetofluids with kinematic viscosities that are small compared to their magnetic diffusivities. Laboratory experiments are in progress to produce similar dynamos in liquid metals. This work reviews recent computations of thresholds in critical magnetic Reynolds number above which dynamo amplification can be expected for mechanically forced turbulence (helical and nonhelical, short wavelength and long wavelength) as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number P{sub M}. New results for helical forcing are discussed, for which a dynamo is obtained at P{sub M}=5x10{sup -3}. The fact that the kinetic turbulent spectrum is much broader in wave-number space than the magnetic spectrum leads to numerical difficulties that are bridged by a combination of overlapping direct numerical simulations and subgrid models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Typically, the critical magnetic Reynolds number increases steeply as the magnetic Prandtl number decreases, and then reaches an asymptotic plateau at values of at most a few hundred. In the turbulent regime and for magnetic Reynolds numbers large enough, both small- and large-scale magnetic fields are excited. The interactions between different scales in the flow are also discussed.

  12. STELLAR DYNAMOS AND CYCLES FROM NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dubé, Caroline; Charbonneau, Paul E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca

    2013-09-20

    We present a series of kinematic axisymmetric mean-field αΩ dynamo models applicable to solar-type stars, for 20 distinct combinations of rotation rates and luminosities. The internal differential rotation and kinetic helicity profiles required to calculate source terms in these dynamo models are extracted from a corresponding series of global three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of solar/stellar convection, so that the resulting dynamo models end up involving only one free parameter, namely, the turbulent magnetic diffusivity in the convecting layers. Even though the αΩ dynamo solutions exhibit a broad range of morphologies, and sometimes even double cycles, these models manage to reproduce relatively well the observationally inferred relationship between cycle period and rotation rate. On the other hand, they fail in capturing the observed increase of magnetic activity levels with rotation rate. This failure is due to our use of a simple algebraic α-quenching formula as the sole amplitude-limiting nonlinearity. This suggests that α-quenching is not the primary mechanism setting the amplitude of stellar magnetic cycles, with magnetic reaction on large-scale flows emerging as the more likely candidate. This inference is coherent with analyses of various recent global magnetohydrodynamical simulations of solar/stellar convection.

  13. AN AZIMUTHAL DYNAMO WAVE IN SPHERICAL SHELL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Elizabeth; Käpylä, Petri J.; Mantere, Maarit J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-10

    We report the discovery of an azimuthal dynamo wave of a low-order (m = 1) mode in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent convection in spherical shells. Such waves are predicted by mean-field dynamo theory and have been obtained previously in mean-field models. An azimuthal dynamo wave has been proposed as a possible explanation for the persistent drifts of spots observed on several rapidly rotating stars, as revealed through photometry and Doppler imaging. However, this has been judged unlikely because evidence for such waves from DNS has been lacking. Here we present DNS of large-scale magnetic fields showing a retrograde m = 1 mode. Its pattern speed is nearly independent of latitude and does not reflect the speed of the differential rotation at any depth. The extrema of magnetic m = 1 structures coincide reasonably well with the maxima of m = 2 structures of the temperature. These results provide direct support for the observed drifts being due to an azimuthal dynamo wave.

  14. Large Scale Computer Simulation of Erthocyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Cameron; Revalee, Joel; Laradji, Mohamed

    2007-11-01

    The cell membrane is crucial to the life of the cell. Apart from partitioning the inner and outer environment of the cell, they also act as a support of complex and specialized molecular machinery, important for both the mechanical integrity of the cell, and its multitude of physiological functions. Due to its relative simplicity, the red blood cell has been a favorite experimental prototype for investigations of the structural and functional properties of the cell membrane. The erythrocyte membrane is a composite quasi two-dimensional structure composed essentially of a self-assembled fluid lipid bilayer and a polymerized protein meshwork, referred to as the cytoskeleton or membrane skeleton. In the case of the erythrocyte, the polymer meshwork is mainly composed of spectrin, anchored to the bilayer through specialized proteins. Using a coarse-grained model, recently developed by us, of self-assembled lipid membranes with implicit solvent and using soft-core potentials, we simulated large scale red-blood-cells bilayers with dimensions ˜ 10-1 μm^2, with explicit cytoskeleton. Our aim is to investigate the renormalization of the elastic properties of the bilayer due to the underlying spectrin meshwork.

