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Sample records for asv integrase proteins

  1. Localization of ASV Integrase-DNA Contacts by Site-Directed Crosslinking and their Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, George; Alexandratos, Jerry; Zhou, Dongwen; Bojja, Ravi S.; Satoh, Tadashi; Potapov, Mikhail; Kogon, Alex; Potapov, Viktor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background We applied crosslinking techniques as a first step in preparation of stable avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN)-DNA complexes for crystallographic investigations. These results were then compared with the crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome and with published data for other retroviral IN proteins. Methodology/Results Photoaffinity crosslinking and site-directed chemical crosslinking were used to localize the sites of contacts with DNA substrates on the surface of ASV IN. Sulfhydryl groups of cysteines engineered into ASV IN and amino-modified nucleotides in DNA substrates were used for attachment of photocrosslinkers. Analysis of photocrosslinking data revealed several specific DNA-protein contacts. To confirm contact sites, thiol-modified nucleotides were introduced into oligo-DNA substrates at suggested points of contact and chemically crosslinked to the cysteines via formation of disulfide bridges. Cysteines incorporated in positions 124 and 146 in the ASV IN core domain were shown to interact directly with host and viral portions of the Y-mer DNA substrate, respectively. Crosslinking of an R244C ASV IN derivative identified contacts at positions 11 and 12 on both strands of viral DNA. The most efficient disulfide crosslinking was observed for complexes of the ASV IN E157C and D64C derivatives with linear viral DNA substrate carrying a thiol-modified scissile phosphate. Conclusion Analysis of our crosslinking results as well as published results of retroviral IN protein from other laboratories shows good agreement with the structure of PFV IN and derived ASV, HIV, and MuLV models for the core domain, but only partial agreement for the N- and C-terminal domains. These differences might be explained by structural variations and evolutionary selection for residues at alternate positions to perform analogous functions, and by methodological differences: i.e., a static picture of a particular assembly from crystallography vs

  2. Structural Studies of the HIV-1 Integrase Protein: Compound Screening and Characterization of a DNA-Binding Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the HIV integrase protein and mechanisms of resistance to HIV integrase inhibitors is complicated by the lack of a full length HIV integrase crystal structure. Moreover, a lentiviral integrase structure with co-crystallised DNA has not been described. For these reasons, we have developed a structural method that utilizes free software to create quaternary HIV integrase homology models, based partially on available full-length prototype foamy virus integrase structures as well as several structures of truncated HIV integrase. We have tested the utility of these models in screening of small anti-integrase compounds using randomly selected molecules from the ZINC database as well as a well characterized IN:DNA binding inhibitor, FZ41, and a putative IN:DNA binding inhibitor, HDS1. Docking studies showed that the ZINC compounds that had the best binding energies bound at the IN:IN dimer interface and that the FZ41 and HDS1 compounds docked at approximately the same location in integrase, i.e. behind the DNA binding domain, although there is some overlap with the IN:IN dimer interface to which the ZINC compounds bind. Thus, we have revealed two possible locations in integrase that could potentially be targeted by allosteric integrase inhibitors, that are distinct from the binding sites of other allosteric molecules such as LEDGF inhibitors. Virological and biochemical studies confirmed that HDS1 and FZ41 share a similar activity profile and that both can inhibit each of integrase and reverse transcriptase activities. The inhibitory mechanism of HDS1 for HIV integrase seems to be at the DNA binding step and not at either of the strand transfer or 3' processing steps of the integrase reaction. Furthermore, HDS1 does not directly interact with DNA. The modeling and docking methodology described here will be useful for future screening of integrase inhibitors as well as for the generation of models for the study of integrase drug resistance. PMID:26046987

  3. Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrease Active Site Upon Metal Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP; Briggs, J. M.

    2000-04-05

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. We report here a fully hydrated 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation performed using parallel NWChem3.2.1 with the AMBER95 force field. The HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain previously determined by crystallography (1B9D) and modeling including two Mg2+ ions placed into the active site based on an alignment against an ASV integrase structure containing two divalent metals (1VSH), was used as the starting structure. The simulation reveals a high degree of flexibility in the region of residues 140-149 even in the presence of a second divalent metal ion and a dramatic conformational change of the side chain of E152 when the second metal ion is present. This study shows similarities in the behavior of the catalytic residues in the HIV-1 and ASV integrases upon metal binding. The present simulation also provides support to the hypothesis that the second metal ion is likely to be carried into the HIV-1 integrase active site by the substrate, a strand of DNA.

  4. Host proteins interacting with the Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase: Multiple transcriptional regulators and chromatin binding factors

    PubMed Central

    Studamire, Barbara; Goff, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    Background A critical step for retroviral replication is the stable integration of the provirus into the genome of its host. The viral integrase protein is key in this essential step of the retroviral life cycle. Although the basic mechanism of integration by mammalian retroviruses has been well characterized, the factors determining how viral integration events are targeted to particular regions of the genome or to regions of a particular DNA structure remain poorly defined. Significant questions remain regarding the influence of host proteins on the selection of target sites, on the repair of integration intermediates, and on the efficiency of integration. Results We describe the results of a yeast two-hybrid screen using Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase as bait to screen murine cDNA libraries for host proteins that interact with the integrase. We identified 27 proteins that interacted with different integrase fusion proteins. The identified proteins include chromatin remodeling, DNA repair and transcription factors (13 proteins); translational regulation factors, helicases, splicing factors and other RNA binding proteins (10 proteins); and transporters or miscellaneous factors (4 proteins). We confirmed the interaction of these proteins with integrase by testing them in the context of other yeast strains with GAL4-DNA binding domain-integrase fusions, and by in vitro binding assays between recombinant proteins. Subsequent analyses revealed that a number of the proteins identified as Mo-MLV integrase interactors also interact with HIV-1 integrase both in yeast and in vitro. Conclusion We identify several proteins interacting directly with both MoMLV and HIV-1 integrases that may be common to the integration reaction pathways of both viruses. Many of the proteins identified in the screen are logical interaction partners for integrase, and the validity of a number of the interactions are supported by other studies. In addition, we observe that some of the

  5. von Hippel–Lindau binding protein 1-mediated degradation of integrase affects HIV-1 gene expression at a postintegration step

    PubMed Central

    Mousnier, Aurélie; Kubat, Nicole; Massias-Simon, Aurélie; Ségéral, Emmanuel; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Emiliani, Stéphane; Dargemont, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase, the viral enzyme responsible for provirus integration into the host genome, can be actively degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Here, we identify von Hippel–Lindau binding protein 1(VBP1), a subunit of the prefoldin chaperone, as an integrase cellular binding protein that bridges interaction between integrase and the cullin2 (Cul2)-based von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) ubiquitin ligase. We demonstrate that VBP1 and Cul2/VHL are required for proper HIV-1 expression at a step between integrase-dependent proviral integration into the host genome and transcription of viral genes. Using both an siRNA approach and Cul2/VHL mutant cells, we show that VBP1 and the Cul2/VHL ligase cooperate in the efficient polyubiquitylation of integrase and its subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Results presented here support a role for integrase degradation by the prefoldin–VHL–proteasome pathway in the integration–transcription transition of the viral replication cycle. PMID:17698809

  6. LEDGF dominant interference proteins demonstrate prenuclear exposure of HIV-1 integrase and synergize with LEDGF depletion to destroy viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Anne M; Saenz, Dyana T; Morrison, James; Hu, Chunling; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2011-04-01

    Target cell overexpression of the integrase binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) inhibits HIV-1 replication. The mechanism and protein structure requirements for this dominant interference are unclear. More generally, how and when HIV-1 uncoating occurs postentry is poorly defined, and it is unknown whether integrase within the evolving viral core becomes accessible to cellular proteins prior to nuclear entry. We used LEDGF dominant interference to address the latter question while characterizing determinants of IBD antiviral activity. Fusions of green fluorescent protein (GFP) with multiple C-terminal segments of LEDGF inhibited HIV-1 replication substantially, but minimal chimeras of either polarity (GFP-IBD or IBD-GFP) were most effective. Combining GFP-IBD expression with LEDGF depletion was profoundly antiviral. CD4(+) T cell lines were rendered virtually uninfectable, with single-cycle HIV-1 infectivity reduced 4 logs and high-input (multiplicity of infection = 5.0) replication completely blocked. We restricted GFP-IBD to specific intracellular locations and found that antiviral activity was preserved when the protein was confined to the cytoplasm or directed to the nuclear envelope. The life cycle block triggered by the cytoplasm-restricted protein manifested after nuclear entry, at the level of integration. We conclude that integrase within the viral core becomes accessible to host cell protein interaction in the cytoplasm. LEDGF dominant interference and depletion impair HIV-1 integration at distinct postentry stages. GFP-IBD may trigger premature or improper integrase oligomerization. PMID:21270171

  7. Sequence-specific binding of DNA by the Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase protein.

    PubMed Central

    Krogstad, P A; Champoux, J J

    1990-01-01

    Genetic studies have indicated that integration of retroviral DNA into the host genome depends on the presence of the inverted repeats at the free termini of the long terminal repeats on the unintegrated DNA and on the product of the 3' end of the pol gene (the integrase [IN] protein). While the precise function of the Moloney murine leukemia virus IN protein is uncertain, others have shown that it is a DNA-binding protein and functions in the processing of the inverted repeats prior to integration. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we cloned and expressed the IN protein in Escherichia coli. Crude extracts of total cellular protein were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose filters, denatured in guanidine, renatured, and incubated with oligonucleotide probes. Single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides corresponding to the termini of unintegrated linear viral DNA were specifically bound by the IN protein in this assay. These data suggest that the role of the Moloney IN protein in the early steps of integration involves sequence-specific recognition of the DNA sequences found at the ends of the long terminal repeats. Images PMID:2186176

  8. Formation of a stable complex between the human immunodeficiency virus integrase protein and viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; Lutzke, R A; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    The integrase (IN) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediates two distinct reactions: (i) specific removal of two nucleotides from the 3' ends of the viral DNA and (ii) integration of the viral DNA into target DNA. Although IN discriminates between specific (viral) DNA and nonspecific DNA in physical in vitro assays, a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain could not be identified in the protein. A nonspecific DNA-binding domain, however, was found at the C terminus of the protein. We examined the DNA-binding characteristics of HIV-1 IN, and found that a stable complex of IN and viral DNA is formed in the presence of Mn2+. The IN-viral DNA complex is resistant to challenge by an excess of competitor DNA. Stable binding of IN to the viral DNA requires that the protein contains an intact N-terminal domain and active site (in the central region of the protein), in addition to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:7937134

  9. B'-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Goedele N

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B' family of the regulatory subunits. B'-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B' subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein-protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B', which when mutated render B' incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  10. B′-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Goedele N.

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B′ family of the regulatory subunits. B′-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B′ subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein–protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B′, which when mutated render B′ incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  11. Identification of the catalytic and DNA-binding region of the human immunodeficiency virus type I integrase protein.

    PubMed

    Vink, C; Oude Groeneger, A M; Plasterk, R H

    1993-03-25

    The integrase (IN) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is required for specific cleavage of the viral DNA termini, and subsequent integration of the viral DNA into target DNA. To identify the various domains of the IN protein we generated a series of IN deletion mutants as fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP). The deletion mutants were tested for their ability to bind DNA, to mediate site-specific cleavage of the viral DNA ends, and to carry out integration and disintegration reactions. We found that the DNA-binding region resides between amino acids 200 and 270 of the 288-residues HIV-1 IN protein. The catalytic domain of the protein was mapped between amino acids 50 and 194. For the specific activities of IN, cleavage of the viral DNA and integration, both the DNA-binding domain and the conserved amino-terminal region of IN are required. These regions are dispensable however, for disintegration activity. PMID:8464733

  12. Site-specific hydrolysis and alcoholysis of human immunodeficiency virus DNA termini mediated by the viral integrase protein.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; Yeheskiely, E; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Plasterk, R H

    1991-01-01

    Before integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA, two nucleotides are removed from the 3' ends of the viral DNA by the integrase (IN) protein. We studied the chemistry of this reaction, and found that IN mediates site-specific hydrolysis of a phosphodiester bond, resulting in release of a dinucleotide. A class of alcohols (including glycerol, 1,2-propanediol, but not 1,3-propanediol) can also act as nucleophile in this reaction, and likewise the alcoholic amino acids L-serine and L-threonine can be covalently linked to the dinucleotide. No evidence was found for a covalent linkage between the IN protein and this dinucleotide, suggesting that IN directs a single nucleophilic attack of water at the specific phosphodiester bond. Images PMID:1662361

  13. Bacteriophage φC31 Integrase Mediated Transgenesis in Xenopus laevis for Protein Expression at Endogenous Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bryan G.; Weeks, Daniel L.

    Bacteriophage φC31 inserts its genome into that of its host bacterium via the integrase enzyme which catalyzes recombination between a phage attachment site (attP) and a bacterial attachment site (attB). Integrase requires no accessory factors, has a high efficiency of recombination, and does not need perfect sequence fidelity for recognition and recombination between these attachment sites. These imperfect attachment sites, or pseudo-attachment sites, are present in many organisms and have been used to insert transgenes in a variety of species. Here we describe the φC31 integrase approach to make transgenic Xenopus laevis embryos.

  14. Exploring the binding of d(GGGT)4 to the HIV-1 integrase: An approach to investigate G-quadruplex aptamer/target protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Veronica; Pirone, Luciano; Mayol, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia; Virgilio, Antonella; Galeone, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The aptamer d(GGGT)4 (T30923 or T30695) forms a 5'-5' dimer of two stacked parallel G-quadruplexes, each characterized by three G-tetrads and three single-thymidine reversed-chain loops. This aptamer has been reported to exhibit anti-HIV activity by targeting the HIV integrase, a viral enzyme responsible for the integration of viral DNA into the host-cell genome. However, information concerning the aptamer/target interaction is still rather limited. In this communication we report microscale thermophoresis investigations on the interaction between the HIV-1 integrase and d(GGGT)4 aptamer analogues containing abasic sites singly replacing thymidines in the original sequence. This approach has allowed the identification of which part of the aptamer G-quadruplex structure is mainly involved in the interaction with the protein. PMID:27109379

  15. Dynamic Modulation of HIV-1 Integrase Structure and Function by Cellular Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Protein*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christopher J.; Kessl, Jacques J.; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Dar, Mohd Jamal; Engelman, Alan; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2008-01-01

    The mandatory integration of the reverse-transcribed HIV-1 genome into host chromatin is catalyzed by the viral protein integrase (IN), and IN activity can be regulated by numerous viral and cellular proteins. Among these, LEDGF has been identified as a cellular cofactor critical for effective HIV-1 integration. The x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic core domain (CCD) of IN in complex with the IN binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF has furthermore revealed essential protein-protein contacts. However, mutagenic studies indicated that interactions between the full-length proteins were more extensive than the contacts observed in the co-crystal structure of the isolated domains. Therefore, we have conducted detailed biochemical characterization of the interactions between full-length IN and LEDGF. Our results reveal a highly dynamic nature of IN subunit-subunit interactions. LEDGF strongly stabilized these interactions and promoted IN tetramerization. Mass spectrometric protein footprinting and molecular modeling experiments uncovered novel intra- and inter-protein-protein contacts in the full-length IN-LEDGF complex that lay outside of the observable IBD-CCD structure. In particular, our studies defined the IN tetramer interface important for enzymatic activities and high affinity LEDGF binding. These findings provide new insight into how LEDGF modulates HIV-1 IN structure and function, and highlight the potential for exploiting the highly dynamic structure of multimeric IN as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:18801737

  16. HIV-1 Integrase-DNA Recognition Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kessl, Jacques J.; McKee, Christopher J.; Eidahl, Jocelyn O.; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Katz, Ari; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2009-01-01

    Integration of a reverse transcribed DNA copy of the HIV viral genome into the host chromosome is essential for virus replication. This process is catalyzed by the virally encoded protein integrase. The catalytic activities, which involve DNA cutting and joining steps, have been recapitulated in vitro using recombinant integrase and synthetic DNA substrates. Biochemical and biophysical studies of these model reactions have been pivotal in advancing our understanding of mechanistic details for how IN interacts with viral and target DNAs, and are the focus of the present review. PMID:21994566

  17. Staphylococcus aureus SarA is a Regulatory Protein Responsive to Redox and pH that can Support Bacteriophage Lambda Integrase-Mediated Excision/Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, David F.; Higginbotham, Robin H.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Segall1, Anca M.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Hurlburt, Barry K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide array of virulence factors and causes a correspondingly diverse array of infections. Production of these virulence factors is under the control of a complex network of global regulatory elements, one of which is sarA. sarA encodes a DNA-binding protein that is considered to function as a transcription factor capable of acting as either a repressor or an activator. Using competitive ELISA assays, we demonstrate that SarA is present at approximately 50,000 copies per cell, which is not characteristic of classical transcription factors. We also demonstrate that SarA is present at all stages of growth in vitro and is capable of binding DNA with high affinity but that its binding affinity and pattern of shifted complexes in electrophoretic mobility shift assays is responsive to the redox state. We also show that SarA binds to the bacteriophage lambda (λ) attachment site, attL, producing SarA-DNA complexes similar to intasomes, which consist of bacteriophage lambda integrase, E. coli integration host factor and attL DNA. In addition, SarA stimulates intramolecular excision recombination in the absence of λ excisionase, a DNA-binding accessory protein. Taken together, these data suggest that SarA may function as an architectural accessory protein. PMID:19919677

  18. Structure of the catalytic domain of avian sarcoma virus integrase with a bound HIV-1 integrase-targeted inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lubkowski, Jacek; Yang, Fan; Alexandratos, Jerry; Wlodawer, Alexander; Zhao, He; Burke, Terrence R.; Neamati, Nouri; Pommier, Yves; Merkel, George; Skalka, Anna Marie

    1998-01-01

    The x-ray structures of an inhibitor complex of the catalytic core domain of avian sarcoma virus integrase (ASV IN) were solved at 1.9- to 2.0-Å resolution at two pH values, with and without Mn2+ cations. This inhibitor (Y-3), originally identified in a screen for inhibitors of the catalytic activity of HIV type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), was found in the present study to be active against ASV IN as well as HIV-1 IN. The Y-3 molecule is located in close proximity to the enzyme active site, interacts with the flexible loop, alters loop conformation, and affects the conformations of active site residues. As crystallized, a Y-3 molecule stacks against its symmetry-related mate. Preincubation of IN with metal cations does not prevent inhibition, and Y-3 binding does not prevent binding of divalent cations to IN. Three compounds chemically related to Y-3 also were investigated, but no binding was observed in the crystals. Our results identify the structural elements of the inhibitor that likely determine its binding properties. PMID:9560188

  19. New applications for phage integrases.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Paul C M; Colloms, Sean; Rosser, Susan; Stark, Marshall; Smith, Margaret C M

    2014-07-29

    Within the last 25 years, bacteriophage integrases have rapidly risen to prominence as genetic tools for a wide range of applications from basic cloning to genome engineering. Serine integrases such as that from ϕC31 and its relatives have found an especially wide range of applications within diverse micro-organisms right through to multi-cellular eukaryotes. Here, we review the mechanisms of the two major families of integrases, the tyrosine and serine integrases, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type as they are applied in genome engineering and synthetic biology. In particular, we focus on the new areas of metabolic pathway construction and optimization, biocomputing, heterologous expression and multiplexed assembly techniques. Integrases are versatile and efficient tools that can be used in conjunction with the various extant molecular biology tools to streamline the synthetic biology production line. PMID:24857859

  20. New Applications for Phage Integrases

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C.M.; Colloms, Sean; Rosser, Susan; Stark, Marshall; Smith, Margaret C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Within the last 25 years, bacteriophage integrases have rapidly risen to prominence as genetic tools for a wide range of applications from basic cloning to genome engineering. Serine integrases such as that from ϕC31 and its relatives have found an especially wide range of applications within diverse micro-organisms right through to multi-cellular eukaryotes. Here, we review the mechanisms of the two major families of integrases, the tyrosine and serine integrases, and the advantages and disadvantages of each type as they are applied in genome engineering and synthetic biology. In particular, we focus on the new areas of metabolic pathway construction and optimization, biocomputing, heterologous expression and multiplexed assembly techniques. Integrases are versatile and efficient tools that can be used in conjunction with the various extant molecular biology tools to streamline the synthetic biology production line. PMID:24857859

  1. HIV-1 Group O Integrase Displays Lower Enzymatic Efficiency and Higher Susceptibility to Raltegravir than HIV-1 Group M Subtype B Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Depatureaux, Agnès; Quashie, Peter K.; Mesplède, Thibault; Han, Yingshan; Koubi, Hannah; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 group O (HIV-O) is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase coding region. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on enzyme function and susceptibility to integrase inhibitors. Accordingly, we cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 group O clades A and B, an HIV-O divergent strain, and HIV-1 group M (HIV-M, subtype B), used as a reference. To assess enzymatic function of HIV-O integrase, we carried out strand transfer and 3′ processing assays with various concentrations of substrate (DNA target and long terminal repeats [LTR], respectively) and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of various concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki) and 50% effective concentration (EC50) values were calculated for HIV-O integrases and HIV-O viruses, respectively, and compared with those of HIV-M. The results showed that HIV-O integrase displayed lower activity in strand transfer assays than did HIV-M enzyme, whereas 3′ processing activities were similar to those of HIV-M. HIV-O integrases were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL) in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. Molecular modeling suggests that two key polymorphic residues that are close to the integrase catalytic site, 74I and 153A, may play a role in these differences. PMID:25224008

  2. The casposon-encoded Cas1 protein from Aciduliprofundum boonei is a DNA integrase that generates target site duplications.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Alison B; Dyda, Fred

    2015-12-15

    Many archaea and bacteria have an adaptive immune system known as CRISPR which allows them to recognize and destroy foreign nucleic acid that they have previously encountered. Two CRISPR-associated proteins, Cas1 and Cas2, are required for the acquisition step of adaptation, in which fragments of foreign DNA are incorporated into the host CRISPR locus. Cas1 genes have also been found scattered in several archaeal and bacterial genomes, unassociated with CRISPR loci or other cas proteins. Rather, they are flanked by nearly identical inverted repeats and enclosed within direct repeats, suggesting that these genetic regions might be mobile elements ('casposons'). To investigate this possibility, we have characterized the in vitro activities of the putative Cas1 transposase ('casposase') from Aciduliprofundum boonei. The purified Cas1 casposase can integrate both short oligonucleotides with inverted repeat sequences and a 2.8 kb excised mini-casposon into target DNA. Casposon integration occurs without target specificity and generates 14-15 basepair target site duplications, consistent with those found in casposon host genomes. Thus, Cas1 casposases carry out similar biochemical reactions as the CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 complex but with opposite substrate specificities: casposases integrate specific sequences into random target sites, whereas CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 integrates essentially random sequences into a specific site in the CRISPR locus. PMID:26573596

  3. The casposon-encoded Cas1 protein from Aciduliprofundum boonei is a DNA integrase that generates target site duplications

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Alison B.; Dyda, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Many archaea and bacteria have an adaptive immune system known as CRISPR which allows them to recognize and destroy foreign nucleic acid that they have previously encountered. Two CRISPR-associated proteins, Cas1 and Cas2, are required for the acquisition step of adaptation, in which fragments of foreign DNA are incorporated into the host CRISPR locus. Cas1 genes have also been found scattered in several archaeal and bacterial genomes, unassociated with CRISPR loci or other cas proteins. Rather, they are flanked by nearly identical inverted repeats and enclosed within direct repeats, suggesting that these genetic regions might be mobile elements (‘casposons’). To investigate this possibility, we have characterized the in vitro activities of the putative Cas1 transposase (‘casposase’) from Aciduliprofundum boonei. The purified Cas1 casposase can integrate both short oligonucleotides with inverted repeat sequences and a 2.8 kb excised mini-casposon into target DNA. Casposon integration occurs without target specificity and generates 14–15 basepair target site duplications, consistent with those found in casposon host genomes. Thus, Cas1 casposases carry out similar biochemical reactions as the CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 complex but with opposite substrate specificities: casposases integrate specific sequences into random target sites, whereas CRISPR Cas1-Cas2 integrates essentially random sequences into a specific site in the CRISPR locus. PMID:26573596

  4. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase

    PubMed Central

    Grandgenett, Duane P; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear cDNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3’ OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3’ OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS. PMID:26322168

  5. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase.

    PubMed

    Grandgenett, Duane P; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-08-26

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear cDNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3' OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3' OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS. PMID:26322168

  6. RETROVIRAL INTEGRASE: THEN AND NOW

    PubMed Central

    Andrake, Mark D.; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    The retroviral integrases are virally encoded, specialized recombinases that catalyze the insertion of viral DNA into the host cell’s DNA, a process that is essential for virus propagation. We have learned a great deal since the existence of an integrated form of retroviral DNA (the provirus) was first proposed by Howard Temin in 1964. Initial studies focused on the genetics and biochemistry of avian and murine virus DNA integration, but the pace of discovery increased substantially with advances in technology, and an influx of investigators focused on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We begin with a brief account of the scientific landscape in which some of the earliest discoveries were made, and summarize research that led to our current understanding of the biochemistry of integration. A more detailed account of recent analyses of integrase structure follows, as they have provided valuable insights into enzyme function and raised important new questions. PMID:26958915

  7. Expression of an active form of recombinant Ty1 reverse transcriptase in Escherichia coli: a fusion protein containing the C-terminal region of the Ty1 integrase linked to the reverse transcriptase-RNase H domain exhibits polymerase and RNase H activities.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, M; Boutabout, M; Wilhelm, F X

    2000-01-01

    Replication of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ty1 retrotransposon requires a reverse transcriptase capable of synthesizing Ty1 DNA. The first description of an active form of a recombinant Ty1 enzyme with polymerase and RNase H activities is reported here. The Ty1 enzyme was expressed as a hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli to facilitate purification of the recombinant protein by metal-chelate chromatography. Catalytic activity of the recombinant protein was detected only when amino acid residues encoded by the integrase gene were added to the N-terminus of the reverse transcriptase-RNase H domain. This suggests that the integrase domain could play a role in proper folding of reverse transcriptase. Several biochemical properties of the Ty1 enzyme were analysed, including the effect of MgCl(2), NaCl, temperature and of the chain terminator dideoxy GTP on its polymerase activity. RNase H activity was examined by monitoring the cleavage of a RNA-DNA template-primer. Our results suggest that the distance between the RNase H and polymerase active sites corresponds to the length of a 14-nucleotide RNA-DNA heteroduplex. The recombinant protein produced in E. coli should be useful for further biochemical and structural analyses and for a better understanding of the role of integrase in the activation of reverse transcriptase. PMID:10816427

  8. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Heather A.; Masukawa, Keven M.; Rubins, Kathleen; Bushman, Frederic; Jorgensen, William L.; Lins, Roberto; Briggs, James; Mccammon, Andy

    2000-05-11

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  9. Developing a dynamic pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Carlson, H A; Masukawa, K M; Rubins, K; Bushman, F D; Jorgensen, W L; Lins, R D; Briggs, J M; McCammon, J A

    2000-06-01

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of "dynamic" pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a "static" pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors. PMID:10841789

  10. Biochemical and virological analysis of the 18-residue C-terminal tail of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohd J; Monel, Blandine; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Helland, Dag E; Engelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background The 18 residue tail abutting the SH3 fold that comprises the heart of the C-terminal domain is the only part of HIV-1 integrase yet to be visualized by structural biology. To ascertain the role of the tail region in integrase function and HIV-1 replication, a set of deletion mutants that successively lacked three amino acids was constructed and analyzed in a variety of biochemical and virus infection assays. HIV-1/2 chimers, which harbored the analogous 23-mer HIV-2 tail in place of the HIV-1 sequence, were also studied. Because integrase mutations can affect steps in the replication cycle other than integration, defective mutant viruses were tested for integrase protein content and reverse transcription in addition to integration. The F185K core domain mutation, which increases integrase protein solubility, was furthermore analyzed in a subset of mutants. Results Purified proteins were assessed for in vitro levels of 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities whereas HIV-1 infectivity was measured using luciferase reporter viruses. Deletions lacking up to 9 amino acids (1-285, 1-282, and 1-279) displayed near wild-type activities in vitro and during infection. Further deletion yielded two viruses, HIV-11-276 and HIV-11-273, that displayed approximately two and 5-fold infectivity defects, respectively, due to reduced integrase function. Deletion mutant HIV-11-270 and the HIV-1/2 chimera were non-infectious and displayed approximately 3 to 4-fold reverse transcription in addition to severe integration defects. Removal of four additional residues, which encompassed the C-terminal β strand of the SH3 fold, further compromised integrase incorporation into virions and reverse transcription. Conclusion HIV-11-270, HIV-11-266, and the HIV-1/2 chimera were typed as class II mutant viruses due to their pleiotropic replication defects. We speculate that residues 271-273 might play a role in mediating the known integrase-reverse transcriptase interaction, as

  11. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  12. Identification of Residues in the C-terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase That Mediate Binding to the Transportin-SR2 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    De Houwer, Stephanie; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Thys, Wannes; Taltynov, Oliver; Zmajkovicova, Katarina; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    Transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2 and TNPO3) is a cellular cofactor of HIV replication that has been implicated in the nuclear import of HIV. TRN-SR2 was originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen as an interaction partner of HIV integrase (IN) and in two independent siRNA screens as a cofactor of viral replication. We have now studied the interaction of TRN-SR2 and HIV IN in molecular detail and identified the TRN-SR2 interacting regions of IN. A weak interaction with the catalytic core domain (CCD) and a strong interaction with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN were detected. By dissecting the catalytic core domain (CCD) of IN into short structural fragments, we identified a peptide (INIP1, amino acids 170EHLKTAVQMAVFIHNFKRKGGI191) retaining the ability to interact with TRN-SR2. By dissecting the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN, we could identify two interacting peptides (amino acids 214QKQITKIQNFRVYYR228 and 262RRKVKIIRDYGK273) that come together in the CTD tertiary structure to form an exposed antiparallel β-sheet. Through site-specific mutagenesis, we defined the following sets of amino acids in IN as important for the interaction with TRN-SR2: Phe-185/Lys-186/Arg-187/Lys-188 in the CCD and Arg-262/Arg-263/Lys-264 and Lys-266/Arg-269 in the CTD. An HIV-1 strain carrying K266A/R269A in IN was replication-defective due to a block in reverse transcription, confounding the study of nuclear import. Insight into the IN/TRN-SR2 interaction interface is necessary to guide drug discovery efforts targeting the nuclear entry step of replication. PMID:22872638

  13. Correlation of Recombinant Integrase Activity and Functional Preintegration Complex Formation during Acute Infection by Replication-Defective Integrase Mutant Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies characterized two types of replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase mutants: class I, which are specifically blocked at the integration step, and class II, which harbor additional virion production and/or reverse transcription defects. Class I mutant enzymes supported little if any metal ion-dependent 3′-processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro, whereas class II enzymes displayed partial or full catalytic function in studies with simplified assay designs, suggesting that defective interaction(s) with heterologous integrase binding proteins might underlie the class II mutant viral phenotype. To address this hypothesis, class I and II mutant enzymes were interrogated under expanded sets of in vitro conditions. The majority failed to catalyze the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA, highlighting defective integrase function as the root cause of most class II in addition to all class I mutant virus infection defects. One mutant protein, K264E, in contrast, could support the wild-type level of concerted integration activity. After accounting for its inherent reverse transcription defect, HIV-1K264E moreover formed preintegration complexes that supported the efficient integration of endogenous viral DNA in vitro and normal levels and sequences of 2-long terminal repeat-containing circle junctions during acute infection. K264E integrase furthermore efficiently interacted in vitro with two heterologous binding partners, LEDGF/p75 and reverse transcriptase. Our results underscore the physiological relevance of concerted integration assays for tests of integrase mutant function and suggest that the K264E mutation disrupts an interaction with an intranuclear integrase binding partner that is important for HIV-1 integration. PMID:22278243

  14. Uneven Genetic Robustness of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Hughes, Joseph; Wilson, Sam J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic robustness (tolerance of mutation) may be a naturally selected property in some viruses, because it should enhance adaptability. Robustness should be especially beneficial to viruses like HIV-1 that exhibit high mutation rates and exist in immunologically hostile environments. Surprisingly, however, the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) exhibits extreme fragility. To determine whether fragility is a general property of HIV-1 proteins, we created a large library of random, single-amino-acid mutants in HIV-1 integrase (IN), covering >40% of amino acid positions. Despite similar degrees of sequence variation in naturally occurring IN and CA sequences, we found that HIV-1 IN was significantly more robust than CA, with random nonsilent IN mutations only half as likely to cause lethal defects. Interestingly, IN and CA were similar in that a subset of mutations with high in vitro fitness were rare in natural populations. IN mutations of this type were more likely to occur in the buried interior of the modeled HIV-1 intasome, suggesting that even very subtle fitness effects suppress variation in natural HIV-1 populations. Lethal mutations, in particular those that perturbed particle production, proteolytic processing, and particle-associated IN levels, were strikingly localized at specific IN subunit interfaces. This observation strongly suggests that binding interactions between particular IN subunits regulate proteolysis during HIV-1 virion morphogenesis. Overall, use of the IN mutant library in conjunction with structural models demonstrates the overall robustness of IN and highlights particular regions of vulnerability that may be targeted in therapeutic interventions. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 integrase (IN) protein is responsible for the integration of the viral genome into the host cell chromosome. To measure the capacity of IN to maintain function in the face of mutation, and to probe structure/function relationships, we created a library of random single

  15. Reversion of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase mutant at a second site restores enzyme function and virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, B; Carlini, F; Verani, P; Engelman, A

    1996-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the retroviral RNA genome into the host cell genome is essential for viral replication. The virion-associated integrase protein, encoded by the 3' end of the viral pol gene, is required for integration. Stable virus-producing T-cell lines were established for replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 carrying single amino acid substitutions at conserved residues in the catalytic domain of integrase. Phenotypically reverted virus was detected 12 weeks after transfection with the integrase mutant carrying the P-109-->S mutation (P109S). Unlike the defective P109S virus, the revertant virus (designated P109SR) grew in CD4+ SupT1 cells. In addition to the Ser substitution at Pro-109, P109SR had a second substitution of Ala for Thr at position 125 in integrase. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to show that the P109S T125A genotype was responsible for the P109SR replication phenotype. The T125A substitution also rescued the in vitro enzyme activities of recombinant P109S integrase protein. P109S integrase did not display detectable 3' processing or DNA strand transfer activity, although 5 to 10% of wild-type disintegration activity was detected. P109S T125A integrase displayed nearly wild-type levels of 3' processing, DNA strand transfer, and disintegration activities, confirming that T125A is a second-site intragenic suppressor of P109S. P109S integrase ran as a large aggregate on a size exclusion column, whereas wild-type integrase ran as a monomer and P109S T125A integrase ran as a mixed population. Pro-109 and Thr-125 are not immediately adjacent in the crystal structure of the integrase catalytic domain. We suggest that the T125A substitution restores integrase function by stabilizing a structural alteration(s) induced by the P109S mutation. PMID:8970947

  16. Prevalence of SOS-mediated control of integron integrase expression as an adaptive trait of chromosomal and mobile integrons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integrons are found in hundreds of environmental bacterial species, but are mainly known as the agents responsible for the capture and spread of antibiotic-resistance determinants between Gram-negative pathogens. The SOS response is a regulatory network under control of the repressor protein LexA targeted at addressing DNA damage, thus promoting genetic variation in times of stress. We recently reported a direct link between the SOS response and the expression of integron integrases in Vibrio cholerae and a plasmid-borne class 1 mobile integron. SOS regulation enhances cassette swapping and capture in stressful conditions, while freezing the integron in steady environments. We conducted a systematic study of available integron integrase promoter sequences to analyze the extent of this relationship across the Bacteria domain. Results Our results showed that LexA controls the expression of a large fraction of integron integrases by binding to Escherichia coli-like LexA binding sites. In addition, the results provide experimental validation of LexA control of the integrase gene for another Vibrio chromosomal integron and for a multiresistance plasmid harboring two integrons. There was a significant correlation between lack of LexA control and predicted inactivation of integrase genes, even though experimental evidence also indicates that LexA regulation may be lost to enhance expression of integron cassettes. Conclusions Ancestral-state reconstruction on an integron integrase phylogeny led us to conclude that the ancestral integron was already regulated by LexA. The data also indicated that SOS regulation has been actively preserved in mobile integrons and large chromosomal integrons, suggesting that unregulated integrase activity is selected against. Nonetheless, additional adaptations have probably arisen to cope with unregulated integrase activity. Identifying them may be fundamental in deciphering the uneven distribution of integrons in the Bacteria

  17. Characterization of the bacteriophage lambda excisionase (Xis) protein: the C-terminus is required for Xis-integrase cooperativity but not for DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Numrych, T E; Gumport, R I; Gardner, J F

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a mutational analysis of the xis gene of bacteriophage lambda. The Xis protein is 72 amino acids in length and required for excisive recombination. Twenty-six mutants of Xis were isolated that were impaired or deficient in lambda excision. Mutant proteins that contained amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal 49 amino acids of Xis were defective in excisive recombination and were unable to bind DNA. In contrast, one mutant protein containing a leucine to proline substitution at position 60 and two truncated proteins containing either the N-terminal 53 or 64 amino acids continued to bind lambda DNA, interact cooperatively with FIS and promote excision. However, these three mutants were unable to bind DNA cooperatively with Int. Cooperativity between wild-type Xis and Int required the presence of FIS, but not the Int core-type binding sites. This study shows that Xis has at least two functional domains and also demonstrates the importance of the cooperativity in DNA binding of FIS, Xis and Int in lambda excision. Images PMID:1396573

  18. Virtual screening with AutoDock Vina and the common pharmacophore engine of a low diversity library of fragments and hits against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase: participation in the SAMPL4 protein-ligand binding challenge.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Alexander L; Santiago, Daniel N; Forli, Stefano; Santos-Martins, Diogo; Olson, Arthur J

    2014-04-01

    To rigorously assess the tools and protocols that can be used to understand and predict macromolecular recognition, and to gain more structural insight into three newly discovered allosteric binding sites on a critical drug target involved in the treatment of HIV infections, the Olson and Levy labs collaborated on the SAMPL4 challenge. This computational blind challenge involved predicting protein-ligand binding against the three allosteric sites of HIV integrase (IN), a viral enzyme for which two drugs (that target the active site) have been approved by the FDA. Positive control cross-docking experiments were utilized to select 13 receptor models out of an initial ensemble of 41 different crystal structures of HIV IN. These 13 models of the targets were selected using our new "Rank Difference Ratio" metric. The first stage of SAMPL4 involved using virtual screens to identify 62 active, allosteric IN inhibitors out of a set of 321 compounds. The second stage involved predicting the binding site(s) and crystallographic binding mode(s) for 57 of these inhibitors. Our team submitted four entries for the first stage that utilized: (1) AutoDock Vina (AD Vina) plus visual inspection; (2) a new common pharmacophore engine; (3) BEDAM replica exchange free energy simulations, and a Consensus approach that combined the predictions of all three strategies. Even with the SAMPL4's very challenging compound library that displayed a significantly lower amount of structural diversity than most libraries that are conventionally employed in prospective virtual screens, these approaches produced hit rates of 24, 25, 34, and 27 %, respectively, on a set with 19 % declared binders. Our only entry for the second stage challenge was based on the results of AD Vina plus visual inspection, and it ranked third place overall according to several different metrics provided by the SAMPL4 organizers. The successful results displayed by these approaches highlight the utility of the computational

  19. The mechanism of ϕC31 integrase directionality: experimental analysis and computational modelling

    PubMed Central

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Zhao, Jia; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Smith, Margaret C. M.; Stark, W. Marshall; Colloms, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    Serine integrases, DNA site-specific recombinases used by bacteriophages for integration and excision of their DNA to and from their host genomes, are increasingly being used as tools for programmed rearrangements of DNA molecules for biotechnology and synthetic biology. A useful feature of serine integrases is the simple regulation and unidirectionality of their reactions. Recombination between the phage attP and host attB sites is promoted by the serine integrase alone, giving recombinant attL and attR sites, whereas the ‘reverse’ reaction (between attL and attR) requires an additional protein, the recombination directionality factor (RDF). Here, we present new experimental data on the kinetics and regulation of recombination reactions mediated by ϕC31 integrase and its RDF, and use these data as the basis for a mathematical model of the reactions. The model accounts for the unidirectionality of the attP × attB and attL × attR reactions by hypothesizing the formation of structurally distinct, kinetically stable integrase–DNA product complexes, dependent on the presence or absence of RDF. The model accounts for all the available experimental data, and predicts how mutations of the proteins or alterations of reaction conditions might increase the conversion efficiency of recombination. PMID:27387286

  20. Minimal size of prototype foamy virus integrase for nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Hyun, U; Lee, D H; Shin, C G

    2011-01-01

    We have reported previously that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrase (IN) has a strong nuclear localization signal (NLS) in its C-terminal domain, in particular in a region of aa 306-334 including highly karyophilic arginines or lysines at positions 308, 313, 318, 324, and 329. In this study, we used various mutants of the C-terminal domain to further analyze its karyophilic determinants. Plasmids expressing these mutants fused to maltose binding protein (MBP) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were transfected to COS-1 cells and subcellular localization of these fluorescent fusion proteins was determined by fluorescent microscopy. The results revealed that a maximum karyophilicity was exhibited by a region longer than the previously described one of 29 aa (aa 306-334), in particular by a 64 aa region (aa 289-352) with Arg341 and Lys349 as critical determinants. PMID:21692567

  1. Consensus HIV-1 subtype A integrase and its raltegravir-resistant variants: design and characterization of the enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, Olga; Krotova, Olga; Agapkina, Julia; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina; Korolev, Sergey; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Viklund, Alecia; Lukashov, Vladimir; Magnani, Mauro; Medstrand, Patrik; Karpov, Vadim; Gottikh, Marina; Isaguliants, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Model studies of the subtype B and non-subtype B integrases are still required to compare their susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs, evaluate the significance of resistance mutations and identify the impact of natural polymorphisms on the level of enzymatic reactivity. We have therefore designed the consensus integrase of the HIV-1 subtype A strain circulating in the former Soviet Union territory (FSU-A) and two of its variants with mutations of resistance to the strand transfer inhibitor raltegravir. Their genes were synthesized, and expressed in E coli; corresponding His-tagged proteins were purified using the affinity chromatography. The enzymatic properties of the consensus integrases and their sensitivity to raltegravir were examined in a series of standard in vitro reactions and compared to the properties of the integrase of HIV-1 subtype B strain HXB2. The consensus enzyme demonstrated similar DNA-binding properties, but was significantly more active than HXB-2 integrase in the reactions of DNA cleavage and integration. All integrases were equally susceptible to inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir, indicating that the sporadic polymorphisms inherent to the HXB-2 enzyme have little effect on its susceptibility to drugs. Insensitivity of the mutated enzymes to the inhibitors of strand transfer occurred at a cost of a 30-90% loss of the efficacies of both 3'-processing and strand transfer. This is the first study to describe the enzymatic properties of the consensus integrase of HIV-1 clade A and the effects of the resistance mutations when the complex actions of sporadic sequence polymorphisms are excluded. PMID:24594066

  2. HIV pharmacotherapy: A review of integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine; Trustman, Nathan; Yalong, April

    2016-02-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are a class of antiretroviral agents used to treat HIV. These drugs--raltegravir, elvitegravir, and dolutegravir--are preferred options for treatment-naïve patients when used in combination with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Based on clinical trials, INSTIs have been proven to be effective with minimal safety concerns. This article reviews the pharmacologic profile, role in therapy, and safety and efficacy of each agent. PMID:26818644

  3. Enhancement of As(V) adsorption onto activated sludge by methylation treatment.

    PubMed

    Kang, So-Young; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2007-08-01

    Biosorption properties of arsenate [As(V)] onto activated sludge were investigated in batch systems. The adsorption of As(V) onto sludge increased from 23 to 266 microg/g dry weight through the methylation of the activated sludge. This increase resulted from neutralization of carboxylic groups via the methylation process. The pH effect of As(V) uptake was also investigated and As(V) adsorption by methylated sludge decreased significantly at high pH (pH > 11) due to competition between As(V) and OH(-) ions for binding sites distributed on sludge surfaces. In contrast, low pH favored As(V) adsorption by methylated sludge because of the elevated quantities of positively charged functional groups. The results suggest that methylated activated sludge may provide promising applications for the simultaneous removal and separation of As(V) from aqueous effluents. PMID:17505894

  4. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN-DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5'-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  5. IntI2 Integron Integrase in Tn7

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Karin; Sundström, Lars; Pelletier, Alex; Roy, Paul H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrons can insert and excise antibiotic resistance genes on plasmids in bacteria by site-specific recombination. Class 1 integrons code for an integrase, IntI1 (337 amino acids in length), and are generally borne on elements derived from Tn5090, such as that found in the central part of Tn21. A second class of integron is found on transposon Tn7 and its relatives. We have completed the sequence of the Tn7 integrase gene, intI2, which contains an internal stop codon. This codon was found to be conserved among intI2 genes on three other Tn7-like transposons harboring different cassettes. The predicted peptide sequence (IntI2*) is 325 amino acids long and is 46% identical to IntI1. In order to detect recombination activity, the internal stop codon at position 179 in the parental allele was changed to a triplet coding for glutamic acid. The sequences flanking the cassette arrays in the class 1 and 2 integrons are not closely related, but a common pool of mobile cassettes is used by the different integron classes; two of the three antibiotic resistance cassettes on Tn7 and its close relatives are also found in various class 1 integrons. We also observed a fourth excisable cassette downstream of those described previously in Tn7. The fourth cassette encodes a 165-amino-acid protein of unknown function with 6.5 contiguous repeats of a sequence coding for 7 amino acids. IntI2*179E promoted site-specific excision of each of the cassettes in Tn7 at different frequencies. The integrases from Tn21 and Tn7 showed limited cross-specificity in that IntI1 could excise all cassettes from both Tn21 and Tn7. However, we did not observe a corresponding excision of the aadA1 cassette from Tn21 by IntI2*179E. PMID:11872723

  6. Brujita Integrase: A Simple, Arm-Less, Directionless, and Promiscuous Tyrosine Integrase System.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Bryce L; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacteriophage Brujita is an unusual temperate phage in which establishment of superinfection immunity is dependent on chromosomal integration. Integration is mediated by a non-canonical tyrosine integrase (Int) lacking an N-terminal domain typically associated with binding to arm-type sites within the phage attachment site (attP). This raises the question as to how these Ints bind their DNA substrates, if they form higher-order protein DNA complexes, and how site selection and recombinational directionality are determined. Here we show that Brujita Int is a simple recombinase, whose properties more closely resemble those of FLP and Cre than it does the canonical phage Ints. Brujita Int uses relatively small DNA substrates, fails to discriminate between attP and attB, cleaves attachment site DNA to form a 6-base overlap region, and lacks directional control. Brujita Int also has an unusual pattern of binding to its DNA substrates. It binds to two half sites (B and B') at attB, although binding to the B half site is strongly dependent on occupancy of B'. In contrast, binding to the P half site is not observed, even when Int is bound at P'. However, an additional Int binding site (P1) is displaced to the left of the crossover site at attP, is required for recombination and is predicted to facilitate binding of Int to the P half site during synapsis. These simple phage Int systems may reflect ancestral states of phage evolution with the complexities of higher-order complex formation and directional control representing subsequent adaptations. PMID:27113630

  7. Tight Regulation of the intS Gene of the KplE1 Prophage: A New Paradigm for Integrase Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Panis, Gaël; Duverger, Yohann; Courvoisier-Dezord, Elise; Champ, Stéphanie; Talla, Emmanuel; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2010-01-01

    Temperate phages have the ability to maintain their genome in their host, a process called lysogeny. For most, passive replication of the phage genome relies on integration into the host's chromosome and becoming a prophage. Prophages remain silent in the absence of stress and replicate passively within their host genome. However, when stressful conditions occur, a prophage excises itself and resumes the viral cycle. Integration and excision of phage genomes are mediated by regulated site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine and serine recombinases. In the KplE1 prophage, site-specific recombination is mediated by the IntS integrase and the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF). We previously described a sub-family of temperate phages that is characterized by an unusual organization of the recombination module. Consequently, the attL recombination region overlaps with the integrase promoter, and the integrase and RDF genes do not share a common activated promoter upon lytic induction as in the lambda prophage. In this study, we show that the intS gene is tightly regulated by its own product as well as by the TorI RDF protein. In silico analysis revealed that overlap of the attL region with the integrase promoter is widely encountered in prophages present in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting a general occurrence of negatively autoregulated integrase genes. The prediction that these integrase genes are negatively autoregulated was biologically assessed by studying the regulation of several integrase genes from two different Escherichia coli strains. Our results suggest that the majority of tRNA-associated integrase genes in prokaryotic genomes could be autoregulated and that this might be correlated with the recombination efficiency as in KplE1. The consequences of this unprecedented regulation for excisive recombination are discussed. PMID:20949106

  8. Tight regulation of the intS gene of the KplE1 prophage: a new paradigm for integrase gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Panis, Gaël; Duverger, Yohann; Courvoisier-Dezord, Elise; Champ, Stéphanie; Talla, Emmanuel; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2010-10-01

    Temperate phages have the ability to maintain their genome in their host, a process called lysogeny. For most, passive replication of the phage genome relies on integration into the host's chromosome and becoming a prophage. Prophages remain silent in the absence of stress and replicate passively within their host genome. However, when stressful conditions occur, a prophage excises itself and resumes the viral cycle. Integration and excision of phage genomes are mediated by regulated site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine and serine recombinases. In the KplE1 prophage, site-specific recombination is mediated by the IntS integrase and the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF). We previously described a sub-family of temperate phages that is characterized by an unusual organization of the recombination module. Consequently, the attL recombination region overlaps with the integrase promoter, and the integrase and RDF genes do not share a common activated promoter upon lytic induction as in the lambda prophage. In this study, we show that the intS gene is tightly regulated by its own product as well as by the TorI RDF protein. In silico analysis revealed that overlap of the attL region with the integrase promoter is widely encountered in prophages present in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting a general occurrence of negatively autoregulated integrase genes. The prediction that these integrase genes are negatively autoregulated was biologically assessed by studying the regulation of several integrase genes from two different Escherichia coli strains. Our results suggest that the majority of tRNA-associated integrase genes in prokaryotic genomes could be autoregulated and that this might be correlated with the recombination efficiency as in KplE1. The consequences of this unprecedented regulation for excessive recombination are discussed. PMID:20949106

  9. The Competitive Interplay between Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor BI/D and LEDGF/p75 during the Early Stage of HIV-1 Replication Adversely Affects Inhibitor Potency.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Serrao, Erik; Hoyte, Ashley; Larue, Ross C; Slaughter, Alison; Sharma, Amit; Plumb, Matthew R; Kessl, Jacques J; Fuchs, James R; Bushman, Frederic D; Engelman, Alan N; Griffin, Patrick R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-05-20

    Allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) have recently emerged as a promising class of antiretroviral agents and are currently in clinical trials. In infected cells, ALLINIs potently inhibit viral replication by impairing virus particle maturation but surprisingly exhibit a reduced EC50 for inhibiting HIV-1 integration in target cells. To better understand the reduced antiviral activity of ALLINIs during the early stage of HIV-1 replication, we investigated the competitive interplay between a potent representative ALLINI, BI/D, and LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 integrase. While the principal binding sites of BI/D and LEDGF/p75 overlap at the integrase catalytic core domain dimer interface, we show that the inhibitor and the cellular cofactor induce markedly different multimerization patterns of full-length integrase. LEDGF/p75 stabilizes an integrase tetramer through the additional interactions with the integrase N-terminal domain, whereas BI/D induces protein-protein interactions in C-terminal segments that lead to aberrant, higher-order integrase multimerization. We demonstrate that LEDGF/p75 binds HIV-1 integrase with significantly higher affinity than BI/D and that the cellular protein is able to reverse the inhibitor induced aberrant, higher-order integrase multimerization in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with these observations, alterations of the cellular levels of LEDGF/p75 markedly affected BI/D EC50 values during the early steps of HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, genome-wide sequencing of HIV-1 integration sites in infected cells demonstrate that LEDGF/p75-dependent integration site selection is adversely affected by BI/D treatment. Taken together, our studies elucidate structural and mechanistic details of the interplay between LEDGF/p75 and BI/D during the early stage of HIV-1 replication. PMID:26910179

  10. Comparison of Newly Assembled Full Length HIV-1 Integrase With Prototype Foamy Virus Integrase: Structure-Function Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug design against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase through its mechanistic study is of great interest in the area in biological research. The main obstacle in this area is the absence of the full-length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase to be used as a model. A complete structure, similar to HIV-1 of a prototype foamy virus integrase in complex with DNA, including all conservative residues, is available and has been extensively used in recent investigations. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether the above model is precisely representative of HIV-1 integrase. This would critically determine the success of any designed drug using the model in deactivation of integrase and AIDS treatment. Materials and Methods Primarily, a new structure for HIV-1 was constructed, using a crystal structure of prototype foamy virus as the starting structure. The constructed structure of HIV-1 integrase was simultaneously simulated with a prototype foamy virus integrase on a separate occasion. Results Our results indicate that the HIV-1 system behaves differently from the prototype foamy virus in terms of folding, hydration, hydrophobicity of binding site and stability. Conclusions Based on our findings, we can conclude that HIV-1 integrase is vastly different from the prototype foamy virus integrase and does not resemble it, and the modeling output of the prototype foamy virus simulations could not be simply generalized to HIV-1 integrase. Therefore, our HIV-1 model seems to be more representative and more useful for future research. PMID:27540450

  11. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results. PMID:16839248

  12. Outer domains of integrase within retroviral intasomes are dispensible for catalysis of DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Lin, Shiqiang; Craigie, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Retroviral DNA integration is mediated by nucleoprotein complexes (intasomes) comprising a pair of viral DNA ends synapsed by a tetramer of integrase. Current integrase inhibitors act on intasomes rather than free integrase protein. Structural and functional studies of intasomes are essential to understand their mechanism of action and how the virus can escape by mutation. To date, prototype foamy virus (PFV) is the only retrovirus for which high-resolution structures of intasomes have been determined. In the PFV intasome structure, only the core domains of the outer subunits are ordered; the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and N-terminal extension domain are disordered. Are these "missing domains" required for function or are they dispensable? We have devised a strategy to assemble "hetero-intasomes" in which the outer domains are not present as a tool to assess the functional role of the missing domains for catalysis of integration. We find that the disordered domains of outer subunits are not required for intasome assembly or catalytic activity as catalytic core domains can substitute for the outer subunits in the case of both PFV and HIV-1 intasomes. PMID:26537415

  13. HIV type 1 integrase inhibitors: from basic research to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jegede, Oyebisi; Babu, John; Di Santo, Roberto; McColl, Damian J; Weber, Jan; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Similar to other retroviruses, productive infection with HIV-1 requires three key steps in the viral replication: (i) reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA into viral cDNA by the viral reverse transcriptase; (ii) integration of viral cDNA into host cell genome using the viral integrase; and (iii) cleavage of newly synthesized viral polypeptide by the viral protease into individual viral proteins during new virion assembly. Following their discovery, all three viral enzymes were considered as targets for antiretroviral drugs. However, while multiple reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors have been used for more than 12 years to treat HIV-infected individuals, only recently has the viral integrase enzyme emerged as an alternative, clinically validated target to block HIV-1 replication. Here we review the biology of HIV-1 integration, the mechanisms of action and development of resistance to integrase inhibitors, and the latest data on the most recent clinical trials involving this promising, novel class of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:18820719

  14. Novel Bifunctional Quinolonyl Diketo Acid Derivatives as HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Activities and Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Roux, Alessandra; Artico, Marino; Lavecchia, Antonio; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Palmisano, Lucia; Andreotti, Mauro; Amici, Roberta; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The virally encoded integrase protein is an essential enzyme in the life cycle of the HIV-1 virus and represents an attractive and validated target in the development of therapeutics against HIV infection. Drugs that selectively inhibit this enzyme, when used in combination with inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease, are believed to be highly effective in suppressing the viral replication. Among the HIV-1 integrase inhibitors, the β-diketo acids (DKAs) represent a major lead for anti-HIV-1drug development. In this study, novel bifunctional quinolonyl diketo acid derivatives were designed, synthesized and tested for their inhibitory ability against HIV-1 integrase. The compounds are potent inhibitors of integrase activity. Particularly, derivative 8 is a potent IN inhibitor for both steps of the reaction (3′-processing and strand transfer) and exhibits both high antiviral activity against HIV-1 infected cells and low cytotoxicity. Molecular modeling studies provide a plausible mechanism of action, which is consistent with ligand SARs and enzyme photo-crosslinking experiments. PMID:16539381

  15. Pyridoxine hydroxamic acids as novel HIV-integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stranix, Brent R; Wu, Jinzi J; Milot, Guy; Beaulieu, Françis; Bouchard, Jean-Emanuel; Gouveia, Kristine; Forte, André; Garde, Seema; Wang, Zhigang; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Delelis, Olivier; Xiao, Yong

    2016-02-15

    A series of pyridoxine hydroxamic acid analog bearing a 5-aryl-spacers were synthesized. Evaluation of these novel HIV integrase complex inhibitors revealed compounds with high potency against wild-type HIV virus. PMID:26826732

  16. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:20016921

  17. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for betaretroviral intasome function.

