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Sample records for asymptomatic hiv-infected individuals

  1. Asymptomatic HIV-infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Impaired Lung CD4+ T-Cell Responses to Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Dominic H.; Afran, Louise; Kankwatira, Anstead M.; Malamba, Rose D.; Allain, Theresa J.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain at higher risk of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) than HIV-uninfected individuals. This increased susceptibility may be caused by impairment of alveolar macrophage (AM) function and/or mycobacteria-specific alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses observed in HIV-infected ART-naive adults. Objectives: To determine whether ART was associated with improvement in both AM function, assessed by phagosomal proteolysis, and alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses to Mycobacterium in HIV-infected individuals. Methods: Peripheral blood was drawn and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed on healthy, 35 HIV-uninfected, 25 HIV-infected ART-naive, and 50 HIV-infected ART-treated asymptomatic adults. Phagosomal proteolysis of AM was assessed with fluorogenic beads. Mycobacteria-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining. Measurements and Main Results: HIV-infected adults on ART exhibited lower plasma HIV viral load and higher blood CD4+ T-cell count than ART-naive adults. AM proteolysis and total mycobacteria-specific Th1 CD4+ T-cell responses in individuals on ART for greater than or equal to 4 years were similar to HIV-uninfected control subjects but those on ART for less than 4 years had impaired responses. Total influenza-specific alveolar Th1 CD4+ T-cell responses were intact in all individuals receiving ART. In contrast, BAL and blood mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses were impaired in adults on ART irrespective of duration. Conclusions: AM and mycobacteria-specific alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses in HIV-infected adults on ART for less than 4 years are impaired and may partly explain the high risk of TB in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Strategies to augment ART to improve lung immune cell function and reduce the high incidence of TB in HIV-infected adults who initiate ART should be investigated. PMID:25225948

  2. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART. PMID:26475399

  3. Asymptomatic Tuberculosis-Induced Ileal Perforation in an HIV- Infected Individual; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Moslemi, Sam; Tahamtan, Maryam; Taheri, Lohrasb; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    The co-existence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality because of a widespread organ involvement. The gastrointestinal tract is a common site for localization of opportunistic microorganisms in AIDS. However, surgical abdominal emergencies such as intestinal perforation resulted from tuberculosis are uncommon in these patients. The asymptomatic occurrence of such intestinal perforation has not been reported our knowledge. We represent an HIV and HCV co-infected man with miliary tuberculosis and an incidentally detected free air under  diaphragm in the chest X-ray eventually resulting in exploratory laparotomy which then revealed two tubercular-induced intestinal perforations. It seems that as the tuberculosis is increasing in incidence, mostly due to reactivation in HIV-infected patients especially in developing countries, we should not underestimate its acute abdominal emergencies such as bowel perforation. PMID:27162854

  4. HIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses in asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Pontesilli, O; Carlesimo, M; Varani, A R; Ferrara, R; Guerra, E C; Bernardi, M L; Ricci, G; Mazzone, A M; D'Offizi, G; Aiuti, F

    1995-01-01

    In vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HIV-1 recombinant antigens (gp160, p24, and Rev protein) were studied in 83 patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection (CDC groups II and III) and circulating CD4 lymphocyte numbers > 400/mm3. Significant response to at least one of the three antigens was detected in 52.4% of the subjects, but the responses were weak, and concordance of the response to the three antigens was rare, the frequency of individuals responding to each antigen not exceeding 22.4%. Increasing frequencies of response were observed when recall antigens (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans glycomannoprotein) (65.5%) and anti-CD3 MoAb (76.6%) were used as stimuli. Although a significant association between lymphocyte response to p24, but not gp160, and steadiness of CD4 lymphocyte numbers before the assay was observed, no predictive value for lack of CD4 cell decrease was confirmed for either antigen, and fluctuation of the responses to HIV antigens was seen during subsequent follow up. The panel of T cell assays used could be regarded as appropriate for monitoring both HIV-specific responses and T lymphocyte function during immunotherapy with soluble HIV antigens. PMID:7774051

  5. Use of RT-Defective HIV Virions: New Tool to Evaluate Specific Response in Chronic Asymptomatic HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Arberas, Hodei; García-Pérez, Javier; García, Felipe; Bargalló, Manuel Enric; Maleno, María José; Gatell, José María; Mothe, Beatriz; Alcami, José; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Plana, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of new reagents that can be used to screen or monitor HIV-1-specific responses constituted an interesting field in the development of HIV vaccines to improve their efficacy. Methods We have evaluated the specific T cell response against different types of NL4-3 virions (including NL4-3 aldrithiol-2 treated, NL4-3/ΔRT and R5 envelopes: NL4-3/ΔRT/ΔEnv[AC10] and NL4-3/ΔRT/ΔEnv[Bal]) and against pools of overlapping peptides (15 mer) encompassing the HIV-1 Gag and Nef regions. Cryopreserved PBMC from a subset of 69 chronic asymptomatic HIV positive individuals have been employed using different techniques including IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, surface activation markers and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) by flow cytometry. Results The differential response obtained against NL4-3 aldrithiol-2 treated and NL4-3/ΔRT virions (25% vs 55%, respectively) allow us to divide the population in three groups: “full-responders” (positive response against both viral particles), “partial-responders” (positive response only against NL4-3/ΔRT virions) and “non-responders” (negative responses). There was no difference between X4 and R5 envelopes. The magnitude of the total responses was higher against NL4-3/ΔRT and was positively correlated with gender and inverse correlated with viral load. On the contrary CD4+ T cell count was not associated with this response. In any case responses to the viruses tended to be lower in magnitude than those detected by the overlapping peptides tested. Finally we have found an increased frequency of HLA-B27 allele (23% vs 9%) and a significant reduction in some activation markers (CD69 and CD38) on T cells surface in responders vs non-responders individuals. Conclusions In summary these virions could be considered as alternative and useful reagents for screening HIV-1-specific T cell responses in HIV exposed uninfected people, HIV infected patients and to assess immunogenicity of new prototypes both in vitro and

  6. Ocular Syphilis among HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jonathan Z.; Tucker, Joseph D.; Lobo, Ann-Marie; Marra, Christina M.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Papaliodis, George N.; Felsenstein, Donna; Durand, Marlene L.; Yawetz, Sigal; Robbins, Gregory K.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individual with ocular manifestations of secondary syphilis. Twelve other cases of HIV-associated ocular syphilis are also presented. Six of 12 individuals had normal cerebrospinal fluid study results, and 3 patients required retreatment within 1.5 years. In patients with HIV infection, clinicians should be vigilant for ocular syphilis despite normal cerebrospinal fluid measures and for syphilis reinfection. PMID:20604717

  7. Value of CXCL13 in diagnosing asymptomatic neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, RongXin; Lu, Chun; Lu, Sihan; Hu, Yunxin; Ma, Han; Lai, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing; Feng, Peiying; Lu, Rongbiao; Li, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing asymptomatic neurosyphilis (ANS) in HIV-infected patients is difficult. A recent report suggested that CXCL13 is a promising diagnostic marker for neurosyphilis in HIV-positive patients. However, whether CXCL13 can be a diagnostic marker for ANS in HIV-infected patients remains unknown. The purpose of our study was to determine the role of CXCL13 in diagnosing ANS in HIV-infected patients. This study comprised two study and three control groups. Two study groups included 12 HIV-infected patients with ANS and 25 patients with syphilis and HIV co-infection (without ANS). Three control groups included 9 patients with ANS without HIV infection, 25 HIV-infected patients without syphilis and 10 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of CSF CXCL13 were measured before and after neurosyphilis therapy. Our results showed that CSF CXCL13 concentrations were significantly increased in all of the HIV-infected patients with ANS, the 25 HIV patients with syphilis and the 9 ANS patients without HIV, but not in the patients of the other two control groups. CSF CXCL13 concentrations declined in the two study groups of patients following neurosyphilis therapy. Therefore, CSF CXCL13 concentrations could improve the diagnosis of ANS in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25769888

  8. Tobacco use and cessation in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wewers, Mary Ellen; Ferketich, Amy; Diaz, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The smoking prevalence estimates among HIV-infected individuals range from 40%-84%; much higher than the overall adult prevalence in the United States. Characteristics that are associated with smokers who are HIV-positive include drug and alcohol abuse, psychiatric comorbidities, and lower education and socioeconomic status. There are important health implications for HIV-infected smokers, including bacterial and Pneumocystis pneumonia, tuberculosis, COPD, lung cancer and coronary artery disease. To date, there have been few tobacco dependence treatment trials conducted among HIV-infected smokers. Most have used nicotine replacement therapy but abstinence rates were low. A recent preliminary study found the use of varenicline to be well tolerated and it may increase abstinence rates with HIV-infected individuals. Recommendations for future research include examining underlying factors that contribute to persistent smoking and barriers to abstinence, identifying ways to increase motivation for quit attempts, increasing the number of multi-centered, two-arm tobacco dependence treatment trials, and using highly efficacious first-line pharmacotherapy in tobacco dependence treatment intervention studies. Addressing the above-mentioned research gaps will help to reduce the tobacco-related disease burden of HIV-infected individuals in the future. PMID:23702169

  9. Mitral Annular and Coronary Artery Calcification Are Associated with Mortality in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lange, David C.; Glidden, David; Secemsky, Eric A.; Ordovas, Karen; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Bolger, Ann F.; Hsue, Priscilla Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV infection increases cardiovascular risk. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) and mitral annular calcification (MAC) identify patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between MAC, CAC and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Methods and Results We studied 152 asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and computed tomography (CT). MAC was identified on TTE using standardized criteria. Presence of CAC, CAC score and CAC percentiles were determined using the modified Agatston criteria. Mortality data was obtained from the Social Security and National Death Indices (SSDI/NDI). The median age was 49 years; 87% were male. The median duration of HIV was 16 years; 84% took antiretroviral therapy; 64% had an undetectable viral load. CVD risk factors included hypertension (35%), smoking (62%) and dyslipidemia (35%). Twenty-five percent of individuals had MAC, and 42% had CAC. Over a median follow-up of 8 years, 11 subjects died. Subjects with CAC had significantly higher mortality compared to those with MAC only or no MAC. The Harrell’s C-statistic of CAC was 0.66 and increased to 0.75 when MAC was added (p = 0.05). MAC, prior CVD, age and HIV viral load were independently associated with higher age- and gender-adjusted CAC percentiles in an adjusted model (p < 0.05 for all). Conclusion In HIV patients, the presence of MAC, traditional risk factors and HIV viral load were independently associated with CAC. Presence of CAC and MAC may be useful in identifying HIV-infected individuals at higher risk for death. PMID:26132465

  10. Serotonin-Related Gene Polymorphisms and Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Alcohol Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Karina; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals continue to experience neurocognitive deterioration despite virologically successful treatments. While the cause remains unclear, evidence suggests that HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) may be associated with neurobehavioral dysfunction. Genetic variants have been explored to identify risk markers to determine neuropathogenesis of neurocognitive deterioration. Memory deficits and executive dysfunction are highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults. These conditions can affect their quality of life and HIV risk-taking behaviors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SLC6A4, TPH2, and GALM genes may affect the activity of serotonin and increase the risk of HAND. The present study explored the relationship between SLC6A4, TPH2, and GALM genes and neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected alcohol abusers. A total of 267 individuals were genotyped for polymorphisms in SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR, TPH2 rs4570625, and GALM rs6741892. To assess neurocognitive functions, the Short Category and the Auditory Verbal Learning Tests were used. TPH2 SNP rs4570625 showed a significant association with executive function in African American males (odds ratio 4.8, 95% CI, 1.5–14.8; P = 0.005). Similarly, GALM SNP rs6741892 showed an increased risk with African American males (odds ratio 2.4, 95% CI, 1.2–4.9; P = 0.02). This study suggests that TPH2 rs4570625 and GALM rs6741892 polymorphisms may be risk factors for HAND. PMID:27069689

  11. Differential Gene Expression in HIV-Infected Individuals Following ART

    PubMed Central

    Massanella, Marta; Singhania, Akul; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Pier, Rose; Lada, Steven; White, Cory H.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Blanco, Julià; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the effect of ART on gene expression in HIV-infected individuals have identified small numbers of modulated genes. Since these studies were underpowered or cross-sectional in design, a paired analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated before and after ART, from a robust number of HIV-infected patients (N=32) was performed. Gene expression was assayed by microarray and 4,157 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified following ART using multivariate permutation tests. Pathways and Gene Ontology (GO) terms over-represented for DEGs reflected the transition from a period of active virus replication before ART to one of viral suppression (e.g., repression of JAK-STAT signaling) and possible prolonged drug exposure (e.g. oxidative phosphorylation pathway) following ART. CMYC was the DEG whose product made the greatest number of interactions at the protein level in protein interaction networks (PINs), which has implications for the increased incidence of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) in HIV-infected patients. The differential expression of multiple genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR including well-known drug metabolism genes (e.g., ALOX12 and CYP2S1). Targets not confirmed by RT-qPCR (i.e., GSTM2 and RPL5) were significantly confirmed by droplet digital (ddPCR), which may represent a superior method when confirming DEGs with low fold changes. In conclusion, a paired design revealed that the number of genes modulated following ART was an order of magnitude higher than previously recognized. PMID:23933117

  12. Differential gene expression in HIV-infected individuals following ART.

    PubMed

    Massanella, Marta; Singhania, Akul; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Pier, Rose; Lada, Steven M; White, Cory H; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Blanco, Julià; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Woelk, Christopher H

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies of the effect of ART on gene expression in HIV-infected individuals have identified small numbers of modulated genes. Since these studies were underpowered or cross-sectional in design, a paired analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated before and after ART, from a robust number of HIV-infected patients (N=32) was performed. Gene expression was assayed by microarray and 4157 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified following ART using multivariate permutation tests. Pathways and gene ontology (GO) terms over-represented for DEGs reflected the transition from a period of active virus replication before ART to one of viral suppression (e.g., repression of JAK-STAT signaling) and possible prolonged drug exposure (e.g., oxidative phosphorylation pathway) following ART. CMYC was the DEG whose product made the greatest number of interactions at the protein level in protein interaction networks (PINs), which has implications for the increased incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in HIV-infected patients. The differential expression of multiple genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR including well-known drug metabolism genes (e.g., ALOX12 and CYP2S1). Targets not confirmed by RT-qPCR (i.e., GSTM2 and RPL5) were significantly confirmed by droplet digital (ddPCR), which may represent a superior method when confirming DEGs with low fold changes. In conclusion, a paired design revealed that the number of genes modulated following ART was an order of magnitude higher than previously recognized. PMID:23933117

  13. HIV infection of choroid plexus in AIDS and asymptomatic HIV-infected patients suggests that the choroid plexus may be a reservoir of productive infection.

    PubMed

    Petito, C K; Chen, H; Mastri, A R; Torres-Munoz, J; Roberts, B; Wood, C

    1999-12-01

    The choroid plexus (CPx) may be an important site of viral dissemination since monocytes and dendritic cells in its stroma are infected with HIV in AIDS patients and since the ratio of CPx to brain infection is more than 2 : 1. In order to see if CPx infection also develops in asymptomatic (ASY) HIV-infected patients, we examined archival formalin-fixed brain and CPx from 14 AIDS and seven ASY cases, using routine histology, immunohistochemistry for HIV gp41, and DNA extraction and gene amplification for HIV DNA. Eight of 14 AIDS (57%) had HIV-positive cells in the CPx and four (29%) had HIV encephalitis. Two of seven ASY cases (29%) had HIV-positive cells in the CPx but none had HIV encephalitis. Extracted DNA from brain, CPx and systemic organs of five ASY cases was amplified by nested PCR with or without Southern blotting for HIV env gene. It was positive in systemic organs in five cases; in CPx in four cases; and in brain in one case. This study shows that the CPx is a site of HIV infection in ASY patients and that the frequency of CPx infection is higher than seen in brain in both AIDS and ASY cases. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the CPx may be a site for hematogeneous spread and a reservoir for HIV infection during the period of clinical latency. PMID:10602407

  14. Effects of tobacco smoking on HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Marta; Laguno, Montserrat; Martínez, María; Martínez, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    A longer life expectancy and a high prevalence of tobacco smoking among HIV patients have led to an increasing cumulative exposure to tobacco in this community. Clinical recommendations for smoking cessation in HIV patients are mainly based on the body of evidence from the general population plus few available data from HIV cohort studies. The assumption that the pathophysiology of tobacco-related diseases in HIV-infected patients is similar to that in the general population may be questionable. This article reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying health problems attributable to tobacco in HIV patients, and how these mechanisms may interact with those of HIV infection. Tobacco smoking exerts a greater health impact on HIV-infected patients than on uninfected smokers. Components of tobacco smoke and HIV infection induce complex interrelated pathophysiological changes through different pathways, affecting various organ systems with a cumulative or synergistic effect. This review supports the contention that HIV infection may confer an increased susceptibility to the harmful effects of smoking. Tobacco-related harm in the setting of HIV infection is still underestimated. A better understanding of the pathophysiological interaction between tobacco smoking and HIV will help to promote smoking cessation in this specific population. PMID:25427101

  15. Auditory impairments in HIV-infected individuals in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Maro, Isaac I.; Moshi, Ndeserua; Clavier, Odile H.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Wilbur, Jed C.; Chambers, Robert D.; Fellows, Abigail M.; Jastrzembski, Benjamin G.; Mascari, John E.; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Musiek, Frank E.; Waddell, Richard D.; von Reyn, C. Fordham; Buckey, Jay C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Abnormal hearing tests have been noted in HIV-infected patients in several studies, but the nature of the hearing deficit has not been clearly defined. We performed a cross-sectional study of both HIV+ and HIV− individuals in Tanzania using an audiological test battery. We hypothesized that HIV+ adults would have a higher prevalence of abnormal central and peripheral hearing test results compared to HIV− controls. Additionally, we anticipated that the prevalence of abnormal hearing assessments would increase with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) use, and treatment for tuberculosis (TB). Design Pure-tone thresholds, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), tympanometry, and a gap detection test were performed using a laptop-based hearing testing system on 751 subjects (100 HIV− in the U.S., plus 651 in Dar es Salaam Tanzania including 449 HIV+ [130 ART− and 319 ART+], and 202 HIV−, subjects. No U.S. subjects had a history of TB treatment. In Tanzania, 204 of the HIV+, and 23 of the HIV−, subjects had a history of TB treatment. Subjects completed a video and audio questionnaire about their hearing as well as a health history questionnaire. Results HIV+ subjects had reduced DPOAE levels compared to HIV− subjects, but their hearing thresholds, tympanometry results, and gap detection thresholds were similar. Within the HIV+ group, those on ART reported significantly greater difficulties understanding speech-in-noise, and were significantly more likely to report that they had difficulty understanding speech than the ART− group. The ART+ group had a significantly higher mean gap detection threshold compared to the ART− group. No effects of TB treatment were seen. Conclusions The fact that the ART+/ART− groups did not differ in measures of peripheral hearing ability (DPOAEs, thresholds), or middle ear measures (tympanometry), but that the ART+ group had significantly more trouble understanding speech and higher gap detection thresholds

  16. Long-term Bone Mineral Density Changes in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip M; Kitch, Douglas; McComsey, Grace A; Collier, Ann C; Koletar, Susan L; Erlandson, Kristine M; Yin, Michael T; Bartali, Benedetta; Ha, Belinda; Melbourne, Kathy; Brown, Todd T

    2016-08-15

    We compared adjusted bone mineral density (BMD) changes between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during the first approximately 7.5 years after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and HIV-uninfected controls. HIV-infected individuals (n = 97) had significantly greater adjusted BMD decline than controls (n = 614) during the first 96 weeks of ART. Subsequently, the rate of BMD decline slowed in HIV-infected individuals but remained greater than the rate of decline in HIV-uninfected individuals at the lumbar spine but not at the hip. In HIV-infected individuals after 96 weeks, no HIV- or treatment-related characteristic was associated with BMD loss, but lower lean body mass was associated with greater BMD loss at both lumbar spine and hip. PMID:27330053

  17. Determinants of Smoking and Quitting in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Susan; Meigs, James B.; Grinspoon, Steven K.; Triant, Virginia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is widespread among HIV-infected patients, who confront increased risk of smoking-related co-morbidities. The effects of HIV infection and HIV-related variables on smoking and smoking cessation are incompletely understood. We investigated the correlates of smoking and quitting in an HIV-infected cohort using a validated natural language processor to determine smoking status. Method We developed and validated an algorithm using natural language processing (NLP) to ascertain smoking status from electronic health record data. The algorithm was applied to records for a cohort of 3487 HIV-infected from a large health care system in Boston, USA, and 9446 uninfected control patients matched 3:1 on age, gender, race and clinical encounters. NLP was used to identify and classify smoking-related portions of free-text notes. These classifications were combined into patient-year smoking status and used to classify patients as ever versus never smokers and current smokers versus non-smokers. Generalized linear models were used to assess associations of HIV with 3 outcomes, ever smoking, current smoking, and current smoking in analyses limited to ever smokers (persistent smoking), while adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and psychiatric illness. Analyses were repeated within the HIV cohort, with the addition of CD4 cell count and HIV viral load to assess associations of these HIV-related factors with the smoking outcomes. Results Using the natural language processing algorithm to assign annual smoking status yielded sensitivity of 92.4, specificity of 86.2, and AUC of 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88–0.91). Ever and current smoking were more common in HIV-infected patients than controls (54% vs. 44% and 42% vs. 30%, respectively, both P<0.001). In multivariate models HIV was independently associated with ever smoking (adjusted rate ratio [ARR] 1.18, 95% CI 1.13–1.24, P <0.001), current smoking (ARR 1.33, 95% CI 1.25

  18. Mortality and Risk Stratification of HIV Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Heltemes, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    For the first decade and a half after the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was first identified, the prognosis for most people infected with HIV was quite poor. Life insurance companies responded accordingly and insurance laboratories developed new means to test for the infection. However, it is now clear that people with HIV infection are living longer and that the majority of deaths occurring among those on treatment are now no longer due to AIDS-defining illnesses. This review examines the results of selected studies which analyzed mortality outcomes in those with HIV infection, the many factors which influence those outcomes, and the limitations in the data and in their applicability to an insurance population. PMID:27584921

  19. Sports behaviour among HIV-infected versus non-infected individuals in a Berlin cohort.

    PubMed

    Stein, L; Hechler, D; Jessen, A B; Neumann, K; Jessen, H; Beneke, R

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity has been recommended based on beneficial effects described in HIV-infected patients. However, such guidelines do not take into account actual sport behaviours and general attitudes towards physical activity. To evaluate actual sport activity and attitudes towards sport in HIV-infected versus non-infected individuals we conducted an anonymous questionnaire investigating the prevalence, as well as possible changes, in sports engagement and the overall attitude to physical activity. A total of 283 patients of a general care facility specialized in the treatment of HIV/AIDS in Berlin, Germany, participated; 124 were HIV infected and 159 were non-infected, mostly men who have sex with men (MSM) (88%), with a median age of 35 years. The HIV-infected participants had a median CD4+ count of 554 cells/µL and 48.8% of them were using antiretroviral therapy (ART) at the time of survey. The proportion of patients actually performing physical activity was significantly lower (P = 0.028) within the HIV-infected group (61.3%) than within the non-infected group (74.2%). This difference remained significant after accounting for possible confounders such as age, gender, injecting drug use and sexual preferences. Previously reported sport activity prevalence was similar in both groups on leaving school. From our data we could not identify an association between the time of HIV diagnosis and changes in sports activity. In conclusion, fewer HIV-infected individuals report physical activity than non-infected individuals. Sociodemographic studies to evaluate potential differences in sports behaviour are required in order to inform exercise guidelines for HIV-infected patients. PMID:22362683

  20. The impact of HIV infection on blood leukocyte responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic patients and patients with bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Hoogendijk, Arie J; de Vos, Alex F; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-induced changes in cytokine responses to bacteria may influence susceptibility to bacterial infections and the consequent inflammatory response. Methods We examined the impact of HIV on whole blood responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic subjects and patients with bacterial bloodstream infection (BSI). Whole blood was stimulated ex vivo with two bacterial Toll-like receptor agonists (lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid) and two pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typhoidal Salmonella), which are relevant in HIV-positive patients. Production of interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 was used as a read-out. Results In asymptomatic subjects, HIV infection was associated with reduced interferon-γ, release after stimulation and priming of the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to non-typhoidal Salmonella. In patients with BSI, we found no such priming effect, nor was there evidence for more profound sepsis-induced immunosuppression in BSI patients with HIV co-infection. Conclusions These results suggest a complex effect of HIV on leukocyte responses to bacteria. However, in patients with sepsis, leukocyte responses were equally blunted in patients with and without HIV infection. PMID:27189532

  1. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  2. Suppression of HIV Replication by Lymphoid Tissue CD8+ Cells Correlates with the Clinical State of HIV-Infected Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackbourn, David J.; Mackewicz, Carl E.; Barker, Edward; Hunt, Thomas K.; Herndier, Brian; Haase, Ashley T.; Levy, Jay A.

    1996-11-01

    Lymphoid tissues from asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals, as compared with symptomatic HIV-infected subjects, show limited histopathological changes and lower levels of HIV expression. In this report we correlate the control of HIV replication in lymph nodes to the non-cytolytic anti-HIV activity of lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells. Five subjects at different stages of HIV-related disease were studied and the ability of their CD8+ cells, isolated from both lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood, to inhibit HIV replication was compared. CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of two HIV-infected long-term survivors suppressed HIV replication at a low CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.1. The CD8+ cells from the lymphoid tissue of a third asymptomatic subject suppressed HIV replication at a CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.25; the subject's peripheral blood CD8+ cells showed this antiviral response at a lower ratio of 0.05. The lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells from two AIDS patients were not able to suppress HIV replication, and the peripheral blood CD8+ cells of only one of them suppressed HIV replication. The plasma viremia, cellular HIV load as well as the extent of pathology and virus expression in the lymphoid tissue of the two long-term survivors, were reduced compared with these parameters in the three other subjects. The data suggest that the extent of anti-HIV activity by CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue relative to peripheral blood correlates best with the clinical state measured by lymphoid tissue pathology and HIV burden in lymphoid tissues and blood. The results and further emphasis to the importance of this cellular immune response in controlling HIV pathogenesis.

  3. Altered metabolism of gut microbiota contributes to chronic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castellanos, J F; Serrano-Villar, S; Latorre, A; Artacho, A; Ferrús, M L; Madrid, N; Vallejo, A; Sainz, T; Martínez-Botas, J; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Vera, M; Dronda, F; Leal, M; Del Romero, J; Moreno, S; Estrada, V; Gosalbes, M J; Moya, A

    2015-07-01

    Altered interplay between gut mucosa and microbiota during treated HIV infection may possibly contribute to increased bacterial translocation and chronic immune activation, both of which are predictors of morbidity and mortality. Although a dysbiotic gut microbiota has recently been reported in HIV+ individuals, the metagenome gene pool associated with HIV infection remains unknown. The aim of this study is to characterize the functional gene content of gut microbiota in HIV+ patients and to define the metabolic pathways of this bacterial community, which is potentially associated with immune dysfunction. We determined systemic markers of innate and adaptive immunity in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals on successful antiretroviral therapy without comorbidities and in healthy non-HIV-infected subjects. Metagenome sequencing revealed an altered functional profile, with enrichment of the genes involved in various pathogenic processes, lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, bacterial translocation, and other inflammatory pathways. In contrast, we observed depletion of genes involved in amino acid metabolism and energy processes. Bayesian networks showed significant interactions between the bacterial community, their altered metabolic pathways, and systemic markers of immune dysfunction. This study reveals altered metabolic activity of microbiota and provides novel insight into the potential host-microbiota interactions driving the sustained inflammatory state in successfully treated HIV-infected patients. PMID:25407519

  4. [New electrophysiological findings on the incidence of brain involvement in clinically and neurologically asymptomatic HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Arendt, G; Hefter, H; Elsing, C; Neuen-Jakob, E; Strohmeyer, G; Freund, H J

    1989-12-01

    Motor (postural tremor of the outstretched hands, most rapid voluntary alternating index finger movements and rise times of most rapid voluntary isometric index finger extensions) and psychometric tests (multiple choice vocabulary test - form b, syndrome short test, the German version of the standard progressive matrices - Raven, and the psychic and somatic findings according to the AMDP-system) as well as MRI-Scans were analysed in 100 HIV-infected patients of all stages according to the actual CDC-classification, but without any central-nervous or psychic deficit. Patients with drug, alcohol or tranquilizer abuse, opportunistic, cerebral infections or fever were excluded from the study. Tremor-peak-frequencies and reaction times did not show any significant difference to an age- and sex-matched control group; the other motor parameters revealed significant slowing in the patient group and a worsening with the CDC-stages. MRI-scans of all the patients were normal. The psychometric tests did not show significant alterations on a group statistical level, especially not in the depression scales. Morphologically, the motor performances of the HIV-infected patients resembled those of patients with basal ganglia diseases (M. Huntington, M. Wilson, M. Parkinson). Correspondingly, in some cases of clinically demented HIV-positive patients, MRI-scans showed lesions in the basal ganglia. It can be concluded, that there is an early subclinical central-nervous system affection in HIV-infected patients, especially of the basal ganglia, detectable with appropriate motor function tests sometimes considerably preceeding structural deficits seen later in the course of the disease in MRI-scans. PMID:2514087

  5. Autoantibodies against peripheral blood cells appear early in HIV infection and their prevalence increases with disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, R J; Mulder, J W; Vlekke, A B; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J K; Weigel, H M; Lange, J M; von dem Borne, A E

    1990-01-01

    The presence of platelet- and neutrophil-bound immunoglobulin (PBIg and NBIg) in thrombocytopenic or neutropenic HIV-infected individuals has led to the concept that in HIV infection thrombocytopenia and neutropenia are mediated by autoimmunity. However, PBIg and NBIg were also demonstrated in non-cytopenic HIV-infected individuals. We determined the prevalence of autoantibodies against neutrophils and platelets by immunofluorescence in randomly chosen persons in different stages of asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV infection. Platelet and neutrophil autoantibodies already appeared in the asymptomatic stage and their prevalence further increased in the symptomatic stages. No correlation was found between the presence of either platelet or neutrophil antibodies and the occurrence of circulating immune complexes in the blood or the serum immunoglobulin level. There was no significant difference in neutrophil counts in HIV-infected persons with or without neutrophil autoantibodies. In addition, no significant difference in neutrophil count was found between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected persons. HIV-infected individuals with platelet autoantibodies tended to have a lower platelet count than HIV-infected individuals without these antibodies. However, the platelet count in HIV-infected individuals without platelet antibodies was significantly lower than in the non-HIV infected persons. Thus, autoantibodies against platelets and neutrophils occur early in HIV infection and their prevalence is correlated with disease progression. Their presence is associated with cytopenia only in a limited number of persons. Non-immune mechanisms also mediate thrombocytopenia in HIV infection. PMID:1974174

  6. Alcohol Drinking Pattern: A Comparison between HIV-Infected Patients and Individuals from the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Leticia R.; Barcellos, Nemora T.; Alencastro, Paulo R.; Wolff, Fernando H.; Moreira, Leila B.; Gus, Miguel; Brandão, Ajacio B. M.; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is highly prevalent in the general population and among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to compare the pattern of alcohol consumption and to describe characteristics associated with heavy alcohol consumption in individuals from the general population with patients infected with HIV. Methods Participants for this analysis came from a population-based cross-sectional study and from a consecutive sampling of patients infected with HIV. Participants aged 18 years or older were interviewed using similar questionnaires with questions pertaining to socio-demographic characteristics, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, and HIV-related characteristics, among others. Blood pressure and anthropometric measures were measured using standardized procedures. Results Weekly alcohol consumption was more prevalent among individuals from the general population than HIV-infected patients: 57.0 vs. 31.1%, P<0.001. The prevalence of heavy episodic drinking was higher in the population sample as well: 46.1 vs. 17.0%, P<0.001. In the general population, heavy alcohol consumption was more prevalent in men. Cigarette smoking was independently associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV infected (Prevalence Ratio; PR = 5.9; 95%CI 2.6–13.9; P<0,001) and general population (PR = 2.6; 95%CI 1.9–3.0; P<0.001). Years at school were inversely associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV-infected patients and directly associated among participants from the general population, even after controlling for sex, age, skin color, and smoking. Conclusions Heavy alcohol consumption is more prevalent in the general population than among HIV-infected patients. Individuals aware about their disease may reduce the amount of alcoholic beverages consumption comparatively to healthy individuals from the general population. PMID:27362541