  15. Large-scale carbon fiber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A realistic release of carbon fibers was established by burning a minimum of 45 kg of carbon fiber composite aircraft structural components in each of five large scale, outdoor aviation jet fuel fire tests. This release was quantified by several independent assessments with various instruments developed specifically for these tests. The most likely values for the mass of single carbon fibers released ranged from 0.2 percent of the initial mass of carbon fiber for the source tests (zero wind velocity) to a maximum of 0.6 percent of the initial carbon fiber mass for dissemination tests (5 to 6 m/s wind velocity). Mean fiber lengths for fibers greater than 1 mm in length ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 mm. Mean diameters ranged from 3.6 to 5.3 micrometers which was indicative of significant oxidation. Footprints of downwind dissemination of the fire released fibers were measured to 19.1 km from the fire.

  16. Curvature constraints from large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Raccanelli, Alvise; Durrer, Ruth; Kamionkowski, Marc; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2016-06-01

    We modified the CLASS code in order to include relativistic galaxy number counts in spatially curved geometries; we present the formalism and study the effect of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature. The new version of the code is now publicly available. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we investigate how measurements of the spatial curvature parameter ΩK with future galaxy surveys are affected by relativistic effects, which influence observations of the large scale galaxy distribution. These effects include contributions from cosmic magnification, Doppler terms and terms involving the gravitational potential. As an application, we consider angle and redshift dependent power spectra, which are especially well suited for model independent cosmological constraints. We compute our results for a representative deep, wide and spectroscopic survey, and our results show the impact of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature parameter estimation. We show that constraints on the curvature parameter may be strongly biased if, in particular, cosmic magnification is not included in the analysis. Other relativistic effects turn out to be subdominant in the studied configuration. We analyze how the shift in the estimated best-fit value for the curvature and other cosmological parameters depends on the magnification bias parameter, and find that significant biases are to be expected if this term is not properly considered in the analysis.

  17. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  18. Food appropriation through large scale land acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand for agricultural products and the uncertainty of international food markets has recently drawn the attention of governments and agribusiness firms toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in the developing world. The targeted countries are typically located in regions that have remained only marginally utilized because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) for commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crops yield gaps. While the extent of the acquired land and the associated appropriation of freshwater resources have been investigated in detail, the amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still need to be quantified. Here we use a unique dataset of land deals to provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of crop and food appropriation potentially associated with LSLAs. We show how up to 300-550 million people could be fed by crops grown in the acquired land, should these investments in agriculture improve crop production and close the yield gap. In contrast, about 190-370 million people could be supported by this land without closing of the yield gap. These numbers raise some concern because the food produced in the acquired land is typically exported to other regions, while the target countries exhibit high levels of malnourishment. Conversely, if used for domestic consumption, the crops harvested in the acquired land could ensure food security to the local populations.

  19. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  20. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  1. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

    2002-01-28

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

  2. Large Scale Thermal Events in the Solar Nebula Recorded in FeNi Metal Condensates in CH Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meibom, A.; Desch, S. J.; Krot, A. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Petaev, M. I.; Wilson, L.; Keil, K.

    2000-01-01

    Some FeNi metal grains in CHs formed by gas-solid condensation from a gas of solar composition cooling at approx. 0.2 K/h from approx. 1370 K to approx. 1270 K. An astrophysical setting is proposed, which involves large scale convective updrafts from the disk midplane.

  3. An informal paper on large-scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Large scale systems are defined as systems requiring more than one decision maker to control the system. Decentralized control and decomposition are discussed for large scale dynamic systems. Information and many-person decision problems are analyzed.