    PubMed

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J; Dewdney, Tamaria G; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-02-18

    Retroviral integrase catalyses the integration of viral DNA into host target DNA, which is an essential step in the life cycle of all retroviruses. Previous structural characterization of integrase-viral DNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus revealed a functional integrase tetramer, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera use tetrameric integrase. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Here, using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we determine an unexpected octameric integrase architecture for the intasome of the betaretrovirus mouse mammary tumour virus. The structure is composed of two core integrase dimers, which interact with the viral DNA ends and structurally mimic the integrase tetramer of prototype foamy virus, and two flanking integrase dimers that engage the core structure via their integrase carboxy-terminal domains. Contrary to the belief that tetrameric integrase components are sufficient to catalyse integration, the flanking integrase dimers were necessary for mouse mammary tumour virus integrase activity. The integrase octamer solves a conundrum for betaretroviruses as well as alpharetroviruses by providing critical carboxy-terminal domains to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis because of evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain-carboxy-terminal domain linker regions. The octameric architecture of the intasome of mouse mammary tumour virus provides new insight into the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  18. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  19. Investigation on the sucrose binding pocket of HIV-1 Integrase by molecular dynamics and synergy experiments.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Esposito, Francesca; Morreale, Francesca; Martini, Riccardo; Tramontano, Enzo; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes whose catalytic activity depends on multimeric assembly are targets for inhibitors that perturb the interactions between the protein subunits such as the HIV-1 Integrase (IN). Sucrose has been recently crystallized in complex with IN revealing an allosteric binding pocket at the monomer-monomer interface. Herein, molecular dynamics were applied to theoretically test the effect of this small ligand on IN. As a result, such a compound increases the mutual free energy of binding between the two interacting monomers. Biological experiments confirmed the computational forecast. PMID:26048795

  20. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN–DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5′-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  1. Allosteric Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kushol; Brady, Troy; Dyer, Benjamin M.; Malani, Nirav; Hwang, Young; Male, Frances; Nolte, Robert T.; Wang, Liping; Velthuisen, Emile; Jeffrey, Jerry; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the presence of antiviral agents results in evolution of drug-resistant variants, motivating the search for additional drug classes. Here we report studies of GSK1264, which was identified as a compound that disrupts the interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and the cellular factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. GSK1264 displayed potent antiviral activity and was found to bind at the site occupied by LEDGF/p75 on IN by x-ray crystallography. Assays of HIV replication in the presence of GSK1264 showed only modest inhibition of the early infection steps and little effect on integration targeting, which is guided by the LEDGF/p75·IN interaction. In contrast, inhibition of late replication steps was more potent. Particle production was normal, but particles showed reduced infectivity. GSK1264 promoted aggregation of IN and preformed LEDGF/p75·IN complexes, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition. LEDGF/p75 was not displaced from IN during aggregation, indicating trapping of LEDGF/p75 in aggregates. Aggregation assays with truncated IN variants revealed that a construct with catalytic and C-terminal domains of IN only formed an open polymer associated with efficient drug-induced aggregation. These data suggest that the allosteric inhibitors of IN are promising antiviral agents and provide new information on their mechanism of action. PMID:24904063

  2. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways. PMID:27417934

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: effect on viral replication of mutations at highly conserved residues.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Wilson, W; Byles, E; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-08-01

    Sequence comparisons of the integrase (IN) proteins from different retroviruses have identified several highly conserved residues. We have introduced mutations at 16 of these sites into the integrase gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and analyzed the phenotypes of the resulting viruses. The viruses were all normal for p24 content and reverse transcriptase activity. In addition, all of the mutants could infect T-cell lines and undergo reverse transcription, as assessed by PCR analysis. Most of the mutant viruses also had normal Western blot (immunoblot) profiles, although three of the mutations resulted in reduced signals for IN relative to the wild type on the immunoblots and mutation of residue W235 completely abolished recognition of the protein by pooled sera from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive patients. Mutations that have previously been shown to abolish activity in in vitro studies produced noninfectious viruses. The substitution of W235 was notable in producing a noninfectious virus, despite previous reports of this residue being nonessential for IN activity in vitro (A.D. Leavitt, L. Shiue, and H.E. Varmus, J. Biol. Chem. 268:2113-2119, 1993). In addition, we have identified four highly conserved residues that can be mutated without any affect on viral replication in T-cell lines. PMID:8035478

  4. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Smith, Steven J; Maskell, Daniel P; Metifiot, Mathieu; Pye, Valerie E; Fesen, Katherine; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Cherepanov, Peter; Hughes, Stephen H; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-04-15

    HIV integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are among the newest anti-AIDS drugs; however, mutant forms of IN can confer resistance. We developed noncytotoxic naphthyridine-containing INSTIs that retain low nanomolar IC50 values against HIV-1 variants harboring all of the major INSTI-resistant mutations. We found by analyzing crystal structures of inhibitors bound to the IN from the prototype foamy virus (PFV) that the most successful inhibitors show striking mimicry of the bound viral DNA prior to 3'-processing and the bound host DNA prior to strand transfer. Using this concept of "bi-substrate mimicry," we developed a new broadly effective inhibitor that not only mimics aspects of both the bound target and viral DNA but also more completely fills the space they would normally occupy. Maximizing shape complementarity and recapitulating structural components encompassing both of the IN DNA substrates could serve as a guiding principle for the development of new INSTIs. PMID:26808478

  5. The role of lysine 186 in HIV-1 integrase multimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoux, Lionel; Sebastian, Sarah; Muesing, Mark A.; Luban, Jeremy . E-mail: luban@irb.unisi.ch

    2007-07-20

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes biochemical reactions required for viral cDNA insertion into host cell chromosomal DNA, an essential step in the HIV-1 replication cycle. In one of these reactions, the two ends of the linear viral cDNA are believed to be simultaneously ligated to chromosomal DNA by a tetrameric form of IN. The structure of the full-length IN tetramer is not known but a model consisting of the N-terminal domain and the catalytic core revealed basic residues 186 to 188 at the interface between the two IN dimers. We found that alteration of these residues, in particular changing IN lysine residue 186 to glutamate (K186Q), impairs IN oligomerization in the yeast two-hybrid system and decreases oligomeric forms of IN within virions. When expressed independently of other viral proteins in human cells, IN-K186Q did not concentrate in the nucleus as did wild-type IN. Co-expression of wild-type IN restored the multimerization defects of IN-K186Q, in both the two-hybrid system and in virions, and also rescued the nuclear targeting defects. Virions bearing IN-K186Q were not infectious in a single cycle of replication but when mixed virions containing two different IN mutants were produced, IN-K186Q was capable of complementing the catalytically inactive mutant IN-D116A. Our biochemical and functional data support the crystallographic model in which IN residue K186 lies at the interface between IN dimers and suggest that tetramerization is important, not only for concerted integration, but also for IN nuclear targeting.

  6. Characterization of the relationship between integrase, excisionase and antirepressor activities associated with a superinfecting Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, P. C. M.; Rigden, D. J.; Saunders, J. R.; McCarthy, A. J.; Allison, H. E.

    2011-01-01

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli emerged as new food borne pathogens in the early 1980s, primarily driven by the dispersal of Shiga toxin-encoding lambdoid bacteriophages. At least some of these Stx phages display superinfection phenotypes, which differ significantly from lambda phage itself, driving through in situ recombination further phage evolution, increasing host range and potentially increasing the host's pathogenic profile. Here, increasing levels of Stx phage Φ24B integrase expression in multiple lysogen cultures are demonstrated along with apparently negligible repression of integrase expression by the cognate CI repressor. The Φ24B int transcription start site and promoter region were identified and found to differ from in silico predictions. The unidirectional activity of this integrase was determined in an in situ, inducible tri-partite reaction. This indicated that Φ24B must encode a novel directionality factor that is controlling excision events during prophage induction. This excisionase was subsequently identified and characterized through complementation experiments. In addition, the previous proposal that a putative antirepressor was responsible for the lack of immunity to superinfection through inactivation of CI has been revisited and a new hypothesis involving the role of this protein in promoting efficient induction of the Φ24B prophage is proposed. PMID:21062824

  7. The effects of oil on As(V) adsorption on illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and chlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainipee, Wimolporn; Cuadros, Javier; Sephton, Mark A.; Unsworth, Catherine; Gill, Martin G.; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of oil on As(V) adsorption on clay minerals has been investigated using batch experiments at low and high pH, NaCl concentration and oil contents. Four clay minerals were chosen because of their abundance in sediments and their different crystal chemistry: illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and chlorite. The values for pH were 4 and 8 and salt concentrations were 0.001 and 0.7 M NaCl to appreciate the effects of changing salinity, e.g. from fresh water to seawater conditions. For the coating experiments, a well-characterised oil was used to survey the main effects of complex organic mixtures on adsorption and oil to clay mineral (w/w) ratios were 0.0325 and 0.3250. As(V) adsorption increased with increasing NaCl concentration, suggesting that the mechanisms of As(V) adsorption are related to the formation of surface complexes in which Na+ ions act as bridges between the clay surface and the As(V) anions. Cation bridging is also indicated by zeta potential measurements which show that higher NaCl concentrations along with the presence of As(V) can cause the clay particles and adsorbed ions to have a more negative overall charge. Adsorption is lower at higher pH due to the reduced number of positively charged sites on the edge of clay mineral layers. Oil coating reduces As(V) adsorption by decreasing the available surface area of clay minerals, except in the case of oil-coated montmorillonite, where surface area following dispersion in water is increased. The main variables controlling As(V) adsorption are surface area and surface charge density, as confirmed by a simplified quantitative model. These findings advance our ability to predict the effects of complex pollution events in various freshwater and marine settings.

  8. Adsorption, desorption and fractionation of As(V) on untreated and mussel shell-treated granitic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco-Reigosa, N.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2015-03-01

    As(V) adsorption and desorption were studied on granitic material, coarse and fine mussel shell and granitic material amended with 12 and 24 t ha-1 fine shell, investigating the effect of different As(V) concentrations and different pH as well as the fractions where the adsorbed As(V) was retained. As(V) adsorption was higher on fine than on coarse shell. Mussel shell amendment increased As(V) adsorption on granitic material. Adsorption data corresponding to the unamended and shell-amended granitic material were satisfactory fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Desorption was always <19% when the highest As(V) concentration (100 mg L-1) was added. Regarding the effect of pH, the granitic material showed its highest adsorption (66%) at pH <6, and it was lower as pH increased. Fine shell presented notable adsorption in the whole pH range between 6 and 12, with a maximum of 83%. The shell-amended granitic material showed high As(V) adsorption, with a maximum (99%) at pH near 8, but decreased as pH increased. Desorption varying pH was always <26%. In the granitic material, desorption increased progressively when pH increased from 4 to 6, contrary to what happened to mussel shell. Regarding the fractionation of the adsorbed As(V), most of it was in the soluble fraction (weakly bound). The granitic material did not show high As(V) retention capacity, which could facilitate As(V) transfer to water courses and to the food chain in case of As(V) compounds being applied on this material; however, the mussel shell amendment increased As(V) retention, making this practice recommendable.

  9. A novel family of integrases associated with prophages and genomic islands integrated within the tRNA-dihydrouridine synthase A (dusA) gene.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Daniel N; Elbourne, Liam D H; Mabbutt, Bridget C; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-05-19

    Genomic islands play a key role in prokaryotic genome plasticity. Genomic islands integrate into chromosomal loci such as transfer RNA genes and protein coding genes, whilst retaining various cargo genes that potentially bestow novel functions on the host organism. A gene encoding a putative integrase was identified at a single site within the 5' end of the dusA gene in the genomes of over 200 bacteria. This integrase was discovered to be a component of numerous genomic islands, which appear to share a target site within the dusA gene. dusA encodes the tRNA-dihydrouridine synthase A enzyme, which catalyses the post-transcriptional reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine in tRNA. Genomic islands encoding homologous dusA-associated integrases were found at a much lower frequency within the related dusB and dusC genes, and non-dus genes. Excision of these dusA-associated islands from the chromosome as circularized intermediates was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Analysis of the dusA-associated islands indicated that they were highly diverse, with the integrase gene representing the only universal common feature. PMID:25883135

  10. As(V) adsorption onto nanoporous titania adsorbents (NTAs): effects of solution composition.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Suk; Batchelor, Bill; Park, Sung Hyuk; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2012-08-30

    This study has focused on developing two nanoporous titania adsorbents (NTA) to enhance removal efficiency of adsorption process for As(V) by characterizing the effects of pH and phosphate concentration on their sorption capacities and behaviors. One type of adsorbent is a mesoporous titania (MT) solid phase and the other is group of a highly ordered mesoporous silica solids (SBA-15) that can incorporate different levels of reactive titania sorption sites. Microscopic analysis showed that Ti((25))-SBA-15 (Ti/SBA=0.25 g/g) had titania nanostructured mesopores that do not rupture the highly ordered hexagonal silica framework. However, MT has disordered, wormhole-like mesopores that are caused by interparticle porosity. Adsorption experiments showed that Ti((25))-SBA-15 had a greater sorption capacity for As(V) than did Ti((15))-SBA-15 or Ti((35))-SBA-15 and the amount of As(V) adsorbed generally decreased as pH increased. Higher removal of As(V) was observed with Ti((25))-SBA-15 than with MT at pH 4, but MT had higher removals at higher pH (7, 9.5), even though MT has a lower specific surface area. However, in the presence of phosphate, MT showed higher removal of As(V) at low pH rather than did Ti((25))-SBA-15. As expected, the NTAs showed very fast sorption kinetics, but they followed a bi-phasic sorption pattern. PMID:22727482

  11. Theoretical study on the HIV-1 integrase-5CITEP complex based on polarized force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Caiyi; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Dawei

    2010-07-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of 5CITEP binding with HIV-1 integrase (IN) are presented using both polarized and nonpolarized force fields. When nonpolarized force field is used, the ligand drifts away from the original binding site. However, this depressing behavior can be curbed by introducing electronic polarization effect into the force field that stabilizes the protein structure and keeps the ligand in the binding pocket. Moreover, simulation under polarized force field gives a binding energy of -4.85 kcal/mol which is in excellent agreement with the experimental Δ G of -4.38 kcal/mol. The results demonstrate the importance of intra-protein electronic polarization in stabilizing the binding complex of IN-5CITEP and accurately predicting the binding energy.

  12. Biological responses of duckweed (Lemna minor L.) exposed to the inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V): effects of concentration and duration of exposure.

    PubMed

    Duman, Fatih; Ozturk, Fatma; Aydin, Zeki

    2010-06-01

    The accumulation of arsenic (As) and physiological responses of Lemna minor L. under different concentration (0, 1, 4, 16 and 64 microM) and duration (1, 2, 4 and 6 days) of two species As, NaAsO(2) and Na(2)HAsO(4).7H(2)O, were studied in hydroponics. The accumulation of both As species depended on As concentration and exposure duration. The highest accumulation of As was found as 17408 and 8674 microg g(-1), for plants exposed to 64 microM of As(III) and As(V), respectively, after 6 days. Two-way ANOVA analyses indicated that, for plants exposed to arsenite (As(III)), exposure duration had a greater effect than concentration on As accumulation. Conversely, exposure concentration had a greater effect on As accumulation in plants exposed to arsenate (As(V)). Arsenic exposure levels, approaching 16 microM for As(III) and 64 microM for As(V), did not significantly affect EC values. Beyond these exposure concentrations, EC values increased in a manner that depended on duration. Significant effect of As(III) on lipid peroxidation was observed at 1 microM application whereas, this effect started to be significant after an exposure to 16 microM As(V). For both As(III) and As(V), photosynthetic pigment levels slightly increased for the first day with respect to the control, followed by a gradual decline at higher concentrations and durations. An increase in protein content and enzyme activity was observed at moderate exposure conditions, followed by a decrease. Significant positive correlations were determined between accumulated As and ion leakage and lipid peroxidation. Negative correlations were found between accumulated As and total chlorophyll and protein content. Our results suggested that exposure duration and concentration had a strong synergetic effect on antioxidant enzyme activity. The findings of the present study may be useful when this plant is used as a phytoremediator in arsenic-polluted water. PMID:20221688

  13. Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572) exhibits significantly slower dissociation than raltegravir and elvitegravir from wild-type and integrase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 integrase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Kendra E; Wang, Ruolan; Deanda, Felix; Johns, Brian A; Weaver, Kurt; Shen, Yingnian; Tomberlin, Ginger H; Carter, H Luke; Broderick, Timothy; Sigethy, Scott; Seki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R

    2011-10-01

    The integrase inhibitor (INI) dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572) has significant activity against HIV-1 isolates with raltegravir (RAL)- and elvitegravir (ELV)-associated resistance mutations. As an initial step in characterizing the different resistance profiles of DTG, RAL, and ELV, we determined the dissociation rates of these INIs with integrase (IN)-DNA complexes containing a broad panel of IN proteins, including IN substitutions corresponding to signature RAL and ELV resistance mutations. DTG dissociates slowly from a wild-type IN-DNA complex at 37°C with an off-rate of 2.7 × 10(-6) s(-1) and a dissociative half-life (t(1/2)) of 71 h, significantly longer than the half-lives for RAL (8.8 h) and ELV (2.7 h). Prolonged binding (t(1/2), at least 5 h) was observed for DTG with IN-DNA complexes containing E92, Y143, Q148, and N155 substitutions. The addition of a second substitution to either Q148 or N155 typically resulted in an increase in the off-rate compared to that with the single substitution. For all of the IN substitutions tested, the off-rate of DTG from IN-DNA complexes was significantly slower (from 5 to 40 times slower) than the off-rate of RAL or ELV. These data are consistent with the potential for DTG to have a higher genetic barrier to resistance, provide evidence that the INI off-rate may be an important component of the mechanism of INI resistance, and suggest that the slow dissociation of DTG may contribute to its distinctive resistance profile. PMID:21807982

  14. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-28

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R{sup 2} = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification.

  15. Adsorption of As(V) inside the pores of porous hematite in water.

    PubMed

    Dai, Min; Xia, Ling; Song, Shaoxian; Peng, Changsheng; Lopez-Valdivieso, Alejandro

    2016-04-15

    As(V) adsorption inside the pores of porous hematite in water has been studied in this work. This study was performed on nonporous hematite and porous hematite prepared from the thermal decomposition of goethite and siderite through the measurements of adsorption isotherm, SEM-EDX, XRD and BET. The results demonstrated that the As(V) adsorption was difficult to be realized inside pores if they were too small. This observation might be due to that the pore entrances were blocked by the adsorbed ions and thus the inside surfaces became invalid for the adsorption. Only if the pore size is large enough, the effective surface area inside pores would be close to that on non-porous hematite for As(V) adsorption. In addition, it was found that siderite is better than goethite for preparing porous hematite with thermal decomposition as adsorbent for arsenic removal. PMID:26799222

  16. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification.

  17. As(V) and P Competitive Sorption on Soils, By-Products and Waste Materials.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Pérez, Ivana María; Paradelo-Núñez, Remigio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María José; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-12-01

    Batch-type experiments were used to study competitive As(V) and P sorption on various soils and sorbent materials. The materials assayed were a forest soil, a vineyard soil, pyritic material, granitic material, coarsely and finely ground mussel shell, calcinated mussel shell ash, pine sawdust and slate processing fines. Competition between As(V) and P was pronounced in the case of both soils, granitic material, slate fines, both shells and pine sawdust, showing more affinity for P. Contrary, the pyritic material and mussel shell ash showed high and similar affinity for As(V) and P. These results could be useful to make a correct use of the soils and materials assayed when focusing on As and P removal in solid or liquid media, in circumstances where both pollutants may compete for sorption sites. PMID:26690456

  18. As(V) and P Competitive Sorption on Soils, By-Products and Waste Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Pérez, Ivana María; Paradelo-Núñez, Remigio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María José; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Batch-type experiments were used to study competitive As(V) and P sorption on various soils and sorbent materials. The materials assayed were a forest soil, a vineyard soil, pyritic material, granitic material, coarsely and finely ground mussel shell, calcinated mussel shell ash, pine sawdust and slate processing fines. Competition between As(V) and P was pronounced in the case of both soils, granitic material, slate fines, both shells and pine sawdust, showing more affinity for P. Contrary, the pyritic material and mussel shell ash showed high and similar affinity for As(V) and P. These results could be useful to make a correct use of the soils and materials assayed when focusing on As and P removal in solid or liquid media, in circumstances where both pollutants may compete for sorption sites. PMID:26690456

  19. Application of Liquid Emulsion Membrane Technique for the Removal of As(V) from Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binnal, Prakash; Hiremath, Poornima G.

    2012-08-01

    Liquid emulsion membrane technique was used to remove As(V) from synthetic aqueous solutions. The emulsion was composed of Aliquat 336 as an extractant, commercial kerosene as a diluent and Span 80 (Sorbiton monooleate) as an emulsifying agent. Different types of internal phases were used, namely, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate, sodium sulphate and sodium chloride. The effect of process parameters affecting extraction efficiency, such as, initial concentration of As(V) in feed solution, pH of feed solution, concentrations of Aliquat 336 and Span 80 in membrane phase, volume ratio of stripping phase to membrane phase, concentration of internal phase, type of internal phase, volume ratio of emulsion to feed, agitation speed during extraction and time of extraction was investigated. The optimum conditions for the extraction were determined. A maximum As(V) removal rate of 97.8 was observed under optimum conditions.

  20. Next-Generation Site-Directed Transgenesis in the Malaria Vector Mosquito Anopheles gambiae: Self-Docking Strains Expressing Germline-Specific phiC31 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Janet M.; Underhill, Ann; McArthur, Clare C.; Eggleston, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have a devastating impact on global health and the situation is complicated due to difficulties with both existing control measures and the impact of climate change. Genetically modified mosquitoes that are refractory to disease transmission are seen as having great potential in the delivery of novel control strategies. The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase system has been successfully adapted for site-directed transgene integration in a range of insects, thus overcoming many limitations due to size constraints and random integration associated with transposon-mediated transformation. Using this technology, we previously published the first site-directed transformation of Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria. Mosquitoes were initially engineered to incorporate the phiC31 docking site at a defined genomic location. A second phase of genetic modification then achieved site-directed integration of an anti-malarial effector gene. In the current publication we report improved efficiency and utility of the phiC31 integrase system following the generation of Anopheles gambiae self-docking strains. Four independent strains, with docking sites at known locations on three different chromosome arms, were engineered to express integrase under control of the regulatory regions of the nanos gene from Anopheles gambiae. The resulting protein accumulates in the posterior oocyte to provide integrase activity at the site of germline development. Two self-docking strains, exhibiting significantly different levels of integrase expression, were assessed for site-directed transgene integration and found to demonstrate greatly improved survival and efficiency of transformation. In the fight against malaria, it is imperative to establish a broad repertoire of both anti-malarial effector genes and tissue-specific promoters to regulate their expression, enabling those offering maximum effect with minimum fitness cost to be identified

  1. As(V) and As(III) reactions on pristine pyrite and on surface-oxidized pyrite.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fenglong; Dempsey, Brian A; Osseo-Asare, Kwadwo A

    2012-12-15

    Reactions of As(III) and As(V) with pyrite were investigated using pristine pyrite (produced and reacted in a rigorously anoxic environment with P(O2)<10(-8)atm) and using surface-oxidized pyrite (produced under anoxic conditions, exposed to air, then stored and reacted under rigorously anoxic conditions). Results with surface-oxidized pyrite were similar to previously reported arsenic-pyrite results. However As(III) adsorbed over a broader pH range on pristine pyrite than on surface-oxidized pyrite, As(V) adsorbed over a narrower pH range on pristine pyrite than on surface-oxidized pyrite, and adsorbed As(V) on pristine pyrite was reduced to As(III) but adsorbed As(V) was not reduced with surface-oxidized pyrite. Reduction of As(V) with pristine pyrite was first-order in total As(V), Fe(II) was released, and sulfur was oxidized. The proposed mechanism for pyrite oxidation by As(V) was similar to the published mechanism for oxidation by O(2) and rates were compared. The results can be used to predict the removals of As(V) and As(III) on pyrite in continuously anoxic environments or on pyrite in intermittently oxic/anoxic environments. Rigorous cleanup and continuous maintenance of strictly anoxic conditions are required if commercial or produced pyrites are to be used as surrogates for pristine pyrite. PMID:23000211

  2. Solution structure of the DNA binding domain of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Lodi, P J; Ernst, J A; Kuszewski, J; Hickman, A B; Engelman, A; Craigie, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1995-08-01

    The solution structure of the DNA binding domain of HIV-1 integrase (residues 220-270) has been determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The protein is a dimer in solution, and each subunit is composed of a five-stranded beta-barrel with a topology very similar to that of the SH3 domain. The dimer is formed by a stacked beta-interface comprising strands 2, 3, and 4, with the two triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets, one from each subunit, oriented antiparallel to each other. One surface of the dimer, bounded by the loop between strands beta 1 and beta 2, forms a saddle-shaped groove with dimensions of approximately 24 x 23 x 12 A in cross section. Lys264, which has been shown from mutational data to be involved in DNA binding, protrudes from this surface, implicating the saddle-shaped groove as the potential DNA binding site. PMID:7632683

  3. The same site on the integrase-binding domain of lens epithelium–derived growth factor is a therapeutic target for MLL leukemia and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Pollock, Jonathan; He, Shihan; Miao, Hongzhi; Purohit, Trupta; Yokom, Adam; Hess, Jay L.; Muntean, Andrew G.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) is a chromatin-associated protein implicated in leukemia and HIV type 1 infection. LEDGF associates with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins and menin and is required for leukemic transformation. To better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the LEDGF integrase-binding domain (IBD) interaction with MLL fusion proteins in leukemia, we determined the solution structure of the MLL-IBD complex. We found a novel MLL motif, integrase domain binding motif 2 (IBM2), which binds to a well-defined site on IBD. Point mutations within IBM2 abolished leukemogenic transformation by MLL-AF9, validating that this newly identified motif is essential for the oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins. Interestingly, the IBM2 binding site on IBD overlaps with the binding site for the HIV integrase (IN), and IN was capable of efficiently sequestering IBD from the menin-MLL complex. A short IBM2 peptide binds to IBD directly and inhibits both the IBD-MLL/menin and IBD-IN interactions. Our findings show that the same site on IBD is involved in binding to MLL and HIV-IN, revealing an attractive approach to simultaneously target LEDGF in leukemia and HIV. PMID:25305204

  4. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors Stabilize an Integrase-Single Blunt-Ended DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Sibes; Pandey, Krishan K.; Vora, Ajaykumar C.; Grandgenett, Duane P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Integration of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) cDNA ends by integrase (IN) into host chromosomes involves a concerted integration mechanism. IN juxtaposes two DNA blunt-ends to form the synaptic complex (SC) which is the intermediate in the concerted integration pathway. SC is inactivated by strand transfer inhibitors (STI) with IC50 values of ~20 nM for inhibition of concerted integration. We detected a new nucleoprotein complex on native agarose that was produced in the presence of STI >200 nM, termed IN-single DNA (ISD) complex. Two IN dimers appear to bind in a parallel fashion at the DNA terminus producing a ~32 bp DNaseI protective footprint. In the presence of Raltegravir, MK-2048 and L-841,411, IN incorporated ~20 to 25% of the input blunt-ended DNA substrate into the stabilized ISD complex. Seven other STI also produced the ISD complex (≤ 5% of input DNA). The formation of the ISD complex was not dependent upon 3’ OH processing and the DNA was predominately blunt-ended in the complex. Raltegravir-resistant IN mutant N155H weakly form the ISD complex in the presence of Raltegravir at ~25% level of wild type IN. In contrast, MK-2048 and L-841,411 produced ~3 to 5-fold more ISD than Raltegravir with N155H IN, which is susceptible to these two inhibitors. The results suggest STI are slow binding inhibitors and the potency to form and stabilize the ISD complex is not always related to inhibition of concerted integration. Rather, the apparent binding and dissociation properties of each STI influenced the production of the ISD complex. PMID:21295584

  5. Biosorption of As(V) onto dried alligator weed root: role of metal (hydro) oxides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Tao, Weihua; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigates the adsorption of As(V) onto the dried powder of alligator weed root as bio-sorbent, using acid pre-treated alligator weed root powder as the reference. The isotherm study suggested there is a favorable As(V) adsorption happened on the AWR surface. The batch adsorption experimental results indicated that the ionic strength has little impact on the adsorption, while the solution pH has a significant effect on the adsorption with apparent inhibition appearing in both extreme acidic and alkaline pH region. In addition, the properties of the biosorbent were characterized by various techniques including SEM-EDS, FT-IR, and ICP detection. The analysis results suggested that the metals including Mn, Fe, and Al enrich over the alligator weed root surface in the morphology of metal (hydro) oxide. Based on the nature of the biosorbent and As(V) besides the adsorption performance, the metal (hydro) oxides over biosorbent surface is suggested as the essential role to drive the adsorption. With the metal (hydro) oxides denuded in the pre-treatment, the biosorbent loses its adsorption capability for As(V) totally. PMID:26458188

  6. ON-SITE MERCURY ANALYSIS OF SOIL AT HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES BY IMMUNOASSAY AND ASV

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two field methods for Hg, immunoassay and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), that can provide onsite results for quick decisions at hazardous waste sites were evaluated. Each method was applied to samples from two Superfund sites that contain high levels of Hg; Sulphur Bank Me...

  7. Adsorption, desorption and fractionation of As(V) on untreated and mussel shell-treated granitic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco-Reigosa, N.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2014-12-01

    As(V) adsorption and desorption were studied on granitic material, coarse and fine mussel shell, and granitic material amended with 12 and 24 t ha-1 fine shell, investigating the effect of different As(V) concentrations and different pH, as well as the fractions where the adsorbed As(V) was retained. As(V) adsorption was higher on fine than on coarse shell. Mussel shell amendment increased As(V) adsorption on granitic material. Adsorption data corresponding to the un-amended and shell-amended granitic material were satisfactory fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Desorption was always < 19% when the highest As(V) concentration (100 mg L-1) was added. Regarding the effect of pH, the granitic material showed its highest adsorption (66%) at pH < 6, and it was lower as pH increased. Fine shell presented notable adsorption in the whole pH range between 6 and 12, with a maximum of 83%. The shell-amended granitic material showed high As(V) adsorption, with a maximum (99%) at pH near 8, but decreasing as pH increased. Desorption varying pH was always < 26%. In the granitic material, desorption increased progressively when pH increased from 4 to 6, contrary to what happened to mussel shell. Regarding the fractionation of the adsorbed As(V), most of it was in the soluble fraction (weakly bound). Globally, the granitic material did not show high As(V) retention capacity, which implies risks of water pollution and transfer to the food chain; however, the mussel shell amendment increased As(V) retention, making this practice recommendable.

  8. Removal of As(V) using iron oxide impregnated carbon prepared from Tamarind hull.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Agarwal, Vaibhav; De, Sirshendu; Basu, Jayanta K

    2010-08-01

    Iron oxide impregnated tamarind hull carbon (IOITHC) was developed for use as an adsorbent for the removal of As(V) from water. Tamarind hull was used as the source of carbonaceous material, which was first treated with ferric chloride and ammonium hydroxide solutions with successive calcination at 873-974 K in a muffle furnace for 1 h to prepare an arsenic adsorbent. The B.E.T surface area of IOITHC was found to be 304.6 m(2) g(-1) and the average iron content in the adsorbent was found to be 7 wt%. The point of zero charge (pH(zpc)) of IOITHC was found to be 6.9. As(V) and arsenic (as total) adsorption on IOITHC were investigated in batch mode using As(V) spiked distilled water and real contaminated groundwater (CGW). The effects of speed of agitation, adsorbent particle size, temperature, pH of the solution, and concentration of the adsorbate on the adsorption process were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of about 1.2 mg g(-1) As(V) was achieved. The removal of As(V) on IOITHC was compared with the untreated tamarind hull carbon as well as with the activated commercial carbon and IOITHC was found to be better adsorbent. Arsenic adsorption from arsenic contaminated groundwater (CGW) on IOITHC in batch mode indicates that 98% removal was achieved for adsorbent loading of 3.0 g L(-1) with initial arsenic concentration of 264 microg L(-1). Desorption study of arsenic from As(V)-loaded IOITHC was performed using aqueous solution in the pH range of 3 to 12. PMID:20563914

  9. Natural Stilbenoids Isolated from Grapevine Exhibiting Inhibitory Effects against HIV-1 Integrase and Eukaryote MOS1 Transposase In Vitro Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chaignepain, Stéphane; Subra, Frederic; Munir, Soundasse; Delelis, Olivier; Lesbats, Paul; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Merillon, Jean-Michel; Auge-Gouillou, Corinne; Parissi, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Polynucleotidyl transferases are enzymes involved in several DNA mobility mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Some of them such as retroviral integrases are crucial for pathogenous processes and are therefore good candidates for therapeutic approaches. To identify new therapeutic compounds and new tools for investigating the common functional features of these proteins, we addressed the inhibition properties of natural stilbenoids deriving from resveratrol on two models: the HIV-1 integrase and the eukaryote MOS-1 transposase. Two resveratrol dimers, leachianol F and G, were isolated for the first time in Vitis along with fourteen known stilbenoids: E-resveratrol, E-piceid, E-pterostilbene, E-piceatannol, (+)-E-ε-viniferin, E-ε-viniferinglucoside, E-scirpusin A, quadragularin A, ampelopsin A, pallidol, E-miyabenol C, E-vitisin B, hopeaphenol, and isohopeaphenol and were purified from stalks of Vitis vinifera (Vitaceae), and moracin M from stem bark of Milliciaexelsa (Moraceae). These compounds were tested in in vitro and in vivo assays reproducing the activity of both enzymes. Several molecules presented significant inhibition on both systems. Some of the molecules were found to be active against both proteins while others were specific for one of the two models. Comparison of the differential effects of the molecules suggested that the compounds could target specific intermediate nucleocomplexes of the reactions. Additionally E-pterostilbene was found active on the early lentiviral replication steps in lentiviruses transduced cells. Consequently, in addition to representing new original lead compounds for further modelling of new active agents against HIV-1 integrase, these molecules could be good tools for identifying such reaction intermediates in DNA mobility processes. PMID:24312275

  10. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  11. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Ealy, Julie B.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu; Katzman, Michael

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  12. Kinetics and Longevity of ϕC31 Integrase in Mouse Liver and Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Christopher L.; Keravala, Annahita; Woodard, Lauren E.; Hillman, Robert T.; Stowe, Timothy R.; Chu, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ϕC31 integrase system provides genomic integration of plasmid DNA that may be useful in gene therapy. For example, the ϕC31 system has been used in combination with hydrodynamic injection to achieve long-term expression of factor IX in mouse liver. However, a concern is that prolonged expression of ϕC31 integrase within cells could potentially stimulate chromosome rearrangements or an immune response. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses were performed to investigate the duration of ϕC31 integrase expression in mouse liver. Integrase was expressed within 2 to 3 hr after hydrodynamic injection of a plasmid expressing ϕC31 integrase. Expression peaked between 8 and 16 hr and fell to background levels by 24–48 hr postinjection. Analysis of the amount of integrase plasmid DNA present in the liver over time suggested that the brief period of integrase expression could largely be accounted for by rapid loss of the bulk of the plasmid DNA, as well as by silencing of plasmid expression. PCR analysis of integration indicated that ϕC31 integrase carried out genomic integration of a codelivered attB-containing plasmid by 3 hr after plasmid injection. Integrase was expressed for longer times and at higher levels in transfected cultured cells compared with liver. Inhibitor studies suggested that the enzyme had a short half-life and was degraded by the 26S proteasome. The short duration of integrase expression in liver and rapid integration reaction appear to be features favorable for use in gene therapy. PMID:20497035

  13. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (<300 Da) screened using primarily biophysical assays. FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs. PMID:26324045

  14. Use of a Novel Integrase-Deficient Lentivirus for Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy With Survivin Promoter-Driven Diphtheria Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Lin, Baoshun; Gao, Anding; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Hongyu; Shen, Haifeng; Hu, Qiong; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Meng; Lan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Kuancan

    2015-08-01

    As an immunotoxin, diphtheria toxin has been widely used in gene therapy and gene function assays for its roles in protein synthesis inhibition, and the aim of our study is to set up a nonintegrating lentiviral system for specific expression of diphtheria toxin A (DTA) used in cancer gene therapy.Here, we established a lentiviral system that could coordinately express fluorescent protein and DTA driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, which is convenient for us to precisely trace the expression of DTA and monitor the process of lentivirus packaging. To achieve safer cancer therapy, we replaced the CMV promoter with the Survivin promoter, a specific promoter that is dramatically activated in cancer tissues and cells, but not in normal tissues and cells, and that will impose greater therapeutic potential because a significant expression difference occurred between these 2 groups. Meanwhile, we obtained integrase-deficient lentivirus (IDLV) after packaging with the integrase mutant, which expresses defective integrase RRK262263264AAH, to minimize the side effects that derived from the insertional mutagenesis of the host genome.Our results suggest that the IDLV system that we generated possesses therapeutic potential in cancers in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26252309

  15. Use of a Novel Integrase-Deficient Lentivirus for Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy With Survivin Promoter-Driven Diphtheria Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baoshun; Gao, Anding; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Hongyu; Shen, Haifeng; Hu, Qiong; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Meng; Lan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Kuancan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As an immunotoxin, diphtheria toxin has been widely used in gene therapy and gene function assays for its roles in protein synthesis inhibition, and the aim of our study is to set up a nonintegrating lentiviral system for specific expression of diphtheria toxin A (DTA) used in cancer gene therapy. Here, we established a lentiviral system that could coordinately express fluorescent protein and DTA driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, which is convenient for us to precisely trace the expression of DTA and monitor the process of lentivirus packaging. To achieve safer cancer therapy, we replaced the CMV promoter with the Survivin promoter, a specific promoter that is dramatically activated in cancer tissues and cells, but not in normal tissues and cells, and that will impose greater therapeutic potential because a significant expression difference occurred between these 2 groups. Meanwhile, we obtained integrase-deficient lentivirus (IDLV) after packaging with the integrase mutant, which expresses defective integrase RRK262263264AAH, to minimize the side effects that derived from the insertional mutagenesis of the host genome. Our results suggest that the IDLV system that we generated possesses therapeutic potential in cancers in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26252309

  16. Influence of Drug Resistance Mutations on the Activity of HIV-1 Subtypes A and B Integrases: a Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shadrina, O. A.; Zatsepin, T. S.; Agapkina, Yu. Yu.; Isaguliants, M. G.; Gottikh, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) DNA into the genome of an infected cell is one of the key steps in the viral replication cycle. The viral enzyme integrase (IN), which catalyzes the integration, is an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. However, the HIV-1 therapy often results in the IN gene mutations inducing viral resistance to integration inhibitors. To assess the impact of drug resistance mutations on the activity of IN of HIV-1 subtype A strain FSU-A, which is dominant in Russia, variants of the consensus IN of this subtype containing the primary resistance mutations G118R and Q148K and secondary compensatory substitutions E138K and G140S were prepared and characterized. Comparative study of these enzymes with the corresponding mutants of IN of HIV-1 subtype B strains HXB-2 was performed. The mutation Q148K almost equally reduced the activity of integrases of both subtypes. Its negative effect was partially compensated by the secondary mutations E138K and G140S. Primary substitution G118R had different influence on the activity of proteins of the subtypes A and B, and the compensatory effect of the secondary substitution E138K also depended on the viral subtype. Comparison of the mutants resistance to the known strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a new inhibitor XZ-259 (a dihydro-1H-isoindol derivative), showed that integrases of both subtypes with the Q148K mutation were insensitive to raltegravir and elvitegravir but were effectively inhibited by XZ-259. The substitution G118R slightly reduced the efficiency of IN inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir and caused no resistance to XZ_259. PMID:25927004

  17. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2012-02-07

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly.

  18. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  19. Bovine Lactoferrampin, Human Lactoferricin, and Lactoferrin 1-11 Inhibit Nuclear Translocation of HIV Integrase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Winston Yan; Wong, Jack Ho; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Cheung, Randy Chifai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate fragments derived from human and bovine lactoferrins for ability to inhibit nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. It was shown that human lactoferricin, human lactoferrin 1-11, and bovine lactoferrampin reduced nuclear distribution of HIV-1 integrase. Bovine lactoferrampin could inhibit both the activity and nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. Human lactoferrampin, bovine lactoferricin, and bovine lactoferrin 1-11 had no effect on HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation. Human lactoferrampin which inhibited the activity of integrase did not prevent its nuclear translocation. Human lactoferricin and lactoferrin 1-11 did not inhibit HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation despite their ability to attenuate the enzyme activity. The discrepancy between the findings on reduction of HIV-1 activity and inhibition of nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase was due to the different mechanisms involved. A similar reasoning can also be applied to the different inhibitory potencies of the milk peptides on different HIV enzymes, i.e., nuclear translocation. PMID:27022750

  20. Modeling and fixed bed column adsorption of As(V) on laterite soil.

    PubMed

    Maji, Sanjoy K; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar; Adak, Asok

    2007-09-01

    Laterite soil, an abundant locally available natural adsorbent, has been evaluated for As(V) removal from aqueous solutions in column mode operation. The column studies were conducted using columns of 10, 20, 30 cm bed depth with 2 cm internal diameter. Initial As(V) concentration was 0.5 mg/L and flow rate was 7.75 mL/min. Bohart and Adams sorption model was employed for the determination of different parameters like height of exchange zone, adsorption rate, time required for exchange zone to move, and the adsorption capacity. Effect of flow rate and initial concentration was studied. The adsorption capacity of the laterite soil for 0.5 mg/L of As(V) was found to be 62.32 mg/L, and the adsorption rate constant was 1.0911 L/mg h for the minimum bed depth of 8.47 cm. The column was designed by the BDST model. Freundlich isotherm model was used to compare the theoretical and experimental breakthrough profile in the dynamic process. The bed saturation obtained was 36-80%. Regeneration of the exhausted column was possible with 1M NaOH. PMID:17849300

  1. Electromembrane extraction and spectrophotometric determination of As(V) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Kamyabi, Mohammad Ali; Aghaei, Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this study, for the first time electromembrane extraction (EME) was used as a highly efficient sample pre-treatment method for the UV-VIS spectrophotometric determination of As(V) in water samples. The influences of experimental parameters during EME were investigated and optimized using one-variable-at-a-time methodology as follows: organic solvent: 1-octanol+2.5% (V/V) di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate, applied voltage: 70V, extraction time: 15min, pH of acceptor: 13, stirring rate: 750rpm. The method allowed the determination of As(V) in the range of 5-300ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was found to be within the range of 3.4-7.6%. The limit of detection, corresponding to a signal to noise ratio of three, was 1.5ngmL(-1). The proposed method was finally applied to the determination of As(V) in water samples and relative recoveries ranging from 95 to 102% were obtained. PMID:27374507

  2. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) using ozone microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, Snigdha; Majumder, Subrata Kumar; Ghosh, Pallab

    2014-02-01

    The use of ozone in the treatment of water and wastewater is rapidly increasing due to its high oxidizing power. Arsenic is one the most toxic elements found in water. As(III) and As(V) are the major sources of arsenic poisoning. It is known that As(V) can be more easily removed from water by adsorptive methods than As(III). In this work, oxidation of more toxic As(III) to less toxic As(V) was studied in a pilot-plant by using ozone microbubbles. The microbubbles were effective in dissolving ozone in water. The oxidation was fast over a wide range of pH (e.g., 4-9). The role of hydroxyl radical in the oxidation of As(III) under acidic conditions was investigated by using 2-propanol as the hydroxyl radical scavenger. Under acidic conditions, the addition of 2-propanol slowed down the oxidation, which proves that hydroxyl radicals were involved in the oxidation process. The effect of carbonate ions on the rate of oxidation was investigated. It was found that the generation of carbonate ion radical from the carbonate ion accelerated the oxidation of As(III). The kinetics of oxidation of As(III) by ozone was studied. PMID:24268174

  3. The sorption property of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution using waste cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wooram; Lee, Yunsub; Kim, Yangsu; Choi, Jinyoung; Han*, Ohhyung

    2015-04-01

    The sorption property of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution was investigated using waste cast iron(WCI), which is a byproduct of the iron casting process in foundries. Two types of WCI were used in the experiment: grind precipitate dust (GPD) and cast iron shot (CIS). Non-equilibrium batch experiments were performed under different concentrations of As(III) and As(V). Results showed that waste cast iron was effective in the removal of As(III) and As(V). The phase changes of sorbed As species on the GPD using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) were investigated. The results showed the binding energy of 45.19eV for As(V) were obtained, whereas two of 45.3eV and 43.91eV for As(III) were shown in GPD. It can be strongly suggested that GPD mediated As(V) had no evidence for the reduction of ionized As(V) species into As(III), whereas GPD mediated As(III) showed a partial oxidation of As(III) into As(V). The qualitative and quantitative analysis of As distribution and metal containing phase in WCI surface through the XRF, XRD, EPMA, EDS patterns, BSE and SEM image were investigated. The GPD and CIS are a spherical shape with Fe0 composition in correspondence with XRF and XRD analysis results. Quantitative analysis for molar ratio of Fe and As indicated a 1.1% and 1.5% of As(V) and As(III) molar fractions were observed in GPD, while 5.1% and 0.9% fractions in CIS.

  4. Clinical Use of HIV Integrase Inhibitors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Messiaen, Peter; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Fun, Axel; Nijhuis, Monique; Brusselaers, Nele; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal regimen choice of antiretroviral therapy is essential to achieve long-term clinical success. Integrase inhibitors have swiftly been adopted as part of current antiretroviral regimens. The purpose of this study was to review the evidence for integrase inhibitor use in clinical settings. Methods MEDLINE and Web-of-Science were screened from April 2006 until November 2012, as were hand-searched scientific meeting proceedings. Multiple reviewers independently screened 1323 citations in duplicate to identify randomized controlled trials, nonrandomized controlled trials and cohort studies on integrase inhibitor use in clinical practice. Independent, duplicate data extraction and quality assessment were conducted. Results 48 unique studies were included on the use of integrase inhibitors in antiretroviral therapy-naive patients and treatment-experienced patients with either virological failure or switching to integrase inhibitors while virologically suppressed. On the selected studies with comparable outcome measures and indication (n = 16), a meta-analysis was performed based on modified intention-to-treat (mITT), on-treatment (OT) and as-treated (AT) virological outcome data. In therapy-naive patients, favorable odds ratios (OR) for integrase inhibitor-based regimens were observed, (mITT OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.59–0.86). However, integrase inhibitors combined with protease inhibitors only did not result in a significant better virological outcome. Evidence further supported integrase inhibitor use following virological failure (mITT OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.11–0.66), but switching to integrase inhibitors from a high genetic barrier drug during successful treatment was not supported (mITT OR 1.43; 95% CI 0.89–2.31). Integrase inhibitor-based regimens result in similar immunological responses compared to other regimens. A low genetic barrier to drug-resistance development was observed for raltegravir and elvitegravir, but not for dolutegravir. Conclusion

  5. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  6. Structural Basis for the Recognition Between HIV-1 Integrase and Transcriptional Coactivator p75

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov,P.; Ambrosio, A.; Rahman, S.; Ellenberger, T.; Engelman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an essential retroviral enzyme, and human transcriptional coactivator p75, which is also referred to as lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF), is the dominant cellular binding partner of HIV-1 IN. Here, we report the crystal structure of the dimeric catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN complexed to the IN-binding domain of LEDGF. Previously identified LEDGF hotspot residues anchor the protein to both monomers at the IN dimer interface. The principal structural features of IN that are recognized by the host factor are the backbone conformation of residues 168-171 from one monomer and a hydrophobic patch that is primarily comprised of {alpha}-helices 1 and 3 of the second IN monomer. Inspection of diverse retroviral primary and secondary sequence elements helps to explain the apparent lentiviral tropism of the LEDGF-IN interaction. Because the lethal phenotypes of HIV-1 mutant viruses unable to interact with LEDGF indicate that IN function is highly sensitive to perturbations of the structure around the LEDGF-binding site, we propose that small molecule inhibitors of the protein-protein interaction might similarly disrupt HIV-1 replication.

  7. Cellular Cofactors of Lentiviral Integrase: From Target Validation to Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Taltynov, Oliver; Desimmie, Belete A.; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN), an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2) has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs). PMID:22928108

  8. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Efficient Gene Transfer to Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells with Minimal Genotoxic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Helen E.; Nowrouzi, Ali; Fronza, Raffaele; McDonald, Robert A.; Kane, Nicole M.; Alba, Raul; Delles, Christian; Sessa, William C.; Schmidt, Manfred; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that injury-induced neointima formation was rescued by adenoviral-Nogo-B gene delivery. Integrase-competent lentiviral vectors (ICLV) are efficient at gene delivery to vascular cells but present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. Conversely, integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLV) offer additional benefits through reduced mutagenesis risk, but this has not been evaluated in the context of vascular gene transfer. Here, we have investigated the performance and genetic safety of both counterparts in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and compared gene transfer efficiency and assessed the genotoxic potential of ICLVs and IDLVs based on their integration frequency and insertional profile in the human genome. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mediated by IDLVs (IDLV-eGFP) demonstrated efficient transgene expression in VSMCs. IDLV gene transfer of Nogo-B mediated efficient overexpression of Nogo-B in VSMCs, leading to phenotypic effects on VSMC migration and proliferation, similar to its ICLV version and unlike its eGFP control and uninfected VSMCs. Large-scale integration site analyses in VSMCs indicated that IDLV-mediated gene transfer gave rise to a very low frequency of genomic integration compared to ICLVs, revealing a close-to-random genomic distribution in VSMCs. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of IDLVs for safe and efficient vascular gene transfer. PMID:22931362

  9. Plasmid integration in a wide range of bacteria mediated by the integrase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii bacteriophage mv4.

