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Sample records for asymptomatic aortic stenosis

  1. Diagnosis and management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Minako; Chaliki, Hari P

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a disease that progresses slowly for years without symptoms, so patients need to be carefully managed with appropriate follow up and referred for aortic valve replacement in a timely manner. Development of symptoms is a clear indication for aortic valve intervention in patients with severe AS. The decision for early surgery in patients with asymptomatic severe AS is more complex. In this review, we discuss how to identify high-risk patients with asymptomatic severe AS who may benefit from early surgery. PMID:26981214

  2. Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Chisato

    2016-08-01

    Optimal management for asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Considering the increase in elderly patients, improved surgical outcomes and the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, we must reconsider the optimal management of asymptomatic severe AS. In this article, previous studies regarding the natural history of asymptomatic severe AS were reviewed to obtain a clinical perspective of AS in the growing elderly patient population. The incidence of sudden death in asymptomatic severe AS varies among studies from 0.25% to 1.7% per year, with differences related to study design and patient background. Except for very severe AS, sudden death or AS-related cardiac death without preceding symptoms is uncommon if 'watchful' waiting strategy is possible. Therefore, early operation is reasonable in very severe AS, but it is not recommended for all patients with severe AS. Using exercise tests, plasma levels of natriuretic peptides and other parameters, risk stratification of asymptomatic severe AS is needed to select patients who may have greater benefit following early operation. On the other hand, 'watchful' waiting is not always possible in real world of our practice. Patient education and periodic echocardiography are essential in 'watchful' waiting, which is not simply waiting strategy without careful monitoring. Individualised discussion regarding the indication for early operation is necessary, considering age, clinical background, predicted natural history and operative risk in each patient. PMID:27091844

  3. Natural History, Diagnostic Approaches, and Therapeutic Strategies for Patients With Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Généreux, Philippe; Stone, Gregg W; O'Gara, Patrick T; Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume; Redfors, Björn; Giustino, Gennaro; Pibarot, Philippe; Bax, Jeroen J; Bonow, Robert O; Leon, Martin B

    2016-05-17

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is one of the most common valvular diseases encountered in clinical practice. Current guidelines recommend aortic valve replacement (AVR) when the aortic valve is severely stenotic and the patient is symptomatic; however, a substantial proportion of patients with severe AS are asymptomatic at the time of first diagnosis. Although specific morphological valve features, exercise testing, stress imaging, and biomarkers can help to identify patients with asymptomatic severe AS who may benefit from early AVR, the optimal management of these patients remains uncertain and controversial. The current report presents a comprehensive review of the natural history and the diagnostic evaluation of asymptomatic patients with severe AS, and is followed by a meta-analysis from reported studies comparing an early AVR strategy to active surveillance, with an emphasis on the level of evidence substantiating the current guideline recommendations. Finally, perspectives on directions for future investigation are discussed. PMID:27049682

  4. Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis with normal left ventricular function - A review.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, I; Jayanthi, K

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is one of the commonest forms of acquired valvular heart disease. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the treatment of choice for symptomatic severe AS. Conservative management is usually advocated for asymptomatic severe AS. But there are data on predictors to identify subsets of asymptomatic AS patients at high risk of cardiac events in whom early surgical intervention is warranted. Non-invasive tests like exercise stress test, exercise echocardiography will help us to identify those who are at high risk of developing early symptoms due to LV dysfunction and also those at high risk of sudden death. In this article, an attempt is made to review the literature on this subset of asymptomatic severe AS to help clinicians to decide regarding the need for early aortic valve replacement in them. PMID:27543485

  5. Relation of Left Ventricular Mass to Prognosis in Initially Asymptomatic Mild to Moderate Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossebø, Anne B.; Pedersen, Terje R.; Cioffi, Giovanni; Lønnebakken, Mai Tone; Cramariuc, Dana; Rogge, Barbara P.; Devereux, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background— The prognostic importance of left ventricular (LV) mass in nonsevere asymptomatic aortic stenosis has not been documented in a large prospective study. Methods and Results— Cox regression analysis was used to assess the impact of echocardiographic LV mass on rate of major cardiovascular events in 1656 patients (mean age, 67 years; 39.6% women) with mild-to-moderate asymptomatic aortic stenosis participating in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Patients were followed during 4.3 years of randomized treatment with combined simvastatin 40 mg and ezetimibe 10 mg daily or placebo. At baseline, LV mass index was 45.9+14.9 g/m2.7, and peak aortic jet velocity was 3.09+0.54 m/s. During follow-up, 558 major cardiovascular events occurred. In Cox regression analyses, 1 SD (15 g/m2.7) higher baseline LV mass index predicted increases in hazards of 12% for major cardiovascular events, 28% for ischemic cardiovascular events, 34% for cardiovascular mortality, and 23% for combined total mortality and hospitalization for heart failure (all P<0.01), independent of confounders. In time-varying models, taking the progressive increase in LV mass index during follow-up into account, 1 SD higher in-study LV mass index was consistently associated with 13% to 61% higher hazard for cardiovascular events (all P<0.01), independent of age, sex, body mass index, valvuloarterial impedance, LV ejection fraction and concentricity, and the presence of concomitant hypertension. Conclusions— Higher LV mass index is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality during progression of aortic stenosis. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00092677. PMID:26489804

  6. Exercise Echocardiography in Asymptomatic Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Preserved Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Henri, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The management of asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Recent series reported that early aortic valve replacement might be associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, the risk-benefit ratio should be carefully evaluated and early surgery only be proposed to a subset of asymptomatic patients considered at higher risk. Exercise echocardiography can help unmask symptomatic patients combined with assessment of the hemodynamic consequences of AS. Recent studies have demonstrated that exercise echocardiography can provide incremental prognostic value to identify patients who may benefit most from early surgery. In "truly" asymptomatic patients, an increase in mean aortic gradient ≥ 18-20 mmHg, a limited left ventricular contractile reserve or a pulmonary hypertension during exercise are predictive parameters of adverse cardiac events. Exercise echocardiography is low-cost, safe and available in many referral centers, and does not expose patients to radiation. The purpose of this article is to describe the role of exercise testing and echocardiography in the management of asymptomatic patients with severe AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:24753801

  7. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for lumbar discectomy in a patient with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sung; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Shin Young; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il-ok; Kong, Myoung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The use of neuraxial anesthesia has traditionally been contraindicated in patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, general anesthesia can be riskier than neuraxial anesthesia for severe aortic stenosis patients undergoing spinal surgeries in the prone position as this can cause a major reduction in cardiac output secondary to diminished preload. In addition, general anesthesia, muscle relaxation, and positive-pressure ventilation can decrease venous return and reduce vascular tone, further compromising cardiac output. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with closely monitored, careful titration of the local anesthetic dose can be an efficient and safe anesthetic method for managing such patients. We describe the successful management of combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in an asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis patient scheduled for lumbar discectomy. PMID:25237450

  8. Risk stratifying asymptomatic aortic stenosis: role of the resting 12-lead ECG.

    PubMed

    Greve, Anders M

    2014-02-01

    Despite being routinely performed in the clinical follow-up of asymptomatic AS patients, little or no evidence describes the prognostic value of ECG findings in asymptomatic AS populations. This PhD thesis examined the correlates of resting 12-lead ECG variables with echocardiographic measures of AS severity and cardiovascular outcomes in the till date largest cohort (n=1,563) of asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS. Most importantly, this PhD thesis demonstrated that QRS-duration adds independent predictive value of sudden cardiac death and that the additional presence of ECG LVH/strain for fixed AS severity represents a lethal risk attribute. Finally, ECG abnormalities displayed low/moderate concordance with echocardiographic parameters. This argues that the ECG should be regarded as a separate tool for obtaining prognostically important information. Treatment was not randomized by ECG findings, future studies should therefore examine if and which ECG variables should elicit closer follow-up and/or earlier intervention to improve prognosis in asymptomatic AS populations. PMID:24495893

  9. Rationale and design of the Aortic Valve replAcemenT versus conservative treatment in Asymptomatic seveRe aortic stenosis (AVATAR trial): A randomized multicenter controlled event-driven trial.

    PubMed

    Banovic, Marko; Iung, Bernard; Bartunek, Jozef; Asanin, Milika; Beleslin, Branko; Biocina, Bojan; Casselman, Filip; da Costa, Mark; Deja, Marek; Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Kala, Petr; Labrousse, Lois; Loncar, Zlatibor; Marinkovic, Jelena; Nedeljkovic, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Milan; Nemec, Peter; Nikolic, Serge D; Pencina, Michael; Penicka, Martin; Ristic, Arsen; Sharif, Faisal; Van Camp, Guy; Vanderheyden, Marc; Wojakowski, Wojtek; Putnik, Svetozar

    2016-04-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) therapy is an obvious choice for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients as it improves symptoms, left ventricular function, and survival. The treatment decisions and indication for AVR in asymptomatic patients with severe AS and normal left ventricular ejection fraction are less well established and the subject of ongoing debate. Many efforts have been made to define the best treatment option in asymptomatic AS patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Retrospective and observational data imply that elective AVR for asymptomatic severe AS may lead to improvement in outcomes in comparison to surgery performed after onset of symptoms. The AVATAR trial will aim to assess outcomes among asymptomatic AS patients randomized to either elective early AVR or medical management with vigilant follow-up. In the latter group, AVR would be delayed until either the onset of symptoms or changes in predefined echocardiographic parameters. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it will be the first large prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial that will evaluate the safety and efficacy of elective AVR in this specific group of patients. PMID:26995381

  10. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  11. Bilateral ostial coronary stenosis and rheumatic aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Alexeyi; Weich, Hellmuth; Doubell, Anton; Moolman, Johannes A

    2006-01-01

    A 49-year-old patient presented with angina pectoris and clinical findings of aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation. Rheumatic aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation was diagnosed on echocardiography. Coronary angiography findings showed severe calcification in the aorta root with right coronary ostial occlusion, and were suggestive of left main ostial stenosis and proximal main stem stenosis, which was confirmed on CT angiography. Curvilinear calcification of the aorta was present on CT angiography. The findings suggested syphilitic aortitis. Syphilis serology was positive (RPR titre 1/16). The angina was caused by severe coronary ostial disease likely due to syphilitic aortitis and exacerbated by the rheumatic aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation. PMID:16885079

  12. Rheumatic aortic stenosis in young patients presenting with combined aortic and mitral stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, G; Cherian, G; Krishnaswami, S; SUKUMAR, I P; John, S

    1977-01-01

    This report describes 30 patients under the age of 30 years with rheumatic aortic stenosis, presenting with combined aortic and mitral stenosis. Three patients had additional tricuspid stenosis. Twenty-eight patients gave a history of rheumatic polyarthritis. The diagnosis was confirmed by right and left heart catheterisation in all. The murmur of aortic stenosis was not initially present in 8 out of 10 patients in congestive heart failure. Aortic valve calcification was not seen. Cineangiography showed a tricuspid aortic valve in all, unlike congenital aortic stenosis. A unique feature of this group was the raised pulmonary vascular resistance in 87 per cent of the patients. The present study shows that patients in India developing aortic stenosis after rheumatic fever do so early in the natural history of the disease. PMID:849390

  13. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  14. Supravalvular aortic stenosis after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuya; Koide, Masaaki; Kunii, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Kazumasa; Kanzaki, Tomohito; Ohashi, Yuko

    2016-07-01

    Supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of transposition of the great arteries is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of the arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries. The narrowed ascending aorta was replaced with a graft. The right pulmonary artery was transected to approach the ascending aorta which adhered severely to the main pulmonary trunk, and we obtained a good operative field. PMID:25957091

  15. Aortic Stenosis, a Left Ventricular Disease: Insights from Advanced Imaging.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Sveeta; van Zalen, Jet; Treibel, Thomas A; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Moon, James C; Lloyd, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common primary valve disorder in the elderly with an increasing prevalence. It is increasingly clear that it is also a disease of the left ventricle (LV) rather than purely the aortic valve. The transition from left ventricular hypertrophy to fibrosis results in the eventual adverse effects on systolic and diastolic function. Appropriate selection of patients for aortic valve intervention is crucial, and current guidelines recommend aortic valve replacement in severe AS with symptoms or in asymptomatic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50 %. LVEF is not a sensitive marker and there are other parameters used in multimodality imaging techniques, including longitudinal strain, exercise stress echo and cardiac MRI that may assist in detecting subclinical and subtle LV dysfunction. These findings offer potentially better ways to evaluate patients, time surgery, predict recovery and potentially offer targets for specific therapies. This article outlines the pathophysiology behind the LV response to aortic stenosis and the role of advanced multimodality imaging in describing it. PMID:27384950

  16. Asymptomatic Stenosis in the Cervical and Thoracic Spines of Patients with Symptomatic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lyu, Ho Dong; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Studies on age-related degenerative changes causing concurrent stenoses in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines (triple stenosis) are rare in the literature. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the incidence of asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis, (2) the incidence of concurrent radiologic spinal stenosis in the cervical and thoracic spines, and (3) the radiologic features of cervical stenosis that might predict concurrent thoracic stenosis. Methods Whole-spine T2 sagittal magnetic resonance images of patients older than 80 and diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis between January 2003 and January 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. We included patients with asymptomatic spondylotic cervical and thoracic stenosis. We measured the anteroposterior diameters of the vertebral body, bony spinal canal, and spinal cord, along with the Pavlov ratio and anterior or posterior epidural stenosis at the level of the disk for each cervical and thoracic level. We compared the radiologic parameters between the subgroups of cervical stenosis with and without thoracic stenosis. Results Among the 460 patients with lumbar stenosis, 110 (23.9%) had concurrent radiologic cervical stenosis and 112 (24.3%) had concurrent radiologic thoracic stenosis. Fifty-six patients (12.1%) had combined radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in addition to their symptomatic lumbar stenosis (triple stenosis). Anterior epidural stenosis at C7–T1 was associated with a high prevalence of thoracic stenosis. Conclusions It appears that asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis is common in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PMID:26430589

  17. Aortic Stenosis and Vascular Calcifications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A.; Gahl, William A.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports . We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. PMID:22100375

  18. Diagnosis and Management of Valvular Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Matthew J; Resar, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive disease that affects 2% of the population aged 65 years or older. The major cause of valvular AS in adults is calcification and fibrosis of a previously normal tricuspid valve or a congenital bicuspid valve, with rheumatic AS being rare in the United States. Once established, the rate of progression of valvular AS is quite variable and impossible to predict for any particular patient. Symptoms of AS are generally insidious at onset, though development of any of the three cardinal symptoms of angina, syncope, or heart failure portends a poor prognosis. Management of symptomatic AS remains primarily surgical, though transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients at high or prohibitive operative risk. PMID:25368539

  19. Operative Treatment of Combined Aortic Stenosis and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadric, Nedzad; Kabil, Emir; Mujanovic, Emir; Hadziselimovic, Mehdin; Jahic, Mirza; Rajkovic, Stojan; Osmanovic, Enes; Avdic, Sevleta; Keranovic, Suad; Behrem, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aortic valve replacement is a standard operating procedure in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Structure of patients undergoing surgery ranges from young population with isolated mitral valvular disease to the elderly population, which is in addition to the underlying disease additionally burdened with comorbidity. One of the most commonly present factors that further complicate the surgery is coronary heart disease that occurs in, almost, one third of patients with aortic stenosis. The aim is to compare the results of surgery for aortic valve replacement with or without coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Patients and Methods: From August 2008 to January 2013 in our center operated on 120 patients for aortic stenosis. Of this number, 75 were men and 45 women. The average age was 63.37 years (16-78). Isolated aortic valve replacement was performed in 89 patients and in 31 patients underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary bypass surgery. Implanted 89 biological and 31 mechanical valves. Results: Patients with associated aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease were more expressed symptomatic symptoms preoperatively to patients with isolated aortic stenosis who were on average younger age. Intra-hospital morbidity and mortality was more pronounced in the group of patients with concomitant aortic valve replacement and coronary bypass surgery. Morbidity was recorded in 17 patients (14.3%) in both groups, while the mortality rate in both groups was 12 patients (10.1%). Conclusion: Evaluation of preoperative risk factors and comorbidity in patients with aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease contributes to a significant reduction in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Also, early diagnosis of associated coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis contributes to timely decision for surgery thus avoiding subsequent ischaemic changes and myocardial damage. PMID:25870480

  20. Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis Treated With the Repositionable and Retrievable Lotus Valve.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Julia; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis is a well-established and safe therapeutic option. However, data on TAVI in bicuspid aortic valve stenosis are limited and show a higher rate of moderate-severe aortic regurgitation compared with TAVI for tricuspid aortic valve stenosis. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, the use of the mechanically deployed Lotus valve in bicuspid aortic stenosis. In our patient who had severe bicuspid aortic stenosis and was at high surgical risk, the implantation of the repositionable and completely retrievable Lotus valve was a safe and controlled procedure resulting in no relevant aortic regurgitation. PMID:26604121

  1. The relation between transaortic pressure difference and flow during dobutamine stress echocardiography in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, S; Rimington, H; Chambers, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the relation between transaortic pressure difference and flow in patients with aortic stenosis.
METHODS—50 asymptomatic patients with all grades of aortic stenosis were studied using dobutamine stress echocardiography. Individual plots of mean pressure drop against flow were drawn. Comparisons were made between grades of aortic stenosis as defined by the continuity equation.
RESULTS—A significant linear relation between pressure difference and flow was found in 34 patients (68%). There was a significant curvilinear relation in four (8%), while no significant regression line could be fitted in 12 (24%). In the 34 patients with linear fits, the slopes (mean (SD)) were 0.08 (0.07) in mild, 0.10 (0.04) in moderate, and 0.22 (0.16) in severe aortic stenosis (p = 0.0055).
CONCLUSIONS—Transaortic pressure difference can be related directly to flow in many patients with all grades of aortic stenosis. However, there are individual differences in slope and intercept suggesting that resistance calculated at rest may not always be representative. Raw pressure drop/flow plots may be an alternative method of describing valve function.


Keywords: aortic stenosis; continuity equation; resistance; Doppler echocardiography PMID:10377300

  2. Serum and tissue biomarkers in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapelouzou, Alkistis; Tsourelis, Loukas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Degiannis, Dimitrios; Kogerakis, Nektarios; Cokkinos, Dennis V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS) is seen in a large proportion of individuals over 60 years. It is an active process, influenced by lipid accumulation, mechanical stress, inflammation, and abnormal extracellular matrix turnover. Various biomarkers (BMs) are studied, as regards mechanisms, diagnosis and prognosis. Methods: In the calcified valves calcium deposition, elastin fragmentation and disorganization of cellular matrix were assessed, together with expression of OPN, OPG, osteocalcin (OCN) and RL2. We prospectively studied the following serum BMs in 60 patients with CAVS and compared them to 20 healthy controls, free from any cardiac disease: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), which regulate collagen turnover, inflammatory factors, i.e. tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa), interleukin 2 (IL2), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) which regulates fibrosis, fetuin-A (fet-A), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin (SOST), and relaxin-2 (RL2) which positively or negatively regulate calcification. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) which regulates migration and infiltration of monocytes/macrophages was also studied as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) an oxidative marker. Results: Extent of tissue valve calcification (Alizarin Red stain) was negatively correlated with tissue elastin, and RL2, and positively correlated with tissue OCN and serum TIMP1 and MCP-1 and negatively with MMP9. Tissue OCN was positively correlated with OPN and negatively with the elastin. Tissue OPN was negatively correlated with elastin and OPG. Tissue OPN OPG and RL2 were not correlated with serum levels In the serum we found in patients statistically lower TIMP1, fet-A and RL2 levels, while all other BMs were higher compared to the healthy group. Positive correlations between SOST and IL2, OPG and MDA but negative with TNFa and OPN were found; also MMP9 was negatively correlated with TNFa and MCP-1

  3. Moderate Aortic Stenosis and Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: Clinical Update for the Perioperative Echocardiographer.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Yasdet; Singh, Saket; Augoustides, John G; MacKnight, Brenda; Zhou, Elizabeth; Gutsche, Jacob T; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-10-01

    Incidental aortic stenosis in the setting of coronary artery bypass surgery may be a perioperative challenge. The accurate assessment of the degree of aortic stenosis remains an important determinant. Although severe aortic stenosis is an indication for valve replacement, current guidelines advise a balanced approach to the management of moderate aortic stenosis in this setting. Multiple factors should be considered in a team discussion to balance risks versus benefits for the various management options in the given patient. The rapid progress in aortic valve technologies also offer alternatives for definitive management of moderate aortic stenosis in this setting that will likely become even safer in the near future. PMID:26275517

  4. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels. PMID:27246132

  5. Congenitally corrected transposition and degenerative severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Faganello, Giorgio; Nelson, Martin; Stuart, Graham

    2008-10-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac anomaly characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connections. Young patients with this lesion can present with congestive cardiac failure, usually secondary to a large ventricular septal defect or pulmonary stenosis. We report here our experience with a lady aged 79, admitted to our unit because of deterioration of her congestive cardiac failure as a consequence of uncorrected congenitally corrected transposition associated with degenerative severe aortic stenosis. PMID:18752714

  6. Aortic intimal sarcoma masquerading as bilateral renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Supreet; Pothineni, Naga Krishna; Syal, Gaurav; Ali, Syed Mujtaba; Krause, Michelle W

    2013-01-01

    Aortic intimal sarcoma is a rare tumor with poor prognosis. The most common manifestations are thromboembolic phenomena and vascular obstruction. We present a case of aortic intimal sarcoma causing bilateral renal artery stenosis which manifested as resistant hypertension and acute kidney inury. Multiple attempts to stent the renal arteries were unsuccessful. Eventually the patient developed acute limb ischemia and oliguric kidney failure as complications of the primary tumor. PMID:24052470

  7. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  8. Spatial quantitative vectorcardiography in aortic stenosis: correlation with hemodynamic findings.

    PubMed

    Talwar, K K; Mohan, J C; Narula, J; Kaul, U; Bhatia, M L

    1988-02-01

    Thirty-four patients with hemodynamically documented valvar aortic stenosis without congestive heart failure were studied by the corrected Frank lead system vectorcardiography, with special emphasis on the angular characteristics of spatial R max to define the severity of the lesion. Spatial QRS-T angle demonstrated a highly significant correlation with the peak left ventricular systolic pressure (r = 0.72, P less than 0.001) and a significant correlation with peak transvalvar aortic gradient (r = 0.49, P less than 0.01). Furthermore, all patients with a QRS-T angle of more than 90 degrees had significant aortic stenosis (TVG greater than or equal to 50 mm Hg). The peak left ventricular systolic pressure and transvalvar aortic gradient also demonstrated a significant negative correlation with azimuth angle (r = -0.36 and -0.34, respectively; P less than 0.05) and a positive correlation with spatial R max magnitude (r = 0.38 and 0.41, respectively; P less than 0.05). There was no correlation between elevation angle of spatial R max and left ventricle systolic pressure or transvalvar aortic gradient. Our study indicates that spatial quantitative vectorcardiographic angular characteristics, particularly spatial QRS-T angle, may be a useful adjunct to other noninvasive techniques to assess the severity of valvar aortic stenosis. PMID:3343071

  9. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month. PMID:26980403

  10. Alkaptonuria Presenting with Impressive Osteoarticular Changes and Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Bernardino; Roca, Manuel; Monferrer, Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria, or ochronosis, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, causes an excess of homogentisic acid that results in dark pigmentation, calcification, and inflammation of cartilaginous and other tissues. Cardiovascular complications are also typical of the disease. We report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with impressive osteoarticular changes and aortic stenosis associated with alkaptonuria. PMID:27169295

  11. Hemodynamic evaluation of suspected severe aortic stenosis leads to a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lake, Mikhailia; Tanawuttiwat, Tanyanan; Bilsker, Martin; De Marchena, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The evaluation of aortic stenosis is not always straightforward. When symptoms of severe aortic stenosis are present with supporting Doppler echocardiographic or cardiac catheterization data, replacement of the aortic valve is recommended. Occasionally, Doppler- and catheter-derived data are discordant; appropriate treatment in such cases becomes less clear. We report a case in which a 66-year-old man's symptoms and Doppler data suggested severe aortic stenosis. However, heart catheterization data suggested otherwise, and ultimately it led to the diagnosis of a highly vascular renal tumor. Shunting within the tumor resulted in high cardiac output, which, in combination with a small aortic root, masqueraded as severe aortic stenosis. PMID:25873807

  12. "Killer coronary artery" and aortic valve stenosis: A tricky case.

    PubMed

    Nader, Joseph; Labont, Béatris Alina; Houpe, David; Caus, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery from the right coronary sinus is rarely diagnosed in elderly patients. We report such an anomaly in a 75-year-old lady presenting with chest pain and syncope. Preoperative screening revealed that her aortic valve was moderately stenotic. The patient underwent a successful unroofing procedure combined with aortic valve replacement. The outcome was uncomplicated and the patient remained asymptomatic at one year postoperatively. PMID:24787552

  13. The role of cardiac biochemical markers in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Calvin W L; Djohan, Andie H; Lang, Chim C

    2016-06-01

    Calcified aortic stenosis is one of the most common causes of heart failure in the elderly. Current guidelines recommend aortic valve replacement in patients with severe disease and evidence of decompensation based on either symptoms or impaired systolic ejection fraction. However, symptoms are often subjective whilst impaired ejection fraction is not a sensitive marker of ventricular decompensation. Interest has surrounded the use of cardiac biochemical markers as objective measures of left ventricular decompensation in aortic stenosis. We will first examine mechanisms of release of biochemical markers associated with myocardial wall stress (BNP/NT-proBNP), myocardial fibrosis (markers of collagen metabolism, galectin-3, soluble ST2) and myocyte death/myocardial ischemia (high-sensitivity cardiac troponins, heart-type fatty acid binding protein, myosin-binding protein C); and discuss future directions of these markers. PMID:26900722

  14. Hemolytic anemia with aortic stenosis resolved by urgent aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Isamu; Matsuo, Tatsuro; Sasayama, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Hideo

    2008-08-01

    A 78-year-old man with aortic stenosis complained of dark colored urine followed by recurrent chest pain and syncopal episodes. Echocardiography showed severely calcified aortic stenosis with the maximal pressure gradient of 125 mm Hg. Hemoglobin was 7.9 g/dL, lactate dehydrogenase was 2,295 IU/L, haptoglobin was less than 10 mg/dL, reticulocyte count was elevated, and Coombs' test was negative. We performed an urgent aortic valve replacement. After the surgery, the patient's urine became clear and his chest pain and syncope abated. All laboratory data returned to normal physiological values. In conclusion, the observed hemolysis was related to the aortic shear stress of a calcified aortic valve. PMID:18640351

  15. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients <50 years, 20 patients between 51-70 years and 13 patients 70-85 years). When comparing patients 70-85 years, AA distensibility was significantly lower in those with AS compared to those without AS (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1, P = 0.03) while there was no difference in the PDA (1.0 ± 1.1 vs. 1.0 ± 1.2, P = 0.26) and DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort. PMID:25855464

  16. Prognosis of supravalve aortic stenosis in 81 patients in Liverpool (1960-1993).

    PubMed Central

    Kitchiner, D.; Jackson, M.; Walsh, K.; Peart, I.; Arnold, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognosis of supravalve aortic stenosis into early adult life and the factors affecting this prognosis. DESIGN: 81 patients with supravalve aortic stenosis were followed for a median duration of 8.3 (range 1 to 29) years. PATIENTS: 40 patients (49.4%) had Williams' syndrome, 18 (22.2%) familial supravalve aortic stenosis, 18 (22.2%) sporadic supravalve aortic stenosis, and five (6.2%) other syndromes. Nineteen patients had additional levels of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. RESULTS: 47 patients (58%) underwent operation; 20% within a year of presentation. Multivariable analysis predicted that 88% of patients would undergo intervention within 30 years of follow up. The chance of intervention was increased by more severe aortic stenosis at presentation and the presence of multilevel obstruction in patients with sporadic supravalve aortic stenosis. Three deaths occurred before operation and 13 within a month of operation. Ten (62.5%) of the postoperative deaths were in patients with multilevel obstruction. Predicted survival 30 years after presentation was 66%. Risk factors for survival were age and severity of aortic stenosis at presentation. Multilevel obstruction did not emerge as a significant risk factor for death because of the high association with the severity of stenosis at presentation. 74% of survivors had mild or insignificant stenosis at follow up. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term survival is related to age and the severity of aortic stenosis at presentation. Most patients will require intervention, and most survivors will have mild stenosis. PMID:8705769

  17. Postpartum patient with thrombosis of mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Benfatti, Ricardo Adala; Martins Júnior, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Guilherme Viotto Rodrigues da; Pontes, José Carlos Dorsa Vieira

    2011-01-01

    The blood hypercoagulability in pregnancy increases significantly the incidence of thrombosis of mechanical valves. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis is extremely rare. We report the case of an immediate postpartum patient with aortic mechanical prostheses and acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis who underwent emergency heart surgery, with severe hemodynamic instability, using adapted surgical technique for correction of supravalvular stenosis with satisfactory clinical and echocardiography results. PMID:21894422

  18. Elevated Plasma Soluble ST2 Is Associated with Heart Failure Symptoms and Outcome in Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Dulgheru, Raluca; Magne, Julien; Henri, Christine; Servais, Laurence; Bouznad, Nassim; Ancion, Arnaud; Martinez, Christophe; Davin, Laurent; Le Goff, Caroline; Nchimi, Alain; Piérard, Luc; Oury, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is often used as a complementary finding in the diagnostic work-up of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Whether soluble ST2, a new biomarker of cardiac stretch, is associated with symptomatic status and outcome in asymptomatic AS is unknown. sST2 and BNP levels were measured in 86 patients (74±13 years; 59 asymptomatic, 69%) with AS (<1.5 cm2) and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction who were followed-up for 26±16 months. Both BNP and sST2 were associated with NYHA class but sST2 (>23 ng/mL, AUC = 0.68, p<0.01) was more accurate to identify asymptomatic patients or those who developed symptoms during follow-up. sST2 was independently related to left atrial index (p<0.0001) and aortic valve area (p = 0.004; model R2 = 0.32). A modest correlation was found with BNP (r = 0.4, p<0.01). During follow-up, 29 asymptomatic patients (34%) developed heart failure symptoms. With multivariable analysis, peak aortic jet velocity (HR = 2.7, p = 0.007) and sST2 level (HR = 1.04, p = 0.03) were independent predictors of cardiovascular events. In AS, sST2 levels could provide complementary information regarding symptomatic status, new onset heart failure symptoms and outcome. It might become a promising biomarker in these patients. PMID:26390433

  19. Aortic stenosis associated with Scheie's syndrome. Report of successful valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Masuda, H; Morishita, Y; Taira, A; Kuriyama, M

    1993-03-01

    A 62-year-old man who had aortic stenosis associated with Scheie's syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis [MPS], type I-S) successfully underwent aortic valve replacement. The composition of acidic glycosaminoglycans (acid mucopolysaccharides) of the excised aortic valve analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) supported the diagnosis of Scheie's syndrome. This article reviews the literature on aortic stenosis in MPS, a rare inherited metabolic disorder, and discusses biochemical features and surgical repair. PMID:8449111