  7. Human papillomavirus, anal cancer, and screening considerations among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, William Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Invasive anal cancer has become an important cause of non AIDS-related cancer among HIV-infected individuals. Human papillomavirus is the main etiological agent. This review explains the pathophysiologic role of human papillomavirus in the development of invasive anal cancer, summarizes recent epidemiological trends of invasive anal cancer, and reviews the evidence to address common clinical questions posed when screening for anal cancer in HIV-infected patients. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on human papillomavirus oncogenesis is still unclear, but given the increased clinical burden of invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients, many clinics have implemented screening programs for anal cancer and its precursors. Despite the availability of several modalities for treatment of precursors of anal cancer, evidence that current treatment modalities favorably alter the natural history of human papillomavirus oncogenesis in the anal and perianal regions is still inconclusive. However, there is sufficient evidence to state that the accuracy of anal cancer screening procedures (cytology and high-resolution anoscopy directed biopsy) is comparable to the accuracy of those used in screening for cervical cancer precursors. Studies that systematically assess the efficacy of these anal cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients are needed. PMID:23681437

  8. Older individuals with HIV infection have greater memory deficits than younger individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tan, IL; Smith, BR; Hammond, E; Vronbrock-Roosa, H; Creighton, JA; Selnes, OA; McArthur, JC; Sacktor, N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains persistently high in the era of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to characterize the pattern of neurocognitive dysfunction in older subjects with HAND, in particular amnestic versus non-amnestic impairment. Methods 106 subjects from the Johns Hopkins University NIMH Clinical Outcomes cohort underwent standardized neuropsychological (NP) testing between November 2006 and June 2010. We examined performance in seven cognitive domains (memory, attention, speed of processing, visuospatial, language, motor and executive). Older subjects were defined as age > 50 years at the time of NP testing. Subjects were diagnosed with HAND according to established criteria, and dichotomized into amnestic cognitive impairment or non-amnestic cognitive impairment, with deficit defined as z-scores < −1.5 for the verbal and non-verbal memory domains. Results There were 32 older subjects with a mean age (SD) of 54.2 (2.8) years, and 74 younger subjects, 43.7 (4.3) years. Older age was associated with a 4.8 fold higher odds of memory deficits, adjusted for potential confounders (p=0.035) identified a priori. With age modeled as a continuous covariate, every 1-year increase in age was associated with a 1.11 fold higher odds of memory deficit (p=0.05). Conclusion There was a higher proportion of amnestic cognitive impairment among older subjects than younger subjects with HIV infection. Neurodegenerative processes other than those directly due to HIV may be increasingly important as individuals with chronic HIV infection and HAND survive into older age. PMID:24078559

  9. Quantification of mitochondrial toxicity in HIV-infected individuals by quantitative PCR compared to flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thor A.; Lin, Chen-Han; Tobin, Nicole H.; Côté, Hélène C.F.; Sloan, Derek D.; Jerome, Keith R.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive diagnostic assays to evaluate mitochondrial toxicity could have significant clinical utility for HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods This study compared the ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear DNA determined by quantitative PCR to the ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear-encoded proteins by flow cytometry, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 73 HIV-infected individuals with and without risk factors for mitochondrial toxicity. Results PCR detected similar mitochondrial/nuclear DNA in HIV-infected individuals without a history of ART, and those receiving ART with lipodystrophy, lipoatrophy or a history of suspected lactic acidosis. However, the ratio was significantly greater in ART-untreated compared to those receiving either stavudine or didanosine. In contrast, flow cytometry did not detect any differences in mitochondrial/nuclear protein (1). There was no correlation between the assays (rho = −0.05, p = 0.65). Conclusions Assessment of the mitochondrial/nuclear DNA ratio by quantitative PCR performed better than the mitochondrial/nuclear-encoded protein ratio by flow cytometry to detect adverse effects of nucleoside analogues on mitochondria. PMID:23044657

  10. Substance abuse, adherence with antiretroviral therapy, and clinical outcomes among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Gregory M

    2011-05-23

    Substance abuse and addiction are highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. Substance abuse is an important comorbidity that affects the delivery and outcomes of HIV medical management. In this paper I will review data examining the associations between substance abuse and HIV treatment and potential strategies to improve outcomes in this population that warrant further investigation. Current - but not past - substance abuse adversely affects engagement in care, acceptance of antiretroviral therapy, adherence with therapy, and long-term persistence in care. Substance abuse treatment appears to facilitate engagement in HIV care, and access to evidence-based treatment for substance abuse is central to addressing the HIV epidemic. Strategies that show promise for HIV-infected substance abusers include integrated treatment models, directly observed therapy, and incentive-based interventions. PMID:20888839

  11. Substance abuse, adherence with antiretroviral therapy, and clinical outcomes among HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. Substance abuse is an important comorbidity that affects the delivery and outcomes of HIV medical management. In this paper I will review data examining the associations between substance abuse and HIV treatment and potential strategies to improve outcomes in this population that warrant further investigation. Current - but not past - substance abuse adversely affects engagement in care, acceptance of antiretroviral therapy, adherence with therapy, and long-term persistence in care. Substance abuse treatment appears to facilitate engagement in HIV care, and access to evidence-based treatment for substance abuse is central to addressing the HIV epidemic. Strategies that show promise for HIV-infected substance abusers include integrated treatment models, directly observed therapy, and incentive-based interventions. PMID:20888839

  12. Gut Bacteria Metabolism Impacts Immune Recovery in HIV-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Rojo, David; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Deusch, Simon; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F; Bargiela, Rafael; Sainz, Talía; Vera, Mar; Moreno, Santiago; Estrada, Vicente; Gosalbes, María José; Latorre, Amparo; Seifert, Jana; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés; Ferrer, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    While changes in gut microbial populations have been described in human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART), the mechanisms underlying the contributions of gut bacteria and their molecular agents (metabolites and proteins) to immune recovery remain unexplored. To study this, we examined the active fraction of the gut microbiome, through examining protein synthesis and accumulation of metabolites inside gut bacteria and in the bloodstream, in 8 healthy controls and 29 HIV-infected individuals (6 being longitudinally studied). We found that HIV infection is associated to dramatic changes in the active set of gut bacteria simultaneously altering the metabolic outcomes. Effects were accentuated among immunological ART responders, regardless diet, subject characteristics, clinical variables other than immune recovery, the duration and type of ART and sexual preferences. The effect was found at quantitative levels of several molecular agents and active bacteria which were herein identified and whose abundance correlated with HIV immune pathogenesis markers. Although, we cannot rule out the possibility that some changes are partially a random consequence of the disease status, our data suggest that most likely reduced inflammation and immune recovery is a joint solution orchestrated by both the active fraction of the gut microbiota and the host. PMID:27428431

  13. Osteopontin enhances HIV replication and is increased in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Tanzeem; Adams, Robert; Nerle, Sujata; Kamara, Masiray; Eger, Caitlin; Marder, Karen; Cohen, Bruce; Schifitto, Giovanni; McArthur, Justin C.; Sacktor, Ned; Pardo, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite effective and widely available suppressive anti-HIV therapy, the prevalence of mild neurocognitive dysfunction continues to increase. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a multifactorial disease with sustained central nervous system inflammation and immune activation as prominent features. Inflammatory macrophages, HIV-infected and uninfected, play a central role in the development of HIV dementia. There is a critical need to identify biomarkers and to better understand the molecular mechanisms leading to cognitive dysfunction in HAND. In this regard, we identified through a subtractive hybridization strategy osteopontin (OPN, SPP1, gene) an inflammatory marker, as an upregulated gene in HIV-infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. Knockdown of OPN in primary macrophages resulted in a threefold decrease in HIV-1 replication. Ectopic expression of OPN in the TZM-bl cell line significantly enhanced HIV infectivity and replication. A significant increase in the degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκBα and an increase in the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio of NF-κB were found in HIV-infected cells expressing OPN compared to controls. Moreover, mutation of the NF-κB binding domain in the HIV-LTR abrogated enhanced promoter activity stimulated by OPN. Interestingly, compared to cerebrospinal fluid from normal and multiple sclerosis controls, OPN levels were significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals both with and without neurocognitive disorder. OPN levels were highest in HIV-infected individuals with moderate to severe cognitive impairment. Moreover, OPN was significantly elevated in brain tissue from HIV-infected individuals with cognitive disorder versus those without impairment. Collectively, these data suggest that OPN stimulates HIV-1 replication and that high levels of OPN are present in the CNS compartment of HIV-infected individuals, reflecting ongoing inflammatory processes at this site despite anti-HIV therapy. PMID

  14. Does "asymptomatic" mean without symptoms for those living with HIV infection?

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean J; Cuca, Yvette P; Kirksey, Kenn M; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Rosa, María E; Nicholas, Patrice K; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Canaval, Gladys; Robinson, Linda; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Human, Sarie; Arudo, John; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Bunch, Eli; Dole, Pamela J; Coleman, Christopher; Nokes, Kathleen; Reynolds, Nancy R; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Maryland, Mary; Voss, Joachim; Lindgren, Teri

    2009-03-01

    Throughout the history of the HIV epidemic, HIV-positive patients with relatively high CD4 counts and no clinical features of opportunistic infections have been classified as "asymptomatic" by definition and treatment guidelines. This classification, however, does not take into consideration the array of symptoms that an HIV-positive person can experience long before progressing to AIDS. This short report describes two international multi-site studies conducted in 2003-2005 and 2005-2007. The results from the studies show that HIV-positive people may experience symptoms throughout the trajectory of their disease, regardless of CD4 count or classification. Providers should discuss symptoms and symptom management with their clients at all stages of the disease. PMID:19280409

  15. Altered production of tumour necrosis factors alpha and beta and interferon gamma by HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Vyakarnam, A; Matear, P; Meager, A; Kelly, G; Stanley, B; Weller, I; Beverley, P

    1991-01-01

    In vitro studies shows that recombinant tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and beta, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) can enhance HIV replication, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with HIV in vitro secrete high levels of the same cytokines. As T cells secrete all three mediators, the capacity of T cell activation signals to trigger cytokine production in PBMC from HIV-infected individuals was investigated as such patients may be immunocompromised. We demonstrate that asymptomatic seropositives in CDC group II/III as well as patients who have progressed to CDC group IV of the disease proliferate efficiently to anti-CD3 antibody, recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), PHA plus phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (PMA) but secrete significantly (P less than 0.05) higher amounts of TNF-alpha, TNF-beta and IFN-gamma compared with controls in response to the same stimulants. We also show a difference between group II/III and group IV patients with the latter secreting more TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. The kinetics of TNF-alpha and -beta, and IFN-gamma production was stimulus dependent with overall levels varying in time for each stimulus. Furthermore, the kinetics of the response to all three stimulants were altered in seropositives; CDC group II/III and group IV patients secreted higher levels of cytokines over several time points compared to controls. The altered production of these mediators by HIV-infected patients may contribute to disease progression and to the pathogenesis of AIDS. PMID:1901776

  16. Plasma Cytokine Levels Are Related to Brain Volumes in HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gongvatana, Assawin; Correia, Stephen; Dunsiger, Shira; Gauthier, Lynne; Devlin, Kathryn N.; Ross, Skye; Navia, Bradford; Tashima, Karen T.; DeLaMonte, Suzanne; Cohen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected individuals frequently exhibit brain dysfunction despite antiretroviral treatment. The neuropathological mechanisms underlying these abnormalities remain unclear, pointing to the importance of identifying biomarkers sensitive to brain dysfunction. Methods We examined 74 medically stable HIV-infected individuals using T1-weighted MRI. Volumes of the cortical grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, and ventricles were derived using automated parcellation. A panel of plasma cytokines was measured using multiplexed bead array immunoassay. A model selection algorithm was used to select the combination of clinical and cytokine markers that best predicted each brain volumetric measure in a series of linear regression models. Results Higher CD4 nadir, shorter HIV infection duration, and antiretroviral treatment were significantly related to higher volumes of the putamen, thalamus, hippocampus, and WM. Older age was related to lower volumes in most brain regions and higher ventricular volume. Higher IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were related to higher volumes of the putamen, pallidum, amygdala, GM, and WM. Higher IL-1β, IL-6, IL-16, IL-18, IP-10, MIP-1β, and SDF-1α were related to lower volumes of the putamen, pallidum, thalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, GM, and WM; and higher ventricular volume. Conclusion The current findings provide evidence linking smaller brain volumes to HIV disease history, antiretroviral treatment, and advanced age. Cytokine markers, especially IL-6 and IL-16, showed robust association with brain volumes even after accounting for other clinical variables, demonstrating their utility in examining the mechanisms of HIV-associated brain abnormalities. PMID:25273619

  17. Chest Computed Tomography Findings in HIV-Infected Individuals in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Emily; Wittman, Catherine; Gingo, Matthew; Fernainy, Khaled; Fuhrman, Carl; Kessinger, Cathy; Weinman, Renee; McMahon, Deborah; Leader, Joseph; Morris, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest radiographic abnormalities were common in HIV-infected individuals in the pre-combination antiretroviral therapy era, but findings may differ now due to a changing spectrum of pulmonary complications. Methods Cross-sectional study of radiographic abnormalities in an HIV-infected outpatient population during the antiretroviral therapy era. Demographics, chest computed tomography, and pulmonary function tests were obtained in HIV-infected volunteers without acute respiratory illness from the University of Pittsburgh HIV/AIDS clinic. Overall prevalence of radiographic abnormalities and potential risk factors for having any abnormality, nodules, or emphysema were evaluated using univariate and multivariable analyses. Results A majority of the 121 participants (55.4%) had a radiographic abnormality with the most common being emphysema (26.4%), nodules (17.4%), and bronchiectasis (10.7%). In multivariate models, age (odds ratio [OR] per year  = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.14, p<0.001), pneumonia history (OR  = 3.60, 95% CI  = 1.27–10.20, p = 0.016), and having ever smoked (OR  = 3.66, p = 0.013, 95% CI  = 1.31–10.12) were significant predictors of having any radiographic abnormality. Use of antiretroviral therapy, CD4 cell count, and HIV viral load were not associated with presence of abnormalities. Individuals with radiographic emphysema were more likely to have airway obstruction on pulmonary function tests. Only 85.8% participants with nodules had follow-up imaging resulting in 52.4% having stable nodules, 23.8% resolution of their nodules, 4.8% development of a new nodule, and 4.8% primary lung cancer. Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities remain common in HIV-infected individuals with emphysema, nodules, and bronchiectasis being the most common. Age, smoking, and pneumonia were associated with radiographic abnormalities, but HIV-associated factors did not seem to predict risk. PMID:25409510

  18. Serological Response to Treatment of Syphilis with Doxycycline Compared with Penicillin in HIV-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Hoffmann, Steen; Cowan, Susan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Benfield, Thomas; Gerstoft, Jan; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2016-08-23

    Serological response to treatment of syphilis with orally administered doxycycline or intramuscularly administered penicillin was assessed in patients with concurrent HIV. All HIV-infected individuals diagnosed with syphilis attending 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark were included. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with serological outcome were modelled using propensity-score-adjusted logistic regression analysis. In total, 202 cases were treated with doxycycline or intramuscular penicillin. At 12 months, serological failure was observed in 12 cases (15%) treated with doxycycline and in 8 cases (17%) treated with penicillin (OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.16-3.88), p = 0.76). The serological cure rate at 12 months was highest in patients with primary syphilis (100%), followed by patients with secondary (89%), early latent (71%) and late latent (67%) syphilis (p = 0.006). In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the use of doxycycline as a treatment option when treating a HIV-infected population for syphilis. PMID:26568359

  19. Prescription medication misuse among HIV-infected individuals taking antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newville, Howard; Roley, Jason; Sorensen, James L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV has become a highly treatable disease due to advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Additionally, HIV-infected individuals often take opiates, barbiturates, and benzodiazepines to treat co-occurring conditions, including pain and symptoms of HIV. We sought to examine prescription medication misuse by surveying 295 HIV-infected patients receiving ART. Participants answered questions about their demographics, alcohol and other drug use, psychiatric diagnoses, ART adherence and side effects, and quality of life. 11% of our sample acknowledged prescription medication misuse. In regression analysis, prescription medication misusers were more likely to report any drinking to intoxication (OR=4.31, 95% CI: 1.35-13.76, p=0.013), reported greater severity of ART side effects (OR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10, p=0.041), and demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, p=0.048) compared to those who did not misuse prescription medications. Special care should be taken by medical providers before prescribing medications that may be abused or diverted. Patients should also be screened for aberrant use, even if not prescribed. ART side effects, cognitive deficits, and alcohol abuse may serve as risk factors or indicators of prescription medication misuse, and should be monitored. PMID:25245428

  20. Food insecurity, depression, and social support in HIV-infected Hispanic individuals.

    PubMed

    Kapulsky, Leonid; Tang, Alice M; Forrester, Janet E

    2015-04-01

    Previous research has identified an association between food insecurity and depression in a variety of world regions in both healthy and HIV-infected individuals. We examined this association in 183 HIV-infected Hispanic adults from the greater Boston area. We measured depression with the Burnam depression screen and food insecurity with the Radimer/Cornell Questionnaire. Dietary intake was assessed with an adapted version of the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Logistic regression models were created with depression as the outcome variable and food insecurity as the main predictor. In bivariate analyses, food insecurity was significantly associated with depression [odds ratio (OR) 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 5.5; p = 0.03]. When we accounted for social support, food insecurity was no longer significant. We found no differences in the quality or quantity of dietary intake between the food insecure and food secure groups. Our findings highlight the importance of social support in the association between food insecurity and depression. Food insecurity may reflect social support more than actual dietary intake in this population. PMID:25047405

  1. Quantitative Evaluation of an Instrument to Identify Chronic Pain in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jessica S; Westfall, Andrew O; Chamot, Eric; Saag, Michael; Walcott, Melonie; Ritchie, Christine; Kertesz, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    A method to rapidly identify the presence of chronic pain would enhance the care of HIV-infected individuals, but such an instrument has not been assessed in this population to date. We assessed the construct validity of the two-question Brief Chronic Pain Questionnaire (BCPQ) in HIV-infected patients by assessing the association between BCPQ responses and known correlates of chronic pain. Participants in the University of Alabama Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems cohort completed the BCPQ, along with the EuroQOL to assess physical function, the PHQ-9 to assess depression, and the PHQ-anxiety module to assess anxiety. Among 100 participants, 25% were female, the mean age was 45 (SD 12), 63% were African American, 27% were publicly insured, the median CD4(+) T cell count was 572 cells/mm(3) (IQR 307-788), and 82% had an undetectable viral load. Participants with chronic pain were more likely to have impaired mobility (43% vs. 12%, p=0.001), difficulty with usual activities (47% vs. 12%, p<0.001), lower overall health state (70 vs. 84, p=0.002), pain today (80% vs. 27%, p<0.001), depression (30% vs. 15%, p=0.10), and anxiety (43% vs. 10%, p<0.001) than those without chronic pain. This study provides preliminary evidence for the BCPQ as a brief questionnaire to identify the presence of chronic pain in HIV care settings. PMID:25693683

  2. SCREENING GUIDELINES FOR NON-AIDS DEFINING CANCERS IN HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Deepthi; Aboulafia, David M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Review The growing burden of non-AIDS-defining malignancies (non-ADM) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) highlights the need for cancer prevention and early detection. In this article we propose screening guidelines for non-ADM in PLWHA. Recent findings Screening for lung cancer with low-dose helical chest computerized tomography (LDCT) in the National Lung Screening Trial data demonstrated a decrease in lung cancer and all-cause mortality. Recent studies have demonstrated a favorable experience among PLWHA with liver transplantation. Over-diagnosis is common with breast and prostate cancer screening. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. Summary Screening recommendations for the general population can be applied to PLWHA patients for breast, colon and prostate cancer. Screening for lung cancer with LDCT could be considered in PLWHA at risk. American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases screening recommendations with biennial ultrasonography may be applied to at-risk PLWHA for hepatocellular carcinoma. All HIV-infected adults should be offered anal cancer screening as part of clinical care at specialized centers. PMID:23942295

  3. Depressive symptoms, lifestyle structure, and ART adherence among HIV-infected individuals: a longitudinal mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A; Wagner, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented relationship between depression and antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence, few studies have identified explanatory pathways through which depression affects adherence. The current study tested lifestyle structure-the degree of organization and routinization of daily activities-as a mediator of this relationship, given previous evidence of lifestyle structure being associated with both depression and ART nonadherence. HIV-infected individuals starting or re-starting ART in the California Collaborative Treatment Group 578 study (n = 199) were assessed over 48 weeks. Adherence was measured using electronic monitoring caps to determine dose timing and doses taken, and viral load was assessed. The mediating role of lifestyle structure was tested using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling and bootstrapping. Lifestyle significantly mediated the relationship between depression and both measures of ART adherence behavior. Interventions that minimize disruptions to lifestyle structure and link adherence to daily activities may be useful for individuals with depression and ART nonadherence. PMID:24874725

  4. Interventions to Address Chronic Disease and HIV: Strategies to Promote Exercise and Nutrition Among HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Diana; Somarriba, Gabriel; Neri, Daniela; Miller, Tracie L.

    2012-01-01

    Food insecurity, micronutrient deficits, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and bone disorders complicate the treatment of HIV infection. Nutrition and exercise interventions can be effective in ameliorating these symptoms that are associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this literature review, we examine the most recent nutrition and exercise interventions for HIV-infected patients. Macronutrient supplementation can be useful in treating malnutrition and wasting. Multivitamin (vitamin B complex, vitamin C, and vitamin E) supplements and vitamin D may improve quality of life and decrease morbidity and mortality. Nutritional counseling and exercise interventions are effective for treating obesity, fat redistribution, and metabolic abnormalities. Physical activity interventions improve body composition, strength, and fitness in HIV-infected individuals. Taken collectively, the evidence suggests that a proactive approach to nutrition and physical activity guidance and interventions can improve outcomes and help abrogate the adverse metabolic, cardiovascular, and psychological consequences of HIV and its treatments. PMID:22933247

  5. The quality of interactive computer use among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Smaglik, P; Hawkins, R P; Pingree, S; Gustafson, D H; Boberg, E; Bricker, E

    1998-01-01

    This study examined how HIV-infected individuals used an interactive health software package called CHESS (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System). CHESS packages information and support in a variety of ways; the research examined how a subset of users whose posttest scores in a larger randomized trial showed significant improvement in quality of life compared on use patterns of CHESS with those who did not improve. The evidence presented here points to the nature of CHESS use more than it does to the amount of CHESS use. Those whose quality of life improved were among the most involved in their use of CHESS information tools. That is, even though Discussion Group accounted for the majority of all CHESS uses and time spent with the system, total use and Discussion Group use appeared less important than use of the information tools, especially if that use was at least somewhat sustained and involved. PMID:10947374

  6. Associated factors for treatment delay in pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals: a nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The delay in initiating treatment for tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals may lead to the development of a more severe form of the disease, with higher rates of morbidity, mortality and transmissibility. The aim of the present study was to estimate the time interval between the onset of symptoms and initiating treatment for TB in HIV-infected individuals, and to identify the factors associated to this delay. Methods A nested case-control study was undertaken within a cohort of HIV-infected individuals, attended at two HIV referral centers, in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Delay in initiating treatment for TB was defined as the period of time, in days, which was greater than the median value between the onset of cough and initiating treatment for TB. The study analyzed biological, clinical, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors as well as those related to HIV and TB infection, potentially associated to delay. The odds ratios were estimated with the respective confidence intervals and p-values. Results From a cohort of 2365 HIV-infected adults, 274 presented pulmonary TB and of these, 242 participated in the study. Patients were already attending 2 health services at the time they developed a cough (period range: 1 – 552 days), with a median value of 41 days. Factors associated to delay were: systemic symptoms asthenia, chest pain, use of illicit drugs and sputum smear-negative. Conclusion The present study indirectly showed the difficulty of diagnosing TB in HIV-infected individuals and indicated the need for a better assessment of asthenia and chest pain as factors that may be present in co-infected patients. It is also necessary to discuss the role played by negative sputum smear results in diagnosing TB/HIV co-infection as well as the need to assess the best approach for drug users with TB/HIV. PMID:22958583

  7. CD4+ T Cell Depletion, Immune Activation and Increased Production of Regulatory T Cells in the Thymus of HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bandera, Alessandra; Ferrario, Giulio; Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; Soria, Alessandro; Zanini, Fabio; Sabbatini, Francesca; Airoldi, Monica; Marchetti, Giulia; Franzetti, Fabio; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms by which HIV affects the thymus are multiple and only partially known, and the role of thymic dysfunction in HIV/AIDS immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. To evaluate the effects of HIV infection on intra-thymic precursors of T cells in HIV-infected adults, we conducted a detailed immunophenotypic study of thymic tissue isolated from 7 HIV-infected and 10 HIV-negative adults who were to undergo heart surgery. We found that thymuses of HIV-infected individuals were characterized by a relative depletion of CD4+ single positive T cells and a corresponding enrichment of CD8+ single positive T cells. In addition, thymocytes derived from HIV-infected subjects showed increased levels of activated and proliferating cells. Our analysis also revealed a decreased expression of interleukin-7 receptor in early thymocytes from HIV-infected individuals, along with an increase in this same expression in mature double- and single-positive cells. Frequency of regulatory T cells (CD25+FoxP3+) was significantly increased in HIV-infected thymuses, particularly in priorly-committed CD4 single positive cells. Our data suggest that HIV infection is associated with a complex set of changes in the immunophenotype of thymocytes, including a reduction of intrathymic CD4+ T cell precursors, increased expression of activation markers, changes in the expression pattern of IL-7R and enrichment of T regulatory cells generation. PMID:20520721

  8. HIV Prevalence and Risks Associated with HIV Infection among Transgender Individuals in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Ngak, Song; Srean, Chhim; Sansothy, Neth; Mills, Stephen; Ferradini, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    = 3.25 [1.35,7.85]) were independently associated with HIV infection. Conclusions This study confirms transgender individuals as one of the highest-risk groups for HIV infection in Cambodia. It suggests the need for programmatic strategies that mitigate identified associated risks and facilitate access to HIV care for this population. PMID:27070152

  9. Autonomic Function is Associated with Fitness Level in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Morgan H; Hetzler, Ronald K; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Kimura, Iris F; Stickley, Cris D; Lindsey, Rachel A; Nakamoto, Beau K; Chow, Dominic C

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular fitness can improve autonomic function (AF) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Methods Cross-sectional study investigating relationship between AF and cardiovascular fitness in HIV+ individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Participants’ (n=29) maximal oxygen consumption (VO2MAX) were assessed by graded exercise test and scaled allometrically, then divided into tertiles by fitness level (Unfit, Low-fit, and Moderately-fit). Heart rate variability (HRV) and the Autonomic Reflex Screen were used to assess AF. Results Median VO2MAX were 104.9, 130.5, and 150.2 mL•kg−.67•min−1 for Unfit (n=10), Low-fit (n=10), and Moderately-fit (n= 9) groups respectively (p<0.05). Positive correlations were found between VO2MAX and HRV (Spearman’s rho range 0.383 to 0.553) were found. Quantitative Sudomotor Axon Reflex Test (QSART) Distal Leg volumes was lower in Unfit compared to Low-fit (p=0.007) and Moderately-fit groups (p=0.018). Unfit QSART total volumes was lower than Moderately-fit (p=0.014). Conclusion A positive relationship existed between AF and fitness levels. HIV+ individuals could benefit from improved fitness. PMID:26213714

  10. Treatment considerations for HIV-infected individuals with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Blank, Michael B; Himelhoch, Seth; Walkup, James; Eisenberg, Marlene M

    2013-12-01

    There has been a general recognition of a syndemic that includes HIV/AIDS and serve mental illnesses including schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and others. The pathophysiology and direction of effects between severe mental illness and HIV infection is less clear however, and relatively little work has been done on prevention and treatment for people with these complex, co-occurring conditions. Here we present the most recent work that has been published on HIV and mental illness. Further, we describe the need for better treatments for "triply diagnosed persons"; those with HIV, mental illness, and substance abuse and dependence. Finally, we describe the potential drug-drug interactions between psychotropic medications and anti-retrovirals, and the need for better treatment guidelines in this area. We describe one example of an individually tailored intervention for persons with serious mental illness and HIV (PATH+) that shows that integrated community-based treatments using advanced practice nurses (APNs) as health navigators can be successful in improving health-related quality of life and reducing the burden of disease in these persons. PMID:24158425

  11. Thirty-Day Postoperative Mortality Among Individuals With HIV Infection Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy and Procedure-Matched, Uninfected Comparators

    PubMed Central

    King, Joseph T.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Gordon, Adam J.; Crystal, Stephen; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has converted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, and patients now undergo a variety of surgical procedures, but current surgical outcomes are inadequately characterized. OBJECTIVE To compare 30-day postoperative mortality in patients with HIV infection receiving ART with the rates in uninfected individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of nationwide electronic medical record data from the US Veterans Health Administration Healthcare System, October 1, 1996, to September 30, 2010. Common inpatient surgical procedures were grouped using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Clinical Classification System to match HIV-infected and uninfected patients in a 1:2 ratio. Data on 1641 patients with HIV infection receiving combination ART who were undergoing inpatient surgery were compared with data on 3282 procedure-matched, uninfected comparators. Poisson regression models of 30-day postoperative mortality were adjusted for procedure year, age, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, hemoglobin level, albumin level, HIV infection, CD4 cell count, and HIV-1 RNA level. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All-cause 30-day postoperative mortality. RESULTS The most common procedures in both groups were cholecystectomy (10.5%), hip arthroplasty (10.5%), spine surgery (9.8%), herniorrhaphy (7.4%), and coronary artery bypass grafting (7.0%). In patients with HIV infection, CD4 cell distributions were 80.0% with 200/µL or more, 16.3% with 50/µL to 199/µL, and 3.7% with less than 50/µL; 74.1% of patients with HIV infection had undetectable HIV-1 RNA. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was associated with higher 30-day postoperative mortality compared with the mortality in uninfected patients (3.4% [56 patients]) vs 1.6% [53]); incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.11; 95% CI, 1.41–3.17; P < .001). CD4 cell count was inversely associated with mortality, but HIV-1 RNA provided no

  12. High Seroprevalence of Human Herpesviruses in HIV-Infected Individuals Attending Primary Healthcare Facilities in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schaftenaar, Erik; Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Getu, Sarah; McIntyre, James A.; Struthers, Helen E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Peters, Remco P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Seroprevalence data of human herpesviruses (HHVs) are limited for sub-Saharan Africa. These are important to provide an indication of potential burden of HHV-related disease, in particular in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals who are known to be at increased risk of these conditions in the Western world. In this cross-sectional study among 405 HIV-infected and antiretroviral therapy naïve individuals in rural South Africa the seroprevalence of HHVs was: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) (98%), herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) (87%), varicella zoster virus (VZV) (89%), and 100% for both Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Independent factors associated with VZV seropositivity were low educational status and having children. Lack of in-house access to drinking water was independently associated with positive HSV-1 serostatus, whereas Shangaan ethnicity was associated with HSV-2 seropositivity. Increasing age was associated with higher IgG titres to both EBV and CMV, whereas CD4 cell count was negatively associated with EBV and CMV IgG titres. Moreover, IgG titres of HSV-1 and 2, VZV and CMV, and CMV and EBV were positively correlated. The high HHV seroprevalence emphasises the importance of awareness of these viral infections in HIV-infected individuals in South Africa. PMID:24914671