    PubMed Central

    Auvray, F; Coddeville, M; Ritzenthaler, P; Dupont, L

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriophage mv4 is a temperate phage infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. During lysogenization, the phage integrates its genome into the host chromosome at the 3' end of a tRNA(Ser) gene through a site-specific recombination process (L. Dupont et al., J. Bacteriol., 177:586-595, 1995). A nonreplicative vector (pMC1) based on the mv4 integrative elements (attP site and integrase-coding int gene) is able to integrate into the chromosome of a wide range of bacterial hosts, including Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei (two strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Integrative recombination of pMC1 into the chromosomes of all of these species is dependent on the int gene product and occurs specifically at the pMC1 attP site. The isolation and sequencing of pMC1 integration sites from these bacteria showed that in lactobacilli, pMC1 integrated into the conserved tRNA(Ser) gene. In the other bacterial species where this tRNA gene is less or not conserved; secondary integration sites either in potential protein-coding regions or in intergenic DNA were used. A consensus sequence was deduced from the analysis of the different integration sites. The comparison of these sequences demonstrated the flexibility of the integrase for the bacterial integration site and suggested the importance of the trinucleotide CCT at the 5' end of the core in the strand exchange reaction. PMID:9068626

  10. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75 Binding Site of Integrase Block HIV Replication and Modulate Integrase Multimerization

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Frauke; Shaw, Stephen; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Desimmie, Belete A.; Marchand, Arnaud; Butler, Scott; Smets, Wim; Chaltin, Patrick; Westby, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the HIV integrase (HIV IN) is a clinically validated approach for designing novel anti-HIV therapies. We have previously described the discovery of a novel class of integration inhibitors, 2-(quinolin-3-yl)acetic acid derivatives, blocking HIV replication at a low micromolar concentration through binding in the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV integrase, hence referred to as LEDGINs. Here we report the detailed characterization of their mode of action. The design of novel and more potent analogues with nanomolar activity enabled full virological evaluation and a profound mechanistic study. As allosteric inhibitors, LEDGINs bind to the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket in integrase, thereby blocking the interaction with LEDGF/p75 and interfering indirectly with the catalytic activity of integrase. Detailed mechanism-of-action studies reveal that the allosteric mode of inhibition is likely caused by an effect on HIV-1 integrase oligomerization. The multimodal inhibition by LEDGINs results in a block in HIV integration and in a replication deficiency of progeny virus. The allosteric nature of LEDGINs leads to synergy in combination with the clinically approved active site HIV IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) raltegravir, and cross-resistance profiling proves the distinct mode of action of LEDGINs and INSTIs. The allosteric nature of inhibition and compatibility with INSTIs underline an interest in further (clinical) development of LEDGINs. PMID:22664975

  11. Computer tools in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design (CADD) methodologies have made great advances and contributed significantly to the discovery and/or optimization of many clinically used drugs in recent years. CADD tools have likewise been applied to the discovery of inhibitors of HIV-I integrase, a difficult and worthwhile target for the development of efficient anti-HIV drugs. This article reviews the application of CADD tools, including pharmacophore search, quantitative structure–activity relationships, model building of integrase complexed with viral DNA and quantum-chemical studies in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors. Different structurally diverse integrase inhibitors have been identified by, or with significant help from, various CADD tools. PMID:21426160

  12. Unmasking the ancestral activity of integron integrases reveals a smooth evolutionary transition during functional innovation

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; Loot, Celine; Parissi, Vincent; Nivina, Aleksandra; Bouchier, Christiane; Mazel, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine (Y)-recombinases have evolved to deliver mechanistically different reactions on a variety of substrates, but these evolutionary transitions are poorly understood. Among them, integron integrases are hybrid systems recombining single- and double-stranded DNA partners. These reactions are asymmetric and need a replicative resolution pathway, an exception to the canonical second strand exchange model of Y-recombinases. Integron integrases possess a specific domain for this specialized pathway. Here we show that despite this, integrases are still capable of efficiently operating the ancestral second strand exchange in symmetrical reactions between double-stranded substrates. During these reactions, both strands are reactive and Holliday junction resolution can follow either pathway. A novel deep-sequencing approach allows mapping of the crossover point for the second strand exchange. The persistence of the ancestral activity in integrases illustrates their robustness and shows that innovation towards new recombination substrates and resolution pathways was a smooth evolutionary process. PMID:26961432

  13. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  14. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification. PMID:21459813

  15. QSAR study of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Sharma, Anju; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2013-03-01

    A QSAR study was performed on curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using multiple linear regression. The statistically significant model was developed with squared correlation coefficients (r(2)) 0.891 and cross validated r(2) (r(2) cv) 0.825. The developed model revealed that electronic, shape, size, geometry, substitution's information and hydrophilicity were important atomic properties for determining the inhibitory activity of these molecules. The model was also tested successfully for external validation (r(2) pred = 0.849) as well as Tropsha's test for model predictability. Furthermore, the domain analysis was carried out to evaluate the prediction reliability of external set molecules. The model was statistically robust and had good predictive power which can be successfully utilized for screening of new molecules. PMID:23286784

  16. Surface speciation of As(III) and As(V) in relation to charge distribution.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, Monika; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2006-10-01

    The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) on goethite has been studied as a function of pH and loading. The data can be successfully described with the charge distribution (CD) model (extended Stern layer option) using realistic species observed by EXAFS. The CD values have been derived theoretically. Therefore, the Brown bond valence approach has been applied to MO/DFT optimized geometries of a series of hydrated complexes of As(III) and As(V) with Fe(III) (hydr)oxide. The calculated ionic CD values have been corrected for the effect of dipole orientation of interfacial water, resulting in overall interfacial CD coefficients that can be used to describe the surface speciation as a function of pH and loading. For As(III), the main surface species is a bidentate complex and a minor contribution of a monodentate species is found, which is in agreement with EXAFS. The CD values have also been fitted. Such an analysis of the adsorption data resulted in the same surface species. The fitted CD values for the bidentate complex points to the presence of strong AsO bonds with the surface and a weaker AsOH bond with the free OH ligand. This agrees quantitatively with the MO/DFT optimized geometry. Interpretation of free fitted CD values for As(V) binding suggests that the main surface species is a non-protonated bidentate complex (B) with a contribution of a singly protonated surface complex (MH) at sub-neutral pH and high loading. In addition, a protonated bidentate surface complex (BH) may be present. The same species are found if the theoretical CD values are used in the data analysis. The pH dependency of surface speciation is strongly influenced by the charge attribution of adsorbed species to the electrostatic surface plane while the effect of loading is primarily controlled by the amount of charge attributed to the 1-plane, illustrating the different action of the CD value. The MO/DFT geometry optimizations furthermore suggest that for As(V) the B, MH and BH surface

  17. As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) sorption on biochars and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamadopoulos, Evan; Agrafioti, Evita; Kalderis, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    The use of biochar, as a cost effective sorbent for heavy metal removal from contaminated water and soils is becoming a very promising practice. In this study, rice husk, the organic fraction of solid wastes, as well as sewage sludge were used as precursors for biochar production. The first was chosen as one of the most abundant types of biomass worldwide and the other two in order to find alternative innovative uses of these wastes. A series of batch kinetic and equilibrium (sorption and desorption) experiments was conducted using As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) as adsorbates. The specific heavy metals were chosen in order to assess biochars removal capacity towards both anionic and cationic metals. Apart from biochars, a sandy loam soil was also used as adsorbent for metal removal. Knowing the separate behavior of biochars and soil towards metal sorption, it could be the first step in explaining the fate of heavy metals in a biochar amended soil. The kinetic study showed that, for all adsorbents and metals examined, sorption can be well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. What is more, simulation of sorption isotherms gave a better fit for the Freundlich model, possibly due to the heterogeneous surface of the initial biomasses and the fine aggregates that soil consists of. Based on the equilibrium study, the materials examined removed more than 95% of the initial Cr(III). This is possibly related to the electrostatic interactions between adsorbents negative surface charge and Cr(III) cations. However, removal rates for As(V) and Cr(VI) anions were significantly lower. Biochar derived from sewage sludge was efficient in removing 89% of Cr(VI) and 53% of As(V). Its ash high Fe2O3 content may have enhanced metal adsorption via precipitation. Soil was the most effective material for the removal of As(V), yet it could not strongly retain metal anions compared to biochars, as a significant amount of the adsorbed metal was released during desorption

  18. Removal of As(III) and As(V) from water by copper oxide incorporated mesoporous alumina.

    PubMed

    Pillewan, Pradnya; Mukherjee, Shrabanti; Roychowdhury, Tarit; Das, Sera; Bansiwal, Amit; Rayalu, Sadhana

    2011-02-15

    In the present manuscript a new adsorbent namely copper oxide incorporated mesoporous alumina (COIMA) for removal of arsenic from water is reported. The COIMA was prepared by treating mesoporous alumina with copper sulphate solution followed by calcination at 450°C in the presence of air. Various adsorption isotherm and kinetic parameters were computed using batch adsorption studies to determine the adsorption capacity for As(III) and As(V) and to understand the mechanism of adsorption. It was observed that incorporation of copper oxide improves the adsorption capacity of unmodified alumina from 0.92 to 2.16 mg g(-1) for As(III) and from 0.84 to 2.02 mg g(-1) for As(V). The results revealed that the adsorption follows Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models for both As(III) and As(V). The material is capable of simultaneously removing As(III) and As(V) with removal efficiencies of more than 95% for both As(III) and As(V). Assessment of the water quality before and after treatment with COIMA also confirmed that the there is no leaching of copper and other parameters were also within permissible limits of Indian drinking water standard indicating that the COIMA can be used for treatment of arsenic contaminated drinking water. PMID:21186080

  19. The long-acting integrase inhibitor GSK744 protects macaques from repeated intravaginal SHIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Spreen, William; Yueh, Yun Lan; Mitchell, James; Jenkins, Leecresia; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2015-01-14

    Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Truvada is a proven HIV prevention strategy; however, its effectiveness is limited by low adherence. Antiretroviral drug formulations that require infrequent dosing may increase adherence and thus PrEP effectiveness. We investigated whether monthly injections of a long-acting formulation of the HIV integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 (GSK744 LA) prevented simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection by vaginal challenge in macaques. Female pigtail macaques (n = 12) were exposed to intravaginal inoculations of SHIV twice a week for up to 11 weeks. Half of the animals received a GSK744 LA injection every 4 weeks, and half received placebo. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all six macaques from infection. Placebo controls were all infected after a median of 4 (range, 2 to 20) vaginal challenges with SHIV. Efficacy was related to high and sustained vaginal and plasma drug concentrations that remained above the protein-adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration during the dosing cycles. These data support advancement of GSK744 LA as a potential PrEP candidate for women. PMID:25589631

  20. Blind prediction of HIV integrase binding from the SAMPL4 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, David L.; Liu, Shuai; Lim, Nathan M.; Wymer, Karisa L.; Perryman, Alexander L.; Forli, Stefano; Deng, Nanjie; Su, Justin; Branson, Kim; Olson, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we give an overview of the protein-ligand binding portion of the SAMPL4 challenge, which focused on predicting binding of HIV integrase inhibitors in the catalytic core domain. The challenge encompassed three components – a small “virtual screening” challenge, a binding mode prediction component, and a small affinity prediction component. Here, we give summary results and statistics concerning the performance of all submissions at each of these challenges. Virtual screening was particularly challenging here in part because, in contrast to more typical virtual screening test sets, the inactive compounds were tested because they were thought to be likely binders, so only the very top predictions performed significantly better than random. Pose prediction was also quite challenging, in part because inhibitors in the set bind to three different sites, so even identifying the correct binding site was challenging. Still, the best methods managed low RMSD predictions in many cases. Here, we give an overview of results, highlight some features of methods which worked particularly well, and refer the interested reader to papers in this issue which describe specific submissions for additional details. PMID:24595873

  1. Kuwanon-L as a New Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor: Molecular Modeling and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Francesca; Tintori, Cristina; Martini, Riccardo; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferrarese, Roberto; Cabiddu, Gianluigi; Corona, Angela; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Calcaterra, Andrea; Iovine, Valentina; Botta, Bruno; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo; Botta, Maurizio; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-11-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) active site inhibitors are the latest class of drugs approved for HIV treatment. The selection of IN strand-transfer drug-resistant HIV strains in patients supports the development of new agents that are active as allosteric IN inhibitors. Here, a docking-based virtual screening has been applied to a small library of natural ligands to identify new allosteric IN inhibitors that target the sucrose binding pocket. From theoretical studies, kuwanon-L emerged as the most promising binder and was thus selected for biological studies. Biochemical studies showed that kuwanon-L is able to inhibit the HIV-1 IN catalytic activity in the absence and in the presence of LEDGF/p75 protein, the IN dimerization, and the IN/LEDGF binding. Kuwanon-L also inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell cultures. Overall, docking and biochemical results suggest that kuwanon-L binds to an allosteric binding pocket and can be considered an attractive lead for the development of new allosteric IN antiviral agents. PMID:26360521

  2. [Mechanism of groundwater As(V) removal with ferric flocculation and direct filtration].

    PubMed

    Kang, Ying; Duan, Jin-Ming; Jing, Chuan-Yong

    2015-02-01

    The As removal process and mechanism from groundwater using ferric flocculation-direct filtration system was investigated using batch, field pilot tests, extended X-ray absorption fine structure ( EXAFS) spectroscopy, and charge-distribution multisite complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The results showed that arsenate [As(V)] was the dominant As species in the groundwater with a concentration of 40 μg x L(-1). The treatment system could supply 64 984 L As-safe drinking water (< 10 μg L(-1)) using Fe 1.5 mg x L(-1). Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) demonstrated that the leachate As was 3.4 μg x L(-1), much lower than the EPA regulatory concentration (5 mg x L(-1)). EXAFS and CD-MUSIC model indicated that As(V) was adsorbed onto ferric hydroxide via bidentate binuclear complexes in the pH range of 3 to 9.5, while formation of precipitate with Ca or Mg dominated the As removal at pH > 9.5. PMID:26031078

  3. The mechanisms of detoxification of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and As(V) in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pantoja Munoz, L; Purchase, D; Jones, H; Raab, A; Urgast, D; Feldmann, J; Garelick, H

    2016-06-01

    The response of Chlorella vulgaris when challenged by As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was assessed through experiments on adsorption, efflux and speciation of arsenic (reduction, oxidation, methylation and chelation with glutathione/phytochelatin [GSH/PC]). Our study indicates that at high concentrations of phosphate (1.62mM of HPO4(2-)), upon exposure to As(V), cells are able to shift towards methylation of As(V) rather than PC formation. Treatment with As(V) caused a moderate decrease in intracellular pH and a strong increase in the concentration of free thiols (GSH). Passive surface adsorption was found to be negligible for living cells exposed to DMA and As(V). However, adsorption of As(III) was observed to be an active process in C. vulgaris, because it did not show saturation at any of the exposure periods. Chelation of As(III) with GS/PC and to a lesser extent hGS/hPC is a major detoxification mechanism employed by C. vulgaris cells when exposed to As(III). The increase of bound As-GS/PC complexes was found to be strongly related to an increase in concentration of As(III) in media. C. vulgaris cells did not produce any As-GS/PC complex when exposed to As(V). This may indicate that a reduction step is needed for As(V) complexation with GSH/PC. C. vulgaris cells formed DMAS(V)-GS upon exposure to DMA independent of the exposure period. As(III) triggers the formation of arsenic complexes with PC and homophytochelatins (hPC) and their compartmentalisation to vacuoles. A conceptual model was devised to explain the mechanisms involving ABCC1/2 transport. The potential of C. vulgaris to bio-remediate arsenic from water appeared to be highly selective and effective without the potential hazard of reducing As(V) to As(III), which is more toxic to humans. PMID:26994369

  4. Application of personal computers in the analytical laboratory-III ASV analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D; Raphaeli, D; Ben-Yaakov, S

    1987-08-01

    Automatic operation and data-processing of ASV analysis is achieved by interfacing a general-purpose polarograph to a personal computer. The software package, written in SUPER BASIC, includes graphic routines that are used to display the voltamperograms and calibration curve, and as an interface with the operator. Data-processing can be done manually, interactively or automatically. In the last of these modes, peak position and height are evaluated by first correcting for baseline drift and then fitting the peaks to a Gaussian function. It is found that this procedure is relatively insensitive to noise. The system is used routinely in the analysis of treated domestic wastewater and soils irrigated by effluents. The flexibility of the programming and the feature of interactive work are important in this connection, which calls for careful examination of peaks distorted by matrix interferences. PMID:18964391

  5. Use of Integrase Inhibitors in HIV-Infected Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dehority, Walter; Abadi, Jacobo; Wiznia, Andrew; Viani, Rolando M

    2015-09-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral drugs is an increasingly prevalent challenge affecting both the adult and pediatric HIV-infected populations. Though data on the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of newer antiretroviral agents in children typically lags behind adult data, newer agents are becoming available for use in HIV-infected children who are failing to respond to or are experiencing toxicities with traditional antiretroviral regimens. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors are one such new class of antiretrovirals. Raltegravir has been US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for use in patients over the age of 4 weeks. Elvitegravir is a second member of this class, and has the potential for use in children but does not yet have a Pediatric FDA indication. Dolutegravir, a second-generation integrase inhibitor, is approved for those older than 12 years. This review summarizes the use of integrase inhibitors in children and adolescents, and highlights the results of recent clinical trials. PMID:26242765

  6. Using ΦC31 integrase to mediate insertion of DNA in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, You E; Allen, Bryan G; Weeks, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    The two most common methods used to generate transgenic Xenopus embryos, restriction enzyme-mediated insertion, and I-SceI meganuclease take advantage of relatively common but spatially unpredictable double-stranded breaks in sperm, egg, or early embryo genomes. These methods also tend to insert multimeric copies of the transgene. An alternative is to use bacteriophage- or transposon-derived integrase or recombinase to mediate more site-specific insertion of the transgene. The use of phiC31 integrase requires a defined sequence for insertion and is compatible with insertion of a single copy of the transgene. We describe the protocol we use to facilitate phiC31 integrase transgene insertion including the use of insulator sequences to reduce position effect disruption of transgene activity. PMID:22956091

  7. HIV Virions as Nanoscopic Test Tubes for Probing Oligomerization of the Integrase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Employing viruses as nanoscopic lipid-enveloped test tubes allows the miniaturization of protein–protein interaction (PPI) assays while preserving the physiological environment necessary for particular biological processes. Applied to the study of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), viral biology and pathology can also be investigated in novel ways, both in vitro as well as in infected cells. In this work we report on an experimental strategy that makes use of engineered HIV-1 viral particles, to allow for probing PPIs of the HIV-1 integrase (IN) inside viruses with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorescent proteins (FP). We show that infectious fluorescently labeled viruses can be obtained and that the quantity of labels can be accurately measured and controlled inside individual viral particles. We demonstrate, with proper control experiments, the formation of IN oligomers in single viral particles and inside viral complexes in infected cells. Finally, we show a clear effect on IN oligomerization of small molecule inhibitors of interactions of IN with its natural human cofactor LEDGF/p75, corroborating that IN oligomer enhancing drugs are active already at the level of the virus and strongly suggesting the presence of a dynamic, enhanceable equilibrium between the IN dimer and tetramer in viral particles. Although applied to the HIV-1 IN enzyme, our methodology for utilizing HIV virions as nanoscopic test tubes for probing PPIs is generic, i.e., other PPIs targeted into the HIV-1, or PPIs targeted into other viruses, can potentially be studied with a similar strategy. PMID:24654558

  8. Hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of HIV-1 Integrase/Inhibitor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Pianwanit, Somsak; Parasuk, Vudhichai; Ebalunode, Jerry O.; Briggs, James M.; Kokpol, Sirirat

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN) is an attractive target for development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome chemotherapy. In this study, conventional and coupled quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of HIV-1 IN complexed with 5CITEP (IN-5CITEP) were carried out. In addition to differences in the bound position of 5CITEP, significant differences at the two levels of theory were observed in the metal coordination geometry and the areas involving residues 116–119 and 140–166. In the conventional MD simulation, the coordination of Mg2+ was found to be a near-perfect octahedral geometry whereas a distorted octahedral complex was observed in QM/MM. All of the above reasons lead to a different pattern of protein-ligand salt link formation that was not observed in the classical MD simulation. Furthermore to provide a theoretical understanding of inhibition mechanisms of 5CITEP and its derivative (DKA), hybrid QM/MM MD simulations of the two complexes (IN-5CITEP and IN-DKA) have been performed. The results reveal that areas involving residues 60–68, 116–119, and 140–149 were substantially different among the two systems. The two systems show similar pattern of metal coordination geometry, i.e., a distorted octahedron. In IN-DKA, both OD1 and OD2 of Asp-64 coordinate the Mg2+ in a monodentate fashion whereas only OD1 is chelated to the metal as observed in IN-5CITEP. The high potency of DKA as compared to 5CITEP is supported by a strong salt link formed between its carboxylate moiety and the ammonium group of Lys-159. Detailed comparisons between HIV-1 IN complexed with DKA and with 5CITEP provide information about ligand structure effects on protein-ligand interactions in particular with the Lys-159. This is useful for the design of new selective HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:17693479

  9. A method for producing transgenic cells using a multi-integrase system on a human artificial chromosome vector.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeyuki; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Yuji; Nanba, Eiji; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    The production of cells capable of expressing gene(s) of interest is important for a variety of applications in biomedicine and biotechnology, including gene therapy and animal transgenesis. The ability to insert transgenes at a precise location in the genome, using site-specific recombinases such as Cre, FLP, and ΦC31, has major benefits for the efficiency of transgenesis. Recent work on integrases from ΦC31, R4, TP901-1 and Bxb1 phages demonstrated that these recombinases catalyze site-specific recombination in mammalian cells. In the present study, we examined the activities of integrases on site-specific recombination and gene expression in mammalian cells. We designed a human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector containing five recombination sites (ΦC31 attP, R4 attP, TP901-1 attP, Bxb1 attP and FRT; multi-integrase HAC vector) and de novo mammalian codon-optimized integrases. The multi-integrase HAC vector has several functions, including gene integration in a precise locus and avoiding genomic position effects; therefore, it was used as a platform to investigate integrase activities. Integrases carried out site-specific recombination at frequencies ranging from 39.3-96.8%. Additionally, we observed homogenous gene expression in 77.3-87.5% of colonies obtained using the multi-integrase HAC vector. This vector is also transferable to another cell line, and is capable of accepting genes of interest in this environment. These data suggest that integrases have high DNA recombination efficiencies in mammalian cells. The multi-integrase HAC vector enables us to produce transgene-expressing cells efficiently and create platform cell lines for gene expression. PMID:21390305

  10. A rat brain mRNA encoding a transcriptional activator homologous to the DNA binding domain of retroviral integrases.

    PubMed Central

    Duilio, A; Zambrano, N; Mogavero, A R; Ammendola, R; Cimino, F; Russo, T

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a rat cDNA, named FE65, hybridizing to an mRNA of about 2,300 nucleotides present in rat brain, undetectable in rat liver and very poorly represented in other tissues. An mRNA of the same size is present in human neuroblastoma cells and is absent from other human cell lines. The FE65 cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a polypeptide of 499 amino acids in which 143 residues can be aligned with the DNA binding domain of the integrases encoded by mammalian immunodeficiency viruses. The remaining part of the FE65 ORF is not homologous with the correspondent regions of the integrases; the first 206 residues of the FE65 ORF show numerous negative charges and a short sequence not dispensable for the function of the transactivating acidic domain of the jun family transcriptional factors. A plasmid which expresses FE65 amino acids 1-232 fused to the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain was co-transfected with a plasmid containing five GAL4 binding sites upstream of a minimal Adenovirus promoter controlling the expression of the CAT gene. This experiment showed that the fused protein GAL4-FE65 is able to obtain a 30-40 fold increase of the CAT gene expression compared to the expression observed in the presence of the GAL4 DNA binding domain alone. Two types of FE65 mRNA are present in rat brain, differing only for six nucleotides. We demonstrate that this is the consequence of a neuron-specific alternative splicing of a six-nucleotide miniexon, which is also present in the human genome, in an intron/exon context very similar to that of the rat FE65 gene. Images PMID:1923810

  11. Pharmacovirological impact of an integrase inhibitor on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cDNA species in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Allespach, Ina; Oberbremer, Lena; Golden, Pamela L; Foster, Scott A; Johns, Brian A; Weatherhead, Jason G; Novick, Steven J; Chiswell, Karen E; Garvey, Edward P; Keppler, Oliver T

    2009-08-01

    Clinical trials of the first approved integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, have demonstrated a drop in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA loads of infected patients that was unexpectedly more rapid than that with a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and apparently dose independent. These clinical outcomes are not understood. In tissue culture, although their inhibition of integration is well documented, the effects of INIs on levels of unintegrated HIV-1 cDNAs have been variable. Furthermore, there has been no report to date on an INI's effect on these episomal species in vivo. Here, we show that prophylactic treatment of transgenic rats with the strand transfer INI GSK501015 reduced levels of viral integrants in the spleen by up to 99.7%. Episomal two-long-terminal-repeat (LTR) circles accumulated up to sevenfold in this secondary lymphoid organ, and this inversely correlated with the impact on the proviral burden. Contrasting raltegravir's dose-ranging study with HIV patients, titration of GSK501015 in HIV-infected animals demonstrated dependence of the INI's antiviral effect on its serum concentration. Furthermore, the in vivo 50% effective concentration calculated from these data best matched GSK501015's in vitro potency when serum protein binding was accounted for. Collectively, this study demonstrates a titratable, antipodal impact of an INI on integrated and episomal HIV-1 cDNAs in vivo. Based on these findings and known biological characteristics of viral episomes, we discuss how integrase inhibition may result in additional indirect antiviral effects that contribute to more rapid HIV-1 decay in HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:19458008

  12. Antiviral characteristics of GSK1265744, an HIV integrase inhibitor dosed orally or by long-acting injection.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kobayashi, Masanori; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Suyama-Kagitani, Akemi; Kawauchi-Miki, Shinobu; Taishi, Teruhiko; Kawasuji, Takashi; Johns, Brian A; Underwood, Mark R; Garvey, Edward P; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 is a new HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) engineered to deliver efficient antiviral activity with a once-daily, low-milligram dose that does not require a pharmacokinetic booster. The in vitro antiviral profile and mechanism of action of GSK1265744 were established through integrase enzyme assays, resistance passage experiments, and cellular assays with site-directed molecular (SDM) HIV clones resistant to other classes of anti-HIV-1 agents and earlier INSTIs. GSK1265744 inhibited HIV replication with low or subnanomolar efficacy and with a selectivity index of at least 22,000 under the same culture conditions. The protein-adjusted half-maximal inhibitory concentration (PA-EC50) extrapolated to 100% human serum was 102 nM. When the virus was passaged in the presence of GSK1265744, highly resistant mutants with more than a 10-fold change (FC) in EC50 relative to that of the wild-type were not observed for up to 112 days of culture. GSK1265744 demonstrated activity against SDM clones containing the raltegravir (RAL)-resistant Y143R, Q148K, N155H, and G140S/Q148H signature variants (FC less than 6.1), while these mutants had a high FC in the EC50 for RAL (11 to >130). Either additive or synergistic effects were observed when GSK1265744 was tested in combination with representative anti-HIV agents, and no antagonistic effects were seen. These findings demonstrate that, similar to dolutegravir, GSK1265744 is differentiated as a new INSTI, having a markedly distinct resistance profile compared with earlier INSTIs, RAL, and elvitegravir (EVG). The collective data set supports further clinical development of GSK1265744. PMID:25367908

  13. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part I. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee

    2007-03-23

    We have identified oleuropein (Ole) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) as a unique class of HIV-1 inhibitors from olive leaf extracts effective against viral fusion and integration. We used molecular docking simulation to study the interactions of Ole and HT with viral targets. We find that Ole and HT bind to the conserved hydrophobic pocket on the surface of the HIV-gp41 fusion domain by hydrogen bonds with Q577 and hydrophobic interactions with I573, G572, and L568 on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide N36, interfering with formation of the gp41 fusion-active core. To test and confirm modeling predications, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 fusion complex formation using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on HIV-1 fusion core formation with EC{sub 50}s of 66-58 nM, with no detectable toxicity. Our findings on effects of HIV-1 integrase are reported in the subsequent article.

  14. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (AS) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (ASV)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (iAs) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (AsV). E M Kenyon1, L M Del Razo2, and M F Hughes1. 1NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City, Mexico.

    The relationship o...

  15. Removal of Cr(VI) and As(V) ions from aqueous solutions by polyacrylate and polystyrene anion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachuła, Justyna; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    The sorption of Cr(VI) and As(V) from the aqueous solutions with the polyacrylate anion exchangers of the strong base functional groups Amberlite IRA 458 and Amberlite IRA 958 was studied. The studies were carried out by the static-batch method. The concentration of Cr(VI) and As(V) ions in the aqueous solution was determined by the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The influence of several parameters was studied with respect to sorption equilibrium. The phase contact time and the concentration affect the sorption process. The equilibrium state was established already after 15 min of phase contact time. Maximum uptake of Cr(VI) and As(V) occurred at pH 5 and 10, respectively. The determined kinetic parameters imply that the sorption process proceeds according to the equation type of pseudo second-order. Sorption equilibrium data were correlated with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Removal of As(V) ions on macroporous Amberlite IRA 900 decreased about 12 % in presence of other anions (Cl-, NO3 -, SO4 2-) in the solution. The sorption was temperature dependent.

  16. Subtype diversity associated with the development of HIV-1 resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Lowe, Matthew; Moisi, Daniela; Hardy, Isabelle; Gagnon, Simon; Charest, Hugues; Baril, Jean Guy; Wainberg, Mark A; Roger, Michel

    2011-05-01

    We used genotypic and phylogenetic analysis to determine integrase diversity among subtypes, and studied natural polymorphisms and mutations implicated in resistance to integrase inhibitors (INI) in treatment-naïve persons (n = 220) and -experienced individuals (n = 24). Phylogenetics revealed 7 and 10% inter-subtype diversity in the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease regions, respectively. Integrase sequencing identified a novel A/B recombinant in which all viruses in a male-sex-male (MSM) transmission cluster (n = 12) appeared to possess subtype B in integrase and subtype A in the remainder of the pol region. Natural variations and signature polymorphisms were observed at codon positions 140, 148, 151, 157, and 160 among HIV subtypes. These variations predicted higher genetic barriers to G140S and G140C in subtypes C, CRF02_AG, and A/CRF01_AE, as well as higher genetic barriers toward acquisition of V151I in subtypes CRF02_AG and A/CRF01_AE. The E157Q and E160Q mutational motif was observed in 35% of INI-naïve patients harboring subtype C infections, indicating intra-subtype variations. Thirteen patients failed raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens within 8 ± 1 months, in association with the major Q148K/R/H and G140A/S (n = 8/24) or N155H (n = 5/24) mutational pathways. Of note, the remaining patients on RAL regimens for 14 ± 3 months harbored no or only minor integrase mutations/polymorphisms (T66I, T97A, H114P, S119P, A124S, G163R, I203M, R263K). These results demonstrate the importance of understanding subtype variability in the development of resistance to INIs. PMID:21360548

  17. Preliminary study on the DNA-binding properties of phage ΦC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihui; Fang, Yuxiang; Wang, Rencheng; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Jinzhong

    2011-09-15

    ΦC31 integrase is a member of the large serine subfamily and is required for the recombination of the phage genome into the host chromosome, either to establish or exit from the lysogenic state. This enzyme can also mediate site-specific integration in mammalian cells in a cofactor-independent manner and has been considered as a potentially powerful tool for gene therapy. It has previously been reported that DAXX interacts with ΦC31 integrase and markedly inhibits its integration efficiency, and the 451RFGK454 tetramer of ΦC31 integrase has been identified as the interacting motif. Here, we report that both the deletion of the tetramer or the replacement of Arg with His greatly reduced the recombination activity of the ΦC31 integrase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further demonstrated that the DNA-binding ability and binding specificity of the two mutants were dramatically reduced. Bioinformatic analysis indicated a probable helix-turn-helix-like DNA-binding motif between residues 415-525, a region that contains the tetramer motif. However, neither truncated Int(415-525) nor Int(△415-525) alone could bind to the attB target sequence. Results of a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay indicated that Int(415-525) did not fold correctly into a helix-turn-helix-like structure, which may be one of the reasons for its lack of DNA-binding ability. Thus, the identification and confirmation of four key amino acids in the DNA-binding specificity and recombination activity of ΦC31 integrase provide information about the domain structure and function of the large C-terminal region and suggest important implications for the more efficient use of integrase in gene transfer and gene therapy. PMID:21679753

  18. Development of tricyclic hydroxy-1H-pyrrolopyridine-trione containing HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Smith, Steven J; Vu, B Christie; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2011-05-15

    New tricyclic HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors were prepared that combined structural features of bicyclic pyrimidinones with recently disclosed 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-diones. This combination resulted in the introduction of a nitrogen into the aryl ring and the addition of a fused third ring to our previously described inhibitors. The resulting analogues showed low micromolar inhibitory potency in in vitro HIV-1 integrase assays, with good selectivity for strand transfer relative to 3'-processing. PMID:21493066

  19. DNA Physical Properties and Nucleosome Positions Are Major Determinants of HIV-1 Integrase Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Naughtin, Monica; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Xavier, Johan; Meyer, Sam; Silvain, Maud; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Levy, Nicolas; Miele, Vincent; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Ruff, Marc; Parissi, Vincent; Vaillant, Cédric; Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integrases (INs) catalyse the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the host cell genome. This process is selective, and chromatin has been proposed to be a major factor regulating this step in the viral life cycle. However, the precise underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. We have developed a new in vitro integration assay using physiologically-relevant, reconstituted genomic acceptor chromatin and high-throughput determination of nucleosome positions and integration sites, in parallel. A quantitative analysis of the resulting data reveals a chromatin-dependent redistribution of the integration sites and establishes a link between integration sites and nucleosome positions. The co-activator LEDGF/p75 enhanced integration but did not modify the integration sites under these conditions. We also conducted an in cellulo genome-wide comparative study of nucleosome positions and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integration sites identified experimentally in vivo. These studies confirm a preferential integration in nucleosome-covered regions. Using a DNA mechanical energy model, we show that the physical properties of DNA probed by IN binding are important in determining IN selectivity. These novel in vitro and in vivo approaches confirm that IN has a preference for integration into a nucleosome, and suggest the existence of two levels of IN selectivity. The first depends on the physical properties of the target DNA and notably, the energy required to fit DNA into the IN catalytic pocket. The second depends on the DNA deformation associated with DNA wrapping around a nucleosome. Taken together, these results indicate that HIV-1 IN is a shape-readout DNA binding protein. PMID:26075397

  20. Role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase in uncoating of the viral core.

    PubMed

    Briones, Marisa S; Dobard, Charles W; Chow, Samson A

    2010-05-01

    After membrane fusion with a target cell, the core of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters into the cytoplasm, where uncoating occurs. The cone-shaped core is composed of the viral capsid protein (CA), which disassembles during uncoating. The underlying factors and mechanisms governing uncoating are poorly understood. Several CA mutations can cause changes in core stability and a block at reverse transcription, demonstrating the requirement for optimal core stability during viral replication. HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes the insertion of the viral cDNA into the host genome, and certain IN mutations are pleiotropic. Similar to some CA mutants, two IN mutants, one with a complete deletion of IN (NL-DeltaIN) and the other with a Cys-to-Ser substitution (NL-C130S), were noninfectious, with a replication block at reverse transcription. Compared to the wild type (WT), the cytoplasmic CA levels of the IN mutants in infected cells were reduced, suggesting accelerated uncoating. The role of IN during uncoating was examined by isolating and characterizing cores from NL-DeltaIN and NL-C130S. Both IN mutants could form functional cores, but the core yield and stability were decreased. Also, virion incorporation of cyclophilin A (CypA), a cellular peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that binds specifically to CA, was decreased in the IN mutants. Cores isolated from WT virus depleted of CypA had an unstable-core phenotype, confirming a role of CypA in promoting optimal core stability. Taken together, our results indicate that IN is required during uncoating for maintaining CypA-CA interaction, which promotes optimal stability of the viral core. PMID:20219923

  1. Tracer test with As(V) under variable redox conditions controlling arsenic transport in the presence of elevated ferrous iron concentrations.

    PubMed

    Höhn, R; Isenbeck-Schröter, M; Kent, D B; Davis, J A; Jakobsen, R; Jann, S; Niedan, V; Scholz, C; Stadler, S; Tretner, A

    2006-11-20

    To study transport and reactions of arsenic under field conditions, a small-scale tracer test was performed in an anoxic, iron-reducing zone of a sandy aquifer at the USGS research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. For four weeks, a stream of groundwater with added As(V) (6.7 muM) and bromide (1.6 mM), was injected in order to observe the reduction of As(V) to As(III). Breakthrough of bromide (Br(-)), As(V), and As(III) as well as additional parameters characterizing the geochemical conditions was observed at various locations downstream of the injection well over a period of 104 days. After a short lag period, nitrate and dissolved oxygen from the injectate oxidized ferrous iron and As(V) became bound to the freshly formed hydrous iron oxides. Approximately one week after terminating the injection, anoxic conditions had been reestablished and increases in As(III) concentrations were observed within 1 m of the injection. During the observation period, As(III) and As(V) were transported to a distance of 4.5 m downgradient indicating significant retardation by sorption processes for both species. Sediment assays as well as elevated concentrations of hydrogen reflected the presence of As(V) reducing microorganisms. Thus, microbial As(V) reduction was thought to be one major process driving the release of As(III) during the tracer test in the Cape Cod aquifer. PMID:16945450

  2. Dithiothreitol causes HIV-1 integrase dimer dissociation while agents interacting with the integrase dimer interface promote dimer formation.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Mukund, Susmith; Brendza, Katherine M; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Jin, Debi; Liu, Xiaohong; Mitchell, Michael; Sakowicz, Roman; Geleziunas, Romas

    2011-03-15

    We have developed a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay that detects the formation of HIV-1 integrase (IN) dimers. The assay utilizes IN monomers that express two different epitope tags that are recognized by their respective antibodies, coupled to distinct fluorophores. Surprisingly, we found that dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing agent essential for in vitro enzymatic activity of IN, weakened the interaction between IN monomers. This effect of DTT on IN is dependent on its thiol groups, since the related chemical threitol, which contains hydroxyls in place of thiols, had no effect on IN dimer formation. By studying mutants of IN, we determined that cysteines in IN appear to be dispensable for the dimer dissociation effect of DTT. Peptides derived from the IN binding domain (IBD) of lens epithelium derived growth factor/transcriptional coactivator p75 (LEDGF), a cellular cofactor that interacts with the IN dimer interface, were tested in this IN dimerization assay. These peptides, which compete with LEDGF for binding to IN, displayed an intriguing equilibrium binding dose-response curve characterized by a plateau rising to a peak, then descending to a second plateau. Mathematical modeling of this binding system revealed that these LEDGF-derived peptides promote IN dimerization and block subunit exchange between IN dimers. This dose-response behavior was also observed with a small molecule that interacts with the IN dimer interface and inhibits LEDGF binding to IN. In conclusion, this novel IN dimerization assay revealed that peptide and small molecule inhibitors of the IN-LEDGF interaction also stabilize IN dimers and promote their formation. PMID:21222490

  3. Resistance against Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors and Relevance to HIV Persistence.

    PubMed

    Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    Drug resistance prevents the successful treatment of HIV-positive individuals by decreasing viral sensitivity to a drug or a class of drugs. In addition to transmitted resistant viruses, treatment-naïve individuals can be confronted with the problem of drug resistance through de novo emergence of such variants. Resistant viruses have been reported for every antiretroviral drug tested so far, including the integrase strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir. However, de novo resistant variants against dolutegravir have been found in treatment-experienced but not in treatment-naïve individuals, a characteristic that is unique amongst antiretroviral drugs. We review here the issue of drug resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors as well as both pre-clinical and clinical studies that have led to the identification of the R263K mutation in integrase as a signature resistance substitution for dolutegravir. We also discuss how the topic of drug resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors may have relevance in regard to the nature of the HIV reservoir and possible HIV curative strategies. PMID:26198244

  4. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  5. Integrase Inhibitor Prodrugs: Approaches to Enhancing the Anti-HIV Activity of β-Diketo Acids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    HIV integrase, encoded at the 3'-end of the HIV pol gene, is essential for HIV replication. This enzyme catalyzes the incorporation of HIV DNA into human DNA, which represents the point of "no-return" in HIV infection. Integrase is a significant target in anti-HIV drug discovery. This review article focuses largely on the design of integrase inhibitors that are β-diketo acids constructed on pyridinone scaffolds. Methodologies for synthesis of these compounds are discussed. Integrase inhibition data for the strand transfer (ST) step are compared with in vitro anti-HIV data. The review also examines the issue of the lack of correlation between the ST enzymology data and anti-HIV assay results. Because this disconnect appeared to be a problem associated with permeability, prodrugs of these inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Prodrugs dramatically improved the anti-HIV activity data. For example, for compound, 96, the anti-HIV activity (EC50) improved from 500 nM for this diketo acid to 9 nM for its prodrug 116. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the IC50 and IC90 ST enzymology data for 96 (6 nM and 97 nM, respectively) and the EC50 and EC90 anti-HIV data for its prodrug 116 (9 nM and 94 nM, respectively). Finally, it was confirmed that the prodrug 116 was rapidly hydrolyzed in cells to the active compound 96. PMID:26184144

  6. Discovery of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: pharmacophore mapping, virtual screening, molecular docking, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hardik; Patel, Paresh; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    HIV-1 integrase enzyme plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and responsible for integration of virus into human genome. Here, both computational and synthetic approaches were used to design and synthesize newer HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Pharmacophore mapping was performed on 20 chemically diverse molecules using DISCOtech, and refinement was carried out using GASP. Ten pharmacophore models were generated, and model 2, containing four features including two donor sites, one acceptor atom, and one hydrophobic region, was considered the best model as it has the highest fitness score. It was used as a query in NCI and Maybridge databases. Molecules having more than 99% Q(fit) value were used to design 30 molecules bearing pteridine ring and were docked on co-crystal structure of HIV-1 integrase enzyme. Among these, six molecules, showing good docking score compared with the reference standards, were synthesized by conventional as well as microwave-assisted methods. All compounds were characterized by physical and spectral data and evaluated for in vitro anti-HIV activity against the replication of HIV-1 (IIIB) in MT-4 cells. The used approach of molecular docking and anti-HIV activity data of designed molecules will provide significant insights to discover novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors. PMID:23957390

  7. The Stringent Response Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Dissemination by Regulating Integron Integrase Expression in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Strugeon, Emilie; Tilloy, Valentin; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Class 1 integrons are genetic systems that enable bacteria to capture and express gene cassettes. These integrons, when isolated in clinical contexts, most often carry antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. They play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. The key element of integrons is the integrase, which allows gene cassettes to be acquired and shuffled. Planktonic culture experiments have shown that integrase expression is regulated by the bacterial SOS response. In natural settings, however, bacteria generally live in biofilms, which are characterized by strong antibiotic resilience and by increased expression of stress-related genes. Here, we report that under biofilm conditions, the stringent response, which is induced upon starvation, (i) increases basal integrase and SOS regulon gene expression via induction of the SOS response and (ii) exerts biofilm-specific regulation of the integrase via the Lon protease. This indicates that biofilm environments favor integron-mediated acquisition of antibiotic resistance and other adaptive functions encoded by gene cassettes. PMID:27531906

  8. Biosorption of Cr(VI) and As(V) at high concentrations by organic and inorganic wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Rivas Pérez, Ivana; Paradelo Núñez, Remigio; Nóvoa Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias Estévez, Manuel; José Fernández Sanjurjo, María; Álvarez Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez Delgado, Avelino

    2016-04-01

    The potential reutilization of several wastes as biosorbents for As(V) and Cr(VI) has been assessed in batch-type experiments. The materials studied were one inorganic: mussel shell, and three organic: pine bark, oak ash and hemp waste. Batch experiments were performed in order to determine the removal capacity of the wastes under conditions of high As(V) and Cr(VI) loads. For this, 3 g of each waste material were added with 30 mL NaNO3 0.01 M dissolutions containing 0, 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mmol As(V) L‑1 or Cr(VI) L‑1, prepared from analytical grade Na2HAsO4 or K2Cr2O7. The resulting suspensions were shaken for 24 h, centrifuged and filtered. Once each batch experiment corresponding to the sorption trials ended, each individual sample was added with 30 mL of NaNO3 0.01 M to desorb As(V) or Cr(VI), shaken for 24 h, centrifuged and filtered as in the sorption trials. Oak ash showed high sorption (>76%) and low desorption (<7%) for As(V), which was lower on mussel shell (<31%), hemp waste (<16%) and pine bark (<9.9%). In turn, pine bark showed the highest Cr(VI) sorption (>98%) with very low desorption (<0.5%), followed by oak ash (27% sorption), and hemp waste and mussel shell, that presented very low Cr(VI) sorption (<10%). Sorption data for both elements were better described by the Freundlich than by the Langmuir model. The variable results obtained for the removal of the two anionic contaminants for a given sorbent suggest that different mechanisms govern removal from the solution in each case. In summary, oak ash would be an efficient sorbent material for As(V), but not for Cr(VI), while pine bark would be the best sorbent for Cr(VI) removal.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and dose-range finding toxicity of a novel anti-HIV active integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice; Mishra, Sanjay; Mirsalis, Jon; O'Loughlin, Kathleen; Zhong, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Integration of viral DNA into human chromosomal DNA catalyzed by HIV integrase represents the "point of no return" in HIV infection. For this reason, HIV integrase is considered a crucial target in the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic agents. We have discovered a novel HIV integrase inhibitor 1, that exhibits potent antiviral activity and a favorable metabolism profile. This paper reports on the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of compound 1 and the relevance of these findings with respect to further development of this integrase-targeted antiviral agent. Oral administration of compound 1 in Sprague Dawley rats revealed rapid absorption. Drug exposure increased with increasing drug concentration, indicative of appropriate dose-dependence correlation. Compound 1 exhibited suitable plasma half-life, extensive extravascular distribution and acceptable bioavailability. Toxicity studies revealed no compound-related clinical pathology findings. There were no changes in erythropoietic, white blood cell or platelet parameters in male and female rats. There was no test-article related change in other clinical chemistry parameters. In addition, there were no detectable levels of bilirubin in the urine and there were no treatment-related effects on urobilinogen or other urinalysis parameters. The preclinical studies also revealed that the no observed adverse effect level and the maximum tolerated dose were both high (>500mg/kg/day). The broad and significant antiviral activity and favorable metabolism profile of this integrase inhibitor, when combined with the in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic data and their pharmacological relevance, provide compelling and critical support for its further development as an anti-HIV therapeutic agent. PMID:24821255

  10. Simulink-Based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David m.; Bacon, Barton J.

    2006-01-01

    The Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) is a Simulink-based approach to providing an engineering quality desktop simulation capability for finding trim solutions, extracting linear models for vehicle analysis and control law development, and generating open-loop and closed-loop time history responses for control system evaluation. It represents a useful level of maturity rather than a finished product. The layout is hierarchical and supports concurrent component development and validation, with support from the Concurrent Versions System (CVS) software management tool. Real Time Workshop (RTW) is used to generate pre-compiled code for substantial component modules, and templates permit switching seamlessly between original Simulink and code compiled for various platforms. Two previous limitations are addressed. Turn around time for incorporating tabular model components was improved through auto-generation of required Simulink diagrams based on data received in XML format. The layout was modified to exploit a Simulink "compile once, evaluate multiple times" capability for zero elapsed time for use in trimming and linearizing. Trim is achieved through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) with a narrow, script definable interface to the vehicle model which facilitates incorporating new models.

  11. Behaviour of Silica and Florisil as Solid Supports in the Removal Process of As(V) from Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Andreea; Davidescu, Corneliu Mircea; Negrea, Adina; Ciopec, Mihaela; Lupa, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    In this study two solid supports, silica and florisil, were impregnated with crown ether (dibenzo-18-crown-6) and Fe(III) ions and their efficiency was compared in the adsorption process of As(V) from aqueous solutions. The solid supports were impregnated with crown ether due to their ability to build complexes with positives ions. Fe(III) was used because of As(V) affinity for it. The impregnated solid supports were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the specific surface area. The influence of the solid : liquid ratio on the adsorption process, kinetic studies for the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order, and activation energy were studied. Thermodynamic studies as well as equilibrium studies were carried out. The obtained results showed that, from the two considered materials, impregnated silica presents a higher efficiency with a good selectivity, able to remove As(V) from aqueous solutions containing trace concentrations. PMID:25821633

  12. Discovery of a novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitor from natural compounds through structure based virtual screening and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wan-Gang; Zhang, Xuan; Ip, Denis Tsz-Ming; Yang, Liu-Meng; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Wan, David Chi-Cheong

    2014-09-17

    The interaction between HIV-1 integrase and LEDGF/P75 has been validated as a target for anti-HIV drug development. Based on the crystal structure of integrase in complex with LEDGF/P75, a library containing 80 thousand natural compounds was filtered with virtual screening. 11 hits were selected for cell based assays. One compound, 3-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)-8-{[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]methyl}-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (D719) inhibited integrase nuclear translocation in cell imaging. The binding mode of D719 was analyzed with molecular simulation. The anti-HIV activity of D719 was assayed by measuring the p24 antigen production in acute infection. The structure characteristics of D719 may provide valuable information for integrase inhibitor design. PMID:25128456

  13. Activities, crystal structures and molecular dynamics of dihydro-1H-isoindole derivatives, inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Johnson, Barry C.; Hare, Stephen; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, XueZhi; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Cherepanov, Peter; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Based on a series of lactam and phthalimide derivatives that inhibit HIV-1 integrase, we developed a new derivative, XZ-259, with biochemical and antiviral activities comparable to raltegravir. We determined the crystal structures of XZ-259 and four other derivatives in complex with the prototype foamy virus intasome. The compounds bind at the integrase-Mg2+-DNA interface of the integrase active site. In biochemical and antiviral assays, XZ-259 inhibits raltegravir-resistant HIV-1 integrases harboring the Y143R mutation. Molecular modeling is also presented suggesting that XZ-259 can bind in the HIV-1 intasome with its dimethyl sulfonamide group adopting two opposite orientations. Molecular dynamics analyses of the HIV-1 intasome highlight the importance of the viral DNA in drug potency. PMID:23075516

  14. Actinophage R4 integrase-based site-specific chromosomal integration of non-replicative closed circular DNA.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takamasa; Nishizawa, Akito; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Asayama, Munehiko; Shirai, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    The actinophage R4 integrase (Sre)-based molecular genetic engineering system was developed for the chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A cloned DNA fragment containing two attP sites, green fluorescent protein (gfp) as a first transgene, and an antibiotic resistance gene as a selection marker was self-ligated to generate non-replicative closed circular DNA (nrccDNA) for integration. nrccDNA was introduced into attB-inserted E. coli cells harboring the plasmid expressing Sre by electroporation. The expressed Sre catalyzed site-specific integration between one of the two attP sites on nrccDNA and the attB site on the E. coli chromosome. The integration frequency was affected by the chromosomal location of the target site. A second nrccDNA containing two attB sites, lacZα encoding the alpha fragment of β-galactosidase as a transgene, and another antibiotic resistance gene was integrated into the residual attP site on the gfp-integrated E. coli chromosome via one of the two attB sites according to reiterating site-specific recombination. The integrants clearly exhibited β-galactosidase activity and green fluorescence, suggesting the simultaneous expression of multiple recombinant proteins in E. coli. The results of the present study showed that a step-by-step integration procedure using nrccDNA achieved the chromosomal integration of multiple genes. PMID:26870903

  15. Clinical Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and Drug-Interaction Profile of the Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Mackenzie L.; Hadzic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Dolutegravir is a second generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) currently under review by the US FDA for marketing approval. Dolutegravir’s in vitro, protein adjusted 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) for wild-type virus is 0.064 μg/ml, and it retains in vitro anti-HIV 1 activity across a broad range of viral phenotypes known to confer resistance to the currently marketed INSTIs, raltegravir and elvitegravir. Dolutegravir has a half-life (t½) of 13 to 14 hours and maintains concentrations over the in vitro, protein adjusted IC90 for more than 30 hours following a single dose. Additionally, dolutegravir has comparatively low intersubject variability compared to raltegravir and elvitegravir. A plasma exposure-response relationship has been well described, with antiviral activity strongly correlating to trough concentration (Ctrough) values. Phase III trials have assessed the antiviral activity of dolutegravir compared with efavirenz and raltegravir in antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve patients and found dolutegravir to achieve more rapid and sustained virologic suppression in both instances. Additionally, studies of dolutegravir activity in patients with known INSTI-resistant mutations have been favorable, indicating that dolutegravir retains activity in a variety of INSTI resistant phenotypes. Much like currently marketed INSTIs, dolutegravir is very well tolerated. Because dolutegravir inhibits the renal transporter, organic cation transporter (OCT) 2, reduced tubular secretion of creatinine leads to non-progressive increases in serum creatinine. These serum creatinine increases have not been associated with decreased glomerular filtration rate or progressive renal impairment. Dolutegravir’s major and minor metabolic pathways are UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 and cytochrome (CYP)3A4, respectively, and it neither induces nor inhibits CYP isozymes. Thus dolutegravir has a modest drug interaction profile. However, antacids significantly

  16. Comparison of Fe-Al-modified natural materials by an electrochemical method and chemical precipitation for the adsorption of F- and As(V).