  20. Ultrasonographic markers of vascular risk in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrini, Mauro; Altamura, Claudia; Cerqua, Raffaella; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Viticchi, Giovanna; Provinciali, Leandro; Paulon, Luca; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Six-hundred twenty-one subjects with unilateral asymptomatic severe internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis were prospectively evaluated with a median follow-up of 27 months (min=6, max=68). Vascular risk profile, plaque characteristic, stenosis progression, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) were investigated in all patients. Outcome measures were occurrence of ischemic stroke ipsilateral to ICA stenosis and vascular death, while myocardial infarction, contralateral strokes, and transient ischemic attack were considered as competing events. A total of 99 subjects (15.9%) suffered from a vascular event. Among them, 39 were strokes ipsilateral to the stenosis (6.3%). Degree of stenosis, stenosis progression, and common carotid artery IMT resulted as independent predictive factors of ipsilateral stroke. Considering a stenosis of 60% to 70% as reference, a degree between 71% and 90% increased the risk by 2.45, while a degree between 91% and 99% increased the risk by 3.26. The progression of stenosis was a strong risk factor (hazard ratio=4.32). Finally, the role of carotid IMT was confirmed as crucial additional measure, with an increased risk by 25% for each 0.1 mm IMT increase. Our data suggest that IMT, stenosis progression and severity should be considered as risk factors for cerebrovascular events in asymptomatic subjects with severe ICA stenosis. PMID:23361391

  1. Impact of systemic hypertension on the assessment of aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kadem, L; Dumesnil, J G; Rieu, R; Durand, L-G; Garcia, D; Pibarot, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of systemic arterial hypertension on the indices of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. Methods: A severe supravalvar AS was created in 24 pigs. The maximum and mean pressure gradients across the stenosis were measured by Doppler echocardiography and by catheterisation. Both echocardiography and catheter data were used to calculate stenosis effective orifice area, energy loss coefficient, and peak systolic left ventricular wall stress. Measurements were taken both at normal aortic pressures and during hypertension induced by banding of the distal thoracic aorta in 14 pigs and by intravenous administration of phenylephrine in 10 pigs. Results: During hypertension, systemic arterial resistance downstream from the stenosis increased greatly (all animals: 71 (40)%), whereas total systemic arterial compliance decreased significantly (−38 (21)%). Hypertension resulted in a moderate increase in effective orifice area (29 (14)%) and energy loss coefficient (25 (17)%) and substantial decreases in catheter gradients (maximum: −40 (20)%; mean: −43 (20)%; peak to peak: −70 (23)%) and Doppler gradients (maximum: −35 (17)%; mean: −37 (16)%). In multivariate analysis, peak to peak gradient was significantly (p < 0.001) related to the energy loss coefficient, mean flow rate, and arterial compliance, whereas maximum and mean catheter gradients were related only to the energy loss coefficient and flow rate. Of major importance, maximum systolic left ventricular wall stress increased greatly during hypertension (43 (23)%). Conclusions: The severity of AS may be partially masked by the presence of coexisting hypertension. The markers of AS severity should thus be interpreted with caution in hypertensive patients and be re-evaluated when the patient is in a normotensive state. PMID:15710719

  2. Sex Differences in Aortic Stenosis and Outcome Following Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Laura E; Fairbairn, Timothy A; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2015-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the commonest valve defect in the developed world and is associated with a high mortality once symptomatic. There is a difference in the way that male and female hearts remodel in the face of chronic pressure overload: women develop a concentrically hypertrophied, small cavity left ventricle (LV), whereas men are more prone to the development of eccentric hypertrophy. At a cellular level, there is an increase in collagen and metalloproteinase gene expression in males suggesting a different regulation of extracellular volume composition according to sex. Male hearts with aortic stenosis appear to have more fibrosis than their female comparators. The trigger for this appears to be in part related to estrogen receptor signaling, but other factors such as renin-angiotensin activation, nitric oxide, and circulating noradrenaline levels may also be implicated. Treatment options include surgical valve replacement (SAVR) and more recently transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Female sex may be a risk factor for adverse outcome following SAVR and conversely appears to confer a survival advantage when undergoing TAVR. Whether the lower mortality seen following TAVR in women compared with men (despite their increased age and frailty) reflects their longer life expectancy, smaller annular size (and less post-TAVR aortic regurgitation), more favorable LV reverse remodeling, or more likely, a combination of these factors remains to be established. PMID:26653869

  3. Aortic Balloon Valvuloplasty Prior to Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Novel Approach to Aortic Stenosis and End-Stage Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coverstone, Edward; Korenblat, Kevin; Crippin, Jeffrey S.; Chapman, William C.; Kates, Andrew M.; Zajarias, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The combination of severe aortic stenosis and end-stage liver disease increases the morbidity and mortality of surgical aortic valve replacement or orthotopic liver transplantation resulting in a prohibitive operative risk. We propose a staged approach of balloon aortic valvuloplasty prior to orthotopic liver transplantation as a bridge to definitive aortic valve replacement. Between 2010 and 2012, four patients with severe aortic stenosis and end-stage liver disease underwent staged balloon aortic valvuloplasty followed by orthotopic liver transplantation. All patients had been deemed to be inappropriate candidates for liver transplantation or aortic valve surgery due to their comorbidity. One patient died of complications from a perivalvular abscess. Three patients went on to successful graft implantation and function and surgical recovery. Two of the three patients proceeded to definitive surgical aortic valve replacement with the remainder currently undergoing evaluation. In this case series, we present a novel approach of balloon aortic valvuloplasty prior to liver transplantation as a potential bridge to definitive treatment of severe aortic stenosis in the end-stage liver patient. PMID:25431682

  4. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Sara; Meledin, Valery; Bar, Iris; Fabricant, Jacob; Gandelman, Gera; George, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between circulating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features. Methods We assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry. Results There was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls. Patients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9% vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%, P = 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes were inversely related to aortic valve area. Conclusions Patients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe. PMID:26918018

  5. Pathological Investigation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis, Compared with Atherosclerotic Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis and Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (CBAV) is the main cause of aortic stenosis (AS) in young adults. However, the histopathological features of AS in patients with CBAV have not been fully investigated. Methods and Results We examined specimens of aortic valve leaflets obtained from patients who had undergone aortic valve re/placement at our institution for severe AS with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AS group), severe AS with tricuspid aortic valve (n = 24, TAV-AS group), and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AR group). We compared the histopathological features among the three groups. Pathological features were classified using semi-quantitative methods (graded on a scale 0 to 3) by experienced pathologists without knowledge of the patients’ backgrounds. The severity of inflammation, neovascularization, and calcium and cholesterol deposition did not differ between the CBAV-AS and TAV-AS groups, and these four parameters were less marked in the CBAV-AR group than in the CBAV-AS (all p<0.01). Meanwhile, the grade of valvular fibrosis was greater in the CBAV-AS group, compared with the TAV-AS and CBAV-AR groups (both p<0.01). In AS patients, thickness of fibrotic lesions was greater on the aortic side than on the ventricular side (both p<0.01). Meanwhile, thickness of fibrotic lesions was comparable between the aortic and ventricular sides in CBAV-AR patients (p = 0.35). Conclusions Valvular fibrosis, especially on the aortic side, was greater in patients with CBAV-AS than in those without, suggesting a difference in the pathogenesis of AS between CBAV and TAV. PMID:27479126

  6. [Left coronary ostial stenosis and aortic regurgitation associated with syphilitic aortitis; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Otani, Takashi; Fukumura, Yoshiaki; Kurushima, Atsushi; Osumi, Masahiro; Matsueda, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    We report a surgical case of severe left coronary ostial stenosis and aortic regurgitation associated with syphilitic aortitis. A 46-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of effort angina pectoris. Coronary angiography and echocardiography showed severe left coronary ostial stenosis and aortic regurgitation. We initiated treatment with penicillin G injections and an emergency surgery was performed 8 days later. Aortic valve replacement (SJM #23) and coronary artery bypass grafting were also performed. We used in situ left internal thoracic artery (ITA) and right gastroepiploic artery (GEA) to prevent stenosis of the proximal anastomotic site in the late postoperative period. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:20662242

  7. Aortic stenosis in a patient with Hurler's syndrome after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naruhito; Anagnostopoulos, Petros V; Azakie, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    We describe a case of severe aortic stenosis in a 16-year-old male with Hurler's syndrome who had prior bone marrow transplantation. The excised aortic valve leaflets showed characteristic pathologic findings of Hurler's syndrome. This is the first case report of aortic valve replacement in a patient with Hurler's syndrome treated with bone marrow transplantation that demonstrates progression of the aortic valve disease despite treatment. PMID:21262073

  8. Factors Influencing the Prognosis of Octogenarians with Aortic Stenosis in the Advanced Aging Societies.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuai; Yamaguchi, Kazuto; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Ito, Saki; Nakashima, Ryuma; Sugamori, Takashi; Endo, Akihiro; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recognition of clinical symptoms is critical to developing an effective therapeutic strategy for aortic valve stenosis (AS). Although AS is common, little is known about the factors influencing the natural history of AS patients who are 80 years of age older in advanced aging societies. We investigated the natural history and indications for valve procedures in AS patients of 80 years of age or older. Methods The medical records of 108 consecutive AS patients (moderate grade or higher) who are 80 years of age or older (mean age, 84.2±3.9 years; female, 65 patients) were reviewed to investigate their symptoms, the development of congestive heart failure, the incidence of referral for aortic valve replacement and death. The median duration of follow-up was 9 months (interquartile range, 2 to 25 months). Results The probability of remaining free of events (valve replacement and death) was 29±13% in all patients. There was no significant difference in the aortic valve area of the symptomatic and asymptomatic patients (0.85±0.28 cm(2) vs. 0.88±0.25 cm(2), p=0.59). The aortic valve (AV) velocity and AV area index were predictors of subsequent cardiac events (p<0.05). Conclusion The severity of AS was the only factor to affect the prognosis of AS patients who were 80 years old of age or older. It is necessary to frequently monitor the subjective symptoms of such patients and to objectively measure the AV area. PMID:27580533

  9. Catheterization-Doppler discrepancies in nonsimultaneous evaluations of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Aghassi, Payam; Aurigemma, Gerard P; Folland, Edward D; Tighe, Dennis A

    2005-05-01

    Prior validation studies have established that simultaneously measured catheter (cath) and Doppler mean pressure gradients (MPG) correlate closely in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS). In clinical practice, however, cath and Doppler are rarely performed simultaneously; which may lead to discrepant results. Accordingly, our aim was to ascertain agreement between these methods and investigate factors associated with discrepant results. We reviewed findings in 100 consecutive evaluations for AS performed in 97 patients (mean age 72 +/- 10 yr) in which cath and Doppler were performed within 6 weeks. We recorded MPG, aortic valve area (AVA), cardiac output, and ejection fraction (EF) by both methods. Aortic root diameter, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVIDd) and posterior wall thickness (PWT) were measured by echocardiography and gender, heart rate, and heart rhythm were also recorded. An MPG discrepancy was defined as an intrapatient difference > 10 mmHg. Mean pressure gradients by cath and Doppler were 36 +/- 22 mmHg and 37 +/- 20 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.73). Linear regression showed good correlation (r = 0.82) between the techniques. An MPG discrepancy was found in 36 (36%) of 100 evaluations; in 19 (53%) of 36 evaluations MPG by Doppler was higher than cath, and in 17 (47%) of 36, it was lower. In 33 evaluations, EF differed by >10% between techniques. Linear regression analyses revealed that EF difference between studies was a significant predictor of MPG discrepancy (P = 0.004). Women had significantly higher MPG than men by both cath and Doppler (43 +/- 25 mmHg versus 29 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.001]; 42 +/- 23 mmHg versus 32 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.014], respectively). Women exhibited discrepant results in 23 (47%) of 49 evaluations versus 13 (25%) of 51 evaluations in men (P = 0.037). After adjustment for women's higher MPG, there was no statistically significant difference in MPG discrepancy between genders (P = 0.22). No significant interactions between

  10. Severe Congenital Obstruction of the Left Main Coronary Artery Coexisting With Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis in Williams Syndrome: A Dangerous Association.

    PubMed

    Szaflik, Katarzyna; Kaźmierczak, Piotr; Moll, Jacek Jan; Moll, Jadwiga Anna

    2016-03-01

    Congenital obstruction of the left main coronary artery is a complicating feature of supravalvular aortic stenosis. We describe an eight-month-old female patient with Williams syndrome, supravalvular aortic stenosis, and branch pulmonary artery stenosis, with concomitant anomaly of severe obstruction of the left coronary artery orifice. PMID:26582765

  11. Exercise-induced cardiopulmonary arrest in a child with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Masaya; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-06-01

    The beneficial effect of exercise restriction in preventing sudden cardiac death in children with aortic stenosis remains unclear. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy with congenital aortic stenosis who was resuscitated after sudden cardiac arrest during exercise. The case led to the new concept that exercise restriction may prevent not only unpredictable ventricular ischaemic events and associated arrhythmias but also progressive ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:27161031

  12. A Prospective Study of Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenosis in Neurologically Normal Volunteers in a Japanese Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Ryukichi; Nakagawa, Tomonori; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Onoda, Keiichi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of major intracranial arteries is a leading cause of ischemic stroke in Asia. However, the long-term prognosis of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) in healthy volunteers has not been fully examined. Here, we conducted a longitudinal study to examine the prognosis of healthy volunteers with asymptomatic ICAS and to determine the risk factors for ICAS, including asymptomatic brain parenchymal lesions. We studied 2,807 healthy Japanese volunteers with no history of stroke (mean age, 62.0 years). They were followed for a mean interval of 64.5 months. The degree of ICAS and the presence of asymptomatic brain lesions were assessed by using magnetic resonance imaging. Asymptomatic ICAS was detected in 166 volunteers (5.9%) at the initial examination. Moderate and mild stenoses were observed in 1.5 and 4.4% of patients, respectively. Significant risk factors for ICAS were older age and a history of hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. During follow-up, ischemic stroke developed in 32 volunteers. Seven strokes occurred in the ICAS group, whose stroke incidence rate was higher than that in the non-ICAS group (0.78 vs. 0.18% per year). According to a Cox regression analysis, asymptomatic ICAS was an independent risk factor for future ischemic stroke after adjustment for age. Furthermore, after asymptomatic brain lesions were taken into account, ICAS was still a significant risk factor for stroke onset. In conclusion, even mild to moderate asymptomatic ICAS was a significant risk factor for future stroke, independent of asymptomatic brain lesions, in a healthy Japanese population. Mild to moderate ICAS might be a therapeutic target for stroke prevention. PMID:27047445

  13. Noninvasive evaluation of the severity of aortic stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Nitta, M; Nakamura, T; Hultgren, H N; Bilisoly, J; Marquess, B

    1987-05-01

    A noninvasive point score system for the evaluation of severity of aortic stenosis (AS) was employed in a prospective study of 153 patients (mean age 64.8 +/- 0.8 years) referred from invasive studies or for the evaluation of a systolic murmur. Seven variables were recorded and scored as follows: LVH by ECG (0-2); aortic valve calcium by chest x-ray film (0-2); loudness of A2 (0-2); Q-peak of murmur (0-3); T-time of carotid pulse (0-3); ejection time (0-3); and LVH by echo (0-1). Range of the total score was 0-16. All patients had the aortic valve area (AVA) determined by cardiac catheterization. Data analysis revealed that the relation between the total score and the AVA was curvilinear with a score greater than or equal to 5 correctly identifying 100/107 (93 percent) of patients with a valve area of less than or equal to 1.0 cm2. If the patients with an AVA of less than or equal to 1.0 cm2 were considered severe and patients with a total score less than 5 were considered mild-moderate, the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy for a score greater than or equal to 5 were 93 percent, 96 percent, and 98 percent, respectively. The relation between the score and aortic valve gradient (AVG) was linear with a score of greater than or equal to 5 correctly identifying 84/88 (95 percent) with an AVG greater than or equal to 40 mm Hg. If the patients with a pressure gradient over 40 mm Hg were considered severe, the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy for a score greater than or equal to 5 were 95 percent, 72 percent, and 82 percent, respectively. It is concluded that a point score system employing seven noninvasive variables is simple and accurate in identifying patients with severe AS and would be a valuable addition to a Doppler determined gradient. PMID:3568771

  14. Sex-associated differences in the modulation of vascular risk in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Laura; Balestrini, Simona; Avitabile, Emma; Altamura, Claudia; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Viticchi, Giovanna; Falsetti, Lorenzo; Provinciali, Leandro; Silvestrini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify determinants of the different sex-related stroke risk in subjects with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. In all, 492 women (44.4%) and 617 men (55.6%), with unilateral ⩾60% asymptomatic ICA stenosis, were prospectively evaluated with a median follow-up of 37 months (interquartile range, 26 to 43). Vascular risk profile, plaque characteristics, stenosis progression, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were investigated. Outcome measure was the occurrence of ischemic stroke ipsilateral to ICA stenosis. Myocardial infarction, contralateral stroke and transient ischemic attack were considered as competing events. The incidence rate of ipsilateral stroke over the entire follow-up period was 0.16%: 0.09% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05 to 0.15) in women and 0.22% (95% CI 0.17 to 0.29) in men (log-rank test, P<0.001). Stenosis progression significantly influenced the risk of ipsilateral stroke in both men (subhazard ratio, SHR, 8.99) and women (SHR 4.89). Stenosis degree (71% to 90%, SHR 2.35; 91% to 99%, SHR 3.38) and irregular plaque surface (SHR 2.32) were relevant risk factors for ipsilateral stroke only in men. Our findings suggest that characteristics of the stenosis and plaque exert a different effect in modulating vascular risk in the two sexes. Understanding sex differences in cardiovascular disease could help to target sex-specific future therapies. PMID:25586143

  15. Relation of Aortic Valve Morphologic Characteristics to Aortic Valve Insufficiency and Residual Stenosis in Children With Congenital Aortic Stenosis Undergoing Balloon Valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Petit, Christopher J; Gao, Kevin; Goldstein, Bryan H; Lang, Sean M; Gillespie, Scott E; Kim, Sung-In H; Sachdeva, Ritu

    2016-03-15

    Aortic valve morphology has been invoked as intrinsic to outcomes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for congenital aortic valve stenosis. We sought to use aortic valve morphologic features to discriminate between valves that respond favorably or unfavorably to BAV, using aortic insufficiency (AI) as the primary outcome. All patients who underwent BAV at 2 large-volume pediatric centers from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Morphologic features assessed on pre-BAV echo included valve pattern (unicuspid, functional bicuspid, and true bicuspid), leaflet fusion length, leaflet excursion angle, and aortic valve opening area and on post-BAV echo included leaflet versus commissural tear. Primary end point was increase in AI (AI+) of ≥2°. Eighty-nine patients (median age 0.2 years) were included in the study (39 unicuspid, 41 functional bicuspid, and 9 true bicuspid valves). Unicuspid valves had a lower opening area (p <0.01) and greater fusion length (p = 0.01) compared with functional and true bicuspid valves. Valve gradient pre-BAV and post-BAV were not different among valve patterns. Of the 16 patients (18%) with AI+, 14 had leaflet tears (odds ratio 13.9, 3.8 to 50). True bicuspid valves had the highest rate (33%) of AI+. On multivariate analysis, leaflet tears were associated with AI+, with larger opening area pre-BAV and lower fusion length pre-BAV. AI+ was associated with larger pre-BAV opening area. Gradient relief was associated with reduced angle of excursion. Valve morphology influences outcomes after BAV. Valves with lesser fusion and larger valve openings have higher rates of leaflet tears which in turn are associated with AI. PMID:26805657

  16. Decreased platelet function in aortic valve stenosis: high shear platelet activation then inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.; Etherington, M. D.; Brant, J.; Watkins, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To elucidate the mechanism of the bleeding tendency observed in patients with aortic valve stenosis. DESIGN--A prospective study of high and low shear platelet function tests in vitro in normal controls compared with that in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis with a mean (SD) systolic gradient by Doppler of 75 (18) mm Hg before and at least 4 months after aortic valve replacement. SETTING--District general hospital. RESULTS--The patients showed reduced retention in the high shear platelet function tests. (a) Platelet retention in the filter test was 53.6 (12.6)% in patients with aortic valve stenosis and 84.8 (9.6)% in the controls (P < 0.001). (b) Retention in the glass bead column test was 49.8 (19.2) in the patients and 87.4 (8.7) in the controls (P < 0.001). (c) The standard bleeding time was longer in the patients (P < 0.06). Results of the high shear tests (a, b, and c) after aortic valve replacement were within the normal range. The platelet count was low but within the normal range before surgery and increased postoperatively (P < 0.01). There were no differences in the results of standard clotting tests, plasma and intraplatelet von Willebrand's factor, or in 15 platelet aggregation tests using five agonists between patients with aortic valve stenosis and controls. CONCLUSIONS--The high shear haemodynamics of aortic valve stenosis modify platelet function in vivo predisposing to a bleeding tendency. This abnormality of platelet function is detectable only in vitro using high shear tests. The abnormal function is reversed by aortic valve replacement. High shear forces in vitro activate and then inactivate platelets. By the same mechanisms aortic valve stenosis seems to lead to high shear damage in vivo, resulting in a clinically important bleeding tendency in some patients. PMID:8541170

  17. Changing strategy for aortic stenosis with coronary artery disease by transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2013-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is combined with aortic stenosis (AS) in 40-50 % of patients with typical angina. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has changed the guideline for AS in patients with high comorbidity. At the same time more than 60 % of isolated CABG has been performed without cardiopulmonary bypass in Japan. CABG is recommended and should be considered in patients with primary indication for AVR and luminal stenosis >70 % in major coronary arteries and the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) by guidelines. AVR is indicated for severe AS undergoing CABG. It is generally accepted to perform AVR for moderate AS at the time of CABG by valve guidelines. However, prophylactic AVR for moderate AS associated with CABG may increase the early operative risk and expose the patients to postoperative long-term valve related complications. AVR after previous CABG poses potential risk for mortality and morbidity. The presence of patent ITA is a significant risk of its injury and difficulty of myocardial protection during aortic cross-clamping. Therefore, at present, for severe AS previous CABG with patent ITA should be one of the definite indications of TAVI. Rationale of TAVI in patients with severe AS and CAD has not been clearly delineated. The safety of TAVI irrespective of the extent and anatomy of CAD is still controversial. PCI is not appropriate before TAVI in high-risk patients with CAD. In the near future hybrid TAVI will be realistic considering least operative mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. PMID:23546769

  18. Dynamic LVOT Obstruction and Aortic Stenosis in the Same Patient: A Case of Challenging Doppler Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew W; Kiernan, Francis J

    2015-06-01

    We present a patient with both dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and valvular aortic stenosis. The aortic valve was calcified, and velocities and gradients measured by continuous-wave Doppler met standard criteria for severe aortic stenosis. The increased subvalvular velocities invalidated assumptions of the simplified Bernoulli equation; correction using the longer form of the Bernoulli equation suggested a lower but still significant gradient. The complex shape of the subvalvular spectral Doppler envelope indicated supranormal systolic function and dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction. Left heart catheterization with an end-hole catheter was required to determine the subvalvular and valvular components of the obstruction. PMID:25809389

  19. Aortic stenosis: insights on pathogenesis and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Guglielmo, Marco; Balasus, Fabio; Novo, Salvatore; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Corrado, Egle

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular heart disease in the Western populations, with an estimated overall prevalence of 3% in adults over 75 years. To understand its patho-biological processes represents a priority. In elderly patients, AS usually involves trileaflet valves and is referred to as degenerative calcific processes. Scientific evidence suggests the involvement of an active “atherosclerosis-like” pathogenesis in the initiation phase of degenerative AS. To the contrary, the progression could be driven by different forces (such as mechanical stress, genetic factors and interaction between inflammation and calcification). The improved understanding presents potentially new therapeutic targets for preventing and inhibiting the development and progression of the disease. Furthermore, in clinical practice the management of AS patients implies the evaluation of generalized atherosclerotic manifestations (i.e., in the coronary and carotid arteries) even for prognostic reasons. In counselling elderly patients, the risk stratification should address individual frailty beyond the generic risk scores. In these regard, the co-morbidities, and in particular those linked to the global atherosclerotic burden, should be carefully investigated in order to define the risk/benefit ratio for invasive treatment strategies. We present a detailed overview of insights in pathogenesis of AS with possible practical implications. PMID:27582763

  20. Aortic stenosis: insights on pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Guglielmo, Marco; Balasus, Fabio; Novo, Salvatore; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Corrado, Egle

    2016-09-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular heart disease in the Western populations, with an estimated overall prevalence of 3% in adults over 75 years. To understand its patho-biological processes represents a priority. In elderly patients, AS usually involves trileaflet valves and is referred to as degenerative calcific processes. Scientific evidence suggests the involvement of an active "atherosclerosis-like" pathogenesis in the initiation phase of degenerative AS. To the contrary, the progression could be driven by different forces (such as mechanical stress, genetic factors and interaction between inflammation and calcification). The improved understanding presents potentially new therapeutic targets for preventing and inhibiting the development and progression of the disease. Furthermore, in clinical practice the management of AS patients implies the evaluation of generalized atherosclerotic manifestations (i.e., in the coronary and carotid arteries) even for prognostic reasons. In counselling elderly patients, the risk stratification should address individual frailty beyond the generic risk scores. In these regard, the co-morbidities, and in particular those linked to the global atherosclerotic burden, should be carefully investigated in order to define the risk/benefit ratio for invasive treatment strategies. We present a detailed overview of insights in pathogenesis of AS with possible practical implications. PMID:27582763

  1. Altered Resting-State Cortical EEG Oscillations in Patients With Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fu-Jung; Hsieh, Fang-Yuh; Chen, Wei-Ta; Chu, Da-Chen; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-04-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is characterized by altered cerebral hemodynamics and cognitive impairment, but the underlying neurophysiological mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate the alterations of cortical activities, resting-state electrophysiological activities were recorded from patients with mild (<30%; n=10; age 57-85 years), moderate (30% to 50%; n=11; age 66-88 years), and severe (>50%; n=8; age 67-91 years) carotid stenosis. The current density and oscillatory power of the cortical sources were analyzed using the minimum norm estimates method combined with fast Fourier transform analysis. Our results indicate that the cortical current density among regions of the brain was similar, irrespective of the degree of carotid stenosis. With regard to the cortical oscillations, augmented theta activities in the bilateral parietal, left temporal, and left occipital regions and attenuated alpha activities in the bilateral frontal and right central regions were obtained in patients with severe asymptomatic carotid stenosis. We suggest that the source-based cortical oscillations at theta and alpha bands might reflect the alterations of the brain activities and characterize the altered neurophysiological mechanism of the brain with at least 50% occlusion of the carotid artery. Further longitudinal studies with larger populations are warranted to verify the present findings. PMID:25465434

  2. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Uk; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Joon Yong

    2016-04-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS) are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief. PMID:27066434

  3. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Uk; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Joon Yong

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS) are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief. PMID:27066434

  4. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  5. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Liu, Hui; Wang, Hui; Kong, Xiangqing

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  6. Copeptin constitutes a novel biomarker of degenerative aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Lasota, Bartosz; Mizia, Magdalena; Chmiel, Artur; Adamczyk, Tomasz; Chudek, Jerzy; Gasior, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    Copeptin is a new biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. Its diagnostic value in degenerative aortic valve stenosis (AS) with preserved left ventricle systolic function is unknown. We aimed to assess the association of serum copeptin levels with AS severity and coexistence of coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixty-four patients with AS and preserved left ventricle systolic function including 40 with severe degenerative AS (group sAS, effective orifice area EOA = 0.67 cm(2)) and 24 with moderate degenerative AS (group mAS, EOA = 1.40 cm(2)) were enrolled into the study. Twenty-three patients without AS and heart failure, matched for age, sex, and CAD occurrence served as the control group (group C). Serum levels of copeptin and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum copeptin concentrations were significantly higher in patients with AS: sAS (405 pg/ml) and mAS (351 pg/ml; sAS vs mAS P < 0.05), compared with group C (302 pg/ml, P < 0.05). Serum copeptin levels correlated inversely with EOA (r = -0.55; P < 0.001) in AS patients. There was no correlation between copeptin and NT-proBNP or association with the coexisting CAD. Receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed that copeptin was a good marker of severe/moderate AS (sensitivity 71 %; specificity 87 %), with the optimized cut-off value of 354 pg/ml. Serum copeptin concentration constitutes a novel biomarker of degenerative AS. Coexisting CAD does not interfere with copeptin level. PMID:23142954

  7. Impact of Aortic Valve Calcification, as Measured by MDCT, on Survival in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A.; Michelena, Hector I.; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D.; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. METHODS In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. RESULTS During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ≤ 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. CONCLUSIONS This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of

  8. Impact of Pulmonary Hypertension on Outcomes Following Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Melby, Spencer J.; Moon, Marc R.; Lindman, Brian R.; Bailey, Marci S.; Hill, Laureen L.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The presence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) historically has been considered a significant risk factor affecting early and late outcomes following valve replacement. Given the number of recent advances in the management of PH following cardiac surgery a better understanding of the impact of PH on outcomes may assist in the clinical management of these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if pulmonary hypertension remains a risk factor in the modern era for adverse outcomes following aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic valve stenosis. Methods From January 1996 to June 2009, 1,080 patients underwent AVR for primary aortic valve stenosis, of which 574 (53%) had normal systolic pulmonary artery pressures (sPAP) and 506 (47%) had PH. PH was defined as mild (sPAP 35-44 mmHg), moderate (45-59mmHg), or severe (≥ 60mmHg). In the group of patients with PH, 204 had postoperative echocardiograms. Results Operative mortality was significantly higher in patients with PH (47/506, 9% versus 31/574, 5%; p=0.02). The incidence of postoperative stroke was similar (p=0.14), but patients with PH had an increased median hospital LOS (8 versus 7 days, p=0.001) and an increased incidence of prolonged ventilation (26% versus 17%, p<0.001). Preoperative PH was an independent risk factor for decreased long term survival (RR 1.7, p=0.02). Those with persistent PH postoperatively had decreased survival. Five-year survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 78 ± 6% with normal sPAP and 77 ± 7% with mild PH postoperatively, compared to 64 ± 8% with moderate PH and 45 ± 12% with severe PH (p<0.001). Conclusion In patients undergoing AVR, preoperative PH increased operative mortality and decreased long-term survival. Patients with persistent moderate or severe PH after AVR had decreased long-term survival. These data suggest that PH had a significant impact on outcomes in patients undergoing AVR and should be considered in preoperative risk assessment. PMID:21596173

  9. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction. PMID:24368183

  10. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication. PMID:26355692

  11. Definition of Best Medical Treatment in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Veith, Frank J; Spence, J David

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of best medical treatment (BMT) is the cornerstone of the management of patients with either asymptomatic or symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We review the literature to define the components of BMT. Smoking cessation, maintaining a healthy body weight, moderate exercise, and a Mediterranean diet are essential lifestyle measures. Moderate alcohol consumption may also be beneficial but recommending it to patients may be hazardous if they consume too much. The importance of lifestyle measures is largely underestimated by both physicians and patients. Blood pressure and diabetes control, antiplatelet agents, and lipid-lowering treatment with statins/ezetimibe comprise the pharmacological components of BMT. Initiation of an intensive regimen of BMT is a sine qua non for patients with carotid artery stenosis whether or not they are offered or undergo an invasive revascularization procedure. PMID:26721504