  4. Characterizing convection in geophysical dynamo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jonathan Shuo

    The Earth's magnetic field is produced by a fluid dynamo in the molten iron outer core. This geodynamo is driven by fluid motions induced by thermal and chemical convection and strongly influenced by rotational and magnetic field effects. While frequent observations are made of the morphology and time-dependent field behavior, flow dynamics in the core are all but inaccessible to direct measurement. Thus, forward models are essential for exploring the relationship between the geomagnetic field and its underlying fluid physics. The goal of my PhD is to further our understanding of the fluid physics driving the geodynamo. In order to do this, I have performed a suite of nonrotating and rotating convection laboratory experiments and developed a new experimental device that reaches more extreme values of the governing parameters than previously possible. In addition, I conduct a theoretical analysis of well-established results from a suite of dynamo simulations by Christensen and Aubert (2006). These studies are conducted at moderate values of the Ekman number (ratio between viscosity and Coriolis forces, ˜ 10-4), as opposed to the the extremely small Ekman numbers in planetary cores (˜ 10 -15). At such moderate Ekman values, flows tend to take the form of large-scale, quasi-laminar axial columns. These columnar structures give the induced magnetic field a dipolar morphology, similar to what is seen on planets. However, I find that some results derived from these simulations are fully dependent on the fluid viscosity, and therefore are unlikely to reflect the fluid physics driving dynamo action in the core. My findings reinforce the need to understand the turbulent processes that arise as the governing parameters approach planetary values. Indeed, my rotating convection experiments show that, as the Ekman number is decreased beyond ranges currently accessible to dynamo simulations, the regime characterized by laminar columns is found to dwindle. We instead find a

  5. Properties of Nonlinear Dynamo Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo theory offers the most promising explanation of the generation of the sun's magnetic cycle. Mean field electrodynamics has provided the platform for linear and nonlinear models of solar dynamos. However, the nonlinearities included are (necessarily) arbitrarily imposed in these models. This paper conducts a systematic survey of the role of nonlinearities in the dynamo process, by considering the behaviour of dynamo waves in the nonlinear regime. It is demonstrated that only by considering realistic nonlinearities that are non-local in space and time can modulation of the basic dynamo wave he achieved. Moreover, this modulation is greatest when there is a large separation of timescales provided by including a low magnetic Prandtl number in the equation for the velocity perturbations.

  6. Large-Scale Mid- and Upper-Tropospheric Vertical Motions and MJO Convective Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Scott; Houze, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) is used to demonstrate that anomalies of large-scale vertical motion with ~30 day variability at Addu City, Maldives, exist to the west of the Indian Ocean prior to the occurrence of widespread, organized convection associated with convectively active Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) events during DYNAMO/AMIE. The upward motions are associated with large negative anomalies of 150 hPa velocity potential, extend as low as 700 hPa, and apparently circumnavigate the globe several times. Sustained, widespread, organized convection does not initially develop until 0-2 days after large-scale upper-tropospheric upward motion anomalies arrive over the Indian Ocean. Over low-precipitation regions where they are not reinforced by latent heating, the magnitude of the equatorial anomalies is as large as 0.03 Pa s-1. Using large-scale forcing data derived from a sounding array in conjunction with ground-based radar, typical profiles of environmental heating, vertical motion, and moisture advection are computed for periods prior to those during which deep convection is prevalent and those during which moderately deep cumulonimbi do not form into deep clouds. In both environmental regimes, convection with tops between 3 and 7 km are present. Drying by horizontal advection is also ubiquitous. During periods when moderately deep cumulonimbus do not tend to grow into deep convection, vertical moisture advection is insufficient on the large-scale to overcome drying by horizontal advection. Prior to sustenance of deep convection,vertical advection of moisture in the mid- to upper-troposphere overcomes drying by horizontal advection such that the total (horizontal + vertical) moisture advection throughout the troposphere is positive. In order to do so, upward motion in the middle- and upper-troposphere, in excess of the median by as much as 0.03 Pa s-1, is necessary. The large-scale upward motions connected to equatorially trapped, eastward propagating divergent