    PubMed

    Vázquez Mejía, G; Martínez-Miranda, V; Fall, C; Linares-Hernández, I; Solache-Ríos, M

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of fluoride and arsenic ions by modified natural materials may have an impact on the removal of F- and As(V) from waters. In this work, a zeolitic material and pozzolan (commonly known as pumicite) were modified with aluminium an iron by an electrochemical method and chemical precipitation, respectively. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F- and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Adsorption kinetic data were best fitted to pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data to the Langmuir isotherm model. The highest F- and As(V) sorption capacities were obtained for modified zeolitic (0.866 mg/g) and pozzolan (3.35 mg/g) materials, respectively, with initial F- or As(V) concentrations of 10 mg/L. It was found that the unmodified materials did not show either adsorption of F- ions or As(V), which indicated that Al and Fe in the adsorbents are responsible for the adsorption of these ions. In general, both modified materials show similar capacities for the adsorption of F- and As(V). PMID:26362939

  17. Organo-modified sericite in the remediation of an aquatic environment contaminated with As(III) or As(V).

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Mok; Tiwari, Diwakar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to obtain the hybrid material precursor to the naturally and abundantly available sericite, a mica-based clay; the materials were further employed in the remediation of arsenic from aqueous solutions. The study was intended to provide a cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment technology. The hybrid organo-modified sericite was obtained using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) and alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (AMBA) organic surfactants by introducing regulated doses of HDTMA or AMBA. The materials were characterized using infrared and X-ray diffraction analytical data, whereas the surface morphology was discussed by taking its SEM images. These materials were employed to assess the pre-concentration and speciation of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch reactor data showed that increasing the sorptive concentration (from 1.0 to 15.0 mg/L) and pH (i.e., pH 2.0 to 10.0) caused the percent uptake of As(III) and As(V) to decrease significantly. The kinetic data showed that a sharp initial uptake of arsenic reached its equilibrium state within about 50 min of contact time, and the sorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order rate law both for As(III) and As(V) sorption. A 1,000 times increase in the background electrolyte concentration, i.e., NaNO3, caused a significant decrease in As(III) removal, whereas As(V) was almost unaffected, which inferred that As(III) was adsorbed, mainly by the van der Waals or even by the electrostatic attraction, whereas As(V) was adsorbed chemically and formed "inner-sphere" complexes at the solid/solution interface. The equilibrium state modeling studies indicated that the sorption data fitted well the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Henceforth, the removal capacity was calculated under these equilibrium conditions. It was noted that organo-modified sericite possessed a significantly higher removal capacity compared to its virgin sericite

  18. Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, J. F.; O'Brien, T. F.; Bergeron, E.; Twichell, D.; Worley, C. R.; Danforth, W. W.; Andrews, B. A.; Irwin, B.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to address pertinent coastal issues such as erosion, sediment availability, sediment transport, vulnerability of coastal areas to natural and anthropogenic hazards, and resource management. Geologic framework mapping in these shallow- water environments has provided valuable data used to 1) define modern sediment distribution and thickness, 2) determine underlying stratigraphic and structural controls on shoreline behavior, and 3) enable onshore-to- offshore geologic mapping within the coastal zone when coupled with subaerial techniques such as GPR and topographic LIDAR. Research in nearshore areas presents technological challenges due to the dynamics of the environment, high volume of data collected, and the geophysical limitations of operating in very shallow water. In 2004, the USGS, in collaboration with NOAA's Coastal Services Center, began a multi-year seafloor mapping effort to better define oyster habitats within Apalachicola Bay, Florida, a shallow water estuary along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bay poses a technological challenge due to its shallow depths (< 4-m) and high turbidity that prohibits the use of bathymetric LIDAR. To address this extreme shallow water setting, the USGS incorporated an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) into seafloor mapping operations, in June 2006. The ASV is configured with a chirp sub-bottom profiler (4 24 kHz), dual-frequency chirp sidescan-sonar (100/500 kHz), single-beam echosounder (235 kHz), and forward-looking digital camera, and will be used to delineate the distribution and thickness of surficial sediment, presence

  19. Quantitative prediction of integrase inhibitor resistance from genotype through consensus linear regression modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Integrase inhibitors (INI) form a new drug class in the treatment of HIV-1 patients. We developed a linear regression modeling approach to make a quantitative raltegravir (RAL) resistance phenotype prediction, as Fold Change in IC50 against a wild type virus, from mutations in the integrase genotype. Methods We developed a clonal genotype-phenotype database with 991 clones from 153 clinical isolates of INI naïve and RAL treated patients, and 28 site-directed mutants. We did the development of the RAL linear regression model in two stages, employing a genetic algorithm (GA) to select integrase mutations by consensus. First, we ran multiple GAs to generate first order linear regression models (GA models) that were stochastically optimized to reach a goal R2 accuracy, and consisted of a fixed-length subset of integrase mutations to estimate INI resistance. Secondly, we derived a consensus linear regression model in a forward stepwise regression procedure, considering integrase mutations or mutation pairs by descending prevalence in the GA models. Results The most frequently occurring mutations in the GA models were 92Q, 97A, 143R and 155H (all 100%), 143G (90%), 148H/R (89%), 148K (88%), 151I (81%), 121Y (75%), 143C (72%), and 74M (69%). The RAL second order model contained 30 single mutations and five mutation pairs (p < 0.01): 143C/R&97A, 155H&97A/151I and 74M&151I. The R2 performance of this model on the clonal training data was 0.97, and 0.78 on an unseen population genotype-phenotype dataset of 171 clinical isolates from RAL treated and INI naïve patients. Conclusions We describe a systematic approach to derive a model for predicting INI resistance from a limited amount of clonal samples. Our RAL second order model is made available as an Additional file for calculating a resistance phenotype as the sum of integrase mutations and mutation pairs. PMID:23282253

  20. Targeted transgene insertion into the CHO cell genome using Cre recombinase-incorporating integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Takuya; Huang, Shuohao; Imanishi, Suguru; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2016-07-01

    Retroviral vectors have served as efficient gene delivery tools in various biotechnology fields. However, viral DNA is randomly inserted into the genome, which can cause problems, such as insertional mutagenesis and gene silencing. Previously, we reported a site-specific gene integration system, in which a transgene is integrated into a predetermined chromosomal locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using integrase-defective retroviral vectors (IDRVs) and Cre recombinase. In this system, a Cre expression plasmid is transfected into founder cells before retroviral transduction. In practical applications of site-specific gene modification such as for hard-to-transfect cells or for in vivo gene delivery, both the transgene and the Cre protein into retroviral virions should be encapsulate. Here, we generated novel hybrid IDRVs in which viral genome and enzymatically active Cre can be delivered (Cre-IDRVs). Cre-IDRVs encoding marker genes, neomycin resistance and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), flanked by wild-type and mutated loxP sites were produced using an expression plasmid for a chimeric protein of Cre and retroviral gag-pol. After analyzing the incorporation of the Cre protein into retroviral virions by Western blotting, the Cre-IDRV was infected into founder CHO cells, in which marker genes (hygromycin resistance and red fluorescent protein) flanked with corresponding loxP sites are introduced into the genome. G418-resistant colonies expressing GFP appeared and the site-specific integration of the transgene into the expected chromosomal site was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Moreover, when Cre-IDRV carried a gene expression unit for a recombinant antibody, the recombinant cells in which the antibody expression cassette was integrated in a site-specific manner were generated and the cells produced the recombinant antibody. This method may provide a promising tool to perform site-specific gene modification according to Cre

  1. Prevalent Polymorphisms in Wild-Type HIV-1 Integrase Are Unlikely To Engender Drug Resistance to Dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572)

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samiul; Madsen, Heather; Horton, Joseph; DeAnda, Felix; Martin-Carpenter, Louise; Sato, Akihiko; Cuffe, Robert; Chen, Shuguang; Underwood, Mark; Nichols, Garrett

    2013-01-01

    The majority of HIV-1 integrase amino acid sites are highly conserved, suggesting that most are necessary to carry out the critical structural and functional roles of integrase. We analyzed the 34 most variable sites in integrase (>10% variability) and showed that prevalent polymorphic amino acids at these positions did not affect susceptibility to the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (S/GSK1349572), as demonstrated both in vitro (in site-directed mutagenesis studies) and in vivo (in a phase IIa study of dolutegravir monotherapy in HIV-infected individuals). Ongoing clinical trials will provide additional data on the virologic activity of dolutegravir across subject viruses with and without prevalent polymorphic substitutions. PMID:23295935

  2. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  3. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  4. Isolation, structure, and HIV-1-integrase inhibitory activity of structurally diverse fungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Dewey, Raymond; Polishook, Jon D; Dombrowski, Anne W; Zink, Deborah L; Guan, Ziqiang; Collado, Javier; Platas, Gonzalo; Pelaez, Fernando; Felock, Peter J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-12-01

    HIV-1 integrase is a critical enzyme for replication of HIV, and its inhibition is one of the most promising new drug strategies for anti-retroviral therapy, with potentially significant advantages over existing therapies. In this report, a series of HIV-1 inhibitors isolated from the organic extract of fermentations from terrestrial fungi is described. These fungal species, belonging to a variety of genera, were collected from throughout the world following the strict guidelines of Rio Convention on Biodiversity. The polyketide- and terpenoid-derived inhibitors are represented by two naphthoquinones, a biphenyl and two triphenyls, a benzophenone, four aromatics with or without catechol units, a linear aliphatic terpenoid, a diterpenoid, and a sesterterpenoid. These compounds inhibited the coupled and strand-transfer reaction of HIV-1 integrase with an IC(50) value of 0.5-120 micro M. The bioassay-directed isolation, structure elucidation, and HIV-1 inhibitory activity of these compounds are described. PMID:14714192

  5. Identification of an evolutionarily conserved domain in human lens epithelium-derived growth factor/transcriptional co-activator p75 (LEDGF/p75) that binds HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, Peter; Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A; Engelman, Alan

    2004-11-19

    Human lens epithelium-derived growth factor/transcriptional co-activator p75 (LEDGF/p75) protein was recently identified as a binding partner for HIV-1 integrase (IN) in human cells. In this work, we used biochemical and bioinformatic approaches to define the domain organization of LEDGF/p75. Using limited proteolysis and deletion mutagenesis we show that the protein contains a pair of evolutionarily conserved domains, assuming about 35% of its sequence. Whereas the N-terminal PWWP domain had been recognized previously, the second domain is novel. It is comprised of approximately 80 amino acid residues and is both necessary and sufficient for binding to HIV-1 IN. Strikingly, the integrase binding domain (IBD) is not unique to LEDGF/p75, as a second human protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HRP2), contains a homologous sequence. LEDGF/p75 and HRP2 IBDs avidly bound HIV-1 IN in an in vitro GST pull-down assay and each full-length protein potently stimulated HIV-1 IN activity in vitro. LEDGF/p75 and HRP2 are predicted to share a similar domain organization and have an evident evolutionary and likely functional relationship. PMID:15371438

  6. Efficacy and Tolerability of Integrase Inhibitors in Antiretroviral-Naive Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Abbraccio, Maurizio; Busto, Annunziata; De Marco, Mario; Figoni, Mario; Maddaloni, Adelaide; Abrescia, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral agents recently licensed for the treatment of both naive and experienced HIV-infected patients. They inhibit the catalytic activity of the HIV-encoded enzyme integrase and prevent the integration of the HIV genome into the host cell genome, so slowing the propagation of the infection. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors cause a rapid drop in viral load, exhibit very low drug interactions (except elvitegravir/cobicistat), and have low pill burden and convenient dosing frequency. Drugs in this class have been compared to others in antiretroviral-naive patients with efavirenz and with protease inhibitors. Final results of the STARTMRK trial highlighted the better virologic and immunologic performance of raltegravir over efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil co-formulation. Raltegravir was also superior to atazanavir/ritonavir and darunavir/ritonavir in the ACTG 5257 study for the combined virologic/tolerability endpoint. Elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir was non-inferior to efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir and to atazanavir/ritonavir plus emtricitabine/tenofovir in terms of confirmed virologic response in the GS-US-236-0102 and GS-US-236-0103 studies, respectively. Finally, dolutegravir showed non-inferiority compared to raltegravir in the SPRING-2 study and was superior to efavirenz and darunavir/ritonavir in the SINGLE and FLAMINGO trials, respectively. The aim of this review is to analyze the data on efficacy and safety of integrase strand transfer inhibitors in antiretroviral-naive HIV patients and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of drugs within this class. PMID:26450805

  7. The systemic effects of sclerostin overexpression using ΦC31 integrase in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Park, Bo Mi; Kang, Myengmo; Nam, HeeJin; Kim, Eun Jin; Bae, ChuHyun; Lim, Sung Kil

    2016-04-01

    Sclerostin, encoded by the Sost gene, is mainly produced by osteocytes in bone and antagonizes the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which is a requisite for bone formation. Currently, human anti-sclerostin antibodies are being tested in phase III clinical trials. In addition, serum sclerostin levels are reported to be associated with bone mineral density and fracture risk in normal individuals; however, the correlation between serum sclerostin and bone mass remains controversial. To study the effects of the continuous exposure of exogenous sclerostin on bone, a ΦC31 integrase system, which has the characteristics of site-specificity and efficiency, was applied for the delivery of the Sost gene in this study. We injected Sost-attB plasmid with or without ΦC31 integrase plasmid into the mouse tail vein using a hydrodynamic-based method. The site-specific integration of the Sost gene into the mouse genome was confirmed by examining a pseudo-attP site on the hepatic genomic DNA. Sclerostin was expressed in the hepatocytes, secreted into the blood flow, and maintained at high concentrations in the mice with both Sost-attB plasmid and ΦC31 integrase plasmid injections, which was observed by serial measurement. Moreover, the mice with long-term high levels of serum sclerostin showed trabecular bone loss on micro-CT analysis. Peripheral B cell populations were not affected. Our results suggested that sclerostin could be expressed in the liver and sustained successfully at high levels in the blood by using the ΦC31 integrase system, leading to trabecular bone loss. These findings may help to further ascertain the effects of sclerostin introduced exogenously on the skeleton. PMID:26845353

  8. The design of 8-hydroxyquinoline tetracyclic lactams as HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Velthuisen, Emile J; Johns, Brian A; Temelkoff, David P; Brown, Kevin W; Danehower, Susan C

    2016-07-19

    A novel series of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors were designed using the venerable two-metal binding pharmacophore model and incorporating structural elements from two different literature scaffolds. This manuscript describes a number of 8-hydroxyquinoline tetracyclic lactams with exceptional antiviral activity against HIV-1 and little loss of potency against the IN signature resistance mutations Q148K and G140S/Q148H. PMID:27092410

  9. Preclinical Profile of BI 224436, a Novel HIV-1 Non-Catalytic-Site Integrase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Amad, Ma'an; Bailey, Murray D.; Bethell, Richard; Bös, Michael; Bonneau, Pierre; Cordingley, Michael; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Edwards, Paul; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Garneau, Michel; Jakalian, Araz; Kawai, Stephen; Lamorte, Louie; LaPlante, Steven; Luo, Laibin; Mason, Steve; Poupart, Marc-André; Rioux, Nathalie; Schroeder, Patricia; Simoneau, Bruno; Tremblay, Sonia; Tsantrizos, Youla; Witvrouw, Myriam; Yoakim, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    BI 224436 is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with effective antiviral activity that acts through a mechanism that is distinct from that of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). This 3-quinolineacetic acid derivative series was identified using an enzymatic integrase long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA 3′-processing assay. A combination of medicinal chemistry, parallel synthesis, and structure-guided drug design led to the identification of BI 224436 as a candidate for preclinical profiling. It has antiviral 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of <15 nM against different HIV-1 laboratory strains and cellular cytotoxicity of >90 μM. BI 224436 also has a low, ∼2.1-fold decrease in antiviral potency in the presence of 50% human serum and, by virtue of a steep dose-response curve slope, exhibits serum-shifted EC95 values ranging between 22 and 75 nM. Passage of virus in the presence of inhibitor selected for either A128T, A128N, or L102F primary resistance substitutions, all mapping to a conserved allosteric pocket on the catalytic core of integrase. BI 224436 also retains full antiviral activity against recombinant viruses encoding INSTI resistance substitutions N155S, Q148H, and E92Q. In drug combination studies performed in cellular antiviral assays, BI 224436 displays an additive effect in combination with most approved antiretrovirals, including INSTIs. BI 224436 has drug-like in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties, including Caco-2 cell permeability, solubility, and low cytochrome P450 inhibition. It exhibited excellent pharmacokinetic profiles in rat (clearance as a percentage of hepatic flow [CL], 0.7%; bioavailability [F], 54%), monkey (CL, 23%; F, 82%), and dog (CL, 8%; F, 81%). Based on the excellent biological and pharmacokinetic profile, BI 224436 was advanced into phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:24663024

  10. Structural Properties of HIV Integrase. Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, K.; Diamond, T; Hwang, Y; Bushman, F; Van Duyne, G

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the catalytic component of the preintegration complex, a large nucleoprotein assembly critical for the integration of the retroviral genome into a host chromosome. Although partial crystal structures of human immunodeficiency virus IN alone and its complex with the integrase binding domain of the host factor PSIP1/lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 are available, many questions remain regarding the properties and structures of LEDGF-bound IN oligomers. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, multiangle light scattering, and small angle x-ray scattering, we have established the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and molecular shapes of IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes in solution. Analyses of intact IN tetramers bound to two different LEDGF truncations allow for placement of the integrase binding domain by difference analysis. Modeling of the small angle x-ray scattering envelopes using existing structural data suggests domain arrangements in the IN oligomers that support and extend existing biochemical data for IN {center_dot} LEDGF complexes and lend new insights into the quaternary structure of LEDGF-bound IN tetramers. These IN oligomers may be involved in stages of the viral life cycle other than integration, including assembly, budding, and early replication.

  11. Molecular Features Related to HIV Integrase Inhibition Obtained from Structure- and Ligand-Based Approaches

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Luciana L.; Maltarollo, Vinícius G.; de Lima, Emmanuela Ferreira; Weber, Karen C.; Honorio, Kathia M.; da Silva, Albérico B. F.

    2014-01-01

    Among several biological targets to treat AIDS, HIV integrase is a promising enzyme that can be employed to develop new anti-HIV agents. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanistic interpretation of HIV-1 integrase inhibition and to rationalize the molecular features related to the binding affinity of studied ligands. A set of 79 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and its relationship with biological activity are investigated employing 2D and 3D QSAR models, docking analysis and DFT studies. Analyses of docking poses and frontier molecular orbitals revealed important features on the main ligand-receptor interactions. 2D and 3D models presenting good internal consistency, predictive power and stability were obtained in all cases. Significant correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.908 and q2 = 0.643 for 2D model; r2 = 0.904 and q2 = 0.719 for 3D model) were obtained, indicating the potential of these models for untested compounds. The generated holograms and contribution maps revealed important molecular requirements to HIV-1 IN inhibition and several evidences for molecular modifications. The final models along with information resulting from molecular orbitals, 2D contribution and 3D contour maps should be useful in the design of new inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity within the chemical diversity of the data. PMID:24416129

  12. The Promise of Dolutegravir: A Novel Second Generation Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harmanjit; Kaur, Mandeep; Kakkar, Ashish K; Kumar, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG), a novel integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI), is one of the newest addition to the arsenal of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapeutics. Dolutegravir is the first member of the class of second generation integrase strand transfer inhibitors aimed primarily to address the current unmet need for novel unboosted integrase inhibitors with convenient once-daily dosing and a superior resistance profile. During its clinical development, DTG has demonstrated noninferior or superior efficacy in both treatment-naive as well as treatmentexperienced individuals including those who have previously failed first generation INSTIs. Other potential advantages include a favorable safety profile, low propensity for drug-drug interactions, and prolonged serum half-life permitting once-daily administration in treatment-naive or treatment-experienced INSTI naive HIV patients. Twice-daily administration is recommended in individuals with established or suspected resistance to first-generation INSTIs. This review outlines the need for new HIV therapeutics and summarizes the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profile of dolutegravir. PMID:27157040

  13. Sketching the historical development of pyrimidones as the inhibitors of the HIV integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2015-06-01

    Heterocyclic substances perform a very unique role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the primary objectives of the analysis within pyrimidine centered new heterocyclic elements chronologically from their finding focusing on one of the essential enzyme of HIV virus particle that is integrase upon suppressing its strand transfer function. The class of compounds reviewed here includes bicyclic pyrimidines, dihydroxypyrimidines, pyrimidine-2,4-dinones, N-methylpyrimidones, pyranopyrimidine, pyridine-quinoline conjugates, pyrimidine-2-carboxamides, N-3 hydroxylated pyrimidine-2,4-diones as well as their various substituted analogues. Such initiatives released an effective drug Raltegravir as a first FDA approved anti-HIV integrase inhibitor as well as several of its derivatives along with other pyrimidones is under clinical or preclinical growth. Some of the provided scaffolds indicated dual anti-HIV efficacies against HIV reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes at both cites as 3'-processing and strand transfer, while several scaffolds exhibited potency against Raltegravir resistant HIV mutant strains determining themselves a potent class of compounds having appealing upcoming implementations. Connections of the new compounds' molecular structure and HIV viral target has been overviewed to be able to accomplish further growth of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process. PMID:25084622

  14. Integrase-independent HIV-1 infection is augmented under conditions of DNA damage and produces a viral reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Ebina, Hirotaka Kanemura, Yuka; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Urata, Kozue; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2012-05-25

    HIV-1 possesses a viral protein, integrase (IN), which is necessary for its efficient integration in target cells. However, it has been reported that an IN-defective HIV strain is still capable of integration. Here, we assessed the ability of wild type (WT) HIV-1 to establish infection in the presence of IN inhibitors. We observed a low, yet clear infection of inhibitor-incubated cells infected with WT HIV which was identical to cells infected with IN-deficient HIV, D64A. Furthermore, the IN-independent integration could be enhanced by the pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents suggesting that integration is mediated by a DNA repair system. Moreover, significantly faster viral replication kinetics with augmented viral DNA integration was observed after infection in irradiated cells treated with IN inhibitor compared to nonirradiated cells. Altogether, our results suggest that HIV DNA has integration potential in the presence of an IN inhibitor and may serve as a virus reservoir.

  15. Four-tiered {pi} interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive {pi} electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished {pi} interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the {pi} interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this {pi}-{pi} interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  16. Huwe1, a novel cellular interactor of Gag-Pol through integrase binding, negatively influences HIV-1 infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiji P; Okawa, Katsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Sano, Kouichi; Ogawa, Kanako; Masuda, Takao; Morikawa, Yuko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Suzuki, Youichi

    2011-04-01

    Integration, an indispensable step for retrovirus replication, is executed by integrase (IN), which is expressed as a part of a Gag-Pol precursor. Although mechanistic detail of the IN-catalyzed integration reaction is well defined, numerous evidence have demonstrated that IN is involved in multiple steps of retrovirus replication other than integration. In this study, Huwe1, a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, was identified as a new cellular interactor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN. The interaction was mediated through the catalytic core domain of IN and a wide-range region of Huwe1. Interestingly, although depletion of Huwe1 in target cells did not affect the early phase of HIV-1 infection in a human T cell line, we found that infectivity of HIV-1 released from the Huwe1 knockdown cells was significantly augmented more than that of virus produced from control cells. The increase in infectivity occurred in proviral DNA synthesis. Further analysis revealed that Huwe1 interacted with HIV-1 Gag-Pol precursor protein through an IN domain. Our results suggest that Huwe1 in HIV-1 producer cells has a negative impact on early post-entry events during the next round of virus infection via association with an IN region of Gag-Pol. PMID:21167302

  17. Purification, solution properties and crystallization of SIV integrase containing a continuous core and C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Yan, Y; Zugay-Murphy, J; Xu, B; Cole, J L; Witmer, M; Felock, P; Wolfe, A; Hazuda, D; Sardana, M K; Chen, Z; Kuo, L C; Sardana, V V

    1999-11-01

    The C-terminal two-thirds segment of integrase derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to greater than 95% homogeneity. The protein encompasses amino-acid residues 50-293 and contains a F185H substitution to enhance solubility. In dilute solutions at concentrations below 1 mg ml(-1), the enzyme is predominantly dimeric. At the higher concentrations (>10 mg ml(-1)) required to enable crystallization, the enzyme self-associates to form species with molecular weights greater than 200 kDa. Despite the apparent high aggregation in solution, the enzyme crystallizes from a 8%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (molecular weight 6000) solution in a form suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. The resulting single crystals belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 79.76, b = 99.98, c = 150.2 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees and Z = 4. Under X-ray irradiation generated with a rotating-anode generator, the crystals diffract to 2.8 A resolution and allow collection of a native 3 A resolution diffraction data set. PMID:10531491

  18. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  19. Structural requirements for potential HIV-integrase inhibitors identified using pharmacophore-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ataul; Pillay, Tahir S

    2016-02-23

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disease which is a collection of symptoms and infections caused by a retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is currently no curative treatment and therapy is reliant on the use of existing anti-retroviral drugs. Pharmacoinformatics approaches have already proven their pivotal role in the pharmaceutical industry for lead identification and optimization. In the current study, we analysed the binding preferences and inhibitory activity of HIV-integrase inhibitors using pharmacoinformatics. A set of 30 compounds were selected as the training set of a total 540 molecules for pharmacophore model generation. The final model was validated by statistical parameters and further used for virtual screening. The best mapped model (R = 0.940, RMSD = 2.847, Q(2) = 0.912, se = 0.498, Rpred(2) = 0.847 and rm(test)(2) = 0.636) explained that two hydrogen bond acceptor and one aromatic ring features were crucial for the inhibition of HIV-integrase. From virtual screening, initial hits were sorted using a number of parameters and finally two compounds were proposed as promising HIV-integrase inhibitors. Drug-likeness properties of the final screened compounds were compared to FDA approved HIV-integrase inhibitors. HIV-integrase structure in complex with the most active and final screened compounds were subjected to 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies to check comparative stability of the complexes. The study suggested that the screened compounds might be promising HIV-integrase inhibitors. The new chemical entities obtained from the NCI database will be subjected to experimental studies to confirm potential inhibition of HIV integrase. PMID:26809073

  20. Biochemical analysis of the role of G118R-linked dolutegravir drug resistance substitutions in HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Quashie, Peter K; Mesplède, Thibault; Han, Ying-Shan; Veres, Tamar; Osman, Nathan; Hassounah, Said; Sloan, Richard D; Xu, Hong-Tao; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) have been reported for all currently approved anti-HIV drugs, including the latest integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). We previously used the new INSTI dolutegravir (DTG) to select a G118R integrase resistance substitution in tissue culture and also showed that secondary substitutions emerged at positions H51Y and E138K. Now, we have characterized the impact of the G118R substitution, alone or in combination with either H51Y or E138K, on 3' processing and integrase strand transfer activity. The results show that G118R primarily impacted the strand transfer step of integration by diminishing the ability of integrase-long terminal repeat (LTR) complexes to bind target DNA. The addition of H51Y and E138K to G118R partially restored strand transfer activity by modulating the formation of integrase-LTR complexes through increasing LTR DNA affinity and total DNA binding, respectively. This unique mechanism, in which one function of HIV integrase partially compensates for the defect in another function, has not been previously reported. The G118R substitution resulted in low-level resistance to DTG, raltegravir (RAL), and elvitegravir (EVG). The addition of either of H51Y or E138K to G118R did not enhance resistance to DTG, RAL, or EVG. Homology modeling provided insight into the mechanism of resistance conferred by G118R as well as the effects of H51Y or E138K on enzyme activity. The G118R substitution therefore represents a potential avenue for resistance to DTG, similar to that previously described for the R263K substitution. For both pathways, secondary substitutions can lead to either diminished integrase activity and/or increased INSTI susceptibility. PMID:24080645

  1. Removal of As(III) and As(V) from water using a natural Fe and Mn enriched sample.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Eleonora; Ciminelli, Virginia S T; Höll, Wolfgang H

    2005-12-01

    The arsenic removal capacity of a natural oxide sample consisting basically of Mn-minerals (birnessite, cryptomelane, todorokite), and Fe-oxides (goethite, hematite), collected in the Iron Quadrangle mineral province in Minas Gerais, Brazil, has been investigated. As-spiked tap water and an As-rich mining effluent with As-concentrations from 100 microg L(-1) to 100 mg L(-1) were used for the experiments. Sorbent fractions of different particle sizes (<38 microm to 0.5 mm), including spherical material (diameter 2 mm), have been used. Batch and column experiments (pH values of 3.0, 5.5, and 8.5 for batch, and about pH 7.0 for column) demonstrated the high adsorption capacity of the material, with the sorption of As(III) being higher than that of As(V). At pH 3.0, the maximum uptake for As(V) and for As(III)-treated materials were 8.5 and 14.7 mg g(-1), respectively. The Mn-minerals promoted the oxidation of As(III) to As(V), for both sorbed and dissolved As-species. Column experiments with the cFeMn-c sample for an initial As-concentration of 100 microg L(-1) demonstrated a very efficient elimination of As(III), since the drinking water limit of 10 microg L(-1) was exceeded only after 7400 BV total throughput. The As-release from the loaded samples was below the limit established by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, thus making the spent material suitable for discharge in landfill deposits. PMID:16290184

  2. The Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor BI-D Affects Virion Maturation but Does Not Influence Packaging of a Functional RNA Genome

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; van der Velden, Yme; Bonnard, Damien; Le Rouzic, Erwann; Das, Atze T.; Benarous, Richard; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The viral integrase (IN) is an essential protein for HIV-1 replication. IN inserts the viral dsDNA into the host chromosome, thereby aided by the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75. Recently a new class of integrase inhibitors was described: allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs). Although designed to interfere with the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction to block HIV DNA integration during the early phase of HIV-1 replication, the major impact was surprisingly found on the process of virus maturation during the late phase, causing a reverse transcription defect upon infection of target cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of an ALLINI are misformed with the ribonucleoprotein located outside the virus core. Virus assembly and maturation are highly orchestrated and regulated processes in which several viral proteins and RNA molecules closely interact. It is therefore of interest to study whether ALLINIs have unpredicted pleiotropic effects on these RNA-related processes. We confirm that the ALLINI BI-D inhibits virus replication and that the produced virus is non-infectious. Furthermore, we show that the wild-type level of HIV-1 genomic RNA is packaged in virions and these genomes are in a dimeric state. The tRNAlys3 primer for reverse transcription was properly placed on this genomic RNA and could be extended ex vivo. In addition, the packaged reverse transcriptase enzyme was fully active when extracted from virions. As the RNA and enzyme components for reverse transcription are properly present in virions produced in the presence of BI-D, the inhibition of reverse transcription is likely to reflect the mislocalization of the components in the aberrant virus particle. PMID:25072705

  3. As(III) and As(V) removal from the aqueous phase via adsorption onto acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) alginate beads and goethite alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongkyun; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Jongsik; Ji, Min-Kyu; Han, Young-Soo; Park, Young-Tae; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2015-07-15

    Acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) is a solid waste generated following the neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD). This material entrapped in calcium alginate was investigated for the sorption of As(III) and As(V). Three different adsorbent materials were prepared: AMDS alginate beads (AABs), goethite alginate beads (GABs), and pure alginate beads. The effects of pH and the adsorption kinetics were investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were also evaluated. The optimum pH range using the AABs was determined to be within 2-10 for As(III) and 2-9 for As(V). Adsorption equilibrium data were evaluated using the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity qmax was 18.25 and 4.97 mg g(-1) for As(III) on AAB and GAB, respectively, and 21.79 and 10.92 mg g(-1) for As(V) on AAB and GAB, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was observed to follow pseudo-second order kinetics. The As K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that the adsorbed As(III) on the AABs was oxidized to As(V) via manganese oxide in the AMDS. PMID:25804789

  4. Comparative evaluation of magnetite-graphene oxide and magnetite-reduced graphene oxide composite for As(III) and As(V) removal.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeojoon; Park, Won Kyu; Hwang, Tae-Mun; Yoon, Dae Ho; Yang, Woo Seok; Kang, Joon-Wun

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic removal using Fe3O4-graphene oxide composite (M-GO) and Fe3O4-reduced graphene oxide composite (M-rGO) was investigated. The M-GO was more effective to adsorb both As(III) and As(V) than M-rGO, because the more functional groups existing on the M-GO could lead to synthesize more Fe3O4 with M-GO. As(III) was more favorable to be adsorbed than As(V) onto both M-GO and M-rGO. According to the effect of pH on arsenic removal, the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged surface of Fe3O4-graphene based adsorbents and anionic As(V) species was a major factor to adsorb As(V). The adsorption mechanism of As(III), on the other hand, was strongly affected by a surface complexation, rather than electrostatic interactions. Consequently, in terms of the process energy consumption, energy saving could be achieved via omitting the reduction process to fabricate M-rGO from M-GO and the pre-oxidation process to convert As(III) to As(V). PMID:26551223

  5. A new large-DNA-fragment delivery system based on integrase activity from an integrative and conjugative element.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2013-07-01

    During the past few decades, numerous plasmid vectors have been developed for cloning, gene expression analysis, and genetic engineering. Cloning procedures typically rely on PCR amplification, DNA fragment restriction digestion, recovery, and ligation, but increasingly, procedures are being developed to assemble large synthetic DNAs. In this study, we developed a new gene delivery system using the integrase activity of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE). The advantage of the integrase-based delivery is that it can stably introduce a large DNA fragment (at least 75 kb) into one or more specific sites (the gene for glycine-accepting tRNA) on a target chromosome. Integrase recombination activity in Escherichia coli is kept low by using a synthetic hybrid promoter, which, however, is unleashed in the final target host, forcing the integration of the construct. Upon integration, the system is again silenced. Two variants with different genetic features were produced, one in the form of a cloning vector in E. coli and the other as a mini-transposable element by which large DNA constructs assembled in E. coli can be tagged with the integrase gene. We confirmed that the system could successfully introduce cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNAs from E. coli into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida in a site-specific manner. The integrase delivery system works in concert with existing vector systems and could thus be a powerful tool for synthetic constructions of new metabolic pathways in a variety of host bacteria. PMID:23686268

  6. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Brandon L.; Larue, Ross C.; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein–protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins. PMID:26858406

  7. The optimization of As(V) removal over mesoporous alumina by using response surface methodology and adsorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Caiyun; Pu, Hongping; Li, Hongying; Deng, Lian; Huang, Si; He, Sufang; Luo, Yongming

    2013-06-15

    The Box-Behnken Design of the response surface methodology was employed to optimize four most important adsorption parameters (initial arsenic concentration, pH, adsorption temperature and time) and to investigate the interactive effects of these variables on arsenic(V) adsorption capacity of mesoporous alumina (MA). According to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and response surface analyses, the experiment data were excellent fitted to the quadratic model, and the interactive influence of initial concentration and pH on As(V) adsorption capacity was highly significant. The predicted maximum adsorption capacity was about 39.06 mg/g, and the corresponding optimal parameters of adsorption process were listed as below: time 720 min, temperature 52.8 °C, initial pH 3.9 and initial concentration 130 mg/L. Based on the results of arsenate species definition, FT-IR and pH change, As(V) adsorption mechanisms were proposed as follows: (1) at pH 2.0, H₃AsO₄ and H₂AsO₄(-) were adsorbed via hydrogen bond and electrostatic interaction, respectively; (2) at pH 6.6, arsenic species (H₂AsO₄(-) and HAsO₄(2-)) were removed via adsorption and ion exchange, (3) at pH 10.0, HAsO₄(2-) was adsorbed by MA via ion exchange together with adsorption, while AsO₄(3-) was removed by ion exchange. PMID:23643954

  8. The λ Integrase Site-specific Recombination Pathway.

    PubMed

    Landy, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    The site-specific recombinase encoded by bacteriophage λ (Int) is responsible for integrating and excising the viral chromosome into and out of the chromosome of its Escherichia coli host. Int carries out a reaction that is highly directional, tightly regulated, and depends upon an ensemble of accessory DNA bending proteins acting on 240 bp of DNA encoding 16 protein binding sites. This additional complexity enables two pathways, integrative and excisive recombination, whose opposite, and effectively irreversible, directions are dictated by different physiological and environmental signals. Int recombinase is a heterobivalent DNA binding protein and each of the four Int protomers, within a multiprotein 400 kDa recombinogenic complex, is thought to bind and, with the aid of DNA bending proteins, bridge one arm- and one core-type DNA site. In the 12 years since the publication of the last review focused solely on the λ site-specific recombination pathway in Mobile DNA II, there has been a great deal of progress in elucidating the molecular details of this pathway. The most dramatic advances in our understanding of the reaction have been in the area of X-ray crystallography where protein-DNA structures have now been determined for of all of the DNA-protein interfaces driving the Int pathway. Building on this foundation of structures, it has been possible to derive models for the assembly of components that determine the regulatory apparatus in the P-arm, and for the overall architectures that define excisive and integrative recombinogenic complexes. The most fundamental additional mechanistic insights derive from the application of hexapeptide inhibitors and single molecule kinetics. PMID:26104711

  9. Bacterial ability in AsIII oxidation and AsV reduction: Relation to arsenic tolerance, P uptake, and siderophore production.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Teplitski, Max; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between bacterial ability in arsenic transformation, siderophore production, and P uptake was investigated using six arsenic-resistant bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. Bacterial strains of PG5 and 12 were better arsenite (AsIII) oxidizers (31-46 vs. 6.2-21% of 1 mM AsIII) whereas PG 6, 9, 10 and 16 were better arsenate (AsV) reducers (58-95 vs. 7.5-46% of 1 mM AsV). Increase in AsV concentration from 0 to 1 mM induced 3.0-8.4 times more P uptake by bacteria but increase in P concentration from 0.1 to 1 mM reduced AsV uptake by 17-71%, indicating that P and AsV were taken up by P transporters. Bacteria producing more siderophores (PG5 and 12; >73 μM equiv) showed greater AsIII oxidation and AsIII resistance than those producing less siderophore (PG 6, 9, 10 and 16; <23 μM equiv). This observation was further supported by results obtained from mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens impaired in siderophore production, as they were 23-25% less tolerant to AsIII than the wild-type. Arsenic-resistant bacteria increased their arsenic tolerance by retaining less arsenic in cells via efficient AsIII oxidation and AsV reduction, which were impacted by P uptake and siderophore production. PMID:25576133

  10. The use of artificial neural network for modelling of phycoremediation of toxic elements As(III) and As(V) from wastewater using Botryococcus braunii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, a thorough investigation has been done on the removal efficiency of both As(III) and As (V) from synthetic wastewater by phycoremediation of Botryococcus braunii algal biomass. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are practised for predicting % phycoremediation efficiency of both As(III) and As(V) ions. The influence of several parameters for example initial pH, inoculum size, contact time and initial arsenic concentration (either As(III) or As(V)) was examined systematically. The maximum phycoremediation of As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.22% and 88.15% at pH 9.0, equilibrium time of 144 h by using algal inoculum size of 10% (v/v) and initial arsenic concentration of 50 mg/L. The data acquired from laboratory scale experimental set up was utilized for training a three-layer feed-forward back propagation (BP) with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) training algorithm having 4:5:1 architecture. A comparison between the experimental data and model outputs provided a high correlation coefficient (R2all_ANN equal to 0.9998) and exhibited that the model was capable for predicting the phycoremediation of both As(III) and As(V) from wastewater. The network topology was optimized by changing number of neurons in hidden layers. ANNs are efficient to model and simulate highly non-liner multivariable relationships. Absolute error and Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output were calculated for ANN model outputs. The comparison of phycoremediation efficiencies of both As(III) and As(V) between experimental results and ANN model outputs exhibited that ANN model can determine the behaviour of As(III) and As(V) elimination process under various circumstances.

  11. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions. PMID:20055590

  12. Development of magnetic graphene oxide adsorbent for the removal and preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) species from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rashidi Nodeh, Hamid; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-05-01

    New-generation adsorbent, Fe3O4@SiO2/GO, was developed by modification of graphene oxide (GO) with silica-coated (SiO2) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4). The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The developed adsorbent was used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from environmental waters prior to ICP-MS analysis. Fe3O4@SiO2/GO provided high adsorption capacities, i.e., 7.51 and 11.46 mg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, at pH 4.0. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic were investigated for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. Preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) were studied using magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) method at pH 9.0 as the adsorbent showed selective adsorption for As(III) only in pH range 7-10. MSPE using Fe3O4@SiO2/GO was developed with good linearities (0.05-2.0 ng mL(-1)) and high coefficient of determination (R (2) = 0.9992 and 0.9985) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) (3× SD/m, n = 3) obtained were 7.9 pg mL(-1) for As(III) and 28.0 pg mL(-1) for As(V). The LOD obtained is 357-1265× lower than the WHO maximum permissible limit of 10.0 ng mL(-1). The developed MSPE method showed good relative recoveries (72.55-109.71 %) and good RSDs (0.1-4.3 %, n = 3) for spring water, lake, river, and tap water samples. The new-generation adsorbent can be used for the removal and simultaneous preconcentration of As(III) and As(V) from water samples successfully. The adsorbent removal for As(III) is better than As(V). PMID:26850098

  13. Detection of heavy metals released at the sediment/water interface by combining Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (ASV) and Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, S.; Ciani, I.; Bragato, C.; Baldo, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    Hemisphere mercury microelectrodes are investigated in combine anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) experiments for the detection of heavy metal ions at the solid/solution interface of a sediment sample. Relatively large anodic stripping peaks due to lead are monitored at μm distances from the solid particles, while, under the same experimental conditions, no or lower ASV peaks are found in the bulk solution. This suggests that diffusion gradients at sediment/water interface is monitored. This method, therefore, offers a new possibility for investigating on spatial differences of immobilization and remobilization processes of heavy metals at sediment/water interfaces.

  14. Screening of potential pseudo att sites of Streptomyces phage ΦC31 integrase in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhi-peng; Chen, Lu-sheng; Jia, Cai-yan; Zhu, Huan-zhang; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Aim: ΦC31 integrase mediates site-specific recombination between two short sequences, attP and attB, in phage and bacterial genomes, which is a promising tool in gene regulation-based therapy since the zinc finger structure is probably the DNA recognizing domain that can further be engineered. The aim of this study was to screen potential pseudo att sites of ΦC31 integrase in the human genome, and evaluate the risks of its application in human gene therapy. Methods: TFBS (transcription factor binding sites) were found on the basis of reported pseudo att sites using multiple motif-finding tools, including AlignACE, BioProspector, Consensus, MEME, and Weeder. The human genome with the proposed motif was scanned to find the potential pseudo att sites of ΦC31 integrase. Results: The possible recognition motif of ΦC31 integrase was identified, which was composed of two co-occurrence conserved elements that were reverse complement to each other flanking the core sequence TTG. In the human genome, a total of 27924 potential pseudo att sites of ΦC31 integrase were found, which were distributed in each human chromosome with high-risk specificity values in the chromosomes 16, 17, and 19. When the risks of the sites were evaluate more rigorously, 53 hits were discovered, and some of them were just the vital functional genes or regulatory regions, such as ACYP2, AKR1B1, DUSP4, etc. Conclusion: The results provide clues for more comprehensive evaluation of the risks of using ΦC31 integrase in human gene therapy and for drug discovery. PMID:23416928

  15. Effects of etravirine on the pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor S/GSK1265744.

    PubMed

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigational integrase inhibitor in phase 2 studies. Healthy subjects received 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 alone once daily for 10 days (period 1) and in combination with 200 mg of ETR twice daily for 14 days (period 2). Serial plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected on day 10 during period 1 and on day 14 during period 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Etravirine had no effects on S/GSK1265744 geometric mean ratios of the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosing interval (1.01; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.956 to 1.06), of the maximum observed plasma concentration (1.04; 90% CI, 0.987 to 1.09), or of the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (0.999; 90% CI, 0.942 to 1.06). Etravirine pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters observed following coadministration with S/GSK1265744 were in the range of historical values reported for ETR alone in healthy subjects. These results indicate that 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 for 10 days as monotherapy followed by an additional 14 days in combination with ETR was well tolerated in healthy subjects and that no dose adjustment of S/GSK1265744 is required when it is coadministered with ETR. PMID:23114768

  16. Effects of Etravirine on the Pharmacokinetics of the Integrase Inhibitor S/GSK1265744

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Lou, Yu; Dumont, Etienne; Spreen, William

    2013-01-01

    HIV integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir and elvitegravir halt HIV progression, but treatment-emergent resistance and cross-resistance have been observed. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine (ETR) may be used in combination with integrase inhibitors in patients with drug resistance. This single-center, open-label, two-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated the effects of ETR coadministration on the pharmacokinetic profile of S/GSK1265744, an investigational integrase inhibitor in phase 2 studies. Healthy subjects received 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 alone once daily for 10 days (period 1) and in combination with 200 mg of ETR twice daily for 14 days (period 2). Serial plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analyses were collected on day 10 during period 1 and on day 14 during period 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Etravirine had no effects on S/GSK1265744 geometric mean ratios of the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosing interval (1.01; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.956 to 1.06), of the maximum observed plasma concentration (1.04; 90% CI, 0.987 to 1.09), or of the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (0.999; 90% CI, 0.942 to 1.06). Etravirine pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters observed following coadministration with S/GSK1265744 were in the range of historical values reported for ETR alone in healthy subjects. These results indicate that 30 mg of S/GSK1265744 for 10 days as monotherapy followed by an additional 14 days in combination with ETR was well tolerated in healthy subjects and that no dose adjustment of S/GSK1265744 is required when it is coadministered with ETR. PMID:23114768

  17. Characterization of the Drug Resistance Profiles of Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Said A.; Liu, Yannan; Quashie, Peter K.; Oliveira, Maureen; Moisi, Daniela; Brenner, Bluma G.; Sandstrom, Paul A.; Mesplède, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously showed that the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 is susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and that the same IN drug resistance mutations result in similar phenotypes in both viruses. Now we wished to determine whether tissue culture drug selection studies with SIV would yield the same resistance mutations as in HIV. Tissue culture selection experiments were performed using rhesus macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) infected with SIVmac239 viruses in the presence of increasing concentrations of dolutegravir (DTG), elvitegravir (EVG), and raltegravir (RAL). We now show that 22 weeks of selection pressure with DTG yielded a mutation at position R263K in SIV, similar to what has been observed in HIV, and that selections with EVG led to emergence of the E92Q substitution, which is a primary INSTI resistance mutation in HIV associated with EVG treatment failure. To study this at a biochemical level, purified recombinant SIVmac239 wild-type (WT) and E92Q, T97A, G118R, Y143R, Q148R, N155H, R263K, E92Q T97A, E92Q Y143R, R263K H51Y, and G140S Q148R recombinant substitution-containing IN enzymes were produced, and each of the characteristics strand transfer, 3′-processing activity, and INSTI inhibitory constants was assessed in cell-free assays. The results show that the G118R and G140S Q148R substitutions decreased Km′ and Vmax′/Km′ for strand transfer compared to those of the WT. RAL and EVG showed reduced activity against both viruses and against enzymes containing Q148R, E92Q Y143R, and G140S Q148R. Both viruses and enzymes containing Q148R and G140S Q148R showed moderate levels of resistance against DTG. This study further confirms that the same mutations associated with drug resistance in HIV display similar profiles in SIV. IMPORTANCE Our goal was to definitively establish whether HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) share similar resistance

  18. Review of integrase strand transfer inhibitors for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Eun; Mohamed, Abdilahi; Kalabalik, Julie; Sharma, Roopali

    2015-10-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are oral antiretroviral agents used against HIV infection. There are three agents available, including raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, some of which are available as combination medications with other antiretroviral drugs. The efficacy and safety of INSTIs in treatment-naïve and experienced HIV-infected patients have been established by multiple studies. Based on the current practice guidelines, INSTI-based regimens are considered as one of the first-line therapies for treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. There are new INSTIs in development to improve the resistance profile and to decrease the frequency of drug administration. PMID:26293294

  19. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an Inhibitor Scaffold of HIV Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Sham, Yuk Y.; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold. PMID:21381765

  20. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an inhibitor scaffold of HIV integrase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Sham, Yuk Y; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-04-14

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling, and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold. PMID:21381765

  1. Feline leukemia virus integrase and capsid packaging functions do not change the insertion profile of standard Moloney retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Métais, J-Y; Topp, S; Doty, R T; Borate, B; Nguyen, A-D; Wolfsberg, T G; Abkowitz, J L; Dunbar, C E

    2010-06-01

    Adverse events linked to perturbations of cellular genes by vector insertion reported in gene therapy trials and animal models have prompted attempts to better understand the mechanisms directing viral vector integration. The integration profiles of vectors based on MLV, ASLV, SIV and HIV have all been shown to be non-random, and novel vectors with a safer integration pattern have been sought. Recently, we developed a producer cell line called CatPac that packages standard MoMLV vectors with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) gag, pol and env gene products. We now report the integration profile of this vector, asking if the FeLV integrase and capsid proteins could modify the MoMLV integration profile, potentially resulting in a less genotoxic pattern. We transduced rhesus macaque CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with CatPac or standard MoMLV vectors, and determined their integration profile by LAM-PCR. We obtained 184 and 175 unique integration sites (ISs) respectively for CatPac and standard MoMLV vectors, and these were compared with 10 000 in silico-generated random IS. The integration profile for CatPac vector was similar to MoMLV and equally non-random, with a propensity for integration near transcription start sites and in highly dense gene regions. We found an IS for CatPac vector localized 715 nucleotides upstream of LMO-2, the gene involved in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed by X-SCID patients treated by gene therapy using MoMLV vectors. In conclusion, we found that replacement of MoMLV env, gag and pol gene products with FeLV did not alter the basic integration profile. Thus, there appears to be no safety advantage for this packaging system. However, considering the stability and efficacy of CatPac vectors, further development is warranted, using potentially safer vector backbones, for instance those with a SIN configuration. PMID:20237508

  2. Speciation of AsIII and AsV in fruit juices by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction and hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new procedure was developed to speciate and quantify As(III) and As(V) in fruit juices. At pH 3.0, As(III) and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) formed a complex, which was extracted into carbon tetrachloride by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME) and subsequently quantified...

  3. Impact of carbon nanotubes on the toxicity of inorganic arsenic [AS(III) and AS(V)] to Daphnia magna: The role of certain arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Allam, Ahmed A; Ajarem, Jamaan; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zuoyao

    2016-07-01

    As a type of emerging nanomaterial, hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs) may interact with other pollutants in the aquatic environments and further influence their toxicity, transport, and fate. Thus, evaluation of toxicity to arsenic in the presence of CNTs needs to receive much more attention. The present study was conducted to explore the underlying mechanisms of OH-MWCNT-induced arsenic (As[III] and As[V]) toxicity changes in the aquatic organism Daphnia magna at different pH levels. The most toxic species for As(III) and As(V) to D. magna were found to be H2 AsO3 (-) and H2 AsO4 (-) . It appeared that the pH values were of greatest importance when the biological toxicity of As(III) and As(V) was compared. Furthermore, the effects of OH-MWCNTs on arsenic toxicity to D. magna indicated that the presence of OH-MWCNTs could enhance the toxicity of arsenic. The interactions of arsenic with OH-MWCNTs were further investigated by conducting adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity of As(V) by OH-MWCNTs was found to be higher than that of As(III). To conclude, adsorption of certain arsenic species onto OH-MWCNTs is crucial for a reliable interpretation of enhanced toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1852-1859. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26681408

  4. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND URINARY EXCRETION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN C57BL/6 MICE FOLLOWING SUBCHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENATE (ASV) IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship of exposure and tissue concentration of parent chemical and metabolites over prolonged exposure is a critical issue for chronic toxicities mediated by metabolite(s) rather than parent chemical alone. This is an issue for AsV because its trivalent metabolites hav...

  5. Removal of As(V), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from aqueous environments by poly(acrylonitril-co-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride)-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dudu, Tuba Ersen; Sahiner, Mehtap; Alpaslan, Duygu; Demirci, Sahin; Aktas, Nahit

    2015-09-15

    Cationic poly(Acrylonitril-co-Acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl Ammonium Chloride) (p(AN-co-APTMACl)) hydrogels in bulk were synthesized by using acrylonitrile (AN) and 3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (APTMACl) as monomers. The prepared hydrogels were exposed to amidoximation reaction to replace hydrophobic nitrile groups with hydrophilic amidoxime groups that have metal ion binding ability. Those replacements were increased the hydrogels absorption capacity for As(V) and Cr(VI). Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms equations were utilized to obtain the best-fitted isotherm model for the absorption of the ions at different metal ion concentrations. The absorption data of As(V) ion were fitted well to Freundlich isotherm while those of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) ions were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm. The maximum absorption of poly(3-acrylamidopropyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (p(APTMACl)) and amid-p(AN-co-APTMACl) macro gels were 22.39 mg and 21.83 mg for As(V), and 30.65 mg and 18.16 mg for Cr(VI) ion per unit gram dried gel, respectively. Kinetically, the absorption behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 2nd-order kinetic model and those of As(V) ions were fitted well to a pseudo 1st order kinetic model. PMID:26188989

  6. Nature and reactivity of layered double hydroxides formed by coprecipitating Mg, Al and As(V): Effect of arsenic concentration, pH, and aging.

    PubMed

    Sommella, Alessia; Caporale, Antonio G; Denecke, Melissa A; Mangold, Stefan; Pigna, Massimo; Santoro, Anna; Terzano, Roberto; Violante, Antonio

    2015-12-30

    Arsenic (As) co-precipitation is one of the major processes controlling As solubility in soils and waters. When As is co-precipitated with Al and Mg, the possible formation of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and other nanocomposites can stabilize As in their structures thus making this toxic element less available. We investigated the nature and reactivity of Mg-Al-arsenate [As(V)] co-precipitated LDHs formed in solution affected by As concentration, pH, and aging. At the beginning of the co-precipitation process, poorly crystalline LDH and non-crystalline Al(Mg)-oxides form. Prolonged aging of the samples promotes crystallization of LDHs, evidenced by an increase in As K XANES intensities and XRD peak intensities. During aging Al- and/or Mg-oxides are likely transformed by dissolution/re-precipitation processes into more crystalline but still defective LDHs. Surface area, chemical composition, reactivity of the precipitates, and anion exchange properties of As(V) in the co-precipitates are influenced by pH, aging, and As concentration. This study demonstrates that (i) As(V) retards or inhibits the formation and transformation of LDHs and (ii) more As(V) is removed from solution if co-precipitated with Mg and Al than by sorption onto well crystallized LDHs. PMID:26241870

  7. COMPARATIVE TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND URINARY EXCRETION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (IAS) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (ASV) AND ARSENITE (ASIII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMPARATIVE TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND URINARY EXCRETION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (iAs) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (AsV) AND ARSENITE (AsIII). E M Kenyon, L M Del Razo and M F Hughes. U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, RTP, NC, USA; ...

  8. Simian-tropic HIV as a model to study drug resistance against integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wares, Melissa; Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Sandstrom, Paul A; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    Drug resistance represents a key aspect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment failure. It is important to develop nonhuman primate models for studying issues of drug resistance and the persistence and transmission of drug-resistant viruses. However, relatively little work has been conducted using either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or SIV/HIV recombinant viruses for studying resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Here, we used a T-cell-tropic SIV/HIV recombinant virus in which the capsid and vif regions of HIV-1 were replaced with their SIV counterparts (simian-tropic HIV-1 [stHIV-1](SCA,SVIF)) to study the impact of a number of drug resistance substitutions in the integrase coding region at positions E92Q, G118R, E138K, Y143R, S153Y, N155H, and R263K on drug resistance, viral infectivity, and viral replication capacity. Our results show that each of these substitutions exerted effects that were similar to their effects in HIV-1. Substitutions associated with primary resistance against dolutegravir were more detrimental to stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) infectiousness than were resistance substitutions associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir, consistent with data that have been reported for HIV-1. These findings support the role of stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) as a useful model with which to evaluate the role of INSTI resistance substitutions on viral persistence, transmissibility, and pathogenesis in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:25583721

  9. HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: design, synthesis and molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; De Grazia, Sara; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on a new series of benzylindole derivatives with various substituents at the benzene-fused ring, suggested by our 3D pharmacophore model developed for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs). All synthesized compounds proved to be active in the nanomolar range (6-35 nM) on the strand-transfer step (ST). In particular, derivative 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5,7-dimethoxy-1H-indol-3-yl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid (8e), presenting the highest best-fit value on pharmacophore model, showed a potency comparable to that of clinical INSTIs GS 9137 (1) and MK-0518 (2). The binding mode of our molecules has been investigated using the recently published crystal structure of the complex of full-length integrase from the prototype foamy virus in complex with its cognate DNA (PFV-IN/DNA). The results highlighted the ability of derivative 8e to assume the same binding mode of MK-0518 and GS 9137. PMID:21227550

  10. [Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) play crucial roles in the life cycle of HIV-1, which are also key targets in the area of anti-HIV drug research. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the most employed drugs used to treat AIDS patients and HIV-infected people, while one of the integrase inhibitors has already been approved by US FDA to appear on the market. Great achievement has been made in the research on both, separately. Recently, much more attention of medicinal chemistry researchers has been attracted to the strategies of multi-target drugs. Compounds with excellent potency against both HIV RT and IN, evidently defined as dual inhibitors targeting both enzymes, have been obtained through considerable significant exploration, which can be classified into two categories according to different strategies. Combinatorial chemistry approach together with high throughput screening methods and multi-target-based virtual screening strategy have been useful tools for identifying selective anti-HIV compounds for long times; Rational drug design based on pharmacophore combination has also led to remarkable results. In this paper, latest progress of both categories in the discovery and structural modification will be covered, with a view to contribute to the career of anti-HIV research. PMID:23833931

  11. Design and synthesis of bicyclic pyrimidinones as potent and orally bioavailable HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Muraglia, Ester; Kinzel, Olaf; Gardelli, Cristina; Crescenzi, Benedetta; Donghi, Monica; Ferrara, Marco; Nizi, Emanuela; Orvieto, Federica; Pescatore, Giovanna; Laufer, Ralph; Gonzalez-Paz, Odalys; Di Marco, Annalise; Fiore, Fabrizio; Monteagudo, Edith; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Felock, Peter J; Rowley, Michael; Summa, Vincenzo

    2008-02-28

    HIV integrase is one of the three enzymes encoded by HIV genome and is essential for viral replication, but integrase inhibitors as marketed drugs have just very recently started to emerge. In this study, we show the evolution from the N-methylpyrimidinone structure to bicyclic pyrimidinones. Introduction of a suitably substituted amino moiety modulated the physical-chemical properties of the molecules and conferred nanomolar activity in the inhibition of spread of HIV-1 infection in cell culture. An extensive SAR study led to sulfamide (R)- 22b, which inhibited the strand transfer with an IC50 of 7 nM and HIV infection in MT4 cells with a CIC95 of 44 nM, and ketoamide (S)- 28c that inhibited strand transfer with an IC50 of 12 nM and the HIV infection in MT4 cells with a CIC95 of 13 nM and exhibited a good pharmacokinetic profile when dosed orally to preclinical species. PMID:18217703

  12. Site-specific transformation of Drosophila via phiC31 integrase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Jack R; Lee, Anne M; Wu, C-ting

    2006-06-01

    Position effects can complicate transgene analyses. This is especially true when comparing transgenes that have inserted randomly into different genomic positions and are therefore subject to varying position effects. Here, we introduce a method for the precise targeting of transgenic constructs to predetermined genomic sites in Drosophila using the C31 integrase system in conjunction with recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We demonstrate the feasibility of this system using two donor cassettes, one carrying the yellow gene and the other carrying GFP. At all four genomic sites tested, we observed exchange of donor cassettes with an integrated target cassette carrying the mini-white gene. Furthermore, because RMCE-mediated integration of the donor cassette is necessarily accompanied by loss of the target cassette, we were able to identify integrants simply by the loss of mini-white eye color. Importantly, this feature of the technology will permit integration of unmarked constructs into Drosophila, even those lacking functional genes. Thus, C31 integrase-mediated RMCE should greatly facilitate transgene analysis as well as permit new experimental designs. PMID:16547094

  13. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process. PMID:26116177

  14. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Rasaee, Mohammad J.