  12. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  13. Determinants and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Levy, Franck; Rusinaru, Dan; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Charles, Vincent; Peltier, Marcel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2015-11-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is frequently encountered in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and its incidence also increases with age. In the general population, AF is known to increase cardiovascular risk. We sought to investigate the prognostic importance of AF associated with AS in the context of routine clinical practice. This analysis was based on 809 patients (75 ± 12 years) diagnosed with AS (aortic valve area <2 cm(2)) and normal (≥50%) ejection fraction (EF). Patients were grouped according to the presence of sinus rhythm (SR) or AF at study enrollment. The AF group comprised 141 patients (17.5%) with AF, whereas 668 patients (82.5%) were in SR at inclusion. Four-year estimates of all-cause mortality with medical and surgical management were 60 ± 5% for the AF group compared with 24 ± 2% for the SR group (p = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the AF group than in the SR group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.47 [1.83 to 3.33], p = 0.0001). AF remained associated with excess mortality risk when the analysis was limited to asymptomatic patients (adjusted HR 2.31 [1.38 to 3.89], p = 0.002) and, respectively, patients with severe AS (adjusted HR 2.22 [1.41 to 3.49], p = 0.001). Among patients managed medically, AF was independently associated with increased risk of death in the overall study population (adjusted HR 2.52 [1.81 to 3.51], p = 0.0001), in asymptomatic AS (adjusted HR 2.12 [1.19 to 3.76], p = 0.01), and in severe AS (adjusted HR 2.23 [1.30 to 3.81], p = 0.004). In conclusion, AF is a major predictor of mortality, in both medically and surgically managed patients with AS, irrespective of the functional status and the severity. AF is, therefore, a strong marker of risk in AS and should be considered for clinical decision making. PMID:26410605

  14. A clinical risk score of myocardial fibrosis predicts adverse outcomes in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Calvin W.L.; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Lefevre, Guillaume; Bailleul, Sophie; Yeung, Emily N.W.; Koo, Maria; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Mathieu, Tiffany; Semple, Scott I.; Mills, Nicholas L.; Vahanian, Alec; Newby, David E.; Dweck, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Midwall myocardial fibrosis on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a marker of early ventricular decompensation and adverse outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to develop and validate a novel clinical score using variables associated with midwall fibrosis. Methods and results One hundred forty-seven patients (peak aortic velocity (Vmax) 3.9 [3.2,4.4] m/s) underwent CMR to determine midwall fibrosis (CMR cohort). Routine clinical variables that demonstrated significant association with midwall fibrosis were included in a multivariate logistic score. We validated the prognostic value of the score in two separate outcome cohorts of asymptomatic patients (internal: n = 127, follow-up 10.3 [5.7,11.2] years; external: n = 289, follow-up 2.6 [1.6,4.5] years). Primary outcome was a composite of AS-related events (cardiovascular death, heart failure, and new angina, dyspnoea, or syncope). The final score consisted of age, sex, Vmax, high-sensitivity troponin I concentration, and electrocardiographic strain pattern [c-statistic 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.78–0.91), P < 0.001; Hosmer–Lemeshow χ2 = 7.33, P = 0.50]. Patients in the outcome cohorts were classified according to the sensitivity and specificity of this score (both at 98%): low risk (probability score <7%), intermediate risk (7–57%), and high risk (>57%). In the internal outcome cohort, AS-related event rates were >10-fold higher in high-risk patients compared with those at low risk (23.9 vs. 2.1 events/100 patient-years, respectively; log rank P < 0.001). Similar findings were observed in the external outcome cohort (31.6 vs. 4.6 events/100 patient-years, respectively; log rank P < 0.001). Conclusion We propose a clinical score that predicts adverse outcomes in asymptomatic AS patients and potentially identifies high-risk patients who may benefit from early valve replacement. PMID:26491110

  15. The effect of statins therapy in aortic stenosis: Meta-analysis comparison data of RCTs and observationals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Nicoll, Rachel; He, Yi hua; Henein, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis has been shown to share the same risk factors as atherosclerosis which suggested a potential benefit from statins therapy. Fourteen studies which provided the effect of statins treatment on aortic stenosis (AS) were meta-analyzed, including 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9 observational studies. In the RCTs, statins did not have any influence on peak aortic valve velocity, peak valve gradient, mean valve gradient, aortic valve area and aortic calcification compared to controls. In the observational studies, the peak valve velocity, peak gradient and aortic valve area showed less progression in the statins group compared to controls. This article describes data related article title “The effect of statins on valve function and calcification in aortic stenosis: a meta-analysis” (Zhao et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977437

  16. The effect of statins therapy in aortic stenosis: Meta-analysis comparison data of RCTs and observationals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Nicoll, Rachel; He, Yi Hua; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-06-01

    Aortic stenosis has been shown to share the same risk factors as atherosclerosis which suggested a potential benefit from statins therapy. Fourteen studies which provided the effect of statins treatment on aortic stenosis (AS) were meta-analyzed, including 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9 observational studies. In the RCTs, statins did not have any influence on peak aortic valve velocity, peak valve gradient, mean valve gradient, aortic valve area and aortic calcification compared to controls. In the observational studies, the peak valve velocity, peak gradient and aortic valve area showed less progression in the statins group compared to controls. This article describes data related article title "The effect of statins on valve function and calcification in aortic stenosis: a meta-analysis" (Zhao et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977437

  17. Progressive supra-aortic stenosis in a young adult with the findings of Singleton Merten Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozyuksel, Arda; Ersoy, Cihangir; Canturk, Emir; Akcevin, Atif

    2014-01-01

    Singleton Merten Syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of unknown origin. Patients often present with muscular weakness, failure to thrive, abnormal dentition, glaucoma, psoriatic skin lesions, aortic calcification and musculoskeletal abnormalities. In this case, we present a young girl with a history of aortic root replacement, who had an unusual progressive supra-aortic stenosis managed with urgent surgery during the course of the syndrome. Cardiovascular involvement needs special attention, since it is the major cause of mortality along with rhythm disturbances in the course of Singleton Merten Syndrome. PMID:25193816

  18. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Podder, Subrata; Kumar, Ajay; Mahajan, Sachin; Saha, Pradip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS) causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR) and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS) with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score. PMID:25566720

  19. Acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Stress cardiomyopathy is a condition of chest pain, breathlessness, abnormal heart rhythms and sometimes congestive heart failure or shock precipitated by intense mental or physical stress. Case presentation A 64-year-old male with a known diagnosis of moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis and advised that valve replacement was not urgent, presented with acute pulmonary edema following extraordinary mental distress. The patient was misdiagnosed as having a "massive heart attack" and died when managed by a traditional protocol for acute myocardial infarction/coronary artery disease, irrespective of his known aortic stenosis. Conclusion Intense mental stress poses a considerable risk, particularly to patients with significant aortic stenosis. As described here, it can precipitate acute pulmonary edema. Importantly, effective management of acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in patients with known aortic stenosis requires its distinction from acute pulmonary edema caused by an acute myocardial infarction. Treatment options include primarily urgent rhythm and/or rate control, as well as cautious vasodilation. PMID:20062645

  20. Should patients with asymptomatic significant carotid stenosis undergo simultaneous carotid and cardiac surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Ogutu, Peter; Werner, Raphael; Oertel, Frank; Beyer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether patients with severe asymptomatic carotid and coronary artery diseases should undergo simultaneous carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A total of 624 papers were found using the reported search, of which 20 represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study results of these papers are tabulated. Previous cohort studies showed mixed results, while advocating for the necessity of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). A recent RCT showed that patients undergoing prophylactic or simultaneous CEA + CABG had lower rates of stroke (0%) compared with delayed CEA 1–3 months after CABG (7.7%), without significant perioperative mortality difference. This study included patients with unilateral severe (>70%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis requiring CABG. An earlier partly randomized trial also showed better outcomes for patients undergoing simultaneous procedures (P = 0.045). Interestingly, systematic reviews previously failed to show compelling evidence supporting prophylactic CEA. This could be partly due to the fact that these reviews collectively analyse different cohort qualities. Neurological studies have, however, shown reduced cognitive and phonetic quality and function in patients with unilateral and bilateral asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Twenty-one RCTs comparing lone carotid artery stenting (CAS) and CEA informed the American Heart Association guidelines, which declared CAS comparable with CEA for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (CS). However, the risk of death/stroke for CAS alone is double that for CEA alone in the acute phase following onset of symptoms, while CEA alone is associated with a doubled risk of myocardial infarction. There is

  1. Early repolarization is associated with significant coronary artery stenosis in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Suh, Beomseok; Park, Sehhoon; Shin, Dong Wook; Ahn, Hongkeun; Cho, Seongcheol; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Hyejin; Park, Jin Ho; Cho, BeLong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between early repolarization (ERP) and coronary heart disease (CHD) by evaluating its association with coronary artery stenosis and plaques. Consecutive asymptomatic adults aged 30 or more without CHD were investigated (n = 3100). Adjusting for major cardiovascular risk factors, ERP was significantly associated with significant coronary stenosis with incremental predictive value (aOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.13-2.60; ROC AUC 0.763 vs. 0.723, P < 0.001; NRI 4.86%, P = 0.042; IDI 0.0030, P = 0.040), specifically in intermediate risk group (aOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.29-4.20; ROC AUC 0.753 vs. 0.708, P = 0.001). ERP was shown to be especially associated with significant coronary stenosis with non-calcified plaque (aOR 2.26, 95% CI 1.28-3.98). Our study is the first to directly show the association of ERP with CHD. Future studies are needed to replicate our results and investigate whether it would be beneficial to include ERP in risk algorithms for CHD screening. PMID:26694693

  2. Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, D; Harrison, P; Mackie, I; Sidhu, P; Purdy, G; Lawrie, A; Watt, H; Machin, S; Brown, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference. Methods: A full blood count was done and whole blood flow cytometry used to measure platelet surface expression of CD62P, CD63, and PAC1 binding and the percentage of leucocyte–platelet complexes in patients with acute (0–21 days, n = 19) and convalescent (79–365 days) symptomatic (n = 16) and asymptomatic (n = 16) severe (⩾70%) carotid stenosis. Most patients were treated with aspirin (37.5–300 mg daily) although alternative antithrombotic regimens were more commonly used in the symptomatic group. Results: The mean platelet count was higher in patients with acute and convalescent symptomatic compared with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. There were no significant differences in the median percentage expression of CD62P and CD63, or PAC1 binding between the acute or convalescent symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The median percentages of neutrophil–platelet (p = 0.004), monocyte–platelet (p = 0.046), and lymphocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.02) were higher in acute symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients. In patients on aspirin monotherapy, the percentages of neutrophil–platelet and monocyte–platelet complexes (p = 0.03) were higher in acute symptomatic (n = 11) than asymptomatic patients (n = 14). In the convalescent phase, the median percentages of all leucocyte–platelet complexes in the symptomatic group dropped to levels similar to those found in the asymptomatic group. Conclusion: Increased platelet count and leucocyte–platelet complex formation may contribute to the early excess risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:16107361

  3. Acute systemic hypotension after arteriovenous fistula construction in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mise, Naobumi; Uchida, Lisa; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Tanaka, Shinji; Nakajima, Hiroyoshi; Sugimoto, Tokuichiro

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old hemodialysis patient with severe aortic stenosis, who developed acute systemic hypoperfusion after arteriovenous fistula (AVF) construction. He presented with hypotension and repeated syncope soon after distal radiocephalic AVF construction, and finally developed a respiratory arrest. His blood pressure and hemodynamics recovered promptly by sub-emergent aortic valve replacement surgery. In the present case, the heart with severe aortic stenosis could not increase cardiac output in response to the reduction in peripheral vascular resistance caused by the AVF. High-output heart failure, a relatively rare AVF-associated disorder, occurs with an excessive AVF flow, usually more than 3 L/min or 30% of cardiac output. However, heart failure may develop soon after construction of an AVF with a moderate blood flow if a patient's cardiac function is severely impaired. In addition, heart failure may improve with AVF preservation if the underlying heart disease is treatable. PMID:21725657

  4. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  5. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick; Erkilet, Gülsüm; Veulemans, Verena; Kröpil, Patric; Schurgers, Leon; Zeus, Tobias; Heiss, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating microparticles (MPs) derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC) as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC) by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation. Results Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs), endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs) and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification. PMID:27010400

  6. Involvement of Immune Cell Network in Aortic Valve Stenosis: Communication between Valvular Interstitial Cells and Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a heart disease prevalent in the elderly characterized by valvular calcification, fibrosis, and inflammation, but its exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Previously, aortic valve stenosis was thought to be caused by chronic passive and degenerative changes associated with aging. However, recent studies have demonstrated that atherosclerotic processes and inflammation can induce valvular calcification and bone deposition, leading to valvular stenosis. In particular, the most abundant cell type in cardiac valves, valvular interstitial cells, can differentiate into myofibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells, leading to valvular calcification and stenosis. Differentiation of valvular interstitial cells can be trigged by inflammatory stimuli from several immune cell types, including macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, and mast cells. This review indicates that crosstalk between immune cells and valvular interstitial cells plays an important role in the development of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:26937229

  7. The spectrum of low-output low-gradient aortic stenosis with normal ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Pislaru, Sorin V; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2016-05-01

    Low-flow, low-gradient (LF/LG) severe aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved ejection fraction refers to the condition of AS with aortic valve area ≤1 cm(2), stroke volume index <35 mL/m(2), mean aortic valve gradient <40 mm Hg and left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50%. This mismatch of aortic valve area suggesting severe stenosis and 'low' gradient in some patients has led to confusion as to the severity of stenosis. Conditions previously labelled as LF/LG severe AS include a spectrum, with measurement error probably being the most common cause of marked inconsistency between gradient, valve area and patient presentation. The presence of LG severe AS may be overestimated in petite patients, who may have aortic valve area slightly less than 1 cm(2)with only moderate AS. Concomitant cardiac conditions besides AS, including significant mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, intracardiac shunts and constrictive pericarditis, may contribute to reduced stroke volume, and evidence for these must be sought at the time of echocardiography. True LF/LG severe AS is associated with a unique and probably maladaptive remodelling pattern with smaller ventricles, increasing relative wall thickness, progressive worsening of diastolic function and higher afterload, as demonstrated by lower systemic arterial compliance, higher systemic vascular resistance and higher valvuloarterial impedance. Control of hypertension is essential to the appropriate management of patients with AS. Aortic valve replacement should be considered in patients with compelling evidence of severe AS who remain symptomatic despite optimal treatment of hypertension. PMID:26822426

  8. Aortic stenosis in adults. Non-invasive estimation of pressure differences by continuous wave Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Hegrenaes, L; Hatle, L

    1985-01-01

    The peak and mean aortic transvalvar pressure differences measured invasively and non-invasively by continuous wave Doppler echocardiography were compared in 87 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis. The mean values were calculated from the maximal velocities of the aortic jet recorded with a spectral display of the Doppler frequency shifts and by applying a modified Bernoulli equation. Technically satisfactory velocity curves for estimating the mean pressure differences could not be obtained in three patients and invasive measurements were not obtained in two. In all patients the peak transvalvar pressure difference was calculated since the aortic jet was identified non-invasively. The peak and mean pressure differences measured invasively and non-invasively correlated well--with only minor underestimation of the pressure differences measured with the Doppler technique--regardless of age, sex, and the presence or absence of aortic valvar regurgitation, or other valvar lesions. With a systematic search for the highest velocities in the aortic jet and with on line spectral analysis of the Doppler frequencies the peak and the mean aortic pressure differences can be determined non-invasively with a high degree of precision in almost all patients. Images PMID:4052281

  9. Echocardiographic and electron beam tomographic assessment of stenosis in patients with aortic valve disease: gradient versus valve area

    PubMed Central

    Piers, L.H.; Dikkers, R.; Tio, R.A.; van den Berg, M.P.; Willems, T.P.; Oudkerk, M.; Zijlstra, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely used to evaluate aortic valve stenosis. However, it does not give reliable results in every patient. There is growing interest in electron-beam tomography (EBT) as a noninvasive cardiac imaging technique. The usefulness of EBT to evaluate aortic stenosis has yet to be evaluated. Aim To compare EBT with TTE in assessing severity of aortic stenosis. Methods In total 47 patients (18 females, 29 males) underwent a contrast-enhanced EBT scan and TTE within 6±20 days. The calcium score of the aortic valve was determined and the aortic valve area (AVA) was measured by planimetry. A complete TTE study, during which the peak pressure gradient across the aortic valve was measured, was performed in all patients by an experienced sonographer. Results There was a significant correlation between AVA assessed by EBT and peak pressure gradient (r=-0.38, p=0.009). The calcium score of the aortic valve assessed by EBT correlated with peak pressure gradient (r=0.48, p=0.001). Conclusion EBT is a useful noninvasive method to evaluate the severity of aortic stenosis. It holds the possibility of assessing the AVA as well as quantification of the degree of calcification. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696558

  10. [Immediate and mid-term results of surgery of aortic valve stenosis in the newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Losay, J; Touchot-Koné, A; Bruniaux, J; Serraf, A; Lacour-Gayet, F; Planché, C; Binet, J P

    1992-05-01

    Between January 1980 and June 1990, 47 consecutive neonates with severe aortic stenosis underwent surgical aortic commissurotomy at Marie-Lannelongue Hospital. The average age at operation was 5 days. Other cardiac abnormalities were present in 27 children and left ventricular fibroelastosis in 11 children. Closed heart aortic valvotomy via the apex of the left ventricle was performed in 26 patients and open heart commissurotomy in 21 patients. Immediate per- or postoperative death was observed in 14 cases (29.8%). Six patients died after open heart valvulotomy (29%) and 8 after closed heart valvulotomy (31%). The mortality was higher in children with a critical preoperative status: 60% versus 22% (p less than 0.05); in cases with an associated cardiac malformation: 45% versus 6% (p less than 0.01) or fibroelastosis: 91% versus 11% (p less than 0.001). None of the patients was lost to follow-up which lasted an average of 47 +/- 41 months. Ten secondary deaths were observed, of which 4 were sudden, 4 after reoperation and 2 due to mitral stenosis with pulmonary hypertension. The overall one year survival was 57% (IC 70%: 40-64); the 5 year survival was 46% (IC 70%; 30-60). Reoperation was necessary in 12 children. Survival without reoperation at 1 and 5 years was 49% (IC 70%: 41-56) and 43% (IC 70%: 29-59) respectively. At the last follow-up examination, 97% of the 23 survivors had good left ventricular function; the systolic pressure gradient was less than 50 mmHg in two thirds of patients and aortic regurgitation was minimal or absent in three quarters of patients. In critical aortic stenosis in neonates, surgery is associated with a high immediate and secondary mortality. The results at medium term in the survivors are good with respect to symptoms, left ventricular function and obstruction to left ventricular ejection. PMID:1530395

  11. Sex, Aging, and Preexisting Cerebral Ischemic Disease in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Acker, Michael A.; Bilello, Michel; Melhem, Elias R.; Stambrook, Elizabeth; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing cardiac surgery have a high frequency of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions, the presence of which appears to predict cognitive sequelae. Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis (AS) incur an exceptionally high risk for perioperative cerebral ischemia. The extreme risk in this subgroup may arise from the preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. We tested the hypotheses that increasing age, female sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS are predictive of the severity of preexisting cerebral ischemic lesions. Methods A total of 95 subjects were included in this study. Subjects were imaged on 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanners to obtain multimodal image sets which were used for the automatic segmentation of cerebral lesion volume. The dependence of lesion volume upon age, sex, coronary artery disease, and the severity of AS were tested. Results The results demonstrate a strong correlation between aging, female sex, and white matter and ischemia-like lesion volume in patients with aortic stenosis. Conclusions Women and those of advanced age presenting for aortic valve replacement for AS may incur a particularly high risk for postoperative neurologic sequelae due to an exceptional preexisting burden of cerebral ischemic disease. PMID:20868818

  12. Computational Modeling of Aortic Valvular Stenosis to Asses the Range of Validity of Gorlin Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okpara, Emanuel; Agarwal, Ramesh; Rifkin, Robert; Wendl, Mike

    2003-11-01

    It is well known from clinical observations that the underestimation errors occur with the use of Gorlin formula (1) for the calculation of valve area of the stenotic aortic valve in patients with low cardiac output, that is in low flow states. Since 1951, empirical modifications to Gorlin formula have been proposed in the literaure by many researchers. In this paper, we study the mild to severe aortic valve stenosis for low to high flow rates by employing a simplified model of aortic valve. The aortic valve stenosis is modeled by a circular orifice in a flat plate embedded in the cross-section of a rigid tube (aorta). Experimental results are available for this configuration for the validation of a CFD solver "FLUENT". The numerical data base generated for this model for various degrees of stenoses and flow rates is employed to asses the range of validity of Gorlin's equation. Modifications to Gorlin formula are suggested to make it valid for all flow rates to determine the valve area for clinical use. (1) R. Gorlin and S. Gorlin," Hydraulic Formula for Calculation of the Area of Stenotic Mitral Valve, Other Cardiac Valves and Central Circulatory Shunts," Am. Heart Journal, Vol. 41, 1951, pp. 1-29.

  13. Discrete subaortic stenosis. Operative age and gradient as predictors of late aortic valve incompetence.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, G; Tiso, E; Mazzucco, A; Daliento, L; Rubino, M; Tursi, V; Fracasso, A

    1993-07-01

    Between January 1969 and May 1990, 100 patients were operated on for discrete subaortic stenosis. Three patients died in the perioperative period. Patients with intrinsic lesions, prosthetic replacement, or extensive operative remodeling of the aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. The 67 remaining patients had a median follow-up of 62 months. Preoperatively, 8 patients had aortic valve competence, 51 had mild incompetence, and 8 patients moderate aortic valve incompetence. At follow-up mild incompetence persisted in 27 and moderate incompetence in 6 patients. In 1 patient it worsened from no incompetence to mild and in another patient from mild to moderate. The probability of aortic incompetence at follow-up was significantly and simultaneously related (multivariate ordinal logistic model) to (1) older age at operation (logarithm of months, p = 0.007), (2) higher preoperative gradient (third power of milligrams of mercury, p = 0.0004), (3) preoperative cardiomegaly (p = 0.04), and (4) surgical myectomy (p = 0.002). There was an interaction between age and gradient (p = 0.03). Two nomograms are proposed as a generalizable aid to decision making. The data support the policy of early repair of subaortic stenosis. PMID:8321008

  14. Echocardiographic evaluation of systolic left-ventricular function in infants with critical aortic stenosis before and after aortic valvotomy.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, R; Zeike, B; Messmer, B J; von Bernuth, G

    1990-08-01

    Infants with critical aortic stenosis may have global or regional left ventricular contraction abnormalities. In order to evaluate the clinical significance of these contraction abnormalities, we examined the systolic left ventricular function before and after aortic valvotomy in 16 infants operated on between 1980 and 1987. Left ventricular free wall and septal motion were studied by cross sectional echocardiography using the apical 4-chamber view. Enddiastolic and endsystolic left ventricular frames were digitized. The relative systolic reduction of the total left ventricular area (reflecting ejection fraction) as well as of 5 left ventricular sectors (reflecting regional wall motion) was calculated and compared to previously established normal values. Before valvotomy, 8 infants had normal and the other 8 impaired left ventricular systolic wall motion. These latter infants showed hypokinesia of the apex and/or the posterolateral left ventricular wall resulting in a decreased systolic reduction of the total left ventricular area. Four of these infants had evidence of myocardial infarction on intraoperative inspection. Early after operation, the systolic reduction of the total left ventricular area was normal in all infants, and the left ventricular apex and poster-lateral wall were either normo- or hyperkinetic. Follow-up studies of all infants more than 10 months and of 7 infants more than 3 years after operation showed that the left ventricular systolic wall motion remained normal in all, irrespective of whether it was normal or abnormal preoperatively. This study suggests that left ventricular contraction abnormalities in infants with critical aortic stenosis may be reversible and thus do not constitute a contraindication against aortic valvotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2237884

  15. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Anesthetic Management of a Parturient with Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Tyagaraj, Kalpana; Gutman, David A.; Belliveau, Lynn; Sadiq, Adnan; Feierman, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize anesthetic management and avoid adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, a clear understanding of the changes in cardiovascular physiology that occur during pregnancy is paramount. The effects of normal gestation on the cardiovascular system are particularly significant in a parturient with cardiac valvular pathology. We present a case of a 27-year-old G2P0 at 37 weeks with a past medical history of diabetes, macrosomia, congenital bicuspid aortic valve with severe stenosis (valve area 0.7 cm2) who was scheduled for elective C-section. A multidisciplinary discussion involving cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, obstetric surgeons, neonatal intensivists, perfusion staff, anesthesiologists, and nursing staff was held to formulate a plan for the perioperative management of this parturient. Also, contingency plans were formulated and discussed with the care providers, in the event of acute decompensation of the mother and baby and possible need for emergency aortic valvuloplasty and/or aortic valve replacement. PMID:26090237

  16. Concomitant transapical treatment of aortic stenosis and degenerated mitral bioprosthesis with two 29 mm Edwards Sapien XT prostheses.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Leonardo; Farah, Bruno; Tchetche, Didier

    2013-12-01

    An 85-year-old woman was admitted to our institution for effort dyspnea. She had a history of mitral valve replacement with a 29 mm Carpentier-Edwards bioprosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed aortic stenosis and senescence of the mitral bioprosthesis. The heart team opted for a transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and mitral valve-in-valve implantation (m-ViV). Two Edwards Sapien XT (ESXT) 29 mm devices were selected. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the concomitant transapical implantation of two 29 mm ESXTs for a combination of failed mitral bioprosthesis and native aortic stenosis. PMID:24296390

  17. Emergency aortic valve replacement and Caesarian section in a primigravida with severe aortic stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, Puneet K; Zutshi, V; Shamsunder, S; Batra, S; Ghosh, P

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Congenital bicuspid aortic valve with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a rare condition (3–6% of patients with congenital heart disease). Pregnancy in these patients carries a high risk of maternal and fetal mortality. With advancing gestational age, these women may develop cardiac failure due to increased cardiorespiratory requirements. When medical therapy proves insufficient, cardiac surgery becomes mandatory to save the patient's life. Balloon valvuloplasty is only palliative treatment, the duration of benefit being only 6 months. Valve replacement is thus recommended. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery with valve replacement has been reported to carry a lower risk of maternal mortality (1.5–13%) but a very high fetal risk (16–40%). This paper reports the case of a 30-year-old primigravida with severe AS with bicuspid aortic valve and pulmonary congestion clinically uncontrolled, in whom CPB surgery and aortic valve replacement was performed as an emergency procedure, along with a lower segment Caesarian section. Conclusion The outcome of unrelieved severe symptomatic AS in pregnancy is poor. Multidisciplinary management is important to avoid deterioration in cardiac performance in parturients with severe AS. CPB during pregnancy carries a high risk to the fetus. Therefore, open heart surgery during pregnancy should be advised only in extreme emergencies (ie, heart failure refractory to conventional therapy).

  18. Evaluation of aortic stenosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with established routine clinical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kupfahl, C; Honold, M; Meinhardt, G; Vogelsberg, H; Wagner, A; Mahrholdt, H; Sechtem, U

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether direct planimetry of aortic valve area (AVA) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a reliable tool for determining the severity of aortic stenosis compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE), and cardiac catheterisation. Methods: 44 symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis were studied. By cardiac catheterisation AVA was calculated by the Gorlin equation. AVA was measured with CMR from steady state free precession (true fast imaging with steady state precession) by planimetry. AVA was also determined from TOE images by planimetry and from TTE images by the continuity equation. Results: Bland-Altman analysis evaluating intraobserver and interobserver variability showed a very small bias for both (−0.016 and 0.019, respectively; n  =  20). Bias and limits of agreement between CMR and TTE were 0.05 (−0.35, 0.44) cm2 (n  =  37), between CMR and TOE 0.02 (−0.39, 0.42) cm2 (n  =  32), and between CMR and cardiac catheterisation 0.09 (−0.30, 0.47) cm2 (n  =  36). The sensitivity and specificity of CMR to detect AVA ⩽ 0.80 cm2 measured by cardiac catheterisation was 78% and 89%, of TOE 70% and 70%, and of TTE 74% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: CMR planimetry is highly reliable and reproducible. Further, CMR planimetry had the best sensitivity and specificity of all non-invasive methods for detecting severe aortic stenosis in comparison with cardiac catheterisation. Therefore, CMR planimetry of AVA with steady state free precession is a new powerful diagnostic tool, particularly for patients with uncertain or discrepant findings by other modalities. PMID:15253962

  19. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  20. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  1. Circulating microRNA Profiling Needs Further Refinement Before Clinical Use in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Sean; Williams, Michael J A; Phillips, L Vicky; Jones, Gregory T

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive condition leading to heart failure and death without treatment. No medical therapy currently exists for AS, and a major management challenge is deciding on the correct timing of aortic valve replacement. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that are stable in the circulation. We wished to use miRNAs as biomarkers of disease in AS. Methods and Results We performed microarray-based whole miRNome profiling of 24 participants with AS and 27 control participants. After adjustment for age and multiple testing, we identified 4 miRNAs significantly different between groups. These findings were then examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in a larger validation cohort of 101 controls and 94 participants with AS, stratified in a prespecified analysis by presence of coexisting coronary artery disease (CAD). We obtained mixed results for miR-22-3p, miR-24-3p, miR-382-5p, and miR-451a in the validation cohort, with differing associations according to CAD status. miR-21-5p was increased in AS patients without CAD, but there was no difference between groups with CAD. Conclusion Despite holding great promise, circulating miRNA profiling requires further refinement before translation into clinical use as a biomarker in aortic stenosis. PMID:26304936

  2. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  3. [Aortic Valve Replacement after Balloon Valvuloplasty for Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Dialysis Patient with Cardiogenic Shock;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Masanori; Hirotani, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Satoshi; Saito, Sumikatsu; Takeuchi, Shigeyuki; Hasegawa, Tasuku; Endo, Ayaka; Yamasaki, Yu; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    A 67-year-old man on chronic hemodialysis was admitted with worsening congestive heart failure due to critical aortic stenosis. Echocardiography showed severe aortic stenosis with a valve area of 0.67 cm2 and an ejection fraction of 0.31. Cardiac catheterization revealed severe pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary artery pressures of 62/32 mmHg. In the middle of cardiac catheterization, the systolic pressure declined to 60 mmHg due to cardiogenic shock. Dopamine hydrochloride and dobutamine hydrochloride infusions were necessary to maintain a systolic pressure greater than 80 mmHg. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty was urgently performed. The patient's symptoms rapidly resolved except for angina on exertion. One month later, elective aortic valve replacement was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the he was discharged on the 60th postoperative day. A follow-up echocardiogram 6 months postoperatively revealed normal prosthetic valve function and an ejection fraction of 0.6. PMID:26066880

  4. Left ventricular response to pressure afterload in children: aortic stenosis and coarctation: a systematic review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Jashari, Haki; Rydberg, Annika; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Bajraktari, Gani; Henein, Michael Y

    2015-01-15

    Congenital aortic stenosis (CAS) and Coarctation of Aorta (CoA) represent two forms of pressure afterload that affect the left ventricle (LV), hence require regular echocardiographic monitoring. Subclinical dysfunction of the LV exists even in asymptomatic patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), implying low sensitivity of EF in predicting optimum time for intervention. In this article we review patterns of LV myocardial deformation before and after correction of CAS and CoA in infants, children and adolescents, showing their important role in monitoring the course of LV dysfunction. A systematic search using PubMed was performed and suitable studies are presented on a narrative form. Normal EF and/or fractional shortening (FS), with subclinical myocardial dysfunction are reported in all studies before intervention. The short-term results, after intervention, were related to the type of procedure, with no improvement or further deterioration related to surgery but immediate improvement after balloon intervention. Long term follow-up showed further improvement but still subnormal function. Thus correction of CAS and CoA before irreversible LV dysfunction is vital, and requires longitudinal studies in order to identify the most accurate parameter for function prognostication. Until then, conventional echocardiographic parameters together with myocardial velocities and deformation parameters should continue to provide follow-up reproducible measures of ventricular function. PMID:25464254