  13. Hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals: a systematic review and meta-analysis of estimated prevalence in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Tiago Castro Lopes; Zwahlen, Marcel; Rauch, Andri; Egger, Matthias; Wandeler, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening is recommended for all HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy, data on epidemiologic characteristics of HCV infection in resource-limited settings are scarce. Methods We searched PubMed and EMBASE for studies assessing the prevalence of HCV infection among HIV-infected individuals in Africa and extracted data on laboratory methods used. Prevalence estimates from individual studies were combined for each country using random-effects meta-analysis. The importance of study design, population and setting as well as type of test (anti-HCV antibody tests and polymerase chain reactions) was examined with meta-regression. Results Three randomized controlled trials, 28 cohort studies and 121 cross-sectional analyses with 108,180 HIV-infected individuals from 35 countries were included. The majority of data came from outpatient populations (55%), followed by blood donors (15%) and pregnant women (14%). Based on estimates from 159 study populations, anti-HCV positivity prevalence ranged between 3.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8–4.7) in Southern Africa and 42.3% (95% CI 4.1–80.5) in North Africa. Study design, type of setting and age distribution did not influence this prevalence significantly. The prevalence of replicating HCV infection, estimated from data of 29 cohorts, was 2.0% (95% CI 1.5–2.6). Ten studies from nine countries reported the HCV genotype of 74 samples, 53% were genotype 1, 24% genotype 2, 14% genotype 4 and 9% genotypes 3, 5 or 6. Conclusions The prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies is high in HIV-infected patients in Africa, but replicating HCV infection is rare and varies widely across countries. PMID:27293220

  14. Acyclovir Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Herpes Zoster Among HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Barnabas, Ruanne V; Baeten, Jared M; Lingappa, Jairam R; Thomas, Katherine K; Hughes, James P; Mugo, Nelly R; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Gray, Glenda; Rees, Helen; Mujugira, Andrew; Ronald, Allan; Stevens, Wendy; Kapiga, Saidi; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2016-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons have higher rates of herpes zoster than HIV-uninfected individuals. We assessed whether twice daily treatment with 400 mg of oral acyclovir reduces the incidence of herpes zoster in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 3408 persons coinfected with HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2. During 5175 person-years of follow-up, 26 cases of herpes zoster occurred among those assigned acyclovir, compared with 69 cases among those assigned placebo (rates, 1.00 and 2.68/100 person-years, respectively), a relative decrease of 62% (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, .24-.67; P < .001). Daily acyclovir prophylaxis significantly reduced herpes zoster incidence among HIV-infected persons. PMID:26142452

  15. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  16. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  17. Probiotics Reduce Inflammation in Antiretroviral Treated, HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of the “Probio-HIV” Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    d’Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Giustini, Noemi; Serafino, Sara; Calantone, Nina; De Girolamo, Gabriella; Bianchi, Luigi; Bellelli, Valeria; Ascoli-Bartoli, Tommaso; Marcellini, Sonia; Turriziani, Ombretta; Brenchley, Jason M.; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV infection results in damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, microbial translocation and immune activation. These are not completely normalized with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Moreover, increate morbidity and mortality of cART-treated HIV-infected individuals is associated with inflammation. Methods In order to enhance GI tract immunity, we recruited and treated 20 HIV-infected humans with cART supplemented with probiotics and followed inflammation and immunological parameters (clinical trial number NCT02164344). 11 HIV seronegative subjects were included as control group. The enumeration of CD4+, CD8+, CD38+ and HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were evaluated on peripheral blood; HIV-RNA levels, sCD14, d-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP) high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), IL-6 and Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein (LBP) were assayed on plasma. Results We observe that cART does not normalize the levels of immune activation in HIV positive patients anyway inflammation and markers of microbial translocation were significantly reduced with probiotic supplementation. Patients show a clear and statistically significant reduction in the levels of immune activation on CD4 T-lymphocytes, for both markers CD38 and HLA-DR and their simultaneous expression, LBP and hsCRP plasma levels after probiotic diet supplementation settling to values comparable to controls. Conclusions Supplementing cART with probiotics in HIV-infected individuals may improve GI tract immunity and there by mitigate inflammatory sequelae, ultimately improving prognosis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02164344 PMID:26376436

  18. A CONCISE PANEL OF BIOMARKERS IDENTIFIES NEUROCOGNITIVE FUNCTIONING CHANGES IN HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Michael, Benedict Daniel; Franklin, Donald; Cookson, Debra Rosario; Bharti, Ajay R.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurocognitive (NC) impairment (NCI) occurs commonly in people living with HIV. Despite substantial effort, no biomarkers have been sufficiently validated for diagnosis and prognosis of NCI in the clinic. The goal of this project was to identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for NCI in a comprehensively characterized HIV cohort. Methods Multidisciplinary case review selected 98 HIV-infected individuals and categorized them into four NC groups using normative data: stably normal (SN), stably impaired (SI), worsening (Wo), or improving (Im). All subjects underwent comprehensive NC testing, phlebotomy, and lumbar puncture at two timepoints separated by a median of 6.2 months. Eight biomarkers were measured in CSF and blood by immunoassay. Results were analyzed using mixed model linear regression and staged recursive partitioning. Results At the first visit, subjects were mostly middle-aged (median 45) white (58%) men (84%) who had AIDS (70%). Of the 73% who took antiretroviral therapy (ART), 54% had HIV RNA levels below 50 c/mL in plasma. Mixed model linear regression identified that only MCP-1 in CSF was associated with neurocognitive change group. Recursive partitioning models aimed at diagnosis (i.e., correctly classifying neurocognitive status at the first visit) were complex and required most biomarkers to achieve misclassification limits. In contrast, prognostic models were more efficient. A combination of three biomarkers (sCD14, MCP-1, SDF-1α) correctly classified 82% of Wo and SN subjects, including 88% of SN subjects. A combination of two biomarkers (MCP-1, TNF-α) correctly classified 81% of Im and SI subjects, including 100% of SI subjects. Conclusions This analysis of well-characterized individuals identified concise panels of biomarkers associated with NC change. Across all analyses, the two most frequently identified biomarkers were sCD14 and MCP-1, indicators of monocyte/macrophage activation. While the panels differed depending on

  19. Factors Associated with D-Dimer Levels in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Álvaro H.; O’Connor, Jemma L.; Phillips, Andrew N.; Baker, Jason V.; Vjecha, Michael J.; Losso, Marcelo H.; Klinker, Hartwig; Lopardo, Gustavo; Williams, Ian; Lundgren, Jens D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher plasma D-dimer levels are strong predictors of mortality in HIV+ individuals. The factors associated with D-dimer levels during HIV infection, however, remain poorly understood. Methods In this cross-sectional study, participants in three randomized controlled trials with measured D-dimer levels were included (N = 9,848). Factors associated with D-dimer were identified by linear regression. Covariates investigated were: age, gender, race, body mass index, nadir and baseline CD4+ count, plasma HIV RNA levels, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6]), antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, ART regimens, co-morbidities (hepatitis B/C, diabetes mellitus, prior cardiovascular disease), smoking, renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] and cystatin C) and cholesterol. Results Women from all age groups had higher D-dimer levels than men, though a steeper increase of D-dimer with age occurred in men. Hepatitis B/C co-infection was the only co-morbidity associated with higher D-dimer levels. In this subgroup, the degree of hepatic fibrosis, as demonstrated by higher hyaluronic acid levels, but not viral load of hepatitis viruses, was positively correlated with D-dimer. Other factors independently associated with higher D-dimer levels were black race, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, being off ART at baseline, and increased levels of CRP, IL-6 and cystatin C. In contrast, higher baseline CD4+ counts and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were negatively correlated with D-dimer levels. Conclusions D-dimer levels increase with age in HIV+ men, but are already elevated in women at an early age due to reasons other than a higher burden of concomitant diseases. In hepatitis B/C co-infected individuals, hepatic fibrosis, but not hepatitis viral load, was associated with higher D-dimer levels. PMID:24626096

  20. Diabetes mellitus among HIV-infected individuals in follow-up care at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Solomon Mekonnen; Getachew, Assefa; Fasika, Solomon; Bayisa, Mulugeta; Girma Demisse, Abayneh; Mesfin, Nebiyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and associated factors among HIV-infected adults in northwest Ethiopia. Design Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Setting HIV clinic of the University of Gondar Hospital, Ethiopia. Participants All HIV-infected adults who visited the HIV clinic from December 2013 to the end of February 2014 were the source population. Measures A structured and pretested questionnaire incorporating the WHO STEPwise approach was used. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess factors associated with DM. Results The overall prevalence of type 2 DM was 8% (95% CI 5.5% to 10.5%). The prevalence of DM was higher (13.2%; 95% CI 8.0% to 18.3%) among subjects receiving pre-antiretroviral treatment (pre-ART) than among those taking ART (5.1%; 95% CI 2.6% to 7.6%). Thirteen (35.1%) of the DM cases were newly identified during the study. Obesity (adjusted OR (AOR) 6.55; 1.20 to 35.8), hypertension (AOR 3.45; 1.50 to 7.90), being in the pre-ART group (AOR 4.47; 1.80 to 11.08), hypertriglyceridaemia (AOR 2.24; 1.02 to 49.5) and tertiary-level education (AOR 11.8; 2.28 to 61.4) were associated with DM. Conclusions Overall DM prevalence was high, particularly among subjects in the pre-ART group. More educated, hypertensive and obese HIV-infected adults were more likely to have DM as a comorbidity. Health policy and the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals should take into account the rising DM. PMID:27540099

  1. Increased Frequency of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Type 1 Regulatory T Cells in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kristina; Koch, Nora; Sandaradura de Silva, Ute; Jung, Norma; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Hartmann, Pia; Romerio, Fabio; Lehmann, Clara

    2015-12-01

    In HIV-1 infection elevated serum levels of interferon-α (IFN-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) are associated with immune hyperactivation and disease progression. Recently, coexpression of CD49b and LAG-3 was shown to identify Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, which secrete large amounts of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. We analyzed the frequency of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cells in the peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals at different stages of the disease. We found increased levels of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cells as well as IL-10 in HIV patients. With disease progression, Tr1 cells negatively correlate with frequency of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), the main producers of IFN-α. However, elevated IL-10 levels could not be ascribed to the CD49b/LAG-3(+)Tr1 cell population. Moreover, we showed in vitro that IFN-α leads to an upregulation of IL-10 as well as CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cell counts in healthy controls, recapitulating effects observed in vivo during HIV infection. Our results suggest that overexpression of IFN-α during HIV infection drives the generation of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether elevated IL-10 levels are beneficial or detrimental in regard to disease progression. PMID:26192268

  2. PD-L1 Blockade Differentially Impacts Regulatory T Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals Depending on Plasma Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Peligero, Cristina; Argilaguet, Jordi; Güerri-Fernandez, Roberto; Torres, Berta; Ligero, Carmen; Colomer, Pilar; Plana, Montserrat; Knobel, Hernando; García, Felipe; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway has emerged as a potential therapy to restore impaired immune responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Most reports have studied the impact of the PD-L1 blockade on effector cells and neglected possible effects on regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which play an essential role in balancing immunopathology and antiviral effector responses. The aim of this study was to define the consequences of ex vivo PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from HIV-infected individuals. We observed that HIV infection led to an increase in PD-1+ and PD-L1+ Treg cells. This upregulation correlated with disease progression and decreased under antiretroviral treatment. Treg cells from viremic individuals had a particularly high PD-1 expression and impaired proliferative capacity in comparison with Treg cells from individuals under antiretroviral treatment. PD-L1 blockade restored the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from viremic individuals but had no effect on its suppressive capacity. Moreover, it increased the viral production in cell cultures from viremic individuals. This increase in viral production correlated with an increase in Treg cell percentage and a reduction in the CD4/Treg and CD8/Treg cell ratios. In contrast to the effect of the PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from viremic individuals, we did not observe a significant effect on the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from individuals in whom viremia was controlled (either spontaneously or by antiretroviral treatment). However, PD-L1 blockade resulted in an increased proliferative capacity of HIV-specific-CD8 T cells in all subjects. Taken together, our findings suggest that manipulating PD-L1 in vivo can be expected to influence the net gain of effector function depending on the subject’s plasma viremia. PMID:26633181

  3. PD-L1 Blockade Differentially Impacts Regulatory T Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals Depending on Plasma Viremia.

    PubMed

    Peligero, Cristina; Argilaguet, Jordi; Güerri-Fernandez, Roberto; Torres, Berta; Ligero, Carmen; Colomer, Pilar; Plana, Montserrat; Knobel, Hernando; García, Felipe; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway has emerged as a potential therapy to restore impaired immune responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Most reports have studied the impact of the PD-L1 blockade on effector cells and neglected possible effects on regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which play an essential role in balancing immunopathology and antiviral effector responses. The aim of this study was to define the consequences of ex vivo PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from HIV-infected individuals. We observed that HIV infection led to an increase in PD-1+ and PD-L1+ Treg cells. This upregulation correlated with disease progression and decreased under antiretroviral treatment. Treg cells from viremic individuals had a particularly high PD-1 expression and impaired proliferative capacity in comparison with Treg cells from individuals under antiretroviral treatment. PD-L1 blockade restored the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from viremic individuals but had no effect on its suppressive capacity. Moreover, it increased the viral production in cell cultures from viremic individuals. This increase in viral production correlated with an increase in Treg cell percentage and a reduction in the CD4/Treg and CD8/Treg cell ratios. In contrast to the effect of the PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from viremic individuals, we did not observe a significant effect on the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from individuals in whom viremia was controlled (either spontaneously or by antiretroviral treatment). However, PD-L1 blockade resulted in an increased proliferative capacity of HIV-specific-CD8 T cells in all subjects. Taken together, our findings suggest that manipulating PD-L1 in vivo can be expected to influence the net gain of effector function depending on the subject's plasma viremia. PMID:26633181

  4. Regulation of Gag- and Env-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses in ART-Naïve HIV-Infected Patients: Potential Implications for Individualized Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prebensen, Christian; Lind, Andreas; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne-Ma; Kvale, Dag

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to develop a functional cure for HIV infection will likely require boosting of effector T cell responses to eliminate reactivated, latently infected cells. We have recently explored an assay for assessing antigen-specific regulation of T cell proliferation, which was related to clinical progression in untreated patients and to vaccine efficacy in two trials of therapeutic Gag-based vaccines. We here expand the same assay to further investigate regulation mediated by various inhibitory pathways. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 26 asymptomatic HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients were stimulated with Gag and Env overlapping peptide panels for 5 days. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) blocking inhibitory mediators interleukin (IL) 10, transforming growth factor (TGF) β, programmed death ligand (PD–L) 1 and herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) were added to parallel cultures. Functional T cell regulation (FTR) was defined as the difference in proliferation between stimulated cultures with and without blocking mAbs. FTR was detected in 54% of patients. Blockade of IL-10/PD-L1 and IL10/TGF-β detected all cases with Gag- and Env-associated FTR, respectively. In accordance with previous findings, isolated Env FTR was associated with higher plasma HIV RNA and lower CD4 counts, while patients with both Gag and Env FTR also had higher Gag- and Env-specific proliferative CD8+ T cell responses. There was no association between FTR and frequencies of activated regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we observed substantial heterogeneity in FTR between patients, inhibitory pathways and HIV antigens. FTR may help to individualize immunomodulation and warrants further assessment in clinical immunotherapy trials. PMID:27128502

  5. A concise panel of biomarkers identifies neurocognitive functioning changes in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Thomas D; Deutsch, Reena; Michael, Benedict Daniel; Franklin, Donald; Cookson, Debra Rosario; Bharti, Ajay R; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L

    2013-12-01

    Neurocognitive (NC) impairment (NCI) occurs commonly in people living with HIV. Despite substantial effort, no biomarkers have been sufficiently validated for diagnosis and prognosis of NCI in the clinic. The goal of this project was to identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for NCI in a comprehensively characterized HIV cohort. Multidisciplinary case review selected 98 HIV-infected individuals and categorized them into four NC groups using normative data: stably normal (SN), stably impaired (SI), worsening (Wo), or improving (Im). All subjects underwent comprehensive NC testing, phlebotomy, and lumbar puncture at two timepoints separated by a median of 6.2 months. Eight biomarkers were measured in CSF and blood by immunoassay. Results were analyzed using mixed model linear regression and staged recursive partitioning. At the first visit, subjects were mostly middle-aged (median 45) white (58 %) men (84 %) who had AIDS (70 %). Of the 73 % who took antiretroviral therapy (ART), 54 % had HIV RNA levels below 50 c/mL in plasma. Mixed model linear regression identified that only MCP-1 in CSF was associated with neurocognitive change group. Recursive partitioning models aimed at diagnosis (i.e., correctly classifying neurocognitive status at the first visit) were complex and required most biomarkers to achieve misclassification limits. In contrast, prognostic models were more efficient. A combination of three biomarkers (sCD14, MCP-1, SDF-1α) correctly classified 82 % of Wo and SN subjects, including 88 % of SN subjects. A combination of two biomarkers (MCP-1, TNF-α) correctly classified 81 % of Im and SI subjects, including 100 % of SI subjects. This analysis of well-characterized individuals identified concise panels of biomarkers associated with NC change. Across all analyses, the two most frequently identified biomarkers were sCD14 and MCP-1, indicators of monocyte/macrophage activation. While the panels differed depending on the outcome and on the

  6. HPV and anal cancer in HIV-infected individuals: a review.

    PubMed

    Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Mooij, Sofie H; Richel, Oliver; de Vries, Henry J C; Prins, Jan M

    2014-09-01

    HIV infection is one of the strongest risk factors for anal squamous cell cancer (ASCC). Most ASCC are caused by HPV, and most HPV-associated ASCC are caused by HPV-16. Anal HPV infections are very common in men who have sex with men (MSM), and nearly universal among HIV-infected MSM. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor for ASCC, is present in about 30 % of HIV+ MSM, but neither the progression rate to ASCC nor the regression rate are known. The incidence rate of ASCC among HIV-infected people has risen in the first decade after cART became available, but appears to be plateauing recently. Anal cytology has poor sensitivity and specificity. High resolution anoscopy (HRA) is advocated by some as a screening tool in high-risk groups, but is cumbersome and time-consuming and it is unknown whether HRA followed by treatment of HGAIN prevents ASCC. More research is needed on progression and regression rates of HGAIN, on effective therapy of HGAIN, and on biomarkers that predict HGAIN or anal cancer. HPV vaccination and earlier start of cART may prevent most anal cancers in the long run. PMID:24990810

  7. Associations between Cognition, Gender and Monocyte Activation among HIV Infected Individuals in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Royal, Walter; Cherner, Mariana; Burdo, Tricia H; Umlauf, Anya; Letendre, Scott L; Jumare, Jibreel; Abimiku, Alash'le; Alabi, Peter; Alkali, Nura; Bwala, Sunday; Okwuasaba, Kanayo; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M; Akolo, Christopher; Guo, Ming; Williams, Kenneth C; Blattner, William A

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of gender in the occurrence of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment (NCI) and associations with markers of HIV-related immune activity has not been previously examined. In this study 149 antiretroviral-naïve seropositive subjects in Nigeria (SP, 92 women and 57 men) and 58 seronegative (SN, 38 women and 20 men) were administered neuropsychological testing that assessed 7 ability domains. From the neuropsychological test scores was calculated a global deficit score (GDS), a measure of overall NCI. Percentages of circulating monocytes and plasma HIV RNA, soluble CD163 and soluble CD14 levels were also assessed. HIV SP women were found to be younger, more educated and had higher CD4+ T cell counts and borderline higher viral load measures than SP men. On the neuropsychological testing, SP women were more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency and had a higher mean GDS than SN women. Compared to SP men, SP women were also more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency as well as on tests of learning and memory. Numbers of circulating monocytes and plasma sCD14 and sCD163 levels were significantly higher for all SP versus all SN individuals and were also higher for SP women and for SP men versus their SN counterparts. Among SP women, soluble CD14 levels were slightly higher than for SP men, and SP women had higher viral load measurements and were more likely to have detectable virus than SP men. Higher sCD14 levels among SP women correlated with more severe global impairment, and higher viral load measurements correlated with higher monocyte numbers and sCD14 and sCD14 levels, associations that were not observed for SP men. These studies suggest that the risk of developing NCI differ for HIV infected women and men in Nigeria and, for women, may be linked to effects from higher plasma levels of HIV driving activation of circulating monocytes. PMID:26829391

  8. Associations between Cognition, Gender and Monocyte Activation among HIV Infected Individuals in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Walter; Cherner, Mariana; Burdo, Tricia H.; Umlauf, Anya; Letendre, Scott L.; Jumare, Jibreel; Abimiku, Alash’le; Alabi, Peter; Alkali, Nura; Bwala, Sunday; Okwuasaba, Kanayo; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M.; Akolo, Christopher; Guo, Ming; Williams, Kenneth C.; Blattner, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of gender in the occurrence of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment (NCI) and associations with markers of HIV-related immune activity has not been previously examined. In this study 149 antiretroviral-naïve seropositive subjects in Nigeria (SP, 92 women and 57 men) and 58 seronegative (SN, 38 women and 20 men) were administered neuropsychological testing that assessed 7 ability domains. From the neuropsychological test scores was calculated a global deficit score (GDS), a measure of overall NCI. Percentages of circulating monocytes and plasma HIV RNA, soluble CD163 and soluble CD14 levels were also assessed. HIV SP women were found to be younger, more educated and had higher CD4+ T cell counts and borderline higher viral load measures than SP men. On the neuropsychological testing, SP women were more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency and had a higher mean GDS than SN women. Compared to SP men, SP women were also more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency as well as on tests of learning and memory. Numbers of circulating monocytes and plasma sCD14 and sCD163 levels were significantly higher for all SP versus all SN individuals and were also higher for SP women and for SP men versus their SN counterparts. Among SP women, soluble CD14 levels were slightly higher than for SP men, and SP women had higher viral load measurements and were more likely to have detectable virus than SP men. Higher sCD14 levels among SP women correlated with more severe global impairment, and higher viral load measurements correlated with higher monocyte numbers and sCD14 and sCD14 levels, associations that were not observed for SP men. These studies suggest that the risk of developing NCI differ for HIV infected women and men in Nigeria and, for women, may be linked to effects from higher plasma levels of HIV driving activation of circulating monocytes. PMID:26829391

  9. Alarming attrition rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-antiretroviral therapy care in Myanmar, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myo Minn; Gupta, Vivek; Aung, Thet Ko; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Oo, Htun Nyunt; Kumar, Ajay MV

    2016-01-01

    Background High retention rates have been documented among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Myanmar. However, there is no information on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in care before initiation of ART (pre-ART care). We assessed attrition (loss-to-follow-up [LTFU] and death) rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-ART care and their associated factors over a 4-year period. Design In this retrospective cohort study, we extracted routinely collected data of HIV-infected adults (>15 years old) entering pre-ART care (June 2011–June 2014) as part of an Integrated HIV Care (IHC) programme, Myanmar. Attrition rates per 100 person-years and cumulative incidence of attrition were calculated. Factors associated with attrition were examined by calculating hazard ratios (HRs). Results Of 18,037 HIV-infected adults enrolled in the IHC programme, 11,464 (63%) entered pre-ART care (60% men, mean age 37 years, median cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count 160 cells/µL). Of the 11,464 eligible participants, 3,712 (32%) underwent attrition of which 43% were due to deaths and 57% were due to LTFU. The attrition rate was 78 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 75–80). The cumulative incidence of attrition was 70% at the end of a 4-year follow-up, of which nearly 90% occurred in the first 6 months. Male sex (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4–1.6), WHO clinical Stage 3 and 4, CD4 count <200 cells/µL, abnormal BMI, and anaemia were statistically significant predictors of attrition. Conclusions Pre-ART care attrition among persons living with HIV in Myanmar was alarmingly high – with most attrition occurring within the first 6 months. Strategies aimed at improving early HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART are needed. Suggestions include comprehensive nutrition support and intensified monitoring to prevent pre-ART care attrition by tracking patients who do not return for pre-ART care appointments. It is high time that Myanmar moves towards a

  10. Virological and immunological characteristics of HIV-infected individuals at the earliest stage of infection

    PubMed Central

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Sacdalan, Carlo P.; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Chomont, Nicolas; de Souza, Mark; Luekasemsuk, Tassanee; Schuetz, Alexandra; Krebs, Shelly J; Dewar, Robin; Jagodzinski, Linda; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Spudich, Serena; Valcour, Victor; Sereti, Irini; Michael, Nelson; Robb, Merlin; Phanuphak, Praphan; Kim, Jerome H.; Phanuphak, Nittaya

    2016-01-01

    Background The challenges of identifying acute HIV infection (AHI) have resulted in a lack of critical information on early AHI that constrains the development of therapeutics that are designed to eradicate HIV from the infected host. Methods AHI participants were recruited from the Thai Red Cross Anonymous Clinic in Bangkok, Thailand into the RV254/SEARCH010 protocol and categorised according to Fiebig stages as follows: Fiebig I (HIV-RNA+, p24 Ag−, HIV IgM−) and Fiebig II–IV (HIV-RNA+, p24 Ag + or −, HIV IgM− or +, Western blot- or indeterminate). Proviral and viral burden and immune activation levels were compared between Fiebig stage groups at the time of AHI. CD4 and CD4/CD8 ratio were also compared between groups before and up to 96 weeks of ART. Results Median age was 27 years and 96% were male. Fiebig I individuals had lower median HIV-DNA in mononuclear cells from blood (3 vs. 190 copies/106 cells) and gut (0 vs. 898 copies/106 cells), and lower HIV-RNA in blood (4.2 vs. 6.2 log10 copies/mL), gut (1.7 vs. 3.1 log10 copies/mg) and cerebrospinal fluid (2.0 vs. 3.8 log10 copies/mL), when compared to Fiebig II–IV individuals (all P<0.01). Median plasma sCD14 level was lower (1.1 vs. 1.6 μg/mL) in Fiebig I individuals as was the frequency of CD8+HLADR+CD38+ T cells in blood (7.6 vs. 14.9%, both P<0.05). The median plasma interleukin 6 levels were similar between stages (0.6 in Fiebig I vs. 0.5 pg/mL in Fiebig II–IV, P>0.05). The frequencies of CD4+HLA-DR+CD38+ T cells were also similar between these stages (2.1 vs. 2.6%, P>0.05). Median CD4 count and CD4/CD8 ratio were higher in Fiebig I: 508 vs. 340 cells/mm3 and 1.1 vs. 0.7, respectively (both P<0.001). After ART, CD4 cell count normalised by week 24 in Fiebig I and week 48 in Fiebig II–IV. However, CD4/CD8 ratio was lower in both groups after 96 weeks of ART compared to healthy Thais (P=0.02). Conclusions Compared to later AHI stages, Fiebig I was associated with lower HIV burden in blood

  11. Causes of liver disease and its outcome in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Shamanna, Suryanarayana Bettadpura; Naik, Ramavath Raghu Ramulu; Hamide, Abdoul

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease in HIV-infected patients has remained unaddressed in India. This study describes the causes of liver disease in HIV-infected patients and short-term outcome in them. Designed as a prospective observational study, it was conducted at Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research between September 2011 and March 2013. All consecutive HIV patients (>13 years) attending the antiretroviral therapy clinic or admitted in the Medicine Department were screened, and patients with liver disease or with either HBsAg or anti-HCV antibody positivity were included in the study. Of the 198 patients screened, 51 (26 %) had either abnormal liver function test or had HBsAg or anti-HCV positivity. The median age of the patients was 40 years and 82 % were males. The median CD4 count was 123 cells/mm(3). Eighteen (35 %) of them had alcoholic liver disease. Six patients had probable hepatic involvement due to tuberculosis. Ten patients had antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. One patient had acute hepatitis B and seven patients had chronic hepatitis B. The cause could not be established in 10 patients (20 %). After a median period of 8 months of follow up, 23 patients had improved, 19 patients (37 %) had died, and six patients had been lost to follow up. Of the patients who had died, 11 patients (58 %) had tuberculosis, and 6 patients (30 %) had decompensated alcoholic liver disease. In conclusion, liver disease in HIV-infected patients was associated with high mortality. Alcohol abuse, tuberculosis, and antituberculosis drugs were the major causes. PMID:27435618

  12. Patient Navigation Facilitates Medical and Social Services Engagement Among HIV-Infected Individuals Leaving Jail and Returning to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Morewitz, Mark; Pearson, Charles; Weeks, John; Packard, Rebecca; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Kang-Dufour, Mi_Suk; Myers, Janet J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals leaving jails, facilities typically used to confine accused persons awaiting trial or to incarcerate persons for minor offenses, often face barriers to engagement with medical and social-support services. Patient navigation is a model that may ease these barriers by supporting individuals in negotiating fragmented and highly bureaucratic systems for services and care. While there is evidence linking navigation to a reduction in health disparities, little is known about the mechanisms by which the model works. We present findings of an ethnographic study of interactions between navigators and their clients: HIV-infected men and women recently released from jails in San Francisco, California. We conducted 29 field observations of navigators as they accompanied their clients to appointments, and 40 in-depth interviews with clients and navigators. Navigators worked on strengthening clients' abilities to engage with social-services and care systems. Building this strength required navigators to gain clients' trust by leveraging their own similar life experiences or expressing social concordance. After establishing meaningful connections, navigators spent time with clients in their day-to-day environments serving as mentors while escorting clients to and through their appointments. Intensive time spent together, in combination with a shared background of incarceration, HIV, and drug use, was a critical mechanism of this model. This study illustrates that socially concordant navigators are well positioned to facilitate successful transition to care and social-services engagement among a vulnerable population. PMID:24517539

  13. Patient navigation facilitates medical and social services engagement among HIV-infected individuals leaving jail and returning to the community.