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  15. The Naphthyridinone GSK364735 Is a Novel, Potent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase Inhibitor and Antiretroviral▿

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Edward P.; Johns, Brian A.; Gartland, Margaret J.; Foster, Scott A.; Miller, Wayne H.; Ferris, Robert G.; Hazen, Richard J.; Underwood, Mark R.; Boros, Eric E.; Thompson, James B.; Weatherhead, Jason G.; Koble, Cecilia S.; Allen, Scott H.; Schaller, Lee T.; Sherrill, Ronald G.; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kobayashi, Masanori; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Miki, Shigeru; Nakahara, Koichiro; Noshi, Takeshi; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-01-01

    The naphthyridinone GSK364735 potently inhibited recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase in a strand transfer assay (mean 50% inhibitory concentration ± standard deviation, 8 ± 2 nM). As expected based on the structure of the drug, it bound competitively with another two-metal binding inhibitor (Kd [binding constant], 6 ± 4 nM). In a number of different cellular assays, GSK364735 inhibited HIV replication with potency at nanomolar concentrations (e.g., in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and MT-4 cells, 50% effective concentrations were 1.2 ± 0.4 and 5 ± 1 nM, respectively), with selectivity indexes of antiviral activity versus in-assay cytotoxicity of at least 2,200. When human serum was added, the antiviral potency decreased (e.g., a 35-fold decrease in the presence of 100% human serum was calculated by extrapolation from the results of the MT-4 cell assay). In cellular assays, GSK364735 blocked viral DNA integration, with a concomitant increase in two-long-terminal-repeat circles. As expected, this integrase inhibitor was equally active against wild-type viruses and mutant viruses resistant to approved drugs targeting either reverse transcriptase or protease. In contrast, some but not all viruses resistant to other integrase inhibitors were resistant to GSK364735. When virus was passaged in the presence of the inhibitor, we identified resistance mutations within the integrase active site that were the same as or similar to mutations arising in response to other two-metal binding inhibitors. Finally, either additive or synergistic effects were observed when GSK364735 was tested in combination with approved antiretrovirals (i.e., no antagonistic effects were seen). Thus, based on all the data, GSK364735 exerted potent antiviral activity through the inhibition of viral DNA integration by interacting at the two-metal binding site within the catalytic center of HIV integrase. PMID:18160521

  16. Removal and co-transport of Zn, As(V), and Cd during leachate seepage through downgradient mine soils: A batch sorption and column study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juhee; Nam, Seung Mo; Hyun, Seunghun

    2016-05-01

    The removal of Zn, As(V), and Cd during the leachate seepage process was measured in single, binary, and ternary solute systems by batch sorption and 1-D column flow experiments, followed by a sequential extraction procedure (SEP). In single-solute systems, sorption (Kd(⁎)) occurred in the order of As(V)>Zn≫Cd, and this sequence did not change in the presence of other solutes. In multi-solute systems, the sorption of Zn (~20%) and Cd (~27%) was enhanced by As(V), while Zn and Cd suppressed the sorption of each other. In all cases, As(V) sorption was not affected by the cations, indicating that As(V) is prioritized by sorption sites to a much greater degree than Zn and Cd. Element retention by column soils was strongly correlated (r(2)=0.77) with Kd(⁎). Across column segments, mass retention was in the order of inlet (36-54%)>middle (26-35%)>outlet (20-31%), except for Cd in the Zn-Cd binary system. The result of SEP revealed that most of the retained Cd (98-99%) and Zn (56-71%) was in the labile fraction (e.g., the sum of F1 and F2) while only 9-12% of As(V) was labile and most (>55%) was specifically adsorbed to Fe/Al oxides. Plots of the labile fraction (f(labile)) and the fast sorption fraction (f(fast)) suggested that the kinetics of specific As(V) sorption occur rapidly (f(fast)>f(labile)), whereas labile Zn and Cd sorption occurs slowly (f(labile)>f(fast)), indicating the occurrence of kinetically limited labile sorption sites, probably due to Zn-Cd competition. In conclusion, the element leaching potential of mine leachate can be greatly attenuated during downgradient soil seepage. However, when assessing the soil attenuation process, the impact of sorption competitors and the lability of adsorbed elements should first be considered. PMID:26896586

  17. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C.; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1–50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  18. Development and Identification of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Peptide Derived by Modification of the N-Terminal Domain of HIV-1 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Sala, Marina; Spensiero, Antonia; Esposito, Francesca; Scala, Maria C; Vernieri, Ermelinda; Bertamino, Alessia; Manfra, Michele; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Grieco, Paolo; Novellino, Ettore; Cadeddu, Marta; Tramontano, Enzo; Schols, Dominique; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M

    2016-01-01

    The viral enzyme integrase (IN) is essential for the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and represents an important target for the development of new antiretroviral drugs. In this study, we focused on the N-terminal domain (NTD), which is mainly involved into protein oligomerization process, for the development and synthesis of a library of overlapping peptide sequences, with specific length and specific offset covering the entire native protein sequence NTD IN 1-50. The most potent fragment, VVAKEIVAH (peptide 18), which includes a His residue instead of the natural Ser at position 39, inhibits the HIV-1 IN activity with an IC50 value of 4.5 μM. Amino acid substitution analysis on this peptide revealed essential residues for activity and allowed us to identify two nonapeptides (peptides 24 and 25), that show a potency of inhibition similar to the one of peptide 18. Interestingly, peptide 18 does not interfere with the dynamic interplay between IN subunits, while peptides 24 and 25 modulated these interactions in different manners. In fact, peptide 24 inhibited the IN-IN dimerization, while peptide 25 promoted IN multimerization, with IC50 values of 32 and 4.8 μM, respectively. In addition, peptide 25 has shown to have selective anti-infective cell activity for HIV-1. These results confirmed peptide 25 as a hit for further development of new chemotherapeutic agents against HIV-1. PMID:27375570

  19. The HIV-1 Integrase Mutant R263A/K264A Is 2-fold Defective for TRN-SR2 Binding and Viral Nuclear Import*

    PubMed Central

    De Houwer, Stéphanie; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Thys, Wannes; Rocha, Susana; Dirix, Lieve; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Transportin-SR2 (Tnpo3, TRN-SR2), a human karyopherin encoded by the TNPO3 gene, has been identified as a cellular cofactor of HIV-1 replication, specifically interacting with HIV-1 integrase (IN). Whether this interaction mediates the nuclear import of HIV remains controversial. We previously characterized the TRN-SR2 binding interface in IN and introduced mutations at these positions to corroborate the biological relevance of the interaction. The pleiotropic nature of IN mutations complicated the interpretation. Indeed, all previously tested IN interaction mutants also affected RT. Here we report on a virus with a pair of IN mutations, INR263A/K264A, that significantly reduce interaction with TRN-SR2. The virus retains wild-type reverse transcription activity but displays a block in nuclear import and integration, as measured by quantitative PCR. The defect in integration of this mutant resulted in a smaller increase in the number of two-long terminal repeat circles than for virus specifically blocked at integration by raltegravir or catalytic site mutations (IND64N/D116N/E152Q). Finally, using an eGFP-IN-labeled HIV fluorescence-based import assay, the defect in nuclear import was corroborated. These data altogether underscore the importance of the HIV-IN TRN-SR2 protein-protein interaction for HIV nuclear import and validate the IN/TRN-SR2 interaction interface as a promising target for future antiviral therapy. PMID:25063804

  20. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2012-01-01

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck’s raltegravir and Gilead’s elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5- positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  1. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2012-12-15

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck's raltegravir and Gilead's elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5-positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  2. Successful Prevention of Transmission of Integrase Resistance in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Alexandra U; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger D; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Cavassini, Matthias; Battegay, Manuel; Hauser, Christoph; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-transmitted drug resistance (TDR) may increase with the increasing use of INSTIs. We analyzed the prevalence of INSTI TDR in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (2008-2014). In 1 of 1316 drug-naive samples (0.1%), a major INSTI TDR mutation was detected. Prevalence was stable, although INSTIs were increasingly used. We showed that this is in contrast to the introduction of previous drug classes, in which more treatment failures with resistant strains occurred and TDR was observed more rapidly. We demonstrated on a population-level that it is possible to avoid TDR to a new drug class for years. PMID:27130429

  3. Long-Acting Integrase Inhibitor Protects Macaques from Intrarectal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Chasity D.; Spreen, William R.; Mohri, Hiroshi; Moss, Lee; Ford, Susan; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Markowitz, Martin; Ho, David D.

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 (GSK744) is an integrase strand-transfer inhibitor that has been formulated as a long-acting (LA) injectable suitable for monthly to quarterly clinical administration. GSK744 LA was administered at two time points 4 weeks apart beginning 1 week before virus administration, and macaques were challenged weekly for 8 weeks. GSK744 LA, at plasma concentrations achievable with quarterly injections in humans, protected all animals against repeated low-dose challenges. In a second experiment, macaques were given GSK744 LA 1 week before virus administration and challenged repeatedly until infection occurred. Protection decreased over time and correlated with the plasma drug levels. With a quarterly dosing schedule in humans, our results suggest that GSK744 LA could potentially decrease adherence problems associated with daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PMID:24594934

  4. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs. PMID:27565348

  5. Comparative docking and CoMFA analysis of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2011-08-01

    The docking studies and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were performed on highly active molecules of curcumine derivatives against 3' processing activity of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. The optimum CoMFA model was selected with statistically significant cross-validated r(2) value of 0.815 and non-cross validated r (2) value of 0.99. The common pharmacophore of highly active molecules was used for screening of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The high contribution of polar interactions in pharmacophore mapping is well supported by docking and CoMFA results. The results of docking, CoMFA, and pharmacophore mapping give structural insights as well as important binding features of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 IN inhibitors which can provide guidance for the rational design of novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:21327540

  6. Natural polymorphism S119R of HIV-1 integrase enhances primary INSTI resistance.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Ode, Hirotaka; Matsuda, Masakazu; Kito, Yumiko; Shigemi, Urara; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Junji; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-07-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which block proviral DNA integration into the host chromosome, are clinically effective against HIV-1 isolates exhibiting resistance to other classes of antiretroviral agents. Although naturally occurring amino acid variation has been less frequently observed in the integrase region, the functional constraints of this variation on primary INSTI resistance-associated mutations are not fully understood. In the present study, we focused on the S119G/R/P/T (S119X) polymorphisms, which are frequently observed in HIV-1 sequences derived from clinical specimens (naïve, n=458, 26%). The frequency of the S119X polymorphism together with Q148H/R (n=8, 63%) or N155H (n=12, 83%) was relatively high compared with that of naïve group. Our in vitro assays revealed that S119G/P/T alone exerted no effect on the susceptibility to INSTIs, whereas S119R enhanced the level of INSTI resistance induced by well-known INSTI resistance-associated mutations (Y143C, Q148H or N155H). Notably, the S119R polymorphism contributed to a significant (5.9-fold) increase in dolutegravir resistance caused by G140S/Q148H. Analysis of two cases of virological failure during raltegravir-based therapy showed that the accumulation and the rapid evolution of primary INSTI resistance-associated mutations coincided with the S119R mutation. These data highlight the role of the S119X polymorphism in INSTI resistance, and this polymorphism might be linked to the potential treatment outcome with INSTI-based therapy. PMID:25956162

  7. LEDGINs inhibit late stage HIV-1 replication by modulating integrase multimerization in the virions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LEDGINs are novel allosteric HIV integrase (IN) inhibitors that target the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 binding pocket of IN. They block HIV-1 integration by abrogating the interaction between LEDGF/p75 and IN as well as by allosterically inhibiting the catalytic activity of IN. Results Here we demonstrate that LEDGINs reduce the replication capacity of HIV particles produced in their presence. We systematically studied the molecular basis of this late effect of LEDGINs and demonstrate that HIV virions produced in their presence display a severe replication defect. Both the late effect and the previously described, early effect on integration contribute to LEDGIN antiviral activity as shown by time-of-addition, qPCR and infectivity assays. The late effect phenotype requires binding of LEDGINs to integrase without influencing proteolytic cleavage or production of viral particles. LEDGINs augment IN multimerization during virion assembly or in the released viral particles and severely hamper the infectivity of progeny virions. About 70% of the particles produced in LEDGIN-treated cells do not form a core or display aberrant empty cores with a mislocalized electron-dense ribonucleoprotein. The LEDGIN-treated virus displays defective reverse transcription and nuclear import steps in the target cells. The LEDGIN effect is possibly exerted at the level of the Pol precursor polyprotein. Conclusion Our results suggest that LEDGINs modulate IN multimerization in progeny virions and impair the formation of regular cores during the maturation step, resulting in a decreased infectivity of the viral particles in the target cells. LEDGINs thus profile as unique antivirals with combined early (integration) and late (IN assembly) effects on the HIV replication cycle. PMID:23721378

  8. The R262K substitution combined with H51Y in HIV-1 subtype B integrase confers low-level resistance against dolutegravir.

    PubMed

    Cutillas, Vincent; Mesplede, Thibault; Anstett, Kaitlin; Hassounah, Said; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) can be used effectively against HIV-1 infection. To date, no resistance substitution has been found in INSTI-naive patients treated with the new integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG). In a recent selection study with DTG, using a virus bearing the H51Y substitution in integrase, the emergence of an R to K substitution at position 262 (R262K) was observed. We characterized this double mutant with respect to integrase strand transfer activity and susceptibility to DTG both biochemically and in tissue culture. We showed that the addition of R262K to H51Y decreased recombinant integrase strand transfer activity but improved integrase DNA-binding affinity, compared to wild-type or H51Y-containing enzymes. The defect in strand transfer activity did not translate into a decrease in HIV-1 infectivity. The combination of H51Y and R262K substitutions slightly decreased susceptibility to DTG (fold change = 1.87) in cell-based resistance assays. Although viral replication was not affected and enzyme efficiency was impaired by the addition of R262K to H51Y, there was an overall increase in the level of biochemical drug resistance against DTG. Our findings suggest that the R at position 262 plays an important role in DNA binding. PMID:25348535

  9. Incorporation of SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) Aeroservoelastic Models into SAREC-ASV Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Stevens, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The Simulink-based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) was modified to incorporate linear models representing aeroservoelastic characteristics of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model. The S4T planform is for a Technology Concept Aircraft (TCA) design from the 1990s. The model has three control surfaces and is instrumented with accelerometers and strain gauges. Control laws developed for wind-tunnel testing for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression System functions were implemented in the simulation. The simulation models open- and closed-loop response to turbulence and to control excitation. It provides time histories for closed-loop stable conditions above the open-loop flutter boundary. The simulation is useful for assessing the potential impact of closed-loop control rate and position saturation. It also provides a means to assess fidelity of system identification procedures by providing time histories for a known plant model, with and without unmeasured turbulence as a disturbance. Sets of linear models representing different Mach number and dynamic pressure conditions were implemented as MATLAB Linear Time Invariant (LTI) objects. Configuration changes were implemented by selecting which LTI object to use in a Simulink template block. A limited comparison of simulation versus wind-tunnel results is shown.

  10. Adsorption of As(III), As(V) and Cu(II) on zirconium oxide immobilized alginate beads in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Cho, Dong-Wan; Kumar, Rahul; Baek, Seung Han; Kurade, Mayur B; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-10-01

    A composite adsorbent to remove arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], and copper [Cu(II)] from aqueous phase was synthesized by immobilizing zirconium oxide on alginate beads (ZOAB). The composition (wt%) of ZOAB (Zr-34.0; O-32.7; C-21.3; Ca-1.0) was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Sorption studies were conducted on single and binary sorbate systems, and the effects of contact time, initial adsorbate concentration, and pH on the adsorption performance of ZOAB (pHPZC = 4.3) were monitored. The sorption process for As(III)/As(V) and Cu(II) reached an equilibrium state within 240 h and 24 h, respectively, with maximum sorption capacities of 32.3, 28.5, and 69.9 mg g(-1), respectively. The addition of Cu(II) was favorable for As(V) sorption in contrast to As(III). In the presence of 48.6 mg L(-1) Cu(II), the sorption capacity of As(V) increased from 1.5 to 3.8 mg g(-1) after 240 h. The sorption data for As(III)/As(V) and Cu(II) conformed the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. The adsorption of As(III), As(V), and Cu(II) followed pseudo second order kinetics. The effect of arsenic species on Cu(II) sorption was insignificant. The results of present study demonstrated that the synthesized sorbent could be useful for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic contaminants from wastewaters. PMID:27372261

  11. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in fruit juices by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guoxin; Chen, Guoying; Chen, Tuanwei

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive method was developed to speciate and quantify As(III) and As(V) in fruit juices. At pH 3.0, As(III) and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) formed a complex, which was extracted into CCl4 by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and subsequently quantified by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). After As(V) was reduced by thiosulphate at pH 1.7-1.8, total inorganic arsenic (iAs) was determined following the same protocol and As(V) was calculated from the difference. Interference from methylarsonic acid (MMA) was managed at <10% by controlling the pH of the reduction reaction. This procedure achieved 1.2 μg L(-1) limit of detection (3σ) and 92-102% recovery at 10 μg L(-1), and is applicable to most fruit juices except certain pear juice that may contain considerable MMA. PMID:26212955

  12. New calcareous soil-alginate composites for efficient uptake of Fe(III), Mn(II) and As(V) from water.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M; Abdel-Hamid, Mohammed I; Rashad, Mohamed; Ali, Abdelnaser S M; Azab, Yehia A

    2013-07-25

    In the present study, various grades of sodium alginates were extracted from different brown macro-algae and their characteristics were investigated using FTIR, UV-vis and EA. The alginates were used in combination with different proportions of calcareous soil to develop new composite microparticles as potential sorbents for efficient uptake of Fe(III), Mn(II) and As(V) from water. Under the investigated conditions (1g of composite equilibrated in 100ml of standard metal ion solution), the composites have removed almost 100% of Fe(III) in the concentration range of 0.5-16.0 mg l(-1). Soil, alginate and composites exhibited the highest removal (about 89%) of Mn(II) at 0.5 mg l(-1). Reasonable removal efficiency (50-60%) was recorded at 0.5 mg l(-1) of As(V) whereas, increasing the initial As(V) concentration resulted in marked decrease in removal efficiency. The collected equilibrium data were also fitted to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for all the developed composites. PMID:23768586

  13. Biochar pyrolytically produced from municipal solid wastes for aqueous As(V) removal: adsorption property and its improvement with KOH activation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongmei; Capareda, Sergio; Chang, Zhizhou; Gao, Jun; Xu, Yueding; Zhang, Jianying

    2014-10-01

    Biochar converted from waste products is being considered as an alternative adsorbent for removal of aqueous heavy metal(loid)s. In this work, experimental and modeling investigations were conducted to examine the effect of biochars pyrolytically produced from municipal solid wastes on removing aqueous As(V) before and after activated by 2M KOH solution. Results showed that the highest adsorption capacity of pristine biochars was 24.49 mg/g. The pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir adsorption isotherm model can preferably describe the adsorption process. The activated biochar showed enhanced As(V) adsorption ability with an adsorption capacity of 30.98 mg/g, which was more than 1.3 times of pristine biochars, and 2-10 times of modified biochars reported by other literatures. Increase of surface area and changes of porous texture, especially the functional groups on the surface of activated biochars are the major contributors to its more efficient adsorption of As(V). PMID:25103038

  14. Dual inhibition of HIV-1 replication by integrase-LEDGF allosteric inhibitors is predominant at the post-integration stage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LEDGF/p75 (LEDGF) is the main cellular cofactor of HIV-1 integrase (IN). It acts as a tethering factor for IN, and targets the integration of HIV in actively transcribed gene regions of chromatin. A recently developed class of IN allosteric inhibitors can inhibit the LEDGF-IN interaction. Results We describe a new series of IN-LEDGF allosteric inhibitors, the most active of which is Mut101. We determined the crystal structure of Mut101 in complex with IN and showed that the compound binds to the LEDGF-binding pocket, promoting conformational changes of IN which explain at the atomic level the allosteric effect of the IN/LEDGF interaction inhibitor on IN functions. In vitro, Mut101 inhibited both IN-LEDGF interaction and IN strand transfer activity while enhancing IN-IN interaction. Time of addition experiments indicated that Mut101 behaved as an integration inhibitor. Mut101 was fully active on HIV-1 mutants resistant to INSTIs and other classes of anti-HIV drugs, indicative that this compound has a new mode of action. However, we found that Mut101 also displayed a more potent antiretroviral activity at a post-integration step. Infectivity of viral particles produced in presence of Mut101 was severely decreased. This latter effect also required the binding of the compound to the LEDGF-binding pocket. Conclusion Mut101 has dual anti-HIV-1 activity, at integration and post-integration steps of the viral replication cycle, by binding to a unique target on IN (the LEDGF-binding pocket). The post-integration block of HIV-1 replication in virus-producer cells is the mechanism by which Mut101 is most active as an antiretroviral. To explain this difference between Mut101 antiretroviral activity at integration and post-integration stages, we propose the following model: LEDGF is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein that is absent in the cytoplasm. Therefore, LEDGF can outcompete compound binding to IN in the nucleus of target cells lowering its antiretroviral

  15. Differential divalent cation requirements uncouple the assembly and catalytic reactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Hazuda, D J; Felock, P J; Hastings, J C; Pramanik, B; Wolfe, A L

    1997-01-01

    Previous in vitro analyses have shown that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase uses either manganese or magnesium to assemble as a stable complex on the donor substrate and to catalyze strand transfer. We now demonstrate that subsequent to assembly, catalysis of both 3' end processing and strand transfer requires a divalent cation cofactor and that the divalent cation requirements for assembly and catalysis can be functionally distinguished based on the ability to utilize calcium and cobalt, respectively. The different divalent cation requirements manifest by these processes are exploited to uncouple assembly and catalysis, thus staging the reaction. Staged 3' end processing and strand transfer assays are then used in conjunction with exonuclease III protection analysis to investigate the effects of integrase inhibitors on each step in the reaction. Analysis of a series of related inhibitors demonstrates that these types of compounds affect assembly and not either catalytic process, therefore reconciling the apparent disparate results obtained for such inhibitors in assays using isolated preintegration complexes. These studies provide evidence for a distinct role of the divalent cation cofactor in assembly and catalysis and have implications for both the identification and characterization of integrase inhibitors. PMID:9261430

  16. HIV-2 Integrase Polymorphisms and Longitudinal Genotypic Analysis of HIV-2 Infected Patients Failing a Raltegravir-Containing Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Cavaco-Silva, Joana; Abecasis, Ana; Miranda, Ana Cláudia; Poças, José; Narciso, Jorge; Águas, Maria João; Maltez, Fernando; Almeida, Isabel; Germano, Isabel; Diniz, António; Gonçalves, Maria de Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Cunha, Celso; Camacho, Ricardo Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the HIV-2 integrase gene polymorphisms and the pathways to resistance of HIV-2 patients failing a raltegravir-containing regimen, we studied 63 integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI)-naïve patients, and 10 heavily pretreated patients exhibiting virological failure while receiving a salvage raltegravir-containing regimen. All patients were infected by HIV-2 group A. 61.4% of the integrase residues were conserved, including the catalytic motif residues. No INSTI-major resistance mutations were detected in the virus population from naïve patients, but two amino acids that are secondary resistance mutations to INSTIs in HIV-1 were observed. The 10 raltegravir-experienced patients exhibited resistance mutations via three main genetic pathways: N155H, Q148R, and eventually E92Q - T97A. The 155 pathway was preferentially used (7/10 patients). Other mutations associated to raltegravir resistance in HIV-1 were also observed in our HIV-2 population (V151I and D232N), along with several novel mutations previously unreported. Data retrieved from this study should help build a more robust HIV-2-specific algorithm for the genotypic interpretation of raltegravir resistance, and contribute to improve the clinical monitoring of HIV-2-infected patients. PMID:24681625

  17. Secondary mutations in viruses resistant to HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that restore viral infectivity and replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Koichiro; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Masanori; Miki, Shigeru; Noshi, Takeshi; Seki, Takahiro; Kanamori-Koyama, Mikiko; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward P; Johns, Brian A; Foster, Scott A; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2009-02-01

    Passage of HIV-1 in the presence of integrase inhibitors (INIs) generates resistant viruses that have mutations in the integrase region. Integrase-resistant mutations Q148K and Q148R were identified as primary mutations with the passage of HIV-1 IIIB in the presence of INIs S-1360 or S/GSK-364735, respectively. Secondary amino acid substitutions E138K or G140S were observed when passage with INI was continued. The role of these mutations was investigated with molecular clones. Relative to Q148K alone, Q148K/E138K had 2- and >6-fold increases in resistance to S-1360 and S/GSK-364735, respectively, and the double mutant had slightly better infectivity and replication kinetics. In contrast, Q148K/G140S and Q148R/E138K had nearly equivalent or slightly reduced fold resistance to the INI compared with their respective Q148 primary mutants, and had increases in infectivity and replication kinetics. Recovery of these surrogates of viral fitness coincided with the recovery of integration efficiency of viral DNA into the host cell chromosome for these double mutants. These data show that recovery of viral integration efficiency can be an important factor for the emergence and maintenance of INI-resistant mutations. PMID:19027039

  18. Site-specific T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis thaliana mediated by the combined action of CRE recombinase and ϕC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Annelies; De Buck, Sylvie; Nolf, Jonah; Van Lerberge, Els; Depicker, Ann

    2013-07-01

    Random T-DNA integration into the plant host genome can be problematic for a variety of reasons, including potentially variable transgene expression as a result of different integration positions and multiple T-DNA copies, the risk of mutating the host genome and the difficulty of stacking well-defined traits. Therefore, recombination systems have been proposed to integrate the T-DNA at a pre-selected site in the host genome. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of the ϕC31 integrase (INT) for efficient targeted T-DNA integration. Moreover, we show that the iterative site-specific integration system (ISSI), which combines the activities of the CRE recombinase and INT, enables the targeting of genes to a pre-selected site with the concomitant removal of the resident selectable marker. To begin, plants expressing both the CRE and INT recombinase and containing the target attP site were constructed. These plants were supertransformed with a T-DNA vector harboring the loxP site, the attB sites, a selectable marker and an expression cassette encoding a reporter protein. Three out of the 35 transformants obtained (9%) showed transgenerational site-specific integration (SSI) of this T-DNA and removal of the resident selectable marker, as demonstrated by PCR, Southern blot and segregation analysis. In conclusion, our results show the applicability of the ISSI system for precise and targeted Agrobacterium-mediated integration, allowing the serial integration of transgenic DNA sequences in plants. PMID:23574114

  19. L-chicoric acid inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in vivo and is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Ryan A; Lee, Deborah J; McDougall, Brenda R; King, Peter J; Victoria, Joseph; Mao, Yingqun; Lei, Xiangyang; Reinecke, Manfred G; Robinson, W Edward

    2004-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) must covalently join the viral cDNA into a host chromosome for productive HIV infection. l-Chicoric acid (l-CA) enters cells poorly but is a potent inhibitor of IN in vitro. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), l-CA inhibits integration at concentrations from 500 nM to 10 microM but also inhibits entry at concentrations above 1 microM. Using recombinant HIV IN, steady-state kinetic analyses with l-CA were consistent with a noncompetitive or irreversible mechanism of inhibition. IN, in the presence or absence of l-CA, was successively washed. Inhibition of IN diminished, demonstrating that l-CA was reversibly bound to the protein. These data demonstrate that l-CA is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of IN in vitro and of HIV integration in vivo. Thus, l-CA likely interacts with amino acids other than those which bind substrate. PMID:15302207

  20. Adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto colloidal microparticles of commercial cross-linked polyallylamine (Sevelamer) from single and binary ion solutions.

    PubMed

    Kyzas, George Z; Siafaka, Panoraia I; Kostoglou, Margaritis; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2016-07-15

    This work investigates the removal of arsenic ions in trivalent (As(III)) or pentavalent form (As(V)) from single-component and binary (equal initial ion concentrations) aqueous solutions using commercial cross-linked polyallylamine (namely as Sevelamer) as adsorbent. This is the first work in literature regarding the application of that commercial material as adsorbent for ions. Sevelamer (SVL) is a widely known pharmaceutical compound and the existence of primary and secondary amino groups (with different ratios) in its molecule increases its adsorption potential. For this purpose can be easily proposed as potential sorbent. The adsorption evaluation was based on the pH-effect (optimum pH=6, where As(III) and As(V) removal was 69 and 86%, respectively), isotherms and kinetic curves. The maximum theoretical adsorption capacity (Qm) was 86 and 133mg/g for single-component solutions of As(III) and As(V), respectively. The respective values for binary mixtures of the same concentration (100mg/L) were 84 and 116mg/g, respectively (calculated after fitting to Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model at 20°C). A novel kinetic interpretation based on the raw experimental kinetics data was also developed. Although adsorption of As(III) and As(V) occurs mainly at different sites, there is an interdependence in their adsorption kinetics. It was found that adsorption from the binary mixtures is a two-stage process. The adsorption mechanism of SVL and arsenic ions interaction was elucidated using FTIR spectroscopy before and after adsorption. SEM images and XRD patterns (the material was amorphous both before and after arsenic adsorption indicating that the mechanism did not alter its physical state) were also taken for the characterization of SVL before and after arsenic adsorption. The adsorption mechanism was mainly attributed to the electrostatic interactions between negatively As ions and positively charged amino groups of SVL. For this reason, As(V) adsorption is higher than

  1. A new perovskite-type NdFeO3 adsorbent: synthesis, characterization, and As(V) adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Minh Dai; Nhiem Dao, Ngoc; Van Nguyen, Duc; Chuc Pham, Ngoc; Ninh Vu, The; Dung Doan, Trung

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline NdFeO3 perovskite oxide was prepared by the combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and corresponding metal nitrate precursors under optimum process conditions, using a solution with a pH of 2, a metal/PVA molar ratio of 1:3, and a calcination temperature of 600 °C, and was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller nitrogen adsorption and desorption, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The synthesized perovskite NdFeO3, which had an average size of 20 nm and a relatively high surface area of 20 m2 g‑1, was investigated for adsorbing hazardous arsenate from aqueous solution. Arsenate adsorption by perovskite NdFeO3 is a pH-dependent process with a high adsorption capacity at pH levels between 4 and 7 and a maximum As(V) adsorption capacity of 126.58 mg g‑1, higher than most arsenate adsorbents reported in the literature. Kinetic and equilibrium data of reaction under the experimental conditions are best described by a pseudo-second-order and the Langmuir isotherm equation. The values of enthalpy, Gibbs free energy and entropy changes (ΔH0 = +63.916 kJ mol‑1, ΔG0 = ‑6.551 kJ mol‑1 to ‑14.021 kJ mol‑1 at T = 283‑313 K, ΔS0 = +0.249 kJ mol‑1 K‑1) suggested that the reaction was endothermic, spontaneous, and took place with increasing entropy.

  2. Determination of traces of Sb(III) using ASV in Sb-rich water samples affected by mining.

    PubMed

    Cidu, Rosa; Biddau, Riccardo; Dore, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Chemical speciation [Sb(V) and Sb(III)] affects the mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of antimony. In oxygenated environments Sb(V) dominates whereas thermodynamically unstable Sb(III) may occur. In this study, a simple method for the determination of Sb(III) in non acidic, oxygenated water contaminated with antimony is proposed. The determination of Sb(III) was performed by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV, 1-20 μg L(-1) working range), the total antimony, Sb(tot), was determined either by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, 1-100μgL(-1) working range) or inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, 100-10,000 μg L(-1) working range) depending on concentration. Water samples were filtered on site through 0.45 μm pore size filters. The aliquot for determination of Sb(tot) was acidified with 1% (v/v) HNO3. Different preservatives, namely HCl, L(+) ascorbic acid or L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO3, were used to assess the stability of Sb(III) in synthetic solutions. The method was tested on groundwater and surface water draining the abandoned mine of Su Suergiu (Sardinia, Italy), an area heavily contaminated with Sb. The waters interacting with Sb-rich mining residues were non acidic, oxygenated, and showed extreme concentrations of Sb(tot) (up to 13,000 μg L(-1)), with Sb(III) <10% of total antimony. The stabilization with L(+) tartaric acid plus HNO3 appears useful for the determination of Sb(III) in oxygenated, Sb-rich waters. Due to the instability of Sb(III), analyses should be carried out within 7 days upon the water collection. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require time-consuming preparation steps prior to analysis of Sb(III). PMID:25479865

  3. Sorption and redox reactions of As(III) and As(V) within secondary mineral coatings on aquifer sediment grains.

    PubMed

    Singer, David M; Fox, Patricia M; Guo, Hua; Marcus, Matthew A; Davis, James A

    2013-10-15

    Important reactive phenomena that affect the transport and fate of many elements occur at the mineral-water interface (MWI), including sorption and redox reactions. Fundamental knowledge of these phenomena are often based on observations of ideal mineral-water systems, for example, studies of molecular scale reactions on single crystal faces or the surfaces of pure mineral powders. Much less is understood about MWI in natural environments, which typically have nanometer to micrometer scale secondary mineral coatings on the surfaces of primary mineral grains. We examined sediment grain coatings from a well-characterized field site to determine the causes of rate limitations for arsenic (As) sorption and redox processes within the coatings. Sediments were obtained from the USGS field research site on Cape Cod, MA, and exposed to synthetic contaminated groundwater solutions. Uptake of As(III) and As(V) into the coatings was studied with a combination of electron microscopy and synchrotron techniques to assess concentration gradients and reactive processes, including electron transfer reactions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray microprobe (XMP) analyses indicated that As was primarily associated with micrometer- to submicrometer aggregates of Mn-bearing nanoparticulate goethite. As(III) oxidation by this phase was observed but limited by the extent of exposed surface area of the goethite grains to the exterior of the mineral coatings. Secondary mineral coatings are potentially both sinks and sources of contaminants depending on the history of a contaminated site, and may need to be included explicitly in reactive transport models. PMID:24041305

  4. Interaction between Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Is Required for Reverse Transcription during HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tekeste, Shewit S.; Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Weiner, Ethan M.; Xu, Xiaowen; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication requires reverse transcription of its RNA genome into a double-stranded cDNA copy, which is then integrated into the host cell chromosome. The essential steps of reverse transcription and integration are catalyzed by the viral enzymes reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN), respectively. In vitro, HIV-1 RT can bind with IN, and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of IN is necessary and sufficient for this binding. To better define the RT-IN interaction, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to map a binding surface on the IN CTD in the presence of RT prebound to a duplex DNA construct that mimics the primer-binding site in the HIV-1 genome. To determine the biological significance of the RT-IN interaction during viral replication, we used the NMR chemical shift mapping information as a guide to introduce single amino acid substitutions of nine different residues on the putative RT-binding surface in the IN CTD. We found that six viral clones bearing such IN substitutions (R231E, W243E, G247E, A248E, V250E, and I251E) were noninfectious. Further analyses of the replication-defective IN mutants indicated that the block in replication took place specifically during early reverse transcription. The recombinant INs purified from these mutants, though retaining enzymatic activities, had diminished ability to bind RT in a cosedimentation assay. The results indicate that the RT-IN interaction is functionally relevant during the reverse transcription step of the HIV-1 life cycle. IMPORTANCE To establish a productive infection, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) needs to reverse transcribe its RNA genome to create a double-stranded DNA copy and then integrate this viral DNA genome into the chromosome of the host cell. These two essential steps are catalyzed by the HIV-1 enzymes reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN), respectively. We have shown previously that IN

  5. Sequential Deletion of the Integrase (Gag-Pol) Carboxyl Terminus Reveals Distinct Phenotypic Classes of Defective HIV-1 ▿ † §

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Kevin D.; Topper, Michael B.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A requisite step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the insertion of the viral genome into that of the host cell, a process catalyzed by the 288-amino-acid (32-kDa) viral integrase (IN). IN recognizes and cleaves the ends of reverse-transcribed viral DNA and directs its insertion into the chromosomal DNA of the target cell. IN function, however, is not limited to integration, as the protein is required for other aspects of viral replication, including assembly, virion maturation, and reverse transcription. Previous studies demonstrated that IN is comprised of three domains: the N-terminal domain (NTD), catalytic core domain (CCD), and C-terminal domain (CTD). Whereas the CCD is mainly responsible for providing the structural framework for catalysis, the roles of the other two domains remain enigmatic. This study aimed to elucidate the primary and subsidiary roles that the CTD has in protein function. To this end, we generated and tested a nested set of IN C-terminal deletion mutants in measurable assays of virologic function. We discovered that removal of up to 15 residues (IN 273) resulted in incremental diminution of enzymatic function and infectivity and that removal of the next three residues resulted in a loss of infectivity. However, replication competency was surprisingly reestablished with one further truncation, corresponding to IN 269 and coinciding with partial restoration of integration activity, but it was lost permanently for all truncations extending N terminal to this position. Our analyses of these replication-competent and -incompetent truncation mutants suggest potential roles for the IN CTD in precursor protein processing, reverse transcription, integration, and IN multimerization. PMID:21367893

  6. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for β-retroviral intasome function

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA (vDNA) into host target (tDNA), which is an essential step in the lifecycle of all retroviruses1. Prior structural characterization of IN-vDNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV) revealed a functional IN tetramer2–5, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera will employ tetrameric IN6–9. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallography, we determine here an unexpected octameric IN architecture for the β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) intasome. The structure is composed of two core IN dimers, which interact with the vDNA ends and structurally mimic the PFV IN tetramer, and two flanking IN dimers that engage the core structure via their IN C-terminal domains (CTDs). Contrary to the belief that tetrameric IN components are sufficient to catalyze integration, the flanking IN dimers were necessary for MMTV IN activity. The IN octamer solves a conundrum for the β- as well as α-retroviruses by providing critical CTDs to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis due to evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain (CCD)-CTD linker regions. The octameric architecture of the MMTV intasome provides a new paradigm for the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  7. Using the class 1 integron-integrase gene as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution

    PubMed Central

    Gillings, Michael R; Gaze, William H; Pruden, Amy; Smalla, Kornelia; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Around all human activity, there are zones of pollution with pesticides, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and the microorganisms associated with human waste streams and agriculture. This diversity of pollutants, whose concentration varies spatially and temporally, is a major challenge for monitoring. Here, we suggest that the relative abundance of the clinical class 1 integron-integrase gene, intI1, is a good proxy for pollution because: (1) intI1 is linked to genes conferring resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and heavy metals; (2) it is found in a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria; (3) its abundance can change rapidly because its host cells can have rapid generation times and it can move between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer; and (4) a single DNA sequence variant of intI1 is now found on a wide diversity of xenogenetic elements, these being complex mosaic DNA elements fixed through the agency of human selection. Here we review the literature examining the relationship between anthropogenic impacts and the abundance of intI1, and outline an approach by which intI1 could serve as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution. PMID:25500508

  8. Diarylsulfones, a novel class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Neamati, N; Mazumder, A; Zhao, H; Sunder, S; Burke, T R; Schultz, R J; Pommier, Y

    1997-01-01

    A majority of reported human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors are polyhydroxylated aromatic compounds containing two phenyl rings separated by aliphatic or aromatic linkers. Most inhibitors possessing a catechol moiety exhibit considerable toxicity in cellular assays. In an effort to identify nonhydroxylated analogs, a series of aromatic sulfones were tested for their ability to inhibit the 3' processing and strand transfer steps that are necessary for HIV replication. Several aromatic sulfones have previously been shown to have moderate activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in cellular assays; however, their inhibitory potencies against IN have not been explored. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of a series of sulfones and sulfonamides against IN was determined. Among 52 diaryl sulfones tested, 4 were determined to be highly potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.8 to 10 micrograms/ml), 5 had good potencies (IC50, 11 to 50 micrograms/ml), 10 showed moderate potencies (IC50, 51 to 100 micrograms/ml), and 33 were inactive (IC50, > 100 micrograms/ml) against IN. All of the active compounds exhibited similar potencies against HIV-2 IN. Sulfa drugs, used extensively in treating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in AIDs patients, were also examined. Among 19 sulfonamides tested, sulfasalazine (IC50, 50 micrograms/ml) was the most potent. We conclude that potent inhibitors of IN can be designed based on the results presented in this study. PMID:9021196

  9. Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors as a Delivery Platform for Targeted Modification of Adenosine Deaminase Locus

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Alok V; Hollis, Roger P; Kuftinec, Gabriela; Senadheera, Shantha; Chan, Rebecca; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) for transient delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and donor templates for site-specific modification of the human adenosine deaminase (hADA) gene. Initially, we constructed IDLVs carrying ZFN monomers (Single-IDLVs) and found them to be able to deliver their gene-editing payload to K562 cells successfully upon cotransduction, with minimal cytotoxicity. To simplify delivery, we designed an IDLV construct to deliver both ZFN monomers from the same vector (Double-IDLV). However, this construct in its original state was prone to rearrangements of the vector genome, resulting in greatly reduced functionality; this was due to recombination between highly similar ZFN monomers arranged in tandem. We modified the Double-IDLV constructs to reduce recombination and restored simultaneous delivery of both ZFNs. We also tested an IDLV construct for delivery of donor templates and demonstrated its efficacy for gene modification. In summary, we highlighted the importance of modifying vector design for co-delivery of highly similar sequences inherent to genome-editing nucleases, and demonstrated significant improvement in the use of IDLVs for delivery of ZFNs and donor templates for genome modification. PMID:23857176

  10. Novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Development by Virtual Screening Based on QSAR Models.

    PubMed

    Guasch, Laura; Zakharov, Alexey V; Tarasova, Olga A; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and is responsible for integration of the virus into the human genome. We present computational approaches used to design novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. We created an IN inhibitor database by collecting experimental data from the literature. We developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models of HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST) inhibitors using this database. The prediction accuracy of these models was estimated by external 5-fold cross-validation as well as with an additional validation set of 308 structurally distinct compounds from the publicly accessible BindingDB database. The validated models were used to screen a small combinatorial library of potential synthetic candidates to identify hits, with a subsequent docking approach applied to further filter out compounds to arrive at a small set of potential HIV-1 IN inhibitors. As result, 236 compounds with good druglikeness properties and with correct docking poses were identified as potential candidates for synthesis. One of the six compounds finally chosen for synthesis was experimentally confirmed to inhibit the ST reaction with an IC50(ST) of 37 µM. The IN inhibitor database is available for download from http://cactus.nci.nih.gov/download/iidb/. PMID:26268340

  11. Methods for the Analyses of Inhibitor-Induced Aberrant Multimerization of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Kessl, Jacques J.; Sharma, Amit; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target as its function is essential for the viral lifecycle. The discovery of multifunctional allosteric IN inhibitors or ALLINIs, which potently impair viral replication by promoting aberrant, higher order IN multimerization as well as inhibit IN interactions with its cellular cofactor, LEDGF/p75, has opened new venues to exploit IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, the recent discovery of multimerization selective IN inhibitors or MINIs, has provided new investigational probes to study the direct effects of aberrant IN multimerization in vitro and in infected cells. Here we describe three complementary methods designed to detect and quantify the effects of these new classes of inhibitors on IN multimerization. These methods include a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence-based assay which allows for measuring EC50 values for the inhibitor-induced aberrant IN multimerization, a dynamic light scattering-based assay which allows for monitoring the formation and sizes of oligomeric IN particles in a time-dependent manner, and a chemical cross-linking-based assay of interacting IN subunits which allows for the determination of IN oligomers in viral particles. PMID:26714710

  12. An update on integrase inhibitors: new opportunities for a personalized therapy? The NEXTaim Project.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Massimo; Marcotullio, Simone; Puro, Vincenzo; De Carli, Gabriella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Nozza, Silvia; Gori, Andrea; Rusconi, Stefano; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Clementi, Massimo; Perno, Carlo Federico; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Castagna, Antonella; De Luca, Andrea; Galli, Massimo; Giacomelli, Andrea; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Mussini, Cristina; Di Biagio, Antonio; Puoti, Massimo; Bruno, Raffaele; Zuccaro, Valentina; Antinori, Andrea; Cinque, Paola; Croce, Davide; Restelli, Umberto; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the development of antiretroviral agents to control HIV replication, HIV infection has turned from a fatal disease into a treatable chronic infection. The present work collects the opinions of several experts on the efficacy and safety of recently approved second generation of integrase inhibitors and, in particular, on the role of this new class of drugs in antiretroviral therapy. The availability of new therapeutic options represents an opportunity to ameliorate the efficacy of cART in controlling HIV replication also within viral reservoirs. The personalization of the treatment driven mainly by the management of comorbidities, HIV-HCV co-infections and aging, will be easier with antiretroviral drugs without drug-drug interactions and with a better toxicity and tolerability profile. Future assessment of economic impact for the introduction of new innovative drugs in the field of antiretroviral therapy will likely need some degree of adjustment of the evaluation criteria of costs and benefit which are currently based almost exclusively on morbidity and mortality. PMID:26571377

  13. Initial Characterization of Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors for Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanoun, Naima; Gayral, Marion; Pointreau, Adeline; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority (85%) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are discovered at too of a late stage to allow curative surgery. In addition, PDAC is highly resistant to conventional methods of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which only offer a marginal clinical benefit. Consequently, the prognosis of this cancer is devastating, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. In this dismal context, we recently demonstrated that PDAC gene therapy using nonviral vectors is safe and feasible, with early signs of efficacy in selected patients. Our next step is to transfer to the clinic HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) that outshine other therapeutic vectors to treat experimental models of PDAC. However, a primary safety issue presented by LVs that may delay their use in patients is the risk of oncogenesis after vector integration in the host's cell DNA. Thus, we developed a novel anticancerous approach based on integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) and demonstrated that IDLVs can be successfully engineered to transiently deliver therapeutic genes to inhibit pancreatic cancer cells proliferation. This work stems for the use of therapeutic IDLVs for the management of PDAC, in forthcoming early phase gene therapy clinical trial for this disease with no cure. PMID:26731312

  14. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles. PMID:18625269

  15. Using the class 1 integron-integrase gene as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution.

    PubMed

    Gillings, Michael R; Gaze, William H; Pruden, Amy; Smalla, Kornelia; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-06-01

    Around all human activity, there are zones of pollution with pesticides, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and the microorganisms associated with human waste streams and agriculture. This diversity of pollutants, whose concentration varies spatially and temporally, is a major challenge for monitoring. Here, we suggest that the relative abundance of the clinical class 1 integron-integrase gene, intI1, is a good proxy for pollution because: (1) intI1 is linked to genes conferring resistance to antibiotics, disinfectants and heavy metals; (2) it is found in a wide variety of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria; (3) its abundance can change rapidly because its host cells can have rapid generation times and it can move between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer; and (4) a single DNA sequence variant of intI1 is now found on a wide diversity of xenogenetic elements, these being complex mosaic DNA elements fixed through the agency of human selection. Here we review the literature examining the relationship between anthropogenic impacts and the abundance of intI1, and outline an approach by which intI1 could serve as a proxy for anthropogenic pollution. PMID:25500508

  16. Methods for the Analyses of Inhibitor-Induced Aberrant Multimerization of HIV-1 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Sharma, Amit; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target as its function is essential for the viral lifecycle. The discovery of multifunctional allosteric IN inhibitors or ALLINIs, which potently impair viral replication by promoting aberrant, higher order IN multimerization as well as inhibit IN interactions with its cellular cofactor, LEDGF/p75, has opened new venues to exploit IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, the recent discovery of multimerization selective IN inhibitors or MINIs, has provided new investigational probes to study the direct effects of aberrant IN multimerization in vitro and in infected cells. Here we describe three complementary methods designed to detect and quantify the effects of these new classes of inhibitors on IN multimerization. These methods include a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence-based assay which allows for measuring EC50 values for the inhibitor-induced aberrant IN multimerization, a dynamic light scattering-based assay which allows for monitoring the formation and sizes of oligomeric IN particles in a time-dependent manner, and a chemical cross-linking-based assay of interacting IN subunits which allows for the determination of IN oligomers in viral particles. PMID:26714710

  17. Binding mode prediction of biologically active compounds from plant Salvia Miltiorrhiza as integrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Lugsanangarm, Kiattisak; Kokpol, Sirirat; Abd-Elazem, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN), an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication, has been targeted in antiretroviral drug therapy. The emergence of HIV-1 variants clinically resistant to antiretroviral agents has lead to the development of alternative IN inhibitors. In the present work, binding modes of a high potent IN inhibitor, M522 and M532, within the catalytic binding site of wild type (WT) IN were determined using molecular docking calculation. Both M522 and M532 displayed similar modes of binding within the IN putative binding pocket and exhibited favorable interactions with the catalytic Mg2+ ions, the nearby amino acids and viral DNA through metal-ligand chelation, hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions. Furthermore, the modes of action of these two compounds against the mutated Y212R, N224H and S217H PFV IN were also predicted. Although the replacement of amino acid could somehow disturb inhibitor binding mode, almost key interactions which detected in the WT complexes were fairly conserved. Detailed information could highlight the application of M522 and M532 as candidate IN inhibitors for drug development against drug resistant strains. PMID:23750093

  18. A Symmetric Region of the HIV-1 Integrase Dimerization Interface Is Essential for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Thys, Wannes; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important target for contemporary antiretroviral drug design research. Historically, efforts at inactivating the enzyme have focused upon blocking its active site. However, it has become apparent that new classes of allosteric inhibitors will be necessary to advance the antiretroviral field in light of the emergence of viral strains resistant to contemporary clinically used IN drugs. In this study we have characterized the importance of a close network of IN residues, distant from the active site, as important for the obligatory multimerization of the enzyme and viral replication as a whole. Specifically, we have determined that the configuration of six residues within a highly symmetrical region at the IN dimerization interface, composed of a four-tiered aromatic interaction flanked by two salt bridges, significantly contributes to proper HIV-1 replication. Additionally, we have utilized a quantitative luminescence assay to examine IN oligomerization and have determined that there is a very low tolerance for amino acid substitutions along this region. Even conservative residue substitutions negatively impacted IN multimerization, resulting in an inactive viral enzyme and a non-replicative virus. We have shown that there is a very low tolerance for amino acid variation at the symmetrical dimeric interface region characterized in this study, and therefore drugs designed to target the amino acid network detailed here could be expected to yield a significantly reduced number of drug-resistant escape mutations compared to contemporary clinically-evaluated antiretrovirals. PMID:23028829

  19. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:26296914

  20. Identifying and Characterizing a Functional HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase-binding Site on Integrase*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Januszyk, Kurt; Phillips, Martin L.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Zhang, Min; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.; Chow, Samson A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) from human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) exerts pleiotropic effects in the viral replication cycle. Besides integration, IN mutations can impact nuclear import, viral maturation, and reverse transcription. IN and reverse transcriptase (RT) interact in vitro, and the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) is both necessary and sufficient for binding RT. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify a putative RT-binding surface on the IN CTD, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain kinetic parameters and the binding affinity for the IN-RT interaction. An IN K258A substitution that disrupts reverse transcription in infected cells is located at the putative RT-binding surface, and we found that this substitution substantially weakens IN CTD-RT interactions. We also identified two additional IN amino acid substitutions located at the putative RT-binding surface (W243E and V250E) that significantly impair viral replication in tissue culture. These results strengthen the notion that IN-RT interactions are biologically relevant during HIV-1 replication and also provide insights into this interaction at the molecular level. PMID:19150986

  1. New Class of HIV-1 Integrase (IN) Inhibitors with a Dual Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Lansdon, Eric B.; Huang, Wayne; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Xu, Yili; Mitchell, Michael; Guo, Hongyan; Babaoglu, Kerim; Liu, Xiaohong; Geleziunas, Romas; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-01-01

    tert-Butoxy-(4-phenyl-quinolin-3-yl)-acetic acids (tBPQA) are a new class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors that are structurally distinct from IN strand transfer inhibitors but analogous to LEDGINs. LEDGINs are a class of potent antiviral compounds that interacts with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding pocket on IN and were identified through competition binding against LEDGF. LEDGF tethers IN to the host chromatin and enables targeted integration of viral DNA. The prevailing understanding of the antiviral mechanism of LEDGINs is that they inhibit LEDGF binding to IN, which prevents targeted integration of HIV-1. We showed that in addition to the properties already known for LEDGINs, the binding of tBPQAs to the IN dimer interface inhibits IN enzymatic activity in a LEDGF-independent manner. Using the analysis of two long terminal repeat junctions in HIV-infected cells, we showed that the inhibition by tBPQAs occurs at or prior to the viral DNA 3′-processing step. Biochemical studies revealed that this inhibition operates by compound-induced conformational changes in the IN dimer that prevent proper assembly of IN onto viral DNA. For the first time, tBPQAs were demonstrated to be allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN displaying a dual mode of action: inhibition of IN-viral DNA assembly and inhibition of IN-LEDGF interaction. PMID:22535962

  2. New class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors with a dual mode of action.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Lansdon, Eric B; Huang, Wayne; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Xu, Yili; Mitchell, Michael; Guo, Hongyan; Babaoglu, Kerim; Liu, Xiaohong; Geleziunas, Romas; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-06-15

    tert-Butoxy-(4-phenyl-quinolin-3-yl)-acetic acids (tBPQA) are a new class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors that are structurally distinct from IN strand transfer inhibitors but analogous to LEDGINs. LEDGINs are a class of potent antiviral compounds that interacts with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding pocket on IN and were identified through competition binding against LEDGF. LEDGF tethers IN to the host chromatin and enables targeted integration of viral DNA. The prevailing understanding of the antiviral mechanism of LEDGINs is that they inhibit LEDGF binding to IN, which prevents targeted integration of HIV-1. We showed that in addition to the properties already known for LEDGINs, the binding of tBPQAs to the IN dimer interface inhibits IN enzymatic activity in a LEDGF-independent manner. Using the analysis of two long terminal repeat junctions in HIV-infected cells, we showed that the inhibition by tBPQAs occurs at or prior to the viral DNA 3'-processing step. Biochemical studies revealed that this inhibition operates by compound-induced conformational changes in the IN dimer that prevent proper assembly of IN onto viral DNA. For the first time, tBPQAs were demonstrated to be allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN displaying a dual mode of action: inhibition of IN-viral DNA assembly and inhibition of IN-LEDGF interaction. PMID:22535962

  3. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent. PMID:26519797

  4. The influence of particle size and structure on the sorption and oxidation behavior of birnessite: I. Adsorption of As(V) and oxidation of As(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Mario; Escobar-Quiroz, Ingrid N.; Salazar-Camacho, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Sorption and oxidation reactions in the environment may affect substantially the mobility of redox-sensitive toxic trace elements and compounds. Investigating the environmental factors that influence these reactions is crucial in understanding and predicting the geochemical fate of these environmental species, as well as to design appropriate engineered remediation schemes. Arsenic is a widespread contaminant of concern, especially in its oxidized forms, and Mn oxide minerals are some of the major contributors to its oxidation. The goal of this work was to investigate the influence of particle size and structural differences of environmentally-relevant Mn(IV) birnessites on the adsorption of As(V) and on the oxidation of As(III). An acid birnessite of 39 m2/g and a δ-MnO2 of 114 m2/g were used. Both birnessites sorbed a maximum Pb(II) of 0.3 Pb/Mn, indicating a significantly larger layer cationic vacancy content for acid birnessite, and a density of reactive edge sites for both of 12 sites/nm2. As(V) forms a bidentate bridging complex on singly-coordinated surface sites at the birnessite particle edges regardless of loading, pH, birnessite type, and presence of pre-sorbed metals(II). Maximum As(V) adsorption, under repulsive electrostatic pH conditions did not yield adsorption congruency behavior between both birnessites at constant pH, presumably because the increase in internal vacancy content causes negative electrostatic repulsion towards external As(V) oxyanion binding. At pH 4.5 As(III) oxidation on birnessites was fast and quantitative at As/Mn ratios of 0.3-0.33, the reaction being largely driven by the proton concentration. At pH 6 δ-MnO2 oxidized As(III) faster and to a higher extent than acid birnessite, at equal masses; but the reverse at equal total surface areas. The oxidation driving force (independently from protons) was higher at pH 6 than at pH 4.5 because of Mn(II) product removal by sorption to interlayer vacancies, which overcomes reactive

  5. Study of As(III) and As(V) Oxoanion Adsorption onto Single and Mixed Ferrite and Hausmannite Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sandra; Sardar, Saima; Maldonado, Stephanie; Garcia, Velia; Tamez, C.; Parsons, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    The removal of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) from an aqueous solution through adsorption on to Fe3O4, MnFe2O4, 50% Mn substituted Fe3O4, 75% Mn substituted Fe3O4, and Mn3O4 nanomaterials was investigated. Characterization of the nanomaterials using XRD showed only pure phases for Mn3O4, MnFe2O4, and Fe3O4. The 50% and 75% substituted nanomaterials were found to be mixtures of Mn3O4 and Fe3O4. From batch studies the optimum binding pH of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) to the nanomaterials was determined to be pH 3. The binding capacity for As(III) and As(VI) to the various nanomaterials was determined using Isotherm studies. The binding capacity of Fe3O4 was determined to be 17.1 mg/g for arsenic(III) and 7.0 mg/g for arsenic(V). The substitution of 25% Mn into the Fe3O4 lattice showed a slight increase in the binding capacity for As(III) and As(VI) to 23.8 mg/g and 7.9 mg/g, respectively. The 50% substituted showed the maximum binding capacity of 41.5 mg/g and 13.9 mg/g for arsenic(III) and arsenic(V). The 75% Mn substituted Fe3O4 capacities were 16.7 mg/g for arsenic(III) and 8.2 mg/g for arsenic(V). The binding capacity of the Mn3O4 was determined to be 13.5 mg/g for arsenic(III) and 7.5 mg/g for arsenic(V). In addition, interference studies on the effects of SO2−4, PO3−4, Cl−, and NO−3 investigated. All the interferences had very minimal effects on the As(III) and As(V) binding never fell below 20% even in the presence of 1000 ppm interfering ions. PMID:25097269

  6. Ty1 Integrase Interacts with RNA Polymerase III-specific Subcomplexes to Promote Insertion of Ty1 Elements Upstream of Polymerase (Pol) III-transcribed Genes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephanie; Ma, Lina; Chan, Patrick H W; Hu, Hui-Lan; Mayor, Thibault; Chen, Hung-Ta; Measday, Vivien

    2016-03-18

    Retrotransposons are eukaryotic mobile genetic elements that transpose by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate and are derived from retroviruses. The Ty1 retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ty1/Copia superfamily, which is present in every eukaryotic genome. Insertion of Ty1 elements into the S. cerevisiae genome, which occurs upstream of genes transcribed by RNA Pol III, requires the Ty1 element-encoded integrase (IN) protein. Here, we report that Ty1-IN interacts in vivo and in vitro with RNA Pol III-specific subunits to mediate insertion of Ty1 elements upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. Purification of Ty1-IN from yeast cells followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis identified an enrichment of peptides corresponding to the Rpc82/34/31 and Rpc53/37 Pol III-specific subcomplexes. GFP-Trap purification of multiple GFP-tagged RNA Pol III subunits from yeast extracts revealed that the majority of Pol III subunits co-purify with Ty1-IN but not two other complexes required for Pol III transcription, transcription initiation factors (TF) IIIB and IIIC. In vitro binding studies with bacterially purified RNA Pol III proteins demonstrate that Rpc31, Rpc34, and Rpc53 interact directly with Ty1-IN. Deletion of the N-terminal 280 amino acids of Rpc53 abrogates insertion of Ty1 elements upstream of the hot spot SUF16 tRNA locus and abolishes the interaction of Ty1-IN with Rpc37. The Rpc53/37 complex therefore has an important role in targeting Ty1-IN to insert Ty1 elements upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes. PMID:26797132

  7. Superparamagnetic nanomaterial Fe3O4-TiO2 for the removal of As(V) and As(III) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Beduk, Fatma

    2016-07-01

    A magnetically separable nanomaterial Fe3O4-TiO2 was synthesized and characterized which was subsequently used for the removal of arsenic (V) from aqueous solutions. The surface morphology, magnetic properties, crystalline structure, thermal stability and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area of the synthesized Fe3O4-TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are characterized by scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analysis and multi point function surface area analyzer. The saturation magnetization of Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was determined to be 50.97 emu/g, which makes them superparamagnetic. The surface area of Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was as much as 94.9 m(2)/g. The main factors affecting adsorption efficiency, such as solution pH, reaction time, initial As(V) concentration and adsorbent concentration are investigated. When the adsorption isotherms were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models, equilibrium data were found to be well represented by Freundlich isotherm, and adsorption on Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity of As(V) on Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs, calculated by the Freundlich model was determined at 11.434 µg/g. 1.0 g/L of Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was efficient for complete removal of 100 µg/L As(V) in 1 h. Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs was also effective for 93% removal of 100 µg/L As(III). Matrix effect was determined using As(V)-contaminated well water. Successfull results were obtained for purification of real well water containing 137.12 µg/L As(V). Results show that Fe3O4-TiO2 NPs are promising adsorbents with an advantage of magnetic separation. PMID:26831455

  8. Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite: A novel biosorbent for removal of As(III) and As(V) ions.