  7. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  8. International space station. Large scale integration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brad

    The International Space Station is the most complex large scale integration program in development today. The approach developed for specification, subsystem development, and verification lay a firm basis on which future programs of this nature can be based. International Space Station is composed of many critical items, hardware and software, built by numerous International Partners, NASA Institutions, and U.S. Contractors and is launched over a period of five years. Each launch creates a unique configuration that must be safe, survivable, operable, and support ongoing assembly (assemblable) to arrive at the assembly complete configuration in 2003. The approaches to integrating each of the modules into a viable spacecraft and continue the assembly is a challenge in itself. Added to this challenge are the severe schedule constraints and lack of an "Iron Bird", which prevents assembly and checkout of each on-orbit configuration prior to launch. This paper will focus on the following areas: 1) Specification development process explaining how the requirements and specifications were derived using a modular concept driven by launch vehicle capability. Each module is composed of components of subsystems versus completed subsystems. 2) Approach to stage (each stage consists of the launched module added to the current on-orbit spacecraft) specifications. Specifically, how each launched module and stage ensures support of the current and future elements of the assembly. 3) Verification approach, due to the schedule constraints, is primarily analysis supported by testing. Specifically, how are the interfaces ensured to mate and function on-orbit when they cannot be mated before launch. 4) Lessons learned. Where can we improve this complex system design and integration task?

  9. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  10. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  11. Cumulus moistening, the diurnal cycle, and large-scale tropical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, James H., Jr.

    Observations and modeling techniques are employed to diagnose the importance of the diurnal cycle in large-scale tropical climate. In the first part of the study, soundings, radar, and surface flux measurements collected in the Indian Ocean DYNAMO experiment (Dynamics of the Madden--Julian Oscillation, or MJO) are employed to study MJO convective onset. According to these observations, MJO onset takes place as follows: moistening of the low--midtroposphere is accomplished by cumuliform clouds that deepen as the drying by large-scale subsidence and horizontal advection simultaneously wane. This relaxing of subsidence is tied to decreasing column radiative cooling, which links back to the evolving cloud population. A new finding from these observations is the high degree to which the diurnal cycle linked to air-sea and radiative fluxes invigorates clouds and drives column moistening each day. This diurnally modulated cloud field exhibits pronounced mesoscale organization in the form of open cells and horizontal convective rolls. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that the diurnal cycle and mesoscale cloud organization represent two manners in which local convective processes promote more vigorous day-to-day tropospheric moistening than would otherwise occur. A suite of model tests are carried out in the second part of the study to 1) test the hypothesis that the diurnal cycle drives moistening on longer timescales, and 2) better understand the relative roles of diurnally varying sea surface temperature (SST) and direct atmospheric radiative heating in the diurnal cycle of convection. Moist convection is explicitly represented in the model, the diurnal cycle of SST is prescribed, and cloud-interactive radiation is simulated with a diurnal cycle in shortwave heating. The large-scale dynamics are parameterized using the spectral weak temperature gradient (WTG) technique recently introduced by Herman and Raymond. In this scheme, external (i.e., large-scale

  12. EFFECTS OF PENETRATIVE CONVECTION ON SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Yamada, Kohei; Kageyama, Akira

    2013-11-20

    Spherical solar dynamo simulations are performed. A self-consistent, fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic system with a stably stratified layer below the convective envelope is numerically solved with a newly developed simulation code based on the Yin-Yang grid. The effects of penetrative convection are studied by comparing two models with and without the stable layer. The differential rotation profile in both models is reasonably solar-like with equatorial acceleration. When considering the penetrative convection, a tachocline-like shear layer is developed and maintained beneath the convection zone without assuming any forcing. While the turbulent magnetic field becomes predominant in the region where the convective motion is vigorous, mean-field components are preferentially organized in the region where the convective motion is less vigorous. Particularly in the stable layer, the strong, large-scale field with a dipole symmetry is spontaneously built up. The polarity reversal of the mean-field component takes place globally and synchronously throughout the system regardless of the presence of the stable layer. Our results suggest that the stably stratified layer is a key component for organizing the large-scale strong magnetic field, but is not essential for the polarity reversal.