  5. A Case of Severe Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis: Valve Repair With Tricuspidization in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Tokue, Masahide; Hara, Hidehiko; Sahara, Naohiko; Yamazaki, Kenji; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Takahashi, Kei; Ozaki, Shigeyuki; Sugi, Kaoru; Nakamura, Masato

    2015-10-01

    A 33-year-old male was referred to our institute with acute heart failure. The patient was found to have a unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) and severe aortic stenosis. He had been followed at a local university hospital during childhood. However, he stopped visiting the outpatient clinic after becoming an adult. His condition subsequently worsened, and he ultimately presented to our hospital with cardiogenic shock. In Japan, some adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients continue to be followed by pediatric cardiologists, though the patterns of practice are variable. This report describes the case of a patient who became lost to follow-up in early adulthood. We thus focus on this ACHD case as an example of the effects of inadequate communication among doctors and the need to establish better ACHD management protocols for treating this patient population. PMID:26467883

  6. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Wachtell, Kristian; Olsen, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9-4.9] to 1.8 [0.8-5.4] mg/l, p < 0.001) and not receiving AVR (1.90 [0.90-4.10] to 1.3 [0.6-2.9] mg/l, p < 0.001). In Cox-regression analyses, hsCRP1 predicted later AVR (HR = 1.17, p < 0.001) independently of hsCRP0 (HR = 0.96, p = 0.33), aortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP0 and an increase during the first year (AVRhighCRP0CRP1inc = 47.3% versus AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec = 27.5%, p < 0.01). The prognostic benefit of a 1-year reduction in hsCRP was larger in patients with high versus low hsCRP0 eliminating the difference in incidence of AVR between high versus low hsCRP0 (AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec = 27.5% versus AVRlowCRP0CRP1dec = 25.8%, p = 0.66) in patients with reduced hsCRP during the first year. Conclusions High hsCRP1 or an increase in hsCRP during the first year of follow-up predicted later AVR independently of AVA, age, gender and other risk factors, although no significant improvement in C-statistics was observed. PMID:26911132

  7. Balloon valvuloplasty in rheumatic aortic valve stenosis: immediate and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Ramasamy, Chandramohan; Saktheeshwaran, Maheshkumar; Selvaraj, Raja; Satheesh, Santhosh; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2015-01-01

    To study the immediate and long-term results of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in a large cohort of patients with rheumatic valvular aortic stenosis. Single tertiary care center retrospective data analysis of immediate and long-term outcomes in patients following BAV from 2000 to 2008. Ninety-two patients with rheumatic aortic stenosis (AS) were studied who underwent BAV. Mean age of patients was 21.7 years (95 % CI 14.3-28.9) with mean follow-up period of 5.7 years (±SD 1.3). Intervention resulted in successful BAV (more than 50 % reduction in baseline gradient) in 79 (85.9 %) subjects (Group A) and partially successful BPV (<50 % reduction in baseline gradient) in 8 (8.7 %) subjects (Group B). BAV failed in 5 (5.4 %) subjects (Group C). Concomitant balloon mitral valvuloplasty was done in 23/92 cases. Mean left ventricular systolic pressure decreased from 165.6 (95 % CI 142.7-196.3) to 110.9 mmHg (95 % CI 92.1-129.6), (P < 0.001) and mean aortic valve (AV) gradient from 50.7 (95 % CI 35.12-66.22) to 27.2 mmHg (95 % CI 25.83-31.23), (P < 0.001). The mean change in ejection fraction and mean AV gradient were significantly different between success (Groups A and B) and failure groups (P < 0.001). Different grades of aortic regurgitation were noted in 32 (34.78 %) patients post BAV (severe regurgitation in 2.18 %). Anova post hoc analysis showed sustained gradient reductions at 1- and 5-year follow-up (P > 0.05). The need for surgery was much lower in Group A (2.5 %) compared to Group B (50 %) and C (100 %). BAV is an effective treatment strategy in dominant AS in multi valvular rheumatic disease situations. Combined aortic and mitral valvuloplasty was performed in one-fourth of study patients. PMID:25069960

  8. Modification of the Secretion Pattern of Proteases, Inflammatory Mediators, and Extracellular Matrix Proteins by Human Aortic Valve is Key in Severe Aortic Stenosis*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Martín-Rojas, Tatiana; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Gil-Dones, Felix; Dardé, Veronica M.; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F.; Padial, Luis R.; Lopez, Juan-Antonio; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cardiovascular medicine is to identify candidate biomarker proteins. Secretome analysis is particularly relevant in this search as it focuses on a subset of proteins released by a cell or tissue under certain conditions. The sample can be considered as a plasma subproteome and it provides a more direct approximation to the in vivo situation. Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. Using a proteomic analysis of the secretome from aortic stenosis valves we could identify candidate markers related to this pathology, which may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we have designed a method to validate the origin of secreted proteins, demonstrating their synthesis and release by the tissue and ruling out blood origin. The nLC-MS/MS analysis showed the labeling of 61 proteins, 82% of which incorporated the label in only one group. Western blot and selective reaction monitoring differential analysis, revealed a notable role of the extracellular matrix. Variation in particular proteins such as PEDF, cystatin and clusterin emphasizes the link between aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis. In particular, certain proteins variation in secretome levels correlates well, not only with label incorporation trend (only labeled in aortic stenosis group) but, more importantly, with alterations found in plasma from an independent cohort of samples, pointing to specific candidate markers to follow up in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:23704777

  9. Autoradiography screening of potential positron emission tomography tracers for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Sergio; Hall, Håkan; Wanhainen, Anders; Björck, Martin; Sörensen, Jens; Antoni, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aetiology and early pathophysiological mechanisms of aortic aneurysm formation are still unknown and challenging to study in vivo. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potentially valuable instrument for non-invasive in vivo pathophysiological studies. No specific tracer to identify the pathophysiological process of aneurysmal dilatation is yet available, however. The aim of this study was to explore if different PET tracers could be useful to image aneurysmal disease. Methods and results Human aneurysmal aortic tissue, collected during elective resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) of asymptomatic patients, was investigated in vitro by means of autoradiography with [68Ga]CRP-binder targeting C-reactive protein, [11C]DAA1106 targeting translocator protein (18 kDa), [11C]D-deprenyl with unknown target receptor, [11C]deuterium-L-deprenyl targeting astrocytes, [18F]fluciclatide targeting integrin αVβ3, [68Ga]IMP461 and bi-specific antibody TF2 052107 targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, [18F]F-metomidate targeting mitochondrial cytochrome P-450 species in the adrenal cortex, and [18F]vorozole targeting aromatase. Of the investigated tracers, only [18F]fluciclatide exhibited specific binding, whereas the other PET tracers failed to show specific uptake in the investigated tissue and are probably not useful for the intended purpose. Conclusion It seems likely that αVβ3 integrin expression in AAA can be visualized with PET and that the αVβ3 selective tracer, [18F]fluciclatide, may be suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of asymptomatic AAA. Additional evaluation of [18F]fluciclatide and αVβ3 integrin expression in AAA will be performed in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:24555564

  10. Fortune or misfortune: asymptomatic, delayed presentation of complete dehiscence of mechanical aortic valve conduit and pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyung Taek; Derose, Joseph; Taub, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Complete dehiscence of a composite aortic valve graft with pseudoaneurysm formation is a rare complication following aortic root replacement. This complication often takes place in the setting of acute graft infection and accompanies symptoms of heart failure, valve insufficiency or sepsis. We present a delayed, asymptomatic presentation of this complication in a young man with distant history of aortic root replacement and medically treated prosthetic valve endocarditis a year postoperatively. He had been non-adherent to warfarin over 10 years, but otherwise maintained a healthy life. After being lost to follow-up, he re-presented 12 years after the initial operation with new-onset seizures. Echocardiogram revealed complete dehiscence of a composite valved conduit at the proximal anastomosis site with a resultant large pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent an urgent re-operation with resection of the pseudoaneurysm and insertion of a tissue valved conduit. He had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery and promised close follow-up on discharge. PMID:27530875

  11. Reliability of Aortic Stenosis Severity Classified by 3-Dimensional Echocardiography in the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimi; Seo, Yoshihiro; Ishizu, Tomoko; Nakajima, Hideki; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Izumo, Masaki; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Otsuji, Yutaka; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2016-08-01

    The estimation of aortic valve area (AVA) by Doppler echocardiography-derived left ventricular stroke volume (LVSV) remains controversial. We hypothesized that AVA estimated from directly measured LVSV by 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) on the continuity equation might be more accurate in classifying aortic stenosis (AS) severity. We retrospectively enrolled 265 patients with moderate-to-severe AS with preserved ejection fraction. Indexed AVA (iAVA) was calculated using LVSV derived by 2D Doppler (iAVADop), Simpson's method (iAVASimp), and 3DE (iAVA3D). During a median follow-up period of 397 days (interquartile range 197 to 706 days), 135 patients experienced the composite end point (cardiac death 9%, aortic valve replacement 24%, and cardiovascular event 27%). Estimated iAVA3D and iAVASimp were significantly smaller than iAVADop and moderately correlated with peak aortic jet velocity. Upper septal hypertrophy was a major cause of discrepancy between iAVADop and iAVA3D methods. Based on the optimal cut-off point of iAVA for predicting peak aortic jet velocity >4.0 m/s, 141 patients (53%) were classified as severe AS and 124 patients (47%) as moderate AS by iAVADop. Indexed AVA3D classified 118 patients (45%) as severe and 147 patients (55%) as moderate AS. Of the 124 patients with moderate AS by iAVADop, 22 patients (18%) were reclassified as severe AS by iAVA3D and showed poor prognosis (hazard ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.4 to 5.0; p = 0.001). In conclusion, 3DE might be superior in classifying patients with AS compared with Doppler method, particularly in patients with upper septal hypertrophy. PMID:27287062

  12. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  13. Gender differences in factors influencing electrocardiographic findings of left ventricular hypertrophy in severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shinji; Omura, Soichiro; Inoue, Hiroko; Ejima, Emiko; Shimozono, Koutatsu; Hayashi, Makiko; Mori, Takahiro; Takenaka, Katsuhiko; Kawamura, Natsumi; Numaguchi, Kotaro; Mori, Etsuo; Asoh, Akemi; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Hiyamuta, Koji

    2014-09-01

    We investigated gender differences in factors influencing the electrocardiographic (ECG) findings of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). The functional and geometric responses of the left ventricle to chronic pressure overload, such as hypertension and AS, have been reported to be different between men and women. However, gender differences in the factors influencing the ECG findings of LVH in pressure overload remain unknown. We conducted a retrospective observational study in consecutive patients with severe AS (aortic valve area (AVA) assessed by cardiac catheterization <1.0 cm(2)) without concomitant significant aortic regurgitation, mitral stenosis and/or regurgitation, conduction disturbance, or myocardial infarction (n = 35 males, 68 females). The ECG criteria were classified into three categories: (1) high voltage by the Sokolow-Lyon index associated with ST-T wave changes (with no digitalis therapy); (2) high voltage alone; and (3) normal. Groups 1 and 2 were defined as LVH on ECG. We compared the ECG findings in relation to the AS severity between genders. Women were older, but there were no significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension, AVA index (AVAI), mean pressure gradient or peak velocity across the AV, LV mass index (LVMI) derived from echocardiography or the distribution of ECG categories between genders. A multiple logistic regression analysis including age, gender, hypertension, AVAI, mean pressure gradient, and LVMI revealed that the LVMI (P = 0.001) and AVAI (P = 0.0434) were significantly related to the distribution of ECG categories. LVMI significantly predicted LVH on ECG in both genders, but AVAI was a predictive factor in only women. ECG LVH in patients with severe AS may be mainly reflected by LVMI in men and by both LVMI and AVAI in women. Factors other than AVA, such as end-stage disease and/or complicating factors such as hypertension, may underlie the observed differences in

  14. Classification of Aortic Stenosis by Flow and Gradient Patterns Provides Insights into the Pathophysiology of Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Mittal, Tarun; Abayalingam, Mayavan; Kabir, Tito; Dalby, Miles; Cleland, John G; Baltabaeva, Aigul; Rahman Haley, Shelley

    2016-08-01

    Different patterns of flow and valve gradients can lead to diagnostic uncertainty about the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). Consecutive patients with severe AS (valve area <1 cm(2)) underwent echocardiography and computed tomography. Patients were classified into 4 groups (high-gradient/normal flow [HGNF], high-gradient/low flow [HGLF], low-gradient/normal flow [LGNF], and low-gradient/low flow [LGLF]). Low flow was defined as stroke volume index <35 mL/m(2) and low gradient as a mean aortic gradient <40 mm Hg. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) was calculated using the Agatston score. Of 181 patients, 56, 30, 46, and 49 had HGNF, HGLF, LGNF and LGLF with median AVC of 2048, 2015, 1366, and 1178 AU/m(2) (P < .0001) and valvuloarterial impedance of 4.5, 6.4, 4.2, and 5.9, respectively (P < .0001). Among those with LGLF, AVC was lower in patients with preserved compared to reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (1018 vs 2550 AU/m(2); P < .0001), but valvuloarterial impedance was similar (P = .33). The LGLF AS with preserved ejection fraction is associated with lower AVC and may identify patients with less severe AS in association with an adaptive ventricular response to high afterload. PMID:26475710

  15. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification. PMID:25809537

  16. Blood vessels and lymphatics in calcific aortic stenosis--in support of its inflammatory pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, I; Krbal, L; Dominik, J

    2010-04-01

    In developed countries, calcific aortic stenosis (CAS) has become the most common acquired valvular disease. It is considered a for of atherosclerosis and, like the latter, of inflammatory origin. Majority of cases of CAS are classified etiologically as either senile ("degenerative")--developing on previously normal aortic valve with three cusps, or based on congenitally malformed--bicuspid aortic valve. Twenty-eight cases of CAS (18 of the senile type, 7 of the bicuspid valve type, and 3 of indeterminable type) were examined by means of histology and immunohistochemistry (CD31 for blood vessels; D2-40 for lymphatics). In the calcified cusps, blood vessels were present in all 28 cases, and lymphatics in 14 of them. Vascularization was associated with lymphocytic infiltrates in 24 cases. There was no difference in the pattern between the two types of CAS. The origin of the cusp vessels is discussed. Our finding in the calcified cusps of both blood and lymphatic vessels together with lymphocytic infiltrates supports the inflammatory theory of the CAS pathogenesis. PMID:21275223

  17. A single codon insertion in PICALM is associated with development of familial subvalvular aortic stenosis in Newfoundland dogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Familial subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) is one of the most common congenital heart defects in dogs and is an inherited defect of Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and human children. Although SAS is known to be inherited, specific genes involved in Newfoundlands with SAS have not been defined. We ...

  18. Rapidly progressed aortic stenosis in a patient with previous diagnosis of polycythemia vera and post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Shohei; Naito, Ryo; Fukao, Kosuke; Hiki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that is often complicated with thromboembolism. However, aortic stenosis (AS) could be a manifestation of the cardiovascular complications of PV possibly through shear stress and atherosclerosis. We report a rare case of rapidly progressed AS in a patient with PV. PMID:27398203

  19. Transcatheter stent implantation for the treatment of abdominal aortic coarctation and right renal artery stenosis in takayasu's arteritis: a case with a 4-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Payam; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad; Ghasemi, Masuood; Pour, Manijeh Zargham

    2011-01-01

    We describe a Takayasu arteritis patient who was admitted because of an abdominal aortic stenosis, further complicated by the presence of a stenotic right renal artery located in the area of the aortic stenosis. After treatment of the renal stenosis with a 4 × 15 mm Driver stent, a 16 × 60 self-expandable nitinol stent (OptiMed) was deployed through the stenosis of the abdominal aorta. Even though the right renal artery was initially compromised after stent deployment through the aortic stenosis, the patient was successfully treated with renal artery re-dilation by a balloon passed through open cells of the aortic stent. During follow up, the patient suffered no procedure-related complications. PMID:21478132

  20. Aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for a heart infection called bacterial endocarditis. Exams and Tests A heart murmur, click, or ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 63. Read More Endocarditis Rheumatic fever Stable angina Update Date 2/24/ ...

  1. Aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Becoming easily tired Feeling the heart beat (palpitations) Fainting, weakness, or dizziness with activity In infants and ... the brain (stroke), intestines, kidneys, or other areas Fainting spells (syncope) Heart failure High blood pressure in ...

  2. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    PubMed

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. PMID:27239021

  3. A Preoperative Assessment of Significant Coronary Stenosis Based on a Semiquantitative Analysis of Coronary Artery Calcification on Noncontrast Computed Tomography in Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Won; Kim, Sung Mok; Park, Sung-Ji; Cho, Eun Jeong; Lee, Sans-Chol; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-03-01

    Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is the recommended assessment for coronary artery disease in patients undergoing elective aortic valve replacement (AVR). Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating lung lesions and calcifications at the cannulation site of the ascending aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of noncontrast CT in the visual assessment of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients undergoing AVR.We retrospectively identified patients with significant aortic stenosis (AS) who were referred for AVR between January 2006 and December 2013. Among these, we included 386 patients (53.6% males, 69.2 ± 8.4 years) who underwent both noncontrast CT and ICA. Significant coronary artery stenosis (CAS) in the ICA was defined as luminal stenosis ≥70%. The 4 main coronary arteries were visually assessed on noncontrast CT and were scored based on the Weston score as follows: 0, no visually detected calcium; 1, a single high-density pixel detected; 3, calcium was dense enough to create a blooming artifact; and 2, calcium in between 1 and 3. Four groups were reclassified by the sum of the Weston scores from each vessel, as follows: noncalcification (0); mild calcification (1-4); moderate calcification (5-8); and severe calcification (9-12). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was generated to identify the cutoff Weston score values for predicting significant CAS. Diagnostic estimates were calculated based on these cutoffs.In the ICA analysis, 62 of the 386 patients (16.1%) had significant CAS. All patients were divided into 4 groups. The noncalcification group had 97 subjects (Weston score 0), the mild degree group had 100 (2.6 ± 1.0), the moderate calcification group had 114 (6.6 ± 1.1), and the severe calcification group had 75 (10.7 ± 1.1). The prevalence of significant CAS in the noncalcification, mild, moderate, and severe groups was 1% (1/97), 5% (5/100), 24% (27/114), and 39% (29

  4. A Preoperative Assessment of Significant Coronary Stenosis Based on a Semiquantitative Analysis of Coronary Artery Calcification on Noncontrast Computed Tomography in Aortic Stenosis Patients Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Won; Kim, Sung Mok; Park, Sung-Ji; Cho, Eun Jeong; Lee, Sans-Chol; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is the recommended assessment for coronary artery disease in patients undergoing elective aortic valve replacement (AVR). Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating lung lesions and calcifications at the cannulation site of the ascending aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of noncontrast CT in the visual assessment of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients undergoing AVR. We retrospectively identified patients with significant aortic stenosis (AS) who were referred for AVR between January 2006 and December 2013. Among these, we included 386 patients (53.6% males, 69.2 ± 8.4 years) who underwent both noncontrast CT and ICA. Significant coronary artery stenosis (CAS) in the ICA was defined as luminal stenosis ≥70%. The 4 main coronary arteries were visually assessed on noncontrast CT and were scored based on the Weston score as follows: 0, no visually detected calcium; 1, a single high-density pixel detected; 3, calcium was dense enough to create a blooming artifact; and 2, calcium in between 1 and 3. Four groups were reclassified by the sum of the Weston scores from each vessel, as follows: noncalcification (0); mild calcification (1–4); moderate calcification (5–8); and severe calcification (9–12). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was generated to identify the cutoff Weston score values for predicting significant CAS. Diagnostic estimates were calculated based on these cutoffs. In the ICA analysis, 62 of the 386 patients (16.1%) had significant CAS. All patients were divided into 4 groups. The noncalcification group had 97 subjects (Weston score 0), the mild degree group had 100 (2.6 ± 1.0), the moderate calcification group had 114 (6.6 ± 1.1), and the severe calcification group had 75 (10.7 ± 1.1). The prevalence of significant CAS in the noncalcification, mild, moderate, and severe groups was 1% (1/97), 5% (5/100), 24% (27

  5. Fetal critical aortic stenosis with natural improvement of hydrops fetalis due to spontaneous relief of severe restrictive atrial communication.

    PubMed

    Ide, Tetsuya; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Kitano, Masataka; Kurosaki, Ken-ichi; Yoshimatsu, Jun

    2015-07-01

    We describe a rare case of fetal critical aortic stenosis with spontaneous relief of severe restrictive atrial communication, resulting in complete resolution of hydrops fetalis in utero. Fetal ultrasonography showed hydrops fetalis caused by critical aortic stenosis with a severely restrictive foramen ovale and severe mitral regurgitation at 23 weeks of gestation. Hydrops fetalis, however, spontaneously resolved, showing an obvious increase of flow through the foramen ovale and pulmonary vein at 26 weeks of gestation. The neonate required balloon dilation of the aortic valve and balloon atrioseptostomy immediately after birth and also received bilateral pulmonary artery banding and arterial duct stenting 1 week later. The patient was in good condition after conversion to biventricular circulation via Ross procedure at 8 months old. The present case suggests that atrioseptostomy as a fetal intervention may improve outcome in even a hydropic condition. PMID:25772579

  6. Quantification of Aortic Valve Calcifications Detected During Lung Cancer-Screening CT Helps Stratify Subjects Necessitating Echocardiography for Aortic Stenosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Young; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Chung, Myung Jin; Cho, Hyoun; Jung, Jung Im; Jang, Hye Won; Jung, Sin-Ho; Goo, Juna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No study has been published on aortic valve calcification (AVC) extent at lung cancer screening low-dose CT (LDCT) and its relationship with aortic stenosis (AS). The purpose of this study was to estimate the cutoff value of AVC on LDCT for detecting AS in asymptomatic Asian subjects. Six thousand three hundred thirty-eight subjects (mean age, 55.9 years ± 8.6) self-referred to health-promotion center underwent LDCT, coronary calcium scoring CT (CSCT), and echocardiography. AVC was quantified using Agatston methods on CT. AVC extent on LDCT was compared with that on CSCT, and AVC threshold for diagnosing AS was calculated. Clinical factors associated with AS and AVC were sought. AVC was observed in 403 subjects (64.9 years ± 8.7) on LDCT (6.4%), and AVC score measured from LDCT showed strong positive correlation with that from CSCT (r = 0.83, P < 0.0001). Of 403 subjects, 40 (10%) were identified to have AS on echocardiography. Cutoff value of AVC score for detecting AS was 138.37 with sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity 83.2%. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.09–1.12) and hypertension (OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10–1.76) were associated with the presence of AVC, whereas AVC extent at LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16–673.70) was the only significant clinical factor associated with AS; AVC extent on LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16–673.70) was the significant clinical factor associated with AS. The AVC extent on LDCT is significantly related to the presence of AS, and we recommend echocardiography for screening AS based on quantified AVC values on LDCT. PMID:27175713

  7. Progression of aortic stenosis in adult men. Detection by noninvasive methods.

    PubMed

    Nitta, M; Nakamura, T; Hultgren, H N; Bilisoly, J; Tovey, D A

    1987-07-01

    One hundred seventy-one patients with aortic stenosis (AS) who had hemodynamic studies were evaluated by a scoring system of the seven following noninvasive variables which our laboratory had developed to estimate the severity of AS: left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by ECG; visible aortic valve calcification by chest x-ray examination; loudness of A2; Q to peak of systolic murmur; T-time of the carotid pulse; LV ejection time; and LVH by M-mode echocardiography. The range of the severity score is 0 to 16, and a score greater than or equal to 5 has been shown correctly to identify 93 percent of patients with severe AS (valve area less than or equal to 1.0 cm2). The present study has applied this method to the detection of progression of AS. Eleven patients (mean age, 60.4 years) were studied who had hemodynamic studies performed two to nine years apart (mean, three years). Progression of stenosis occurred in all, with an increase in mean aortic valve gradient from 23 +/- 4.7 mm Hg to 46 +/- 6.5 mm Hg (p less than 0.005). Aortic valve area decreased from 1.5 +/- 0.18 cm2 to 0.88 +/- 0.10 cm2 (p less than 0.005). Noninvasive scores increased in these patients from 0.7 +/- 0.5 to 7.1 +/- 2.3 (p less than 0.005). Thirty-five patients (mean age, 62.4 years) had repeat noninvasive studies one to six years apart (mean 3 years). Twenty-two (63 percent) had an increase in the noninvasive score of greater than or equal to 3 points, and 20 (57 percent) attained a score of greater than or equal to 5, indicating probable severe AS. The mean initial severity score was 2.2 +/- 0.3, and at the end of a mean follow-up of three years, the score was 8.3 +/- 0.6 (p less than 0.005). It is concluded that in the elderly male, progression of AS over a three-year period occurs in about 60 percent of patients, and progression can be detected by simple, noninvasive methods. PMID:3595248

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation options for treating severe aortic stenosis in the elderly: the nurse's role in postoperative monitoring and treatment.

    PubMed

    Panos, Angela M; George, Elisabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Severe calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive cardiac disease that predominantly affects elderly adults. The hallmark symptoms of AS include exertional dyspnea, angina, and syncope. Adults of advanced age do not usually seek treatment for symptoms until their quality of life is greatly diminished. The 2 standard treatments for severe AS are open aortic valve replacement and percutaneous valvuloplasty. As adults age, their comorbid medical conditions often make them too high of a surgical risk for traditional aortic valve replacement, and percutaneous valvuloplasty, although less invasive, often produces only temporary relief of AS symptoms. To provide severe AS patients with alternative less risky treatment options in their later years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices were developed. Through this overview of the disease progression of AS and the different TAVI devices and the insertion procedures, a better understanding of the initial postoperative nursing care associated with postoperative TAVI patient management will be achieved. PMID:24496250

  9. Acute Outcomes after Introduction of a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) for Balloon Aortic Valvuloplastyin Congenital Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Porras, Diego; Brown, David W; Rathod, Rahul; Friedman, Kevin; Gauvreau, Kimberly; Lock, James E; Esch, Jesse J; Bergersen, Lisa; Marshall, Audrey C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Standardization of care can reduce practice variation, optimize resource utilization and improve clinical outcomes. We have created a standardized clinical assessment and management plan (SCAMP) for patients having balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for congenital aortic stenosis (AS). This study compares acute outcomes of BAV at our institution before and after introduction of this SCAMP. Methods In this retrospective matched cohort study each SCAMP patient was matched to 4 historical controls. Outcomes were categorized based on the combination of residual AS and AR as: 1)Optimal: gradient ≤ 35 mmHg and trivial or no AR, 2)Adequate: gradient ≤ 35 mmHg and mild AR, 3)Inadequate: gradient > 35 mmHg and/or moderate or severe AR. Results All 23 SCAMP patients achieved a residual AS gradient ≤ 35 mmHg; the median residual AS gradient for the SCAMP group was lower (25 (10 – 35) mmHg) than in matched controls (30 (0 – 65) mmHg; p=0.005). The two groups did not differ with regard to degree of AR grade after BAV. Compared to controls, SCAMP patients were more likely to have an optimal result, and less likely to have an inadequate result (52% versus34% and 17% versus 45%, respectively; p=0.02) Conclusions A SCAMP for BAV resulted in optimal acute results in half of the initial 23 patients enrolled, and outcomes in this group were better than those of matched historical controls. Whether these improved acute outcomes translate into better long term outcomes for this patient population remains to be seen. PMID:24127834

  10. Protective Effect of Aortic Stenosis on the Coronary Arteries. Hypothetic Considerations to an Old Enigma

    PubMed Central

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Arcêncio, Livia; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Schmidt, André

    2016-01-01

    A literature overview of angiographic studies has shown that the prevalence of significant coronary disease in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) varies from 20 to 60%. Early necropsy studies suggested that patients with AS had a lower than expected incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD), originating the concept of a protective effect of AS on the coronary arteries. The myth of AS protection against CAD would be better explained as endothelium-myocardial interaction (crosstalk) protection triggered by left ventricular overload. Therefore, the cGMP/NO pathway induced by the AS overload pressure would explain the low incidence of CAD, which is compatible with the amazing natural long-term evolution of this cardiac valve disease. PMID:27142794

  11. Protective Effect of Aortic Stenosis on the Coronary Arteries. Hypothetic Considerations to an Old Enigma.

    PubMed

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Arcêncio, Livia; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Schmidt, André

    2016-04-01

    A literature overview of angiographic studies has shown that the prevalence of significant coronary disease in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) varies from 20 to 60%. Early necropsy studies suggested that patients with AS had a lower than expected incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD), originating the concept of a protective effect of AS on the coronary arteries. The myth of AS protection against CAD would be better explained as endothelium-myocardial interaction (crosstalk) protection triggered by left ventricular overload. Therefore, the cGMP/NO pathway induced by the AS overload pressure would explain the low incidence of CAD, which is compatible with the amazing natural long-term evolution of this cardiac valve disease. PMID:27142794

  12. Exercise echocardiography predicts development of left ventricular dysfunction in medically and surgically treated patients with asymptomatic severe aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Wahi, S; Haluska, B; Pasquet, A; Case, C; Rimmerman, C; Marwick, T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess resting and exercise echocardiography for prediction of left ventricular dysfunction in patients with significant asymptomatic aortic regurgitation.
DESIGN—Cohort study of patients with aortic regurgitation.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre specialising in valvar surgery.
PATIENTS—61 patients (38 men, 23 women; mean (SD) age 53 (14) years) with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic aortic regurgitation and no known coronary artery disease; 35 were treated medically and 26 had aortic valve replacement.
INTERVENTIONS—Exercise echocardiography was used to evaluate ejection fraction, which was measured on the resting and post-stress images using the modified Simpson method. Patients with an increment of ejection fraction after exercise were denoted as having contractile reserve (CR+); those without an increment were labelled CR−.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Standard univariate and multivariate methods and receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to assess the ability of contractile reserve to predict follow up ejection fraction.
RESULTS—In the 35 medically treated patients, 13 of 21 (62%) with CR+ (mean (SD) ejection fraction increment 7 (3)%) had preserved ejection fraction on follow up. In the 14 patients with CR− (ejection fraction decrement 8 (4)%), 13 (93%) had a decrement of ejection fraction on follow up from 60 (5)% at baseline to 54 (3)% on follow up (p = 0.005). Age, resting left ventricular dimensions, medical treatment, aortic regurgitation severity, exercise capacity, and rate-pressure product were similar in both CR+ and CR− groups. Among the 26 surgical patients, 13 showed CR+ (ejection fraction increase 9 (5)%), all of whom had an increase in ejection fraction on follow up (from 49% to 59%). Of 13 surgical patients with CR− (ejection fraction decrease 7 (5)%), 10 (77%) showed the same or worse ejection fraction on postoperative follow up