    PubMed

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-11-01

    The optimization of biosorption/bioaccumulation process of both As(III) and As(V) has been investigated by using the biosorbent; biofilm of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 supported on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite (MGAC). The presence of functional groups on the cell wall surface of the biomass that may interact with the metal ions was proved by FT-IR. To determine the most appropriate correlation for the equilibrium curves employing the procedure of the non-linear regression for curve fitting analysis, isotherm studies were performed for As(III) and As(V) using 30 isotherm models. The pattern of biosorption/bioaccumulation fitted well with Vieth-Sladek isotherm model for As(III) and Brouers-Sotolongo and Fritz-Schlunder-V isotherm models for As(V). The maximum biosorption/bioaccumulation capacity estimated using Langmuir model were 2584.668mg/g for As(III) and 2651.675mg/g for As(V) at 30°C temperature and 220min contact time. The results showed that As(III) and As(V) removal was strongly pH-dependent with an optimum pH value of 7.0. D-R isotherm studies specified that ion exchange might play a prominent role. PMID:27289352

  9. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  10. BF integrase genes of HIV-1 circulating in São Paulo, Brazil, with a recurrent recombination region.

    PubMed

    Iamarino, Atila; de Melo, Fernando Lucas; Braconi, Carla Torres; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Although some studies have shown diversity in HIV integrase (IN) genes, none has focused particularly on the gene evolving in epidemics in the context of recombination. The IN gene in 157 HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-naïve patients from the São Paulo State, Brazil, were sequenced tallying 128 of subtype B (23 of which were found in non-B genomes), 17 of subtype F (8 of which were found in recombinant genomes), 11 integrases were BF recombinants, and 1 from subtype C. Crucially, we found that 4 BF recombinant viruses shared a recurrent recombination breakpoint region between positions 4900 and 4924 (relative to the HXB2) that includes 2 gRNA loops, where the RT may stutter. Since these recombinants had independent phylogenetic origin, we argue that these results suggest a possible recombination hotspot not observed so far in BF CRF in particular, or in any other HIV-1 CRF in general. Additionally, 40% of the drug-naïve and 45% of the drug-treated patients had at least 1 raltegravir (RAL) or elvitegravir (EVG) resistance-associated amino acid change, but no major resistance mutations were found, in line with other studies. Importantly, V151I was the most common minor resistance mutation among B, F, and BF IN genes. Most codon sites of the IN genes had higher rates of synonymous substitutions (dS) indicative of a strong negative selection. Nevertheless, several codon sites mainly in the subtype B were found under positive selection. Consequently, we observed a higher genetic diversity in the B portions of the mosaics, possibly due to the more recent introduction of subtype F on top of an ongoing subtype B epidemics and a fast spread of subtype F alleles among the B population. PMID:22485165

  11. BF Integrase Genes of HIV-1 Circulating in São Paulo, Brazil, with a Recurrent Recombination Region

    PubMed Central

    Iamarino, Atila; de Melo, Fernando Lucas; Braconi, Carla Torres; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Although some studies have shown diversity in HIV integrase (IN) genes, none has focused particularly on the gene evolving in epidemics in the context of recombination. The IN gene in 157 HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-naïve patients from the São Paulo State, Brazil, were sequenced tallying 128 of subtype B (23 of which were found in non-B genomes), 17 of subtype F (8 of which were found in recombinant genomes), 11 integrases were BF recombinants, and 1 from subtype C. Crucially, we found that 4 BF recombinant viruses shared a recurrent recombination breakpoint region between positions 4900 and 4924 (relative to the HXB2) that includes 2 gRNA loops, where the RT may stutter. Since these recombinants had independent phylogenetic origin, we argue that these results suggest a possible recombination hotspot not observed so far in BF CRF in particular, or in any other HIV-1 CRF in general. Additionally, 40% of the drug-naïve and 45% of the drug-treated patients had at least 1 raltegravir (RAL) or elvitegravir (EVG) resistance-associated amino acid change, but no major resistance mutations were found, in line with other studies. Importantly, V151I was the most common minor resistance mutation among B, F, and BF IN genes. Most codon sites of the IN genes had higher rates of synonymous substitutions (dS) indicative of a strong negative selection. Nevertheless, several codon sites mainly in the subtype B were found under positive selection. Consequently, we observed a higher genetic diversity in the B portions of the mosaics, possibly due to the more recent introduction of subtype F on top of an ongoing subtype B epidemics and a fast spread of subtype F alleles among the B population. PMID:22485165

  12. Non-Catalytic Site HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Disrupt Core Maturation and Induce a Reverse Transcription Block in Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Luong; O’Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A.; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M.; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  13. Metal-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by 5CITEP inhibitor: A theoretical QM/MM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Josenaide P.; Araújo Silva, José Rogério; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio N.

    2013-09-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a potential target for developing drugs against AIDS. In this letter, QM/MM approach was used to study the inhibition of IN by 5CITEP inhibitor in presence of divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+). In addition, the main interactions occurring in 5CITEP-IN complex and the influence of divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in enzymatic inhibition were investigated using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)/MM. The results suggest that the Asp64, Asp116 and four crystal water molecules plays a crucial role in cation (Mg2+ or Mn2+) coordination sphere.

  14. Dolutegravir resistance mutation R263K cannot coexist in combination with many classical integrase inhibitor resistance substitutions.

    PubMed

    Anstett, Kaitlin; Mesplede, Thibault; Oliveira, Maureen; Cutillas, Vincent; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    The new integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) dolutegravir (DTG) displays limited cross-resistance with older drugs of this class and selects for the R263K substitution in treatment-experienced patients. We performed tissue culture selections with DTG, using viruses resistant to older INSTIs and infectivity and resistance assays, and showed that the presence of the E92Q or N155H substitution was compatible with the emergence of R263K, whereas the G140S Q148R, E92Q N155H, G140S, Y143R, and Q148R substitutions were not. PMID:25653436

  15. Recent Advances in the Development of Small-Molecular Inhibitors Target HIV Integrase-LEDGF/p75 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Luo, Zaigang

    2015-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) plays an essential role in the HIV-1 replication. It acts by tethering integrase (IN) into the host cellular chromatin. Due to its significance of the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction affords a novel therapeutic approach for the design of new classes of antiretroviral agents. To date, many small molecules have been found to be the inhibitors of INLEDGF/ p75 interaction. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of potential structure-based IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors. The work will be helpful to shed light on the antiretroviral drug development pipeline in the next future. PMID:26156421

  16. Integrase inhibitor (INI) genotypic resistance in treatment-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients infected with diverse HIV-1 clades

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tomas; Dunn, David T.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; De Mendoza, Carmen; Garcia, Frederico; Smit, Erasmus; Fearnhill, Esther; Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence and patterns of genotypic integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance in relation to HIV-1 clade. Methods The cohort comprised 533 INI-naive subjects and 255 raltegravir recipients with viraemia who underwent integrase sequencing in routine care across Europe, including 134/533 (25.1%) and 46/255 (18.0%), respectively, with non-B clades (A, C, D, F, G, CRF01, CRF02, other CRFs, complex). Results No major INI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) occurred in INI-naive subjects. Among raltegravir recipients with viraemia (median 3523 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL), 113/255 (44.3%) had one or more major INI RAMs, most commonly N155H (45/255, 17.6%), Q148H/R/K + G140S/A (35/255, 13.7%) and Y143R/C/H (12/255, 4.7%). In addition, four (1.6%) raltegravir recipients showed novel mutations at recognized resistance sites (E92A, S147I, N155D, N155Q) and novel mutations at other integrase positions that were statistically associated with raltegravir exposure (K159Q/R, I161L/M/T/V, E170A/G). Comparing subtype B with non-B clades, Q148H/R/K occurred in 42/209 (20.1%) versus 2/46 (4.3%) subjects (P = 0.009) and G140S/A occurred in 36/209 (17.2%) versus 1/46 (2.2%) subjects (P = 0.005). Intermediate- to high-level cross-resistance to twice-daily dolutegravir was predicted in 40/255 (15.7%) subjects, more commonly in subtype B versus non-B clades (39/209, 18.7% versus 1/46, 2.2%; P = 0.003). A glycine (G) to serine (S) substitution at integrase position 140 required one nucleotide change in subtype B and two nucleotide changes in all non-B clades. Conclusions No major INI resistance mutations occurred in INI-naive subjects. Reduced occurrence of Q148H/R/K + G140S/A was seen in non-B clades versus subtype B, and was explained by the higher genetic barrier to the G140S mutation observed in all non-B clades analysed. PMID:26311843

  17. Dolutegravir, the Second-Generation of Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors (INSTIs) for the Treatment of HIV.

    PubMed

    Dow, Dorothy E; Bartlett, John A

    2014-12-01

    The integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are the newest antiretroviral class in the HIV treatment armamentarium. Dolutegravir (DTG) is the only second-generation INSTI with FDA approval (2013). It has potential advantages in comparison to first-generation INSTI's, including unboosted daily dosing, limited cross resistance with raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a high barrier to resistance. Clinical trials have evaluated DTG as a 50-mg daily dose in both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced, INSTI-naïve participants. In those treatment-naïve participants with baseline viral load <100,000 copies/mL, DTG combined with abacavir and lamivudine was non-inferior and superior to fixed-dose combination emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz. DTG was also superior to the protease inhibitor regimen darunavir/ritonavir in treatment-naïve participants regardless of baseline viral load. Among treatment-experienced patients naïve to INSTI, DTG (50 mg daily) demonstrated both non-inferiority and superiority when compared to the first-generation INSTI raltegravir (400 mg twice daily) regardless of the background regimen. No phenotypically significant DTG resistance has been demonstrated in INSTI-naïve participant trials. The VIKING trials evaluated DTG's ability to treat persons with HIV with prior INSTI exposure. VIKING demonstrated twice-daily DTG was more efficacious than daily dosing when treating participants receiving and failing first-generation INSTI regimens. DTG maintained potency against single mutations from any of the three major INSTI pathways (Y143, H155, Q148); however, the Q148 mutation with two or more additional mutations significantly reduced its potency. The long-acting formulation of DTG, GSK1265744LA, is the next innovation in this second-generation INSTI class, holding promise for the future of HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25134686

  18. Mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Jing, N; Marchand, C; Liu, J; Mitra, R; Hogan, M E; Pommier, Y

    2000-07-14

    The G-tetrad-forming oligonucleotides and have been identified as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) activity (Rando, R. F., Ojwang, J., Elbaggari, A., Reyes, G. R., Tinder, R., McGrath, M. S., and Hogan, M. E. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1754-1760; Mazumder, A., Neamati, N., Ojwang, J. O., Sunder, S., Rando, R. F., and Pommier, Y. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 13762-13771; Jing, N., and Hogan, M. E. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 34992-34999). To understand the inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by the G-quartet inhibitors, we have designed the oligonucleotides and, composed of three and four G-quartets with stem lengths of 19 and 24 A, respectively. The fact that increasing the G-quartet stem length from 15 to 24 A kept inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity unchanged suggests that the binding interaction occurs between a GTGT loop domain of the G-quartet inhibitors and a catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, referred to as a face-to-face interaction. Docking the NMR structure of (Jing and Hogan (1998)) into the x-ray structure of the core domain of HIV-1 IN, HIV-1 IN-(51-209) (Maignan, S., Guilloteau, J.-P. , Qing, Z.-L., Clement-Mella, C., and Mikol, V. (1998) J. Mol. Biol. 282, 359-368), was performed using the GRAMM program. The statistical distributions of hydrogen bonding between HIV-1 IN and were obtained from the analyses of 1000 random docking structures. The docking results show a high probability of interaction between the GTGT loop residues of the G-quartet inhibitors and the catalytic site of HIV-1 IN, in agreement with the experimental observation. PMID:10801812

  19. A comparative study of As(III) and As(V) in aqueous solutions and adsorbed on iron oxy-hydroxides by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Katharina; Ciminelli, Virgínia S T; Dantas, Maria Sylvia S; Willscher, Sabine

    2010-11-01

    The sorption of the arsenite (AsO(3)(3-)) and the arsenate (AsO(4)(3-)) ions and their conjugate acids onto iron oxides is one of main processes controlling the distribution of arsenic in the environment. The present work intends to provide a large vibrational spectroscopic database for comparison of As(III) and As(V) speciation in aqueous solutions and at the iron oxide - solution interface. With this purpose, ferrihydrite, feroxyhyte, goethite and hematite were firstly synthesized, characterized in detail and used for adsorption experiments. Raman spectra were recorded from As(III) and As(V) aqueous solutions at various pH conditions selected in order to highlight arsenic speciation. Raman Scattering and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) studies were carried out to examine the respective As-bonding mechanisms. The collected data were curve-fitted and discussed according to molecular symmetry concepts. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) was applied to confirm the oxidation state of the sorbed species. The comprehensive spectroscopic investigation contributes to a better understanding of arsenic complexation by iron oxides. PMID:20599245

  20. Synergistic adsorption of As(V) from aqueous solution onto mesoporous silica decorated orderly with Al2O3 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Lan, Jing; Liu, Jiyan; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-09-01

    An improved incipient wetness process was developed to decorate mesoporous silica, in which Al was preloaded onto mesoporous SBA15 followed by decoration of Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This decoration process exploited the homogeneous dispersivity of Al in silica framework and overcome the problem of aggregation of Fe2O3 nanoparticles, which in turn resulted in a synergistic adsorption of As(V) much higher than that of either metal oxide alone. It was found that the prepared adsorbent had mesoporous structure, large specific surface area, and high pore volume according to TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, and XRD analysis. Adsorption kinetics was elucidated by pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and abided by a three-stage intraparticle diffusion mode. Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to fit the adsorption isotherm. It was proved that Fe@Al-SBA15 is a more efficient and effective adsorbent for As(V) than single metal oxide impregnated mesoporous materials, yet it maintains a desirable life cycle. PMID:23773611

  1. Removal of As(III) and As(V) using iron-rich sludge produced from coal mine drainage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung-Seok; Kim, Young-Soo; Park, Sang-Min; Baek, Kitae

    2014-09-01

    To test the feasibility of the reuse of iron-rich sludge (IRS) produced from a coal mine drainage treatment plant for removing As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions, we investigated various parameters, such as contact time, pH, initial As concentration, and competing ions, based on the IRS characterization. The IRS consisted of goethite and calcite, and had large surface area and small particles. According to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping results, As was mainly removed by adsorption onto iron oxides. The adsorption kinetic studies showed that nearly 70 % adsorption of As was achieved within 1 h, and the pseudo-second-order model well explained As sorption on the IRS. The adsorption isotherm results agreed with the Freundlich isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacities for As(III) and As(V) were 66.9 and 21.5 mg/g, respectively, at 293 K. In addition, the adsorption showed the endothermic character. At high pH or in the presence of phosphate, the adsorption of As was decreased. When the desorption experiment was conducted to reuse the IRS, 85 % As was desorbed with 1.0 N NaOH. In the column experiment, adsorbed As in real acid mine drainage was 43 % of the maximum adsorbed amount of As in the batch test. These results suggested that the IRS is an effective adsorbent for As and can be effectively applied for the removal of As in water and wastewater. PMID:24859699

  2. Improving the use of ranking in virtual screening against HIV-1 integrase with triangular numbers and including ligand profiling with antitargets.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Maran, Uko

    2014-11-24

    A delicate balance exists between a drug molecule's toxicity and its activity. Indeed, efficacy, toxicity, and side effect problems are a common cause for the termination of drug candidate compounds and development projects. To address this, an antitarget interaction profile is built and combined with virtual screening and cross docking for new inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase, in order to consider possible off-target interactions as early as possible in a drug or hit discovery program. New ranking techniques using triangular numbers improve ranking information on the compounds and recovery of known inhibitors into the top compounds using different docking programs. This improved ranking arises from using consensus of ranks between docking programs and ligand efficiencies to derive a new rank, instead of using absolute score values, or average of ranks. The triangular number rerank also allowed the objective combination of results from several protein targets or screen conditions and several programs. Triangular number reranking conserves more information than other reranking methods such as average of scores or averages of ranks. In addition, the use of triangular numbers for reranking makes possible the use of thresholds with a justified leeway based on the number of available known inhibitors, so that the majority of the compounds above the threshold in ranks compare to the compounds that have known experimentally determined biological activity. The battery of anti- or off-targets can be tailored to specific molecular or drug design challenges. In silico filters can thus be deployed in successive stages, for prefiltering, activity profiling, and for further analysis and triaging of libraries of compounds. PMID:25303089

  3. Neurological Response to cART vs. cART plus Integrase Inhibitor and CCR5 Antagonist Initiated during Acute HIV

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Spudich, Serena S.; Sailasuta, Napapon; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Fletcher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene D. M. B.; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Allen, Isabel E.; Adams, Collin L.; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Slike, Bonnie M.; Hellmuth, Joanna M.; Kim, Jerome H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central nervous system (CNS) outcomes in participants treated during acute HIV infection with standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) vs. cART plus integrase inhibitor and CCR5 antagonist (cART+). Design 24-week randomized open-label prospective evaluation. Method Participants were evaluated then randomized to initiate cART (efavirenz, tenofovir, and either emtricitabine or lamivudine) vs. cART+ (cART plus raltegravir and maraviroc) during acute HIV and re-evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. We examined plasma and CSF cytokines, HIV RNA levels, neurological and neuropsychological findings, and brain MRS across groups and compared to healthy controls. Results At baseline, 62 participants were in Fiebig stages I-V. Randomized groups were similar for mean age (27 vs. 25, p = 0.137), gender (each 94% male), plasma log10 HIV RNA (5.4 vs. 5.6, p = 0.382), CSF log10 HIV RNA (2.35 vs. 3.31, p = 0.561), and estimated duration of HIV (18 vs. 17 days, p = 0.546). Randomized arms did not differ at 24 weeks by any CNS outcome. Combining arms, all measures concurrent with antiretroviral treatment improved, for example, neuropsychological testing (mean NPZ-4 of -0.408 vs. 0.245, p<0.001) and inflammatory markers by MRS (e.g. mean frontal white matter (FWM) choline of 2.92 vs. 2.84, p = 0.045) at baseline and week 24, respectively. Plasma neopterin (p<0.001) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (p = 0.007) remained elevated in participants compared to controls but no statistically significant differences were seen in CSF cytokines compared to controls, despite individual variability among the HIV-infected group. Conclusions A 24-week course of cART+ improved CNS related outcomes, but was not associated with measurable differences compared to standard cART. PMID:26555069

  4. Conserved sequences in the carboxyl terminus of integrase that are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Byles, E D; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have previously identified a residue in the carboxyl terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), W-235, the requirement for which is only revealed in viral assays for integrase function (P. M. Cannon, W. Wilson, E. Byles, S. M. Kingsman, and A. J. Kingsman, J. Virol. 68:4768-4775, 1994). Our further analysis of this region of retroviral IN has now identified several sequence motifs which are conserved in all the retroviruses we examined, apart from human spumaretrovirus. We have made mutations within these motifs in HIV-1 IN and examined their phenotypes when reintroduced into an infectious proviral clone. The deleterious effects of several of these mutations demonstrate the importance of these regions for IN function in vivo. We observed a further discrepancy, at a motif that is only conserved in the lentiviruses, in the ability of mutants to function in in vitro and in vivo assays. Substitutions both in this region and at W-235 abolish HIV-1 infectivity but do not affect particle production, morphology, reverse transcription, or nuclear import in T-cell lines. Taken together with the in vitro data suggesting that neither of these residues is directly involved in the catalytic reactions of IN, it seems likely that we have identified regions of IN that are essential for interactions with other components of the integration machinery. PMID:8523588

  5. LEDGIN-mediated Inhibition of Integrase-LEDGF/p75 Interaction Reduces Reactivation of Residual Latent HIV.

    PubMed

    Vranckx, Lenard S; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Saleh, Suha; Boll, Annegret; Vansant, Gerlinde; Schrijvers, Rik; Weydert, Caroline; Battivelli, Emilie; Verdin, Eric; Cereseto, Anna; Christ, Frauke; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-06-01

    Persistence of latent, replication-competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) provirus is the main impediment towards a cure for HIV/AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Therefore, different therapeutic strategies to eliminate the viral reservoirs are currently being explored. We here propose a novel strategy to reduce the replicating HIV reservoir during primary HIV infection by means of drug-induced retargeting of HIV integration. A novel class of integration inhibitors, referred to as LEDGINs, inhibit the interaction between HIV integrase and the LEDGF/p75 host cofactor, the main determinant of lentiviral integration site selection. We show for the first time that LEDGF/p75 depletion hampers HIV-1 reactivation in cell culture. Next we demonstrate that LEDGINs relocate and retarget HIV integration resulting in a HIV reservoir that is refractory to reactivation by different latency-reversing agents. Taken together, these results support the potential of integrase inhibitors that modulate integration site targeting to reduce the likeliness of viral rebound. PMID:27428435

  6. Comparative molecular genetic analysis of simian and human HIV-1 integrase interactor INI1/SMARCB1/SNF5.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Dohun; Price, Lenore; Park, In-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Human integrase interactor 1 (INI1/SMARCB1/SNF5) is a chromatin-remodeling molecule that binds to HIV-1 integrase and enhances proviral DNA integration. INI1 is also known as a tumor suppressor gene and has been found to be mutated in several aggressive tumors such as rhabdoid and lymphoid tumors. To study the function of simian INI1, we screened and cloned simian INI1 cDNA from B lymphoma cells of rhesus monkeys using RT-PCR. Sequence analysis showed 23 single nucleotide differences compared to the human ortholog, which, however, did not result in amino acid changes, and the amino acid sequence is therefore 100% conserved between human and simian INI1. Two alternatively spliced isoforms, INI1a and INI1b, were also found in simian INI1. These two isoforms did not show any functional difference in HIV-1 proviral DNA integration and nuclear localization, suggesting that the specificity of simian INI1 would not be a factor preventing HIV-1 infection of a simian host. Nevertheless, INI1b is expressed only in established cancer cell lines such as Jurkat and COS-7 cells, and not in primary cells, suggesting that INIlb could be an indicator of cell transformation. PMID:26350979

  7. Fragment-Based Design of Ligands Targeting a Novel Site on the Integrase Enzyme of Human Immunodeficiency Virus;#8197;1

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Deadman, John J.; Rhodes, David I.; Parker, Michael W.; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-08-17

    Fragment-based screening has been used to identify a novel ligand binding site on HIV-1 integrase. Crystal structures of fragments bound at this site (shown) have been used to design elaborated second-generation compounds that bind with higher affinity and good ligand efficiency.

  8. Cross-resistance profile determination of two second-generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using a panel of recombinant viruses derived from raltegravir-treated clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Van Wesenbeeck, L; Rondelez, E; Feyaerts, M; Verheyen, A; Van der Borght, K; Smits, V; Cleybergh, C; De Wolf, H; Van Baelen, K; Stuyver, L J

    2011-01-01

    The integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL) is currently used for the treatment of both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. Elvitegravir (EVG) is in late phases of clinical development. Since significant cross-resistance between RAL and EVG is observed, there is a need for second-generation integrase inhibitors (INIs) with a higher genetic barrier and limited cross-resistance to RAL/EVG. A panel of HIV-1 integrase recombinants, derived from plasma samples from raltegravir-treated patients (baseline and follow-up samples), were used to study the cross-resistance profile of two second-generation integrase inhibitors, MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with Q148H/R mutations had elevated fold change values with all compounds tested. Although samples with the Y143R/C mutation had reduced susceptibility to RAL, they remained susceptible to MK-2048 and compound G. Samples with the N155H mutation had no reduced susceptibility to compound G. In conclusion, our results allowed ranking of the INIs on the basis of the antiviral activities using recombinant virus stocks from RAL-treated patient viruses. The order according to decreasing susceptibility is compound G, MK-2048, and EVG. PMID:20956600

  9. Investigation of the transport and fate of Pb, Cd, Cr(VI) and As(V) in soil zones derived from moderately contaminated farmland in Northeast, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingmin; Dong, Deming; Hua, Xiuyi; Dong, Shuofei

    2009-10-30

    Some farmland in Shenyang had been irrigated with industrial wastewater since 1962. Although wastewater irrigation was ceased in 1992, soil had been heavily polluted by heavy metals, especially by Cd. For better understanding processes of soil-heavy metal interactions, in particular, the mobility and retention mechanism of heavy metal in soil, a study on the transport and fate of heavy metals in soil zones from Shenyang suburb was carried out by column leaching tests in laboratory. Breakthrough curves of Pb, Cd, Cr(VI) and As(V) fitted by Thomas model and Yoon-Nelson model. The results of fitted breakthrough curves showed that transport rates of the four heavy metals in the soil zones followed the order: Cr(VI)>As(V)>Cd>Pb, which indicated that Cr(VI) was much more mobile, and Pb was comparatively unmovable. Cr in effluents and As were almost entirely Cr(VI) and As(V), respectively, and no Cr(III) and As(III) was ever detected during the leaching tests. The contents of Pb, Cd, Cr and As in leached soils decreased in the order of Pb>Cd>Cr>As, which suggested that adsorption ability of soil to Pb was greatest and to As was least. The methods of selective sequential extraction and solvent extraction were used to determine the fractions of Pb, Cd, Cr, As and the valent states of Cr, As [Cr(VI) or Cr(III), As(V) or As(III)] in original soils and in leached soils. After leaching tests, the relative and absolute concentrations of exchangeable, carbonate, Fe-Mn oxide and organic fraction of each element were all increased, which enhanced the potential mobility and risk of Pb, Cd, Cr and As to soil/groundwater system. The relative concentrations of Cr(III) and As(III) in different depth of the soil zones after leaching tests were increased by about 6.0% and 5.6%, respectively. Cr(III) and As(III) tended to be adsorbed by soils, which reduced the mobility of them into groundwater. PMID:19500903

  10. Anti-HIV-1 integrase compounds from Dioscorea bulbifera and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Chaniad, Prapaporn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Pianwanit, Somsak; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2016-06-01

    Context Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae) has been used in a traditional Thai longevity medicine preparation. Isolation of inhibitors from natural products is a potential source for continuous development of new HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Objective The objective of this study is to isolate the compounds and evaluate their anti-HIV-1 IN activity, as well as to predict the potential interactions of the compounds with an IN. Materials and methods The ethyl acetate and water fractions (1-100 μg/mL) of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils were isolated and tested for their anti-HIV-1 IN activity using the multiplate integration assay (MIA). The interactions of the active compounds with IN were investigated using a molecular docking method. Results and discussions The ethyl acetate and water fractions of Dioscorea bulbifera bulbils afforded seven compounds. Among these, allantoin (1), 2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxybibenzyl (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2-styrylchromone (5) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Myricetin (4) exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 3.15 μM, followed by 2,4,6,7-tetrahydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3, IC50 value= 14.20 μM), quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (6, IC50 value = 19.39 μM) and quercetin-3-O-β-d-galactopyranoside (7, IC50 value = 21.80 μM). Potential interactions of the active compounds (3, 4, 6, and 7) with the IN active site were additionally investigated. Compound 4 showed the best binding affinity to IN and formed strong interactions with various amino acid residues. These compounds interacted with Asp64, Thr66, His67, Glu92, Asp116, Gln148, Glu152, Asn155, and Lys159, which are involved in both the 3'-processing and strand transfer reactions of IN. In particular, galloyl, catechol, and sugar moieties were successful inhibitors for HIV-1 IN. PMID:26864337

  11. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between rilpivirine and integrase inhibitors dolutegravir and GSK1265744.

    PubMed

    Ford, Susan L; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta; Piscitelli, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated oral coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744. Healthy subjects received DTG (50 mg every 24 h for 5 days) or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h for 12 days) in period 1 followed by a washout, RPV (25 mg every 24 h for 11 or 12 days) in period 2, immediately followed by RPV (25 mg every 24 h) plus DTG (50 mg every 24 h) for 5 days or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h) for 12 days in period 3. Steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis of data collected on the last day of each period. The combinations of RPV and DTG (n = 16) and of RPV and GSK1265744 (n = 11) were well tolerated; no grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs) or AE-related discontinuations were observed. The 90% confidence intervals for the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosage interval [AUC0-τ] and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) geometric mean ratios were within 0.8 to 1.25. Following administration of DTG + RPV, DTG and RPV Cτ increased by 22% and 21%, respectively. Following administration of GSK1265744 + RPV, RPV Cτ decreased 8%. DTG and GSK1265744 can be administered with RPV without dosage adjustment for either agent. These results support coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744 as either oral or long-acting depot injection regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01467531.). PMID:23979733

  12. Lack of Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Rilpivirine and Integrase Inhibitors Dolutegravir and GSK1265744

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Susan L.; Gould, Elizabeth; Chen, Shuguang; Margolis, David; Spreen, William; Crauwels, Herta

    2013-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) and GSK1265744 are HIV integrase inhibitors (INIs) in clinical development. The oral formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been approved for treatment-naive HIV infection. Long-acting depot injections of GSK1265744 and RPV are also being developed. This study evaluated the potential for drug interactions between RPV and these INIs. This phase 1, open-label, two-cohort, three-period, single-sequence crossover study evaluated oral coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744. Healthy subjects received DTG (50 mg every 24 h for 5 days) or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h for 12 days) in period 1 followed by a washout, RPV (25 mg every 24 h for 11 or 12 days) in period 2, immediately followed by RPV (25 mg every 24 h) plus DTG (50 mg every 24 h) for 5 days or GSK1265744 (30 mg every 24 h) for 12 days in period 3. Steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis of data collected on the last day of each period. The combinations of RPV and DTG (n = 16) and of RPV and GSK1265744 (n = 11) were well tolerated; no grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs) or AE-related discontinuations were observed. The 90% confidence intervals for the area under the curve from time zero until the end of the dosage interval [AUC0–τ] and maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) geometric mean ratios were within 0.8 to 1.25. Following administration of DTG + RPV, DTG and RPV Cτ increased by 22% and 21%, respectively. Following administration of GSK1265744 + RPV, RPV Cτ decreased 8%. DTG and GSK1265744 can be administered with RPV without dosage adjustment for either agent. These results support coadministration of RPV with DTG or GSK1265744 as either oral or long-acting depot injection regimens. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01467531.) PMID:23979733

  13. Is the effect of silicon on rice uptake of arsenate (AsV) related to internal silicon concentrations, iron plaque and phosphate nutrition?

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Zhu, Y-G; Liu, W-J; Liang, Y-C; Geng, C-N; Wang, S-G

    2007-07-01

    Solution culture experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of silicon (Si) on arsenate (As(V)) uptake by rice. The addition of Si to the pretreatment or uptake solution significantly decreased shoot and root As concentrations (P<0.001 and P<0.05). The presence of Si in the pretreatment or uptake solution also significantly decreased shoot P concentrations (P<0.001). The data demonstrated that both internal and external Si inhibited the uptake of As and P. Results of As uptake kinetics showed that the mechanism of the effect of Si on arsenate uptake is not caused by direct competition for active sites of transporters with As. The effect of Si on As uptake was not entirely mediated through the effect of Si on P uptake. Although the addition of Si to pretreatment solutions still significantly decreased shoot and root As concentrations, the extent of reduction became smaller when rice roots were coated with iron plaque. PMID:17175078

  14. The effect of adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) on objective and subjective outcomes in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF): A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyunju; Sawyer, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the current evidence for adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) with central sleep apnea (CSA) in heart failure (HF) and advance a research agenda and clinical considerations for ASV-treated CSR-CSA in HF. CSR-CSA in HF is associated with higher overall mortality, worse outcomes and lower quality of life (QOL) than HF without CSR-CSA. Five databases were searched using key words (n = 234). Randomized controlled trials assessed objective sleep quality, cardiac, and self-reported outcomes in adults (≥18 years) with HF (n = 10). ASV has a beneficial effect on the reduction of central sleep apnea in adult patients with CSR-CSA in HF, but it is not be superior to CPAP, bilevel PPV, or supplemental oxygen in terms of sleep quality defined by polysomnography, cardiovascular outcomes, subjective daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. ASV is not recommended for CSR-CSA in HF. It is important to continue to refer HF patients for sleep evaluation to clearly discern OSA from CSR-CSA. Symptom management research, inclusive of objective and subjective outcomes, in CSR-CSA in HF adults is needed. PMID:26995256

  15. Synthesis, docking, and biological studies of phenanthrene β-diketo acids as novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Horrick; Sanchez, Tino W.; Neamati, Nouri; Detorio, Mervi; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Buolamwini, John K.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we report the synthesis of halogen-substituted phenanthrene β-diketo acids as new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. The target phenanthrenes were obtained using both standard thermal- and microwave-assisted synthesis. 4-(6-Chlorophenanthren-2-yl)-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid (18) was the most active compound of the series that inhibited both 3′-end processing (3′-P) and strand transfer (ST) with IC50 values of 5 and 1.3 μM, respectively. Docking studies revealed two predominant binding modes that were distinct from the binding modes of raltegravir and elvitegravir, and suggest a novel binding region in the IN active site. Moreover, these compounds do not interact significantly with some of the key amino acids (Q148 and N155) implicated in viral resistance. Therefore, this series of compounds can further be investigated for a possible chemotype to circumvent resistance to clinical HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:24091080

  16. Identification of Phe187 as a crucial dimerization determinant facilitates crystallization of a monomeric retroviral integrase core domain.

    PubMed

    Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2014-10-01

    Retroviral DNA integration into the host genome is mediated by nucleoprotein assemblies containing tetramers of viral integrase (IN). Whereas the fully active form of IN comprises a dimer of dimers, the molecular basis of IN multimerization has not been fully characterized. IN has consistently been crystallized in an analogous dimeric form in all crystallographic structures and experimental evidence as to the level of similarity between IN monomeric and dimeric conformations is missing because of the lack of IN monomeric structures. Here we identify Phe187 as a critical dimerization determinant of IN from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus that causes AIDS in the natural host, and report, in addition to a canonical dimeric structure of the FIV IN core-domain, a monomeric structure revealing the preservation of the backbone structure between the two multimeric forms and suggest a role for Phe187 in "hinging" the flexible IN dimer. PMID:25199694

  17. Mucosal tissue pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a humanized mouse model: Implications for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Sykes, Craig; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Orally administered anti-retroviral drugs show considerable promise for HIV/AIDS pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). For the success of these strategies, pharmacokinetic (PK) data defining the optimal concentration of the drug needed for protection in relevant mucosal exposure sites is essential. Here we employed a humanized mouse model to derive comprehensive PK data on the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL), a leading PrEP drug candidate. Under steady state conditions following oral dosing, plasma and multiple mucosal tissues were sampled simultaneously. RAL exhibited higher drug exposure in mucosal tissues relative to that in plasma with one log higher exposure in vaginal and rectal tissue and two logs higher exposure in intestinal mucosa reflecting the trends seen in the human studies. These data demonstrate the suitability of RAL for HIV PrEP and validate the utility of humanized mouse models for deriving important preclinical PK-PD data. PMID:26771889

  18. The discovery of allyltyrosine based tripeptides as selective inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Neal; Gordon, Christopher P; Boyle, Timothy P; Vandegraaf, Nicholas; Deadman, John; Rhodes, David I; Coates, Jonathan A; Pyne, Stephen G; Keller, Paul A; Bremner, John B

    2016-07-01

    From library screening of synthetic antimicrobial peptides, an O-allyltyrosine-based tripeptide was identified to possess inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase (IN) exhibiting an IC50 value of 17.5 μM in a combination 3'-processing and strand transfer microtitre plate assay. The tripeptide was subjected to structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies with 28 peptides, incorporating an array of natural and non-natural amino acids. Resulting SAR analysis revealed the allyltyrosine residue was a key feature for IN inhibitory activity whilst incorporation of a lysine residue and extended hydrophilic chains bearing a terminal methyl ester was advantageous. Addition of hydrophobic aromatic moieties to the N-terminal of the scaffold afforded compounds with improved inhibitory activity. Consolidation of these functionalities lead to the development of the tripeptide 96 which specifically inhibited the IN strand-transfer reaction with an IC50 value of 2.5 μM. PMID:27225230

  19. Persistent Production of an Integrase-Deleted HIV-1 Variant with No Resistance Mutation and Wild-Type Proviral DNA in a Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cotte, Laurent; Saison, Julien; Ramière, Christophe; Ronfort, Corinne; Venet, Fabienne; Tardy, Jean-Claude; Monneret, Guillaume; André, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An HIV-infected patient presenting an unexpected viral escape under combined antiretroviral treatment is described. The virus isolated from plasma contained a large deletion in the HIV-1 integrase gene but no known resistance mutation. Nested polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) with patient virus integrase-specific primers and probes were developed and used to detect the mutant from plasma, blood, rectal biopsies, and sperm. The variant progressively emerged during a period of therapy-induced virosuppression, and persisted at a low but detectable level for at least 5 years. Surprisingly, proviral DNA from lymphocytes, rectal cells, and sperm cells was, and remained, mainly wild type. Cellular HIV RNA with the deletion was detected only once from the rectum. The origin and mechanisms underlying this so far not described production at a detectable level are largely hypothetical. This observation raised concern about the ability of defective viruses to spread. PMID:25333615

  20. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    PubMed

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA. PMID:21857987

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of substituted 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters as potential anti-cancer agents and HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Edkins, Adrienne L; Isaacs, Michelle; Mnkandhla, Dumisani; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-08-01

    Encouraging selectivity and low micromolar activity against HeLa cervical carcinoma (IC50⩾3.0μM) and the aggressive MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast carcinoma (IC50⩾9.6μM) cell lines has been exhibited by a number of readily accessible 4-(N-benzylamino)cinnamate esters. The potential of the ligands as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors has also been examined. PMID:27317645

  2. 6,7-Dihydroxyisoindolin-1-one and 7,8-Dihydroxy-3,4-Dihydroisoquinolin- 1(2H)-one Based HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Metifiot, Mathieu; Smith, Steven J; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an essential viral enzyme required for HIV-1 replication, which has been targeted by anti-AIDS therapeutics. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) represent a new class of antiretroviral agents developed for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Important structural features that are shared by many INSTIs include a coplanar arrangement of three heteroatoms that chelate two catalytic Mg(2+) ions in the IN active site and a linked halophenyl ring that binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the complex of IN with viral DNA. We recently reported bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one-based IN inhibitors. In the current study, we modified these inhibitors in three ways. First, we increased the spacer length between the metalchelating triad and the halophenyl group. Second, we replaced the indoline [5,6] bicycle with a fused dihydroxyisoquinolinones [6,6] ring system. Finally, we prepared bis-6,7-dihydroxyisoindolin-1-one-4-sulfonamides as dimeric HIV-1 IN inhibitors. These new analogues showed low micromolar inhibitory potency in in vitro HIV-1 integrase assays. PMID:26268341

  3. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  4. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of β-Cyclodextrin Functionalized Ionic Liquid Polymer as a Macroporous Material for the Removal of Phenols and As(V)

    PubMed Central

    Raoov, Muggundha; Mohamad, Sharifah; Abas, Mhd Radzi

    2014-01-01

    β-Cyclodextrin-ionic liquid polymer (CD-ILP) was first synthesized by functionalized β-cyclodextrin (CD) with 1-benzylimidazole (BIM) to form monofunctionalized CD (βCD-BIMOTs) and was further polymerized using a toluene diisocyanate (TDI) linker to form insoluble CD-ILP (βCD-BIMOTs-TDI). The βCD-BIMOTs-TDI polymer was characterized using various tools and the results obtained were compared with those derived from the native β-cyclodextrin polymer (βCD-TDI). The SEM result shows that the presence of ionic liquid (IL) increases the pore size, while the thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) result shows that the presence of IL increases the stability of the polymer. Meanwhile, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) results show that βCD-BIMOTs-TDI polymer has 1.254 m2/g surface areas and the Barret-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution result reveals that the polymer exhibits macropores with a pore size of 77.66 nm. Preliminary sorption experiments were carried out and the βCD-BIMOTs-TDI polymer shows enhanced sorption capacity and high removal towards phenols and As(V). PMID:24366065

  6. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Gandhi, Pooja; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-10-01

    The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV-vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core-shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like sbnd NH, sbnd Cdbnd O, sbnd Cdbnd N and sbnd Cdbnd C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  7. Production of transgenic cattle highly expressing human serum albumin in milk by phiC31 integrase-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Lan, Hui; Shao, Minghao; Yu, Yuan; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic cattle expressing high levels of recombinant human serum albumin (HSA) in their milk may as an alternative source for commercial production. Our objective was to produce transgenic cattle highly expressing HSA in milk by using phiC31 integrase system and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The mammary-specific expression plasmid pIACH(-), containing the attB recognition site for phiC31 integrase, were co-transfected with integrase expression plasmid pCMVInt into bovine fetal fibroblast cells (BFFs). PhiC31 integrase-mediated integrations in genome of BFFs were screened by nested inverse PCR. After analysis of sequence of the PCR products, 46.0% (23/50) of the both attB-genome junction sites (attL and attR) were confirmed, and four pseudo attP sites were identified. The integration rates in BF3, BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were 4.0% (2/50), 6.0% (3/50), 16.0% (8/50) and 20.0% (10/50), respectively. BF3 is located in the bovine chromosome 3 collagen alpha-3 (VI) chain isomer 2 gene, while the other three sites are located in the non-coding region. The transgenic cell lines from BF11, BF19 and BF4 sites were used as donors for SCNT. Two calves from transgenic cells BF19 were born, one died within a few hours after birth, and another calf survived healthy. PCR and Southern blot analysis revealed integration of the transgene in the genome of cloned calves. The nested reverse PCR confirmed that the integration site in cloned calves was identical to the donor cells. The western blotting assessment indicated that recombinant HSA was expressed in the milk of transgenic cattle and the expression level was about 4-8 mg/mL. The present study demonstrated that phiC31 integrase system was an efficient and safety gene delivery tool for producing HSA transgenic cattle. The production of recombinant HSA in the milk of cattle may provide a large-scale and cost-effective resource. PMID:26198751

  8. Exposure to As(III) and As(V) changes the Ca²⁺-activation properties of the two major fibre types from the chelae of the freshwater crustacean Cherax destructor.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gemma; Snow, Elizabeth T; West, Jan M

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic is a known carcinogen found in the soil in gold mining regions at concentrations thousands of times greater than gold. Mining releases arsenic into the environment and surrounding water bodies. The main chemical forms of arsenic found in the environment are inorganic arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)). Yabbies (Cherax destructor) accumulate arsenic at levels comparable to those in the sediment of their environment but the effect on their physiological function is not known. The effects of arsenic exposure (10 ppm sodium arsenite, AsNaO2 - 5.7 ppm As(III)) and 10 ppm arsenic acid, Na2HAsO4·7H2O - 2.6 ppm As(V)) for 40 days on the contractile function of the two major fibre types from the chelae were determined. After exposure, individual fibres were isolated from the chela, "skinned" (membrane removed) and attached to the force recording apparatus. Contraction was induced in solutions containing increasing [Ca(2+)] until a maximum Ca(2+)-activation was obtained. Submaximal force responses were plotted as a percentage of the maximum Ca(2+)-activated force. As(V) exposure resulted in lower levels of calcium required for activation than As(III) indicating an increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) after long term exposure to arsenate compared to arsenite. Myosin heavy chain and tropomyosin content in individual fibres was also decreased as a result of arsenic exposure. Single fibres exposed to As(V) produced significantly more force than muscle fibres from control animals. Long-term exposure of yabbies to arsenic alters the contractile function of the two major fibre types in the chelae. PMID:25014018

  9. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  10. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe₂O₄ composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-01-15

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions. PMID:26322840

  11. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3'-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme-DNA interactions in the active site.

    PubMed

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves

    2016-08-19

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3'-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and -1 bases, which flank the 3'-processing site, play a critical role for 3'-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3'-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3'-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the -1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3'-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3'-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  12. Q148N, a Novel Integrase Inhibitor Resistance Mutation Associated with Low-Level Reduction in Elvitegravir Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Vici; Pinsky, Benjamin A; Smith, Darvin S; Klein, Daniel; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    The integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-resistance mutations Q148H/K/R are arguably the most important INSTI-resistance mutations as they represented the first step to high-level dolutegravir cross-resistance. We describe an individual with transmitted four-class drug resistance whose virus sequence had the previously uncharacterized mutation Q148N. Infectious molecular HIV-1 clones containing Q148N alone and in combination with G140S demonstrated ∼2.4-4.5 reduced elvitegravir susceptibility depending on the virus's genetic context but retained susceptibility to raltegravir and dolutegravir. This level of reduced elvitegravir susceptibility is lower than that observed with Q148H/K/R and in fact the infected individual responded to an initial treatment regimen containing tenofovir/emtricitabine/elvitegravir/cobicistat. Q148N was associated with a higher replication capacity than Q148H, suggesting that this mutation may be more fit in the absence of selective INSTI therapy. PMID:27009474

  13. Pre-organized structure of viral DNA at the binding-processing site of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Renisio, Jean-Guillaume; Cosquer, Sylvain; Cherrak, Ilham; Antri, Saïd El; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge

    2005-01-01

    The integration of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA into the host cell genome is catalysed by the viral integrase (IN). The reaction consists of a 3′-processing [dinucleotide released from each 3′ end of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR)] followed by a strand transfer (insertion of the viral genome into the human chromosome). A 17 base pair oligonucleotide d(GGAAAATCTCTAGCAGT), d(ACTGCTAGAGATTTTCC) reproducing the U5-LTR extremity of viral DNA that contains the IN attachment site was analysed by NMR using the classical NOEs and scalar coupling constants in conjunction with a small set of residual dipolar coupling constants (RDCs) measured at the 13C/15N natural abundance. The combination of these two types of parameters in calculations significantly improved the DNA structure determination. The well-known features of A-tracts were clearly identified by RDCs in the first part of the molecule. The binding/cleavage site at the viral DNA end is distinguishable by a loss of regular base stacking and a distorted minor groove that can aid its specific recognition by IN. PMID:15814814

  14. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  15. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  16. Drug interaction profile of the HIV integrase inhibitor cabotegravir: assessment from in vitro studies and a clinical investigation with midazolam.