  13. Experimental Bullard-von Karman dynamo: MHD saturated regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Sophie; Plihon, Nicolas; Pinton, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    The dynamo instability, converting kinetic energy into magnetic energy, creates the magnetic fields of many astrophysical bodies for which the flows are highly turbulent. Those turbulent fluctuations restricts the range of parameters of numerical and theoretical predictions. As laboratory experiments are closer from natural parameters, this approach is favored in this work. In the past decades, dynamo action has been observed in experiments involving laminar flows [1] or fully turbulent flows [2] in liquid sodium. Nevertheless, the saturation of the velocity field by the Lorentz force due to the dynamo magnetic field is weak in those experiment because the control parameter is always close to the threshold of the instability (which is not the case in astrophysical situations). The details of the mechanism of the back reaction of Lorentz force on the flow are not known. We present here an experimental semi-synthetic dynamo, for which a fluid turbulent induction mechanism ('omega' effect) is associated to an external amplification applying a current into a pair of coils. The flow, called von-Karman, is produced by the counter rotation of two coaxial propellers in a cylindrical tank filled with liquid gallium. The resulting flow is highly turbulent (Re > 10 ^ 5). The amplification, mimicking a turbulent 'alpha' effect, allow to observe the dynamo instability at low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm ~ 2), far below the threshold of natural homogeneous dynamo. This experiment reaches non linear regimes, for which the saturation is a MHD process, at control parameter several times the critical value. The instability grows through an on-off intermittent regime evolving into a full MHD saturated regime for which the Lorentz force is in balance with the inertial one. The power budget is strongly modified by the dynamo magnetic field and we give an insight of the estimated rate of conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic one from experimental data. Very rich regimes such as

  14. Scaling laws in spherical shell dynamos with free-slip boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Gastine, Thomas; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2013-07-01

    Numerical simulations of convection driven rotating spherical shell dynamos have often been performed with rigid boundary conditions, as is appropriate for the metallic cores of terrestrial planets. Free-slip boundaries are more appropriate for dynamos in other astrophysical objects, such as gas-giants or stars. Using a set of 57 direct numerical simulations, we investigate the effect of free-slip boundary conditions on the scaling properties of heat flow, flow velocity and magnetic field strength and compare it with earlier results for rigid boundaries. We find that the nature of the mechanical boundary condition has only a minor influence on the scaling laws. We also find that although dipolar and multipolar dynamos exhibit approximately the same scaling exponents, there is an offset in the scaling pre-factors for velocity and magnetic field strength. We argue that the offset can be attributed to the differences in the zonal flow contribution between dipolar and multipolar dynamos.

  15. A unified large/small-scale dynamo in helical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-09-01

    We use high resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) to show that helical turbulence can generate significant large-scale fields even in the presence of strong small-scale dynamo action. During the kinematic stage, the unified large/small-scale dynamo grows fields with a shape-invariant eigenfunction, with most power peaked at small scales or large k, as in Subramanian & Brandenburg. Nevertheless, the large-scale field can be clearly detected as an excess power at small k in the negatively polarized component of the energy spectrum for a forcing with positively polarized waves. Its strength overline{B}, relative to the total rms field Brms, decreases with increasing magnetic Reynolds number, ReM. However, as the Lorentz force becomes important, the field generated by the unified dynamo orders itself by saturating on successively larger scales. The magnetic integral scale for the positively polarized waves, characterizing the small-scale field, increases significantly from the kinematic stage to saturation. This implies that the small-scale field becomes as coherent as possible for a given forcing scale, which averts the ReM-dependent quenching of overline{B}/B_rms. These results are obtained for 10243 DNS with magnetic Prandtl numbers of PrM = 0.1 and 10. For PrM = 0.1, overline{B}/B_rms grows from about 0.04 to about 0.4 at saturation, aided in the final stages by helicity dissipation. For PrM = 10, overline{B}/B_rms grows from much less than 0.01 to values of the order the 0.2. Our results confirm that there is a unified large/small-scale dynamo in helical turbulence.