  13. Increased plant sterol deposition in vascular tissue characterizes patients with severe aortic stenosis and concomitant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luister, Alexandra; Schött, Hans Frieder; Husche, Constanze; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Plat, Jogchum; Gräber, Stefan; Lütjohann, Dieter; Laufs, Ulrich; Weingärtner, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between phytosterols, oxyphytosterols, and other markers of cholesterol metabolism and concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement. Markers of cholesterol metabolism (plant sterols and cholestanol as markers of cholesterol absorption and lathosterol as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis) and oxyphytosterols were determined in plasma and aortic valve tissue from 104 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis (n=68 statin treatment; n=36 no statin treatment) using gas chromatography-flame ionization and mass spectrometry. The extent of CAD was determined by coronary angiography prior to aortic valve replacement. Patients treated with statins were characterized by lower plasma cholesterol, cholestanol, and lathosterol concentrations. However, statin treatment did not affect the sterol concentrations in cardiovascular tissue. The ratio of campesterol-to-cholesterol was increased by 0.46±0.34μg/mg (26.0%) in plasma of patients with CAD. The absolute values for the cholesterol absorption markers sitosterol and campesterol were increased by 18.18±11.59ng/mg (38.8%) and 11.40±8.69ng/mg (30.4%) in the tissues from patients with documented CAD compared to those without concomitant CAD. Campesterol oxides were increased by 0.06±0.02ng/mg (17.1%) in the aortic valve cusps and oxidized sitosterol-to-cholesterol ratios were up-regulated by 0.35±0.2ng/mg (22.7%) in the plasma of patients with CAD. Of note, neither cholestanol nor the ratio of cholestanol-to-cholesterol was associated with CAD. Patients with concomitant CAD are characterized by increased deposition of plant sterols, but not cholestanol in aortic valve tissue. Moreover, patients with concomitant CAD were characterized by increased oxyphytosterol concentrations in plasma and aortic valve cusps. PMID:25814070

  14. Predictors of Walking Performance and Walking Capacity in People with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, Low Back Pain and Asymptomatic Controls

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins-Lane, Christy C.; Holz, Sara Christensen; Yamakawa, KS; Phalke, Vaishali V.; Quint, Doug J.; Miner, Jennifer; Haig, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Examine predictors of community walking performance and walking capacity in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), compared to individuals with low back pain and asymptomatic controls. Design Retrospective analysis. Setting University Spine Program. Participants 126 participants (50 LSS, 44 low back pain and 32 asymptomatic controls), aged 55–80 yrs. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) 7-day community walking distance measured by pedometer (walking performance) and a 15 minute walking test (walking capacity). All participants had a lumbosacral MRI, electrodiagnostic testing, and a history and physical examination including history of pain and neurologic symptoms, straight leg raise test, tests for directional symptoms, reflexes, strength, and nerve tension signs. The study questionnaire included demographic information, history of back/leg pain, questions about walking, exercise frequency, and pain level, as well as the standardized Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale. Results BMI, pain, age and female sex predicted walking performance (r2 = 0.41) and walking capacity (r2=0.41). The diagnosis of LSS itself had no clear relationship with either walking variable. Compared to the asymptomatic group, LSS participants had significantly lower values for all walking parameters, with the exception of stride length, while there was no significant difference between the LSS and low back pain groups. Conclusions BMI, pain, female sex, and age predict walking performance and capacity in people with LSS, low back pain, and asymptomatic controls. While pain was the strongest predictor of walking capacity, BMI was the strongest predictor of walking performance. Average pain, rather than leg pain was predictive of walking. Obesity and pain are modifiable predictors of walking deficits that could be targets for future intervention studies aimed at increasing walking performance and capacity in both the low back pain and LSS populations. PMID:22365377

  15. The Roberts syndrome: a case report of an infant with valvular aortic stenosis and mutation in ESCO2.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Mustafa; Firinci, Fatih; Balci, Yasemin Isik; Zeybek, Selcan; Ozgürler, Funda; Erdogan, Ilkay; Varan, Birgül; Semerci, Cavidan Nur

    2014-04-01

    Roberts syndrome, which is inherited as an autosomal recessive group of disorders, is a rare syndrome characterized with symmetrical extremity defects, craniofacial abnormalities, and prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. Here, we present a case of Roberts Syndrome brought to the clinic with diarrhoea and multiple abnormalities, that had tetra phocomelia, growth and developmental retardation, abnormality of complete cleft lip-palate accompanied with Aortic stenosis and PDA, and in which cytogenetic analysis identified premature centromere separation. Mutation analysis of ESCO2 revealed a splice site mutation [c.1131+1G>A] in intron 6 in homozygous status in the patient and heterozygous status in the parents. Our case is the first Robert- Syndrome with valvular aortic stenosis in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:24864645

  16. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge-to-decision in high risk patients with aortic stenosis: a new paradigm for the heart team decision making

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Francesco; Moretti, Carolina; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Ciuca, Cristina; Taglieri, Nevio; Berardini, Alessandra; Gallo, Pamela; Cannizzo, Marina; Chiarabelli, Matteo; Ramponi, Niccolò; Taffani, Linda; Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Rapezzi, Claudio; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Whilst the majority of the patients with severe aortic stenosis can be directly addressed to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), in some instances additional information may be needed to complete the diagnostic workout. We evaluated the role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge-to-decision (BTD) in selected high-risk patients. Methods Between 2007 and 2012, the heart team in our Institution required BTD BAV in 202 patients. Very low left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral regurgitation grade ≥ 3, frailty, hemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity, or a combination of these factors were the main drivers for this strategy. We evaluated how BAV influenced the final treatment strategy in the whole patient group and in each specific subgroup. Results Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 23.5% ± 15.3%, age 81 ± 7 years. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, cerebrovascular accident 1% and overall vascular complications 4% (0.5% major; 3.5% minor). Of the 193 patients with BTD BAV who survived and received a second heart team evaluation, 72.6% were finally deemed eligible for definitive treatment (25.4% for AVR; 47.2% for TAVI): 96.7% of patients with left ventricular ejection fraction recovery; 70.5% of patients with mitral regurgitation reduction; 75.7% of patients who underwent BAV in clinical hemodynamic instability; 69.2% of frail patients and 68% of patients who presented serious comorbidities. Conclusions Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be considered as bridge-to-decision in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who cannot be immediate candidates for definitive transcatheter or surgical treatment. PMID:27582761

  17. Asymptomatic large left-atrial ball thrombus. Secondary to mitral stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Agnino, A; Serena, D; Schena, S; Piscitelli, D; Fiore, T; de Luca Tupputi Schinosa, L

    1997-01-01

    We describe the very unusual case of a patient with a large, free-floating left-atrial thrombus secondary to severe mitral stenosis, in whom the peculiar symptoms and complications of a ball thrombus were absent. The patient's only symptom before the episode reported here was mild dyspnea, which was attributed to mitral stenosis. She experienced neither embolism nor syncope. While even her clinical signs did not indicate a left-atrial ball thrombus, both echocardiography and angiography showed a free-floating thrombus. Because of the risk of stroke and acute obstruction of the mitral valve, emergency surgery was performed upon diagnosis of the ball thrombus. The surgery, which consisted of removing the thrombus and replacing the mitral valve with a mechanical prosthesis, was uneventful. A computed tomographic brain scan prior to discharge did not detect any cerebral infarction. Images PMID:9456496

  18. The importance of hybrid stage I palliation for neonates with critical aortic stenosis and reduced left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Yusuke; Hoashi, Takaya; Kagisaki, Koji; Yazaki, Satoshi; Kitano, Masataka; Kurosaki, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Isao; Ichikawa, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    The optimal management strategy for neonates with congenital aortic stenosis, two balanced ventricles, and duct-dependent systemic circulation (critical aortic stenosis) is still controversial. Thirteen patients with critical aortic stenosis underwent balloon aortic valvotomy (BAV) between 1996 and 2013, at the median age of 1 day old (range 0-28). Since 2010, bilateral pulmonary artery banding with ductal stenting following BAV was conducted for patients with reduced left ventricular (LV) function as a hybrid stage I palliation for the bridge to decision for further treatment. A follow-up was completed on all patients and the median follow-up period was 3.3 years (max 16.0). The overall survival rate at 15 years was 67.1 %. Six of the seven patients with maintained LV function could go on to the definitive Ross or Konno-aortic valve replacement at the median duration of 311 days after initial BAV, without any mortality. Three of four patients with reduced LV function died before 2010 with conventional treatment. With use of a hybrid stage I palliation, one of two patients ultimately underwent Fontan completion at 38 months of age and the other successfully underwent the definitive Ross-Konno operation at 9 months of age after recovery of the LV function. Although a statistically significant improvement has not been observed yet, the application of hybrid stage I palliation following BAV would be a favorable alternative for patients with reduced LV function to avoid a high-risk neonatal Ross or Norwood-type operation, and also to determine further treatment carefully. PMID:25480352

  19. Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Sara; Bar, Iris; Meledin, Valery; Derazne, Estela; Gandelman, Gera; George, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have a role in the repair of endothelial surfaces after injury. Reduced numbers of EPCs are associated with endothelial dysfunction and adverse clinical events, suggesting that endothelial injury in the absence of sufficient repair by circulating EPCs promotes the progression of vascular and possibly valvular disorders. The aim of this study was to assess EPC number in patients with AS and to study the predictive value of their circulating levels on prognosis. Methods The number of EPCs was determined by flow cytometry in 241 patients with AS and a control group of 73 pts. Thirty-eight, 52 and 151 patients had mild, moderate and severe AS, respectively. We evaluated the association between baseline levels of EPCs and death from cardiovascular causes during follow up. Results EPC level was significantly higher in patients with AS compared to the control group (p = 0.017). Two hundred and three patients with moderate and severe AS were followed for a median of 20 months. One hundred and twenty patients underwent an intervention. Thirty four patients died during follow up, 20 patients died due to cardiac causes. Advanced age, the presence of coronary artery disease, AS severity index (combination of high NYHA class, smaller aortic valve area and elevated pulmonary artery pressure) and a low EPC number were predictors of cardiac death in the univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression model identified low EPCs number and AS severity index as associated with cardiac death during follow up (p = 0.026 and p = 0.037, respectively). Conclusions EPC number is increased in patients with AS. However, in patients with moderate or severe AS a relatively low number of EPCs is associated with cardiac death at follow up. These results may help to identify AS patients at increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:26913741

  20. Effect of End-Stage Renal Disease on Rate of Progression of Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Darae; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Cho, In Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate the progression of mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and determine its metabolic and hemodynamic contributors and clinical outcomes. A total of 74 patients with ESRD (50 men, age 72 ± 11 years) with mild-to-moderate AS were compared with 79 age- and gender-matched controls with normal kidney function. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic features and clinical outcomes including aortic valve (AV) intervention, hospitalization due to heart failure, and cardiovascular death were analyzed. Patients with ESRD were divided into 2 subgroups according to their rate of AV area changes (group 1 [n = 28], rapid progression; and group 2 [n = 46], slow progression). Progression in the degree of AS was noted in 38% of patients with ESRD and 18% of controls (p <0.01) during comparable echocardiographic follow-up durations (29 ± 15 vs 27 ± 24 months, respectively, p = 0.57). In ESRD, patients in group 1 were older (p <0.01) with higher baseline log parathyroid hormone (p <0.01) and larger stroke volume (p = 0.03) than those in group 2. During clinical follow-up (48 ± 23 months), patients in group 1 showed poorer clinical outcomes than those in group 2 and controls (log-rank p <0.01). Age, left atrial volume index ≥42 ml/m(2), and annual increases of peak pressure gradient across the AV (mm Hg/year) demonstrated additive predictive values for prognosis. AS in ESRD progresses in an accelerated manner along with higher metabolic and hemodynamic loads on AV compared with those with normal kidney function. Accelerated progression of mild-to-moderate AS in ESRD results in poor prognosis. PMID:27138183

  1. Dynamics of Concomitant Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Aortic Stenosis Undergoing TAVI

    PubMed Central

    Sahinarslan, Asife; Vecchio, Francesco; MacCarthy, Philip; Dworakowski, Rafal; Deshpande, Ranjit; Wendler, Olaf; Monaghan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the echocardiographic features of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) pre- and post-trans catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods The study subjects consisted of 79 patients with severe AS, who underwent TAVI. The echocardiographic parameters related to MR severity prior to TAVI and the change in these parameters and MR severity within one month after implantation were retrospectively evaluated. Results The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 53 ± 12%, and the mean MR severity was 1.2 ± 0.7. Among the baseline parameters, age (p = 0.019, r = 0.264), LV mass (p = 0.017, r = 0.269), deceleration time (DT) (p = 0.019, r = -0.266), left atrial diameter (p = 0.003, r = 0.325), were related to pre-procedure MR severity. After TAVI, the grade of MR (1.2 ± 0.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.6, p < 0.001) and MR duration (43 ± 19% vs. 31 ± 23%, p < 0.001) were significantly decreased. The grade of pre-procedural MR (p < 0.001) was a predictor of residual MR after TAVI. However, there was not a significant change in the left ventricular echocardiographic parameters after TAVI [LVEF (53 ± 12 vs. 52 ± 11, p = 0.285), and LV mass (302 ± 84 vs. 306 ± 76 g, p = 0.495)]. Conclusions In patients with severe AS, functional MR is related to age, LV mass, DT and left atrial diameter. TAVI improves MR in these patients, even before LV remodelling occurs. PMID:27471361

  2. Supravalvular aortic stenosis associated to infectious endocarditis and cerebral vascular disease in a patient with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Marhx, Alfonso; López Terrazas, Javier; Palacios Macedo, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by: (a) typical facial features; (b) psychomotor retardation with a specific neurocognitive profile; (c) cardiovascular condition and (d) likely transient hypocalcemia in infancy. The objective of this study was to describe the clinic evolution and diagnosis of patient with this syndrome that was associated with endocarditis caused by Streptococcus parasanguis in the ascending aorta and an aneurism located in the fronto-temporal area, which produced a parenchymal hematoma in the left lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was treated with ceftriaxone and dicloxacillin. Then we proceeded to correct the aneurysm and perform vegetation resection in aortic arteries with supravalvular aortic stenosis correction. The evolution after one year has been favorable and is currently without neurologic sequelae. A 5-year-old male patient presented a diagnosis of supravalvular aortic stenosis. After cardiac catheterization was performed, he presented a fever and right side paresis. The echocardiogram showed multiple vegetations in the ascendant aortic arch and the supraortic arteries. The blood cultures reported S. parasanguis. The magnetic resonance showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with an aneurysm and a hematoma. PMID:25882107

  3. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS)

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Albayrak, Samet; Alpay-Savasan, Zeynep; Zeb, Amna; Turkoglu, Onur; Sobolewski, Paul; Bahado-Singh, Ray O.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS), with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated). Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS. PMID:27152866

  4. Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio May Predict the Severity of Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Akdag, Serkan; Akyol, Aytac; Asker, Muntecep; Duz, Ramazan; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) is an emerging inflammatory indicator which is closely associated with adverse cardiovascular events. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between PLR and the severity of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). Material/Methods The study was designed as a retrospective study. A total of 86 consecutive patients with calcific AS were divided into two groups as mild-to-moderate AS and severe AS according to the transaortic mean pressure gradient. PLR levels were calculated from the complete blood count (CBC). Results Platelet to lymphocyte ratio was significantly higher in severe and mild-to-moderate AS groups when compared to the control subjects (151±31.2, p<0.001, 138±28.8 vs. 126±26.5, p=0.008, respectively). In the subgroup analysis of AS patients, PLR was found to be higher in the severe AS group compared to mild-to-moderate group (p<0.001). A significant correlation was found between PLR and transaortic mean pressure gradient in patients with AS (r=0.421, p<0.001). Conclusions Our study results demonstrated that increased PLR correlates with the severity of calcific AS. PMID:26544152

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of individuals with Williams syndrome and supravalvar aortic stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.B.; Lacro, R.V.; Kunkel, L.M.; Pober, B.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations at the elastin locus (chromosome 7q11.23) have been demonstrated in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and familial supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). Relationships between elastin mutations and vascular and/or neurodevelopmental pathology have yet to be defined. In determining phenotype-genotype correlations in WS/SVAS, we examined 35 individuals with sporadic WS, families with SVAS affecting multiple members, and sporadic cases of isolated obstructive vascular disease. Full length elastin cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which multiple elastin genomic clones have been isolated and ordered relative to the elastin gene, covering a minimum of 35 kb. (Additional genomic clones are being obtained by {open_quote}walking{close_quote} 5{prime} and 3{prime} to elastin.) Elastin genomic clones were used as probes in fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes from WS/SVAS patients. Preliminary analysis confirms elastin deletions in WS patients, but have not yet been demonstrated in patients with isolated vascular disease using this technique. Results of deletional analysis in individuals representing a wide spectrum of phenotypes will be presented.

  6. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS).

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Albayrak, Samet; Alpay-Savasan, Zeynep; Zeb, Amna; Turkoglu, Onur; Sobolewski, Paul; Bahado-Singh, Ray O

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS), with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated). Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS. PMID:27152866

  7. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  8. Clinical Outcome of Patients with Aortic Stenosis and Coronary Artery Disease Not Treated According to Current Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Giuseppe; Pellicano, Mariano; Toth, Gabor G; Casselman, Filip; Adjedj, Julien; Van Praet, Frank; Stockman, Bernard; Degrieck, Ivan; Trimarco, Bruno; Wijns, William; De Bruyne, Bernard; Barbato, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of patients with moderate/severe aortic stenosis and significant coronary disease not treated according to guidelines, recommending combined aortic valve replacement (AVR) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). From 2002 to 2010, we assessed death up to 5 years in 650 patients with moderate/severe aortic stenosis and at least one coronary lesion (>50 %): 23 % were treated conservatively (MT), 17 % with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), 11 % with AVR, and 49 % with combined CABG and AVR. At a median follow-up of 58 months, overall death decreased over the groups (MT, 68 % vs. PCI, 44 % vs. AVR, 34 % vs. CABG and AVR, 23 %, p < 0.01). Compared to the MT group, Cox regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders showed significantly reduced mortality in the PCI, AVR, and CABG and AVR groups. When combined CABG and AVR is not feasible, PCI or AVR alone still improves significantly long-term survival as compared with MT alone. PMID:26883368

  9. Circulating Level of miR-378 Predicts Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanning; Li, Yajiao; Yang, Hao; Rao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Aims Excessively high left ventricle mass is an independent predictor of adverse prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRs) play crucial roles in the regulation of left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, few circulating miRs have been established as predictors of LVH in aortic stenosis (AS) patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether circulating levels of miR-1, miR-133, and miR-378 predict LVH in patients with AS. Methods and Results One-hundred twelve patients with moderate to severe AS and 40 healthy controls were included in the study. Levels of miR-1, miR-133, and miR-378 in the plasma were measured by qPCR. Compared with healthy controls, AS patients had significantly lower circulating levels of miR-1, miR-133, and miR-378. AS patients with LVH had significantly lower miR-378 but not miR-1 and miR-133 compared with those without LVH. Linear regression analysis showed circulating miR-378 had strong correlation with left ventricular mass index (r = 0.283, p = 0.002) and logistic regression showed that lower miR-378 was an independent predictor for LVH in patients with AS (p = 0.037, OR 4.110, 95% CI 1.086 to 15.558). Conclusion Circulating levels of miR-1, miR-133 and miR-378 were decreased in AS patients, and miR-378 predicts LVH independent of the pressure gradient. Further prospective investigations are needed to elucidate whether these circulating miRs affect clinical outcome. PMID:25157568

  10. Left ventricular hypertrophy in ascending aortic stenosis mice: anoikis and the progression to early failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, B.; Price, R. L.; Goldsmith, E. C.; Borg, T. K.; Yan, X.; Douglas, P. S.; Weinberg, E. O.; Bartunek, J.; Thielen, T.; Didenko, V. V.; Lorell, B. H.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine potential mechanisms of the transition from hypertrophy to very early failure, we examined apoptosis in a model of ascending aortic stenosis (AS) in male FVB/n mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Compared with age-matched controls, 4-week and 7-week AS animals (n=12 to 16 per group) had increased ratios of left ventricular weight to body weight (4.7+/-0.7 versus 3.1+/-0.2 and 5. 7+/-0.4 versus 2.7+/-0.1 mg/g, respectively, P<0.05) with similar body weights. Myocyte width was also increased in 4-week and 7-week AS mice compared with controls (19.0+/-0.8 and 25.2+/-1.8 versus 14. 1+/-0.5 microm, respectively, P<0.01). By 7 weeks, AS myocytes displayed branching with distinct differences in intercalated disk size and staining for beta(1)-integrin on both cell surface and adjacent extracellular matrix. In vivo left ventricular systolic developed pressure per gram as well as endocardial fractional shortening were similar in 4-week AS and controls but depressed in 7-week AS mice. Myocyte apoptosis estimated by in situ nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was extremely rare in 4-week AS and control mice; however, a low prevalence of TUNEL-positive myocytes and DNA laddering were detected in 7-week AS mice. The specificity of TUNEL labeling was confirmed by in situ ligation of hairpin oligonucleotides. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that myocyte apoptosis develops during the transition from hypertrophy to early failure in mice with chronic biomechanical stress and support the hypothesis that the disruption of normal myocyte anchorage to adjacent extracellular matrix and cells, a process called anoikis, may signal apoptosis.

  11. Early and long-term results of cardiosurgical treatment of coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis in patients over 80 years old

    PubMed Central

    Buczkowski, Piotr; Perek, Bartłomiej; Katyńska, Izabela; Jemielity, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, patients over 80 years of age have been a growing group of individuals referred to cardiac surgeons. They pose a serious challenge and usually require a multidisciplinary approach. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and late outcomes of cardiosurgical treatment of patients over 80 years of age suffering from coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis. Material and methods The study involved 96 patients aged over 80 years treated between January, 2004 and December, 2012. The mortality and morbidity in the early postoperative period, as well as throughout the follow-up period, were analyzed. Results The majority of patients underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) (58.3%; Group I), while 29.2% of them underwent an isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) (Group II). Combined procedures (CABG + AVR) were carried out in 12.5% of patients (Group III). The mean operational risk calculated according to the logistic EuroSCORE was 11.6%, 11.9%, and 9.5%, respectively in Group I, Group II and in Group III. In the early postoperative period, 4 patients died (all from Group I). The 30-day mortality rate was 4.2% and the morbidity rate was 56.3%. During the post-discharge follow-up period that lasted from 1 to 100 months, 4 patients died (2 from Group I and 2 from Group III). The 2-year probability of survival was 91.9 ± 3.0%. During the last follow-up clinical assessment, half of the patients were asymptomatic. Conclusions The perioperative mortality of the patients is acceptably and markedly lower than that predicted by the logistic EuroSCORE calculator. However, the complication rate, particularly in the early postoperative period, is relatively high. PMID:26336430

  12. Intraoperative Treatment of Fetal Asystole After Endovascular Repair of Aortic Coarctation in a Pregnant Woman with Mitral Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Laleh; Delgado Upegui, Carlos; Ferreira, Renata; Simmons, Lavonne; Ciliberto, Christopher

    2016-03-15

    A G1P0 woman with aortic coarctation and mitral valve stenosis underwent endovascular aortic repair with continuous fetal monitoring during the 20th week of pregnancy. On tracheal extubation, an episode of fetal asystole followed by fetal bradycardia was identified. Ephedrine, nitroglycerin, and terbutaline were administered for intrauterine fetal resuscitation. Subsequently, the patient developed hypertension and pulmonary edema, which were treated with furosemide and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. The fetal heart rate normalized. We conclude that intraoperative monitoring of a previable fetus may aid in optimizing maternal hemodynamics. Before performing interventional procedures in pregnant women, a multidisciplinary team should discuss the goals of neonatal care should adverse fetal events be detected. PMID:26669649

  13. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5%) had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test). However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008), as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8%) had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test). Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644 PMID:21752238

  14. Comparison of dual-source computed tomography for the quantification of the aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis versus transthoracic echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Ropers, Dieter; Ropers, Ulrike; Marwan, Mohammed; Schepis, Titiano; Pflederer, Tobias; Wechsel, Martin; Klinghammer, Lutz; Flachskampf, Frank A; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2009-12-01

    We compared the measurements of the aortic valve area (AVA) using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in patients with mid to severe aortic stenosis to measurements using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and invasive hemodynamic assessment. A total of 50 patients (mean age 73 +/- 10 years) with suspected aortic stenosis were included. The computed tomographic data were acquired using DSCT with standardized scan parameters (2 x 64 x 0.6 mm collimation, 330-ms rotation, 120-kV tube voltage, 560 mA/rot tube current). After injection of 35 ml contrast agent (flow rate 5 ml/s), a targeted volume data set, ranging from the top of the leaflets to the infundibulum, was acquired. Ten cross-sectional data sets (slice thickness 1 mm, no overlap, increment 0.6 mm) were reconstructed during systole in 5% increments of the R-R interval. The AVA determined in systole by planimetry was compared to the calculated AVA values using the continuity equation on TTE and the Gorlin formula on catheterization. DSCT allowed the planimetry of the AVA in all patients. The mean AVA using DSCT was 1.16 +/- 0.47 cm(2) compared to a mean AVA of 1.04 +/- 0.45 cm(2) using TTE and 1.06 +/- 0.45 cm(2) using catheterization, with a significant correlation between DSCT/TTE (r = 0.93, p <0.001) and DSCT/cardiac catheterization (r = 0.97, p <0.001). However, DSCT demonstrated a slight, but significant, overestimation of the AVA compared to TTE (+0.12 +/- 0.17 cm) and catheterization (+0.10 +/- 0.12 cm(2)). In conclusion, DSCT permits one to assess the AVA with a high-image quality and diagnostic accuracy compared to TTE and invasive determination. PMID:19932793

  15. Effect of Randomized Lipid Lowering With Simvastatin and Ezetimibe on Cataract Development (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study).

    PubMed

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; La Cour, Morten; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Ray, Simon; Pedersen, Terje; Rossebø, Anne; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Wachtell, Kristian

    2015-12-15

    Recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on statin initiation on the basis of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk argue that the preventive effect of statins on cardiovascular events outweigh the side effects, although this is controversial. Studies indicate a possible effect of statin therapy on reducing risk of lens opacities. However, the results are conflicting. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (NCT00092677) enrolled 1,873 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other serious co-morbidities were randomized (1:1) to double-blind 40 mg simvastatin plus 10 mg ezetimibe versus placebo. The primary end point in this substudy was incident cataract. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze: (1) if the active treatment reduced the risk of the primary end point and (2) if time-varying low-density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol lowering (annually assessed) was associated with less incident cataract per se. During an average follow-up of 4.3 years, 65 patients (3.5%) developed cataract. Mean age at baseline was 68 years and 39% were women. In Cox multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, prednisolone treatment, smoking, baseline LDL cholesterol and high sensitivity C-reactive protein; simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus placebo was associated with 44% lower risk of cataract development (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.96, p = 0.034). In a parallel analysis substituting time-varying LDL-cholesterol with randomized treatment, lower intreatment LDL-cholesterol was in itself associated with lower risk of incident cataract (hazard ratio 0.78 per 1 mmol/ml lower total cholesterol, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.93, p = 0.008). In conclusion, randomized treatment with simvastatin plus ezetimibe was associated with a 44% lower risk of incident cataract development. This effect should perhaps be considered

  16. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wypasek, Ewa; Potaczek, Daniel P.; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96) vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90) mg/L, p < 0.001) and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01) compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression. PMID:26473826

  17. Heart rate variability in children with aortic valve stenosis – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Piorecka-Makula, Anna; Bobkowski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) in children with aortic valve stenosis (AS) and its relationship with left ventricular mass and peak transaortic valve pressure gradient (PG). Material and methods Sixty children with AS divided into 3 groups according to their PG and 60 healthy controls were studied. Holter ECG monitoring with time domain HRV analysis was performed. Left ventricular mass was calculated by echocardiography. Results Mean values of all HRV parameters were statistically significantly lower (p < 0.001) in children with AS than in controls (respectively: SDNN 127.8 ±28.2 ms; 162.6 ±38.0 ms, SDNN day 99.7 ±26.6 ms; 134.1 ±36.1 ms, SDNN night 99.9 ±32.8 ms; 123.4 ±45.7 ms, SDANN 112.2 ±27.7 ms; 142.4 ±34.6, SDNNi 62.2 ±16.2 ms; 75.9 ±21.6, RMSSD 39.6 ±12.1 ms; 50.3 ±16.7 ms, rMSSD day 33.6 ±10.9 ms; 43.1 ±14.7 ms, rMSSD night 49.8 ±18.1 ms; 64.4 ±24.9 ms, pNN50 16.4 ±9.5%; 23.5 ±11.7%, pNN50 day 12.0 ±8.5%; 18.4 ±10.7%, pNN50 night; 26.5 ±14.8%; 36.4 ±17.4%. No significant differences between the mean values of HRV parameters in children with different PG and with and without myocardial hypertrophy were found. In children with AS and ventricular arrhythmia SDNN day was significantly lower (p < 0.05) compared to patients without arrhythmia (94.9 ±22.1 ms vs. 109.3 ±22.5 ms). Conclusions In children with AS the balance of the autonomic nervous systemic disturbed which manifests in an increase in sympathetic and decrease in parasympathetic activity. Transaortic valve pressure gradient and myocardial hypertrophy do not influence the HRV. The SDNN reduction during the day period may indicate the risk of ventricular arrhythmia in children with AS. PMID:23847678

  18. An experimental study of apico-aortic valved conduit (AAVC) for surgical treatment of aortic stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Hidehiro; Inoue, Tomoki; Hoshi, Katsuichiro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Shimizu, Miki; Tanaka, Ryou; Takashima, Kazuaki; Mori, Yuichi; Noishiki, Yasuharu; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2005-04-01

    A new valved conduit was developed using a canine aortic valve. The bioprosthetic valve was fixed with glutaraldehyde and epoxy compound (Denacol-EX313/810). A vascular graft composed of ultra-fine polyester fiber (10 mm in diameter, 200 mm in length) was used. Four dogs underwent apico-aortic valved conduit (AAVC) implantation and aortic banding (bypass group, BG), while another 4 dogs underwent aortic banding without AAVC implantation (control group, CG). Cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were performed for assessment of hemodynamics 2 weeks and 6 months after surgery. Left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and the left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient differed significantly (P<0.01) between the BG and CG dogs. Left ventricular angiocardiography showed patency of the valved conduit in all the BG dogs. Echocardiography was performed before and 2, 4 and 6 months after surgery, and showed that while pressure overload caused concentric myocardial hypertrophy in the CG dogs, the left ventricle dilated eccentrically in the BG dogs. Furthermore, relief of left ventricular pressure overload by AAVC was maintained. PMID:15876784

  19. Dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs in circulating osteogenic progenitor cells obtained from patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kan; Satoh, Mamoru; Takahashi, Yuji; Osaki, Takuya; Nasu, Takahito; Tamada, Makiko; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Morino, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    CAVD (calcific aortic valve disease) is the defining feature of AS (aortic stenosis). The present study aimed to determine whether expression of ossification-related miRNAs is related to differentiation intro COPCs (circulating osteogenic progenitor cells) in patients with CAVD. The present study included 46 patients with AS and 46 controls. Twenty-nine patients underwent surgical AVR (aortic valve replacement) and 17 underwent TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The number of COPCs was higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). Levels of miR-30c were higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01), whereas levels of miR-106a, miR-148a, miR-204, miR-211, miR-31 and miR-424 were lower in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). The number of COPCs and levels of osteocalcin protein in COPCs were positively correlated with levels of miR-30a and negatively correlated with levels of the remaining miRNAs (all P<0.05). The degree of aortic valve calcification was weakly positively correlated with the number of COPCs and miR-30c levels. The number of COPCs and miR-30c levels were decreased after surgery, whereas levels of the remaining miRNAs were increased (all P<0.05). Changes in these levels were greater after AVR than after TAVI (all P<0.05). In vitro study using cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells transfected with each ossification-related miRNA showed that these miRNAs controlled levels of osteocalcin protein. In conclusion, dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs may be related to the differentiation into COPCs and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CAVD. PMID:27129184

  20. Dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs in circulating osteogenic progenitor cells obtained from patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kan; Takahashi, Yuji; Osaki, Takuya; Nasu, Takahito; Tamada, Makiko; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Morino, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    CAVD (calcific aortic valve disease) is the defining feature of AS (aortic stenosis). The present study aimed to determine whether expression of ossification-related miRNAs is related to differentiation intro COPCs (circulating osteogenic progenitor cells) in patients with CAVD. The present study included 46 patients with AS and 46 controls. Twenty-nine patients underwent surgical AVR (aortic valve replacement) and 17 underwent TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The number of COPCs was higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). Levels of miR-30c were higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01), whereas levels of miR-106a, miR-148a, miR-204, miR-211, miR-31 and miR-424 were lower in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). The number of COPCs and levels of osteocalcin protein in COPCs were positively correlated with levels of miR-30a and negatively correlated with levels of the remaining miRNAs (all P<0.05). The degree of aortic valve calcification was weakly positively correlated with the number of COPCs and miR-30c levels. The number of COPCs and miR-30c levels were decreased after surgery, whereas levels of the remaining miRNAs were increased (all P<0.05). Changes in these levels were greater after AVR than after TAVI (all P<0.05). In vitro study using cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells transfected with each ossification-related miRNA showed that these miRNAs controlled levels of osteocalcin protein. In conclusion, dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs may be related to the differentiation into COPCs and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CAVD. PMID:27129184

  1. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Edit; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Caidahl, Kenneth; Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Department of Throracic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Baeck, Magnus; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  2. [Double-chamber right ventricle, aortic subvalvular stenosis and interventricular septal defect. Apropos of 12 cases].