    PubMed

    Koester, Kimberly A; Morewitz, Mark; Pearson, Charles; Weeks, John; Packard, Rebecca; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Kang-Dufour, Mi Suk; Myers, Janet J

    2014-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals leaving jails, facilities typically used to confine accused persons awaiting trial or to incarcerate persons for minor offenses, often face barriers to engagement with medical and social-support services. Patient navigation is a model that may ease these barriers by supporting individuals in negotiating fragmented and highly bureaucratic systems for services and care. While there is evidence linking navigation to a reduction in health disparities, little is known about the mechanisms by which the model works. We present findings of an ethnographic study of interactions between navigators and their clients: HIV-infected men and women recently released from jails in San Francisco, California. We conducted 29 field observations of navigators as they accompanied their clients to appointments, and 40 in-depth interviews with clients and navigators. Navigators worked on strengthening clients' abilities to engage with social-services and care systems. Building this strength required navigators to gain clients' trust by leveraging their own similar life experiences or expressing social concordance. After establishing meaningful connections, navigators spent time with clients in their day-to-day environments serving as mentors while escorting clients to and through their appointments. Intensive time spent together, in combination with a shared background of incarceration, HIV, and drug use, was a critical mechanism of this model. This study illustrates that socially concordant navigators are well positioned to facilitate successful transition to care and social-services engagement among a vulnerable population. PMID:24517539

  14. Screening for Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Individuals at First Contact after HIV Diagnosis: The Experience of a Large Clinical Center in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Focà, Emanuele; Magro, Paola; Motta, Davide; Compostella, Silvia; Casari, Salvatore; Bonito, Andrea; Brianese, Nigritella; Ferraresi, Alice; Rodari, Paola; Pezzoli, Maria Chiara; Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia; Castelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive disorders are emerging, probably underestimated, complications in HIV-infected people. The aim of the study was to assess neurocognitive profiles of newly detected HIV-infected patients. We performed an observational retrospective single-cohort study. Illiterates and patients with neurologic symptoms or previous psychiatric diagnosis were excluded. Neuropsychological profiles were assessed using a validated battery of neuropsychological tests. We included 206 patients; with males representing the majority of them (85%). Risk factors for HIV acquisition were unprotected sexual intercourse (homo/bisexual in 39.8% and heterosexual in 60.2%). Thirty-nine patients (18.9%) were previous injection drug users, while 41 (19.9%) were alcohol abusers. Mean education was 11.1 years (SD--standard deviation--3.7). A high prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND, 47.1%) was present in HIV-infected patients: particularly, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) was found in 30.6%, mild neurocognitive disorder (MND) in 15% and HIV-associated dementia (HAD) in 1.5%. Male gender, low degree of education, AIDS diagnosis and gepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection were factors independently associated with HAND in a multivariable logistic regression model. Our data suggest that patient-specific factors and AIDS diagnosis have a certain kind of impact in HAND occurrence. A complete neuropsychological screening must be recommended in all patients at HIV-infection diagnosis. PMID:27023519

  15. Screening for Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Individuals at First Contact after HIV Diagnosis: The Experience of a Large Clinical Center in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Focà, Emanuele; Magro, Paola; Motta, Davide; Compostella, Silvia; Casari, Salvatore; Bonito, Andrea; Brianese, Nigritella; Ferraresi, Alice; Rodari, Paola; Pezzoli, Maria Chiara; Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia; Castelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive disorders are emerging, probably underestimated, complications in HIV-infected people. The aim of the study was to assess neurocognitive profiles of newly detected HIV-infected patients. We performed an observational retrospective single-cohort study. Illiterates and patients with neurologic symptoms or previous psychiatric diagnosis were excluded. Neuropsychological profiles were assessed using a validated battery of neuropsychological tests. We included 206 patients; with males representing the majority of them (85%). Risk factors for HIV acquisition were unprotected sexual intercourse (homo/bisexual in 39.8% and heterosexual in 60.2%). Thirty-nine patients (18.9%) were previous injection drug users, while 41 (19.9%) were alcohol abusers. Mean education was 11.1 years (SD—standard deviation—3.7). A high prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND, 47.1%) was present in HIV-infected patients: particularly, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) was found in 30.6%, mild neurocognitive disorder (MND) in 15% and HIV-associated dementia (HAD) in 1.5%. Male gender, low degree of education, AIDS diagnosis and gepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection were factors independently associated with HAND in a multivariable logistic regression model. Our data suggest that patient-specific factors and AIDS diagnosis have a certain kind of impact in HAND occurrence. A complete neuropsychological screening must be recommended in all patients at HIV-infection diagnosis. PMID:27023519

  16. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Toxoplasmosis in HIV infected and non-infected individuals in Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic disease distributed worldwide, is an infection caused by the ubiquitous obligatory intracellular coccidian protozoan organism, Toxoplasma gondii. It is a major public health concern because the disease is serious in terms of mortality or physical and /or psychological sequellae in patients with HIV disease. The aim of the study was to assess the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies and associated risk factors in HIV infected and non-infected individuals attending Felege Hiwot referral hospital, Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at Felege Hiwot referral hospital, Bahir Dar, Amhara National Regional State. Venous blood samples were collected from 103 HIV infected pre anti-retroviral therapy patients at Felege Hiwot referral hospital and 101 HIV negative apparently healthy voluntary blood donors at the blood bank. Serum samples were analyzed for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies using a commercially available ELISA kit. Socio-demographic and associated risk factors for Toxoplasmosis from each individual were also obtained and the data was analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results Of the examined HIV seropositive individuals, 87.4% (90/103) and 10.7% (11/103) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression showed that anti-T. gondii seropositivity was independently significantly associated with undercooked or raw meat consumption (adjusted OR=5.73, 95% CI=1.35-24.39; P=0.02) and having contact with cat (adjusted OR= 4.29, 95% CI=1.08-16.94; P=0.04) in HIV positive individuals. In HIV negative apparently healthy blood donors, prevalence of anti-T. gondii antibodies were 70.29% and 2.97% for IgG and IgM, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that undercooked or raw meat consumption (adjusted OR=6.45, 95% CI=2.16-19.28; p=0.001) and sex (OR=6.79, 95% CI=2.14-21.60; p=0.001) were

  17. Factors Associated with Tobacco Smoking and Cessation among HIV-Infected Individuals under Care in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Thiago S.; Luz, Paula M.; Derrico, Monica; Velasque, Luciane; Grinsztejn, Eduarda; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Santini-Oliveira, Marília; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; De Boni, Raquel Brandini

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide the prevalence of smoking among people living with HIV/AIDS is elevated compared to the general population. This probably reflects the cluster of individual characteristics that have shared risk factors for HIV infection and smoking. A cross-sectional study, enrolling a convenience sample from a Brazilian HIV clinical cohort was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of tobacco smoking and the factors associated with current smoking and abstinence. A total of 2,775 HIV-infected individuals were interviewed: 46.2% have never smoked, 29.9% were current smokers and 23.9% were former smokers. Current smokers had a higher prevalence of alcohol and illicit drug use when compared to the other two groups. A higher proportion of heterosexual individuals were former smokers or never smokers while among men who have sex with men (MSM) a higher proportion were current smokers. Former smokers had been more frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and depression, while for current smokers lung diseases were more frequent. Former smokers and current smokers were more likely to have had any hospital admission (42.0% and 41.2%, respectively) than participants who never smoked (33.5%) (p<0.001). Multivariate model results showed that current smokers (versus never smokers) were more likely to be less educated, to report the use of alcohol, crack and cocaine and to present clinical comorbidities. Former smokers (versus current smokers) were more likely to be older, to have smoked for a shorter amount of time and to have smoked >31 cigarettes/day. MSM (compared to heterosexuals) and cocaine users (versus non-users) had lower odds of being former smokers. Considering our results, smoking cessation interventions should be tailored to younger individuals, MSM and substance users. PMID:25536064

  18. A genome-wide association study of resistance to HIV infection in highly exposed uninfected individuals with hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; McLaren, Paul J.; Dorrell, Lucy; Shianna, Kevin V.; Stemke, Amanda; Pelak, Kimberly; Moore, Stephen; Oldenburg, Johannes; Alvarez-Roman, Maria Teresa; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Boehlen, Francoise; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H.B.; Brand, Brigit; Brown, Deborah; Chiang, Elaine; Cid-Haro, Ana Rosa; Clotet, Bonaventura; Collins, Peter; Colombo, Sara; Dalmau, Judith; Fogarty, Patrick; Giangrande, Paul; Gringeri, Alessandro; Iyer, Rathi; Katsarou, Olga; Kempton, Christine; Kuriakose, Philip; Lin, Judith; Makris, Mike; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Tsakiris, Dimitrios A.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien; Neff, Anne; Oka, Shinichi; Oyesiku, Lara; Parra, Rafael; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Powell, Jerry; Recht, Michael; Shapiro, Amy; Stine, Kimo; Talks, Katherine; Telenti, Amalio; Wilde, Jonathan; Yee, Thynn Thynn; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Martinson, Jeremy; Hussain, Shehnaz K.; Bream, Jay H.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Carrington, Mary; Goedert, James J.; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Goldstein, David B.; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic variation contributes to differences in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To search for novel host resistance factors, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in hemophilia patients highly exposed to potentially contaminated factor VIII infusions. Individuals with hemophilia A and a documented history of factor VIII infusions before the introduction of viral inactivation procedures (1979–1984) were recruited from 36 hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and their genome-wide genetic variants were compared with those from matched HIV-infected individuals. Homozygous carriers of known CCR5 resistance mutations were excluded. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inferred copy number variants (CNVs) were tested using logistic regression. In addition, we performed a pathway enrichment analysis, a heritability analysis, and a search for epistatic interactions with CCR5 Δ32 heterozygosity. A total of 560 HIV-uninfected cases were recruited: 36 (6.4%) were homozygous for CCR5 Δ32 or m303. After quality control and SNP imputation, we tested 1 081 435 SNPs and 3686 CNVs for association with HIV-1 serostatus in 431 cases and 765 HIV-infected controls. No SNP or CNV reached genome-wide significance. The additional analyses did not reveal any strong genetic effect. Highly exposed, yet uninfected hemophiliacs form an ideal study group to investigate host resistance factors. Using a genome-wide approach, we did not detect any significant associations between SNPs and HIV-1 susceptibility, indicating that common genetic variants of major effect are unlikely to explain the observed resistance phenotype in this population. PMID:23372042

  19. Cumulative Incidence of Cancer among HIV-infected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Michael J.; Lau, Bryan; Achenbach, Chad J.; Jing, Yuezhou; Althoff, Keri N.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Engels, Eric A.; Hessol, Nancy; Brooks, John T.; Burchell, Ann N.; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Hogg, Robert; Horberg, Michael A.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, Phillip T.; Mathews, William C.; Mayor, Angel; Modur, Sharada P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Novak, Richard M.; Patel, Pragna; Rachlis, Anita R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Justice, Amy C.; Moore, Richard D.; Dubrow, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is increasingly common among HIV patients given improved survival. Objective To examine calendar trends in cumulative cancer incidence and hazard rate by HIV status. Design Cohort study Setting North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design during 1996–2009 Patients 86,620 HIV-infected and 196,987 uninfected adults Measurements We estimated cancer-type-specific cumulative incidence by age 75 years by HIV status and calendar era, and examined calendar trends in cumulative incidence and hazard rates. Results Cumulative incidences (%) of cancer by age 75 (HIV+/HIV−) were: Kaposi sarcoma (KS), 4.4/0.01; non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), 4.5/0.7; lung, 3.4/2.8; anal, 1.5/0.1; colorectal, 1.0/1.5; liver, 1.1/0.4; Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), 0.9/0.1; melanoma, 0.5/0.6; and oral cavity/pharyngeal, 0.8/0.8. Among HIV-infected subjects, we observed decreasing calendar trends in cumulative incidence and hazard rate for KS and NHL. For anal, colorectal and liver cancers, increasing cumulative incidence, but not hazard rate trends, were due to the decreasing mortality rate trend (−9% per year), allowing greater opportunity to be diagnosed with these cancer types. Despite decreasing hazard rate trends for lung, HL, and melanoma, we did not observe cumulative incidence trends due to the compensating effect of the declining mortality rate on cumulative incidence. Limitations Secular trends in screening, smoking, and viral co-infections were not evaluated. Conclusions Our analytic approach helped disentangle the effects of improved survival and changing cancer-specific hazard rates on cumulative incidence trends among HIV patients. Cumulative cancer incidence by age 75, approximating lifetime risk in HIV patients, may have clinical utility in this population. The high cumulative incidences by age 75 for KS, NHL, and lung cancer supports early and sustained ART and smoking cessation. Primary Funding Source National Institutes of Health PMID:26436616

  20. Effect of Probiotic Supplement on Cytokine Levels in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, Katia; Vecchiet, Jacopo; Ucciferri, Claudio; Di Nicola, Marta; D’Angelo, Chiara; Reale, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation persists in patients infected with HIV. Reduction of inflammatory cytokines and microbial translocation might be one way that this could be managed. Purpose: The anti-inflammatory properties of certain probiotic strains prompted us to investigate whether a probiotic could reduce the inflammatory index of HIV-infected patients. Methods: The study involved 30 HIV+ males on antiretroviral therapy, who were given one bottle of fermented milk Yakult Light® containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) twice a day for four weeks. Results: The probiotic LcS was associated with an increase of T lymphocytes and a significant increase of CD56+ cells (p = 0.04). There was also a significant decrease of mRNA levels of TGFβ, IL-10 and IL-12 (p < 0.001) and IL-1β expression (p < 0.001) and an increase of serum IL-23 (p = 0.03). In addition, decreased inflammation and cardiovascular risk were observed, as shown by a reduction of cystatin C (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data provide preliminary evidence that probiotic supplementation may modulate certain immunological parameters and some of the cytokines that were analyzed. Thus, we propose that LcS may be an inexpensive and practical strategy to support the immune function of HIV+ patients. PMID:26426044

  1. Absolute Lymphocyte Count as a Surrogate Marker of CD4 Count in Monitoring HIV Infected Individuals: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Sharda Raju; Jadhav, Meenal Vitthal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction CD4 cell count has been proposed to be substituted by Absolute lymphocyte count in monitoring HIV infected individuals as methods of CD4 cell count and plasma viral estimation require expensive, specialized equipments and highly trained personnel. Aim To assess the clinical utility of the Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC) to serve as a surrogate marker for predicting a CD4 count < 200 cells/μl in patients with HIV infection in resource poor countries. Materials and Methods A prospective study of 61 patients with HIV/AIDS was conducted. Sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of various ALC cut-offs were computed for CD4 cell count < 200 cells/μl for age < 30 or age ≥ 30 years. Pearson correlation, Linear regression and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC), were used. Results For patients aged ≥ 30 years, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of ALC <1200 cells/μl to predict CD4 cell count < 200 cells/μl were 34.48%, 67.5%, 43.48%, 58.69% respectively. For subjects aged < 30 years, these values were 27.27%, 67.5%, 18.75%, 77.14%, respectively. A ALC < 1643 was found to have maximal sensitivity for predicting a CD4 cell count <200/ μl. Conclusion Our data revealed good correlation between ALC and CD4 cell counts but ALC cut-off of 1200 was not a surrogate marker for CD4 cell count < 200 cells/μl. As we increase the cut-off to <1643/ μl it could be the cost-effective surrogate marker for CD4 cell counts < 200 cells/μl in resource limited settings. PMID:27437225

  2. Renal Dysfunction during Tenofovir Use in a Regional Cohort of HIV-Infected Individuals in the Asia-Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Junko; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Makane, Abhimanyu; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ng, Oon Tek; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Lee, Man Po; Ditangco, Rossana; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Choi, Jun Yong; Wong, Wing Wai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Yunihastuti, Evy; Sim, Benedict LH; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Kantipong, Pacharee; Zhang, Fujie; Mustafa, Mahiran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Pujari, Sanjay; Sohn, Annette H.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, routine monitoring of renal function during antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not been recommended. However, concerns for tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-related nephrotoxicity persist with increased use. Methods We investigated serum creatinine (S-Cr) monitoring rates before and during ART and the incidence and prevalence of renal dysfunction after starting TDF by using data from a regional cohort of HIV-infected individuals in the Asia-Pacific. Time to renal dysfunction was defined as time from TDF initiation to the decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to <60 ml/min/1.73m2 with >30% reduction from baseline using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation or the decision to stop TDF for reported TDF-nephrotoxicity. Predictors of S-Cr monitoring rates were assessed by Poisson regression and risk factors for developing renal dysfunction were assessed by Cox regression. Results Among 2,425 patients who received TDF, S-Cr monitoring rates increased from 1.01 to 1.84 per person per year after starting TDF (incidence rate ratio 1.68, 95%CI 1.62–1.74, p <0.001). Renal dysfunction on TDF occurred in 103 patients over 5,368 person-years of TDF use (4.2%; incidence 1.75 per 100 person-years). Risk factors for developing renal dysfunction included older age (>50 vs. ≤30, hazard ratio [HR] 5.39, 95%CI 2.52–11.50, p <0.001; and using PI-based regimen (HR 1.93, 95%CI 1.22–3.07, p = 0.005). Having an eGFR prior to TDF (pre-TDF eGFR) of ≥60 ml/min/1.73m2 showed a protective effect (HR 0.38, 95%CI, 0.17–0.85, p = 0.018). Conclusions Renal dysfunction on commencing TDF use was not common, however, older age, lower baseline eGFR and PI-based ART were associated with higher risk of renal dysfunction during TDF use in adult HIV-infected individuals in the Asia-Pacific region. PMID:27560968

  3. Predictors of new-onset distal neuropathic pain in HIV-infected individuals in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Malvar, Jemily; Vaida, Florin; Sanders, Chelsea Fitzsimons; Atkinson, J Hampton; Bohannon, William; Keltner, John; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M; Marra, Christina M; Clifford, David B; Gelman, Benjamin; Fan, Juanjuan; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J

    2015-04-01

    Despite modern combination antiretroviral therapy, distal neuropathic pain (DNP) continues to affect many individuals with HIV infection. We evaluated risk factors for new-onset DNP in the CNS Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study, an observational cohort. Standardized, semiannual clinical evaluations were administered at 6 US sites. Distal neuropathic pain was defined by using a clinician-administered instrument standardized across sites. All participants analyzed were free of DNP at study entry. New-onset DNP was recorded at the first follow-up visit at which it was reported. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to evaluate potential predictors including HIV disease and treatment factors, demographics, medical comorbidities, and neuropsychiatric factors. Among 493 participants, 131 (27%) reported new DNP over 2306 visits during a median follow-up of 24 months (interquartile range 12-42). In multivariable regression, after adjusting for other covariates, significant entry predictors of new DNP were older age, female sex, current and past antiretroviral treatment, lack of virologic suppression, and lifetime history of opioid use disorder. During follow-up, more severe depression symptoms conferred a significantly elevated risk. The associations with opioid use disorders and depression reinforce the view that the clinical expression of neuropathic pain with peripheral nerve disease is strongly influenced by neuropsychiatric factors. Delineating such risk factors might help target emerging preventive strategies, for example, to individuals with a history of opioid use disorder, or might lead to new treatment approaches such as the use of tools to ameliorate depressed mood. PMID:25659067

  4. THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING OF PROTEASE INHIBITORS AND EFAVIRENZ IN HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS WITH ACTIVE SUBSTANCE RELATED DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Zingman, Barry S.; Luque, Amneris; Fischl, Margaret A.; Gripshover, Barbara; Venuto, Charles; DiFrancesco, Robin; Forrest, Alan; Morse, Gene D.

    2011-01-01

    (3.75 vs. 5.30 µg/mL). Conclusions The pharmacokinetic data indicate differences between HIV-infected patients with and without SRD that may influence viral load suppression during long-term ARV treatment. These findings require additional investigation in a randomized design with more intensive pharmacokinetic assessment to identify individual factors that are contributing to suboptimal ARV exposure in patients with SRDs. PMID:21544014

  5. A Cross Section Study to Determine the Prevalence of Antibodies against HIV Infection among Hepatitis B and C Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Flores, Geane L; de Almeida, Adilson J; Miguel, Juliana C; Cruz, Helena M; Portilho, Moyra M; Scalioni, Letícia de P; Marques, Vanessa A; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2016-03-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: There are limited data regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HIV individuals; (2) METHODS: A total of 409 patients (126 HBV+ and 283 HCV+) referred to the Brazilian Reference Laboratory for Viral Hepatitis from 2010 to 2013 donated serum samples. Anti-HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBe, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies were measured, and anti-HCV positive samples were tested for viral RNA and genotype; (3) RESULTS: The anti-HIV antibody prevalence was 10.31% and 4.59% among HBV+ and HCV+ patients, respectively. The HCV mean (SD) viral load was log 5.14 ± 1.64 IU/mL, and genotype I was most prevalent (163/283). Anti-HBs and anti-HBc were detected in 40% and 26% of HCV+ individuals, respectively. Among the HBV+ population, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with male gender, marital status (married), tattoo, sexual orientation, sexual practices (oral sex and anal sex), history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), history of viral hepatitis treatment, and a sexual partner with hepatitis or HIV. For the HCV+ group, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with female gender, marital status (married), anal intercourse, previous history of STDs, and number of sexual partners; (4) CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies was found among individuals with HBV and HCV, showing the importance of education programmes towards HIV infection among HBV- and HCV-infected individuals. PMID:26978383

  6. A Cross Section Study to Determine the Prevalence of Antibodies against HIV Infection among Hepatitis B and C Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Geane L.; de Almeida, Adilson J.; Miguel, Juliana C.; Cruz, Helena M.; Portilho, Moyra M.; de P. Scalioni, Letícia; Marques, Vanessa A.; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Melo Villar, Livia

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: There are limited data regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HIV individuals; (2) Methods: A total of 409 patients (126 HBV+ and 283 HCV+) referred to the Brazilian Reference Laboratory for Viral Hepatitis from 2010 to 2013 donated serum samples. Anti-HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBe, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies were measured, and anti-HCV positive samples were tested for viral RNA and genotype; (3) Results: The anti-HIV antibody prevalence was 10.31% and 4.59% among HBV+ and HCV+ patients, respectively. The HCV mean (SD) viral load was log 5.14 ± 1.64 IU/mL, and genotype I was most prevalent (163/283). Anti-HBs and anti-HBc were detected in 40% and 26% of HCV+ individuals, respectively. Among the HBV+ population, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with male gender, marital status (married), tattoo, sexual orientation, sexual practices (oral sex and anal sex), history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), history of viral hepatitis treatment, and a sexual partner with hepatitis or HIV. For the HCV+ group, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with female gender, marital status (married), anal intercourse, previous history of STDs, and number of sexual partners; (4) Conclusion: A high prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies was found among individuals with HBV and HCV, showing the importance of education programmes towards HIV infection among HBV- and HCV-infected individuals. PMID:26978383

  7. Longitudinal evaluation of regulatory T-cell dynamics on HIV-infected individuals during the first 2 years of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Claudia; Horta, Ana; Coutinho-Teixeira, Vítor; Martins-Ribeiro, Ana; Baldaia, Ana; Rb-Silva, Rita; Santos, Catarina L.; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A sizeable percentage of individuals infected by HIV and on antiretroviral therapy (ART) fail to increase their CD4+ T-cells to satisfactory levels. The percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been suggested to contribute to this impairment. This study aimed to address this question and to expand the analysis of Tregs subpopulations during ART. Design: Longitudinal follow-up of 81 HIV-infected individuals during the first 24 months on ART. Methods: CD4+ T-cell counts, Tregs percentages, and specific Tregs subpopulations were evaluated at ART onset, 2, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months of ART (five individuals had no Tregs information at baseline). Results: The slope of CD4+ T-cell recovery was similar for individuals with moderate and with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. No evidence was found for a contribution of the baseline Tregs percentages on the CD4+ T-cell counts recovery throughout ART. In comparison to uninfected individuals, Tregs percentages were higher at ART onset only for patients with less than 200 cells/μl at baseline and decreased afterwards reaching normal values. Within Tregs, the percentage of naive cells remained low in these patients. Reduced thymic export and increased proliferation of Tregs vs. conventional CD4+ T cells might explain these persistent alterations. Conclusion: No effect of Tregs percentages at baseline was detected on CD4+ T-cell recovery. However, profound alterations on Tregs subpopulations were consistently observed throughout ART for patients with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. PMID:26919738

  8. Antiretroviral Medication Adherence and Amplified HIV Transmission Risk Among Sexually Active HIV-Infected Individuals in Three Diverse International Settings.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Li, Xin; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Moore, Ayana T; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Friedman, Ruth Khalili; Limbada, Mohammad; Hughes, James P; Cummings, Vanessa; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Elharrar, Vanessa; Celentano, David; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Successful biomedical prevention/treatment-as-prevention (TasP) requires identifying individuals at greatest risk for transmitting HIV, including those with antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence and/or 'amplified HIV transmission risk,' defined as condomless sex with HIV-uninfected/unknown-status partners when infectious (i.e., with detectable viremia or STI diagnosis according to Swiss criteria for infectiousness). This study recruited sexually-active, HIV-infected patients in Brazil, Thailand, and Zambia to examine correlates of ART nonadherence and 'amplified HIV transmission risk'. Lower alcohol use (OR = .71, p < .01) and higher health-related quality of life (OR = 1.10, p < .01) were associated with greater odds of ART adherence over and above region. Of those with viral load data available (in Brazil and Thailand only), 40 % met Swiss criteria for infectiousness, and 29 % had 'amplified HIV transmission risk.' MSM had almost three-fold (OR = 2.89, p < .001) increased odds of 'amplified HIV transmission risk' (vs. heterosexual men) over and above region. TasP efforts should consider psychosocial and contextual needs, particularly among MSM with detectable viremia. PMID:26246068

  9. Clinical profile of HIV infected patients attending a HIV referral clinic in Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Antwal, Megha; Gurjar, Rohan; Chidrawar, Shweta; Pawar, Jyoti; Gaikwad, Sunil; Panchal, Narayan; Kale, Varsha; Thakar, Madhuri; Risbud, Arun; Tripathy, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has infected several million individuals in India. Various interventions have been implemented for early detection and prevention of transmission of HIV infection. This has progressively changed the clinical profile of HIV infected individuals and this study documents the clinical presentation of individuals positive for HIV in 2010, in Pune, Maharashtra, India. Methods: This cross-sectional study included subjects who had come to the HIV referral clinic for HIV testing from January to December 2010. Children as well as individuals with indeterminate HIV result were excluded from the study, and data for 1546 subjects were finally analysed. Results: The HIV positivity rate among all referred cases for the year 2010 was 35 per cent (male 55% and females 45%). The median age (Q1, Q3) was 31 (25.75, 39) yr. The median CD4 cell count for all HIV infected individuals (whose CD4 count was available n= 345) was 241 cells/µl and for asymptomatic HIV infected individuals was 319 cells/µl. There were 673 (43.5%) symptomatic and 873 (56.5%) asymptomatic participants. Fever, breathlessness, cough with expectoration, weight loss, loss of appetite, generalized weakness, pallor and lymphadenopathy (axillary and cervical) were found to be associated (P< 0.001) with HIV positivity. On multivariate analysis, history of Herpes zoster [AOR 11.314 (6.111-20.949)] and TB [AOR 11.214 (6.111-20.949)] was associated with HIV positivity. Interpretation & conclusions: Signs and symptoms associated with HIV positivity observed in this study can be used by health care providers to detect HIV infection early. Moreover, similar to HIV testing in patients with tuberculosis, strategies can be developed for considering Herpes zoster as a predictor of HIV infection. PMID:25297361

  10. Depression longitudinally mediates the association of appearance concerns to ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Gordon, Janna R; Safren, Steven A

    2014-02-01

    Appearance concerns are common among HIV-infected individuals, and previous cross-sectional and longitudinal data indicate that these concerns are associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) non-adherence. However, to date, no known prospective data have explored the mechanism behind this relationship. Thus, the aim of the current study was to test depression severity as a prospective mediator of the relationship between appearance concerns and ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals with a history of IDU who participated in a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence. Clinician-administered measures of depression severity and appearance concerns, along with electronic monitoring of ART non-adherence were included. Data were analyzed using longitudinal linear mixed-level modeling, and mediation was tested via the Monte Carlo Method of Assessing Mediation. Appearance concerns were predictive of depression severity, γ = .31, SE = .076, 95 % CI [.16, .46], t = 4.1, p = .0001, and depression severity was predictive of ART non-adherence, γ = 3.3, SE = 1.3, 95 % CI [.8, 5.8], t = 2.6, p = .01. The effect of appearance concerns on ART non-adherence, however, was significantly mediated by depression severity, γ = 1.02, 95 % CI [.21, 2.1]. Appearance concerns are associated with depression severity, which in turn is associated with ART non-adherence. Integrative interventions addressing appearance concerns, depression and ART adherence are needed, as this is one potential pathway towards worse health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:23180286

  11. Depression longitudinally mediates the association of appearance concerns to ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Janna R.; Safren, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Appearance concerns are common among HIV-infected individuals, and previous cross-sectional and longitudinal data indicate that these concerns are associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) non-adherence. However, to date, no known prospective data have explored the mechanism behind this relationship. Thus, the aim of the current study was to test depression severity as a prospective mediator of the relationship between appearance concerns and ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals with a history of IDU who participated in a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence. Clinician-administered measures of depression severity and appearance concerns, along with electronic monitoring of ART non-adherence were included. Data were analyzed using longitudinal linear mixed-level modeling, and mediation was tested via the Monte Carlo Method of Assessing Mediation. Appearance concerns were predictive of depression severity, γ = .31, SE = .076, 95 % CI [.16, .46], t = 4.1, p = .0001, and depression severity was predictive of ART non-adherence, γ = 3.3, SE = 1.3, 95 % CI [.8, 5.8], t = 2.6, p = .01. The effect of appearance concerns on ART non-adherence, however, was significantly mediated by depression severity, γ = 1.02, 95 % CI [.21, 2.1]. Appearance concerns are associated with depression severity, which in turn is associated with ART non-adherence. Integrative interventions addressing appearance concerns, depression and ART adherence are needed, as this is one potential pathway towards worse health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:23180286

  12. Determinants of benzodiazepine use in a representative population of HIV-infected individuals: the role of HIV status disclosure (ANRS-EN12-VESPA study).

    PubMed

    Roux, Perrine; Fugon, Lionel; Michel, Laurent; Lert, France; Obadia, Yolande; Spire, Bruno; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia

    2011-09-01

    HIV infection may result in stressful situations such as disclosure to others and could be a mediator between seropositivity status and psychiatric illness, depression, or anxiety. Several results have shown that anxiolytic use (mainly benzodiazepines [BDZ]) is highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals, but few studies have highlighted to what extent this use could be associated with HIV disclosure. A national cross-sectional survey representative of people living with HIV and AIDS in France enrolled 2932 individuals in 102 French HIV hospital departments. Face-to-face interviews and self-administered questions collected information about patients' experience with HIV and HIV care, including use of psychotropic drugs, social support, stigma, and disclosure of HIV status. We identified factors associated with regular BDZ use (i.e., more than once a week) using a weighted logistic regression model. Regular BDZ use and anxiety symptoms were reported by 16% and 29% of the patients, respectively. After multiple adjustment for known correlates of BDZ use and anxiety symptoms, individuals who had disclosed their HIV status to relatives or friends were found to be more likely (OR [95% CI] = 1.78 [1.02-3.09]) to regularly use BDZ. These results show both to what extent disclosure to others continues to be a stressful step in the course of HIV infection and that disclosure is something that could be identified by BDZ use. They also highlight the need for appropriate case management and psychiatric care to help patients manage the consequences of disclosure. PMID:21562996

  13. Trends in survival after cancer diagnosis among HIV-infected individuals between 1992 and 2009. Results from the FHDH-ANRS CO4 cohort.