    PubMed

    Reese, Melinda J; Bowers, Gary D; Humphreys, Joan E; Gould, Elizabeth P; Ford, Susan L; Webster, Lindsey O; Polli, Joseph W

    2016-01-01

    1. Cabotegravir (CAB; GSK1265744) is a potent HIV integrase inhibitor in clinical development as an oral lead-in tablet and long-acting injectable for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. 2. This work investigated if CAB was a substrate for efflux transporters, the potential for CAB to interact with drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters to cause clinical drug interactions, and the effect of CAB on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a CYP3A4 probe substrate, in humans. 3. CAB is a substrate for Pgp and BCRP; however, its high intrinsic membrane permeability limits the impact of these transporters on its intestinal absorption. 4. At clinically relevant concentrations, CAB did not inhibit or induce any of the CYP or UGT enzymes evaluated in vitro and had no effect on the clinical pharmacokinetics of midazolam. 5. CAB is an inhibitor of OAT1 (IC50 0.81 µM) and OAT3 (IC50 0.41 µM) but did not or only weakly inhibited Pgp, BCRP, MRP2, MRP4, MATE1, MATE2-K, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT1, OCT2 or BSEP. 6. Based on regulatory guidelines and quantitative extrapolations, CAB has a low propensity to cause clinically significant drug interactions, except for coadministration with OAT1 or OAT3 substrates. PMID:26340566

  17. Q148N, a Novel Integrase Inhibitor Resistance Mutation Associated with Low-Level Reduction in Elvitegravir Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Smith, Darvin S.; Klein, Daniel; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-resistance mutations Q148H/K/R are arguably the most important INSTI-resistance mutations as they represented the first step to high-level dolutegravir cross-resistance. We describe an individual with transmitted four-class drug resistance whose virus sequence had the previously uncharacterized mutation Q148N. Infectious molecular HIV-1 clones containing Q148N alone and in combination with G140S demonstrated ∼2.4–4.5 reduced elvitegravir susceptibility depending on the virus's genetic context but retained susceptibility to raltegravir and dolutegravir. This level of reduced elvitegravir susceptibility is lower than that observed with Q148H/K/R and in fact the infected individual responded to an initial treatment regimen containing tenofovir/emtricitabine/elvitegravir/cobicistat. Q148N was associated with a higher replication capacity than Q148H, suggesting that this mutation may be more fit in the absence of selective INSTI therapy. PMID:27009474

  18. Development of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vector-Based, Single-Cycle Assay for Evaluation of Anti-Integrase Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Roberta; Andreotti, Mauro; Buffa, Viviana; Leone, Pasqualina; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Amici, Roberta; Palmisano, Lucia; Mancini, Maria Grazia; Michelini, Zuleika; Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Roux, Alessandra; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Vella, Stefano; Cara, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication employ a combination of drugs targeted to two viral enzymes (reverse transcriptase and protease) and to the viral entry/fusion step. However, the high propensity of HIV-1 to develop resistance makes the development of novel compounds targeting different steps of the HIV-1 life cycle essential. Among these, integrase (IN) inhibitors have successfully passed the early phases of clinical development. By preventing integration, IN inhibitors preclude viral replication while allowing production of extrachromosomal forms of viral DNA (E-DNA). Here, we describe an improved and standardized assay aimed at evaluating IN inhibitors by taking advantage of the transcriptional activity of E-DNA produced by HIV-derived vectors in the absence of replication-competent virus. In this context, the use of the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene provides a rapid and quantitative measure of viral-vector infectivity, thus making it a safe and cost-effective assay for evaluating novel IN inhibitors. PMID:17005823

  19. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance. PMID:24278679

  20. Evaluation of selected South African medicinal plants for inhibitory properties against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    PubMed

    Bessong, Pascal Obong; Obi, Chikwelu Larry; Andréola, Marie-Line; Rojas, Luis B; Pouységu, Laurent; Igumbor, Eunice; Meyer, J J Marion; Quideau, Stéphane; Litvak, Simon

    2005-05-13

    Seventeen aqueous and methanol extracts from nine South African medicinal plants, ethnobotanically selected, were screened for inhibitory properties against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Isolated compounds were additionally evaluated on HIV-1 integrase (IN). The strongest inhibition against the RNA-dependent-DNA polymerase (RDDP) activity of RT was observed with the methanol extract of the stem-bark of Peltophorum africanum Sond. (Fabaceae) (IC(50) 3.5 microg/ml), while the methanol extract of the roots of Combretum molle R.Br. ex G. Don (Combretaceae) was the most inhibitory on the ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity (IC(50) 9.7 microg/ml). The known compounds bergenin and catechin, and a red coloured gallotannin composed of meta-depside chains of gallic and protocatechuic acids esterified to a 1-O-isobutyroly-beta-D-glucopyranose core, were isolated from the methanol extract of the roots and stem-bark of Peltophorum africanum. The gallotannin inhibited the RDDP and RNase H functions of RT with IC(50) values of 6.0 and 5.0 microM, respectively, and abolished the 3'-end processing activity of IN at 100 microM. Catechin showed no effect on RT but had a moderate activity on HIV-1 IN. Bergenin was inactive on both enzymes. The aqueous and methanol extracts were non-toxic in a HeLaP4 cell line at a concentration of 400 microg/ml. PMID:15848024

  1. Rational Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Coumarin Derivatives as Protein-protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferro, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a new series of coumarin derivatives searching for novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) allosteric inhibitors. All new obtained compounds were tested in order to evaluate their ability to inhibit the interaction between the HIV-1 IN enzyme and the nuclear protein lens epithelium growth factor LEDGF/p75. A combined approach of docking and molecular dynamic simulations has been applied to clarify the activity of the new compounds. Specifically, the binding free energies by using the method of molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) was calculated, whereas hydrogen bond occupancies were monitored throughout simulations methods. PMID:27546050

  2. Optical data of ERS obtained at 60 cm ASV and 2m Rozhen telescopes useful for the link ICRF-Gaia CRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanovic, G.; Taris, F.; Boeva, S.; Latev, G.

    2014-12-01

    After the GAIA observations (ESA mission) a new optical celestial reference frame (CRF) will be provided which will replace the Hipparcos one. CRF will be dense and based on QSOs (quasi stellar objects). The plan for Gaia is to survey stars and QSOs brighter than 20 mag; it means, about 500 000 extragalactic sources (ERS) and billion stars of our galaxy. Till now, only nearly 10% of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) objects (about 70 common sources) are useful for the link between VLBI (radio) and future Gaia (optical) frames with the highest accuracy. It is because some sources are not optically bright enough, and some of them are not point-like ones but extended sources; the extended sources are not suitable for Gaia astrometric accuracy. So, it is necessary to detect, observe and determine the astrometric positions of common sources in both (optical and radio) domains. For the purpose of mentioned aligning the radio and optical frames, we need as much as possible additional optically bright QSOs (with magnitudes up to 18 and compact structures). The morphology and photometry variations of common QSOs make displacement of their optical photocenters. That displacement could be critical for this link. For morphology investigations, we also included the observations of QSOs made during the period 2011-2013 at the RCC telescope (of Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences); the CCD camera VersArray 1300B was used, and D=F = 2=16. For photometry investigations, we use, among others, the 60 cm ASV telescope (Astronomical Station Vidojevica of Astronomical Observatory in Belgrade, Serbia); the CCD is Apogee U42, and D=F = 0:6=6. We present particularly some data obtained at these telescopes.

  3. Identification of two catalytic residues in RAG1 that define a single active site within the RAG1/RAG2 protein complex.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, S D; Villey, I J; Ptaszek, L M; Schatz, D G

    2000-01-01

    During V(D)J recombination, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins cooperate to catalyze a series of DNA bond breakage and strand transfer reactions. The structure, location, and number of active sites involved in RAG-mediated catalysis have as yet not been determined. Using protein secondary structure prediction algorithms, we have identified a region of RAG1 with possible structural similarities to the active site regions of transposases and retroviral integrases. Based on this information, we have identified two aspartic acid residues in RAG1 (D600 and D708) that function specifically in catalysis. The results support a model in which RAG1 contains a single, divalent metal ion binding active site structurally related to the active sites of transposases/integrases and responsible for all catalytic functions of the RAG protein complex. PMID:10678172

  4. Specific and Independent Recognition of U3 and U5 att Sites by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Harada, Shinji

    1998-01-01

    The retroviral attachment (att) sites at viral DNA ends are cis-acting regions essential for proviral integration. To investigate the sequence features of att important for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration in vivo, we generated a series of 25 att mutants of HIV-1 by mutagenesis of the U3, U5, or both boundaries of att. Our results indicated that the terminal 11 or 12 bp of viral DNA are sufficient for specific recognition by HIV-1 integrase (IN) and suggested that IN might recognize each att site independently in vivo. PMID:9733892

  5. Is It Time for Integrase Inhibitors to be the Preferred Regimen for the First-Line Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Naive Patients?

    PubMed

    Yombi, Jean Cyr; Pozniak, Anton L

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the emergence of combination antiretroviral therapy, HIV/AIDS has been transformed into a manageable, chronic condition in just 30 years and the life expectancy of patients living with HIV is now comparable to those without. Recent data (START) support the strategy of starting all HIV-positive patients regardless of CD4 count. However, patients and physicians want more than just viral control: they want better tolerability, convenience, and few drug-drug interactions. Are the guidelines right in recommending an integrase inhibitor-based regimen as the first-line treatment of choice? PMID:27196353

  6. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay. PMID:27317182

  7. A Long-Acting Integrase Inhibitor Protects Female Macaques from Repeated High-Dose Intravaginal SHIV Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Chasity D.; Yueh, Yun Lan; Spreen, William R.; St. Bernard, Leslie; Boente-Carrera, Mar; Rodriguez, Kristina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Ford, Susan; Mohri, Hiroshi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Hong, Zhi; Ho, David D.; Markowitz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    GSK1265744 long-acting (GSK744 LA) is a strand-transfer inhibitor of HIV/SIV integrase and was shown to be an effective pre-exposure prophylaxis agent in a low-dose intrarectal SHIV rhesus macaque challenge model. Here, we examined the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of GSK744 LA as PrEP against repeat high-dose intravaginal SHIV challenge in female rhesus macaques treated with Depo-Provera which promotes viral transmission vaginally. When Depo-Provera-treated female rhesus macaques were dosed with 50 mg/kg of GSK744 LA monthly, systemic and tissue drug concentrations were lower than previously observed in male rhesus macaques. GSK744 concentrations were 5-fold lower on average in cervical tissues than rectal tissues. Eight female rhesus macaques were treated with GSK744 LA at week 0, and four female rhesus macaques served as controls. All animals received a high dose challenge of SHIV162P3 at week 1. No infection was detected in GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques, whereas viremia was detected 1 to 2 weeks after SHIV challenge in all control animals. The GSK744 LA-treated rhesus macaques were given a second administration of drug at week 4 and further challenged at weeks 5 and 7. GSK744 LA treatment protected 6 of 8 female rhesus macaques against three high-dose SHIV challenges, whereas all control animals became infected after the first challenge (P = 0.0003, log-rank test). These results support further clinical development of GSK744 LA for pre-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:25589630

  8. Implications of integrase inhibitors for HIV-infected transplantation recipients: raltegravir and dolutegravir (S/GSK 1349572).

    PubMed

    Waki, Kayo; Sugawara, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    In the modern era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), reluctance to perform transplantation (Tx) in HIV-infected individuals is no longer justified. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs), the current first line regimens of HAART, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 family (CYP3A4). Most NNRTIs induce CYP3A4, whereas PIs inhibit it. Calcinuerin inhibitors (CNIs), which are mandatory for Tx, need the same enzyme complex for their clearance. Therefore, a significant drug-drug interaction (DDI) is encountered between current HAART and CNIs. This results in extreme difficulty in adjusting the optimal dose of CNIs, for which the therapeutic range is narrow. Of interest, integrase inhibitors (INIs) - novel, potent anti-HIV drugs - are mainly metabolized by uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 and do not induce or inhibit CYP3A4. DDI is presumably absent when NNTRIs or PIs are replaced by INIs. Raltegravir (RAL), a first generation INI, has been introduced into kidney and liver Tx. There is increasing evidence that rejection is well controlled without renal impairment due to CNI over-exposure while persistent, robust suppression of HIV is achieved. Global phase III clinical trials of dolutegravir (DTG), a second generation INI, are currently in progress. In vitro data has suggested that DTG may be less prone to resistance than RAL (referred to as having a higher genetic barrier). The time has come to extensively discuss the implications of INIs in Tx for HIV positive patients. PMID:22101373

  9. Determination of an investigational HIV integrase inhibitor in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Vallano, P T; Woolf, E J; Matuszewski, B K

    2005-06-01

    An HPLC-MS/MS assay for the determination of an HIV integrase inhibitor, 5-(1,1-dioxido-1,2-thiazinan-2-yl)-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-8-hydroxy-1,6-naphthyridine-7-carboxamide (I) in human plasma has been developed and validated. Compound I and a stable isotope labeled internal standard (II) were isolated from 0.5 mL plasma samples by solid phase extraction using an Ansys SPEC C-8 96-well plate. Extracts were separated on a Hypersil BDS C-18 HPLC column (3.0 mmx50 mm, 3 microm) with a mobile phase consisting of 25 mM ammonium formate pH 3.0:acetonitrile (60:40) vol%/vol% pumped at 0.5 mL/min. A Sciex API 365 mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source was operated in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with the precursor-to-product ion transitions m/z 431-->109 (I) and m/z 437-->115 (II) used for quantitation. The assay was validated over the concentration range of 10-5000 ng/mL and was found to have acceptable accuracy, precision, linearity, and selectivity. The mean extraction recovery from spiked plasma samples was 69%. The intra-day accuracy of the assay was within 4% of nominal and intra-day precision was better than 4% C.V. Following a 200 mg dose of the compound administered to human subjects, concentrations of I ranged from 21.1 to 1500 ng/mL in plasma samples collected up to 12 h after dosing. Inter-day accuracy and precision results for quality control samples run over a 3-month period alongside clinical samples showed mean accuracies of within 6% of nominal and precision better than 3.5% C.V. PMID:15866494

  10. Rous Sarcoma Virus Synaptic Complex Capable of Concerted Integration Is Kinetically Trapped by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Krishan K.; Bera, Sibes; Korolev, Sergey; Campbell, Mary; Yin, Zhiqi; Aihara, Hideki; Grandgenett, Duane P.

    2014-01-01

    We determined conditions to produce milligram quantities of the soluble Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) synaptic complex that is kinetically trapped by HIV strand transfer inhibitors (STIs). Concerted integration catalyzed by RSV integrase (IN) is effectively inhibited by HIV STIs. Optimized assembly of the RSV synaptic complex required IN, a gain-of-function 3′-OH-recessed U3 oligonucleotide, and an STI under specific conditions to maintain solubility of the trapped synaptic complex at 4 °C. A C-terminal truncated IN (1–269 residues) produced a homogeneous population of trapped synaptic complex that eluted at ∼151,000 Da upon Superdex 200 size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Approximately 90% of input IN and DNA are incorporated into the trapped synaptic complex using either the C-terminally truncated IN or wild type IN (1–286 residues). No STI is present in the SEC running buffer suggesting the STI-trapped synaptic complex is kinetically stabilized. The yield of the trapped synaptic complex correlates with the dissociative half-life of the STI observed with HIV IN-DNA complexes. Dolutegravir, MK-2048, and MK-0536 are equally effective, whereas raltegravir is ∼70% as effective. Without an STI present in the assembly mixture, no trapped synaptic complex was observed. Fluorescence and mass spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the STI remains associated with the trapped complex. SEC-multiangle light scattering analyses demonstrated that wild type IN and the C-terminal IN truncation are dimers that acted as precursors to the tetramer. The purified STI-trapped synaptic complex contained a tetramer as shown by cross-linking studies. Structural studies of this three-domain RSV IN in complex with viral DNA may be feasible. PMID:24872410

  11. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  12. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water and sediment using reverse-phase ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography-neutron activation analysis (HPLC-NAA).

    PubMed

    Tulasi, Delali; Adotey, Dennis; Affum, Andrews; Carboo, Derick; Serfor-Armah, Yaw

    2013-10-01

    Total As content and the As species distribution in water and sediments from the Kwabrafo stream, a major water body draining the Obuasi gold mining community in southwestern Ghana, have been investigated. Total As content was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Ion-pair reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography-neutron activation analysis (HPLC-NAA) was used for speciation of As species. Solid phase extraction with phosphate buffer was used to extract soluble As species from lyophilized sediment. The mass balance after phosphate extraction of soluble As species in sediment varied from 89 to 96 %. Compositionally appropriate reference material International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)-Lake Sediment (SL)-1 was used to check the validity of INAA method for total As determination. The measured values are in good agreement with the IAEA recommended value and also within the 95 % confidence interval. The accuracy of the measurement in terms of relative deviation from the IAEA recommended value was ±0.83 %. "In-house" prepared As(III) and As(V) standards were used to validate the HPLC-INAA method used for the As species determination. Total As concentration in the water samples ranged from 1.15 to 9.20 mg/L. As(III) species in water varied from 0.13 to 0.7 mg/L, while As(V) species varied from 0.79 to 3.85 mg/L. Total As content in sediment ranged from 2,134 to 3,596 mg/kg dry mass. The levels of As(III) and As(V) species in the sediment ranges from 138 to 506 mg/kg dry mass and 156 to 385 mg/kg dry mass, respectively. PMID:23494192

  13. Short communication: analysis of the integrase gene from HIV type 1-positive patients living in a rural area of West Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Montagna, Claudia; Falasca, Francesca; Bucci, Mauro; Russo, Gianluca; Lichtner, Miriam; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Vullo, Vincenzo; Pistello, Mauro; Antonelli, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Major mutations associated with HIV-I integrase inhibitors (INI) resistance are rare in INI-naive patients. However, polymorphisms at positions that may influence the genetic barrier and/or drive the selection of specific INI resistance pathways are common in HIV non-B subtypes. The aim was to evaluate the presence of natural polymorphisms and/or INI resistance mutations in HIV-1 non-B subtype samples obtained from INI-naive patients living in rural west Cameroon. Thirty-three HIV-1 non-B samples were obtained from INI-naive African women and, as controls, 15 samples of HIV-1 subtype B were obtained from antiretroviral-naive Italian patients. The integrase gene was amplified and sequenced using Trugene Core Reagents. Several amino acid positions in B and non-B subtypes were found to be polymorphic. Interestingly, two patients infected with the CRF02_AG subtype had the resistance mutations N155H and E157Q/E and 12% of African samples had an amino acid substitution at position 143. Silent mutations leading to a higher increment of genetic barriers were detected at 140 and 151 positions in non B-subtypes. Although most polymorphisms may have little effect on INI susceptibility, the IN gene variations found in the present study should be taken into consideration as they may facilitate or delay the emergence of variants fully resistant to INIs. PMID:22214532

  14. Intrinsic sequence specificity of the Cas1 integrase directs new spacer acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Rollie, Clare; Schneider, Stefanie; Brinkmann, Anna Sophie; Bolt, Edward L; White, Malcolm F

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas provides RNA-mediated protection from invading genetic elements. The fundamental basis of the system is the ability to capture small pieces of foreign DNA for incorporation into the genome at the CRISPR locus, a process known as Adaptation, which is dependent on the Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. We demonstrate that Cas1 catalyses an efficient trans-esterification reaction on branched DNA substrates, which represents the reverse- or disintegration reaction. Cas1 from both Escherichia coli and Sulfolobus solfataricus display sequence specific activity, with a clear preference for the nucleotides flanking the integration site at the leader-repeat 1 boundary of the CRISPR locus. Cas2 is not required for this activity and does not influence the specificity. This suggests that the inherent sequence specificity of Cas1 is a major determinant of the adaptation process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08716.001 PMID:26284603

  15. Natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 CRF01_AE integrase coding region in ARV-naïve individuals in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam: an ANRS AC12 working group study.

    PubMed

    Nouhin, Janin; Donchai, Tawee; Hoang, Khanh Thu Huynh; Ken, Sreymom; Kamkorn, Jiraporn; Tran, Ton; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Lien, Truong Xuan; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The HIV integrase enzyme is essential for the HIV life cycle as it mediates integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA into the infected cell's genome. Recently, the development of drugs capable of inhibiting integrase has provided major new options for HIV-infected, treatment-experienced patients with multidrug resistant virus, as well treatment-naïve patients. More than 40 amino acid substitutions within integrase have been described as associated mostly with resistance of HIV B-subtypes to currently available integrase inhibitors (INIs). We have analyzed the natural polymorphisms of the integrase coding region in 87 antiretroviral-naïve subjects (32 from Cambodia, 37 from Thailand and 18 from Vietnam) infected with CRF01_AE virus, the predominant HIV-1 strain circulating in Southeast Asia. The 864bp integrase coding region was sequenced using the ANRS consensus sequencing technique from plasma samples, and amino acid results were interpreted for drug resistance according to the ANRS (Updated July 2009, version 18) and Stanford algorithms (Version November 6, 2009). Alignment of the 87 amino acid sequences against the 2004 Los Alamos HIV-1 clade B consensus sequence showed that overall, 119 of 288 (41.3%) amino acid positions presented at least one polymorphism each. Substitutions found in >60% of study subjects occurred at: K14, A21, V31, S39, I72, T112, T124, T125, G134, I135, K136, D167, V201, L234 and S283. Also, new amino acid substitutions of as yet unknown significance were identified: E152K/H, S153F/L, N155I and E157G. None of the known integrase resistance mutations were observed, except E157Q found in one Cambodian subject (1.1%, CI 95% 0.02-6.3%). The clinical impact of this substitution on resistance of B and nonB-viruses to the licensed INI raltegravir is unclear. If this substitution is confirmed to compromise the virologic response to raltegravir, further studies will be needed to better assess the prevalence of this substitution among CRF01_AE virus

  16. Multiple cellular proteins interact with LEDGF/p75 through a conserved unstructured consensus motif.

    PubMed

    Tesina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Procházková, Kateřina; Fábry, Milan; Sharma, Subhalakshmi; Christ, Frauke; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; De Rijck, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is an epigenetic reader and attractive therapeutic target involved in HIV integration and the development of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL1) fusion-driven leukaemia. Besides HIV integrase and the MLL1-menin complex, LEDGF/p75 interacts with various cellular proteins via its integrase binding domain (IBD). Here we present structural characterization of IBD interactions with transcriptional repressor JPO2 and domesticated transposase PogZ, and show that the PogZ interaction is nearly identical to the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with MLL1. The interaction with the IBD is maintained by an intrinsically disordered IBD-binding motif (IBM) common to all known cellular partners of LEDGF/p75. In addition, based on IBM conservation, we identify and validate IWS1 as a novel LEDGF/p75 interaction partner. Our results also reveal how HIV integrase efficiently displaces cellular binding partners from LEDGF/p75. Finally, the similar binding modes of LEDGF/p75 interaction partners represent a new challenge for the development of selective interaction inhibitors. PMID:26245978

  17. Experimental/theoretical electrostatic properties of a styrylquinoline-type HIV-1 integrase inhibitor and its progenitors.

    PubMed

    Firley, Delphine; Courcot, Blandine; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Fraisse, Bernard; Zouhiri, Fatima; Desmaële, Didier; d'Angelo, Jean; Ghermani, Nour Eddine

    2006-01-12

    We have established that polyhydroxylated styrylquinolines are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase (IN). Among them, we have identified (E)-8-hydroxy-2-[2-(4,5-dihydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-ethenyl]-7-quinolinecarboxylic acid (1) as a promising lead. Previous molecular dynamics simulations and docking procedures have shown that the inhibitory activity involves one or two metal cations (Mg2+), which are present in the vicinity of the active center of the enzyme. However, such methods are generally based on a force-field approach and still remain not as reliable as ab initio calculations with extended basis sets on the whole system. To go further in this area, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictive ability of the electron density and electrostatic properties in the structure-activity relationships of this class of HIV-1 antiviral drugs. The electron properties of the two chemical progenitors of 1 were derived from both high-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio calculations. The twinning phenomenon and solvent disorder were observed during the crystal structure determination of 1. Molecule 1 exhibits a planar s-trans conformation, and a zwitterionic form in the crystalline state is obtained. This geometry was used for ab initio calculations, which were performed to characterize the electronic properties of 1. The electron densities, electrostatic potentials, and atomic charges of 1 and its progenitors are here compared and analyzed. The experimental and theoretical deformation density bond peaks are very comparable for the two progenitors. However, the experimental electrostatic potential is strongly affected by the crystal field and cannot straightforwardly be used as a predictive index. The weak difference in the theoretical electron densities between 1 and its progenitors reveals that each component of 1 conserves its intrinsic properties, an assumption reinforced by a 13C NMR study. This is also shown through an excellent

  18. Development of Elvitegravir Resistance and Linkage of Integrase Inhibitor Mutations with Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Mark A.; Lloyd, Robert M.; Shafer, Robert W.; Kozal, Michael J.; Miller, Michael D.; Holodniy, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG) and raltegravir (RAL) can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI) drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point). Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48) typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs. PMID:22815755

  19. Impact of Primary Elvitegravir Resistance-Associated Mutations in HIV-1 Integrase on Drug Susceptibility and Viral Replication Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Hluhanich, Rebecca M.; Goodman, Derrick D.; Andreatta, Kristen N.; Margot, Nicolas A.; Ye, Linda; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Barnes, Tiffany L.; Novikov, Nikolai; Chen, Xiaowu; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S.; McColl, Damian J.; White, Kirsten L.; Miller, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG) is an effective HIV-1 integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) in advanced clinical development. Primary INSTI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) at six IN positions have been identified in HIV-1-infected patients failing EVG-containing regimens in clinical studies: T66I/A/K, E92Q/G, T97A, S147G, Q148R/H/K, and N155H. In this study, the effect of these primary IN mutations, alone and in combination, on susceptibility to the INSTIs EVG, raltegravir (RAL), and dolutegravir (DTG); IN enzyme activities; and viral replication fitness was characterized. Recombinant viruses containing the six most common mutations exhibited a range of reduced EVG susceptibility: 92-fold for Q148R, 30-fold for N155H, 26-fold for E92Q, 10-fold for T66I, 4-fold for S147G, and 2-fold for T97A. Less commonly observed primary IN mutations also showed a range of reduced EVG susceptibilities: 40- to 94-fold for T66K and Q148K and 5- to 10-fold for T66A, E92G, and Q148H. Some primary IN mutations exhibited broad cross-resistance between EVG and RAL (T66K, E92Q, Q148R/H/K, and N155H), while others retained susceptibility to RAL (T66I/A, E92G, T97A, and S147G). Dual combinations of primary IN mutations further reduced INSTI susceptibility, replication capacity, and viral fitness relative to either mutation alone. Susceptibility to DTG was retained by single primary IN mutations but reduced by dual mutation combinations with Q148R. Primary EVG RAMs also diminished IN enzymatic activities, concordant with their structural proximity to the active site. Greater reductions in viral fitness of dual mutation combinations may explain why some primary INSTI RAMs do not readily coexist on the same HIV-1 genome but rather establish independent pathways of resistance to EVG. PMID:23529738

  20. Impact of primary elvitegravir resistance-associated mutations in HIV-1 integrase on drug susceptibility and viral replication fitness.

    PubMed

    Abram, Michael E; Hluhanich, Rebecca M; Goodman, Derrick D; Andreatta, Kristen N; Margot, Nicolas A; Ye, Linda; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Barnes, Tiffany L; Novikov, Nikolai; Chen, Xiaowu; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S; McColl, Damian J; White, Kirsten L; Miller, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG) is an effective HIV-1 integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) in advanced clinical development. Primary INSTI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) at six IN positions have been identified in HIV-1-infected patients failing EVG-containing regimens in clinical studies: T66I/A/K, E92Q/G, T97A, S147G, Q148R/H/K, and N155H. In this study, the effect of these primary IN mutations, alone and in combination, on susceptibility to the INSTIs EVG, raltegravir (RAL), and dolutegravir (DTG); IN enzyme activities; and viral replication fitness was characterized. Recombinant viruses containing the six most common mutations exhibited a range of reduced EVG susceptibility: 92-fold for Q148R, 30-fold for N155H, 26-fold for E92Q, 10-fold for T66I, 4-fold for S147G, and 2-fold for T97A. Less commonly observed primary IN mutations also showed a range of reduced EVG susceptibilities: 40- to 94-fold for T66K and Q148K and 5- to 10-fold for T66A, E92G, and Q148H. Some primary IN mutations exhibited broad cross-resistance between EVG and RAL (T66K, E92Q, Q148R/H/K, and N155H), while others retained susceptibility to RAL (T66I/A, E92G, T97A, and S147G). Dual combinations of primary IN mutations further reduced INSTI susceptibility, replication capacity, and viral fitness relative to either mutation alone. Susceptibility to DTG was retained by single primary IN mutations but reduced by dual mutation combinations with Q148R. Primary EVG RAMs also diminished IN enzymatic activities, concordant with their structural proximity to the active site. Greater reductions in viral fitness of dual mutation combinations may explain why some primary INSTI RAMs do not readily coexist on the same HIV-1 genome but rather establish independent pathways of resistance to EVG. PMID:23529738

  1. A cooperative and specific DNA-binding mode of HIV-1 integrase depends on the nature of the metallic cofactor and involves the zinc-containing N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Kevin; Leh, Hervé; Henry, Etienne; Simon, Françoise; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Deprez, Eric

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase catalyzes the insertion of the viral genome into chromosomal DNA. We characterized the structural determinants of the 3′-processing reaction specificity—the first reaction of the integration process—at the DNA-binding level. We found that the integrase N-terminal domain, containing a pseudo zinc-finger motif, plays a key role, at least indirectly, in the formation of specific integrase–DNA contacts. This motif mediates a cooperative DNA binding of integrase that occurs only with the cognate/viral DNA sequence and the physiologically relevant Mg2+ cofactor. The DNA-binding was essentially non-cooperative with Mn2+ or using non-specific/random sequences, regardless of the metallic cofactor. 2,2′-Dithiobisbenzamide-1 induced zinc ejection from integrase by covalently targeting the zinc-finger motif, and significantly decreased the Hill coefficient of the Mg2+-mediated integrase–DNA interaction, without affecting the overall affinity. Concomitantly, 2,2′-dithiobisbenzamide-1 severely impaired 3′-processing (IC50 = 11–15 nM), suggesting that zinc ejection primarily perturbs the nature of the active integrase oligomer. A less specific and weaker catalytic effect of 2,2′-dithiobisbenzamide-1 is mediated by Cys 56 in the catalytic core and, notably, accounts for the weaker inhibition of the non-cooperative Mn2+-dependent 3′-processing. Our data show that the cooperative DNA-binding mode is strongly related to the sequence-specific DNA-binding, and depends on the simultaneous presence of the Mg2+ cofactor and the zinc effector. PMID:20164093

  2. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (p<0.001 in both cases), explaining 67.04% of the abundance and 42.95% of the proportion variations in the grassland soil. Both cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate proved to be considerable sources of ARGs, especially sul1, as well as integron-integrases. Sul1, intI1 and intI2 levels in grassland soil were elevated in response to each organic fertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were

  3. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications. PMID:27306022

  4. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  5. 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones (HIDs) as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors: Influence of the alkylcarboxamide substitution of position 4.

    PubMed

    Billamboz, Muriel; Suchaud, Virginie; Bailly, Fabrice; Lion, Cedric; Andréola, Marie-Line; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Cotelle, Philippe

    2016-07-19

    Herein, we report further insight into the biological activities displayed by the 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-dione (HID) scaffold. Previous studies have evidenced the marked fruitful effect of substitution of this two-metal binding pharmacophore at position 4 by phenyl and benzyl carboxamido chains. Strong human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors in the low nanomolar range with micromolar (even down to low nanomolar) anti-HIV activities were obtained. Keeping this essential 4-carboxamido function, we investigated the influence of the replacement of phenyl and benzyl groups by various alkyl chains. This study shows that the recurrent halogenobenzyl pharmacophore found in the INSTIs can be efficiently replaced by an n-alkyl group. With an optimal length of six carbons, we observed a biological profile and a high barrier to resistance equivalent to those of a previously reported hit compound bearing a 4-fluorobenzyl group. PMID:27105029

  6. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  7. Genome engineering and direct cloning of antibiotic gene clusters via phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Du, Deyao; Wang, Lu; Tian, Yuqing; Liu, Hao; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Several strategies have been used to clone large DNA fragments directly from bacterial genome. Most of these approaches are based on different site-specific recombination systems consisting of a specialized recombinase and its target sites. In this study, a novel strategy based on phage ϕBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination was developed, and used for simultaneous Streptomyces genome engineering and cloning of antibiotic gene clusters. This method has been proved successful for the cloning of actinorhodin gene cluster from Streptomyces coelicolor M145, napsamycin gene cluster and daptomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998 at a frequency higher than 80%. Furthermore, the system could be used to increase the titer of antibiotics as we demonstrated with actinorhodin and daptomycin, and it will be broadly applicable in many Streptomyces. PMID:25737113

  8. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker. PMID:15662954

  9. 4-Substituted 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones as a Novel Class of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Billamboz, Muriel; Suchaud, Virginie; Bailly, Fabrice; Lion, Cedric; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Calmels, Christina; Andréola, Marie-Line; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Cotelle, Philippe

    2013-07-11

    A series of 2-hydroxy-1,3-dioxoisoquinoline-4-carboxamides featuring an N-hydroxyimide chelating functionality was evaluated for their inhibitory properties against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN). Several derivatives displayed low nanomolar IC50 values comparable to that of the clinically used raltegravir. A marked effect of one compound on both primary IN-catalyzed reactions, strand transfer (ST), and 3' processing (3'-P), emphasizes a novel IN inhibition mechanism establishing it as a potential new generation IN inhibitor. Substitution of the 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione scaffold at position 4 by carboxamido chains was beneficial for antiviral activity since reproducible low micromolar anti-HIV activities were obtained for the first time within this scaffold. PMID:24900718

  10. 4-Substituted 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones as a Novel Class of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of 2-hydroxy-1,3-dioxoisoquinoline-4-carboxamides featuring an N-hydroxyimide chelating functionality was evaluated for their inhibitory properties against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN). Several derivatives displayed low nanomolar IC50 values comparable to that of the clinically used raltegravir. A marked effect of one compound on both primary IN-catalyzed reactions, strand transfer (ST), and 3′ processing (3′-P), emphasizes a novel IN inhibition mechanism establishing it as a potential new generation IN inhibitor. Substitution of the 2-hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione scaffold at position 4 by carboxamido chains was beneficial for antiviral activity since reproducible low micromolar anti-HIV activities were obtained for the first time within this scaffold. PMID:24900718

  11. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea. PMID:20946407

  12. The Combination of the R263K and T66I Resistance Substitutions in HIV-1 Integrase Is Incompatible with High-Level Viral Replication and the Development of High-Level Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jiaming; Mesplède, Thibault; Oliveira, Maureen; Anstett, Kaitlin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The R263K substitution in integrase has been selected in tissue culture with dolutegravir (DTG) and has been reported for several treatment-experienced individuals receiving DTG as part of salvage therapy. The R263K substitution seems to be incompatible with the presence of common resistance mutations associated with raltegravir (RAL), a different integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI). T66I is a substitution that is common in individuals who have developed resistance against a different INSTI termed elvitegravir (EVG), but it is not known whether these two mutations might be compatible in the context of resistance against DTG or what impact the combination of these substitutions might have on resistance against INSTIs. E138K is a common secondary substitution observed with various primary resistance substitutions in RAL- and EVG-treated individuals. Viral infectivity, replicative capacity, and resistance against INSTIs were measured in cell-based assays. Strand transfer and 3′ processing activities were measured biochemically. The combination of the R263K and T66I substitutions decreased HIV-1 infectivity, replicative capacity, and strand transfer activity. The addition of the E138K substitution partially compensated for these deficits and resulted in high levels of resistance against EVG but not against DTG or RAL. These findings suggest that the presence of the T66I substitution will not compromise the activity of DTG and may also help to prevent the additional generation of the R263K mutation. Our observations support the use of DTG in second-line therapy for individuals who experience treatment failure with EVG due to the T66I substitution. IMPORTANCE The integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) elvitegravir and dolutegravir are newly developed inhibitors against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). HIV drug-resistant mutations in integrase that can arise in individuals treated with elvitegravir commonly include the T66I

  13. New procedure for multielemental speciation analysis of five toxic species: As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(III) and Sb(V) in drinking water samples by advanced hyphenated technique HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska, Monika; Komorowicz, Izabela; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-05-12

    Analytical procedure dedicated for multielemental determination of toxic species: As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(III) and Sb(V) in drinking water samples using high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS) technique was developed. Optimization of the detection and separation conditions was conducted. Dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with oxygen as a reaction gas was involved in the experiments. Obtained analytical signals for species separation were symmetrical, as studied by anion-exchange chromatography. Applied mobile phase consisted of 3 mM of EDTANa2 and 36 mM of ammonium nitrate. Full separation of species in the form of the following forms: H3AsO3, H2AsO4(-), SbO2(-), Sb(OH)6(-), CrO4(2-) was achieved in 15 min with use of gradient elution program. Detailed validation of analytical procedure proved the reliability of analytical measurements. The procedure was characterized by high precision in the range from 1.7% to 2.4%. Detection limits (LD) were 0.067 μg L(-1), 0.068 μg L(-1), 0.098 μg L(-1), 0.083 μg L(-1) and 0.038 μg L(-1) for As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Sb(III) and Sb(V), respectively. Obtained recoveries confirmed the lack of interferences' influence on analytical signals as their values were in the range of 91%-110%. The applicability of the proposed procedure was tested on drinking water samples characterized by mineralization up to 650 mg L(-1). PMID:27114229

  14. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  15. Therapy-Emergent Drug Resistance to Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors in HIV-1 Patients: A Subgroup Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongren; Huang, Xiaojun; Qin, Zhen; Deng, Zhaomin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Baoning; Li, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are a novel class of anti-HIV agents that show high activity in inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Currently, licensed INSTIs include raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG); these drugs have played a critical role in AIDS therapy, serving as additional weapons in the arsenal for treating patients infected with HIV-1. To date, long-term data regarding clinical experience with INSTI use and the emergence of resistance remain scarce. However, the literature is likely now sufficiently comprehensive to warrant a meta-analysis of resistance to INSTIs. Methods Our team implemented a manuscript retrieval protocol using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) via the Web of Science, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We screened the literature based on inclusion and exclusion criteria and then performed a quality analysis and evaluation using RevMan software, Stata software, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). We also performed a subgroup analysis. Finally, we calculated resistance rates and risk ratios (RRs) for the three types of drugs. Results We identified 26 references via the database search. A meta-analysis of the RAL data revealed that the resistance rate was 3.9% (95% CI = 2.9%-4.9%) for the selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the RAL resistance rate reached 40.9% (95% CI = 8.8%-72.9%) for the selected observational studies (OBSs). The rates of resistance to RAL that were associated with HIV subtypes A, B, and C as well as with more complex subtypes were 0.1% (95% CI = -0.7%-0.9%), 2.5% (95% CI = 0.5%-4.5%), 4.6% (95% CI = 2.7%-6.6%) and 2.2% (95% CI = 0.7%-3.7%), respectively. The rates of resistance to EVG and DTG were 1.2% (95% CI = 0.2%-2.2%) and 0.1% (95% CI = -0.2%-0.5%), respectively. Furthermore, we found that the RRs for antiviral resistance were 0.414 (95% CI = 0.210–0

  16. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  17. Consensus HIV-1 FSU-A Integrase Gene Variants Electroporated into Mice Induce Polyfunctional Antigen-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krotova, Olga; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Petkov, Stefan; Kostic, Linda; Agapkina, Julia; Hallengärd, David; Viklund, Alecia; Latyshev, Oleg; Gelius, Eva; Dillenbeck, Tomas; Karpov, Vadim; Gottikh, Marina; Belyakov, Igor M.; Lukashov, Vladimir; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to create gene immunogens targeted against drug-resistant HIV-1, focusing on HIV-1 enzymes as critical components in viral replication and drug resistance. Consensus-based gene vaccines are specifically fit for variable pathogens such as HIV-1 and have many advantages over viral genes and their expression-optimized variants. With this in mind, we designed the consensus integrase (IN) of the HIV-1 clade A strain predominant in the territory of the former Soviet Union and its inactivated derivative with and without mutations conferring resistance to elvitegravir. Humanized IN gene was synthesized; and inactivated derivatives (with 64D in the active site mutated to V) with and without elvitegravir-resistance mutations were generated by site-mutagenesis. Activity tests of IN variants expressed in E coli showed the consensus IN to be active, while both D64V-variants were devoid of specific activities. IN genes cloned in the DNA-immunization vector pVax1 (pVaxIN plasmids) were highly expressed in human and murine cell lines (>0.7 ng/cell). Injection of BALB/c mice with pVaxIN plasmids followed by electroporation generated potent IFN-γ and IL-2 responses registered in PBMC by day 15 and in splenocytes by day 23 after immunization. Multiparametric FACS demonstrated that CD8+ and CD4+ T cells of gene-immunized mice stimulated with IN-derived peptides secreted IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α. The multi-cytokine responses of CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells correlated with the loss of in vivo activity of the luciferase reporter gene co-delivered with pVaxIN plasmids. This indicated the capacity of IN-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells to clear IN/reporter co-expressing cells from the injection sites. Thus, the synthetic HIV-1 clade A integrase genes acted as potent immunogens generating polyfunctional Th1-type CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Generation of such response is highly desirable for an effective HIV-1 vaccine as it offers a possibility to attack virus-infected cells via both MHC

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase inhibitors efficiently suppress feline immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and provide a rationale to redesign antiretroviral treatment for feline AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Andrea; Pistello, Mauro; D'Ostilio, Daniela; Zabogli, Elisa; Taglia, Fabiana; Mancini, Fabiola; Ferro, Stefania; Matteucci, Donatella; De Luca, Laura; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Ciervo, Alessandra; Chimirri, Alba; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Background Treatment of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has been hampered by the absence of a specific combination antiretroviral treatment (ART). Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are emerging as a promising new drug class for HIV-1 treatment, and we evaluated the possibility of inhibiting FIV replication using INSTIs. Methods Phylogenetic analysis of lentiviral integrase (IN) sequences was carried out using the PAUP* software. A theoretical three-dimensional structure of the FIV IN catalytic core domain (CCD) was obtained by homology modeling based on a crystal structure of HIV-1 IN CCD. The interaction of the transferred strand of viral DNA with the catalytic cavity of FIV IN was deduced from a crystal structure of a structurally similar transposase complexed with transposable DNA. Molecular docking simulations were conducted using a genetic algorithm (GOLD). Antiviral activity was tested in feline lymphoblastoid MBM cells acutely infected with the FIV Petaluma strain. Circular and total proviral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR. Results The calculated INSTI-binding sites were found to be nearly identical in FIV and HIV-1 IN CCDs. The close similarity of primate and feline lentivirus IN CCDs was also supported by phylogenetic analysis. In line with these bioinformatic analyses, FIV replication was efficiently inhibited in acutely infected cell cultures by three investigational INSTIs, designed for HIV-1 and belonging to different classes. Of note, the naphthyridine carboxamide INSTI, L-870,810 displayed an EC50 in the low nanomolar range. Inhibition of FIV integration in situ was shown by real-time PCR experiments that revealed accumulation of circular forms of FIV DNA within cells treated with L-870,810. Conclusion We report a drug class (other than nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors) that is capable of inhibiting FIV replication in vitro. The present study helped establish L-870,810, a compound successfully tested in

  19. Multi-competitive interaction of As(III) and As(V) oxyanions with Ca(2+), Mg(2+), PO(3-)(4), and CO(2-)(3) ions on goethite.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, Monika; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2008-04-15

    Complex systems, simulating natural conditions like in groundwater, have rarely been studied, since measuring and in particular, modeling of such systems is very challenging. In this paper, the adsorption of the oxyanions of As(III) and As(V) on goethite has been studied in presence of various inorganic macro-elements (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), PO(3-)(4), CO(2-)(3)). We have used 'single-,' 'dual-,' and 'triple-ion' systems. The presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) has no significant effect on As(III) oxyanion (arsenite) adsorption in the pH range relevant for natural groundwater (pH 5-9). In contrast, both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) promote the adsorption of PO(3-)(4). A similar (electrostatic) effect is expected for the Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) interaction with As(V) oxyanions (arsenate). Phosphate is a major competitor for arsenate as well as arsenite. Although carbonate may act as competitor for both types of As oxyanions, the presence of significant concentrations of phosphate makes the interaction of (bi)carbonate insignificant. The data have been modeled with the charge distribution (CD) model in combination with the extended Stern model option. In the modeling, independently calculated CD values were used for the oxyanions. The CD values for these complexes have been obtained from a bond valence interpretation of MO/DFT (molecular orbital/density functional theory) optimized geometries. The affinity constants (logK) have been found by calibrating the model on data from 'single-ion' systems. The parameters are used to predict the ion adsorption behavior in the multi-component systems. The thus calibrated model is able to predict successfully the ion concentrations in the mixed 2- and 3-component systems as a function of pH and loading. From a practical perspective, data as well as calculations show the dominance of phosphate in regulating the As concentrations. Arsenite (As(OH)(3)) is often less strongly bound than arsenate (AsO(3-)(4)) but arsenite responses less strongly to changes in the

  20. The Microbiota and Abundance of the Class 1 Integron-Integrase Gene in Tropical Sewage Treatment Plant Influent and Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Magna C.; Ávila, Marcelo P.; Reis, Mariana P.; Costa, Patrícia S.; Nardi, Regina M. D.; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are assumed to efficiently remove organic pollutants from sewage in sewage treatment plants, where antibiotic-resistance genes can move between species via mobile genetic elements known as integrons. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed bacterial diversity and class 1 integron abundance in tropical sewage. Here, we describe the extant microbiota, using V6 tag sequencing, and quantify the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) in raw sewage (RS) and activated sludge (AS). The analysis of 1,174,486 quality-filtered reads obtained from RS and AS samples revealed complex and distinct bacterial diversity in these samples. The RS sample, with 3,074 operational taxonomic units, exhibited the highest alpha-diversity indices. Among the 25 phyla, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes represented 85% (AS) and 92% (RS) of all reads. Increased relative abundance of Micrococcales, Myxococcales, and Sphingobacteriales and reduced pathogen abundance were noted in AS. At the genus level, differences were observed for the dominant genera Simplicispira and Diaphorobacter (AS) as well as for Enhydrobacter (RS). The activated sludge process decreased (55%) the amount of bacteria harboring the intI1 gene in the RS sample. Altogether, our results emphasize the importance of biological treatment for diminishing pathogenic bacteria and those bearing the intI1 gene that arrive at a sewage treatment plant. PMID:26115093

  1. Virtual-screening targeting Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 integrase-lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75 interaction for drug development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wan-Gang; Liu, Bai-Nan; Yuan, Jun-Fa

    2015-02-01

    Three integrase (IN) inhibitors have been approved by FDA for clinical treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This stimulates more researchers to focus their studies on this target for anti-HIV drug development. Three steps regarding of IN activity have been validated for inhibitor discovery: strand transfer, 3'-terminal processing, and IN-lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 interaction. Among them, IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction is a new target validated in recent years. Emergence of drug-resistant virus strains makes this target appealing to pharmacologists. Compared with the traditional screening methods such as AlphaScreen and cell-based screening developed for IN inhibitor discovery, virtual screening is a powerful technique in modern drug discovery. Here we summarized the recent advances of virtual-screening targeting IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction. The combined application of virtual screening and experiments in drug discovery against IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction sheds light on anti-HIV research and drug discovery. PMID:25230778

  2. N-Substituted Quinolinonyl Diketo Acid Derivatives as HIV Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors and Their Activity against RNase H Function of Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Pescatori, Luca; Métifiot, Mathieu; Chung, Suhman; Masoaka, Takashi; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Messore, Antonella; Pupo, Giovanni; Madia, Valentina Noemi; Saccoliti, Francesco; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Cosconati, Sandro; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto

    2015-06-11

    Bifunctional quinolinonyl DKA derivatives were first described as nonselective inhibitors of 3'-processing (3'-P) and strand transfer (ST) functions of HIV-1 integrase (IN), while 7-aminosubstituted quinolinonyl derivatives were proven IN strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) that also displayed activity against ribonuclease H (RNase H). In this study, we describe the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new quinolinonyl diketo acid (DKA) derivatives characterized by variously substituted alkylating groups on the nitrogen atom of the quinolinone ring. Removal of the second DKA branch of bifunctional DKAs, and the amino group in position 7 of quinolinone ring combined with a fine-tuning of the substituents on the benzyl group in position 1 of the quinolinone, increased selectivity for IN ST activity. In vitro, the most potent compound was 11j (IC50 = 10 nM), while the most active compounds against HIV infected cells were ester derivatives 10j and 10l. In general, the activity against RNase H was negligible, with only a few compounds active at concentrations higher than 10 μM. The binding mode of the most potent IN inhibitor 11j within the IN catalytic core domain (CCD) is described as well as its binding mode within the RNase H catalytic site to rationalize its selectivity. PMID:25961960

  3. Staphylococcus aureus SarA is a Regulatory Protein Responsive to Redox and pH that Can Support Bacteriophage Lambda Integrase Mediated Excision/Recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide array of virulence factors that largely come under the control of global regulators. One of these, SarA, has been considered to be a transcription factor, and to regulate over a hundred genes as either a repressor or activator. Here, we show that SarA is prese...