  16. TURBULENT CROSS-HELICITY IN THE MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kuzanyan, K. M.; Zhang, H.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2011-12-20

    We study the dynamical and statistical properties of turbulent cross-helicity (correlation of the aligned fluctuating velocity and magnetic field components). We derive an equation governing generation and evolution of the turbulent cross-helicity and discuss its meaning for the dynamo. Using the symmetry properties of the problem we suggest a general expression for the turbulent cross-helicity. Effects of the density stratification, large-scale magnetic fields, differential rotation, and turbulent convection are taken into account. We investigate the relative contribution of these effects to the cross-helicity evolution for two kinds of dynamo models of the solar cycle: a distributed mean-field model and a flux-transport dynamo model. We show that the contribution from the density stratification follows the evolution of the radial magnetic field, while large-scale electric currents produce a more complicated pattern of the cross-helicity of comparable magnitude. The pattern of the cross-helicity evolution strongly depends on details of the dynamo mechanism. Thus, we anticipate that direct observations of the cross-helicity on the Sun may serve for the diagnostic purpose of the solar dynamo process.

  17. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  18. Soft-Pion theorems for large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Consistency relations — which relate an N-point function to a squeezed (N+1)-point function — are useful in large scale structure (LSS) because of their non-perturbative nature: they hold even if the N-point function is deep in the nonlinear regime, and even if they involve astrophysically messy galaxy observables. The non-perturbative nature of the consistency relations is guaranteed by the fact that they are symmetry statements, in which the velocity plays the role of the soft pion. In this paper, we address two issues: (1) how to derive the relations systematically using the residual coordinate freedom in the Newtonian gauge, and relate them to known results in ζ-gauge (often used in studies of inflation); (2) under what conditions the consistency relations are violated. In the non-relativistic limit, our derivation reproduces the Newtonian consistency relation discovered by Kehagias & Riotto and Peloso & Pietroni. More generally, there is an infinite set of consistency relations, as is known in ζ-gauge. There is a one-to-one correspondence between symmetries in the two gauges; in particular, the Newtonian consistency relation follows from the dilation and special conformal symmetries in ζ-gauge. We probe the robustness of the consistency relations by studying models of galaxy dynamics and biasing. We give a systematic list of conditions under which the consistency relations are violated; violations occur if the galaxy bias is non-local in an infrared divergent way. We emphasize the relevance of the adiabatic mode condition, as distinct from symmetry considerations. As a by-product of our investigation, we discuss a simple fluid Lagrangian for LSS.

  19. Soft-Pion theorems for large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao E-mail: lhui@astro.columbia.edu

    2014-09-01

    Consistency relations — which relate an N-point function to a squeezed (N+1)-point function — are useful in large scale structure (LSS) because of their non-perturbative nature: they hold even if the N-point function is deep in the nonlinear regime, and even if they involve astrophysically messy galaxy observables. The non-perturbative nature of the consistency relations is guaranteed by the fact that they are symmetry statements, in which the velocity plays the role of the soft pion. In this paper, we address two issues: (1) how to derive the relations systematically using the residual coordinate freedom in the Newtonian gauge, and relate them to known results in ζ-gauge (often used in studies of inflation); (2) under what conditions the consistency relations are violated. In the non-relativistic limit, our derivation reproduces the Newtonian consistency relation discovered by Kehagias and Riotto and Peloso and Pietroni. More generally, there is an infinite set of consistency relations, as is known in ζ-gauge. There is a one-to-one correspondence between symmetries in the two gauges; in particular, the Newtonian consistency relation follows from the dilation and special conformal symmetries in ζ-gauge. We probe the robustness of the consistency relations by studying models of galaxy dynamics and biasing. We give a systematic list of conditions under which the consistency relations are violated; violations occur if the galaxy bias is non-local in an infrared divergent way. We emphasize the relevance of the adiabatic mode condition, as distinct from symmetry considerations. As a by-product of our investigation, we discuss a simple fluid Lagrangian for LSS.