    PubMed

    Hleyhel, Mira; Belot, Aurélien; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Tattevin, Pierre; Pacanowski, Jérôme; Genet, Philippe; De Castro, Nathalie; Berger, Jean-Luc; Dupont, Caroline; Lavolé, Armelle; Pradier, Christian; Salmon, Dominique; Simon, Anne; Martinez, Valérie; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Costagliola, Dominique; Grabar, Sophie

    2015-11-15

    Although the decline in cancer mortality rates with the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV-infected individuals can be mostly explained by a decrease in cancers incidence, we looked here if improved survival after cancer diagnosis could also contribute to this decline. Survival trends were analyzed for most frequent cancers in the HIV-infected population followed in the French Hospital Database on HIV: 979 and 2,760 cases of visceral and non-visceral Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), 2,339 and 461 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), 446 lung, 312 liver and 257 anal cancers. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were estimated for four periods: 1992-1996, 1997-2000, 2001-2004 and 2005-2009. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare survival across the periods, after adjustment for confounding factors. For 2001-2004, survival was compared to the general population after standardization on age and sex. Between the pre-cART (1992-1996) and early-cART (1997-2000) periods, survival improved after KS, NHL, HL and anal cancer and remained stable after lung and liver cancers. During the cART era, 5-year survival improved after visceral and non-visceral KS, NHL, HL and liver cancer, being 83, 92, 65, 87 and 19% in 2005-2009, respectively, and remained stable after lung and anal cancers, being 16 and 65%, respectively. Compared with the general population, survival in HIV-infected individuals in 2001-2004 was poorer for hematological malignancies and similar for solid tumors. For hematological malignancies, survival continues to improve after 2004, suggesting that the gap between the HIV-infected and general populations will close in the future. PMID:25976897

  14. Failure of standard antimicrobial therapy in children aged 3-59 months with mild or asymptomatic HIV infection and severe pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, Prakash; Thea, Donald M.; MacLeod, William B.; Chisaka, Noel; Fox, Matthew P.; Coovadia, H. M.; Qazi, Shamim

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether children aged 3-59 months with mild or non-symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and WHO-defined severe pneumonia have a higher failure rate than do HIV-uninfected children when treated with the standard WHO treatment of parenteral penicillin or oral amoxicillin. METHODS: This study was a planned sub-analysis of a randomized trial of 3-59-month-old children presenting with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (the APPIS study). We included two sites with high HIV prevalence in Durban, South Africa and Ndola, Zambia. Primary outcome measures were clinical treatment failure at day 2 and day 14. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER: CT00227331http://www.clinicaltrialsgov/show/NCT00227331). FINDINGS: Of the 523 children enrolled, HIV status was known for 464 participants; 106 (23%) of these were infected with HIV. By day 2, 57 (12.3%) children had failed treatment and 110 (23.7%) failed by day 14. Twenty (18.9%) HIV-infected children failed by day 2 compared with 37 (10.3%) uninfected children (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-4.00). Thirty-four (32.1%) HIV-infected children failed treatment by day 14 compared with 76 (21.2%) uninfected children (adjusted OR 1.88; 95% CI: 1.11-3.17). Analysis stratified by age showed that the greatest differential in treatment failure at day 2 and day 14 occurred in the children aged 3-5 months. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected children with severe pneumonia fail WHO-standard treatment with parenteral penicillin or amoxicillin at day 2 and day 14 more often than do HIV-uninfected children, especially young infants. Standard case management of acute respiratory infection (ARI) using WHO treatment guidelines is inadequate in areas of high HIV prevalence and reappraisal of empiric antimicrobial therapy is urgently needed for severe pneumonia associated with HIV-1. PMID:16628299

  15. An adapted frailty-related phenotype and the VACS Index as predictors of hospitalization and mortality in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, Kathleen M.; Tate, Janet P.; Crothers, Kristina; Crystal, Stephen; Leaf, David A.; Womack, Julie; Brown, Todd T.; Justice, Amy C.; Oursler, Krisann K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Frailty is a geriatric syndrome of decreased physiologic reserve and a risk factor for hospitalization and mortality. We hypothesized that an adapted, survey-based frailty-related phenotype (aFRP) predicts hospitalization and mortality among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals in adjusted models but is uncommon among those achieving undetectable HIV-1 RNA. Methods Defined from self-reported domains of physical shrinking, exhaustion, slowness and low physical activity in Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) participants, aFRP was considered present with ≥3 domains and pre-frailty with 1-2 domains. Cox survival analysis determined hazard ratios (HR) for 5-year hospitalization and mortality risk adjusting for frailty states, demographics, health behaviors, comorbidities, and a validated risk index incorporating HIV-specific and general organ system biomarkers, the VACS Index. Model discrimination was assessed. Results Participants with complete data were included (6515/7324 (89%)). Of these, 3.9% of HIV-infected with HIV-1 RNA>400copies/ml; 2.0% of HIV-infected with HIV-1 RNA ≤ 400copies/ml; and 2.8% of uninfected individuals met aFRP criteria (p=0.01). After adjustment for other covariates, aFRP was associated with hospitalization (HR=1.78, 95% CI [1.48, 2.13]) and mortality (HR=1.75, 95% CI [1.28, 2.40]). C-statistics for the VACS Index for hospitalization (0.633) and for mortality (0.756) were higher than for aFRP frailty (0.565 and 0.584, respectively). C-statistic for hospitalization improved modestly when VACS Index and aFRP were both included (0.646) and minimally for mortality (0.761). Conclusions aFRP was independently associated with adverse health outcomes among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. aFRP modestly improved prediction for hospitalization. However, the aFRP is rare among HIV-infected individuals with undetectable HIV-1 RNA. PMID:25202921

  16. The Healthy Living Project: An Individually Tailored, Multidimensional Intervention for HIV-Infected Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Weinhardt, Lance S.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Kirshenbaum, Sheri B.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Catz, Sheryl L.; Ehrhardt, Anke A.; Remien, Robert H.; Morin, Stephen F.

    2005-01-01

    The NIMH Healthy Living Project (HLP), a randomized behavioral intervention trial for people living with HIV, enrolled 943 individuals, including women, heterosexual men, injection drug users, and men who have sex with men from Los Angeles, Milwaukee, New York, and San Francisco. The intervention, which is based on qualitative formative research…

  17. The impact of herbal remedies on adverse effects and quality of life in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bepe, Nyasha; Madanhi, Nathan; Mudzviti, Tinashe; Gavi, Samuel; Maponga, Charles Chiedza; Morse, Gene D

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Use of herbal remedies among HIV-infected individuals in Africa increased in the past decade, mainly due to traditional beliefs and at times inconsistent access to antiretroviral drugs. In Zimbabwe, accessibility and availability of antiretroviral drugs has increased in recent years; however, the use of herbal remedies remains high. This study was conducted to determine the impact of concomitant use of herbal remedies with antiretroviral drugs on adverse events and on quality of life. Methodology A convenient sample of HIV positive patients at Parirenyatwa group of hospitals' Family Care Clinic (Harare, Zimbabwe) was enrolled. A questionnaire was used to collect data on the adverse event experiences of the patients using herbal remedies for their HIV, as well as the types of herbal remedy used. Quality of life index was measured using an HIV/AIDS targeted quality of life (HAT-QOL) tool developed by the World Health Organization. Results Abdominal pain (odds ratio = 2.7, p-value = 0.01) and rash (odds ratio = 2.5, p-value = 0.02) had significant associations with using herbal remedies during antiretroviral therapy. Improved quality of life index was not significantly associated with herbal remedy use during antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions There is evidence to suggest that some traditional herbal remedies used in Zimbabwe may increase incidence of certain types of adverse events when used in combination with antiretroviral drugs. Use of herbal drugs in combination with antiretroviral therapy does not significantly improve quality of life index in comparison to antiretroviral drug use only. PMID:21330740

  18. The shifting locus of risk-reduction: the critical role of HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Indyk, Debbie; Golub, Sarit A

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the shifting locus of control over risk-reduction and examines its implications for the care and support of HIV-positive individuals. We begin by presenting a brief history of the continuum of HIV related risk, illustrating the ways in which advances in risk-assessment and intervention have led to this important shift. Second, we discuss the current state of risk assessment and intervention as it relates to three factors: (a) the point along the continuum of risk at which risk assessment and intervention occurs; (b) the locus of control over risk reduction; and (c) the distinction between primary and secondary risk reduction efforts. Finally, we discuss the meaning of HIV risk and the role of HIV-positive individuals in the new geometry of care that integrates treatment and prevention. How is HIV-risk defined and understood? Who is of risk to whom? Who is responsible for reducing risk?. PMID:16687378

  19. Central nervous system penetration-effectiveness rank does not reliably predict neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Libertone, Raffaella; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Balestra, Pietro; Pinnetti, Carmela; Ricottini, Martina; Maddalena Plazzi, Maria; Menichetti, Samanta; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Nicastri, Emanuele; Bellagamba, Rita; Ammassari, Adriana; Antinori, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system (CNS) penetration-effectiveness (CPE) rank was proposed in 2008 as an estimate of penetration of ARV regimen into the CNS, and validated as predictor of CSF HIV-1 replication. Results on predictive role of CPE on neurocognitive and clinical outcome were conflicting. Materials and Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of neurocognitive profile in HIV-infected cART-treated patients. All patients underwent neuropsychological (NP) assessment by standardized battery of 14 tests on 5 different domains. People were classified as having NCI if they scored >1 standard deviation (SD) below the normal mean in at least two tests, or >2 SD below in one test. Linear and logistic regression analyses were fitted using as outcome Npz8 and impaired/not impaired respectively. Results A total of 660 HIV-infected cART-treated individuals from 2009 to 2014, contributing a total of 1003 tests (mean age 49 (IQR 43–56), male 82%; median current CD4 586/mm3; 18% HCV infected; HIV-RNA <40 cp/mL in 84%). Current ARV regimen was 2NRTIs+1NNRTI 50.3%, 2NRTI+1PI/r in 32.6%, NRTI sparing in 11.1%. Mean CPE of current regimens was 6.6 (95% CI 6.5–6.7). As per test multivariable analysis, higher CPE values were associated to poor NP tasks (Beta=−0,09; 95% CI −0,14 −0,03; p=0.002 at multivariable linear regression). The association between higher CPE and increased NCI risk was confirmed at multivariable logistic regression, with a 1.24-fold risk of NCI occurrence for each point increase of CPE of current regimen at the time of NP testing (see Table 1). In a sensitivity analysis performed only on patients at the first NP test, the association between higher CPE and poor NP tasks and enhanced NCI risk was only marginally confirmed (Beta=−0,05; [−0,12–0,02]; p=0,19; OR 1,13 [0,95–1,34]; p=0.17). Older age, longer time from HIV diagnosis, current CD4 count <350 cell/mm3 and lower education level were all associated to an increased risk of

  20. Pain Self-Management in HIV-infected Individuals with Chronic Pain: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Jessica S.; Walcott, Melonie; Kerns, Robert; Bair, Matthew J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Turan, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain in individuals with HIV is a common, impairing condition. Behavioral interventions for chronic pain specifically tailored to this population have yet to be developed. We assert that understanding self-management strategies already used by persons living with these conditions is an essential first step, and is the objective of this investigation. Design We conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews with individuals with HIV and chronic pain. Results The primary pain self-management strategies articulated by participants were: physical activity; cognitive and spiritual strategies; spending time with family and friends and social support; avoidance of physical/social activity; medication-centric pain management; and substance use. Conclusions Some of these strategies may be viewed as beneficial and overlap with known HIV self-management strategies (cognitive strategies), whereas others may have negative health consequences (substance use). Interventions that incorporate healthy self-management strategies may be particularly effective in improving both HIV and pain outcomes. PMID:25645646

  1. HIV Infection Presenting with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, K; Gupta, Avneet; Manoj, S; Seshadri, Kp

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of dementia in a young healthy individual. On evaluation he was detected to have HIV infection with low CD4 count and a high viral load. He had no opportunistic infections or any other AIDS defining illnesses. He recovered fully within 3 months of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27604445

  2. A Systematic Review of Individual and Contextual Factors Affecting ART Initiation, Adherence, and Retention for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Ian; Plummer, Mary L.; Konopka, Sarah N.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories. Results Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman’s awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child’s health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes. Conclusions To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in

  3. Delay of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation is Common in East African HIV-Infected Individuals in Serodiscordant Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    MUJUGIRA, Andrew; CELUM, Connie; THOMAS, Katherine K.; FARQUHAR, Carey; MUGO, Nelly; KATABIRA, Elly; BUKUSI, Elizabeth A.; TUMWESIGYE, Elioda; BAETEN, Jared M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective WHO guidance recommends antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation for all persons with a known HIV-uninfected partner, as a strategy to prevent HIV transmission. Uptake of ART among HIV-infected partners in serodiscordant partnerships is not known, which we evaluated in African HIV serodiscordant couples. Design Prospective cohort study. Methods Among HIV-infected persons from Kenya and Uganda who had a known heterosexual HIV-uninfected partner, we assessed ART initiation in those who became ART-eligible under national guidelines during follow-up. Participants received quarterly clinical and semi-annual CD4 monitoring, and active referral for ART upon becoming eligible. Results Of 1958 HIV-infected ART-eligible partners, 58% were women and the median age was 34 years. At the first visit when determined to be ART eligible, the median CD4 count was 273 cells/μL (IQR 221, 330), 77% had WHO stage 1 or 2 HIV disease, and 96% were receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. The cumulative probabilities of initiating ART at 6, 12, and 24 months after eligibility were 49.9%, 70.0% and 87.6%, respectively. Younger age (<25 years) (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.39, p=0.001), higher CD4 count (AHR 1.95, p<0.001 for >350 compared with <200 cells/μL), higher education (AHR 1.25, p<0.001), and lack of income (AHR 1.15, p=0.02) were independent predictors for delay in ART initiation. Conclusions In the context of close CD4 monitoring, ART counseling, and active linkage to HIV care, a substantial proportion of HIV-infected persons with a known HIV-uninfected partner delayed ART initiation. Strategies to motivate ART initiation are needed, particularly for younger persons with higher CD4 counts. PMID:24798765

  4. Norovirus in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals: cytokines and viral shedding.

    PubMed

    Newman, K L; Moe, C L; Kirby, A E; Flanders, W D; Parkos, C A; Leon, J S

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the most common cause of epidemic gastroenteritis world-wide. NoV infections are often asymptomatic, although individuals still shed large amounts of NoV in their stool. Understanding the differences between asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals would help in elucidating mechanisms of NoV pathogenesis. Our goal was to compare the serum cytokine responses and faecal viral RNA titres of asymptomatic and symptomatic NoV-infected individuals. We tested serum samples from infected subjects (n = 26; 19 symptomatic, seven asymptomatic) from two human challenge studies of GI.1 NoV for 16 cytokines. Samples from prechallenge and days 1-4 post-challenge were tested for these cytokines. Cytokine levels were compared to stool NoV RNA titres quantified previously by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). While both symptomatic and asymptomatic groups had similar patterns of cytokine responses, the symptomatic group generally exhibited a greater elevation of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines and IL-8 post-challenge compared to the asymptomatic group (all P < 0·01). Daily viral RNA titre was associated positively with daily IL-6 concentration and negatively with daily IL-12p40 concentration (all P < 0·05). Symptoms were not associated significantly with daily viral RNA titre, duration of viral shedding or cumulative shedding. Symptomatic individuals, compared to asymptomatic, have greater immune system activation, as measured by serum cytokines, but they do not have greater viral burden, as measured by titre and shedding, suggesting that symptoms may be immune-mediated in NoV infection. PMID:26822517

  5. Serum (1→3)-β-D-glucan levels in HIV-infected individuals are associated with immunosuppression, inflammation, and cardiopulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Alison; Hillenbrand, Maria; Finkelman, Malcolm; George, M. Patricia; Singh, Vikas; Kessinger, Cathy; Lucht, Lorrie; Busch, Michelle; McMahon, Deborah; Weinman, Renee; Steele, Chad; Norris, Karen A.; Gingo, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Translocation of gastrointestinal bacteria in HIV-infected individuals is associated with systemic inflammation, HIV progression, mortality, and co-morbidities. HIV-infected individuals are also susceptible to fungal infection and colonization, but whether fungal translocation occurs and influences HIV progression or co-morbidities is unknown. Methods Serum (1→3)-β-D-glucan was measured by a Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (Fungitell®) in 132 HIV-infected outpatients. Selected plasma cytokines and markers of peripheral T-cell activation were measured. Pulmonary function testing and Doppler-echocardiography were performed. Relationship of high (≥40pg/ml) and low (<40pg/ml) levels of (1→3)-β-D-glucan with HIV-associated variables, inflammation markers, and pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension measures were determined. Results Forty-eight percent had detectable (1→3)-β-D-glucan, and 16.7% had high levels. Individuals with high (1→3)-β-D-glucan were more likely to have CD4 counts below 200 cells/μl (31.8% vs. 8.4%, p=0.002), had higher log10 HIV viral levels (2.85 vs. 2.13 log copies/ml, p=0.004), and were less likely to use ART (68.2% vs. 90.0%, p=0.006). Plasma IL-8 (p=0.033), TNF-α (p=0.029), and CD8+CD38+ (p=0.046) andCD8+HLA-DR+ (p=0.029) were also increased with high levels. Abnormalities in diffusing capacity (p=0.041) and in pulmonary artery pressures (p=0.006 for pulmonary artery systolic pressure and 0.013 for tricuspid regurgitant velocity) were more common in those with high (1→3)-β-D-glucan. Conclusions We found evidence of peripheral fungal cell wall polysaccharides in an HIV-infected cohort. We also demonstrated an association between high serum (1→3)-β-D-glucan, HIV-associated immunosuppression, inflammation, and cardiopulmonary co-morbidity. These results implicate a new class of pathogen in HIV-associated microbial translocation and suggest a role in HIV progression and co-morbidities. PMID:22972021

  6. Safety, tolerance, and efficacy of atevirdine in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Been-Tiktak, A M; Williams, I; Vrehen, H M; Richens, J; Aldam, D; van Loon, A M; Loveday, C; Boucher, C A; Ward, P; Weller, I V; Borleffs, J C

    1996-01-01

    Atevirdine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study we investigated the effect of atevirdine in asymptomatic antiretroviral naive HIV-infected patients with CD4+ cell counts of between 200 and 750 cells per mm3. Patients were randomized to receive 600 mg of atevirdine (n = 15) or a placebo (n = 15) three times a day for 12 weeks. There was no statistically significant effect of atevirdine on viral loads (HIV p24 antigen and HIV-1 RNA levels by PCR) or CD4+ cell counts. The data do not support the use of atevirdine as a monotherapy in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. PMID:8913487

  7. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care. PMID:27016136

  8. Management of Lipid Levels and Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Infected Individuals: Just Give Them a Statin?

    PubMed

    Stein, James H

    Current guidelines for managing cholesterol to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk focus on providing the appropriate intensity of statin therapy to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level. There is very little evidence supporting the use of treatments aimed at raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level or reducing triglyceride levels. HIV-infected persons have excess risk of CVD compared with the general population. Statins are less effective at reducing LDL-C levels in HIV-infected persons who are also at greater risk for adverse effects from statin treatment. When selecting a statin to achieve desired lowering of LDL-C level, the potential for drug interactions with antiretroviral therapy must be considered. Information from ongoing research is expected to help identify optimal strategies for use of statin treatment in this population. This article summarizes a presentation by James H. Stein, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Improving the Management of HIV Disease, held in Chicago, Illinois, in May 201. PMID:27398770

  9. Exercise and the Asymptomatic Individual: Assessment and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Skrastins, Roland; McCans, John L.

    1982-01-01

    With the current popularity of physical fitness, the family physician is often asked to advise asymptomatic individuals who wish to undertake an exercise program. In the majority of cases, adequate assessment consists of a thorough history and physical examination, along with a few simple investigations, including a resting electrocardiogram. Exercise stress testing of asymptomatic individuals produces an unacceptably high frequency of false-positive results, and its use should be restricted to those patients with cardiac symptoms or major cardiac risk factors. The potential benefits of a longterm commitment to regular exercise should be discussed with the patient and guidance provided on the optimal form of exercise program for that individual. Exercise must not be considered in isolation. Other major cardiovascular risk factors should be sought and dealt with appropriately. PMID:21286106

  10. MicroRNA Profile in CD8+ T-Lymphocytes from HIV-Infected Individuals: Relationship with Antiviral Immune Response and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bargalló, Manel E.; Planet, Evarist; Vilaplana, Elisenda; Escribà, Tuixent; Pérez, Iñaki; Gatell, Josep Maria; García, Felipe; Arnedo, Mireia; Plana M, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between host microRNAs (miRNA), viral control and immune response has not yet been elucidated in the field of HIV. The aim of this study was to assess the differential miRNA profile in CD8+ T-cells between HIV-infected individuals who differ in terms of viral replication control and immune response. Methods miRNA profile from resting and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD8+ T-cells from uninfected individuals (HIV-, n = 11), Elite Controllers (EC, n = 15), Viremic Controllers (VC, n = 15), Viremic Progressors (VP, n = 13) and HIV-infected patients on therapy (ART, n = 14) was assessed using Affymetrix miRNA 3.1 arrays. After background correction, quantile normalization and median polish summarization, normalized data were fit to a linear model. The analysis comprised: resting samples between groups; stimulated samples between groups; and stimulated versus resting samples within each group. Enrichment analyses of the putative target genes were perfomed using bioinformatic algorithms. Results A downregulated miRNA pattern was observed when resting samples from all infected groups were compared to HIV-. A miRNA downregulation was also observed when stimulated samples from EC, ART and HIV- groups were compared to VP, being hsa-miR-4492 the most downregulated. Although a preferential miRNA downregulation was observed when stimulated samples were compared to the respective resting samples, VP presented a differential miRNA expression pattern. In fact, hsa-miR-155 and hsa-miR-181a were downregulated in VP whereas in the other groups, either an upregulation or no differences were observed after stimulation, respectively. Overall, functional enrichment analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were involved in signal transduction pathways, metabolic regulation, apoptosis, and immune response. Conclusions Resting CD8+ T-cells do not exhibit a differential miRNA expression between HIV-infected individuals but they do differ from non

  11. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles of the first Italian Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates recovered from an HIV-infected individual.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, G M; Pignato, S; Salvo, S; Giammanco, G

    2000-12-01

    A total of six Candida dubliniensis isolates were obtained during 1 year of monitoring by monthly swabs from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected individual in Catania, Italy. To the authors' knowledge, this constitutes the first recovery of C. dubliniensis from a human in Italy. Our identification procedure was based on colony color on CHROMagar Candida and carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained by two commercial systems: API ID 32C and API 20C AUX. Karyotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed the phenotypic identification. The biocodes obtained with API 20C AUX and with API ID 32C were 6172134 and 7142140015, respectively, for all six isolates. Both biocodes corresponded to those described in the literature as being produced by most C. dubliniensis isolates with each of the two identification systems. Our results confirm that both API 20C AUX and API ID 32C are able to rapidly and accurately differentiate C. dubliniensis from C. albicans. PMID:11191815

  12. HIV Infection Legal Issues: An Introduction for Developmental Services. Technical Report on Developmental Disabilities and HIV Infection, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Decker, Curtis L.

    As agencies and programs serving individuals with developmental disabilities are called upon to serve a new population of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, they will be forced to confront complex legal questions. This paper discusses the legal frameworks in which individuals with HIV infection are considered eligible…

  13. CD4+ T cell-dependent and CD4+ T cell-independent cytokine-chemokine network changes in the immune responses of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kelly B; Szeto, Gregory L; Alter, Galit; Irvine, Darrell J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-20

    A vital defect in the immune systems of HIV-infected individuals is the loss of CD4(+) T cells, resulting in impaired immune responses. We hypothesized that there were CD4(+) T cell-dependent and CD4(+) T cell-independent alterations in the immune responses of HIV-1(+) individuals. To test this, we analyzed the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations from HIV(+) donors, healthy donors, and healthy donors with CD4(+) T cells experimentally depleted. Multivariate analyses of 16 cytokines and chemokines at 6 and 72 hours after three stimuli (antibody-coated beads to stimulate T cells and R848 or lipopolysaccharide to stimulate innate immune cells) enabled integrative analysis of secreted profiles. Two major effects in HIV(+) PBMCs were not reproduced upon depletion of CD4(+) T cells in healthy PBMCs: (i) HIV(+) PBMCs maintained T cell-associated secreted profiles after T cell stimulation; (ii) HIV(+) PBMCs showed impaired interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion early after innate stimulation. These changes arose from hyperactive T cells and debilitated natural killer (NK) cell, respectively. Modeling and experiments showed that early IFN-γ secretion predicted later differences in secreted profiles in vitro. This effect was recapitulated in healthy PBMCs by blocking the IFN-γ receptor. Thus, we identified a critical deficiency in NK cell responses of HIV-infected individuals, independent of CD4(+) T cell depletion, which directs secreted profiles. Our findings illustrate a broad approach for identifying key disease-associated nodes in a multicellular, multivariate signaling network. PMID:26486173

  14. Trends and Disparities in Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Virologic Suppression Among Newly Treatment-Eligible HIV-Infected Individuals in North America, 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, David B.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Horberg, Michael A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Crane, Heidi M.; Collier, Ann C.; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Gill, M. John; Klein, Marina B.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Gange, Stephen J.; Benson, A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Platt, Aaron; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2013-01-01

    Background. Since the mid-1990s, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have improved in potency, tolerability, ease of use, and class diversity. We sought to examine trends in treatment initiation and resulting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virologic suppression in North America between 2001 and 2009, and demographic and geographic disparities in these outcomes. Methods. We analyzed data on HIV-infected individuals newly clinically eligible for ART (ie, first reported CD4+ count <350 cells/µL or AIDS-defining illness, based on treatment guidelines during the study period) from 17 North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design cohorts. Outcomes included timely ART initiation (within 6 months of eligibility) and virologic suppression (≤500 copies/mL, within 1 year). We examined time trends and considered differences by geographic location, age, sex, transmission risk, race/ethnicity, CD4+ count, and viral load, and documented psychosocial barriers to ART initiation, including non–injection drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and mental illness. Results. Among 10 692 HIV-infected individuals, the cumulative incidence of 6-month ART initiation increased from 51% in 2001 to 72% in 2009 (Ptrend < .001). The cumulative incidence of 1-year virologic suppression increased from 55% to 81%, and among ART initiators, from 84% to 93% (both Ptrend < .001). A greater number of psychosocial barriers were associated with decreased ART initiation, but not virologic suppression once ART was initiated. We found significant heterogeneity by state or province of residence (P < .001). Conclusions. In the last decade, timely ART initiation and virologic suppression have greatly improved in North America concurrent with the development of better-tolerated and more potent regimens, but significant barriers to treatment uptake remain, both at the individual level and systemwide. PMID:23315317

  15. CD4+ T cell–dependent and –independent cytokine-chemokine network changes in the immune responses of HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Kelly B.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Alter, Galit; Irvine, Darrell J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    A vital defect in the immune systems of HIV-infected individuals is the loss of CD4+ T cells, resulting in impaired immune responses. We hypothesized that there were CD4+ T cell–dependent and –independent alterations in the immune responses of HIV-1+ individuals. To test this, we analyzed the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations from HIV+ donors, healthy donors, and healthy donors with CD4+ T cells experimentally depleted. Multivariate analyses of 16 cytokines and chemokines at 6 and 72 hours after three stimuli (antibody-coated beads to stimulate T cells and R848 or LPS to stimulate innate immune cells) enabled integrative analysis of secreted profiles. Two major effects in HIV+ PBMCs were not reproduced upon depleting CD4+ T cell in healthy PBMCs: (i) HIV+ PBMCs maintained T cell–associated secreted profiles after T cell stimulation; (ii) HIV+ PBMCs showed impaired IFN-γ secretion early after innate stimulation. These changes arose from hyperactive T cells and debilitated natural killer (NK) cell, respectively. Modeling and experiments showed that early IFN-γ secretion predicted later differences in secreted profiles in vitro. This effect was recapitulated in healthy PBMCs by blocking the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) receptor. Thus, we identified a critical deficiency in NK cell responses of HIV-infected individuals, independent of CD4+ T cell depletion, which directs secreted profiles. Our findings illustrate a broad approach for identifying key disease-associated nodes in a multicellular, multivariate signaling network. PMID:26486173

  16. High rate of missed HIV infections in individuals with indeterminate or negative HIV western blots based on current HIV testing algorithm in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Kong, Wen-Hua; Tang, Li; Peng, Jin-Song; Wang, Xia; Xu, Jun; Schilling, Robert F; Cai, Thomas; Zhou, Wang

    2016-08-01

    It remains unclear if China's current HIV antibody testing algorithm misses a substantial number of HIV infected individuals. Of 196 specimens with indeterminate or negative results on HIV western blot (WB) retrospectively examined by HIV-1 nucleic acid test (NAT), 67.57% (75/111) of indeterminate WB samples, and 16.47% (14/85) of negative WB samples were identified as NAT positive. HIV-1 loads in negative WB samples were significantly higher than those in indeterminate WB samples. Notably, 86.67% (13/15) of samples with negative WB and double positive immunoassay results were NAT positive. The rate of HIV-1 infections missed by China's current HIV testing algorithm is unacceptably high. Thus, China should consider using NAT or integrating fourth generation ELISA into current only antibodies-based HIV confirmation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1462-1466, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26856240

  17. Feasibility and acceptability of a specialist clinical service for HIV-infected mineworkers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, S; Grant, A D; Day, J H; Rothwell, E; Chaisson, R E; Hayes, R J; Churchyard, G J

    2004-01-01

    Occupational settings offer an ideal opportunity to provide preventive health services for HIV-infected workers. A specialized clinic was established in a mining hospital in the Free State, South Africa, with the primary aim of delivering preventive therapy such as isoniazid to those at high risk of tuberculosis (individuals with HIV infection or silicosis), and cotrimoxazole to those at highest risk for opportunistic infections. The clinic design has taken regard of the importance of minimizing stigma, protecting confidentiality, monitoring potential side effects, supporting adherence and identification of prophylaxis failure. The clinic opened in April 1999 and, by August 2001, 1773 patients had attended at least once; 1762 are HIV-infected and 11 have silicosis. Of those with HIV infection, most were asymptomatic at their first visit. The clinic has achieved high acceptability: 99% of persons who were actively recruited to the service agreed to attend. The number still attending after a median of 13 months from recruitment was 1,270 (72%) and only 48 (2.7%) have declined continued attendance. Most losses were due to termination of employment unrelated to a medical condition. The clinic has already been successfully replicated in two other regions of the mining health service in South Africa and provides a model for workplace HIV clinical services that could be used for implementation of further interventions such as antiretroviral therapy. PMID:14660143

  18. CROI 2016: Neurologic Complications of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2016-01-01

    The brain remains a major target for HIV infection and a site of potential complications for HIV-infected individuals. Emerging data presented at the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections suggest that during the early stages of infection, activated CD4+ cells may traffic the virus into the central nervous system (CNS). HIV is detectable in cells and tissues of the CNS in some individuals despite suppressive antiretroviral treatment. A potential source of cerebrospinal fluid HIV escape may be compartmentalized HIV replication within macrophage lineage cells. Virally infected cells can traffic out of the CNS and may have the potential to reseed the systemic compartment. Additional modifiers of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) were identified, including female sex and hepatic dysfunction. Large epidemiologic studies reported an elevated risk of stroke among HIV-infected individuals, related to traditional vascular risk factors, history of recreational drug use, and HIV measures (lower CD4+ cell nadir and higher viral load). Brain imaging may provide a noninvasive means for detecting early changes in the brain associated with HIV infection and may assist in prognosis of HAND. Some potential adjunctive therapies to standard antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected individuals were considered. PMID:27398860

  19. Education, individual time preferences, and asymptomatic disease detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younoh; Radoias, Vlad

    2016-02-01

    Asymptomatic conditions such as hypertension are generally hard to diagnose, absent routine medical examinations. This is especially problematic in developing countries, where most citizens do not engage in routine examinations due to limited economic resources. We study the roles of education and individual time preferences in asymptomatic disease detection and management. Using discrete choice models on a sample of 4209 hypertensive Indonesian adults surveyed between November 2007 and April 2008, we find that both education and individual time preferences play important roles. However, the effects are different for people in good health than they are for people in bad health. Education does not seem to matter for disease detection when respondents are in good general health, and its effects on disease management vary largely in magnitudes between these groups. In terms of disease detection, more educated respondents have a higher probability of being diagnosed, but only conditional on being in poor general health. Time preferences, on the other hand, matter for respondents in good general health, but the effect is not significant for those in bad health. More impatient respondents that are in good health have a higher probability of being under-diagnosed because they are more likely to forgo routine physicals. The findings point to two distinct channels through which education can affect health, and suggest that different types of policies need to be implemented, in order to reach the entire population. Traditional programs that stimulate education and improve the socio-economic status of individuals in developing countries are helpful, but they do not address the whole problem. Besides its more usual positive effects, education can also negatively affect the health of asymptomatic patients, because it reflects a higher opportunity cost of engaging in preventative health screenings. PMID:26722984

  20. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Benson, Constance A; Daar, Eric S; Dube, Michael P; Haubrich, Richard H; Smith, Davey M; Morris, Sheldon R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation (Ki67(+), p < 0.005), CD4(+) T-cell activation (CD45RA(-)CD38(+), p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1(+), p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses. PMID:26299251

  1. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F.; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Benson, Constance A.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Haubrich, Richard H.; Smith, Davey M.; Morris, Sheldon R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation (Ki67+, p < 0.005), CD4+ T-cell activation (CD45RA–CD38+, p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1+, p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses. PMID:26299251