  4. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  5. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  6. Development of pharmacophore similarity-based quantitative activity hypothesis and its applicability domain: applied on a diverse data-set of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Mehta, Vijay P; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative pharmacophore hypothesis combines the 3D spatial arrangement of pharmacophore features with biological activities of the ligand data-set and predicts the activities of geometrically and/or pharmacophoric similar ligands. Most pharmacophore discovery programs face difficulties in conformational flexibility, molecular alignment, pharmacophore features sampling, and feature selection to score models if the data-set constitutes diverse ligands. Towards this focus, we describe a ligand-based computational procedure to introduce flexibility in aligning the small molecules and generating a pharmacophore hypothesis without geometrical constraints to define pharmacophore space, enriched with chemical features necessary to elucidate common pharmacophore hypotheses (CPHs). Maximal common substructure (MCS)-based alignment method was adopted to guide the alignment of carbon molecules, deciphered the MCS atom connectivity to cluster molecules in bins and subsequently, calculated the pharmacophore similarity matrix with the bin-specific reference molecules. After alignment, the carbon molecules were enriched with original atoms in their respective positions and conventional pharmacophore features were perceived. Distance-based pharmacophoric descriptors were enumerated by computing the interdistance between perceived features and MCS-aligned 'centroid' position. The descriptor set and biological activities were used to develop support vector machine models to predict the activities of the external test set. Finally, fitness score was estimated based on pharmacophore similarity with its bin-specific reference molecules to recognize the best and poor alignments and, also with each reference molecule to predict outliers of the quantitative hypothesis model. We applied this procedure to a diverse data-set of 40 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and discussed its effectiveness with the reported CPH model. PMID:24735019

  7. Determination of the HIV integrase inhibitor, MK-0518 (raltegravir), in human plasma using 96-well liquid-liquid extraction and HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Merschman, S A; Vallano, P T; Wenning, L A; Matuszewski, B K; Woolf, E J

    2007-09-15

    An HPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of MK-0518 (raltegravir), an HIV integrase inhibitor, in human plasma over the concentration range of 2-1000 ng/mL. Stable isotope labeled (13)C(6)-MK-0518 was used as an internal standard. The sample preparation procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction with hexane:methylene chloride in the 96-well format with a 200 microL plasma sample size. The compounds were chromatographed on an Ace C(18) (50 x 3.0 mm, 3 microm, titanium frits) column with 42.5/57.5 (v/v %) 0.1mM EDTA in 0.1% formic acid/methanol mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion pairs for MK-0518 (m/z 445-->109) and (13)C(6)-MK-0518 (m/z 451-->367) on an Applied Biosystem API 4000 HPLC-MS/MS was used for quantitation. Intraday precision of standard curve concentrations in five different lots of control plasma was within 3.2%, while accuracy ranged from 94.8 to 106.8%. The mean extraction recovery of spiked plasma samples was 87%. Quality control (QC) samples were stored at -20 degrees C. Initial within day analysis showed QC accuracy within 7.5% of nominal with precision of 3.1% or less. The plasma QC samples were demonstrated to be stable for up to 23 months at -20 degrees C. The method described has been used to support over 18 clinical studies during Phase I through III of clinical development. PMID:17644453

  8. Evaluation of the effect of short-term treatment with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) on the course of progressive feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Andrea; Cattori, Valentino; Riond, Barbara; Willi, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hosie, Margaret J; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2015-02-25

    Cats persistently infected with the gammaretrovirus feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are at risk to die within months to years from FeLV-associated disease, such as immunosuppression, anemia or lymphoma/leukemia. The integrase inhibitor raltegravir has been demonstrated to reduce FeLV replication in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate raltegravir in vivo for its safety and efficacy to suppress FeLV replication. The safety was tested in three naïve specified pathogen-free (SPF) cats during a 15 weeks treatment period (initially 20mg then 40mg orally b.i.d.). No adverse effects were noted. The efficacy was tested in seven persistently FeLV-infected SPF cats attained from 18 cats experimentally exposed to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The seven cats were treated during nine weeks (40mg then 80mg b.i.d.). Raltegravir was well tolerated even at the higher dose. A significant decrease in plasma viral RNA loads (∼5×) was found; however, after treatment termination a rebound effect was observed. Only one cat developed anti-FeLV antibodies and viral RNA loads remained decreased after treatment termination. Of note, one of the untreated FeLV-A infected cats developed fatal FeLV-C associated anemia within 5 weeks of FeLV-A infection. Moreover, progressive FeLV infection was associated with significantly lower enFeLV loads prior to infection supporting that FeLV susceptibility may be related to the genetic background of the cat. Overall, our data demonstrate the ability of raltegravir to reduce viral replication also in vivo. However, no complete control of viremia was achieved. Further investigations are needed to find an optimized treatment against FeLV. (250 words). PMID:25500005

  9. Ce-Fe-modified zeolite-rich tuff to remove Ba(2+)-like (226)Ra(2+) in presence of As(V) and F(-) from aqueous media as pollutants of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Olguín, María Teresa; Deng, Shuguang

    2016-01-25

    The sorption behavior of the Ba(2+)-like (226)Ra(2+) in the presence of H2AsO4(-)/HAsO4(2-) and F(-) from aqueous media using Ce-Fe-modified zeolite-rich tuff was investigated in this work. The Na-modified zeolite-rich tuff was also considered for comparison purposes. The zeolite-rich tuff collected from Wyoming (US) was in contact with NaCl and CeCl3-FeCl3 solutions to obtain the Na- and Ce-Fe-modified zeolite-rich tuffs (ZUSNa and ZUSCeFe). These zeolites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The BET-specific surface and the points of zero charge were determined as well as the content of Na, Ce and Fe by neutron activation analysis. The textural characteristics and the point of zero charge were changed by the presence of Ce and Fe species in the zeolitic network. A linear model described the Ba(2+)-like (226)Ra(2+) sorption isotherms and the distribution coefficients (Kd) varied with respect to the metallic species present in the zeolitic material. The As(V) oxianionic chemical species and F(-) affected this parameter when the Ba(2+)-like (226)Ra(2+)-As(V)-F(-) solutions were in contact with ZUSCeFe. The H2AsO4(-)/HAsO4(2-) and F(-) were adsorbed by ZUSCeFe in the same amount, independent of the concentration of Ba(2+)-like (226)Ra(2+) in the initial solution. PMID:26476322

  10. Expression and Processing of Proteins Encoded by the Saccharomyces Retrotransposon Ty5†

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Phillip A.; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2001-01-01

    Retroelements (retrotransposons and retroviruses) have two genes in common: gag, which specifies structural proteins that form a virus or virus-like particle, and pol, which specifies catalytic proteins required for replication. For many retroelements, gag and pol are present on separate reading frames. Their expression is highly regulated, and the ratio of Gag to Pol is critical for retroelement replication. The Saccharomyces retrotransposon Ty5 contains a single open reading frame, and we characterized Gag and Pol expression by generating transpositionally active Ty5 elements with epitope tags at the N terminus or C terminus or within the integrase coding region. Immunoblot analysis identified two Gag species (Gag-p27 and Gag-p37), reverse transcriptase (Pol-p59), and integrase (Pol-p80), all of which are largely insoluble in the absence of urea or ionic detergent. These proteins result from proteolytic processing of a polyprotein, because elements with mutations in the presumed active site of Ty5 protease express a single tagged protein (Gag-Pol-p182). Protease mutants are also transpositionally inactive. In a time course experiment, we monitored protein expression, proteolytic processing, and transposition of a Ty5 element with identical epitope tags at its N and C termini. Both transposition and the abundance of Gag-p27 increased over time. In contrast, the levels of Gag-p37 and reverse transcriptase peaked after ∼14 h of induction and then gradually decreased. This may be due to differences in stability of Gag-p27 relative to Gag-p37 and reverse transcriptase. The ratio of Ty5 Gag to Pol averaged 5:1 throughout the time course experiment, suggesting that differential protein stability regulates the amounts of these proteins. PMID:11160677

  11. Diversity of gene cassettes and the abundance of the class 1 integron-integrase gene in sediment polluted by metals.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Pinto, Clarisse; Costa, Patrícia S; Reis, Mariana P; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2016-05-01

    The integron-gene cassette system has typically been associated with antibiotic-resistant pathogens. However, the diversity of gene cassettes and the abundance of class 1 integrons outside of the clinical context are not fully explored. Primers targeting the conserved segments of attC recombination sites were used to amplify gene cassettes from the sediment of the Mina stream, which exhibited a higher degree of stress to metal pollution in the dry season than the rainy season. Of the 143 total analyzed sequences, 101 had no matches to proteins in the database, where cassette open reading frames could be identified by homology with database entries. There was a predominance of sequences encoding essential cellular functions. Each season that was sampled yielded a specific pool of gene cassettes. Real-time PCR revealed that 8.5 and 41.6 % of bacterial cells potentially harbored a class 1 integron in the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. In summary, our findings demonstrate that most of the gene cassettes have no ascribable function and, apparently, historically metal-contaminated sediment favors the maintenance of bacteria containing the intI1 gene. Thus, the diversity of gene cassettes is far from being fully explored deserving further attention. PMID:26961777

  12. In-Silico docking of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors reveals a novel drug type acting on an enzyme/DNA reaction intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an emerging drug target, as IN strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are proving potent antiretroviral agents in clinical trials. One credible theory sees INSTIs as docking at the cellular (acceptor) DNA-binding site after IN forms a transitional complex with viral (donor) DNA. However, mapping of the DNA and INSTI binding sites within the IN catalytic core domain (CCD) has been uncertain. Methods Structural superimpositions were conducted using the SWISS PDB and Cn3D free software. Docking simulations of INSTIs were run by a widely validated genetic algorithm (GOLD). Results Structural superimpositions suggested that a two-metal model for HIV-1 IN CCD in complex with small molecule, 1-(5-chloroindol-3-yl)-3-(tetrazoyl)-1,3-propandione-ene (5CITEP) could be used as a surrogate for an IN/viral DNA complex, because it allowed replication of contacts documented biochemically in viral DNA/IN complexes or displayed by a crystal structure of the IN-related enzyme Tn5 transposase in complex with transposable DNA. Docking simulations showed that the fitness of different compounds for the catalytic cavity of the IN/5CITEP complex significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with their 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in strand transfer assays in vitro. The amino acids involved in inhibitor binding matched those involved in drug resistance. Both metal binding and occupation of the putative viral DNA binding site by 5CITEP appeared to be important for optimal drug/ligand interactions. The docking site of INSTIs appeared to overlap with a putative acceptor DNA binding region adjacent to but distinct from the putative donor DNA binding site, and homologous to the nucleic acid binding site of RNAse H. Of note, some INSTIs such as 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine carboxamides/N-Alkyl-5-hydroxypyrimidinone carboxamides, a highly promising drug class including raltegravir/MK-0518 (now in clinical trials), displayed interactions with IN reminiscent of those

  13. Potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase display a two-step, slow-binding inhibition mechanism which is absent in a drug-resistant T66I/M154I mutant.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Edward P; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gartland, Margaret J; Lang, Scott; Halsey, Wendy; Sathe, Ganesh; Carter, H Luke; Weaver, Kurt L

    2009-02-24

    Two-metal binding HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs) are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 in vitro and in patients. We report here for the first time the kinetics of inhibition of integrase-catalyzed strand transfer. First, the IC(50) values for each of six structurally distinct INIs decreased when a preincubation was included: S-1360 (1.3 microM vs 0.12 microM), L-731,988 (130 nM vs 9 nM), L-870,810 (130 nM vs 4 nM), raltegravir (300 nM vs 9 nM), elvitegravir (90 nM vs 6 nM), and GSK364735 (90 nM vs 6 nM). When reactions with these INIs were initiated with integrase, progress curve analyses indicated time-dependent inhibition, which could be fitted to a two-step mechanism of binding. Overall fitted K(i) values matched the IC(50) values measured with a preincubation: S-1360 (0.17 microM), L-731,988 (34 nM), L-870,810 (2.4 nM), raltegravir (10 nM), elvitegravir (4.0 nM), and GSK364735 (2.5 nM). To begin to understand the mechanism for this slow onset of inhibition and its possible impact on drug resistance, studies of resistance mutations were initiated. T66I/M154I exhibited little if any time-dependent inhibition by any of the six INIs, as measured by differences in potency upon preincubation or by progress curve analysis. These data demonstrate that slow binding is a signature of two-metal binding INIs, and that the second slow step is required for full potency. We discuss a possible structural explanation of the second slow step of inhibition and also the relationship between loss of time-dependent inhibition and drug resistance of this important new class of HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs. PMID:19178153

  14. Identification of proteolytic cleavage sites within the gag-analogue protein of Ty1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Martin-Rendon, E; Hurd, D W; Marfany, G; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-12-01

    Like retroviruses, the yeast retrotransposon Ty1 produces its proteins as precursors that are subsequently cleaved by a protease encoded by the element. These cleavage events are essential for transposition as they release the active reverse transcriptase and integrase and they modify the structure of the virus-like particles in a way that is analogous to the morphological changes that occur during retrovirus core maturation. Using a combination of epitope tagging, amino acid analysis and mutagenesis, we have identified the major cleavage sites for the Ty1 protease within the particle-forming protein, p1, at 407S/408N. In addition, we present evidence indicating that the Ty1 protease may be a 17 kDa protein. PMID:8971723

  15. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived. PMID:18035829

  16. Construction of a new minicircle DNA carrying an enhanced green florescent protein reporter gene for efficient expression into mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sanei Ata-Abadi, Nafiseh; Dormiani, Kianoush; Khazaie, Yahya; Ghaedi, Kamran; Forouzanfar, Mahboobeh; Lachinani, Liana; Rezaei, Naeimeh; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-07-01

    The presence of a bacterial backbone in conventional eukaryotic expression plasmids may cause undesirable effects by triggering the immune responses in mammals and repression of episomal transgene expression. To avoid these problems, researchers have proposed the use of minicircle DNAs which are episomal vectors that have lost their bacterial backbone using a site-specific recombinase mediated recombination. In the present study, we have constructed a new minicircle DNA vector that carries an enhanced green florescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene using phage ΦC31 integrase-mediated recombination and homing endonuclease ISceI-mediated purification in E. coli. ΦC31 integrase expression was under the control of the araBAD promoter, whereas ISceI endonuclease was controlled by the tac promoter. This vector was transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which showed transient expression of EGFP up to 14 generations. Similar results were obtained upon transient transfection into HEK cells. In addition, PCR results on genomic DNA, demonstrated the EGFP-minicircle was episomal and did not integrate into the host genome. Our constructed parental plasmid expresses EGFP and could be used for the generation of episomal minicircle DNA with intent to carry out transient transfection of interested DNA fragments into the eukaryotic cells for various purposes. PMID:25736052

  17. Alternative Splice Variants, a New Class of Protein Cancer Biomarker Candidates: Findings in Pancreatic Cancer and Breast Cancer with Systems Biology Implications

    PubMed Central

    Omenn, Gilbert S.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Menon, Rajasree

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays an important role in protein diversity without increasing genome size. Earlier thought to be uncommon, splicing appears to affect the majority of genes. Alternative splice variants have been detected at the mRNA level in many diseases. We have designed and demonstrated a discovery pipeline for alternative splice variant (ASV) proteins from tandem MS/MS datasets. We created a modified ECgene database with entries from exhaustive three-frame translation of Ensembl transcripts and gene models from ECgene, with periodic updates. The human database has 14 million entries; the mouse database, 10 million entries. We match MS/MS findings against these potential translation products to identify and quantify known and novel ASVs. In this review, we summarize findings and systems biology implications of biomarker candidates from a mouse model of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [28] and a mouse model of human Her2/neu-induced breast cancer [27]. The same approach is being applied to human tumors, plasma, and cell line studies of other cancers. PMID:20534909

  18. Identification of multiple integration sites for Stx-phage Phi24B in the Escherichia coli genome, description of a novel integrase and evidence for a functional anti-repressor.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Paul C M; Gossage, Sharon M; Smith, Darren L; Saunders, Jon R; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2007-12-01

    The key virulence factor in Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli is the expression of Shiga toxin (Stx), which is conferred by Stx-encoding temperate lambdoid phages (Stx-phages). It had been assumed that Stx-phages would behave similarly to lambda phage. However, contrary to the lambda superinfection immunity model, it has been demonstrated that double lysogens can be produced with the Stx-phage Phi24(B). Here, the Phi24(B) integrase gene is identified, and the preferred site of integration defined. Although an E. coli int gene was identified close to the Phi24(B) integration site, it was shown not to be involved in the phage integration event. An additional six potential integration sites were identified in the E. coli genome, and three of these were confirmed experimentally. Two of the other potential sites lie within genes predicted to be essential to E. coli and are therefore unlikely to support phage integration. A Phi24(B) gene, possessing similarity to the well-characterized P22 ant gene, was identified. RT-PCR was used to demonstrate that ant is transcribed in a Phi24(B) E. coli lysogen, and expression of an anti-repressor is the likely explanation for the absence of immunity to superinfection. Demonstration of the ability of Phi24(B) to form multiple lysogens has two potentially serious impacts. First, multiple integrated prophages will drive the evolution of bacterial pathogens as novel Stx-phages emerge following intracellular mutation/recombination events. Second, multiple copies of the stx gene may lead to an increase in toxin production and consequently increased virulence. PMID:18048923

  19. A Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) to Characterize the Sets of Proteins Encoded in Chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suli; Im, Hoguen; Bairoch, Amos; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Chen, Rui; Deutsch, Eric W.; Dalton, Stephen; Fenyo, David; Fanayan, Susan; Gates, Chris; Gaudet, Pascale; Hincapie, Marina; Hanash, Samir; Kim, Hoguen; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lundberg, Emma; Mias, George; Menon, Rajasree; Mu, Zhaomei; Nice, Edouard; Paik, Young-Ki; Uhlen, Mathias; Wells, Lance; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Yan, Fangfei; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Snyder, Michael; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Beavis, Ronald C.; Hancock, William S.

    2014-01-01

    We report progress assembling the parts list for chromosome 17 and illustrate the various processes that we have developed to integrate available data from diverse genomic and proteomic knowledge bases. As primary resources we have used GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, Human Protein Atlas (HPA), and GeneCards. All sites share the common resource of Ensembl for the genome modeling information. We have defined the chromosome 17 parts list with the following information: 1169 protein-coding genes, the numbers of proteins confidently identified by various experimental approaches as documented in GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and HPA, examples of typical data sets obtained by RNASeq and proteomic studies of epithelial derived tumor cell lines (disease proteome) and a normal proteome (peripheral mononuclear cells), reported evidence of post-translational modifications, and examples of alternative splice variants (ASVs). We have constructed a list of the 59 ‘missing’ proteins as well as 201 proteins that have inconclusive mass spectrometric (MS) identifications. In this report we have defined a process to establish a baseline for the incorporation of new evidence on protein identification and characterization as well as related information from transcriptome analyses. This initial list of ‘missing’ proteins that will guide the selection of appropriate samples for discovery studies as well as antibody reagents. Also we have illustrated the significant diversity of protein variants (including post-translational modifications, PTMs) using regions on chromosome 17 that contain important oncogenes. We emphasize the need for mandated deposition of proteomics data in public databases, the further development of improved PTM, ASV and single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases and the construction of websites that can integrate and regularly update such information. In addition, we describe the distribution of both clustered and scattered sets of protein families on the

  20. A chromosome-centric human proteome project (C-HPP) to characterize the sets of proteins encoded in chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suli; Im, Hogune; Bairoch, Amos; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Chen, Rui; Deutsch, Eric W; Dalton, Stephen; Fenyo, David; Fanayan, Susan; Gates, Chris; Gaudet, Pascale; Hincapie, Marina; Hanash, Samir; Kim, Hoguen; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lundberg, Emma; Mias, George; Menon, Rajasree; Mu, Zhaomei; Nice, Edouard; Paik, Young-Ki; Uhlen, Mathias; Wells, Lance; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Yan, Fangfei; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Snyder, Michael; Omenn, Gilbert S; Beavis, Ronald C; Hancock, William S

    2013-01-01

    We report progress assembling the parts list for chromosome 17 and illustrate the various processes that we have developed to integrate available data from diverse genomic and proteomic knowledge bases. As primary resources, we have used GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, Human Protein Atlas (HPA), and GeneCards. All sites share the common resource of Ensembl for the genome modeling information. We have defined the chromosome 17 parts list with the following information: 1169 protein-coding genes, the numbers of proteins confidently identified by various experimental approaches as documented in GPMDB, neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and HPA, examples of typical data sets obtained by RNASeq and proteomic studies of epithelial derived tumor cell lines (disease proteome) and a normal proteome (peripheral mononuclear cells), reported evidence of post-translational modifications, and examples of alternative splice variants (ASVs). We have constructed a list of the 59 "missing" proteins as well as 201 proteins that have inconclusive mass spectrometric (MS) identifications. In this report we have defined a process to establish a baseline for the incorporation of new evidence on protein identification and characterization as well as related information from transcriptome analyses. This initial list of "missing" proteins that will guide the selection of appropriate samples for discovery studies as well as antibody reagents. Also we have illustrated the significant diversity of protein variants (including post-translational modifications, PTMs) using regions on chromosome 17 that contain important oncogenes. We emphasize the need for mandated deposition of proteomics data in public databases, the further development of improved PTM, ASV, and single nucleotide variant (SNV) databases, and the construction of Web sites that can integrate and regularly update such information. In addition, we describe the distribution of both clustered and scattered sets of protein families on the

  1. Transduction of Human Antigen-Presenting Cells with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vector Enables Functional Expansion of Primed Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Roberta; Michelini, Zuleika; Leone, Pasqualina; Macchia, Iole; Klotman, Mary E.; Salvatore, Mirella

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors are being developed as a efficient and safe delivery system for both gene therapy and vaccine purposes. Several reports have demonstrated that a single immunization with integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) delivering viral or tumor model antigens in mice was able to elicit broad and long-lasting specific immune responses in the absence of vector integration. At present, no evidence has been reported showing that IDLVs are able to expand preexisting immune responses in the human context. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages with IDLVs expressing influenza matrix M1 protein resulted in effective induction of in vitro expansion of M1-primed CD8+ T cells, as evaluated by both pentamer staining and cytokine production. This is the first demonstration that IDLVs represent an efficient delivery system for gene transfer and expression in human APCs, useful for immunotherapeutic applications. PMID:20210625

  2. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  3. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  4. TOX4 and NOVA1 Proteins Are Partners of the LEDGF PWWP Domain and Affect HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Morchikh, Mehdi; Xavier, Johan; Charneau, Pierre; Jacob, Yves; Lavigne, Marc

    2013-01-01

    PWWP domains are involved in the chromatin attachment of several proteins. They bind to both DNA and proteins and their interaction with specific histone methylation marks define them as a new class of histone code readers. The lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) contains an N-terminal PWWP domain necessary for its interaction with chromatin but also a C-terminal domain which interacts with several proteins, such as lentiviral integrases. These two domains confer a chromatin-tethering function to LEDGF/p75 and in the case of lentiviral integrases, this tethering participates in the efficiency and site selectivity of integration. Although proteins interacting with LEDGF/p75 C-terminal domain have been extensively studied, no data exist about partners of its PWWP domain regulating its interaction with chromatin. In this study, we report the identification by yeast-two-hybrid of thirteen potential partners of the LEDGF PWWP domain. Five of these interactions were confirmed in mammalian cells, using both a protein complementation assay and co-immunoprecipitation approaches. Three of these partners interact with full length LEDGF/p75, they are specific for PWWP domains of the HDGF family and they require PWWP amino acids essential for the interaction with chromatin. Among them, the transcription activator TOX4 and the splicing cofactor NOVA1 were selected for a more extensive study. These two proteins or their PWWP interacting regions (PIR) colocalize with LEDGF/p75 in Hela cells and interact in vitro in the presence of DNA. Finally, single round VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 but not MLV infection is inhibited in cells overexpressing these two PIRs. The observed inhibition of infection can be attributed to a defect in the integration step. Our data suggest that a regulation of LEDGF interaction with chromatin by cellular partners of its PWWP domain could be involved in several processes linked to LEDGF tethering properties, such as lentiviral integration, DNA

  5. Nuclear protein LEDGF/p75 recognizes supercoiled DNA by a novel DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Kimiko M.; Sano, Kuniaki; Hosoya, Osamu; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) or p75 is a co-activator of general transcription and also involved in insertion of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) cDNA into host cell genome, which occurs preferentially to active transcription units. These phenomena may share an underlying molecular mechanism in common. We report here that LEDGF/p75 binds negatively supercoiled DNA selectively over unconstrained DNA. We identified a novel DNA-binding domain in the protein and termed it ‘supercoiled DNA-recognition domain’ (SRD). Recombinant protein fragments containing SRD showed a preferential binding to supercoiled DNA in vitro. SRD harbors a characteristic cluster of lysine and glutamic/aspartic acid residues. A polypeptide mimicking the cluster (K9E9K9) also showed this specificity, suggesting that the cluster is an essential element for the supercoil recognition. eGFP-tagged LEDGF/p75 expressed in the nucleus distributed partially in transcriptionally active regions that were identified by immunostaining of methylated histone H3 (H3K4me3) or incorporation of Br-UTP. This pattern of localization was observed with SRD alone but abolished if the protein lacked SRD. Thus, these results imply that LEDGF/p75 guides its binding partners, including HIV-1 integrase, to the active transcription site through recognition of negative supercoils generated around it. PMID:21345933

  6. ArsR arsenic-resistance regulatory protein from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yian-Biao; Monchy, Sébastien; Greenberg, Bill; Mergeay, Max; Gang, Oleg; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    The Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 arsR gene, which is part of the arsRIC(2)BC(1)HP operon, and its putative arsenic-resistance regulatory protein were identified and characterized. The arsenic-induced transcriptome of C. metallidurans CH34 showed that the genes most upregulated in the presence of arsenate were all located within the ars operon, with none of the other numerous heavy metal resistance systems present in CH34 being induced. A transcriptional fusion between the luxCDABE operon and the arsR promoter/operator (P/O) region was used to confirm the in vivo induction of the ars operon by arsenite and arsenate. The arsR gene was cloned into expression vectors allowing for the overexpression of the ArsR protein as either his-tagged or untagged protein. The ability of the purified ArsR proteins to bind to the ars P/O region was analyzed in vitro by gel mobility shift assays. ArsR showed an affinity almost exclusively to its own ars P/O region. Dissociation of ArsR and its P/O region was metal dependent, and based on decreasing degrees of dissociation three groups of heavy metals could be distinguished: As(III), Bi(III), Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II); Cd(II); Pb(II) and Zn(II), while no dissociation was observed in the presence of As(V). PMID:19238575

  7. ArsR arsenic-resistance regulatory protein from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; van der Lelie, D.; Monchy, S.; Greenberg, B.; Gang, O.; Taghavi, S.

    2009-08-01

    The Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 arsR gene, which is part of the arsRIC{sub 2}BC{sub 1}HP operon, and its putative arsenic-resistance regulatory protein were identified and characterized. The arsenic-induced transcriptome of C. metallidurans CH34 showed that the genes most upregulated in the presence of arsenate were all located within the ars operon, with none of the other numerous heavy metal resistance systems present in CH34 being induced. A transcriptional fusion between the luxCDABE operon and the arsR promoter/operator (P/O) region was used to confirm the in vivo induction of the ars operon by arsenite and arsenate. The arsR gene was cloned into expression vectors allowing for the overexpression of the ArsR protein as either his-tagged or untagged protein. The ability of the purified ArsR proteins to bind to the ars P/O region was analyzed in vitro by gel mobility shift assays. ArsR showed an affinity almost exclusively to its own ars P/O region. Dissociation of ArsR and its P/O region was metal dependent, and based on decreasing degrees of dissociation three groups of heavy metals could be distinguished: As(III), Bi(III), Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II); Cd(II); Pb(II) and Zn(II), while no dissociation was observed in the presence of As(V).

  8. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naïve to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Utay, Netanya S.; Wook-Chun, Tae; Mann, Surinder; Kashuba, Angela D.; Siewe, Basile; Albanese, Anthony; Troia-Cancio, Paolo; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Somasunderam, Anoma; Yotter, Tammy; Deeks, Steven G.; Landay, Alan; Pollard, Richard B.; Miller, Christopher J.; Moreno, Santiago; Asmuth, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), soluble CD14 (sCD14) and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively), with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease inflammatory

  9. Effect of Ethanol on the Metabolic Characteristics of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Elvitegravir and Elvitegravir/Cobicistat with CYP3A: An Analysis Using a Newly Developed LC-MS/MS Method.

    PubMed

    Midde, Narasimha M; Rahman, Mohammad A; Rathi, Chetan; Li, Junhao; Meibohm, Bernd; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG), an integrase inhibitor for the treatment HIV infection, is increasingly becoming the part of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen. EVG is mainly metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Previously, we have shown that ethanol alters ART-CYP3A4 interactions with protease inhibitors thereby altering their metabolisms. However, as EVG is a fairly new class of drug, its kinetic characteristics and the effect of ethanol on EVG-CYPP3A4 interaction is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized EVG and cobicistat (COBI)-boosted EVG metabolism in human microsomes followed by ethanol-EVG, ethanol-COBI-EVG interaction with CYP3A. First, we developed and validated a simple, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of EVG in the human liver microsomes. The lower limit of quantification for the drug was at 0.003 μM (1.34 ng/ml). Extraction yield, matrix effects, drug stability, and calibration curves for the proposed method were validated according to the FDA guidelines. Time dependent kinetics data showed that 20mM ethanol decreases the apparent half-life of EVG degradation by ~50% compared to EVG alone. Our substrate kinetic results revealed that ethanol mildly decreases the catalytic efficiency for EVG metabolism. Inhibition studies demonstrated that EVG inhibits CYP3A4, and 20 mM ethanol causes a decrease in the IC50 of EVG. However, in the presence of COBI we were unable to determine these parameters effectively because COBI, being a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, blocked the EVG/ethanol-CYP3A4 interactions. Docking studies predicted a shift of EVG or COBI binding to the active site of CYP3A4 in the presence of ethanol. Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol interacts with microsomal CYP3A and alters EVG-CYP3A4 interaction thereby altering EVG metabolism and inhibition of CYP3A4 by EVG. This finding has clinical significance because alcohol use is

  10. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naïve to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Ma, Zhong-Min; Utay, Netanya S; Chun, Tae-Wook; Wook-Chun, Tae; Mann, Surinder; Kashuba, Angela D; Siewe, Basile; Albanese, Anthony; Troia-Cancio, Paolo; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Somasunderam, Anoma; Yotter, Tammy; Deeks, Steven G; Landay, Alan; Pollard, Richard B; Miller, Christopher J; Moreno, Santiago; Asmuth, David M

    2016-01-01

    Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), soluble CD14 (sCD14) and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively), with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease inflammatory

  11. Effect of Ethanol on the Metabolic Characteristics of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Elvitegravir and Elvitegravir/Cobicistat with CYP3A: An Analysis Using a Newly Developed LC-MS/MS Method

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Rahman, Mohammad A.; Rathi, Chetan; Li, Junhao; Meibohm, Bernd; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG), an integrase inhibitor for the treatment HIV infection, is increasingly becoming the part of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen. EVG is mainly metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Previously, we have shown that ethanol alters ART-CYP3A4 interactions with protease inhibitors thereby altering their metabolisms. However, as EVG is a fairly new class of drug, its kinetic characteristics and the effect of ethanol on EVG-CYPP3A4 interaction is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized EVG and cobicistat (COBI)-boosted EVG metabolism in human microsomes followed by ethanol-EVG, ethanol-COBI-EVG interaction with CYP3A. First, we developed and validated a simple, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of EVG in the human liver microsomes. The lower limit of quantification for the drug was at 0.003 μM (1.34ng/ml). Extraction yield, matrix effects, drug stability, and calibration curves for the proposed method were validated according to the FDA guidelines. Time dependent kinetics data showed that 20mM ethanol decreases the apparent half-life of EVG degradation by ~50% compared to EVG alone. Our substrate kinetic results revealed that ethanol mildly decreases the catalytic efficiency for EVG metabolism. Inhibition studies demonstrated that EVG inhibits CYP3A4, and 20 mM ethanol causes a decrease in the IC50 of EVG. However, in the presence of COBI we were unable to determine these parameters effectively because COBI, being a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, blocked the EVG/ethanol-CYP3A4 interactions. Docking studies predicted a shift of EVG or COBI binding to the active site of CYP3A4 in the presence of ethanol. Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol interacts with microsomal CYP3A and alters EVG-CYP3A4 interaction thereby altering EVG metabolism and inhibition of CYP3A4 by EVG. This finding has clinical significance because alcohol use is

  12. Drug Susceptibility and Viral Fitness of HIV-1 with Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor Resistance Substitution Q148R or N155H in Combination with Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Resistance Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael D.; White, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials of coformulated elvitegravir (EVG), cobicistat (COBI), emtricitabine (FTC), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), emergent drug resistance predominantly involved the FTC resistance substitution M184V/I in reverse transcriptase (RT), with or without the tenofovir (TFV) resistance substitution K65R, accompanied by a primary EVG resistance substitution (E92Q, N155H, or Q148R) in integrase (IN). We previously reported that the RT-K65R, RT-M184V, and IN-E92Q substitutions lacked cross-class phenotypic resistance and replicative fitness compensation. As a follow-up, the in vitro characteristics of mutant HIV-1 containing RT-K65R and/or RT-M184V with IN-Q148R or IN-N155H were also evaluated, alone and in combination, for potential interactions. Single mutants displayed reduced susceptibility to their corresponding inhibitor classes, with no cross-class resistance. Viruses with IN-Q148R or IN-N155H exhibited reduced susceptibility to EVG (137- and 40-fold, respectively) that was not affected by the addition of RT-M184V or RT-K65R/M184V. All viruses containing RT-M184V were resistant to FTC (>1,000-fold). Mutants with RT-K65R had reduced susceptibility to TFV (3.3- to 3.6-fold). Without drugs present, the viral fitness of RT and/or IN mutants was diminished relative to that of the wild type in the following genotypic order: wild type > RT-M184V ≥ IN-N155H ≈ IN-Q148R ≥ RT-M184V + IN-N155H ≥ RT-M184V + IN-Q148R ≥ RT-K65R/M184V + IN-Q148R ≈ RT-K65R/M184V + IN-N155H. In the presence of drug concentrations approaching physiologic levels, drug resistance counteracted replication defects, allowing single mutants to outcompete the wild type with one drug present and double mutants to outcompete single mutants with two drugs present. These results suggest that during antiretroviral treatment with multiple drugs, the development of viruses with combinations of resistance substitutions may be favored despite diminished viral fitness. PMID:26574015

  13. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  14. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  15. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types of plant proteins every day to get ...

  16. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  17. Flotation removal of As(V) onto goethite.

    PubMed

    Matis, K A; Zouboulis, A I; Malamas, F B; Ramos Afonso, M D; Hudson, M J

    1997-01-01

    Arsenic oxyanions, considered as priority pollutants, were removed from dilute aqueous solutions by sorption onto synthetic goethite, a typical inorganic adsorbent. Flotation was subsequently applied as an effective solid/liquid separation method. The combined process produced a foam concentrate, containing the arsenic-loaded goethite particles. The dispersed-air flotation technique was used for the generation of fine gas bubbles. The main parameters affecting the process were studied and promising results, in terms of arsenic removal and of goethite separation, were obtained. PMID:15093361

  18. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  19. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  20. HIV-1 integrase: from biology to chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zeinalipour-Loizidou, Eriketi; Nicolaou, Christos; Nicolaides, Athanasios; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2007-07-01

    AIDS has claimed the lives of 25 million people worldwide, an additional 40 million people are HIV-infected and new cases are being diagnosed every year. Despite the fact that HAART has moved AIDS from the category of terminal diseases to that of treatable chronic illnesses, its long-term therapeutic success may be compromised by the development of resistance to the currently used drugs. Despite the availability of RT, PR and fusion inhibitors, the development of further drugs such as inhibitors that target the third enzyme IN is essential for the clinical management of HIV-infected patients. The absence of cellular homolgues to IN and the unique nature of the reactions catalyzed by IN, make it an ideal target for drug design. Considerable progress towards designing HIV-1 IN inhibitors has been made over the last years and several lead compounds have been identified, synthesized and clinically studied. This review focuses on the existing knowledge of the biology of HIV-1 IN with emphasis on the mechanism of integration, structure and function and the technologies for measuring IN activity. This is followed by the current trends on designing HIV-1 IN inhibitors with the aid of molecular informatics and a review on the main classes of HIV-1 IN inhibitors reported this far with special emphasis on the clinical candidates. PMID:17627500

  1. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  2. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  3. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  4. Crystal structure of the Rous sarcoma virus intasome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhiqi; Shi, Ke; Banerjee, Surajit; Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Grandgenett, Duane P; Aihara, Hideki

    2016-02-18

    Integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the life cycle of retroviruses. Retrovirus integrase catalyses insertions of both ends of the linear viral DNA into a host chromosome. Integrase from HIV-1 and closely related retroviruses share the three-domain organization, consisting of a catalytic core domain flanked by amino- and carboxy-terminal domains essential for the concerted integration reaction. Although structures of the tetrameric integrase-DNA complexes have been reported for integrase from prototype foamy virus featuring an additional DNA-binding domain and longer interdomain linkers, the architecture of a canonical three-domain integrase bound to DNA remained elusive. Here we report a crystal structure of the three-domain integrase from Rous sarcoma virus in complex with viral and target DNAs. The structure shows an octameric assembly of integrase, in which a pair of integrase dimers engage viral DNA ends for catalysis while another pair of non-catalytic integrase dimers bridge between the two viral DNA molecules and help capture target DNA. The individual domains of the eight integrase molecules play varying roles to hold the complex together, making an extensive network of protein-DNA and protein-protein contacts that show both conserved and distinct features compared with those observed for prototype foamy virus integrase. Our work highlights the diversity of retrovirus intasome assembly and provides insights into the mechanisms of integration by HIV-1 and related retroviruses. PMID:26887497

  5. Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2011-03-01

    Proteins combine properties of solids, liquids, and glasses. Schrödinger anticipated the main features of biomolecules long ago by stating that they had to be solid-like, but able to assume many different conformations. Indeed proteins can assume a gigantic number of conformational substates with the same primary sequence but different conformations. The different substates are described as craters in a very-high-dimensional energy landscape. The energy landscape is organized in a hierarchy of tiers, craters within craters within craters. Protein motions are pictured as transition between substates - jumps from crater to crater. Initially we assumed that these jumps were controlled by internal barriers between substates, but experiments have shown that nature selected a different approach. Proteins are surrounded by one to two layers of water and are embedded in a bulk solvent. Structural motions of the protein are controlled by the alpha fluctuations in the solvent surrounding the protein. Some internal motions most likely involving side chains are controlled electrostatically by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. The dynamics of proteins is consequently dominated by the environment (H. Frauenfelder et al. PNAS 106, 5129 (2009). One can speculate that this organization permits exchange of information among biomolecules. The energy landscape is not just organized into two tiers, alpha and beta, but cryogenic experiments have revealed more tiers and protein more properties similar to that of glasses. While proteins function at ambient temperatures, cryogenic studies are necessary to understand the physics relevant for biology.

  6. In situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry of copper stained on the gold label after galvanic replacement reaction enlargement for ultrasensitive immunoassay of proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Wang, Linchun; Liu, Ling; Chao, Long; He, Fang; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2016-05-15

    We report a new protocol for ultrasensitive electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensing, on the basis of signal amplification by gold-label/copper-staining, galvanic replacement reactions (GRRs), and in situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) after an enhanced cathodic preconcentration of copper. First, a sandwich-type immuno-structure is appropriately assembled at a glassy carbon electrode. Second, copper is selectively stained on the catalytic surfaces of second antibody-conjugated Au nanoparticles through CuSO4-ascorbic acid redox reaction, and the GRRs between HAuCl4 and the stained copper are used to amplify the quantity of copper. Finally, the corresponding antigen is determined based on simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-preconcentration of copper for in-situ ASV analysis directly at the immunoelectrode. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance and scanning electron microscopy are used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, ultrasensitive analyses of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) are achieved. The limits of detection are 0.3 fg mL(-1) (equivalent to 7 IgG molecules in the 6 μL sample employed) for IgG (S/N=3) and 1.3 nU mL(-1) for CA125 (S/N=3), respectively, which are amongst the best reported to date for the two proteins. The theoretical feasibility of such a single-molecule-level amperometric immunoassay is also discussed based on the immunological reaction thermodynamics. PMID:26802573

  7. DNA Binding of Centromere Protein C (CENPC) Is Stabilized by Single-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yaqing; Topp, Christopher N.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres are the attachment points between the genome and the cytoskeleton: centromeres bind to kinetochores, which in turn bind to spindles and move chromosomes. Paradoxically, the DNA sequence of centromeres has little or no role in perpetuating kinetochores. As such they are striking examples of genetic information being transmitted in a manner that is independent of DNA sequence (epigenetically). It has been found that RNA transcribed from centromeres remains bound within the kinetochore region, and this local population of RNA is thought to be part of the epigenetic marking system. Here we carried out a genetic and biochemical study of maize CENPC, a key inner kinetochore protein. We show that DNA binding is conferred by a localized region 122 amino acids long, and that the DNA-binding reaction is exquisitely sensitive to single-stranded RNA. Long, single-stranded nucleic acids strongly promote the binding of CENPC to DNA, and the types of RNAs that stabilize DNA binding match in size and character the RNAs present on kinetochores in vivo. Removal or replacement of the binding module with HIV integrase binding domain causes a partial delocalization of CENPC in vivo. The data suggest that centromeric RNA helps to recruit CENPC to the inner kinetochore by altering its DNA binding characteristics. PMID:20140237

  8. Protein binding sites involved in the assembly of the KplE1 prophage intasome.

    PubMed

    Panis, Gaël; Duverger, Yohann; Champ, Stéphanie; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2010-08-15

    The organization of the recombination regions of the KplE1 prophage in Escherichia coli K12 differs from that observed in the lambda prophage. Indeed, the binding sites characterized for the IntS integrase, the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF) and the integration host factor (IHF) vary in number, spacing and orientation on the attL and attR regions. In this paper, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of the recombination sites to decipher if all sites are essential for the site-specific recombination reaction and how the KplE1 intasome is assembled. We also show that TorI and IntS form oligomers that are stabilized in the presence of their target DNA. Moreover, we found that IHF is the only nucleoid associated protein (NAP) involved in KplE1 recombination, although it is dispensable. This is consistent with the presence of only one functional IHF site on attR and none on attL. PMID:20494389

  9. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  10. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione ( ... allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful ...

  11. Knockdown of the cellular protein LRPPRC attenuates HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Cameron J; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J; Donnellan, Meghan R; Cerny, Ronald L; Belshan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 exploits numerous host cellular pathways for productive infection. To identify novel factors involved in HIV-1 replication, HIV-1 integrase and matrix protein complexes were captured at 4 hours post infection for proteomic analysis using an affinity purification system. Leucine-rich PPR-motif containing (LRPPRC) protein, a cellular protein involved in mitochondrial function, cell metabolism, and cell-cycle progression was identified as one of the candidate HIV-1 factors. Co-immunoprecipitation RT-PCR experiments confirmed that LRPPRC associated with HIV-1 nucleic acids during the early steps of virus infection. To establish if LRPPRC was critical for HIV-1 infection, three independent LRPPRC knockdown cell lines were constructed (2.7, 3.6, and 4.1). Subcellular fractionation of these cell lines revealed differential knockdown of LRPPRC in subcellular compartments. LRPPRC was knocked down in the insoluble/cytoskeletal fractions of all three cell lines, but the 3.6 and 4.1 cells also showed a reduction in nuclear LRPPRC. Additionally, several cellular factors were downregulated and/or disrupted by loss of LRPPRC. HIV-1 infection was reduced in all three cell lines, but virus production and RNA encapsidation were unaffected, suggesting that LRPPRC was critical for the afferent stage of virus replication. Two of the three cell lines (3.6, 4.1) were refractory for murine leukemia virus infection, a virus dependent on cellular proliferation for productive infection. Consistent with this, these two cell lines exhibited reduced cellular growth with no loss of cellular viability or change in cell cycle phenotype. The early steps of virus infection were also differentially affected among the cell lines. A reduced level of preintegration complex formation was observed in all three cell lines, but viral DNA nuclear import was reduced only in the 3.6 and 4.1 cells. Combined, these data identify LRPPRC as a HIV-1 factor that is involved in HIV-1 replication through more

  12. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  13. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  14. Characterization of Magnaporthe oryzae Chrysovirus 1 Structural Proteins and Their Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Syunichi; Ohta, Tomoko; Onozuka, Nobuya; Sakoda, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Arie, Tsutomu; Teraoka, Tohru

    2012-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae chrysovirus 1 (MoCV1), which is associated with an impaired growth phenotype of its host fungus, harbors four major proteins: P130 (130 kDa), P70 (70 kDa), P65 (65 kDa), and P58 (58 kDa). N-terminal sequence analysis of each protein revealed that P130 was encoded by double-stranded RNA1 (dsRNA1) (open reading frame 1 [ORF1] 1,127 amino acids [aa]), P70 by dsRNA4 (ORF4; 812 aa), and P58 by dsRNA3 (ORF3; 799 aa), although the molecular masses of P58 and P70 were significantly smaller than those deduced for ORF3 and ORF4, respectively. P65 was a degraded form of P70. Full-size proteins of ORF3 (84 kDa) and ORF4 (85 kDa) were produced in Escherichia coli. Antisera against these recombinant proteins detected full-size proteins encoded by ORF3 and ORF4 in mycelia cultured for 9, 15, and 28 days, and the antisera also detected smaller degraded proteins, namely, P58, P70, and P65, in mycelia cultured for 28 days. These full-size proteins and P58 and P70 were also components of viral particles, indicating that MoCV1 particles might have at least two forms during vegetative growth of the host fungus. Expression of the ORF4 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in cytological changes, with a large central vacuole associated with these growth defects. MoCV1 has five dsRNA segments, as do two Fusarium graminearum viruses (FgV-ch9 and FgV2), and forms a separate clade with FgV-ch9, FgV2, Aspergillus mycovirus 1816 (AsV1816), and Agaricus bisporus virus 1 (AbV1) in the Chrysoviridae family on the basis of their RdRp protein sequences. PMID:22623797

  15. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  16. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  17. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  18. Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Sang-Hoon, Kim; Hardzman, Christina; Davis, John k.; Hutcheson, Rachel; Broderick, Joan B.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2012-09-27

    Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

  19. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  20. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  1. Multiple Sites of the Cleavage of 21- and 25-Mer Encephalytogenic Oligopeptides Corresponding to Human Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) by Specific Anti-MBP Antibodies from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Anna M.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Konenkova, Ludmila P.; Buneva, Valentina N.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2013-01-01

    IgGs from patients with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) purified on MBP-Sepharose in contrast to canonical proteases hydrolyze effectively only myelin basic protein (MBP), but not many other tested proteins. Here we have shown for the first time that anti-MBP SLE IgGs hydrolyze nonspecific tri- and tetrapeptides with an extreme low efficiency and cannot effectively hydrolyze longer 20-mer nonspecific oligopeptides corresponding to antigenic determinants (AGDs) of HIV-1 integrase. At the same time, anti-MBP SLE IgGs efficiently hydrolyze oligopeptides corresponding to AGDs of MBP. All sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis of 21-and 25-mer encephalytogenic oligopeptides corresponding to two known AGDs of MBP were found by a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, TLC, and MALDI spectrometry. Several clustered major, moderate, and minor sites of cleavage were revealed in the case of 21- and 25-mer oligopeptides. The active sites of anti-MBP abzymes are localised on their light chains, while heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of abzymes provide high affinity to MBP and specificity of this protein hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-MBP abzymes for intact MBP is approximately 1000-fold higher than for the oligopeptides. The data suggest that all oligopeptides interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal abzymes of total pool of IgGs, which possesses a lower affinity for substrates, and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific than globular protein and can occur in several sites. PMID:23520443

  2. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  3. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  4. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  5. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  6. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Drie, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery. PMID:21272445

  7. Split-Protein Systems: Beyond Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Sujan S.; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-01-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome [1], a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, E. coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  8. Split-protein systems: beyond binary protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-12-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome (Stumpf et al., 2008), a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  9. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  10. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  11. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract to absorb proteins ( protein-losing enteropathy ) Malnutrition Kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome Scarring of the ... may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone marrow ...

  12. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  13. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  14. Protein sensing with engineered protein nanopores*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad M.; Movileanu, Liviu

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanopores is a powerful new frontier in single-molecule sciences. Nanopores have been used effectively in exploring various biophysical features of small polypeptides and proteins, such as their folding state and structure, ligand interactions, and enzymatic activity. In particular, the α-hemolysin protein pore (αHL) has been used extensively for the detection, characterization and analysis of polypeptides, because this protein nanopore is highly robust, versatile and tractable under various experimental conditions. Inspired by the mechanisms of protein translocation across the outer membrane translocases of mitochondria, we have shown the ability to use nanopore-probe techniques in controlling a single protein using engineered αHL pores. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of αHL protein nanopores. Moreover, we demonstrate that placing attractive electrostatic traps is instrumental in tackling single-molecule stochastic sensing of folded proteins. PMID:22528256

  15. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  16. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  17. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  18. Sorghum and millet proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum and millet proteins are an important source of dietary protein for significant numbers of people living throughout Africa and parts of Asia. Compared to other food proteins, such as those found in milk, eggs and wheat, little is known about the functionality of sorghum and millet proteins. ...

  19. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  20. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein. The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help your body repair cells and make new ones. Protein is also important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.

  1. Techniques in protein methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-01-01

    Proteins can be methylated on the side-chain nitrogens of arginine and lysine residues or on carboxy-termini. Protein methylation is a way of subtly changing the primary sequence of a peptide so that it can encode more information. This common posttranslational modification is implicated in the regulation of a variety of processes including protein trafficking, transcription and protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we will use the arginine methyltransferases to illustrate different approaches that have been developed to assess protein methylation. Both in vivo and in vitro methylation techniques are described, and the use of small molecule inhibitors of protein methylation will be demonstrated. PMID:15173617

  2. Biochemical Approaches for Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein-protein interactions or protein complexes are indigenous to nearly all cellular processes, ranging from metabolism to structure. Elucidating both individual protein associations and complex protein interaction networks, while challenging, is an essential goal of functional genomics. For ex...

  3. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  4. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  5. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  6. Designing Fluorinated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E N G

    2016-01-01

    As methods to incorporate noncanonical amino acid residues into proteins have become more powerful, interest in their use to modify the physical and biological properties of proteins and enzymes has increased. This chapter discusses the use of highly fluorinated analogs of hydrophobic amino acids, for example, hexafluoroleucine, in protein design. In particular, fluorinated residues have proven to be generally effective in increasing the thermodynamic stability of proteins. The chapter provides an overview of the different fluorinated amino acids that have been used in protein design and the various methods available for producing fluorinated proteins. It discusses model proteins systems into which highly fluorinated amino acids have been introduced and the reasons why fluorinated residues are generally stabilizing, with particular reference to thermodynamic and structural studies from our laboratory. Lastly, details of the methodology we have developed to measure the thermodynamic stability of oligomeric fluorinated proteins are presented, as this may be generally applicable to many proteins. PMID:27586337

  7. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  8. PINT: Protein-protein Interactions Thermodynamic Database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M D Shaji; Gromiha, M Michael

    2006-01-01

    The first release of Protein-protein Interactions Thermodynamic Database (PINT) contains >1500 data of several thermodynamic parameters along with sequence and structural information, experimental conditions and literature information. Each entry contains numerical data for the free energy change, dissociation constant, association constant, enthalpy change, heat capacity change and so on of the interacting proteins upon binding, which are important for understanding the mechanism of protein-protein interactions. PINT also includes the name and source of the proteins involved in binding, their Protein Information Resource, SWISS-PROT and Protein Data Bank (PDB) codes, secondary structure and solvent accessibility of residues at mutant positions, measuring methods, experimental conditions, such as buffers, ions and additives, and literature information. A WWW interface facilitates users to search data based on various conditions, feasibility to select the terms for output and different sorting options. Further, PINT is cross-linked with other related databases, PIR, SWISS-PROT, PDB and NCBI PUBMED literature database. The database is freely available at http://www.bioinfodatabase.com/pint/index.html. PMID:16381844

  9. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  10. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  11. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  12. Protein S blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  13. Protein electrophoresis - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nephropathy Kidney failure Multiple myeloma Nephrotic syndrome Acute urinary tract infection Risks There are no risks associated with this ... Primary amyloidosis Protein in diet Protein urine test Urinary tract infection - adults Update Date 5/29/2014 Updated by: ...

  14. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  15. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, and protecting you from disease. All About Amino Acids When you eat foods that contain protein, the ... called amino (say: uh-MEE-no) acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins ...

  16. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  17. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. PMID:21406855

  18. Understanding protein folding: small proteins in silico.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Olav; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-01-01

    Recent improvements in methodology and increased computer power now allow atomistic computer simulations of protein folding. We briefly review several advanced Monte Carlo algorithms that have contributed to this development. Details of folding simulations of three designed mini proteins are shown. Adding global translations and rotations has allowed us to handle multiple chains and to simulate the aggregation of six beta-amyloid fragments. In a different line of research we have developed several algorithms to predict local features from sequence. In an outlook we sketch how such biasing could extend the application spectrum of Monte Carlo simulations to structure prediction of larger proteins. PMID:18036571

  19. Imaging Protein-protein Interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seegar, Tom; Barton, William

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are a hallmark of all essential cellular processes. However, many of these interactions are transient, or energetically weak, preventing their identification and analysis through traditional biochemical methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. In this regard, the genetically encodable fluorescent proteins (GFP, RFP, etc.) and their associated overlapping fluorescence spectrum have revolutionized our ability to monitor weak interactions in vivo using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)1-3. Here, we detail our use of a FRET-based proximity assay for monitoring receptor-receptor interactions on the endothelial cell surface. PMID:20972411

  20. CSF myelin basic protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF myelin basic protein is a test to measure the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The CSF ... less than 4 ng/mL of myelin basic protein in the CSF. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  1. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  2. Palmitoylation of Hedgehog proteins.

    PubMed

    Buglino, John A; Resh, Marilyn D

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are secreted signaling proteins that contain amide-linked palmitate at the N-terminus and cholesterol at the C-terminus. Palmitoylation of Hh proteins is critical for effective long- and short-range signaling. The palmitoylation reaction occurs during transit of Hh through the secretory pathway, most likely in the lumen of the ER. Attachment of palmitate to Hh proteins is independent of cholesterol modification and autoprocessing and is catalyzed by Hhat (Hedgehog acyltransferase). Hhat is a member of the membrane bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, a subgroup of multipass membrane proteins that catalyze transfer of fatty acyl groups to lipids and proteins. Several classes of secreted proteins have recently been shown to be substrates for MBOAT acyltransferases, including Hh proteins and Spitz (palmitoylated by Hhat), Wg/Wnt proteins (modified with palmitate and/or palmitoleate by Porcupine) and ghrelin (octanoylated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase). These findings highlight protein fatty acylation as a mechanism that not only influences membrane binding of intracellular proteins but also regulates the signaling range and efficacy of secreted proteins. PMID:22391306

  3. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    Normal value ranges are: Total protein: 6.4 to 8.3 g/dL (grams per deciliter) Albumin: 3.5 to 5.0 g/dL Alpha-1 ... Decreased total protein may indicate: Abnormal loss of protein from the digestive tract or the inability of the digestive tract ...

  4. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  5. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  6. Texturized dairy proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey prote...

  7. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  8. Protein - Which is Best?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  9. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  10. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  11. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  12. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  13. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described. PMID:26836410

  14. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  15. Mechanism of protein decarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Marcocci, Lucia; Das, Dividutta; Wang, Xinhong; Luo, Haibei; Zungu-Edmondson, Makhosazane; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2013-12-01

    Ligand/receptor stimulation of cells promotes protein carbonylation that is followed by the decarbonylation process, which might involve thiol-dependent reduction (C.M. Wong et al., Circ. Res. 102:301-318; 2008). This study further investigated the properties of this protein decarbonylation mechanism. We found that the thiol-mediated reduction of protein carbonyls is dependent on heat-labile biologic components. Cysteine and glutathione were efficient substrates for decarbonylation. Thiols decreased the protein carbonyl content, as detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, but not the levels of malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. Mass spectrometry identified proteins that undergo thiol-dependent decarbonylation, which include peroxiredoxins. Peroxiredoxin-2 and -6 were carbonylated and subsequently decarbonylated in response to the ligand/receptor stimulation of cells. siRNA knockdown of glutaredoxin inhibited the decarbonylation of peroxiredoxin. These results strengthen the concept that thiol-dependent decarbonylation defines the kinetics of protein carbonylation signaling. PMID:24044890

  16. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  17. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  19. Phage display of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kościelska, K; Kiczak, L; Kasztura, M; Wesołowska, O; Otlewski, J

    1998-01-01

    In recent years the phage display approach has become an increasingly popular method in protein research. This method enables the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of phage particles from which molecules of desired functional property(ies) can be rapidly selected. The great advantage of this method is a direct linkage between an observed phenotype and encapsulated genotype, which allows fast determination of selected sequences. The phage display approach is a powerful tool in generating highly potent biomolecules, including: search for specific antibodies, determining enzyme specificity, exploring protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, minimizing proteins, introducing new functions into different protein scaffolds, and searching sequence space of protein folding. In this article many examples are given to illustrate that this technique can be used in different fields of protein science. The phage display has a potential of the natural evolution and its possibilities are far beyond rational prediction. Assuming that we can design the selection agents and conditions we should be able to engineer any desired protein function or feature. PMID:9918498

  20. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions. PMID:21842951

  1. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  2. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  3. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-08-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions.

  4. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui-Guang; Huang, Philip L.; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao; Chen, Hao-Chia; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul L.; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Lee-Huang, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  5. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  6. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation. PMID:26172624

  7. Electrophoretic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentration. The combination of pore size and protein charge, size, and shape determines the migration rate of the protein. In this unit, the standard Laemmli method is described for discontinuous gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, i.e., in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). PMID:19066548

  8. Outer membrane protein purification.

    PubMed

    Arigita, C; Jiskoot, W; Graaf, M R; Kersten, G F

    2001-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from Neisseria meningitidis, which are expressed at high levels, are subdivided in five classes based on molecular weight (1,2) (see Table 1). Table 1 Major Meningococcal Outer-Membrane Proteins Outer-membrane proteins Name Molecular maass Function/characteristics Class 1 PorA 44-47 kDa Porin Class 2/3 PorB 37-42 kDa Porin Class 4 Rmp Reductionmodifiableprotein, unknown Class 5 Opa 26-30 kDa Adhesion,opacity protein Opc 25 kDa Invasion, opacity protein Iron-regulated proteins Mirp 37 kDa Iron acquisition (?);majoriron-regulatedprotein FrpB 70 kDa Ferric enterobactin receptor (also FetA) Adapted from ref. (1). PMID:21336748

  9. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  10. Principles of Flexible Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Andrusier, Nelly; Mashiach, Efrat; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J.

    2008-01-01

    Treating flexibility in molecular docking is a major challenge in cell biology research. Here we describe the background and the principles of existing flexible protein-protein docking methods, focusing on the algorithms and their rational. We describe how protein flexibility is treated in different stages of the docking process: in the preprocessing stage, rigid and flexible parts are identified and their possible conformations are modeled. This preprocessing provides information for the subsequent docking and refinement stages. In the docking stage, an ensemble of pre-generated conformations or the identified rigid domains may be docked separately. In the refinement stage, small-scale movements of the backbone and side-chains are modeled and the binding orientation is improved by rigid-body adjustments. For clarity of presentation, we divide the different methods into categories. This should allow the reader to focus on the most suitable method for a particular docking problem. PMID:18655061

  11. Antimicrobial proteins: From old proteins, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Valerie J; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. The review further considers proteins or protein fragments from crustaceans that have antimicrobial properties but are more usually associated with other biological functions, or are derived from such proteins. It discusses how these unconventional AMPs might be generated at, or delivered to, sites of infection and how they might contribute to crustacean host defence in vivo. It also highlights recent work that is starting to reveal the extent of multi-functionality displayed by some decapod AMPs, particularly their participation in other aspects of host protection. Examples of such activities include proteinase inhibition, phagocytosis, antiviral activity and haematopoiesis. PMID:26320628

  12. Elastic proteins and elastomeric protein alloys.

    PubMed

    Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Weiss, Anthony S

    2016-06-01

    The elastomeric proteins elastin and resilin have been used extensively in the fabrication of biomaterials for tissue engineering applications due to their unique mechanical and biological properties. Tropoelastin is the soluble monomer component of elastin. Tropoelastin and resilin are both highly elastic with high resilience, substantial extensibility, high durability and low energy loss, which makes them excellent candidates for the fabrication of elastic tissues that demand regular and repetitive movement like the skin, lung, blood vessels, muscles and vocal folds. Combinations of these proteins with silk fibroin further enhance their biomechanical and biological properties leading to a new class of protein alloy materials with versatile properties. In this review, the properties of tropoelastin-based and resilin-based biomaterials with and without silk are described in concert with examples of their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26780495

  13. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  14. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  15. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  16. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  17. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  18. Pro