  20. Numerical models of galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elstner, Detlef

    The state of the art for dynamo models in spiral galaxies is reviewed. The comparison of numerical models with special properties of observed magnetic fields yields constraints for the turbulent diffusivity and the α-effect. The derivation of the turbulence parameters from the vertical structure of the interstellar medium gives quite reasonable values for modelling the regular magnetic fields in galaxies with an α2Ω-dynamo. Considering the differences of the turbulence between spiral arms and interarm regions, the observed interarm magnetic fields are recovered in the numerical models due to the special properties of the α2Ω-dynamo.

  1. Grand Minima and Equatorward Propagation in a Cycling Stellar Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustson, Kyle; Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-08-01

    The 3D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic code, using slope-limited diffusion, is employed to capture convective and dynamo processes achieved in a global-scale stellar convection simulation for a model solar-mass star rotating at three times the solar rate. The dynamo-generated magnetic fields possesses many timescales, with a prominent polarity cycle occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic field forms large-scale toroidal wreaths, whose formation is tied to the low Rossby number of the convection in this simulation. The polarity reversals are linked to the weakened differential rotation and a resistive collapse of the large-scale magnetic field. An equatorial migration of the magnetic field is seen, which is due to the strong modulation of the differential rotation rather than a dynamo wave. A poleward migration of magnetic flux from the equator eventually leads to the reversal of the polarity of the high-latitude magnetic field. This simulation also enters an interval with reduced magnetic energy at low latitudes lasting roughly 16 years (about 2.5 polarity cycles), during which the polarity cycles are disrupted and after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles. An analysis of this grand minimum reveals that it likely arises through the interplay of symmetric and antisymmetric dynamo families. This intermittent dynamo state potentially results from the simulation’s relatively low magnetic Prandtl number. A mean-field-based analysis of this dynamo simulation demonstrates that it is of the α-Ω type. The timescales that appear to be relevant to the magnetic polarity reversal are also identified.

  2. Grand Minima and Equatorward Propagation in a Cycling Stellar Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-08-01

    The 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, using slope-limited diffusion, is employed to capture convective and dynamo processes achieved in a global-scale stellar convection simulation for a model solar-mass star rotating at three times the solar rate. The dynamo generated magnetic fields possesses many time scales, with a prominent polarity cycle occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic field forms large-scale toroidal wreaths, whose formation is tied to the low Rossby number of the convection in this simulation. The polarity reversals are linked to the weakened differential rotation and a resistive collapse of the large-scale magnetic field. An equatorial migration of the magnetic field is seen, which is due to the strong modulation of the differential rotation rather than a dynamo wave. A poleward migration of magnetic flux from the equator eventually leads to the reversal of the polarity of the high-latitude magnetic field. This simulation also enters an interval with reduced magnetic energy at low latitudes lasting roughly 16 years (about 2.5 polarity cycles), during which the polarity cycles are disrupted and after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles. An analysis of this grand minimum reveals that it likely arises through the interplay of symmetric and antisymmetric dynamo families. This intermittent dynamo state potentially results from the simulations relatively low magnetic Prandtl number. A mean-field-based analysis of this dynamo simulation demonstrates that it is of the α-Ω type. The time scales that appear to be relevant to the magnetic polarity reversal are also identified.