  2. Torque Teno Midi Virus/Small Anellovirus in Sera of Healthy, HIV/HCV and HIV Infected Individuals in Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fatholahi, Maryam; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Torque Teno Midi Virus/Small Anellovirus (TTMDV/SAV) is a member of the Gammatorquevirus genus within the family Anelloviridae. It is detected in healthy, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV infected individuals and also patients with acute respiratory disease in different countries, but its role in clinical diseases and its full geographical distribution is still unclear. Objectives: The current study aimed to detect the frequency of infection with TTMDV/SAV in the sera of healthy blood donors, hepatitis C infected and HIV positive individuals in Lorestan province, Iran; and also investigate the possible role of TTMDV/SAV virus in liver diseases. Materials and Methods: Fifty two, 36, 4, and 110 serum samples from HIV positive, patients with HIV/HCV and HIV/HCV/HBV co-infections, and healthy individuals were collected in Khorramabad city, respectively. Nested-polymerase chain reaction was performed using SMAs/SMAr primers to detect TTMDV/SAV DNA. Serum aminotransferases were measured. Results: In the HIV/HCV, HIV/HCV/HBV, HIV, and control cases, 29 (80.5%), 3 (75%), 43 (82.7%), and 16 (14.5%) were positive for DNA of TTMDV/SAV, respectively. In the HIV/HCV infected cases and HIV positive cases the level of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were not significantly different in TTMDV/SAV infected and non-infected individuals (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed in the frequency of TTMDV/SAV between healthy controls and each of the HIV positive and HIV/HCV co-infected individuals, no significant difference was observed between HIV positive and HIV/HCV co-infected cases, which may be due to HIV associated immunodeficiency. This is the first time that TTMDV/SAV is reported in HIV infected individuals worldwide. Interpretation of the high frequency of the virus (82.7%) in HIV cases needs more detailed studies. PMID:26862377

  3. APOBEC3G mRNA expression in exposed seronegative and early stage HIV infected individuals decreases with removal of exposure and with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Pérez, Joel A; Ormsby, Christopher E; Hernández-Juan, Ramón; Torres, Klintsy J; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Background APOBEC3G is an antiretroviral factor that acts by inducing G to A mutations. In this study, we examined the expression of APOBEC3G in uninfected HIV-1 exposed individuals at the time of their partner's diagnosis and one year later. We then compared this expression with that of infected individuals at different disease stages. APOBEC3G mRNA was measured in PBMCs from three groups: healthy controls with no known risk factor to HIV infection (n = 26), exposed uninfected individuals who had unprotected sex with their HIV+ partners for at least 3 months (n = 37), and HIV infected patients at various disease stages (n = 45), including 8 patients with low HIV viral loads < 10,000 copies/mL (LVL) for at least 3 years. Additionally, we obtained sequences from the env, gag, pol, nef, vif and the LTR of the patients' virus. Results Exposed uninfected individuals expressed higher APOBEC3G than healthy controls (3.86 vs. 1.69 relative expression units), and their expression significantly decreased after a year from the HIV diagnosis and subsequent treatment of their partners. Infected individuals showed a positive correlation (Rho = 0.57, p = 0.00006) of APOBEC3G expression with CD4+ T cell count, and a negative correlation with HIV viremia (Rho = -0.54, p = 0.00004). The percentage of G to A mutations had a positive correlation (Rho = 0.43, p = 0.0226) with APOBEC3G expression, and it was higher in LVL individuals than in the other patients (IQR 8.27 to 9.64 vs. 7.06 to 8.1, p = 0.0084). Out of 8 LVLs, 3 had hypermutations, and 4 had premature stop codons only in viral vif. Conclusion The results suggest that exposure to HIV may trigger APOBEC3G expression in PBMCs, in the absence of infection. Additionally, cessation of exposure or advanced disease is associated with decreased APOBEC3G expression. PMID:19254362

  4. Depression in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Penzak, S R; Reddy, Y S; Grimsley, S R

    2000-02-15

    The epidemiology, clinical features, and drug treatment of depression in HIV-infected patients are discussed. The lifetime prevalence of depression in patients infected with HIV has been estimated at 22-45%. The signs and symptoms of depression are similar in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, but patients with HIV infection may more frequently have sleep and appetite disturbances. Diagnosis should focus on affective or cognitive depression symptoms that reflect mood state alone. Patients with a history of depression, homosexual men, women, and i.v. drug abusers are among HIV-infected individuals who may be at increased risk for depression. Depression may alter the course of HIV infection by impairing immune function or influencing behavior. Depression my contribute to nonadherence to therapy. Antidepressant therapy is effective in most HIV-positive patients with major depression. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have produced response rates as high as 89%, but their usefulness has been limited by adverse effects. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and other non-TCAs have also demonstrated efficacy and are generally better tolerated. Psychostimulants have improved mood, cognition, and energy level, and androgens have been used for their anabolic effects. The systemic concentrations of antidepressants may be altered by coadministered drugs that affect their cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme-mediated metabolism; in turn, the metabolism and toxicity of certain antiretrovirals may be affected by antidepressants. Guidelines on the treatment of depression in the general population may be applied to patients with HIV infection. Depressive disorders are prevalent among patients with HIV infection but often respond to a variety of treatments. PMID:10714976

  5. The Presence of Psychiatric Disorders in HIV-Infected Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Many women of low socioeconomic status who have contracted HIV qualify for individual, dual, and multiple psychiatric diagnoses that predate their knowledge of their HIV infection. Earlier intervention addressing these problems might have prevented the onset of psychiatric disorders as well as high-risk behaviors that lead to HIV infection. (FC)

  6. [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)].

    PubMed

    Rivero, Antonio; Pulido, Federico; Caylá, Joan; Iribarren, José A; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez-Camacho, Inés

    2013-12-01

    This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. PMID:23541879

  7. ILC You Later: Early and Irreparable Loss of Innate Lymphocytes in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Joseph C; Brenchley, Jason M

    2016-02-16

    Loss of IL-17-producing cells in the gut during HIV infection is linked to GI barrier damage. Kløverpris et al. (2016) find that circulating ILCs are lost early and irreversibly during HIV infection. Early ART administration protects against the ILC loss, and this might be clinically beneficial to HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26885853

  8. Risk factors for default from tuberculosis treatment in HIV-infected individuals in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Concomitant treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) presents a series of challenges for treatment compliance for both providers and patients. We carried out this study to identify risk factors for default from TB treatment in people living with HIV. Methods We conducted a cohort study to monitor HIV/TB co-infected subjects in Pernambuco, Brazil, on a monthly basis, until completion or default of treatment for TB. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals and P-values. Results From a cohort of 2310 HIV subjects, 390 individuals (16.9%) who had started treatment after a diagnosis of TB were selected, and data on 273 individuals who completed or defaulted on treatment for TB were analyzed. The default rate was 21.7% and the following risk factors were identified: male gender, smoking and CD4 T-cell count less than 200 cells/mm3. Age over 29 years, complete or incomplete secondary or university education and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were identified as protective factors for the outcome. Conclusion The results point to the need for more specific actions, aiming to reduce the default from TB treatment in males, younger adults with low education, smokers and people with CD4 T-cell counts < 200 cells/mm3. Default was less likely to occur in patients under HAART, reinforcing the strategy of early initiation of HAART in individuals with TB. PMID:22176628

  9. Clinical features & risk factors associated with cryptosporidiosis in HIV infected adults in India

    PubMed Central

    Ajjampur, S.S. Rao; Asirvatham, J.R.; Muthusamy, Dheepa; Gladstone, B.P.; Abraham, O.C.; Mathai, Dilip; Ward, Honorine; Wanke, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background & objectives Cryptosporidiosis is a leading cause of protracted, life threatening diarrhoea in HIV infected patients. Although data on prevalence are available for Indian patients, no information on risk factors for transmission exists. We therefore undertook this study to identify risk factors for transmission of cryptosporidiosis in HIV infected adults. Methods Both symptomatic (diarrhoeal) and asymptomatic HIV infected patients were screened for cryptosporidiosis. All Cryptosporidium spp. positive cases were enrolled in the study and interviewed to record socio-demographic information, water supply and animal contact. Data were analysed to study clinical features and potential association with species and genotype. Results Of the 28 cryptosporidial infections identified on screening 111 HIV positive patients with diarrhoea, 10 (35.7%) had chronic diarrhoea, 14 (50%) had associated fever and 8 (28.6%) had nausea. Symptomatic patients had a significantly higher number of co-infections with other enteric parasites (P=0.04) than 20 asymptomatics of 423 HIV positive individuals screened. Eleven of 17 (64%) patients with potentially zoonotic infections had diarrhoea. Patients with zoonotic species (64%) also tended to have fever more frequently than those infected with C. hominis (58%). Association between area of residence, rural or urban, water source and contact with animals and acquisition of cryptosporidiosis was not statistically significant. Interpretation & conclusions Cryptosporidiosis is an important cause of morbidity in HIV infected individuals in India, resulting in chronic diarrhoea. Risk factors for potentially zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis were described in this study, but larger studies need to be done for a clearer understanding of the transmission dynamics of different cryptosporidial species in developing countries. PMID:18219083

  10. Modeling the three stages in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A; Middleton, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    A typical HIV infection response consists of three stages: an initial acute infection, a long asymptomatic period and a final increase in viral load with simultaneous collapse in healthy CD4+T cell counts. The majority of existing mathematical models give a good representation of either the first two stages or the last stage of the infection. Using macrophages as a long-term active reservoir, a deterministic model is proposed to explain the three stages of the infection including the progression to AIDS. Simulation results illustrate how chronic infected macrophages can explain the progression to AIDS provoking viral explosion. Further simulation studies suggest that the proposed model retains its key properties even under moderately large parameter variations. This model provides important insights on how macrophages might play a crucial role in the long term behavior of HIV infection. PMID:23238280

  11. Depression is not an Inevitable Outcome of Disclosure Avoidance: HIV Stigma and Mental Health in a Cohort of HIV Infected Individuals from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Wayne T.; Chandy, Sara; Singh, Girija; Panicker, Siju Thomas; Osmand, Thomas A.; Heylen, Elsa; Ekstrand, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that HIV stigma in India can be characterized by a framework dividing manifestations into enacted (discrimination), vicarious (hearing stories of discrimination), felt normative (perceptions of stigma’s prevalence) and internalized stigma (personal endorsement of stigma beliefs). We examined if this framework could explain associations among stigma, efforts to avoid HIV serostatus disclosure, and depression symptoms in a cohort of 198 HIV-infected individuals from southern India who were followed for one year as part of a study of antiretroviral adherence. Prior studies had suggested that disclosure avoidance was a primary outcome of stigma and that impaired well-being was a primary outcome of disclosure avoidance. Analyses from our longitudinal research revealed that the pattern of associations among stigma, disclosure avoidance, and depression symptoms remained consistent over time. Enacted and vicarious stigmas were correlated with felt normative stigma beliefs. In turn, felt normative stigma was correlated with disclosure avoidance. And enacted stigma, internalized stigma, and disclosure avoidance were all associated with depression symptoms. However, even though the overall framework held together, internalized stigma and depression symptoms dropped significantly over time while other components remained unchanged. These findings suggest that, although HIV stigma may limit disclosure, it does not invariably lead to psychological maladjustment. Amidst ongoing perceptions and experiences of stigma, HIV-positive individuals can achieve significant improvements in their acceptance of the disease and in mental wellbeing. PMID:21218366

  12. Depression is not an inevitable outcome of disclosure avoidance: HIV stigma and mental health in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Steward, Wayne T; Chandy, Sara; Singh, Girija; Panicker, Siju T; Osmand, Thomas A; Heylen, Elsa; Ekstrand, Maria L

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that HIV stigma in India can be characterized by a framework dividing manifestations into enacted (discrimination), vicarious (hearing stories of discrimination), felt normative (perceptions of stigma's prevalence), and internalized stigma (personal endorsement of stigma beliefs). We examined whether this framework could explain associations among stigma, efforts to avoid HIV serostatus disclosure, and depression symptoms in a cohort of 198 HIV-infected individuals from Southern India who were followed up for one year as part of a study of antiretroviral adherence. Prior studies had suggested that disclosure avoidance was a primary outcome of stigma and that impaired well-being was a primary outcome of disclosure avoidance. Analyses from our longitudinal research revealed that the pattern of associations among stigma, disclosure avoidance, and depression symptoms remained consistent over time. Enacted and vicarious stigmas were correlated with felt normative stigma beliefs. In turn, felt normative stigma was correlated with disclosure avoidance. And, enacted stigma, internalized stigma, and disclosure avoidance were all associated with depression symptoms. However, even though the overall framework held together, internalized stigma and depression symptoms dropped significantly over time while other components remained unchanged. These findings suggest that, although HIV stigma may limit disclosure, it does not invariably lead to psychological maladjustment. Amidst ongoing perceptions and experiences of stigma, HIV-positive individuals can achieve significant improvements in their acceptance of the disease and in mental well-being. PMID:21218366

  13. Incidence of AIDS-Defining Opportunistic Infections and Mortality during Antiretroviral Therapy in a Cohort of Adult HIV-Infected Individuals in Hanoi, 2007-2014

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Junko; Lee, Kyu Ha; Haneuse, Sebastien; Matsumoto, Shoko; Nguyen, Dung Thi; Nguyen, Dung Thi Hoai; Do, Cuong Duy; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Oka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the prognosis for HIV-infected individuals has improved after antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up, limited data exist on the incidence of AIDS-defining opportunistic infections (ADIs) and mortality during ART in resource-limited settings. Methods HIV-infected adults in two large hospitals in urban Hanoi were enrolled to the prospective cohort, from October 2007 through December 2013. Those who started ART less than one year before enrollment were assigned to the survival analysis. Data on ART history and ADIs were collected retrospectively at enrollment and followed-up prospectively until April 2014. Results Of 2,070 cohort participants, 1,197 were eligible for analysis and provided 3,446 person-years (PYs) of being on ART. Overall, 161 ADIs episodes were noted at a median of 3.20 months after ART initiation (range 0.03–75.8) with an incidence 46.7/1,000 PYs (95% confidence interval [CI] 39.8–54.5). The most common ADI was tuberculosis with an incidence of 29.9/1,000 PYs. Mortality after ART initiation was 8.68/1,000 PYs and 45% (19/45) died of AIDS-related illnesses. Age over 50 years at ART initiation was significantly associated with shorter survival after controlling for baseline CD4 count, but neither having injection drug use (IDU) history nor previous ADIs were associated with poor survival. Semi-competing risks analysis in 951 patients without ADIs history prior to ART showed those who developed ADIs after starting ART were at higher risk of death in the first six months than after six months. Conclusion ADIs were not rare in spite of being on effective ART. Age over 50 years, but not IDU history, was associated with shorter survival in the cohort. This study provides in-depth data on the prognosis of patients on ART in Vietnam during the first decade of ART scale-up. PMID:26939050

  14. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naïve HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Lecanda, Aarón; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Brander, Christian; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART) efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies. Methods We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR) positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations. Results Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64%) corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual) or DR (median 6 pairs/individual) were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001). While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient’s virus (mean 68% of cases), responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002). Conclusions Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides. PMID:26808823

  15. Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Montoya, Jessica L.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Depp, Colin A.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; TMARC Group, The

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277. PMID:24078868

  16. Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Montoya, Jessica L; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Rooney, Alexandra; Gouaux, Ben; Georges, Shereen; Depp, Colin A; Atkinson, J Hampton; Tmarc Group, The

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277. PMID:24078868

  17. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  18. Boosted Lopinavir– Versus Boosted Atazanavir–Containing Regimens and Immunologic, Virologic, and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Study of HIV-Infected Individuals in High-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background. Current clinical guidelines consider regimens consisting of either ritonavir-boosted atazanavir or ritonavir-boosted lopinavir and a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone among their recommended and alternative first-line antiretroviral regimens. However, these guidelines are based on limited evidence from randomized clinical trials and clinical experience. Methods. We compared these regimens with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes using data from prospective studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in Europe and the United States in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration, 2004–2013. Antiretroviral therapy–naive and AIDS-free individuals were followed from the time they started a lopinavir or an atazanavir regimen. We estimated the ‘intention-to-treat’ effect for atazanavir vs lopinavir regimens on each of the outcomes. Results. A total of 6668 individuals started a lopinavir regimen (213 deaths, 457 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths), and 4301 individuals started an atazanavir regimen (83 deaths, 157 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths). The adjusted intention-to-treat hazard ratios for atazanavir vs lopinavir regimens were 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI], .53–.91) for death, 0.67 (95% CI, .55–.82) for AIDS-defining illness or death, and 0.91 (95% CI, .84–.99) for virologic failure at 12 months. The mean 12-month increase in CD4 count was 8.15 (95% CI, −.13 to 16.43) cells/µL higher in the atazanavir group. Estimates differed by NRTI backbone. Conclusions. Our estimates are consistent with a lower mortality, a lower incidence of AIDS-defining illness, a greater 12-month increase in CD4 cell count, and a smaller risk of virologic failure at 12 months for atazanavir compared with lopinavir regimens. PMID:25567330

  19. [Renal abnormalities in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Pernasetti, María Marta; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Fuente, Jorge de la; Arteaga, Javier de; Douthat, Walter; Bardosy, Cecilia; Zarate, Abel; Massari, Pablo U

    2010-01-01

    Several renal complications may occur during HIV infection, especially in advanced stages related to HIV, to other infectious agents and/or drugs. Little is known about the prevalence of renal diseases that may occur as a complication of or related to HIV infection in asymptomatic patients. This is a single center cross-sectional study of asymptomatic HIV(+) patients referred to a nefrology care service at an Argentine hospital to look for the presence of renal abnormalities. Fifty two consecutive patients were studied between April and November 2008. Patients underwent plasma and urine analysis, ultrasound, and kidney biopsy as needed. Mean age was 39.9 +/- 10.6 years, 88% were male, time from HIV diagnosis 53.2 +/- 41.2 months (2-127); 71% had HIV-disease and 77% were on antiretroviral therapy. Mean plasma HIV-RNA copies number was 7.043 +/- 3.322 and CD4+ cell count: 484 +/- 39. Pathologic findings in urine analysis were present in 30.7% of patients: albuminuria 16.6%, microscopic hematuria 11.5%, hypercalciuria 10.8% and crystalluria 6%. Mean glomerular filtration rate was 102.2 +/- 22.95 ml/min (34-149) and 41% of patients could be classified in stages 1 to 3 of chronic kidney disease. Renal abnormalities prevaled in older patients without relationship with presence of HIV-disease. Two patients were biopsied and the findings included: tubulointerstitial nephritis with presence of crystal deposition in one and IgA nephropathy in the other. No HIV-associated nephropathy was detected. The broad spectrum and the high prevalence of lesions found in this series suggest that asymptomatic HIV-infected patients should routinely undergo renal evaluation. PMID:20529774

  20. Contraception for HIV-Infected Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Mirza, Ayesha

    2016-09-01

    Access to high-quality reproductive health care is important for adolescents and young adults with HIV infection to prevent unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and secondary transmission of HIV to partners and children. As perinatally HIV-infected children mature into adolescence and adulthood and new HIV infections among adolescents and young adults continue to occur in the United States, medical providers taking care of such individuals often face issues related to sexual and reproductive health. Challenges including drug interactions between several hormonal methods and antiretroviral agents make decisions regarding contraceptive options more complex for these adolescents. Dual protection, defined as the use of an effective contraceptive along with condoms, should be central to ongoing discussions with HIV-infected young women and couples wishing to avoid pregnancy. Last, reproductive health discussions need to be integrated with discussions on HIV care, because a reduction in plasma HIV viral load below the level of detection (an "undetectable viral load") is essential for the individual's health as well as for a reduction in HIV transmission to partners and children. PMID:27573084

  1. Hypertension, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Anti-Hypertensive Medication Utilization among HIV-infected Individuals in Rakai, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Laura D.; Newell, Kevin; Ssebbowa, Paschal; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gray, Ronald H.; Wawer, Maria J.; Mondo, George; Reynolds, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of hypertension, elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors among HIV-positive individuals in rural Rakai District, Uganda. Methods We assessed 426 HIV-positive individuals in Rakai, Uganda from 2007 to 2010. Prevalence of hypertension and elevated blood pressure assessed by clinical measurement was compared to clinician-recorded hypertension in case report forms. Multiple logistic regression and z-tests were used to examine the association of hypertension and elevated blood pressure with age, sex, body mass index, CD4 cell count, and anti-retroviral treatment (ART) use. For individuals on anti-hypertensives, medication utilization was reviewed. Results The prevalence of hypertension (two elevated blood pressure readings at different time points) was 8.0% (95% CI: 5.4–10.6%), and that of elevated blood pressure (one elevated blood pressure reading) was 26.3% (95% CI: 22.1–30.5%). Age ≥50 years and higher body mass index were positively associated with elevated blood pressure. ART use, time on ART, and CD4 cell count were not associated with hypertension. 83% of subjects diagnosed with hypertension were on anti-hypertensive medications, most commonly beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers. Conclusions Hypertension is common among HIV-positive individuals in rural Uganda. PMID:25430847

  2. Glomerular filtration rate estimated by creatinine, cystatin C, or both markers and the risk of clinical events in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Gregory M.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Wyatt, Christina M.; Post, Frank A.; Bormann, Alison M.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Ross, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy and precision of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations based on plasma creatinine (GFRcr), cystatin C (GFRcys), and the combination of these markers (GFRcr-cys) has recently been assessed in HIV-infected individuals. Methods We compared the associations of baseline GFRcr, GFRcys, and GFRcr-cys (using the CKD-EPI equations) with mortality, cardiovascular events (CVE), and opportunistic diseases (OD) in the Strategies for the Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios per standard deviation (SD) change in GFR. Results 4,614 subjects from the SMART trial with available baseline creatinine and cystatin C data were included in this analysis. Of these, 99 died, 111 had a CVE and 121 had an OD. GFRcys was weakly to moderately correlated with HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and D-dimer, while GFRcr had little or no correlation with these factors. GFRcys had the strongest associations with the three clinical outcomes, followed closely by GFRcr-cys, with GFRcr having the weakest associations with clinical outcomes. In a model adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, HIV-related factors, and inflammation markers, a 1-SD lower GFRcys was associated with a 55% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% -90%) increased risk of mortality, a 21% (95% CI, 0% -47%) increased risk of CVE, and a 22% (95% CI, 0% -48%) increased risk of OD. Conclusions Of the three CKD-EPI GFR equations, GFRcys had the strongest associations with mortality, CVE, and OD. PMID:24024499

  3. Food Insecurity, Dietary Diversity, and Body Mass Index of HIV-Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Rebick, Gabriel W; Franke, Molly F; Teng, Jessica E; Gregory Jerome, J; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-05-01

    Food rations are increasingly offered as part of HIV programs in resource-poor settings, often targeted solely to those with under-nutrition by low body mass index (BMI). This practice does not consider food insecurity, another important risk factor for poor outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). We analyzed factors associated with low BMI and severe food insecurity in 523 PLWH receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Haiti using logistic regression. Food insecurity was present in 89 % of individuals. Among those with severe food insecurity, 86 % had a BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m(2). Severe food insecurity was associated with illiteracy [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.79, p = 0.005], having no income (AOR 1.58, p = 0.04), and poverty (p < 0.001). Compared with those with little to no food insecurity, individuals with severe food insecurity had a less diverse diet. We found that food insecurity was highly prevalent in PLWH receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Haiti. Using BMI as a sole criterion for food supplementation in HIV programs can exclude highly vulnerable individuals who may benefit from such support. PMID:26350637

  4. The role of statins in the setting of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Eckard, Allison Ross; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-09-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other HIV-related co-morbidities. This is due in part to dyslipidemia associated with antiretroviral therapy and increased inflammation and immune activation from chronic HIV infection. Statins not only have potent lipid-lowering properties but are also anti-inflammatory and immunomodulators. Studies suggest that statin therapy in the HIV-infected population may decrease the risk of CVD and other non-AIDS-defining co-morbidities. This review summarizes the recent literature on statin use in the HIV setting. PMID:26126687

  5. [Immunopathogenesis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Alcamí, José; Coiras, Mayte

    2011-03-01

    Killing of CD4 lymphocytes and systemic immune suppression are the hallmarks of HIV infection. These milestones are produced by different mechanisms that draw a complex picture of AIDS immunopathogenesis. The role of the GALT system as a preferential target for HIV, chronic activation of the immune system and viral escape mechanisms are recent challenges that have changed our current view on the mechanisms leading to immune destruction and development of AIDS. In this article, the mechanisms of immune suppression, the evolution of immune response throughout the infection and the mechanisms of viral escape are analysed. PMID:21388715

  6. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  7. Progressive cerebral injury in the setting of chronic HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gongvatana, Assawin; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Buchthal, Steven; Daar, Eric; Schifitto, Giovanni; Campbell, Thomas; Taylor, Michael; Singer, Elyse; Algers, Jeffrey; Zhong, Jianhui; Brown, Mark; McMahon, Deborah; So, Yuen T; Mi, Deming; Heaton, Robert; Robertson, Kevin; Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Cohen, Ronald A; Navia, Bradford

    2013-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that CNS injury and neurocognitive impairment persist in the setting of chronic HIV infection and combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). Yet, whether neurological injury can progress in this setting remains uncertain. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and neurocognitive and clinical assessments were performed over 2 years in 226 HIV-infected individuals on stable CART, including 138 individuals who were neurocognitively asymptomatic (NA). Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), myoinositol, and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) were measured in the midfrontal cortex (MFC), frontal white matter (FWM), and basal ganglia (BG). Longitudinal changes in metabolite levels were determined using linear mixed effect models, as were metabolite changes in relation to global neurocognitive function. HIV-infected subjects showed significant annual decreases in brain metabolite levels in all regions examined, including NAA (2.95 %) and Cho (2.61 %) in the FWM; NAA (1.89 %), Cr (1.84 %), Cho (2.19 %), and Glx (6.05 %) in the MFC; and Glx (2.80 %) in the BG. Similar metabolite decreases were observed in the NA and subclinically impaired subgroups, including subjects with virologic suppression in plasma and CSF. Neurocognitive decline was associated with longitudinal decreases in Glx in the FWM and the BG, and in NAA in the BG. Widespread progressive changes in the brain, including neuronal injury, occur in chronically HIV-infected persons despite stable antiretroviral treatment and virologic suppression and can lead to neurocognitive declines. The basis for these findings is poorly understood and warrants further study. PMID:23613008

  8. The effects of antiretroviral treatment initiation on cognition in HIV-infected individuals with advanced disease in Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Ghate, Manisha; Mehendale, Sanjay; Meyer, Rachel; Umlauf, Anya; Deutsch, Reena; Kamat, Rujvi; Thakar, Madhuri; Risbud, Arun; Kulkarni, Smita; Sakamoto, Maiko; Alexander, Terry; Franklin, Donald; Letendre, Scott; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor; Marcotte, Thomas D

    2015-08-01

    There has been a reduction in the most severe cases of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) with advances in antiretroviral treatment (ART). But the prevalence of milder forms of HAND still remains high. Data from systematically conducted studies on the effects of ART on cognition are scanty in India, where HIV-1 clade C is prevalent. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-seropositive (HIV+) individuals (n = 92) with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/mm(3). The overall and domain-specific levels of cognitive functioning were determined using a locally recruited normative sample, and a change in neurocognitive functioning at the 1-year follow-up visit was analyzed. Results revealed cognitive impairment in 44.6 % of the HIV+ group at baseline. At the 1-year follow-up, the group showed significant improvement in the Learning domain (p < 0.05). HIV+ individuals showing improvement in the global cognitive scores had a significantly lower baseline CD4 cell count compared to others. Overall, the degree of improvement associated with the magnitude of rise in CD4 suggests the possibility that early, mild subclinical deficits may also benefit from treatment. PMID:25750072

  9. Responsiveness of muscle protein synthesis to growth hormone administration in HIV-infected individuals declines with severity of disease.

    PubMed

    McNurlan, M A; Garlick, P J; Steigbigel, R T; DeCristofaro, K A; Frost, R A; Lang, C H; Johnson, R W; Santasier, A M; Cabahug, C J; Fuhrer, J; Gelato, M C

    1997-10-15

    This study was undertaken to determine if human recombinant growth hormone (hrGH, 6 mg/d for 2 wk) would stimulate muscle protein synthesis in AIDS wasting. Healthy controls were compared with patients who were HIV+, had AIDS without weight loss, and had AIDS with > 10% weight loss. Before hrGH, rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis, measured with l-[2H5]phenylalanine, were the same in controls and in all stages of disease. Rates of myofibrillar protein degradation, however, assessed from urinary excretion of 3-methyl histidine, were higher in AIDS and AIDS wasting than in HIV+ or healthy individuals. The group with weight loss had significantly higher TNFalpha levels but not higher HIV viral loads. Muscle function, as determined by isokinetic knee extension and shoulder flexion, was significantly higher in controls than all infected individuals. After GH, rates of protein synthesis were stimulated 27% in controls, with a smaller increase (11%) in HIV+, and a significant depression (42%) in AIDS with weight loss, despite fourfold elevation in insulin-like growth factor-I in all groups. There was a significant correlation of hrGH-induced changes in muscle protein synthesis with severity of disease (P = 0.002). The results indicate increased basal muscle protein degradation and decreased responsiveness of muscle protein synthesis to GH in the later stages of disease. PMID:9329979

  10. Responsiveness of muscle protein synthesis to growth hormone administration in HIV-infected individuals declines with severity of disease.