    PubMed

    Corone, S; Corone, P; Dor, X; Leriche, H; Binet, J P; Planché, C

    1993-05-01

    The authors report 12 cases of double-chamber right ventricle associated with discrete subaortic stenosis and ventricle septal defect. The statistics derived from 3,292 surgical reports of congenital heart diseases operated on at the Marie-Lannelongue Surgical Center over an 8 years period show that this association is 7 times more frequent than the law of chance. Twenty-two per cent of double-chamber right ventricles had an associated discrete subaortic stenosis and, in 9% of cases of subaortic stenosis a double-chamber right ventricle was observed. The cause of this malformation could be a developmental defect of the primitive interampullar ring. PMID:8257271

  3. Analysis of geographic variations in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aortic stenosis in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Vavalle, John P; Phillips, Harry R; Holleran, Sara A; Wang, Andrew; O'Connor, Christopher M; Smith, Peter K; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Patel, Manesh R

    2014-06-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of aortic stenosis (AS), many patients with AS remain untreated. Barriers to accessing cardiovascular surgical care may play a role in this undertreatment. We sought to examine whether there are geographic variations in the treatment of AS within North Carolina that may reflect differential access to care. Hospital discharge data from North Carolina hospitals during federal fiscal year 2010 were analyzed from the Thomson Reuters database. Patients hospitalized with AS were identified using International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes. ICD-9 procedure codes were used to identify patients who had aortic valve replacement and other cardiac procedures. The rates of hospitalizations for AS and aortic valve replacement were calculated per county in North Carolina. In fiscal year 2010, there were 12,111 patients who were discharged from a North Carolina hospital with AS listed as one of the ICD-9 discharge diagnosis codes. The median age for this population was 79 (twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth), with approximately 1/3 patients (28.9%) being at least 85 years of age and >1/2 being female (53.8%). Of them, 1,608 patients underwent valvular surgery with an in-hospital mortality rate of 3.3%. The highest rates, corrected for county population, of hospitalizations where AS was listed as the primary diagnosis were in the most rural segments of North Carolina while those same areas had the lowest rates of valvular surgery. In conclusion, there are significant geographic variations in the rates of hospitalization for AS and for valvular surgery within North Carolina. The most rural segments of the state have the highest rates of hospitalization while also having the lowest rates of surgery. This suggests geographic treatment disparities as a result of access to surgical care that must be considered as new therapies for AS, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, are deployed. PMID:24837267

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic stenosis and a borderline-sized annulus.

    PubMed

    Colkesen, Yucel; Baykan, Oytun; Dagdelen, Sinan; Cayli, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is currently considered an exclusion criterion for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The risk of adverse aortic events such as incomplete sealing, severe paravalvular regurgitation or dislocation due to elliptic shape and asymmetric calcifications in annulus are higher in TAVI. In this case report, we detailed a case of successful trans-femoral TAVI in a 51-year old male with BAV and its management without in-hospital and 30-day complications. The challenge in this case was the patient's anatomy with a 27-mm annulus for balloon expandable device. The applied strategy was balloon sizing and overdilating the 29-mm stented valve with additional volume that obviated re-ballooning. Trans-femoral TAVI was performed uneventfully under fluoroscopic and transoesophageal echocardiography guidance. A multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluation at 1 month did not show device dislodgement or any other complications. Evidence for evaluation post-TAVI is not sufficient in BAV. We believe patients with BAV should undergo a comprehensive assessment after TAVI including MDCT evaluation. PMID:26265070

  5. [A case of tracheo-bronchial stenosis after extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis for interrupted aortic arch treated with suspension of the ascending artery and pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Hoshino, S; Iwaya, F; Igari, T; Ono, T; Takahashi, K

    2001-02-01

    A 9-day-old boy had pulmonary artery banding and extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis for ventricular septal defect (VSD) and type A interrupted aortic arch. Severe dyspnea gradually developed. At 3 months of age, intracardiac repair of VSD was performed. Weaning from the ventilator was difficult. Endoscopic examination and chest CT revealed stenosis of the right and left main bronchi and compression of tracheal bifurcation and the right and left main bronchi by the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. Suspension of the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery was performed 15 days after VSD closure. Nine days after this procedure, the patient was weaned from respirator. Postoperative course was uneventful. Bronchial stenosis may be caused from extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis. PMID:11211771

  6. Morphological and Chemical Study of Pathological Deposits in Human Aortic and Mitral Valve Stenosis: A Biomineralogical Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Salvador, Loris; Valfré, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate heart valve calcification process by different biomineralogical techniques to provide morphological and chemical features of the ectopic deposit extracted from patients with severe mitral and aortic valve stenosis, to better evaluate this pathological process. Polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses brought to light the presence of nodular and massive mineralization forms characterized by different levels of calcification, as well as the presence of submicrometric calcified globular cluster, micrometric cavities containing disorganized tissue structures, and submillimeter pockets formed by organic fibers very similar to amyloid formations. Electron microprobe analyses showed variable concentrations of Ca and P within each deposit and the highest content of Ca and P within calcified tricuspid aortic valves, while powder X-ray diffraction analyses indicated in the nanometer range the dimension of the pathological bioapatite crystals. These findings indicated the presence of highly heterogeneous deposits within heart valve tissues and suggested a progressive maturation process with continuous changes in the composition of the valvular tissue, similar to the multistep formation process of bone tissue. Moreover the micrometric cavities represent structural stages of the valve tissue that immediately precedes the formation of heavily mineralized deposits such as bone-like nodules. PMID:25685595

  7. Aortic Root Translocation with Arterial Switch for Transposition of the Great Arteries or Double Outlet Right Ventricle with Ventricular Septal Defect and Pulmonary Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Pil; Bang, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jae-Suk; Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Young Hwee

    2016-01-01

    Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) and transposition of the great arteries (TGA) with ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary stenosis (PS) are complex heart diseases, the treatment of which remains a surgical challenge. The Rastelli procedure is still the most commonly performed treatment. Aortic root translocation including an arterial switch operation is advantageous anatomically since it has a lower possibility of conduit blockage and the left ventricle outflow tract remains straight. This study reports successful aortic root transpositions in two patients, one with DORV with VSD and PS and one with TGA with VSD and PS. Both patients were discharged without postoperative complications. PMID:27298797

  8. Transcatheter versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Diabetes and Severe Aortic Stenosis at High Risk for Surgery: An Analysis of the PARTNER Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Pibarot, Philippe; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Suri, Rakesh; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Zajarias, Alan; Kodali, Susheel; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Svensson, Lars G.; Waksman, Ron; Smith, Craig R.; Leon, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a less invasive approach to aortic valve replacement (AVR) improves clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Background Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after surgical AVR for AS. Methods Among treated patients with severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery in the PARTNER trial, we examined outcomes stratified by diabetes status of patients randomly assigned to transcatheter or surgical AVR. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Results Among 657 patients enrolled in PARTNER who underwent treatment, there were 275 patients with diabetes (145 transcatheter, 130 surgical). There was a significant interaction between diabetes and treatment group for 1-year all-cause mortality (p=0.048). Among diabetic patients, all-cause mortality at 1 year was 18.0% in the transcatheter group and 27.4% in the surgical group (HR 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99; p=0.04). Results were consistent among patients treated via transfemoral or transapical routes. In contrast, among non-diabetic patients, there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality at 1 year (p=0.48). Among diabetic patients, the 1-year rates of stroke were similar between treatment groups (3.5% transcatheter vs. 3.5% surgery, p=0.88), but the rates of renal failure requiring dialysis >30 days were lower in the transcatheter group (0% vs. 6.1%, p=0.003). Conclusions Among patients with diabetes and severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery, this post-hoc stratified analysis of the PARTNER trial suggests there is a survival benefit, no increase in stroke, and less renal failure from treatment with transcatheter compared to surgical AVR. PMID:24291272

  9. Age-related changes in reservoir and excess components of central aortic pressure in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Cymberknop, Leandro; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Torrado, Juan; Farro, Federico; Pessana, Franco; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2011-01-01

    Study of humans aging has presented difficulties in separating the aging process from concomitant disease and/or in defining normality and abnormality during its development. In accordance with this, aging associates structural and functional changes evidenced in variations in vascular parameters witch suffer alterations during atherosclerosis and have been proposed as early markers of the disease. The absence of adequate tools to differentiate the expected (normal) vascular changes due to aging from those related with a vascular disease is not a minor issue. For an individual, an early diagnosis of a vascular disease should be as important as the diagnosis of a healthy vascular aging. Recent studies have proposed that the capacitive or reservoir function of the aorta and large elastic arteries plays a major role in determining the pulse wave morphology. The arterial pressure waveform can be explained in terms of a reservoir pressure, related to the arterial system compliance, and an "excess" or wave-related pressure, associated with the traveling waves. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of a mathematical approach, age-related changes in measured, reservoir and excess central aortic pressure in order to determine if age-related changes are concentrated in particular decades of life. Central aortic pressure waveform was non-invasively obtained in healthy subjects (age range: 20-69 years old). Age-related profiles in measured, reservoir and excess pressure were calculated. PMID:22255816

  10. The impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis before aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jagielak, Dariusz; Wernio, Edyta; Bramlage, Peter; Gruchała-Niedoszytko, Marta; Rogowski, Jan; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with the reduction of physical activity and muscle mass and may be associated with decreased appetite. Aim To assess the nutritional status and the impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe AS before aortic valve replacement. Material and methods Ninety-nine patients (55 male, 44 female; 74.3 ±5.2 years old) with severe AS and an indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) were included. The nutritional status was assessed by different questionnaires (7-point Subjective Global Assessment Score – 7-SGA, full-Mini Nutritional Assessment – full-MNA) and anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI) kg/m2). Body composition was estimated using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Appetite was assessed by the Simplified Nutrition Assessment Questionnaire (SNAQ). Results The average BMI of patients was 28.8 ±5.8 kg/m2. Results of the 7-SGA and f-MNA questionnaires revealed that 39 patients (39.4%) were at risk of malnutrition. The mean SNAQ score was 15.8 ±1.8. The average length of hospital stay was 10 ±5.8 days. There was a positive correlation of LOS with age (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) and a negative correlation with fat mass (kg) (r = –0.28, p = 0.04) and BMI (r = –0.22, p = 0.03). Postoperative complications were observed in 37 patients (37.4%). Patients who developed complications were older and had poorer nutritional status according to the results of the 7-SGA. Conclusions Despite many patients undergoing AVR being overweight and obese, a considerable proportion displayed clinical signs of malnutrition. The results suggest that an assessment of nutritional status and appetite in this group of patients should be conducted regularly and that the 7-SGA scale could represent a reliable tool to assess malnutrition. PMID:27516781

  11. Echocardiography as a Predicting Method in Diagnosis, Evaluation and Assessment of Children with Subvalvar Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Ragip

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstruction to the left ventricular outflow of the heart may be above the aortic valve (5%), at the valve (74%), or in the subvalvar region (23%). These anomalies represent 3 to 6% of all patients with congenital heart defects (CHD), and it occurs more often in males (male-female ratio of 4:1). AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of transthoracic echocardiography in diagnosis of discrete subaortic membrane, to determine convenient time for surgical intervention, and for identifying involvement of the aortic valve by subaortic shelf. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the medical records and echocardiograms of 18 patients [14 male (77%) and 4 female (23%)] with discrete subaortic membrane, aged 11 month to 12 years, with mean age of 5 years and 3 month, diagnosed at the Pediatric Clinic in Prishtina, during the period September, 1999 and December, 2010 were done. RESULTS: Four patients, in neonatal age were operated from critical coarctation of the aorta and, initial signs of congestive heart failure were presented. 2 of them were operated in Belgrade, Serbia and 2 in Lausanne, Switzerland. CONCLUSION: In all presented patients bicuspid aortic valve was noted, but none of them subaortic membrane was registered. PMID:27275334

  12. The Adverse Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Madrazo, José A.; Zajarias, Alan; Johnson, Stephanie N.; Pérez, Julio E.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The diabetic heart exhibits increased left ventricular (LV) mass and reduced ventricular function. However, this relationship has not been studied in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), a disease process that causes LV hypertrophy and dysfunction through a distinct mechanism of pressure overload. The aim of this study was to determine how diabetes mellitus (DM) impacts LV remodeling and function in patients with severe AS. Methods and Results Echocardiograms were performed on 114 patients with severe AS [mean aortic valve area (AVA) 0.6 cm2] and included measures of LV remodeling and function. Multivariable linear regression models investigated the independent effect of DM on these aspects of LV structure and function. Compared to non-diabetics (n=60), diabetics (n=54) had increased LV mass, LV end-systolic dimension, LV end-diastolic dimension, and decreased LV ejection fraction (EF) and longitudinal systolic strain (p<0.01 for all). In multivariable analyses adjusting for age, sex, systolic BP, AVA, BSA, and coronary disease, DM was an independent predictor of increased LV mass (β=26g, p=0.01), LV end-systolic dimension (β=0.5cm, p=0.008), and LV end-diastolic dimension (β=0.3cm, p=0.025). After additionally adjusting for LV mass, DM was associated with reduced longitudinal systolic strain (β=1.9%, p=0.023) and a trend toward reduced EF (β=−5%, p=0.09). Among diabetics, insulin use (as a marker of disease severity) was associated with larger LV end-systolic dimension and worse LV function. LV mass was a strong predictor of reduced EF and systolic strain (p<0.001 for both). Conclusions DM has an additive adverse effect on hypertrophic remodeling—increased LV mass and larger cavity dimensions—and is associated with reduced systolic function in patients with AS beyond known factors of pressure overload. PMID:21357546

  13. Prognostic Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio on Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Severe Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Im; Cho, Sang Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Singh, Gillian Balbir; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to evaluate the association between an inflammatory marker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with severe calcific AS. Methods A total of 336 patients with isolated severe calcific AS newly diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Using Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression models, we investigated the prognostic value of NLR adjusted for baseline covariates including logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score (EuroSCORE-I) and undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). We also evaluated the clinical relevance of NLR risk groups (divided into low, intermediate, high risk) as categorized by NLR cutoff values. MACE was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction during the follow-up period. Results The inflammatory marker NLR was an independent prognostic factor most significantly associated with MACE [hazard ratio (HR), 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.09; p-value <0.001]. The goodness-of-fit and discriminability of the model including EuroSCORE-I and AVR (loglikelihood difference, 15.49; p-value <0.001; c-index difference, 0.035; p-value = 0.03) were significantly improved when NLR was incorporated into the model. The estimated Kaplan-Meier survival rates at 5 years for the NLR risk groups were 84.6% for the low risk group (NLR ≤ 2), 67.7% for the intermediate risk group (2 < NLR ≤ 9), and 42.6% for the high risk group (NLR > 9), respectively. Conclusion The findings of the present study demonstrate the potential utility of NLR in risk stratification of patients with severe calcific AS. PMID:27548384

  14. Refined multiscale entropy: application to 24-h Holter recordings of heart period variability in healthy and aortic stenosis subjects.

    PubMed

    Valencia, José Fernando; Porta, Alberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Clarià, Francesc; Baranowski, Rafal; Orłowska-Baranowska, Ewa; Caminal, Pere

    2009-09-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) was proposed to characterize complexity as a function of the time-scale factor tau. Despite its broad use, this technique suffers from two limitations: 1) the artificial MSE reduction due to the coarse graining procedure and 2) the introduction of spurious MSE oscillations due to the suboptimal procedure for the elimination of the fast temporal scales. We propose a refined MSE (RMSE), and we apply it to simulations and to 24-h Holter recordings of heart rate variability (HRV) obtained from healthy and aortic stenosis (AS) groups. The study showed that the refinement relevant to the elimination of the fast temporal scales was more helpful at short scales (spanning the range of short-term HRV oscillations), while that relevant to the procedure of coarse graining was more useful at large scales. In healthy subjects, during daytime, RMSE was smaller at short scales (i.e., tau = 1-2) and larger at longer scales (i.e., tau = 4-20) than during nighttime. In AS population, RMSE was smaller during daytime both at short and long time scales (i.e., tau = 1 -11) than during nighttime. RMSE was larger in healthy group than in AS population during both daytime (i.e., tau = 2 -9) and nighttime (i.e., tau = 2). RMSE overcomes two limitations of MSE and confirms the complementary information that can be derived by observing complexity as a function of the temporal scale. PMID:19457745

  15. Fluid Dynamics of the Generation and Transmission of Heart Sounds: (1) A Cardiothoracic Phantom Based Study of Aortic Stenosis Murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshaee, Hani; Seo, Jung-Hee; Zhu, Chi; Welsh, Nathaniel; Garreau, Guillaume; Tognetti, Gaspar; Andreou, Andreas; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    A novel and versatile cardiothoracic phantom has been designed to study the biophysics of heart murmurs associated with aortic stenosis. The key features of the cardiothoracic phantom include the use of tissue-mimetic gel to model the sound transmission through the thorax and the embedded fluid circuit that is designed to mimic the heart sound mechanisms in large vessels with obstructions. The effect of the lungs on heart murmur propagation can also be studied through the insertion of lung-mimicking material into gel. Sounds on the surface of the phantom are measured using a variety of sensors and the spectrum of the recorded signal and the streamwise variation in total signal strength is recorded. Based on these results, we provide insights into the biophysics of heart murmurs and the effect of lungs on sound propagation through the thorax. Data from these experiments is also used to validate the results of a companion computational study. Authors want to acknowledge the financial supports for this study by SCH grant (IIS 1344772) from National Science Foundation.

  16. Ultrasound-image-based Texture Variability along the Carotid Artery Wall in Asymptomatic Subjects with Low and High Stenosis Degrees: Unveiling Morphological Phenomena of the Vulnerable Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golemati, Spyretta; Lehareas, Symeon; Tsiaparas, Nikolaos N.; Nikita, Konstantina S.; Chatziioannou, Achilles; Perrea, Despina N.

    Valid identification of the vulnerable asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis remains a crucial clinical issue. In this study, texture differences were estimated along the atherosclerotic arterial wall, namely at the plaque, the wall adjacent to it and the plaque shoulder, i.e. the boundary between wall and plaque, in an attempt to reveal morphological phenomena, representative of the high stenosis (considered vulnerable) cases. A total of 25 arteries were interrogated, 11 with low (50-69%) and 14 with high (70-100%) degrees of stenosis. The two groups had similar ages. Texture features were estimated from B-mode ultrasound images, and included four second-order statistical parameters (contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity), each calculated at four different image directions (00, 450, 900, 1350), yielding a total of 16 features. Texture differences between (a) wall and plaque and (b) wall and plaque shoulder were quantified as the differences in texture feature values for each tissue area normalised by the texture feature value of the wall, which was considered as reference, as illustrated in the following equation: dTFi = (TFi,W - TFi,P/S)/TFi,W, where dTFi the estimated texture difference, TFi,W the texture of the wall, and TFi,P/S the texture of the plaque (P) or the shoulder (S). Significant differences in texture variability of wall vs. shoulder were observed between high and low stenosis cases for 3 features at diastole and 7 features at systole. No differences were observed for wall vs plaque, although wall texture was significantly different than plaque texture, in absolute values. These findings suggest that texture variability along the atherosclerotic wall, which is indicative of tissue discontinuities, and proneness to rupture, can be quantitatively described with texture indices and reveal valuable morphological phenomena of the vulnerable tissue.

  17. Prevalence of carotid artery stenosis in neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary artery disease: Role of anesthesiologist in preoperative assessment and intraoperative management

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Sameer; Chauhan, Sandeep; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Jagia, Priya; Bisoi, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aimed to determine the prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CAS) due to atherosclerosis in neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for coronary artery disease (CAD). It contemplated a greater role for the cardiac anesthesiologist in the perioperative management of such patients with either previously undiagnosed carotid artery disease or towards re-assessment of severity of CAS. Design: Prospective, observational clinical study. Setting: Operation room of a cardiac surgery centre of a tertiary teaching hospital. Participants: A hundred adult patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification I to III presenting electively for CABG. Interventions: All patients included in this study were subjected to ultrasonic examination by means of acarotid doppler scan to access for presence of CAS just prior to induction of general anesthesia. Measurements and Main Results: Based on parameters measured using carotid doppler, the presence of CAS was defined using standard criteria. The prevalence of CAS was found to be as high as 38% amongst the patients included in our study. The risk factors for CAS were identified to be advanced age, history of smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and presence of a carotid bruit. Conclusion: This study points towards the relatively wide prevalence of carotid artery disease in neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing CABG for CAD in the elective setting. It highlights the need to routinely incorporate carotid ultrasonography in the armamentarium of the cardiac anesthesiologist as standard of care for all patients presenting for CABG. PMID:26750678

  18. Effect of correction of anemia on echocardiographic and clinical parameters in patients with aortic stenosis involving a three-cuspid aortic valve and normal left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miquel; Ble, Mireia; Cladellas, Mercedes; Molina, Luis; Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Roqueta, Cristina; Soler, Cristina; Bruguera, Jordi

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of anemia (defined as hemoglobin concentration of <12 g/dl in women and 13 g/dl in men) on prognosis and to study the effect of recovery from anemia on echocardiographic and clinical parameters in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). This was a prospective study in 315 patients with moderate or severe AS. Patients with anemia received oral iron (ferrous sulfate with mucoproteose, 160 mg iron/day) and erythropoietin, if needed, or intravenous iron, if necessary. The following tests were performed before and after normalization of hemoglobin values: echocardiogram, 6-minute walk test, N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide, and measures of depression, cognitive impairment, and dependence. Patient mean age was 74 years (SD 9). Mean follow-up was 25 months (SD 8). Anemia prevalence in the overall group was 22% (n = 70). Patients who are anemic had a higher rate of complications at follow-up (mortality, hospital admission, or need for valve procedure; 80% vs 62%, p = 0.009). In total, 89% of patients recovered from anemia, with a mean time to recovery of 4.6 weeks (SD 1.4). Improvements were observed on echocardiographic parameters of peak velocity (4.1 to 3.7 m/s, p = 0.02) and mean gradient (44 to 35 mm Hg, p = 0.02). Performance on the 6-minute walk test improved from 235 to 303 m (p <0.001). Median N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide value decreased from 612 to 189 pg/dl (p <0.001). In conclusion, patients with AS and anemia have a worse prognosis than those without anemia. Resolution of anemia is associated with improvements in echocardiographic parameters and functional status, suggesting that treatment of iron deficiency is a relevant option in the management of patients with AS, particularly in nonoperable cases. PMID:25983280

  19. Serum Total Bilirubin Levels Provide Additive Risk Information over the Framingham Risk Score for Identifying Asymptomatic Diabetic Patients at Higher Risk for Coronary Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Jaechan; Koh, Eun Hee; Jang, Jung Eun; Woo, Chang-Yun; Oh, Jin Sun; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) is often delayed in patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum total bilirubin levels are inversely associated with CAD. However, no studies have examined whether this can be used as a biochemical marker for identifying asymptomatic diabetic patients at higher risk for having obstructive CAD. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 460 consecutive asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes. All patients underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography, and their serum total bilirubin levels were measured. Obstructive CAD was defined as ≥50% diameter stenosis in at least one coronary artery. Results Serum total bilirubin tertiles showed an inverse association with the prevalence of obstructive CAD. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for the highest versus the lowest tertile of total bilirubin was 0.227 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.130 to 0.398), and an increment of 1 µmol/L in serum total bilirubin level was associated with a 14.6% decrease in obstructive CAD after adjustment for confounding variables. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the area under the curve for the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) plus serum total bilirubin level was 0.712 (95% CI, 0.668 to 0.753), which is significantly greater than that of the FRS alone (P=0.0028). Conclusion Serum total bilirubin level is inversely associated with obstructive CAD and provides additive risk information over the FRS. Serum total bilirubin may be helpful for identifying asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes who are at higher risk for obstructive CAD. PMID:26566499

  20. Prevalence of Atherosclerotic Coronary Stenosis in Asymptomatic North Indian Population: A Post-mortem Coronary Angiography Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Shatrugan Prasad; Kumar, Senthil; Setia, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Aim A preliminary study of coronaries using post-mortem angiography was undertaken to see the prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary stenosis in non-cardiac unnatural deaths. Materials and Methods This study was conducted in a tertiary care centre located in Chandigarh. A total of 128 medico-legal cases were studied comprising 88 males and 40 females. Post-mortem examinations of these MLC cases were conducted in the Department of Forensic Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh. All hearts were visually screened by post-mortem coronary angiography first and then grossly examined using serial transverse incision technique in positive screening cases to find the degree of narrowing. Results Of the study group, 34% males and 20% females showed evidence of narrowing on angiography. Of the males showing coronary stenosis, 83% had single vessel disease and 13% had double vessel disease, while only one individual had triple vessel disease. In cases of female, all the cases of coronary stenosis were single vessel disease. Left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was the most common vessel involved, followed by right coronary artery (RCA) & Left circumflex artery (LCX) and in cases of double vessel disease, LAD in combination with LCX was responsible for 75% of the cases. Remarkably 23.6% of study population in the age group of less than 40 years showed appreciable narrowing in at least one of the coronaries. Conclusion In general, the prevalence of CAD is on the rise, particularly in younger population owing to the changes in their lifestyle and food habits. This preliminary study revealed evidence of narrowing of at least one coronary in 34% male and 20% female population and 23.6% subjects were less than 40 years old. Further detailed studies are needed especially in younger age group and to support the need for preventive cardiology in the early years of life. PMID:26500922

  1. Brachial artery diameter has a predictive value in the improvement of flow-mediated dilation after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Takata, Munenori; Amiya, Eisuke; Watanabe, Masafumi; Ozeki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Aya; Kawarasaki, Shuichi; Nakao, Tomoko; Hosoya, Yumiko; Uno, Kansei; Saito, Aya; Murasawa, Takahide; Ono, Minoru; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2015-03-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease and aortic valve replacement (AVR) is one of its most effective interventions. AS affects not only the left ventricle, but also vascular function beyond the stenotic valve, which can lead to various types of vascular dysfunction. However, research evaluating the effect of AS on aortic vascular function is limited. In this study, we investigated clinical meaning to evaluate endothelial function in subjects with AS. From April 2011 to April 2012, 20 consecutive adult patients with degenerative AS (mean age, 74.7 ± 7.4 years; range 50-83 years) who underwent AVR at our institution were included in the study. We measured flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to evaluate the effect of AS on endothelial function. The difference between brachial artery diameter (BAD) before (4.0 ± 0.7 mm) and after AVR (3.9 ± 0.6 mm) was not significant (p = 0.043), but FMD significantly improved after AVR (from 3.1 ± 1.8 to 6.0 ± 2.7 %, p < 0.0001). We also analyzed FMD × BAD index, endogenous vasodilatory capability independent of BAD, resulting that it also significantly increased after AVR (12.3 ± 7.0-22.5 ± 9.3, p < 0.0001). We divided patients into two groups by pre- to post-AVR change in FMD (ΔFMD); large-ΔFMD group [ΔFMD >3.0 % (median value)] and small-ΔFMD group (ΔFMD <3.0 %). There were no significant changes in age, blood pressure, heart rate, B-type natriuretic peptide, or echocardiographic parameters in either group. In contrast, BAD was significantly larger in the small ΔFMD group (4.3 ± 0.7 mm) than in the large ΔFMD group (3.7 ± 0.7 mm) (p = 0.030). In addition, cardio-thoracic ratio was significantly greater in the small ΔFMD group (58.4 ± 7.1 %) than in the large ΔFMD group (53.7 ± 4.6 %) (p = 0.048). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of BAD to differentiate large and small ΔFMD demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.750 (p = 0.059) and that optimal cutoff for BAD was 4.28 mm (70

  2. Aortic valve decalcification revisited.

    PubMed

    Marty, A T; Mufti, S; Murabit, I

    1989-11-01

    A 75-year-old woman with a small calcified aortic root, severe aortic stenosis and triple vessel coronary artery disease developed angina at rest. Aortic valve decalcification and quadruple aorto-coronary bypass were done as her aortic root was too small and calcified to do anything else. Postoperative clinical and hemodynamic results have been excellent. Literature review supports application of this therapy in selected patients with trileaflet senescent aortic stenosis. PMID:2614067

  3. Increased Stiffness Is the Major Early Abnormality in a Pig Model of Severe Aortic Stenosis and Predisposes to Congestive Heart Failure in the Absence of Systolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Oh, Jae Gyun; Hammoudi, Nadjib; A Fish, Lauren; Leonardson, Lauren; Picatoste, Belén; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; M. Fish, Kenneth; Hajjar, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains unclear whether abnormal systolic function and relaxation are essential for developing heart failure in pathophysiology of severe aortic stenosis. Methods and Results Yorkshire pigs underwent surgical banding of the ascending aorta. The animals were followed for up to 5 months after surgery, and cardiac function was assessed comprehensively by invasive pressure–volume measurements, 3-dimensional echocardiography, echocardiographic speckle-tracking strain, and postmortem molecular and histological analyses. Pigs with aortic banding (n=6) exhibited significant left ventricular hypertrophy with increased stiffness compared with the control pigs (n=7) (end-diastolic pressure–volume relationship β: 0.053±0.017 versus 0.028±0.009 mm Hg/mL, P=0.007); however, all other parameters corresponding to systolic function, including ejection fraction, end-systolic pressure–volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, echocardiographic circumferential strain, and longitudinal strain, were not impaired in pigs with aortic banding. Relaxation parameters were also similar between groups. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca2+) ATPase protein levels in the left ventricle were similar. There were significant increases in 3-dimensional echocardiographic left atrial volumes, suggesting the usefulness of these indexes to detect increased stiffness. Right atrial pacing with a heart rate of 120 beats per minute induced increased end-diastolic pressure in pigs with aortic banding in contrast to decreased end-diastolic pressure in the control pigs. Histological evaluation revealed that increased stiffness was accompanied by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased perimysial and perivascular fibrosis. Conclusion Increased stiffness is the major early pathological process that predisposes to congestive heart failure without abnormalities in systolic function and relaxation in a clinically relevant animal model of aortic stenosis. PMID:25994443

  4. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24-3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309-3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  5. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide: Bridging to Transcoronary Ablation of Septal Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S.; Poulsen, Steen H.; Agnholt, Jorgen S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) due to angiodysplasias can cause severe, recurrent bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Angiodysplastic bleedings in the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with aortic stenosis and, more recently, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, caused by an acquired coagulopathy known as Heyde’s syndrome. Multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of angiodysplastic bleeding including genetic factors and increased levels of vascular intestinal growth factor at tissue levels. Endoscopic coagulation therapy is the primary treatment but often fails to resolve bleeding, especially in patients with large numbers of angiodysplasias. In patients with aortic stenosis and GB, the main treatment is aortic valve replacement but the patients may be unfit to undergo surgery due to the complicating anemia. In this case story, we present a patient with severe, GB due to hypertrophic subvalvular obstructive cardiomyopathy. Endoscopic procedures with argon beaming were performed without effect on bleeding. The patient was treated with a combination of both thalidomide and octreotide. Within 3 months, the patient recovered from the anemia and was able to undergo transcoronary ethanol ablation. No further bleeding episodes occurred, and thalidomide and octreotide were arrested. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe how this new drug combination therapy is an effective treatment of GB from angiodysplasias and can be used to bridge to surgical or endovascular treatment. PMID:26491506

  6. [Fragility in severe aortic stenosis patient: a multidimensional assessment from nursing].