  3. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  4. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  5. Dynamics of Large-Scale Convective Onset in the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Scott Wayne

    The role of large-scale circulation anomalies in the convective onset of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the Indian Ocean during the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign, conducted Oct. 2011--Feb. 2012, is explained using radar and rawinsonde observations, reanalysis, and regional model simulations. Convective onset was characterized by two episodic and rapid increases in the vertical growth of the cumuliform cloud population over the Indian Ocean: First, the areal coverage of moderately deep (~5 km) convection increased; about 1 week later, the areal coverage of deep (up to the tropopause) convection increased rapidly. Deep tropospheric wavenumber 1 anomalies in zonal wind and vertical velocity circumnavigated the tropics repeatedly during DYNAMO. MJO convective onset occurred when the upward branch of this wavenumber 1 circulation arrived over the Indian Ocean because a reduction in large-scale subsidence cooled the troposphere and steepened the lapse rate below 500 hPa. This made the environment more conducive to development of moderately deep convection. The moderately deep convection moistened the environment during week-long transition periods by transporting moisture vertically from the boundary layer to the free troposphere and detraining it into the clear-air environment, particularly between 650--850 mb. Regional cloud-permitting model simulations of convection during MJO onsets reproduced the distinct transition periods. The modeling results confirmed that rapid cooling of the environment enhanced the areal coverage of, and thus total vertical transport of water within, moderately deep convection at the beginning of transition periods. Evaporation of cloud condensate via entrainment or dissipation of clouds was directly responsible for environmental moistening. Cooling of the climatologically stable layer between 700--850 mb was particularly important because it allowed a greater number of cumulus elements growing

  6. Simulations of Galactic Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  7. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  8. Large-scale gas dynamical processes affecting the origin and evolution of gaseous galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of galactic halo gas are consistent with an interpretation in terms of the galactic fountain model in which supernova heated gas in the galactic disk escapes into the halo, radiatively cools and forms clouds which fall back to the disk. The results of a new study of several large-scale gas dynamical effects which are expected to occur in such a model for the origin and evolution of galactic halo gas will be summarized, including the following: (1) nonequilibrium absorption line and emission spectrum diagnostics for radiatively cooling halo gas in our own galaxy, as well the implications of such absorption line diagnostics for the origin of quasar absorption lines in galactic halo clouds of high redshift galaxies; (2) numerical MHD simulations and analytical analysis of large-scale explosions ad superbubbles in the galactic disk and halo; (3) numerical MHD simulations of halo cloud formation by thermal instability, with and without magnetic field; and (4) the effect of the galactic fountain on the galactic dynamo.

  9. The origin of the helicity hemispheric sign rule reversals in the mean-field solar-type dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Zhang, H.; Sokoloff, D. D.; Kuzanyan, K. M.; Gao, Y.

    2013-11-01

    Observations of proxies of the magnetic helicity in the Sun over the past two solar cycles revealed reversals of the helicity hemispheric sign rule (negative in the North and positive in the South hemispheres). We apply the mean-field solar dynamo model to study the reversals of the magnetic helicity sign for the dynamo operating in the bulk of the solar convection zone. The evolution of the magnetic helicity is governed by the conservation law. We found that the reversal of the sign of the small-scale magnetic helicity follows the dynamo wave propagating inside the convection zone. Therefore, the spatial patterns of the magnetic helicity reversals reflect the processes which contribute to generation and evolution of the large-scale magnetic fields. At the surface, the patterns of the helicity sign reversals are determined by the magnetic helicity boundary conditions at the top of the convection zone. We demonstrate the impact of fluctuations in the dynamo parameters and variability in dynamo cycle amplitude on the reversals of the magnetic helicity sign rule. The obtained results suggest that the magnetic helicity of the large-scale axisymmetric field can be treated as an additional observational tracer for the solar dynamo and it probably can be used for the solar activity forecast as well.

  10. Probes of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suto, Yasushi; Gorski, Krzysztof; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Silk, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A general formalism is developed which shows that the gravitational instability theory for the origin of the large-scale structure of the universe is now capable of critically confronting observational results on cosmic background radiation angular anisotropies, large-scale bulk motions, and large-scale clumpiness in the galaxy counts. The results indicate that presently advocated cosmological models will have considerable difficulty in simultaneously explaining the observational results.