    PubMed Central

    McNurlan, M A; Garlick, P J; Steigbigel, R T; DeCristofaro, K A; Frost, R A; Lang, C H; Johnson, R W; Santasier, A M; Cabahug, C J; Fuhrer, J; Gelato, M C

    1997-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if human recombinant growth hormone (hrGH, 6 mg/d for 2 wk) would stimulate muscle protein synthesis in AIDS wasting. Healthy controls were compared with patients who were HIV+, had AIDS without weight loss, and had AIDS with > 10% weight loss. Before hrGH, rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis, measured with l-[2H5]phenylalanine, were the same in controls and in all stages of disease. Rates of myofibrillar protein degradation, however, assessed from urinary excretion of 3-methyl histidine, were higher in AIDS and AIDS wasting than in HIV+ or healthy individuals. The group with weight loss had significantly higher TNFalpha levels but not higher HIV viral loads. Muscle function, as determined by isokinetic knee extension and shoulder flexion, was significantly higher in controls than all infected individuals. After GH, rates of protein synthesis were stimulated 27% in controls, with a smaller increase (11%) in HIV+, and a significant depression (42%) in AIDS with weight loss, despite fourfold elevation in insulin-like growth factor-I in all groups. There was a significant correlation of hrGH-induced changes in muscle protein synthesis with severity of disease (P = 0.002). The results indicate increased basal muscle protein degradation and decreased responsiveness of muscle protein synthesis to GH in the later stages of disease. PMID:9329979

  11. Genetic diversity of HIV-1 and transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed individuals with HIV infection in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Guo, Zhihong; Yang, Jiezhe; Pan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Jun; Ding, Xiaobei; Zhang, Wenjun; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yun; Huang, Jingjing

    2015-10-01

    HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR) can compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited countries like China where ART has been scaled up and thus leads to an important public health concern. The aim of the study was to elucidate the HIV-1 genetic characteristics and TDR in Hangzhou, China. Two-hundred eleven ART-naive, newly diagnosed individuals were enrolled during January and August 2013. Specimens were classified as recent or chronic infections using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA). The pol fragment covering the entire protease and the first 300 codons of the reverse transcriptase gene was amplified by RT-PCR and nested PCR. Genotypic drug resistance (DR) and phylogenetic analysis were performed on the 200 obtained sequences. Multiple genotypes were identified, including CRF01_AE (62.0%), CRF07_BC (31.0%), subtype B (2.0%), CRF08_BC (1.5%), CRF55_01B (1.0%), CRF18_cpx (0.5%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 2.0%). All the four URFs were found in men who have sex with men, consisting of a recombination of CRF01_AE with subtype B or CRF07_BC. The prevalence of primary DR in newly diagnosed individuals in Hangzhou was low (4.0%). The proportion of DR mutation to protease inhibitors (PIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was 1.5%, 1.5%, and 1.0%, respectively. BED-CEIA revealed that 21.8% (45/211) of the specimens were associated with recent infections. The prevalence of TDR in recent infections was moderate (6.5%). High HIV diversity and relatively high prevalence of TDR in new infections has been found in Hangzhou, indicating an increasing challenge for future HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25899877

  12. [Pneumocystosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Sodqi, M; Oulad Lahsen, A; Chakib, A; Marih, L; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystosis is an opportunistic disease caused by invasion of unicellular fungus Pneumocystic jirovecii which is responsible for febrile pneumonia among patients with cellular immunodeficiency especially those HIV infected. Despite the decreasing of its incidence due to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, as well as anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis among these patients, Pneumocystis pneumonia remains the first AIDS-defining event and a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. The usual radiological presentation is that of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection of trophozoides and/or cysts P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples using several staining techniques. The use of polymerase chain reaction in the BAL samples in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more has allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. The standard regimen of treatment is the association of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole which has been utilized as an effective treatment with a favourable recovery. Early HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy should reduce the incidence of this dreaded disease. PMID:27349824

  13. HIV infection and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, K L; Miller, R F; Dogan, A

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein–Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV‐positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved. PMID:18042692

  14. Potential Health Impacts of Heavy Metals on HIV-Infected Population in USA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohui; Hu, Hui; Dailey, Amy B.; Kearney, Greg; Talbott, Evelyn O.; Cook, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Noninfectious comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases have become increasingly prevalent and occur earlier in life in persons with HIV infection. Despite the emerging body of literature linking environmental exposures to chronic disease outcomes in the general population, the impacts of environmental exposures have received little attention in HIV-infected population. The aim of this study is to investigate whether individuals living with HIV have elevated prevalence of heavy metals compared to non-HIV infected individuals in United States. Methods We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2010 to compare exposures to heavy metals including cadmium, lead, and total mercury in HIV infected and non-HIV infected subjects. Results In this cross-sectional study, we found that HIV-infected individuals had higher concentrations of all heavy metals than the non-HIV infected group. In a multivariate linear regression model, HIV status was significantly associated with increased blood cadmium (p=0.03) after adjusting for age, sex, race, education, poverty income ratio, and smoking. However, HIV status was not statistically associated with lead or mercury levels after adjusting for the same covariates. Conclusions Our findings suggest that HIV-infected patients might be significantly more exposed to cadmium compared to non-HIV infected individuals which could contribute to higher prevalence of chronic diseases among HIV-infected subjects. Further research is warranted to identify sources of exposure and to understand more about specific health outcomes. PMID:24023932

  15. HPTN 062: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial Exploring the Effect of a Motivational-Interviewing Intervention on Sexual Behavior among Individuals with Acute HIV Infection in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Pettifor, Audrey; Corneli, Amy; Kamanga, Gift; McKenna, Kevin; Rosenberg, Nora E.; Yu, Xuesong; Ou, San-San; Massa, Cecilia; Wiyo, Patricia; Lynn, Diana; Tharaldson, Jenae; Golin, Carol; Hoffman, Irving

    2015-01-01

    Objective We pilot tested a Motivational Interviewing (MI) –based counseling intervention for individuals with Acute HIV Infection (AHI) to reduce risky sexual behavior in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods Twenty-eight individuals diagnosed with AHI were randomized to receive either brief education alone, or the brief education plus the MI-based intervention, called Uphungu Wanga. Participants in Uphungu Wanga received four sessions delivered on the day of diagnosis, three days later and at weeks 1 and 2 with a booster session at week 8; participants were followed for 24 weeks from diagnosis. An interviewer administered quantitative questionnaire was conducted at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24. Semi-structured qualitative interviews (SSI) were conducted at weeks 2, 8, 12, and 24. Results The majority of participants in both arms reported rapid and sustained behavior change following diagnosis with AHI. Very few participants reported having sex without a condom after diagnosis. Participants reported a trend towards fewer sex partners and abstaining from sex during study follow-up. Participants in the MI-based arm provided concrete examples of risk reduction strategies in the SSIs while those in the brief education arm primarily described reducing risk behavior, suggesting that the MI-based group may have acquired more risk reduction skills. Conclusions Individuals in both study arms reduced risky sexual behaviors after diagnosis with AHI. We found few major differences between study arms during the 6-month follow up period in self-reported sexual behaviors therefore a MI-based intervention may not be needed to trigger behavior change following AHI. However, comparing the MI-based intervention to repeated brief education sessions made it difficult to assess the potential benefit of an MI-based intervention in a setting where standard counseling often consists of one post-test session. Nevertheless, provision of counseling immediately following diagnosis

  16. A Novel Assay to Measure the Magnitude of the Inducible Viral Reservoir in HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Fromentin, Rémi; Kulpa, Deanna A.; Brehm, Jessica H.; Bebin, Anne-Gaelle; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; O'Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Hecht, Frederick M.; Hoh, Rebecca; Barnard, Richard J.O.; Miller, Michael D.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Deeks, Steven G.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Chomont, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantifying latently infected cells is critical to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the size of the long-lived viral reservoir, but the low frequency of these cells makes this very challenging. Methods We developed TILDA (Tat/rev Induced Limiting Dilution Assay) to measure the frequency of cells with inducible multiply-spliced HIV RNA, as these transcripts are usually absent in latently infected cells but induced upon viral reactivation. TILDA requires less than a million cells, does not require RNA extraction and can be completed in two days. Findings In suppressed individuals on ART, we found the median frequency of latently infected CD4 + T cells as estimated by TILDA to be 24 cells/million, which was 48 times more than the frequency measured by the quantitative viral outgrowth assay, and 6–27 times less than the frequencies of cells harbouring viral DNA measured by PCR-based assays. TILDA measurements strongly correlated with most HIV DNA assays. The size of the latent reservoir measured by TILDA was lower in subjects who initiated ART during the early compared to late stage of infection (p = 0.011). In untreated HIV disease, the frequency of CD4 + cells carrying latent but inducible HIV largely exceeded the frequency of actively producing cells, demonstrating that the majority of infected cells are transcriptionally silent even in the absence of ART. Interpretations Our results suggest that TILDA is a reproducible and sensitive approach to measure the frequency of productively and latently infected cells in clinical settings. We demonstrate that the latent reservoir represents a substantial fraction of all infected cells prior to ART initiation. Research in context In this manuscript, we describe the development of a novel assay that measures the magnitude of the latent HIV reservoir, the main barrier to HIV eradication. This novel assay, termed TILDA for Tat/rev Induced Limiting Dilution Assay, requires only

  17. Individual-Level and Partner-Level Predictors of Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection Among Black and White Men Who Have Sex with Men in Baltimore, MD.

    PubMed

    Maulsby, Cathy; Jain, Kriti; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Flynn, Colin P; Holtgrave, David

    2015-05-01

    Black MSM continue to be the group most disproportionately impacted by HIV in the United States. This study assesses the relationship between partner-level and respondent-level characteristics and newly diagnosed HIV infection among a sample of MSM. Ego-centric data were gathered using venue-based time-space sampling on 335 men who reported on a total of 831 male anal sex partners. In multivariate analyses, age of partner, HIV status of partner, and respondent having had an STD in the past twelve months were associated with a newly diagnosed HIV infection among black MSM. Efforts for black MSM are needed that aim to increase HIV and STD testing, foster open communication between partners about HIV status, and address social determinants of health. PMID:25092514

  18. Net survival of perinatally and postnatally HIV-infected children: a pooled analysis of individual data from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Milly; Becquet, Renaud; Zaba, Basia; Moulton, Lawrence H; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Dabis, François; Newell, Marie-Louise; Ghys, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously, HIV epidemic models have used a double Weibull curve to represent high initial and late mortality of HIV-infected children, without distinguishing timing of infection (peri- or post-natally). With more data on timing of infection, which may be associated with disease progression, a separate representation of children infected early and late was proposed. Methods Paediatric survival post-HIV infection without anti-retroviral treatment was calculated using pooled data from 12 studies with known timing of HIV infection. Children were grouped into perinatally or post-natally infected. Net mortality was calculated using cause-deleted life tables to give survival as if HIV was the only competing cause of death. To extend the curve beyond the available data, children surviving beyond 2.5 years post infection were assumed to have the same survival as young adults. Double Weibull curves were fitted to both extended survival curves to represent survival of children infected perinatally or through breastfeeding. Results Those children infected perinatally had a much higher risk of dying than those infected through breastfeeding, even allowing for background mortality. The final-fitted double Weibull curves gave 75% survival at 5 months after infection for perinatally infected, and 1.1 years for post-natally infected children. An estimated 25% of the early infected children would still be alive at 10.6 years compared with 16.9 years for those infected through breastfeeding. Conclusions The increase in available data has enabled separation of child mortality patterns by timing of infection allowing improvement and more flexibility in modelling of paediatric HIV infection and survival. PMID:21247884

  19. Polypharmacy in the HIV-infected older adult population

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Lauren J; Luque, Amneris E; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among people older than 50 years is increasing. Older HIV-infected patients are particularly at risk for polypharmacy because they often have multiple comorbidities that require pharmacotherapy. Overall, there is not much known with respect to both the impact of aging on medication use in HIV-infected individuals, and the potential for interactions with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and coadministered medications and its clinical consequences. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of polypharmacy with a focus on its impact on the HIV-infected older adult population and to also provide some clinical considerations in this high-risk population. PMID:23818773

  20. HIV-infection in the US, Canada, India and Thailand.

    PubMed

    1996-09-30

    A survey conducted in the US, Canada, India, and Thailand found that substantial numbers of health personnel were unaware both of problems associated with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serologic test and of the asymptomatic stage of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The proportion of surveyed physicians who had treated an HIV-infected patient ranged from a low of 30% in India to a high of 98% in the US. Mean HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) knowledge scores were 83% in India, 84% in Thailand, 92% in Canada, and 93% in the US. Only 67% of health care providers from India understood the concept of false-negative ELISA test results, and only 78% of Canadian and 76% of US respondents understood the meaning of a false-positive result. Awareness of asymptomatic HIV infection ranged from 32% in India to 74% in Canada. The level of comfort in caring for AIDS patients and AIDS knowledge scores were directly correlated with the amount of previous contact with HIV-infected patients. India and Thailand have been identified by the World Health Organization as the countries likely to experience the sharpest increases in HIV in the years ahead. AIDS prevention efforts in these countries have been hindered by religious and cultural proscriptions against public discussions of sexuality, mistaken idea that AIDS is a foreigners' disease, inadequate funding, and concerns about adverse effects on the tourist industry. PMID:12179204

  1. Is Impact of Statin Therapy on All-Cause Mortality Different in HIV-Infected Individuals Compared to General Population? Results from the FHDH-ANRS CO4 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sylvie; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Partisani, Marialuisa; Bidegain, Frédéric; Cotte, Laurent; Aslangul, Elisabeth; Chéret, Antoine; Boccara, Franck; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Pradier, Christian; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Tattevin, Pierre; Costagliola, Dominique; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on all-cause mortality in the general population has been estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.79-0.94) for primary prevention. Reported values in HIV-infected individuals have been discordant. We assessed the impact of statin-based primary prevention on all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals. Methods Patients were selected among controls from a multicentre nested case-control study on the risk of myocardial infarction. Patients with prior cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disorders were not eligible. Potential confounders, including variables that were associated either with statin use and/or death occurrence and statin use were evaluated within the last 3 months prior to inclusion in the case-control study. Using an intention to continue approach, multiple imputation of missing data, Cox’s proportional hazard models or propensity based weighting, the impact of statins on the 7-year all-cause mortality was evaluated. Results Among 1,776 HIV-infected individuals, 138 (8%) were statins users. During a median follow-up of 53 months, 76 deaths occurred, including 6 in statin users. Statin users had more cardiovascular risk factors and a lower CD4 T cell nadir than statin non-users. In univariable analysis, the death rate was higher in statins users (11% vs 7%, HR 1.22, 95%CI 0.53-2.82). The confounders accounted for were age, HIV transmission group, current CD4 T cell count, haemoglobin level, body mass index, smoking status, anti-HCV antibodies positivity, HBs antigen positivity, diabetes and hypertension. In the Cox multivariable model the estimated hazard ratio of statin on all-cause mortality was estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.34-2.19) and it was 0.83 (95%CI 0.51-1.35) using inverse probability treatment weights. Conclusion The impact of statin for primary prevention appears similar in HIV-infected individuals and in the general population. PMID:26200661

  2. A preliminary evaluation of the cognitive and motor effects of pediatric HIV infection in Zairian children.

    PubMed

    Boivin, M J; Green, S D; Davies, A G; Giordani, B; Mokili, J K; Cutting, W A

    1995-01-01

    Fourteen asymptomatic HIV-infected Zairian children under 2 years of age displayed social and motor developmental deficits on the Denver Developmental Screening Test when compared with 20 HIV-negative cohorts born to HIV-infected mothers and 16 control children. In a second study, 11 infected children over 2 years of age had sequential motor and visual-spatial memory deficits on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children and motor development deficits on the Early Childhood Screening Profiles. HIV infection affects central nervous system structures mediating motor and spatial memory development, even in seemingly asymptomatic children. Furthermore, maternal HIV infection compromises the labor-intensive provision of care in the African milieu and undermines global cognitive development in even uninfected children. PMID:7737068

  3. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  4. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  5. [HIV infection : Test and treatment].

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, J K; Wasmuth, J-C

    2016-08-01

    In Europe depending on the country 15-80 % of all individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are either not aware of the diagnosis or are diagnosed later. An early HIV diagnosis could, however, considerably improve the prognosis of individuals infected with HIV and decrease the risk of new infections; therefore, in the presence of indicator diseases, such as sexually transmitted diseases, oral thrush, herpes zoster and lymphoma, the performance of a HIV test is of utmost importance. A newly diagnosed HIV infection represents an indication for starting antiretroviral combination therapy independent of the clinical stage or CD4 cell count. A decline of the viral burden to below the limit of detection and subsequent continuous suppression of viral replication can prevent transition from HIV to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and if started early enough a normal life expectancy can be achieved. Challenges which remain in HIV therapy are the lifelong daily intake of medication and the complex long-term adverse effects. PMID:27368530

  6. Global oral inequalities in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, S J

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of the prevalence and incidence of HIV infection globally reveal striking variances with regard to continent, country, region and gender. Of the global total of 33 million people infected with HIV, approximately 65% are in sub-Saharan African countries and 15% in South and South-East Asia with the remaining 20% spread over the rest of the world. As a percentage of the population, the Caribbean at 1.1% is second only to sub-Saharan Africa (5.5%). The majority of the world's HIV is in women. Deaths from HIV are twenty-fold greater in Africa than in Europe or the USA. Individual countries in sub-Saharan Africa show huge variances in the HIV+ prevalence with most West African countries having a rate of less than 2% whilst southern African countries including Swaziland and Botswana have rates of around 25%. Environment, education and social habits all contribute to the HIV infection rates. Similar variations between countries are seen in SE Asia with Cambodia and Papua New Guinea having rates three times greater than Pakistan. One of the most striking examples of inequality is in life years added to HIV populations as a result of antiretroviral therapy. UN AIDS figures over 1996-2008 suggest an average of 2.88 added years in the USA and Europe, but only 0.1 in sub-Saharan Africa, a thirty-fold difference largely due to accessibility to ART. ART leads to a reduction in oral lesions but it is estimated that some 10 million HIV+ subjects do not have access to oral care. Thus, inequalities exist both for HIV infection and for the associated oral lesions, mainly related to ART access. HIV infection and oral mucosal lesions both appear to be related to general social determinants of health. Oral HCW must be part of mainstream healthcare teams to address these inequalities. PMID:27109270

  7. Elevation of Non-Classical (CD14+/lowCD16++) Monocytes Is Associated with Increased Albuminuria and Urine TGF-β1 in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Brooks I.; Byron, Mary Margaret; Ng, Roland C.; Chow, Dominic C.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective High rates of albuminuria are observed among HIV-infected individuals on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART). Though pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses are described as components of albuminuria in the general population, it is unclear how these responses are associated to albuminuria in ART-treated chronic HIV. We investigated the relationship of monocyte subsets and urine inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers to albuminuria in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Design and Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Hawaii Aging with HIV-cardiovascular disease study cohort participants who were required at entry to be ≥40 years old and on ART ≥3 months. Monocyte subpopulations were determined in banked peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using multi-parametric flow-cytometry. Entry random urine samples were assessed for albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACR). Urine samples were measured for inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers using Luminex technology. Results Among 96 HIV-infected subjects with measured UACR (87% male, 59% Caucasian, and 89% undetectable HIV RNA with median CD4 of 495.5 cells/μL), 18 patients (19%) had albuminuria. Non-classical (CD14low/+CD16++) monocytes were significantly elevated in subjects with albuminuria (p = 0.034) and were correlated to UACR (r = 0.238, p = 0.019). Elevated non-classical monocyte counts were significant predictors of worsening albuminuria, independent of traditional- and ART-associated risk factors (β = 0.539, p = 0.007). Urine TGF-β1 and collagen-IV were significantly higher in albuminuric compared to non-albuminuric participants (TGF-β1; p = 0.039 and collagen-IV; p = 0.042). Urine TGF-β1 was significantly correlated with non-classical monocyte counts (r = 0.464, p = 0.017). Conclusion Alterations in monocyte subpopulations and urine pro-fibrotic factors may play a role in kidney dysfunction during chronic HIV infection and warrants further study. PMID:27097224

  8. Plastin 3 is upregulated in iPSC-derived motoneurons from asymptomatic SMN1-deleted individuals.

    PubMed

    Heesen, Ludwig; Peitz, Michael; Torres-Benito, Laura; Hölker, Irmgard; Hupperich, Kristina; Dobrindt, Kristina; Jungverdorben, Johannes; Ritzenhofen, Swetlana; Weykopf, Beatrice; Eckert, Daniela; Hosseini-Barkooie, Seyyed Mohsen; Storbeck, Markus; Fusaki, Noemi; Lonigro, Renata; Heller, Raoul; Kye, Min Jeong; Brüstle, Oliver; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2016-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a devastating motoneuron (MN) disorder caused by homozygous loss of SMN1. Rarely, SMN1-deleted individuals are fully asymptomatic despite carrying identical SMN2 copies as their SMA III-affected siblings suggesting protection by genetic modifiers other than SMN2. High plastin 3 (PLS3) expression has previously been found in lymphoblastoid cells but not in fibroblasts of asymptomatic compared to symptomatic siblings. To find out whether PLS3 is also upregulated in MNs of asymptomatic individuals and thus a convincing SMA protective modifier, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of three asymptomatic and three SMA III-affected siblings from two families and compared these to iPSCs from a SMA I patient and control individuals. MNs were differentiated from iPSC-derived small molecule neural precursor cells (smNPCs). All four genotype classes showed similar capacity to differentiate into MNs at day 8. However, SMA I-derived MN survival was significantly decreased while SMA III- and asymptomatic-derived MN survival was moderately reduced compared to controls at day 27. SMN expression levels and concomitant gem numbers broadly matched SMN2 copy number distribution; SMA I presented the lowest levels, whereas SMA III and asymptomatic showed similar levels. In contrast, PLS3 was significantly upregulated in mixed MN cultures from asymptomatic individuals pinpointing a tissue-specific regulation. Evidence for strong PLS3 accumulation in shaft and rim of growth cones in MN cultures from asymptomatic individuals implies an important role in neuromuscular synapse formation and maintenance. These findings provide strong evidence that PLS3 is a genuine SMA protective modifier. PMID:26573968

  9. Suitability of HIV-Infected Subjects for Insurance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmukh; Salkind, Alan R; Kneepkens, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives .- To ascertain the suitability of HIV-positive individuals for insurance coverage based on international data and practices. Background .- During the first decade of HIV epidemic, diagnosis of HIV-infection carried a poor prognosis. Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART or ART), HIV infection is more like other chronic diseases with infected individuals often living 20 or more years after the diagnosis of HIV infection Methods .- Review of peer-reviewed publications was undertaken to assess the risk of death in the HIV-infected population as a whole as well as subsets with favorable outcomes and those with additional comorbidities, such as co-infection with hepatitis viruses and drug use. Results .- Review of literature revealed that in well-educated, non-drug using individuals, negative for hepatitis B and C infection, who had CD 4 counts above 500/cmm, viral loads below 500 particles/mL, and were compliant with treatment, the mortality rate was similar to that of general population. Conclusions .- The risk of death, in at least a subset of HIV-positive subjects, is low enough that insurance providers should consider stratifying HIV-infected individuals according to mortality risk and offering insurance rates comparable to people with other diseases with similar mortality risks. PMID:27584807

  10. High Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Asymptomatic Individuals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Mvumbi, Dieudonné Makaba; Bobanga, Thierry Lengu; Melin, Pierrette; De Mol, Patrick; Kayembe, Jean-Marie Ntumba; Situakibanza, Hippolyte Nani-Tuma; Mvumbi, Georges Lelo; Nsibu, Célestin Ndosimao; Umesumbu, Solange Efundu; Hayette, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains a major public health problem in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) with 14 million cases reported by the WHO Malaria Report in 2014. Asymptomatic malaria cases are known to be prevalent in endemic areas and are generally untreated, resulting in a significant source of gametocytes that may serve as reservoir of disease transmission. Considering that microscopy certainly underestimates the prevalence of Plasmodium infections within asymptomatic carriers and that PCR assays are currently recognized as the most sensitive methods for Plasmodium identification, this study was conducted to weigh the asymptomatic carriage in DRC by a molecular method. Six provinces were randomly selected for blood collection in which 80 to 100 individuals were included in the study. Five hundred and eighty blood samples were collected and molecular diagnosis was performed. Globally, almost half of the samples collected from asymptomatic individuals (280/580; 48.2%) had Plasmodium infections and the most species identified was P. falciparum alone in combination with P. malariae. The high prevalence reported here should interpellate the bodies involved in malaria control in DR Congo to take into account asymptomatic carriers in actions taken and consider asymptomatic malaria as a major hurdle for malaria elimination. PMID:26942036

  11. Regulatory T cells generated during cytomegalovirus in vitro stimulation of mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals on HAART correlate with decreased lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jesser, Renee D.; Li, Shaobing; Weinberg, Adriana . E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@uchsc.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-infected patients fail to fully recover cell-mediated immunity despite HAART. To identify regulatory factors, we studied the phenotype and function of in vitro cytomegalovirus (CMV)-stimulated T cells from HAART recipients. CFSE-measured proliferation showed CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells dividing in CMV-stimulated cultures. Compared with healthy controls, CMV-stimulated lymphocytes from HAART recipients had lower {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation; lower IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} production; higher CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} and CD8{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} frequencies; lower CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}; and higher FoxP3 expression in CD8{sup +}CD25{sup hi} cells. CMV-specific proliferation correlated with higher IFN{gamma}, TNF{alpha} and IL10 levels and higher CD4{sup +}perforin{sup +} and CD8{sup +}perforin{sup +} frequencies. Decreased proliferation correlated with higher CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} frequencies and TGF{beta}1 production, which also correlated with each other. Anti-TGF{beta}1 neutralizing antibodies restored CMV-specific proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. In HIV-infected subjects, decreased proliferation correlated with higher CMV-stimulated CD8{sup +}CD25{sup hi} frequencies and their FoxP3 expression. These data indicate that FoxP3- and TGF{beta}1-expressing regulatory T cells contribute to decreased immunity in HAART recipients.

  12. Preventing HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Auerbach, Judith D.; Aral, Sevgi O.; Hodder, Sally; Wingood, Gina; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of new infections has declined recently, women still constitute almost half of the world's 34 million people with HIV infection, and HIV remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Prevention research has made considerable progress during the past few years in addressing the biological, behavioral and social factors that influence women's vulnerability to HIV infection. Nevertheless, substantial work still must be done in order to implement scientific advancements and to resolve the many questions that remain. This article highlights some of the recent advances and persistent gaps in HIV prevention research for women and outlines key research and policy priorities. PMID:23764631

  13. Body Composition in Individuals with Asymptomatic Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2016-02-01

    Greater body mass index (BMI) is associated with a greater risk of osteoarthritis (OA). This study sought to investigate whether the association is mediated by fat mass or lean mass. The study involved 170 men and 488 women aged between 20 and 90 (average age: 55) who were randomly recruited from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The presence of knee OA was radiographically diagnosed based on the Kellgren-Lawrence criteria. Lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were obtained from the DXA whole body scan (Hologic QDR-4500). The relationship between OA, LM, and FM was analyzed by a series of multiple linear regression models which take into account the effects of gender and age. As expected, men and women with knee OA were older than those without OA (65 vs 51 year in men, and 64 vs 52 year in women). After adjusting for age, OA was associated with greater FM and percent body fat (PBF), but the association was only observed in women, not in men. There was no statistically significant difference in LM between OA and non-OA individuals. Moreover, after adjusting for age and BMI or PBF, bone density in OA patients was not significantly different from non-OA individuals. Women with OA of the knee have greater fat mass than non-OA individuals, and that there is no significant difference in bone density between OA and non-OA individuals. Thus, the association between body mass index and OA is mainly mediated by fat mass. PMID:26590808

  14. Gastrointestinal symptoms in ambulatory HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    May, G R; Gill, M J; Church, D L; Sutherland, L R

    1993-08-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are commonly seen in patients with established AIDS. We examined the charts of 258 HIV-infected patients attending our HIV outpatient clinic to determine: (1) the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in unselected HIV-infected patients and (2) if there are any predictors of the development of symptoms in initially asymptomatic patients. We found the overall frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms at initial presentation in our ambulatory, predominantly homosexual population of HIV-infected patients was 35% (95% CI 30-40%) with 19% having anorexia, 15% weight loss, 14% diarrhea, and 5% dysphagia. There was no association between the presence of symptoms and stool parasites, which were found in 51% of patients. In 165 patients who were initially asymptomatic, 72% subsequently developed symptoms over 36 months of actuarial follow-up. Patients with initial T4 counts < 500 were more likely to develop symptoms. Patients with a greater degree of immunosuppression as indicated by a lower T4 count, are more likely to develop gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:8102092

  15. Identifying Recent HIV Infections: From Serological Assays to Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Sikhulile; Wilkinson, Eduan; Novitsky, Vladimir; Vandormael, Alain; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Essex, Max; Engelbrecht, Susan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review serological and molecular based methods to identify HIV infection recency. The accurate identification of recent HIV infection continues to be an important research area and has implications for HIV prevention and treatment interventions. Longitudinal cohorts that follow HIV negative individuals over time are the current gold standard approach, but they are logistically challenging, time consuming and an expensive enterprise. Methods that utilize cross-sectional testing and biomarker information have become an affordable alternative to the longitudinal approach. These methods use well-characterized biological makers to differentiate between recent and established HIV infections. However, recent results have identified a number of limitations in serological based assays that are sensitive to the variability in immune responses modulated by HIV subtypes, viral load and antiretroviral therapy. Molecular methods that explore the dynamics between the timing of infection and viral evolution are now emerging as a promising approach. The combination of serological and molecular methods may provide a good solution to identify recent HIV infection in cross-sectional data. As part of this review, we present the advantages and limitations of serological and molecular based methods and their potential complementary role for the identification of HIV infection recency. PMID:26512688

  16. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Antiretroviral Drug Regimens.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral drug regimens has transformed HIV infection from a fatal illness into a manageable chronic condition. All patients with HIV infection should be considered for antiretroviral therapy, regardless of CD4 count or HIV viral load, for individual benefit and to prevent HIV transmission. Antiretroviral drugs affect HIV in several ways: entry inhibitors block HIV entry into CD4 T cells; nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription from RNA to DNA via chain-terminating proteins; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription through enzymatic inhibition; integrase strand transfer inhibitors block integration of viral DNA into cellular DNA; protease inhibitors block maturation and production of the virus. Current guidelines recommend six combination regimens for initial therapy. Five are based on tenofovir and emtricitabine; the other uses abacavir and lamivudine. Five include integrase strand transfer inhibitors. HIV specialists should assist with treating patients with complicated HIV infection, including patients with treatment-resistant HIV infection, coinfection with hepatitis B or C virus, pregnancy, childhood infections, severe opportunistic infections, complex drug interactions, significant drug toxicity, or comorbidities. Family physicians can treat most patients with HIV infection effectively by choosing appropriate treatment regimens, monitoring patients closely, and retaining patients in care. PMID:27092564

  17. Identifying Recent HIV Infections: From Serological Assays to Genomics.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Sikhulile; Wilkinson, Eduan; Novitsky, Vladimir; Vandormael, Alain; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Essex, Max; Engelbrecht, Susan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we review serological and molecular based methods to identify HIV infection recency. The accurate identification of recent HIV infection continues to be an important research area and has implications for HIV prevention and treatment interventions. Longitudinal cohorts that follow HIV negative individuals over time are the current gold standard approach, but they are logistically challenging, time consuming and an expensive enterprise. Methods that utilize cross-sectional testing and biomarker information have become an affordable alternative to the longitudinal approach. These methods use well-characterized biological makers to differentiate between recent and established HIV infections. However, recent results have identified a number of limitations in serological based assays that are sensitive to the variability in immune responses modulated by HIV subtypes, viral load and antiretroviral therapy. Molecular methods that explore the dynamics between the timing of infection and viral evolution are now emerging as a promising approach. The combination of serological and molecular methods may provide a good solution to identify recent HIV infection in cross-sectional data. As part of this review, we present the advantages and limitations of serological and molecular based methods and their potential complementary role for the identification of HIV infection recency. PMID:26512688

  18. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicting severe damage to mucosal barriers, resulting in tissue infiltration of ‘symbiotic’ intestinal bacteria and viruses that essentially become opportunistic infections promoting systemic immune activation. This leads to activation and recruitment or more target cells for perpetuating HIV infection, resulting in persistent, high level viral replication in lymphoid tissues, rapid evolution of resistant strains, and continued evasion of immune responses. However, vaccine studies and studies of spontaneous controllers are finally providing correlates of immunity from protection and disease progression, including virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, binding antibodies, innate immune responses, and generation of antibodies with potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity. Emerging correlates of immunity indicate that prevention of HIV infection may be possible through effective vaccine strategies that protect and stimulate key regulatory cells and immune responses in susceptible hosts. Further, immune therapies specifically directed towards boosting specific aspects of the immune system may eventually lead to a cure for HIV-infected patients. PMID:23772612

  19. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  20. International travel and HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C. F.; Mann, J. M.; Chin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide problem, its prevalence and pattern vary from country to country. Accordingly, the risk to international travellers of acquiring HIV infection also varies widely in different parts of the world, and depends principally on their behaviour. The risk of sexual acquisition of HIV infection can be virtually eliminated by avoiding penetrative sexual intercourse with intravenous drug users and persons who have had multiple sexual partners (such as prostitutes) or reduced by the use of condoms. The risk of parenteral exposure to HIV can be reduced by avoiding parenteral drug use and behaviour that is likely to lead to injury (with its attendant risk of requiring blood transfusion) and by seeking medical facilities with adequate capabilities to screen blood donors for HIV and to sterilize instruments. HIV screening of international travellers is an ineffective, costly, and impractical public health strategy for limiting the worldwide spread of HIV infection. Travellers infected with HIV require specialized advice regarding health precautions, prophylactic medications, and immunization. PMID:2194689

  1. Metagenomics and the Human Virome in Asymptomatic Individuals.

    PubMed

    Rascovan, Nicolás; Duraisamy, Raja; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have revolutionized how we think about viruses. Investigators can now go beyond pathogenic viruses and have access to the thousands of viruses that inhabit our bodies without causing clinical symptoms. By studying their interactions with each other, with other microbes, and with host genetics and immune systems, we can learn how they affect health and disease. This article reviews current knowledge of the composition and diversity of the human virome in physiologically healthy individuals. It focuses on recent results from metagenomics studies and discusses the contribution of bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses to human health. PMID:27607550