    PubMed

    Melero-Lacasia, Amaia

    2016-01-01

    The interest in studying frailty in older adults is an emerging fact in cardiology due to the incidence of patients undergoing valve replacement procedures in conditions difficult to quantify from the purely clinical point of view. In this regard, the profile of patients has been changing and often elderly people identify with greater vulnerability shown by different aspects such as walking speed, grip strength, independence for activities of daily living or emotional issues that condition their quality of life. These patients need to be identified prior to surgery in order to offer the best therapeutic option. Therefore, in our centre we set out to identify this group of fragile population with a multidimensional assessment where the nurse, through a specific assessment test, can set the degree of fragility of those patients who have an increased vulnerability. In this article we describe the multidimensional assessment in a pilot experience with 115 patients, where patient characteristics were analyzed, providing an overview of the profile of frailty in the elderly with aortic valve heart disease. PMID:26708824

  7. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  8. Idiopathic hypertrophic sub-aortic stenosis (IHSS): a new diagnostic method using ECG-gated thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Garty, I; Flatau, E; Bloch, L

    1985-12-01

    A new diagnostic method for idiopathic hypertrophic sub-aortic stenosis (IHSS), using synchronized ECG gated 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy, is described. Twenty patients previously diagnosed as IHSS were evaluated by sequential three-view ECG gated 201Tl and 45 degrees left anterior oblique multigated (MUGA) cardiac blood pool imaging (Group A). The results were compared with two control groups: 20 patients with no previous history of heart disease (Group B), and 20 patients with coronary ischaemic heart disease (Group C). We suggest the following combination of scintigraphic signs as typical and diagnostic to obstructive IHSS: Elevated left ventricular ejection fraction (mean 83.9% +/- 6.15S.D. versus 72.5% +/- 5.35S.D. and 51.2% +/- 13.65S.D. in Groups B and C respectively); Systolic left ventricular cavity obliteration (71% of obstructive IHSS patients versus 0% in Groups B and C); A ratio of more than 1.3:1 in septal to free wall thickness (100% of patients with IHSS); Perfusion/wall-motion mismatch of septum was demonstrated in all (100%) of patients with IHSS (versus 0% in Group B and 10% in Group C). We suggest this last finding as a new specific diagnostic sign for IHSS, with the ability to differentiate between patients with ischaemic coronary heart disease and IHSS patients; whilst both groups may present chest pains, the first group was characterized by 'matching' of perfusion and motion of the affected myocardial wall while the patients with IHSS had 'mismatching' of these parameters. We suggest gated 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy as an additional sensitive tool for the early diagnosis and evaluation of IHSS patients. PMID:3831851

  9. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24–3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309–3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  10. 10-year stroke prevention after successful carotid endarterectomy for asymptomatic stenosis (ACST-1): a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Alison; Harrison, Michael; Hayter, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangling; Mansfield, Averil; Marro, Joanna; Pan, Hongchao; Peto, Richard; Potter, John; Rahimi, Kazem; Rau, Angela; Robertson, Steven; Streifler, Jonathan; Thomas, Dafydd

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background If carotid artery narrowing remains asymptomatic (ie, has caused no recent stroke or other neurological symptoms), successful carotid endarterectomy (CEA) reduces stroke incidence for some years. We assessed the long-term effects of successful CEA. Methods Between 1993 and 2003, 3120 asymptomatic patients from 126 centres in 30 countries were allocated equally, by blinded minimised randomisation, to immediate CEA (median delay 1 month, IQR 0·3–2·5) or to indefinite deferral of any carotid procedure, and were followed up until death or for a median among survivors of 9 years (IQR 6–11). The primary outcomes were perioperative mortality and morbidity (death or stroke within 30 days) and non-perioperative stroke. Kaplan-Meier percentages and logrank p values are from intention-to-treat analyses. This study is registered, number ISRCTN26156392. Findings 1560 patients were allocated immediate CEA versus 1560 allocated deferral of any carotid procedure. The proportions operated on while still asymptomatic were 89·7% versus 4·8% at 1 year (and 92·1% vs 16·5% at 5 years). Perioperative risk of stroke or death within 30 days was 3·0% (95% CI 2·4–3·9; 26 non-disabling strokes plus 34 disabling or fatal perioperative events in 1979 CEAs). Excluding perioperative events and non-stroke mortality, stroke risks (immediate vs deferred CEA) were 4·1% versus 10·0% at 5 years (gain 5·9%, 95% CI 4·0–7·8) and 10·8% versus 16·9% at 10 years (gain 6·1%, 2·7–9·4); ratio of stroke incidence rates 0·54, 95% CI 0·43–0·68, p<0·0001. 62 versus 104 had a disabling or fatal stroke, and 37 versus 84 others had a non-disabling stroke. Combining perioperative events and strokes, net risks were 6·9% versus 10·9% at 5 years (gain 4·1%, 2·0–6·2) and 13·4% versus 17·9% at 10 years (gain 4·6%, 1·2–7·9). Medication was similar in both groups; throughout the study, most were on antithrombotic and antihypertensive therapy. Net benefits

  11. Prognostic Utility of Biomarkers in Predicting of One-Year Outcomes in Patients with Aortic Stenosis Treated with Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Parenica, Jiri; Nemec, Petr; Tomandl, Josef; Ondrasek, Jiri; Pavkova-Goldbergova, Monika; Tretina, Martin; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Littnerova, Simona; Poloczek, Martin; Pokorny, Petr; Spinar, Jindrich; Cermakova, Zdenka; Miklik, Roman; Malik, Petr; Pes, Ondrej; Lipkova, Jolana; Tomandlova, Marie; Kala, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the work was to find biomarkers identifying patients at high risk of adverse clinical outcomes after TAVI and SAVR in addition to currently used predictive model (EuroSCORE). Background There is limited data about the role of biomarkers in predicting prognosis, especially when TAVI is available. Methods The multi-biomarker sub-study included 42 consecutive high-risk patients (average age 82.0 years; logistic EuroSCORE 21.0%) allocated to TAVI transfemoral and transapical using the Edwards-Sapien valve (n = 29), or SAVR with the Edwards Perimount bioprosthesis (n = 13). Standardized endpoints were prospectively followed during the 12-month follow-up. Results The clinical outcomes after both TAVI and SAVR were comparable. Malondialdehyde served as the best predictor of a combined endpoint at 1 year with AUC (ROC analysis) = 0.872 for TAVI group, resp. 0.765 (p<0.05) for both TAVI and SAVR groups. Increased levels of MDA, matrix metalloproteinase 2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP1), ferritin-reducing ability of plasma, homocysteine, cysteine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine were all predictors of the occurrence of combined safety endpoints at 30 days (AUC 0.750–0.948; p<0.05 for all). The addition of MDA to a currently used clinical model (EuroSCORE) significantly improved prediction of a combined safety endpoint at 30 days and a combined endpoint (0–365 days) by the net reclassification improvement (NRI) and the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) (p<0.05). Cystatin C, glutathione, cysteinylglycine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, nitrite/nitrate and MMP9 did not prove to be significant. Total of 14.3% died during 1-year follow-up. Conclusion We identified malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress, as the most promising predictor of adverse outcomes during the 30-day and 1-year follow-up in high-risk patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis treated with TAVI. The development of a clinical

  12. [Pentax-AWS Airwayscope for awake tracheal intubation in the face-to-face sitting position in an emergency patient with acute exacerbation of aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Seno, Hisayo; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Ohchi, Fumihiro; Miyazaki, Yu; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    We report a successful awake tracheal intubation in an emergency patient with acute exacerbation of aortic stenosis using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope (AWS). An 83-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department for severe dyspnea due to exacerbation of aortic stenosis. Her Sp(O2) was 92-93% even after administration of 10 l x min(-1) oxygen through a reservoir-attached face mask. As she could not remain in the supine position, emergency tracheal intubation in the sitting position was required. After topical anesthesia with 8% lidocaine and careful administration of midazolam, the AWS was inserted into her mouth in the sitting, face-to-face position. The AWS allowed for visualization of the glottis and safe placement of the tracheal tube. Sufficient spontaneous ventilation was maintained during interventions with minimum vital sign changes. Awake intubation in the sitting position with the AWS may be helpful in resolving cardiovascular crisis in patients unable to maintain the supine position. PMID:25199329

  13. Prognostic Value of Circulating MicroRNA-210 Levels in Patients with Moderate to Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Røsjø, Helge; Dahl, Mai Britt; Bye, Anja; Andreassen, Johanna; Jørgensen, Marit; Wisløff, Ulrik; Christensen, Geir; Edvardsen, Thor; Omland, Torbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulating micro-RNAs have been proposed as a novel class of cardiovascular (CV) biomarkers, but whether they meet analytical requirements and provide additional information to establish risk indices have not been established. miR-210 levels are increased in subjects with low VO2 max, which is a recognized risk factor in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), and we hypothesized that circulating miR-210 levels may be increased in patients with AS and associated with a poor prognosis. Methods We measured circulating miR-210 levels by real-time PCR in 57 patients with moderate to severe AS and in 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The merit of miR-210 as a biomarker was assessed according to established criteria, including by comparing miR-210 levels with NT-proBNP and miR-22 levels, which is another miRNA biomarker candidate. Results All patients and control subjects had miR-210 levels within the range of detection (Cq<35) and the analytical variability was low. Circulating miR-210 levels were 2.0±0.2 [mean±SEM] fold increased in AS patients compared to controls (p = 0.002), whereas miR-22 levels were not differently expressed in the AS patients (0.12±0.06 fold increase, p = 0.45). The increase in miR-210 levels in AS patients was comparable to the increment in NT-proBNP levels: [AUC] 0.82 (95% CI 0.70–0.90) vs. 0.85 (0.75–0.93), respectively, p = 0.71. During a median follow-up of 1287 days, 15 patients (26%) died. There was a significant association between higher circulating levels of miR-210 and increased mortality during follow-up: hazard ratio [supra- vs. inframedian levels] 3.3 (95% CI 1.1–10.5), p = 0.039. Adjusting for other risk indices in multivariate analysis did not attenuate the prognostic merit of circulating miR-210 levels. Conclusion Circulating miR-210 levels are increased in patients with AS and provide independent prognostic information to established risk indices. Analytical characteristics were also

  14. Evaluation of Aortic Stenosis Severity using 4D Flow Jet Shear Layer Detection for the Measurement of Valve Effective Orifice Area

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Markl, Michael; Schnell, Susanne; Allen, Bradley; Entezari, Pegah; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, S Chris; Pibarot, Philippe; Carr, James; Barker, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of 4D flow MRI to assess valve effective orifice area (EOA) in patients with aortic stenosis as determined by the jet shear layer detection (JSLD) method. Methods and Results An in-vitro stenosis phantom was used for validation and in-vivo imaging was performed in 10 healthy controls and 40 patients with aortic stenosis. EOA was calculated by the JSLD method using standard 2D phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) and 4D flow MRI measurements (EOAJSLD-2D and EOAJSLD-4D, respectively). As a reference standard, the continuity equation was used to calculate EOA (EOACE) with the 2D PC-MRI velocity field and compared to the EOAJSLD measurements. The in-vitro results exhibited excellent agreement between flow theory (EOA=0.78 cm2) and experimental measurement (EOAJSLD-4D=0.78±0.01 cm2) for peak velocities ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m/s. In-vivo results showed good correlation and agreement between EOAJSLD-2D and EOACE (r=0.91, p<0.001; bias: −0.01±0.38cm2; agreement limits: 0.75 to −0.77cm2), and between EOAJSLD-4D and EOACE (r=0.95, p<0.001; bias: −0.09±0.26cm2; limits: 0.43 to −0.62cm2). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring EOAJSLD using 4D flow MRI. The technique allows for optimization of the EOA measurement position by visualizing the 3D vena contracta, and avoids potential sources of EOACE measurement variability. PMID:24865143

  15. Prognostic value of N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide for conservatively and surgically treated patients with aortic valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M; Hausen, M; Arnold, R; Nef, H; Moellman, H; Berkowitsch, A; Elsaesser, A; Brandt, R; Mitrovic, V; Hamm, C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prognostic value of N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide (NT‐proBNP) in patients with aortic stenosis being treated conservatively or undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods 159 patients were followed up for a median of 902 days. 102 patients underwent AVR and 57 were treated conservatively. NT‐proBNP at baseline was raised in association with the degree of severity and of functional status. Results During follow up 21 patients (13%) died of cardiac causes or required rehospitalisation for decompensated heart failure. NT‐proBNP at baseline was higher in patients with an adverse outcome than in event‐free survivors (median 623 (interquartile range 204–1854) pg/ml v 1054 (687–2960) pg/ml, p  =  0.028). This difference was even more obvious in conservatively treated patients (331 (129–881) pg/ml v 1102 (796–2960) pg/ml, p  =  0.002). Baseline NT‐proBNP independently predicted an adverse outcome in the entire study group and in particular in conservatively treated patients (area under the curve (AUC)  =  0.65, p  =  0.028 and AUC  =  0.82, p  =  0.002, respectively) but not in patients undergoing AVR (AUC  =  0.544). At a cut‐off value of 640 pg/ml, baseline NT‐proBNP was discriminative for an adverse outcome. Conclusion NT‐proBNP concentration is related to severity of aortic stenosis and provides independent prognostic information for an adverse outcome. However, this predictive value is limited to conservatively treated patients. Thus, the data suggest that assessing NT‐proBNP may have incremental value for selecting the optimal timing of valve replacement. PMID:16740919

  16. Relation between stroke volume index to risk of death in patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Maor, Elad; Beigel, Roy; Grupper, Avishay; Kuperstein, Rafael; Hai, Ilan; Medvedofsky, Diego; Perelstein, Olga; Mazin, Israel; Ziv, Asaf; Goldenberg, Ilan; Feinberg, Micha S; Ben Zekry, Sagit

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether assessment of stroke volume index (SVI) can be used to improve risk stratification among patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction (EF). Study population comprised 409 patients with aortic valve area ≤1.00 cm(2), mean gradient <40 mm Hg, and a normal EF (≥50%) who were followed up in a tertiary referral center from 2004 to 2012. Echocardiographic parameters and clinical data were collected. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to evaluate the association between SVI and the risk of all-cause mortality. Mean age of study patients was 78 ± 11 years, and 42% were men. The mean SVI was 39 ± 7 ml/m(2) (tertile 1 = 32 ± 4 ml/m(2); tertile 2 = 39 ± 1 ml/m(2); tertile 3 = 47 ± 4 ml/m(2)). Multivariate analysis showed that the SVI was the most powerful echocardiographic parameter associated with long-term outcome: each 5 ml/m(2) reduction in SVI was associated with a 20% increase in adjusted mortality risk (p = 0.01). Consistently, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the cumulative probability of survival during 3 years of follow-up was 60%, 72%, and 73% among patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-SVI groups, respectively (p = 0.012). Our findings suggest that in patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF, there is a graded inverse relation between SVI and the risk of long-term mortality. PMID:24948491

  17. Dendritic Cells Expressing Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Correlate with Plaque Stability in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Patients with Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhifei; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with atherosclerotic plaques containing inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that are responsible for progression and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Stressed cells undergoing necrosis release molecules that act as endogenous danger signals to alert and activate innate immune cells. In atherosclerotic tissue the number of DCs increases with the progression of the lesion and produce several inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 plays a crucial role in inflammation. However, relationship of DCs and the role of TREM-1 with the stability of atherosclerotic plaques have not been examined. In this study, we investigated the heterogeneity of the plaque DCs, myeloid (mDC1 and mDC2) and plasmacytoid (pDCs), and examined the expression of TREM-1 and their co-localization with DCs in the plaques from symptomatic (S) and asymptomatic (AS) patients with carotid stenosis. We found increased expression of HLA-DR, fascin, and TREM-1 and decreased expression of TREM-2 and α-smooth muscle actin in S compared to AS atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Both TREM-1 and fascin were co-localized suggesting increased expression of TREM-1 in plaque DCs of S compared to AS patients. These data were supported by increased mRNA transcripts of TREM-1 and decreased mRNA transcripts of TREM-2 in carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. There was higher density of both CD1c+ mDC1 and CD141+ mDC2 in the carotid plaques from AS compared to S patients, where as the density of CD303+ pDCs were higher in the carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. These findings suggest a potential role of pDCs and TREM-1 in atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. Thus, newer therapies could be developed to selectively block TREM-1 for stabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27148736

  18. Dendritic Cells Expressing Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Correlate with Plaque Stability in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Patients with Carotid Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vikrant; Rao, Velidi H; Shao, Zhifei; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with atherosclerotic plaques containing inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that are responsible for progression and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Stressed cells undergoing necrosis release molecules that act as endogenous danger signals to alert and activate innate immune cells. In atherosclerotic tissue the number of DCs increases with the progression of the lesion and produce several inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 plays a crucial role in inflammation. However, relationship of DCs and the role of TREM-1 with the stability of atherosclerotic plaques have not been examined. In this study, we investigated the heterogeneity of the plaque DCs, myeloid (mDC1 and mDC2) and plasmacytoid (pDCs), and examined the expression of TREM-1 and their co-localization with DCs in the plaques from symptomatic (S) and asymptomatic (AS) patients with carotid stenosis. We found increased expression of HLA-DR, fascin, and TREM-1 and decreased expression of TREM-2 and α-smooth muscle actin in S compared to AS atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Both TREM-1 and fascin were co-localized suggesting increased expression of TREM-1 in plaque DCs of S compared to AS patients. These data were supported by increased mRNA transcripts of TREM-1 and decreased mRNA transcripts of TREM-2 in carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. There was higher density of both CD1c+ mDC1 and CD141+ mDC2 in the carotid plaques from AS compared to S patients, where as the density of CD303+ pDCs were higher in the carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. These findings suggest a potential role of pDCs and TREM-1 in atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. Thus, newer therapies could be developed to selectively block TREM-1 for stabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27148736

  19. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Jalal; Aghasadeghi, Kamran; Zarrabi, Khalil; Abdi Ardekani, Alireza; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT) angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition. PMID:27069568

  20. Severe symptomatic aortic stenosis: medical therapy and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)—a real-world retrospective cohort analysis of outcomes and cost-effectiveness using national data

    PubMed Central

    Aldalati, Omar; Lacey, Arron; King, William; Anderson, Richard A; Smith, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Determine the real-world difference between 2 groups of patients with severe aortic stenosis and similar baseline comorbidities: surgical turn down (STD) patients, who were managed medically prior to the availability of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) following formal surgical outpatient assessment, and patients managed with a TAVI implant. Design Retrospective cohort study from real-world data. Setting Electronic patient letters were searched for patients with a diagnosis of severe aortic stenosis and a formal outpatient STD prior to the availability of TAVI (1999–2009). The second group comprised the first 90 cases of TAVI in South Wales (2009 onwards). 2 years prior to and 5 years following TAVI/STD were assessed. Patient data were pseudoanonymised, using the Secure Anonymized Information Linkage (SAIL) databank, and extracted from Office National Statistics (ONS), Patient-Episode Database for Wales (PEDW) and general practitioner databases. Population 90 patients who had undergone TAVI in South Wales, and 65 STD patients who were medically managed. Main outcome measures Survival, hospital admission frequency and length of stay, primary care visits, and cost-effectiveness. Results TAVI patients were significantly older (81.8 vs 79.2), more likely to be male (59.1% vs 49.3%), baseline comorbidities were balanced. Mortality in TAVI versus STD was 28% vs 70% at 1000 days follow-up. There were significantly more hospital admissions per year in the TAVI group prior to TAVI/STD (1.5 (IQR 1.0–2.4) vs 1.0 IQR (0.5–1.5)). Post TAVI/STD, the TAVI group had significantly lower hospital admissions (0.3 (IQR 0.0–1.0) vs 1.2 (IQR 0.7–3.0)) and lengths of stay (0.4 (IQR 0.0–13.8) vs 11.0 (IQR 2.5–28.5), p<0.05). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for TAVI was £10 533 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Conclusions TAVI patients were more likely to survive and avoid hospital admissions compared with the medically

  1. Fate of patients with fixed subaortic stenosis after surgical removal.

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, J; Stone, S; Ross, D

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-nine consecutive patients, aged 5 to 57 years, were followed for two to 15 years with serial haemodynamic studies after removal of fixed subaortic stenosis, which was never a "membrane". Two late deaths occurred, one sudden and one in congestive failure. Of 37 survivors, 25 were asymptomatic and could be classified as good or excellent if judged by well-being. Seven were symptomatic, two having had reoperation for fixed subaortic stenosis, and four needed long-term pacing. Evaluation, including the effect of isoprenaline, showed important dynamic obstruction in 17, five of whom redeveloped fixed obstruction. Seven had congestive features without outflow gradients, and 14 had neither congestion nor outflow obstruction. Complete assessment therefore confirmed that only 14 (36%) were haemodynamically satisfactory; two of them had permanent pacing, and four had had aortic valve surgery. Fixed subaortic stenosis should be removed early, when diagnosed, and completely before secondary myocardial changes occur. Patients however "well" need regular supervision and early haemodynamic assessment. The aortic valve, whether repaired, replaced, or untouched, remains a site for infective endocarditis for life. The fixed subaortic stenosis removed at operation may not be present in that form at birth, but acquired secondary to other congenital abnormalities which remain in the patient. Images PMID:7191709

  2. Surgical repair for giant ascending aortic aneurysm to superior vena cava fistula with positive syphilitic test.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Oshima, Susumu; Ono, Makoto; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2015-10-01

    Syphilitic aortitis is usually associated with thoracic aortic saccular aneurysm, aortic regurgitation and coronary ostial stenosis. However, syphilitic aneurysms have rarely been reported today. Here, we report a patient with ascending aortic aneurysm with aorta-superior vena cava (SVC) fistula with positive syphilitic test. A 52-year-old man was admitted to our institution with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm complicated with SVC syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a giant ascending aneurysm 79 mm in diameter. The result of serodiagnostic tests for syphilis had not been judged yet preoperatively. Total arch replacement concomitant with elephant trunk was performed. Intraoperatively, we detected the ascending aorta to SVC fistula. Postoperatively, we suspected the syphilitic aneurysm strongly, because preoperative serodiagnostic test was concluded to be positive. However, histological examination did not show typical syphilitic features. The patient remains asymptomatic 1 year later. Although extremely rarely today, syphilitic aneurysm should be still considered in the differential diagnosis of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:24000069

  3. FTO Is Associated with Aortic Valve Stenosis in a Gender Specific Manner of Heterozygote Advantage: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Thron, Cindy; Akhyari, Payam; Godehardt, Erhard; Lichtenberg, Artur; Rüther, Ulrich; Seehaus, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene have been linked with increased body weight. However, the data on an association of FTO with cardiovascular diseases remains conflicting. Therefore, we ascertained whether FTO is associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS), one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases in the Western world. Methods and Findings In this population-based case-control study the FTO SNP rs9939609 was analyzed in 300 German patients with AVS and 429 German controls of the KORA survey S4, representing a random population. Blood samples were collected prior to aortic valve replacement in AVS cases and FTO rs9939609 was genotyped via ARMS-PCR. Genotype frequencies differed significantly between AVS cases and KORA controls (p = 0.004). Separate gender-analyses uncovered an association of FTO with AVS exclusively in males; homozygote carriers for the risk-allele (A) had a higher risk to develop AVS (p = 0.017, odds ratio (OR) 1.727; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.087–2.747, recessive model), whereas heterozygote carriers for the risk-allele showed a lower risk (p = 0.002, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.384–0.828, overdominant model). After adjustment for multiple co-variables, the odds ratios of heterozygotes remained significant for an association with AVS (p = 0.008, OR 0.565, 95% CI 0.369–0.861). Conclusions This study revealed an association of FTO rs9939609 with AVS. Furthermore, this association was restricted to men, with heterozygotes having a significantly lower chance to develop AVS. Lastly, the association between FTO and AVS was independent of BMI and other variables such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:26431034

  4. Effects of Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibition on Systemic and Pulmonary Hemodynamics and Ventricular Function in Patients with Severe Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Zajarias, Alan; Madrazo, José A.; Shah, Jay; Gage, Brian F.; Novak, Eric; Johnson, Stephanie N.; Chakinala, Murali M.; Hohn, Tara A.; Saghir, Mohammed; Mann, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pressure overload due to aortic stenosis (AS) causes maladaptive ventricular and vascular remodeling that can lead to pulmonary hypertension, heart failure symptoms, and adverse outcomes. Retarding or reversing this maladaptive remodeling and its unfavorable hemodynamic consequences has potential to improve morbidity and mortality. Preclinical models of pressure overload have shown that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibition is beneficial, however the use of PDE5 inhibitors in patients with AS is controversial because of concerns about vasodilation and hypotension. Methods and Results We evaluated the safety and hemodynamic response of 20 subjects with severe symptomatic AS (mean aortic valve area 0.7±0.2 cm2, ejection fraction 60±14%) who received a single oral dose of sildenafil (40mg or 80mg). Compared to baseline, after 60 minutes sildenafil reduced systemic (−12%, p<0.001) and pulmonary (−29%, p=0.002) vascular resistance, mean pulmonary artery (−25%, p<0.001) and wedge (−17%, p<0.001) pressure, and increased systemic (+13%, p<0.001) and pulmonary (+45%, p<0.001) vascular compliance and stroke volume index (+8%, p=0.01). These changes were not dose dependent. Sildenafil caused a modest decrease in mean systemic arterial pressure (−11%, p<0.001), but was well-tolerated with no episodes of symptomatic hypotension. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that a single dose of a PDE5 inhibitor is safe and well-tolerated in patients with severe AS and is associated with acute improvements in pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics resulting in biventricular unloading. These findings support the need for longer-term studies to evaluate the role of PDE5 inhibition as adjunctive medical therapy in patients with AS. PMID:22447809

  5. Cardiovascular syphilis with coronary stenosis and aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Satyendra; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular manifestations of tertiary syphilis include aortitis, aortic root dilation, aneurysm formation, aortic regurgitation, and coronary ostial stenosis. Coronary ostial lesions have been detected in as many as 26% of patients with syphilitic aortitis. However nonostial coronary stenosis and coronary aneurysms in same patient is rarely described in cardiovascular syphilis. PMID:25634420

  6. Inflammation Drives Retraction, Stiffening, and Nodule Formation via Cytoskeletal Machinery in a Three-Dimensional Culture Model of Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jina; Ehsanipour, Arshia; Hsu, Jeffrey J; Lu, Jinxiu; Pedego, Taylor; Wu, Alexander; Walthers, Chris M; Demer, Linda L; Seidlits, Stephanie K; Tintut, Yin

    2016-09-01

    In calcific aortic valve disease, the valve cusps undergo retraction, stiffening, and nodular calcification. The inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, contributes to valve disease progression; however, the mechanisms of its actions on cusp retraction and stiffening are unclear. We investigated effects of TNF-α on murine aortic valvular interstitial cells (VICs) within three-dimensional, free-floating, compliant, collagen hydrogels, simulating their natural substrate and biomechanics. TNF-α increased retraction (percentage of diameter), stiffness, and formation of macroscopic, nodular structures with calcification in the VIC-laden hydrogels. The effects of TNF-α were attenuated by blebbistatin inhibition of myosin II-mediated cytoskeletal contraction. Inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin-D, but not inhibition of Rho kinase with Y27632, blocked TNF-α-induced retraction in three-dimensional VIC hydrogels, suggesting that actin stress fibers mediate TNF-α-induced effects. In the hydrogels, inhibitors of NF-κB blocked TNF-α-induced retraction, whereas simultaneous inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase was required to block TNF-α-induced stiffness. TNF-α also significantly increased collagen deposition, as visualized by Masson's trichrome staining, and up-regulated mRNA expression of discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin. In human aortic valves, calcified cusps were stiffer and had more collagen deposition than noncalcified cusps. These findings suggest that inflammation, through stimulation of cytoskeletal contractile activity, may be responsible for valvular cusp retraction, stiffening, and formation of calcified nodules. PMID:27392969

  7. Caesarean delivery in a parturient with a femoro-femoral crossover graft and congenital aortic stenosis repaired by the Ross procedure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, P; Whittaker, S; Rajesh, U; Bonduelle, M; Morgan, J; Garry, M; Weston, C; Ferguson, C; Fligelstone, L

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with congenital aortic stenosis previously repaired using the Ross procedure, who presented to our unit for urgent caesarean delivery. Management was complicated by moderate residual cardiac disease and the presence of a suprapubic femoro-femoral crossover graft. Following application of five-lead electrocardiogram and invasive blood pressure monitoring, anaesthesia was induced via combined spinal-epidural with epidural volume extension. A high transverse surgical approach avoided the course of the vascular graft, while further precautions included the immediate availability of vascular surgeons and cell salvage. Our anaesthetic technique was tailored to minimise disruption to cardiovascular function, and in particular to limit regurgitant flow across the pulmonary valve. This case highlights the value of early identification of high-risk parturients and multidisciplinary involvement at delivery. Risk stratification in the patient with grown-up congenital heart disease is based upon timely evaluation of the underlying congenital pathology, surgical history and subsequent functional status. PMID:19703763

  8. Beneficial Effects of Physical Exercise on Functional Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress in Rats with Aortic Stenosis-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Mariana Janini; Martinez, Paula Felippe; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Pagan, Luana Urbano; Bonomo, Camila; Lima, Aline Regina Ruiz; Damatto, Ricardo Luiz; Cezar, Marcelo D. M.; Damatto, Felipe Cezar; Rosa, Camila Moreno; Garcia, Camila Marchiolli; Reyes, David Rafael Abreu; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique; Fernandes, Denise Castro; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated the influence of exercise on functional capacity, cardiac remodeling, and skeletal muscle oxidative stress, MAPK, and NF-κB pathway in rats with aortic stenosis- (AS-) induced heart failure (HF). Methods and Results. Eighteen weeks after AS induction, rats were assigned into sedentary control (C-Sed), exercised control (C-Ex), sedentary AS (AS-Sed), and exercised AS (AS-Ex) groups. Exercise was performed on treadmill for eight weeks. Statistical analyses were performed with Goodman and ANOVA or Mann-Whitney. HF features frequency and mortality did not differ between AS groups. Exercise improved functional capacity, assessed by maximal exercise test on treadmill, without changing echocardiographic parameters. Soleus cross-sectional areas did not differ between groups. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in AS-Sed than C-Sed and AS-Ex. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase was changed in AS-Sed and restored in AS-Ex. NADPH oxidase activity and gene expression of its subunits did not differ between AS groups. Total ROS generation was lower in AS-Ex than C-Ex. Exercise modulated MAPK in AS-Ex and did not change NF-κB pathway proteins. Conclusion. Exercise improves functional capacity in rats with AS-induced HF regardless of echocardiographic parameter changes. In soleus, exercise reduces oxidative stress, preserves antioxidant enzyme activity, and modulates MAPK expression. PMID:26904168

  9. Beneficial Effects of Physical Exercise on Functional Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress in Rats with Aortic Stenosis-Induced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mariana Janini; Martinez, Paula Felippe; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Pagan, Luana Urbano; Bonomo, Camila; Lima, Aline Regina Ruiz; Damatto, Ricardo Luiz; Cezar, Marcelo D M; Damatto, Felipe Cezar; Rosa, Camila Moreno; Garcia, Camila Marchiolli; Reyes, David Rafael Abreu; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique; Fernandes, Denise Castro; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated the influence of exercise on functional capacity, cardiac remodeling, and skeletal muscle oxidative stress, MAPK, and NF-κB pathway in rats with aortic stenosis- (AS-) induced heart failure (HF). Methods and Results. Eighteen weeks after AS induction, rats were assigned into sedentary control (C-Sed), exercised control (C-Ex), sedentary AS (AS-Sed), and exercised AS (AS-Ex) groups. Exercise was performed on treadmill for eight weeks. Statistical analyses were performed with Goodman and ANOVA or Mann-Whitney. HF features frequency and mortality did not differ between AS groups. Exercise improved functional capacity, assessed by maximal exercise test on treadmill, without changing echocardiographic parameters. Soleus cross-sectional areas did not differ between groups. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in AS-Sed than C-Sed and AS-Ex. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase was changed in AS-Sed and restored in AS-Ex. NADPH oxidase activity and gene expression of its subunits did not differ between AS groups. Total ROS generation was lower in AS-Ex than C-Ex. Exercise modulated MAPK in AS-Ex and did not change NF-κB pathway proteins. Conclusion. Exercise improves functional capacity in rats with AS-induced HF regardless of echocardiographic parameter changes. In soleus, exercise reduces oxidative stress, preserves antioxidant enzyme activity, and modulates MAPK expression. PMID:26904168

  10. Bilateral coronary ostial stenosis secondary to syphilitic aortitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaoping; Zhao, Shihua; Bi, Wanli; Wang, Ximing

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular syphilis is associated with the tertiary stage of syphilis infection; it involves the ascending aorta and can cause aortic aneurysm, aortic regurgitation, and coronary ostial stenosis. We report here a case in which bilateral coronary ostial stenosis and aortic regurgitation due to syphilitic aortitis was diagnosed; coronary artery bypass graft was then performed. PMID:25151925

  11. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis ... help your pain during flare-ups. Treatments for back pain caused by spinal stenosis include: Medicines that may ...

  12. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  13. Myocardial perfusion and oxygenation are impaired during stress in severe aortic stenosis and correlate with impaired energetics and subclinical left ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in aortic stenosis (AS) is characterized by reduced myocardial perfusion reserve due to coronary microvascular dysfunction. However, whether this hypoperfusion leads to tissue deoxygenation is unknown. We aimed to assess myocardial oxygenation in severe AS without obstructive coronary artery disease, and to investigate its association with myocardial energetics and function. Methods Twenty-eight patients with isolated severe AS and 15 controls underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of perfusion (myocardial perfusion reserve index-MPRI) and oxygenation (blood-oxygen level dependent-BOLD signal intensity-SI change) during adenosine stress. LV circumferential strain and phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratios were assessed using tagging CMR and 31P MR spectroscopy, respectively. Results AS patients had reduced MPRI (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. controls 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.001) and BOLD SI change during stress (5.1 ± 8.9% vs. controls 18.2 ± 10.1%, p = 0.001), as well as reduced PCr/ATP (1.45 ± 0.21 vs. 2.00 ± 0.25, p < 0.001) and LV strain (−16.4 ± 2.7% vs. controls −21.3 ± 1.9%, p < 0.001). Both perfusion reserve and oxygenation showed positive correlations with energetics and LV strain. Furthermore, impaired energetics correlated with reduced strain. Eight months post aortic valve replacement (AVR) (n = 14), perfusion (MPRI 1.6 ± 0.5), oxygenation (BOLD SI change 15.6 ± 7.0%), energetics (PCr/ATP 1.86 ± 0.48) and circumferential strain (−19.4 ± 2.5%) improved significantly. Conclusions Severe AS is characterized by impaired perfusion reserve and oxygenation which are related to the degree of derangement in energetics and associated LV dysfunction. These changes are reversible on relief of pressure overload and hypertrophy regression. Strategies aimed at improving oxygen demand–supply balance to preserve myocardial

  14. Regional alterations of repolarizing K+ currents among the left ventricular free wall of rats with ascending aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Tilmann; Nguyen, Thi Hong-Diep; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Faulhaber, Jörg; Ehmke, Heimo

    2001-01-01

    The effect of cardiac hypertrophy on electrocardiogram (ECG), action potential duration (APD) and repolarizing K+ currents was investigated in epicardial, midmyocardial and endocardial myocytes isolated from the rat left ventricular free wall. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by stenosis of the ascending aorta (AS), which led to an increased pressure load (+85 ± 10 mm) of the left ventricle; sham-operated animals served as controls. In ECG recordings from AS rats, the QTc interval was prolonged and the main vectors of the QRS complex and the T-wave pointed in opposite directions, indicating an abnormal sequence of repolarization. APD and K+ currents were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In the AS group, APD90 (90 % repolarization) was significantly prolonged in epicardial and midmyocardial, but not endocardial myocytes. Corresponding to the increase in APD, the magnitude of the transient outward K+ current (Ito1) was significantly smaller (-30 %) in epicardial and midmyocardial, but not endocardial myocytes. Inactivation and steady-state inactivation of Ito1 were not affected by hypertrophy. Recovery from inactivation was slightly prolonged in endocardial myocytes from AS rats. No differences in delayed rectifier currents (IK) or inwardly rectifying K+ currents (IK1) were detected between myocytes of the three regions of sham-operated or AS animals. However, both currents were reduced by AS. The present data show that cardiac hypertrophy caused by pressure overload leads to an increase in APD and a decrease in Ito1 primarily in epicardial and midmyocardial myocytes, which implies a major role of alterations in Ito1 for the reduced gradient in APD. The effects of AS on IK1 and IK may slightly counteract the decrease in APD gradient. The observed changes in APD and underlying ionic currents could well explain the alterations in repolarization observed in the ECG induced by cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:11158275

  15. Discrepancies between cardiovascular magnetic resonance and Doppler echocardiography in the measurement of transvalvular gradient in aortic stenosis: the effect of flow vorticity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Valve effective orifice area EOA and transvalvular mean pressure gradient (MPG) are the most frequently used parameters to assess aortic stenosis (AS) severity. However, MPG measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) may differ from the one measured by transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography (TTE). The objectives of this study were: 1) to identify the factors responsible for the MPG measurement discrepancies by CMR versus TTE in AS patients; 2) to investigate the effect of flow vorticity on AS severity assessment by CMR; and 3) to evaluate two models reconciling MPG discrepancies between CMR/TTE measurements. Methods Eight healthy subjects and 60 patients with AS underwent TTE and CMR. Strouhal number (St), energy loss (EL), and vorticity were computed from CMR. Two correction models were evaluated: 1) based on the Gorlin equation (MPGCMR-Gorlin); 2) based on a multivariate regression model (MPGCMR-Predicted). Results MPGCMR underestimated MPGTTE (bias = −6.5 mmHg, limits of agreement from −18.3 to 5.2 mmHg). On multivariate regression analysis, St (p = 0.002), EL (p = 0.001), and mean systolic vorticity (p < 0.001) were independently associated with larger MPG discrepancies between CMR and TTE. MPGCMR-Gorlin and MPGTTE correlation and agreement were r = 0.7; bias = −2.8 mmHg, limits of agreement from −18.4 to 12.9 mmHg. MPGCMR-Predicted model showed better correlation and agreement with MPGTTE (r = 0.82; bias = 0.5 mmHg, limits of agreement from −9.1 to 10.2 mmHg) than measured MPGCMR and MPGCMR-Gorlin. Conclusion Flow vorticity is one of the main factors responsible for MPG discrepancies between CMR and TTE. PMID:24053194

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  17. Infundibulopelvic stenosis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Delgado, R.; Castellote, A.

    1984-03-01

    Of 11,500 children who underwent excretory urography during a 17-year period, three were found to have the rare renal malformation infundibulopelvic stenosis, characterized by caliceal dilatation, infundibular stenosis, and hypoplasia or stenosis of the renal pelvis. The contralateral kidney was absent in two cases and normal in the other. Voiding cystourethrograms were normal in all three. Renal sonography showed a variable degree of caliceal dilatation without associated pelvic dilatation. The diagnosis was confirmed by retrograde ureteropyelography in one case. Two patients were followed for 12 and 18 months, respectively; both remained asymptomatic with normal renal function, and sequential sonographic examinations of their kidneys have shown no significant changes. The third patient died of an unrelated condition. Infundibulopelvic stenosis has highly characteristic radiographic features, and prognosis is good for most affected patients.

  18. Delayed hyperenhancement in magnetic resonance imaging of left ventricular hypertrophy caused by aortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: visualisation of focal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Debl, K; Djavidani, B; Buchner, S; Lipke, C; Nitz, W; Feuerbach, S; Riegger, G; Luchner, A

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the extent and distribution of focal fibrosis by gadolinium contrast‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; delayed hyperenhancement) in severe left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in patients with pressure overload caused by aortic stenosis (AS) and with genetically determined hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods 44 patients with symptomatic valvular AS (n  =  22) and HCM (n  =  22) were studied. Cine images were acquired with fast imaging with steady‐state precession (trueFISP) on a 1.5 T scanner (Sonata, Siemens Medical Solutions). Gadolinium contrast‐enhanced MRI was performed with a segmented inversion–recovery sequence. The location, extent and enhancement pattern of hyperenhanced myocardium was analysed in a 12‐segment model. Results Mean LV mass was 238.6 (SD 75.3) g in AS and 205.4 (SD 80.5) g in HCM (p  =  0.17). Hyperenhancement was observed in 27% of patients with AS and in 73% of patients with HCM (p < 0.01). In AS, hyperenhancement was observed in 60% of patients with a maximum diastolic wall thickness ⩾ 18 mm, whereas no patient with a maximum diastolic wall thickness < 18 mm had hyperenhancement (p < 0.05). Patients with hyperenhancement had more severe AS than patients without hyperenhancement (aortic valve area 0.80 (0.09) cm2v 0.99 (0.3) cm2, p < 0.05; maximum gradient 98 (22) mm Hg v 74 (24) mm Hg, p < 0.05). In HCM, hyperenhancement was predominant in the anteroseptal regions and patients with hyperenhancement had higher end diastolic (125.4 (36.9) ml v 98.8 (16.9) ml, p < 0.05) and end systolic volumes (38.9 (18.2) ml v 25.2 (1.7) ml, p < 0.05). The volume of hyperenhancement (percentage of total LV myocardium), where present, was lower in AS than in HCM (4.3 (1.9)% v 8.6 (7.4)%, p< 0.05). Hyperenhancement was observed in 4.5 (3.1) and 4.6 (2.7) segments in AS and HCM, respectively (p  =  0.93), and the enhancement

  19. Incidence and Sequelae of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch in Transcatheter Vs Surgical Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis – A PARTNER Trial Cohort A Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pibarot, Philippe; Weissman, Neil J.; Stewart, William J.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Lindman, Brian R.; McAndrew, Thomas; Kodali, Susheel K.; Mack, Michael J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Miller, D. Craig; Svensson, Lars G.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Smith, Craig R.; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Webb, John; Lim, Scott; Xu, Ke; Hueter, Irene; Douglas, Pamela S.; Leon, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the incidence of PPM in the transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) randomized (RCT) arms of the PARTNER-I trial Cohort A; and 2) to assess the impact of PPM on regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and mortality in these 2 arms and in the TAVR nonrandomized continued access (NRCA) Registry cohort. METHODS The PARTNER trial Cohort A randomized patients 1:1 to TAVR or bioprosthetic SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined as absent if indexed effective orifice area >0.85, moderate ≥0.65 but ≤0.85, or severe <0.65 cm2/m2. LV mass regression and mortality were analyzed using the SAVR-RCT (n = 270), TAVR-RCT (n = 304) and TAVR-NRCA (n = 1637) cohorts. RESULTS Incidence of PPM was 60.0% (severe: 28.1%) in SAVR-RCT versus 46.4% (severe: 19.7%) in TAVR-RCT (p < 0.001) and 43.8% (severe: 13.6%) in TAVR-NRCA. In patients with aortic annulus diameter < 20 mm, severe PPM developed in 33.7% undergoing SAVR compared to 19.0% undergoing TAVR (p = 0.002). PPM was an independent predictor of less LV mass regression at 1 year in SAVR-RCT (p = 0.017) and TAVR-NRCA (p = 0.012) but not in TAVRRCT (p = 0.35). Severe PPM was an independent predictor of 2-year mortality in SAVR-RCT (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.78; p = 0.041) but not in TAVR-RCT (HR: 0.58; p = 0.11). In the TAVRNRCA, severe PPM was not a predictor of 1-year mortality in the whole cohort (HR: 1.05; p = 0.60) but did independently predict mortality in the subset of patients with no post-procedural aortic regurgitation (HR: 1.88; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS In patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, PPM is more frequent and more often severe following SAVR than TAVR. Patients with PPM after SAVR have worse survival and less LV mass regression than those without PPM

  20. Recent advances in aortic valve disease: highlights from a bicuspid aortic valve to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Augoustides, John G T; Wolfe, Yanika; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2009-08-01

    There have been major advances in the management of aortic valve disease. Because bicuspid aortic valve is common and predicts an increased risk of adverse aortic events, these patients merit aortic surveillance and consideration for ascending aortic replacement when its diameter exceeds 4.0 cm. Serial quantitative echocardiographic analysis, as compared with traditional clinical markers, can result in better timing of surgical intervention for aortic regurgitation. Furthermore, echocardiographic analysis of aortic regurgitation can classify the mechanism based on cusp mobility to guide aortic valve repair. In aortic root replacement, aortic valve preservation with reimplantation is a mainstream surgical option in Marfan syndrome to offer freedom from valve-related anticoagulation. Prosthetic aortic root replacement has further alternatives with the introduction of the aortic neosinus design and acceptable clinical outcomes with the porcine xenograft. Because aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may adversely affect patient outcome, its perioperative prevention is important. Furthermore, significant functional mitral regurgitation in association with aortic stenosis often resolves after aortic valve replacement. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve must include valve area because the transaortic pressure gradient may be low in severe stenosis. Aortic valve replacement with partial sternotomy is safe and offers a reasonable less invasive alternative. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, whether transfemoral or transapical, has revolutionized aortic valve replacement; it remains a major theme in the specialty for 2009 and beyond. PMID:19497768

  1. WUnicuspid Aortic Valve- An Uncommon Anomaly With a Common Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sitwala, Puja; Abusara, Ashraf; Ladia, Vatsal; Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; Raudat, Charles; Paul, Timir K

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV), which is a rare congenital anomaly, usually presents as aortic stenosis and/or aortic regurgitation. Here we present a case of UAV co-existent with an ascending aortic aneurysm. A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the hospital after two episodes of syncope. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed an ejection fraction of 62%, severely stenotic aortic valve, and moderate aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed calcification of the aortic valve, compatible with aortic stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 4.3 cm in diameter. He underwent successful aortic valve replacement and repair of ascending aortic aneurysm. He recovered well without any complications. This case suggests that any young patient who presents with syncope, aortic stenosis would be a differential and further workup by any available non-invasive modality needs to be performed. PMID:27383857

  2. Meatal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine Frequent urination Painful urination Urinary incontinence Urinary tract infections Damage to bladder or kidney function in ... opening. Alternative Names Urethral meatal stenosis Images Female urinary tract Male urinary tract Meatal stenosis References Elder JS. ...

  3. Management of carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Louridas, George; Junaid, Asad

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To clarify the definition of carotid artery diseases, the appropriateness of screening for disease, investigation and management of patients presenting with transient ischemic attacks, and management of asymptomatic carotid bruits. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using the terms carotid endarterectomy, carotid disease, and carotid stenosis. Most studies offer level II or III evidence. Consensus statements and guidelines from various neurovascular societies were also consulted. MAIN MESSAGE Patients with symptoms of hemispheric transient ischemic attacks associated with >70% stenosis of the internal carotid artery are at highest risk of major stroke or death. Risk is greatest within 48 hours of symptom onset; patients should have urgent evaluation by a vascular surgeon for consideration of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with 50% to 69% stenosis might benefit from urgent surgical intervention depending on clinical features and associated comorbidity. Patients with <50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. Asymptomatic patients with >60% stenosis should be considered for elective CEA. CONCLUSION Symptomatic carotid artery syndromes need urgent carotid duplex evaluation to determine the need for urgent surgery. Those with the greatest degree of stenosis derive the greatest benefit from timely CEA. PMID:16060177

  4. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  5. Asymptomatic bacteriuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... need treatment. This makes it different from a urinary tract infection that is caused by bacteria. Causes Asymptomatic bacteriuria ... bacteriuria causes no symptoms. The symptoms of a urinary tract infection include burning during urination, an increased urgency to ...

  6. [The use of metabolic therapy in the treatment of ischemic heart disease in hemodynamically formed insignificant aortic stenosis with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuriata, A V; Karavanskaia, I L; Kushnir, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of medical treatment was conducted with justified using of the metabolic component in a complex therapy of ischemic heart disease with chronic heart failure in hemodynamically formed insignificant aortic stenoses. The effect of metabolic correction is shown for pharmaceutical compounds Meldoniya in the form of Vasonat manufactured by "OlainFarm" (Latvia). Positive results of maintenance of systolic activity and prevention of diastolic dysfunction of myocardium were presented. The application of Vasonat in appropriate for the stabilization of adaptive properties of the myocardium and prophylaxis of the development of critical indicators of heart failure in this combined. PMID:22768738

  7. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection (ESI) involves injecting medicine directly into the space around your spinal nerves or spinal cord. Spinal stenosis symptoms often become worse over time, but this may happen slowly. If the pain ...

  8. Glottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kate A; Wyatt, Michelle E

    2016-06-01

    Glottic stenosis is a fixed, focal narrowing at the level of the laryngeal inlet, the true vocal cords. It may be either congenital or acquired and be related to a wide range of etiologies. The stenosis may be either anterior, posterior, or in rare cases, complete. Isolated glottic stenosis is rare; lesions often involve adjacent regions, namely the subglottis. A diagnosis is made from careful history and examination, including evaluation by microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy. The management of glottic stenosis is challenging and should be tailored to each individual case. A secure and adequate airway is the treatment priority alongside optimization of voice and laryngeal competence. Endoscopic and open techniques in either single or multiple stages have been described. PMID:27301598

  9. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... all. They include Pain in your neck or back Numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in your arms or legs Pain going down the leg Foot problems Doctors diagnose spinal stenosis with a physical exam and ...

  10. Spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Melancia, João Levy; Francisco, António Fernandes; Antunes, João Lobo

    2014-01-01

    Narrowing of the spinal canal or foramina is a common finding in spine imaging of the elderly. Only when symptoms of neurogenic claudication and/or cervical myelopathy are present is a spinal stenosis diagnosis made, either of the lumbar spine, cervical spine or both (only very rarely is the thoracic spine involved). Epidemiological data suggest an incidence of 1 case per 100 000 for cervical spine stenosis and 5 cases per 100 000 for lumbar spine stenosis. Cervical myelopathy in patients over 50 years of age is most commonly due to cervical spine stenosis. Symptomatic spinal narrowing can be congenital, or, more frequently, acquired. The latter may be the result of systemic illneses, namely endocrinopathies (such as Cushing disease or acromegaly), calcium metabolism disorders (including hyporarthyroidism and Paget disease), inflammatory diseases (such as rheumathoid arthritis) and infectious diseases. Physical examination is more often abnormal in cervical spondylotic myeloptahy whereas in lumbar spinal stenosis it is typically normal. Therefore spinal stenosis diagnosis relies on the clinical picture corresponding to conspicuous causative changes identified by imaging techniques, most importantly CT and MRI. Other ancillary diagnostic tests are more likely to be yielding for establishing a differential diagnosis, namely vascular claudication. Most patients have a progressive presentation and are offered non operative management as first treatment strategy. Surgery is indicated for progressive intolerable symptoms or, more rarely, for the neurologically catastrophic initial presentations. Surgical strategy consists mainly of decompression (depending on the anatomical level and type of narrowing: laminectomy, foraminotomy, discectomy, corporectomy) with additional instrumentation should spinal stability and sagittal balance be at risk. For cervical spine stenosis the main objective of surgery is to halt disease progression. There is class 1b evidence that surgery

  11. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  12. Fetal cardiac circulation in isolated aortic atresia assessed with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sayit, Aslı Tanrıvermiş; Ipek, Ali; Kurt, Aydın; Aghdasi, Bayan G; Arslan, Halil; Gümüş, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are common, with an incidence of more than 8 in 1000 live births. Aortic atresia is a rare diagnosis and its prognosis is very poor. In this article, we present a case of isolated aortic atresia, a very rare cardiovascular anomaly, and its fetal ultrasound findings which include blood flow at foramen ovale from left to right, right deviation of the interventricular septum, dysfunction of the mitral valve and cardiomegaly. Aortic stenosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aortic atresia. However, in the case of severe aortic stenosis and/or accompanying ventricular septal defect, differential diagnosis may not be done. PMID:24592058

  13. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  14. Recurrent tamponade and aortic dissection in syphilis.

    PubMed

    Stansal, Audrey; Mirault, Tristan; Rossi, Aude; Dupin, Nicolas; Bruneval, Patrick; Bel, Alain; Azarine, Arshid; Minozzi, Catherine; Deman, Anne Laure; Messas, Emmanuel

    2013-11-01

    Syphilitic cardiovascular disease has been described since the 19th century, mainly on autopsy series. Major clinical manifestations are aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, and coronary ostial stenosis. The diagnosis of syphilitic cardiovascular disease is based mainly on positive serologic tests and overt clinical manifestations. We present here a rare and unusual clinical presentation of a tertiary syphilis with recurrent tamponade and type B aortic dissection, whose positive diagnosis was made by polymerase chain reaction on pericardial fluid analysis. PMID:24182507

  15. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morrone, A. |; Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C.

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Real-time transesophageal echocardiography facilitates antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kazato; Yano, Kentaro; Tanaka, Chiharu; Nakashoji, Tomohiro; Tonomura, Daisuke; Takehara, Kosuke; Kino, Naoto; Yoshida, Masataka; Kurotobi, Toshiya; Tsuchida, Takao; Fukumoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of severe aortic stenosis (AS) where antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) was performed under real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance. Real-time TEE can provide useful information for evaluating the aortic valve response to valvuloplasty during the procedure. It was led with the intentional wire-bias technique in order to compress the severely calcified leaflet, and consequently allowed the balloon to reach the largest possible size and achieve full expansion of the aortic annulus. PMID:27054107

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care. PMID:27021619

  18. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a treatment option in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Sutaria, Nilesh; Ariff, Ben; Fertleman, Michael; Malik, Iqbal; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2015-05-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the commonest encountered valvular pathology and a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of severe stenosis. Definitive treatment has traditionally been offered in the form of surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with an acceptable surgical risk and more recently with the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in those where surgery is not a viable option. Prior to the introduction of TAVI, inoperable patients were treated medically and where appropriate with balloon aortic valvuloplasty, a procedure which although effective only provided short-term relief and was associated with high complication rates especially during its infancy. Here we discuss whether balloon aortic valvuloplasty continues to have a role in contemporary clinical practice in an era where significant advances have been achieved in the fields of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI and postoperative care. PMID:25865236

  19. Subglottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Niall D; Cohen, Aliza P; Rutter, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Subglottic stenosis (SGS) is a congenital or acquired condition characterized by a narrowing of the upper airway extending from just below the vocal folds to the lower border of the cricoid cartilage. With the introduction of prolonged intubation in neonates (mid 1960s), acquired SGS became the most frequent cause of laryngeal stenosis; unlike congenital SGS, it does not improve with time. Laryngeal reconstruction surgery evolved as a consequence of the need to manage these otherwise healthy but tracheotomized children. Ongoing innovations in neonatal care have gradually led to the salvage of premature and medically fragile infants in whom laryngeal pathology is often more severe, and in whom stenosis often involves not only the subglottis, but also the supraglottis or glottis-causing significant morbidity and mortality. The primary objective of intervention in these children is decannulation or preventing the need for tracheotomy. The aim of this article is to present a more detailed description of both congenital and acquired SGS, highlighting the essentials of diagnostic assessment and familiarizing the reader with contemporary management approaches. PMID:27301599

  20. Discrete subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M M; Varma, M P; Cleland, J; O'Kane, H O; Webb, S W; Mulholland, H C; Adgey, A A

    1981-01-01

    Data concerning 17 consecutive patients with discrete subaortic stenosis are recorded. Twelve patients underwent operative resection of the obstructing lesion. Of these all except one were symptomatic and all had electrocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular hypertrophy with strain. They had a peak resting systolic left ventricular outflow tract gradient of greater than 50 mmHg as predicted from the combined cuff measurement of systolic blood pressure and the echocardiographically estimated left ventricular systolic pressure and/or as determined by cardiac catheterisation. The outflow tract gradient as predicted from M-mode echocardiography and peak systolic pressure showed close correlation with that measured at cardiac catheterisation or operation. During the postoperative follow-up from one month to 11 years, of 11 patients, one patient required a further operation for recurrence of the obstruction four years after the initial operation. All patients are now asymptomatic. Five patients have not had an operation. The left ventricular outflow tract gradient as assessed at the time of cardiac catheterisation was greater than 50 mmHg. One patient has been lost to follow-up. The remaining four have been followed from four to eight years and have remained asymptomatic and the electrocardiograms have remained unchanged. Careful follow-up of all patients is essential with continuing clinical assessment, electrocardiograms, M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms, and if necessary cardiac catheterisation. Prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis is also essential. Images PMID:6457617

  1. Atherosclerotic carotid stenosis and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis carotid stenosis is associated with stroke and cognitive impairment. Progressive cognitive decline may be an even greater problem than stroke, but it has not been widely recognized and therefore must be adequately addressed. Although both Carotid Endarterectomy (CEA) and Carotid Artery Stenting (CAS) have been proven can prevent future stroke in patients with atherosclerotic carotid stenosis, the influence of CEA and CAS on cognitive function is not clear. In the first part of this review, we evaluated the literature concerning carotid stenosis and the risk of cognitive impairment. Studies have suggested that both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis are associated with cognitive impairment. In the second part, we reviewed the impact of CEA and CAS on cognitive function, some studies have shown benefits, but others have not. PMID:27152468

  2. Surgical Treatment of Anomalous Origin of Right Coronary Artery in a Patient with Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Refatllari, Ali; Likaj, Ermal; Dumani, Selman; Hasimi, Endri; Goda, Artan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An anomalous origin of the right coronary artery is rarely observed, with a reported incidence between 0.026% and 0.25%. This condition is often completely asymptomatic and is found incidentally during angiographic evaluation for other cardiac diseases. However some patients present with exertion angina or sudden death. Surgical treatment in patients with anomalous RCA is still controversial. Treatment can be conservative, angioplasty or surgery. CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old man was admitted with severe mitral stenosis. He complained exertion and rest dyspnea, NYHA III class. He had sequels of embolic stroke, results of left atrial thrombus. Echocardiography showed calcified severe mitral stenosis with mitral orifice area of 1.1 square centimeters with PSPAP 60 mmHg and normal LV function. Routine coronary angiography before surgery showed aberrant origin of RCA from the left sinus of Valsalva with 90% stenosis at his origin. Multi-slice computed tomography proved the diagnosis of anomalous RCA arising from the left sinus of Valsalva and taking an inter-arterial course between the aorta and pulmonary artery. The patient underwent mitral valve replacement with mechanical St. Jude prosthesis No 29 and saphenous vein graft to RCA. We chose by-pass grafting techniques because after aortotomy, RCA was too close to LMCA, intramural course was too short and stenosis of RCA was outside of aortic wall. The patient’s perioperative course was without complications and patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. CONCLUSION: Correction of anomalous of the origin of right coronary artery is mandatory in cases where patient has to be operated for other cardiac causes. PMID:27275346

  3. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  6. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve prolapse; Aortic regurgitation ... Any condition that prevents the aortic valve from closing completely can cause this problem. When the valve doesn't close all the way, a small amount of blood comes ...

  7. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  8. Deep Crater in Heavily Calcified Aortic Valve Leaflet: A "Smoking Gun" for Embolic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sarah Chaoying; Canter, Lisa; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John A

    2015-10-01

    The association of severe calcific aortic stenosis with clinically significant stroke has not been well established. This case vividly describes the relationship with clinical and pathological (gross and microscopic) findings in a 62-year-old man with a severely calcified bicuspid aortic valve. Eleven months prior to aortic valve surgery, the patient had stigmata of cerebral embolic events in the absence of any other embolic source. During the aortic valve replacement surgery for aortic stenosis, he was found to have a large atheroma on the aortic valve cusp with a crater containing friable debris in its center. These findings support the potential for embolic stroke in patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. We recommend that the aortic valve be considered as an embolic source in patients with an otherwise cryptogenic cerebrovascular accident. PMID:27175368

  9. Successful treatment of pure aortic insufficiency with transapical implantation of the JenaValve.

    PubMed

    Bleiziffer, Sabine; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Ried, Thomas; Lange, Rüdiger

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was predominantly developed for patients with severe calcified aortic stenosis, as most devices are designed to anchor within the native valve calcium. We report on a patient with pure insufficiency of a non-calcified aortic valve, in whom an anatomically oriented catheter valve was implanted successfully. The design of the prosthesis with position feelers engaging the native aortic valve leaflets proved to be suitable for the treatment of pure aortic insufficiency. PMID:23344750

  10. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 6):827-31. Citation on PubMed Tassabehji M, Urban Z. Congenital heart disease: Molecular diagnostics of supravalvular ... Med. 2006;126:129-56. Citation on PubMed Urbán Z, Riazi S, Seidl TL, Katahira J, Smoot LB, ...