  2. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  3. HIV-Infected Individuals with Low CD4/CD8 Ratio despite Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Altered T Cell Subsets, Heightened CD8+ T Cell Activation, and Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Lee, Sulggi A.; Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Ferre, April L.; Hayes, Timothy L.; Somsouk, Ma; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Lederman, Michael M.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Jain, Vivek; Huang, Yong; Hecht, Frederick M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; McCune, Joseph M.; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    A low CD4/CD8 ratio in elderly HIV-uninfected adults is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A subset of HIV-infected adults receiving effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) fails to normalize this ratio, even after they achieve normal CD4+ T cell counts. The immunologic and clinical characteristics of this clinical phenotype remain undefined. Using data from four distinct clinical cohorts and three clinical trials, we show that a low CD4/CD8 ratio in HIV-infected adults during otherwise effective ART (after CD4 count recovery above 500 cells/mm3) is associated with a number of immunological abnormalities, including a skewed T cell phenotype from naïve toward terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells, higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation (HLADR+CD38+) and senescence (CD28− and CD57+CD28−), and higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Changes in the peripheral CD4/CD8 ratio are also reflective of changes in gut mucosa, but not in lymph nodes. In a longitudinal study, individuals who initiated ART within six months of infection had greater CD4/CD8 ratio increase compared to later initiators (>2 years). After controlling for age, gender, ART duration, nadir and CD4 count, the CD4/CD8 ratio predicted increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Hence, a persistently low CD4/CD8 ratio during otherwise effective ART is associated with increased innate and adaptive immune activation, an immunosenescent phenotype, and higher risk of morbidity/mortality. This ratio may prove useful in monitoring response to ART and could identify a unique subset of individuals needed of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:24831517

  4. The clinical implications of HIV infection and aging.

    PubMed

    John, M

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study, presented as part of a plenary session at WW7 in Hyderabad, India were to review (i) the epidemiology and current clinical issues of HIV infection with regard to HIV and older populations and (ii) models for increased morbidity and mortality in older HIV-positive individuals with implications for clinical care. HIV infection for those in treatment has become a complex chronic disease in which end-organ injury and resulting morbidity, functional decline, and mortality do not have a single etiology but reflect cumulative loss of organ system reserve from multiple interacting sources leading to functional decline, organ system failure, and death. Emerging guidelines and recommendations suggest a need for increased awareness and treatment of the multifaceted needs of the aging HIV-infected patient. PMID:27109276

  5. Diagnostic tests in HIV management: a review of clinical and laboratory strategies to monitor HIV-infected individuals in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Goldie, Sue J.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review on the performance of diagnostic tests for clinical and laboratory monitoring of HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Diagnostic test information collected from computerized databases, bibliographies and the Internet were categorized as clinical (non-laboratory patient information), immunologic (information from immunologic laboratory tests), or virologic (information from virologic laboratory tests). Of the 51 studies selected for the review 28 assessed immunologic tests, 12 virologic tests and seven clinical and immunologic tests. Methods of performance evaluation were primarily sensitivity and specificity for the clinical category and correlation coefficients for immunologic and virologic categories. In the clinical category, the majority of test performance measures was reported as >70% sensitive and >65% specific. In the immunologic category, correlation coefficients ranged from r=0.54 to r=0.99 for different CD4 count enumeration techniques, while correlation for CD4 and total lymphocyte counts was between r=0.23 and r=0.74. In the virologic category, correlation coefficients for different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ribonucleic acid (RNA) quantification techniques ranged from r=0.54 to r=0.90. Future research requires consensus on designing studies, and collecting and reporting data useful for decision-makers. We recommend classifying information into clinically relevant categories, using a consistent definition of disease across studies and providing measures of both association and accuracy. PMID:16878233

  6. Acute HIV infection - New York City, 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-11-27

    Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (AHI) is a highly infectious phase of disease that lasts approximately 2 months and is characterized by nonspecific clinical symptoms. AHI contributes disproportionately to HIV transmission because it is associated with a high level of viremia, despite negative or indeterminate antibody (Ab) tests. Diagnosis of AHI with individual or pooled nucleic acid amplification tests (p-NAAT) can enable infected persons to adopt behaviors that reduce HIV transmission, facilitate partner referral for counseling and testing, and identify social networks of persons with elevated rates of HIV transmission. The national HIV surveillance case definition does not distinguish AHI from other stages of HIV infection, and the frequency of AHI among reported HIV cases is unknown. In 2008, to increase detection of AHI and demonstrate the feasibility of AHI surveillance, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) initiated p-NAAT screening at four sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics and enhanced citywide HIV surveillance (using a standard case definition) to differentiate AHI among newly reported cases. Seventy cases of AHI (representing 1.9% of all 3,635 HIV diagnoses reported in New York City) were identified: 53 cases from enhanced surveillance and 17 cases from p-NAAT screening (representing 9% of 198 HIV diagnoses at the four clinics). Men who have sex with men (MSM) constituted 81% of AHI cases. Screening STD clinic patients, especially MSM, with p-NAAT can identify additional cases of HIV infection. Surveillance for AHI is feasible and can identify circumstances in which HIV prevention efforts should be intensified. PMID:19940835

  7. Disseminated Sporothrix brasiliensis Infection with Endocardial and Ocular Involvement in an HIV-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Vergara, Mario León; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Silva, Patricia Ferreira; Abdalla, Michel Reis; Sgarbieri, Ricardo Nilsson; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; dos Santos, Keila Cristina; Barata, Cristina Hueb; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated sporotrichosis occurs in individuals with impaired cellular immunity, such as in cases of neoplasia, transplantation, diabetes, and especially, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This report presents a 32-year-old Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient who developed a protracted condition of disseminated sporotrichosis with endocarditis, bilateral endophthalmitis, and lymphatic involvement. He needed cardiac surgery to replace the mitral valve. Sporothrix brasiliensis isolates were recovered from cultures of subcutaneous nodules and mitral valve fragments. Species identification was based on classical and molecular methods. The patient received amphotericin B for 52 days and subsequently, oral itraconazole. He remains asymptomatic, and he is on maintenance therapy with itraconazole. Despite his positive clinical outcome, he developed bilateral blindness. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of endocarditis and endophthalmitis caused by S. brasiliensis. PMID:22403321

  8. Sexual Partner Notification of HIV Infection Among a National United States-Based Sample of HIV-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, E. J.; Gordon, K. S.; Hogben, M.; Crystal, S.; Bryant, K.; Justice, A.C.; Fiellin, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Limited data exist on whether sexual partner notification practices among HIV-infected men, particularly those who have sex with men (MSM), vary by HIV viral load. We examined factors associated with complete (all partners) vs. incomplete partner notification in 760 HIV-infected individuals across the United States, 49% of whom were MSM. Thirty-four percent reported incomplete partner notification. Incomplete partner notification was more likely among black men, MSM, and those reporting casual partners and non-condom use. Partner notification practices did not vary by HIV viral load except among those with casual partners in whom a detectable viral load was associated with incomplete partner notification. Increased sexual partner notification among HIV-infected men, especially MSM, is needed. PMID:24858394

  9. The stochastic dance of early HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Stephen J.

    2005-12-01

    The stochastic nature of early HIV infection is described in a series of models, each of which captures aspects of the dance of HIV during the early stages of infection. It is to this highly variable target that the immune response must respond. The adaptability of the various components of the immune response is an important aspect of the system's operation, as the nature of the pathogens that the response will be required to respond to and the order in which those responses must be made cannot be known beforehand. As HIV infection has direct influence over cells responsible for the immune response, the dance predicts that the immune response will be also in a variable state of readiness and capability for this task of adaptation. The description of the stochastic dance of HIV here will use the tools of stochastic models, and for the most part, simulation. The justification for this approach is that the early stages and the development of HIV diversity require that the model to be able to describe both individual sample path and patient-to-patient variability. In addition, as early viral dynamics are best described using branching processes, the explosive growth of these models both predicts high variability and rapid response of HIV to changes in system parameters.In this paper, a basic viral growth model based on a time dependent continuous-time branching process is used to describe the growth of HIV infected cells in the macrophage and lymphocyte populations. Immigration from the reservoir population is added to the basic model to describe the incubation time distribution. This distribution is deduced directly from the modeling assumptions and the model of viral growth. A system of two branching processes, one in the infected macrophage population and one in the infected lymphocyte population is used to provide a description of the relationship between the development of HIV diversity as it relates to tropism (host cell preference). The role of the immune

  10. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  11. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in HIV-infected Women: Need for Increased Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Erna Milunka; Rana, Aadia I.; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected women carry a significant burden on HPV infection and associated diseases. As HIV-infected individuals are living longer, the prevalence of HPV infection is rising and HPV-associated cytologic abnormalities remain high despite successful treatments of HIV infection. Several HPV vaccines are currently available and recommended for adolescents and adults up to age 26. The vaccine is safe, immunogenic and effective in preventing diseases due to HPV types included in the vaccines, particularly among persons without prior HPV exposure. This review summarizes available data on the use of the HPV vaccines among HIV infected women. The immunogenicity and safety of the vaccine is highlighted and in particular, barriers to vaccination among HIV infected women are discussed. PMID:26599305

  12. Skeletal muscle cellular metabolism in older HIV-infected men.

    PubMed

    Ortmeyer, Heidi K; Ryan, Alice S; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Oursler, KrisAnn K

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to low aerobic capacity. We previously reported 40% lower aerobic capacity in HIV-infected men compared to noninfected age-matched men. The objective of this study was to compare skeletal muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities in HIV-infected men on antiretroviral therapy (55 ± 1 years of age, n = 10 African American men) with age-matched controls (55 ± 1 years of age, n = 8 Caucasian men), and determine their relationship with aerobic capacity. Activity assays for mitochondrial function including enzymes involved in fatty acid activation and oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation, were performed in homogenates prepared from vastus lateralis muscle. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cardiolipin, and oxidized cardiolipin were also measured. β-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) (38%) and citrate synthase (77%) activities were significantly lower, and H2O2 (1.4-fold) and oxidized cardiolipin (1.8-fold) were significantly higher in HIV-infected men. VO2peak (mL/kg FFM/min) was 33% lower in HIV-infected men and was directly related to β-HAD and citrate synthase activity and inversely related to H2O2 and oxidized cardiolipin. Older HIV-infected men have reduced oxidative enzyme activity and increased oxidative stress compared to age-matched controls. Further research is crucial to determine whether an increase in aerobic capacity by exercise training will be sufficient to restore mitochondrial function in older HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27166139

  13. Oral and Airway Microbiota in HIV-Infected Pneumonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Shoko; Fei, Matthew; Huang, Delphine; Fong, Serena; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased frequency of recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected patients and recent studies linking the airway bacterial community (microbiota) to acute and chronic respiratory infection, little is known of the oral and airway microbiota that exist in these individuals and their propensity to harbor pathogens despite antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. This pilot study compared paired samples of the oral and airway microbiota from 15 hospitalized HIV-infected patients receiving antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. Total DNA was extracted, bacterial burden was assessed by quantitative PCR, and amplified 16S rRNA was profiled for microbiome composition using a phylogenetic microarray (16S rRNA PhyloChip). Though the bacterial burden of the airway was significantly lower than that of the oral cavity, microbiota in both niches were comparably diverse. However, oral and airway microbiota exhibited niche specificity. Oral microbiota were characterized by significantly increased relative abundance of multiple species associated with the mouth, including members of the Bacteroides, Firmicutes, and TM7 phyla, while airway microbiota were primarily characterized by a relative expansion of the Proteobacteria. Twenty-two taxa were detected in both niches, including Streptococcus bovis and Chryseobacterium species, pathogens associated with HIV-infected populations. In addition, we compared the airway microbiota of five of these patients to those of five non-HIV-infected pneumonia patients from a previous study. Compared to the control population, HIV-infected patients exhibited relative increased abundance of a large number of phylogenetically distinct taxa, which included several known or suspected pathogenic organisms, suggesting that recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected populations may be related to the presence of these species. PMID:22760045

  14. [HIV infection and human genetics].

    PubMed

    Bobkova, M R

    2009-01-01

    The review summarizes data of recent studies on the impact of human gene polymorphisms on the possibility of HIV infection, as well as the specific features of its pathogenesis, the efficiency of HIV infection treatment and the likelihood of its complication. Main information on the mechanisms responsible for viral penetration into the sensitive cells, for immune response development and involvement of HLA and KIR molecules in this process are briefly outlined. Idea on major cell proteins affecting drug metabolism and excretion and encoding for their genes are generalized. There are many examples that show how different human gene alleles and their combinations affect the nature of the pathogenetic process and the occurrence and degree of adverse reactions. The first example of successfully using the prognostic genetic analysis (HLA-B*5701) registered in 2008 to upgrade the quality of HIV infection treatment is described in detail. Basic requirements for further genetic tests to use the optimal antiretroviral therapy schemes and to reduce its hazardous effects are formulated. PMID:20481056

  15. Viral culture and p24 antigenemia of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals correlated with antibody profiles determined with recombinant polypeptides of all HIV-1 open-reading frames.

    PubMed

    Baur, A; Vornhagen, R; Korn, K; Sonneborn, H H; Eberlein, B; Harrer, T; Brockhaus, W; Jahn, G

    1992-03-01

    The association between viral activity and antibody profiles was investigated in 202 individuals infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) grouped according to their Walter Reed clinical stage. Each study group was subdivided into subjects positive or negative for markers of active viral replication: presence of serum p24 antigen and viral culture. In Western blots using recombinant antigens, sera of HIV-positive individuals with positive viral markers had a significantly lower antibody reactivity to several viral proteins than did individuals without viral markers. Noticeably, proteins of the gag (p24, p17) and env (gp120, COOH-terminal part of gp41) open-reading frames revealed a decreased reactivity. The antibody response to the regulatory proteins revealed no or poor association with viral activity in the host. The results suggest that seroreactivity is mainly influenced by factors reflecting the viral activity of an HIV-infected individual, while the clinical stage of the patient is less important. Especially, reductions in antibodies against gp120 and p17 were useful markers associated with increased viral activity. PMID:1371534

  16. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selection and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.

  17. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selectionmore » and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.« less

  18. Public Policy Affirmations Affecting the Planning and Implementation of Developmental Services for Children and Adults with HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Allen C., Comp.; And Others

    The increasing number of individuals infected with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has created a need to examine public policy issues and to further efforts in planning, implementing, and evaluating services for individuals with HIV infection and their families. A working conference was convened, which identified several…

  19. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities. PMID:24430455

  20. Screening for coronary artery disease in asymptomatic individuals: Why and how?

    PubMed

    Degrell, Philippe; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Feldman, Laurent J; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Ducrocq, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the main cause of death in the world, and coronary artery disease is the largest contributor. Screening asymptomatic individuals for coronary artery disease in view of preventive treatment is therefore of crucial interest. Apart from established risk scores based on traditional risk factors such as the Framingham or SCORE risk scores, new biomarkers and imaging methods have emerged (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2, coronary artery calcium score, carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index). Their added value on top of the classic risk scores varies considerably and the most convincing evidence exists for coronary artery calcium score in intermediate-risk asymptomatic individuals. PMID:26596251

  1. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: The Relationship of HIV Infection with Physical and Social Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Minniti, Nancy L.; Fischer, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) will undoubtedly increase with the improved longevity of HIV-infected persons. HIV infection, itself, as well as multiple physiologic and psychosocial factors can contribute to cognitive impairment and neurologic complications. These comorbidities confound the diagnosis, assessment, and interventions for neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss the role of several key comorbid factors that may contribute significantly to the development and progression of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment, as well as the current status of diagnostic strategies aimed at identifying HIV-infected individuals with impaired cognition and future research priorities and challenges. PMID:25815329

  2. Assessment of quality of life in early stage HIV-infected persons: data from the AIDS Time-oriented Health Outcome Study (ATHOS).

    PubMed

    Lubeck, D P; Fries, J F

    1997-08-01

    The development of new pharmaceutical interventions for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has resulted in extended survival and a need for valid, reliable and responsive instruments to assess health-related QoL (HRQoL). This paper reviews the reliability and validity of an HRQoL instrument, the AIDS Health Assessment Questionnaire (AIDS-HAQ), among persons participating in an observational database of HIV infection. The AIDS-HAQ includes nine subscales: disability, energy, general health, pain, cognitive functioning, mental health, social functioning, health distress and symptoms. Individuals complete the AIDS-HAQ quarterly. Data are reported for 440 individuals entering the study with early HIV infection. Fifty-nine progressed to symptomatic disease and 109 to AIDS after 1 year. The subscales of the instrument resulted in high internal consistency reliability (range = 0.79-0.88). Concurrent validity data reflected the ability to distinguish between patients with increasing disease severity. In all domains, except cognitive functioning, individuals who progressed to AIDS had significant decrements (p < 0.01) in HRQoL compared with symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Significant decrements (p < 0.01) were observed for disability, general health, energy and symptoms for patients who progressed to symptomatic disease from an asymptomatic status. Individuals who had decreasing CD4+ counts also had significant declines (p < 0.001) in disability, general health, social functioning, pain and symptoms. The AIDS-HAQ is an instrument that can be used when comparing group differences and within group changes in observational databases, naturalistic studies and clinical trials. PMID:9330550

  3. HIV infection induces morphometrical changes on the oral (buccal mucosa and tongue) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Adriane Bastos; Gil, Francisca Berenice Dias; França, Beatriz Helena Sottile; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Fernandes, Angela; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in type 1 HIV infected individuals. Oral smears were collected from tongue and buccal mucosa of 30 HIV infected (experimental) and 30 non-infected (control) individuals by liquid-based exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analyzed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. No morphological differences were found between the groups. The mean values of CA were decreased in tongue (P=.00006) and buccal mucosa (P=.00242) in HIV infected individual, while mean values of NA were increased (P=.00308 and .00095, respectively) in the same group. NA/CA ratio for experimental group was increased in both collected places, with P=.00001 (tongue) and P=.00000 (buccal mucosa). This study revealed that HIV infection was able to induce morphometrical changes on the oral epithelial cells. PMID:21198427

  4. How Many HIV infections may be averted by targeting primary infection in men who have sex with men? Quantification of changes in transmission-risk behavior, using an individual-based model.

    PubMed

    White, Peter J; Fox, Julie; Weber, Jonathan; Fidler, Sarah; Ward, Helen

    2014-12-01

    In the United Kingdom, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) is not under control, despite readily available treatment, highlighting the need to design a cost-effective combination prevention package. MSM report significantly reduced transmission risk behavior following HIV diagnosis. To assess the effectiveness of HIV diagnosis in averting transmission during highly infectious primary HIV infection (PHI), we developed a stochastic individual-based model to calculate the number of HIV-transmission events expected to occur from a cohort of recently infected MSM with and those without the behavior changes reported after diagnosis. The model incorporates different types of sex acts, incorporates condom use, and distinguishes between regular and casual sex partners. The impact on transmission in the 3 months after infection depends on PHI duration and testing frequency. If PHI lasts for 3 months and testing is performed monthly, then behavior changes after diagnosis would have reduced estimated transmission events by 49%-52%, from 31-45 to 15-23 events; a shorter duration of PHI and/or a lower testing frequency reduces the number of infections averted. Diagnosing HIV during PHI can markedly reduce transmission by changing transmission-risk behavior. Because of the high infectivity but short duration of PHI, even short-term behavior change can significantly reduce transmission. Our quantification of the number of infections averted is an essential component of assessment of the cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase detection and diagnoses of PHI. PMID:25381380

  5. HIV infection in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, V W; Radcliffe, K W

    1994-01-01

    The Caribbean is a multi-ethnic region with many different cultural differences. The majority of the population is of African descent, but there are also other ethnic groups present such as Indians, Chinese, Syrians and Europeans. The Caribbean region is influenced by countries such as the USA, Great Britain, France and Holland. The countries of the Caribbean have a serious problem with HIV infection and AIDS. The epidemiology of HIV infection in this region, is different from most other parts of the world in that the mode of spread does not easily fit into any of the three WHO patterns. This review shows that the infection initially started in the homosexual/bisexual community, but since then, it has moved to the heterosexual population and this form of contact is now the main mode of transmission of the virus. The Governments of the Caribbean countries have realized the extent of the problem and have taken measures to try to control the epidemic. PMID:8031923

  6. Epidemiology of HIV infection in central Brazil: data from voluntary counseling and testing centers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Sandra Maria Brunini; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Rezza, Giovanni; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Gir, Elucir

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) is recommended to facilitate early identification of HIV infection. Data from VCT centers in Goiás and Federal District, Central Brazil, evaluated HIV prevalence and identified risk factors for HIV among individuals ages 13 years and older. Results indicated a 1.5% overall prevalence of HIV. Factors independently associated with HIV infection were: getting tested in a large city, being illiterate, having had a previous HIV test, living with an HIV-infected sexual partner, and being a noninjection illicit drug user. Being referred by friends was strongly associated with HIV infection. For men, being a health care worker, sex worker, man who has sex with men, or injection drug user were significant. In Central Brazil, HIV remains concentrated in males and subpopulations with known risk behaviors. Higher prevalence among individuals referred to VCT by friends highlights the importance of social network-based HIV prevention interventions in Brazil. PMID:23465400

  7. Large numbers of genetic variants considered to be pathogenic are common in asymptomatic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cassa, Christopher A.; Tong, Mark Y.; Jordan, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    It is now affordable to order clinically interpreted whole genome sequence reports from clinical laboratories. One major component of these reports is derived from the knowledge base of previously identified pathogenic variants, including research articles, locus specific and other databases. While over 150,000 such pathogenic variants have been identified, many of these were originally discovered in small cohort studies of affected individuals, so their applicability to asymptomatic populations is unclear. We analyzed the prevalence of a large set of pathogenic variants from the medical and scientific literature in a large set of asymptomatic individuals (N=1,092) and found 8.5% of these pathogenic variants in at least one individual. In the average individual in the 1000 Genomes Project, previously identified pathogenic variants occur on average 294 times (σ= 25.5) in homozygous form and 942 times (σ = 68.2) in heterozygous form. We also find that many of these pathogenic variants are frequently occurring: there are 3,744 variants with MAF >= 0.01 (4.6%) and 2,837 variants with MAF >= 0.05 (3.5%). This indicates that many of these variants may be erroneous findings or have lower penetrance than previously expected. PMID:23818451

  8. Alterations of antioxidant status in asymptomatic hypercholesterolemic individuals after resveratrol intake.

    PubMed

    Apostolidou, C; Adamopoulos, K; Iliadis, S; Kourtidou-Papadeli, C

    2015-08-01

    High cholesterol is one of the risk factors for atherogenesis, leading to oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The focus of this study was to evaluate the role and the pathways of action of a natural antioxidant, resveratrol, in asymptomatic hypercholesterolemic (AHC) individuals. Forty healthy AHCs and normocholesterolemics (NCs) participated in the study. They received random-order resveratrol and placebo capsules for four weeks. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC), vitamin E and total cholesterol (TC) were measured at baseline and at the end of each intervention. Resveratrol provided a direct antioxidant effect in healthy NC individuals, but in AHC individuals, with a higher demand for antioxidant activity due to higher cholesterol levels, it acted by facilitating an increase in vitamin E. Our findings suggest that resveratrol acts synergistically with other antioxidants against oxidative stress and highlights the importance of hypercholesterolemic individuals consuming natural antioxidants instead of medications to reduce the risk of CVD, while the situation is still reversible. PMID:27108746

  9. A mathematical approach to HIV infection dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, A.; Oharu, S.; Oharu, Y.

    2007-07-01

    In order to obtain a comprehensive form of mathematical models describing nonlinear phenomena such as HIV infection process and AIDS disease progression, it is efficient to introduce a general class of time-dependent evolution equations in such a way that the associated nonlinear operator is decomposed into the sum of a differential operator and a perturbation which is nonlinear in general and also satisfies no global continuity condition. An attempt is then made to combine the implicit approach (usually adapted for convective diffusion operators) and explicit approach (more suited to treat continuous-type operators representing various physiological interactions), resulting in a semi-implicit product formula. Decomposing the operators in this way and considering their individual properties, it is seen that approximation-solvability of the original model is verified under suitable conditions. Once appropriate terms are formulated to describe treatment by antiretroviral therapy, the time-dependence of the reaction terms appears, and such product formula is useful for generating approximate numerical solutions to the governing equations. With this knowledge, a continuous model for HIV disease progression is formulated and physiological interpretations are provided. The abstract theory is then applied to show existence of unique solutions to the continuous model describing the behavior of the HIV virus in the human body and its reaction to treatment by antiretroviral therapy. The product formula suggests appropriate discrete models describing the dynamics of host pathogen interactions with HIV1 and is applied to perform numerical simulations based on the model of the HIV infection process and disease progression. Finally, the results of our numerical simulations are visualized and it is observed that our results agree with medical and physiological aspects.

  10. Syphilis in HIV-Infected Mothers and Infants: Results from the NICHD/HPTN 040 Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Nava; Watts, Heather D.; Camarca, Margaret; Soares, Gabriel; Joao, Esau; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Gray, Glenda; Theron, Gerhard; Santos, Breno; Fonseca, Rosana; Kreitchmann, Regis; Pinto, Jorge; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa; Ceriotto, Mariana; Machado, Daisy Maria; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Grinzstejn, Beatriz; Morgado, Mariza G; Bryson, Yvonne; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis during pregnancy is associated with spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, prematurity and infant mortality. Syphilis may facilitate HIV transmission, which is especially concerning in low and middle income countries where both diseases are common. Methods We performed an analysis of data available from NICHD/HPTN 040 (P1043), a study focused on the prevention of intrapartum HIV transmission to 1684 infants born to 1664 untreated HIV-infected women. The present analysis evaluates risk factors and outcomes associated with a syphilis diagnosis in this cohort of HIV-infected women and their infants. Results Approximately 10% (n=171) of women enrolled had serological evidence of syphilis without adequate treatment documented and 1.4% (n=24) infants were dually HIV and syphilis infected. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that compared to HIV-infected women, co-infected women were significantly more likely to self-identify as non-white (AOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.2), to consume alcohol during pregnancy (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1) and to transmit HIV to their infants (AOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.4), with 88% of HIV infections being acquired in-utero. As compared to HIV infected or HIV exposed infants, co-infected infants were significantly more likely to be born to mothers with VDRL titers ≥1:16 (AOR 3, 95% CI 1.1-8.2) and higher viral loads (AOR 1.5 95% CI 1.1-1.9). Of 6 newborns with symptomatic syphilis, 2 expired shortly after birth, and 2 were HIV-infected. Conclusion Syphilis continues to be a common co-infection in HIV-infected women and can facilitate in utero transmission of HIV to infants. Most infants are asymptomatic at birth, but those with symptoms have high mortality rates. PMID:25742089

  11. Clinical Care of the HIV-Infected Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and chemical dependency, both of which are complicated by and intertwined with mental illness, are complex, overlapping spheres that adversely influence each other and the overall clinical outcomes of the affected individual [1]. Each disorder individually impacts tens of millions of people, with explosive epidemics described worldwide. Drug users have increased age matched morbidity and mortality for a number of medical and psychiatric conditions. HIV/AIDS, with its immunosuppressed states and direct virologic effects, exacerbate morbidity and mortality further among HIV-infected drug users. This article addresses the adverse consequences of HIV/AIDS, drug injection, the secondary comorbidities of both, and the impact of immunosuppression on presentation of disease as well as approaches to managing the HIV-infected drug user. PMID:17502234

  12. Data on pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-17, and IL-6 in the peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Saing, Tommy; Valdivia, Anddre; Hussain, Parveen; Ly, Judy; Gonzalez, Leslie; Guilford, Frederick T; Pearce, Daniel; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2016-09-01

    Our most recent data indicate differences in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, and IL-6) and malondialdehyde (MDA), a stable end-product of lipid peroxidation in the plasma samples between HIV positive individuals with low CD4 T cell counts <200 mm(3) and HIV positive individuals with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 300 mm(3) (ee). The data lend support and provide valuable correlation between CD4 T cell counts and the levels of inflammatory cytokines in HIV positive individuals. PMID:27508262

  13. [Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons].

    PubMed

    Marchewka, Zofia; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Knysz, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons. PMID:26671927

  14. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed. PMID:8867206

  15. Solid organ transplantation and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Polak, Wojciech G; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection has been traditionally considered to be an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplantation. Recent advances in HIV treatment, as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), significantly reduced HIV-related mortality and morbidity. At the same time the number of HIV-infected patients with end-stage organ diseases constantly increased. Current data describing solid organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients demonstrated comparable outcome to that in the HIV-negative population. In light of this, solid organ transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for selected HIV-positive patients with end-stage organ disease. PMID:15171000

  16. Impact of HIV infection on the haemostatic response during sepsis and malaria.

    PubMed

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Kalkman, Rachel; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Alabi, Abraham S; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Grobusch, Martin P; Meijers, Joost C M; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Patients positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are more susceptible to sepsis and malaria, two conditions known to activate the coagulation system. As chronic HIV infection also influences haemostatic mechanisms, we determined the influence of HIV co-infection on coagulation, anticoagulation and the endothelium during sepsis or malaria. We performed a prospective observational study in 325 subjects with or without HIV infection (103 with sepsis, 127 with malaria and 95 asymptomatic controls) in an HIV endemic area in Central Africa. We measured plasma biomarkers indicative of activation of distinct haemostatic mechanisms. Sepsis and malaria had similar effects with elevated markers of coagulation, reduced anticoagulation markers and activation of endothelium. In particular, asymptomatic HIV infection reduced the plasma levels of the anticoagulant co-factor free protein S, and increased activation of the vascular endothelium, which were not normalized by combination antiretroviral therapy. HIV co-infection during sepsis and malaria caused more profound changes in free protein S and von Willebrand factor in sepsis and malaria, and ADAMTS13 in sepsis, while not influencing sepsis- or malaria-induced coagulation activation. These results show for the first time that HIV infection augments selective haemostatic changes during sepsis and malaria, which may contribute to the enhanced morbidity of these conditions in HIV patients. PMID:26970408

  17. Migration, Marital Change, and HIV Infection in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Anglewicz, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Research on the relationship between migration and HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa often suggests that migrants are at higher risk of HIV infection because they are more likely to engage in risk behavior than non-migrants, and tend to move to areas with a relatively higher HIV prevalence. While migration may be a risk factor for HIV infection, I instead focus on the possibility that the HIV positive are more likely to migrate. Using a longitudinal dataset of permanent rural residents and migrants from Malawi, I find that migrants originating from rural areas are indeed more likely than non-migrants to be HIV positive and to have engaged in HIV risk behavior. The increased HIV risk among migrants may be due to the selection of HIV positive individuals into migration; I find that HIV positive individuals are more likely migrate than those who are HIV negative. The explanation for this phenomenon appears to be marital instability, which occurs more frequently among HIV positive individuals and leads to migration after marital change. PMID:22109083

  18. Will You Still Treat Me When I'm 64? Care of the Older Adult With HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Libman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with chronic immune activation that is superimposed on immunologic senescence in older adults, resulting in the acquisition of age-related diseases at younger ages. The incidence of coronary artery disease is higher among HIV-infected persons than uninfected individuals matched for age and sex. HIV infection and its treatment have been associated with premature bone loss. Lung, hepatic, and anal cancers occur at younger ages in persons with HIV infection. HIV-infected patients are living longer, and proper attention to the management of comorbidities in this population is essential. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Howard Libman, MD, in January 2015. PMID:26200710

  19. Psychosocial impact of the lipodystrophy syndrome in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Collins, E; Wagner, C; Walmsley, S

    2000-09-01

    Lipodystrophy is a poorly understood condition associated with antiretroviral therapy in HIV infection. The symptoms may include some combination of central fat accumulation, peripheral fat depletion, and metabolic disturbance. A qualitative survey of 33 HIV-infected heterosexual women and gay men with lipodystrophy assessed psychosocial impact and effect on quality of life. Dominant themes included erosion of self-image and self-esteem, problems in social and sexual relations, threats to locus of control, forced HIV disclosure, and demoralization and depression. Another theme was clinicians' minimization of the importance of lipodystrophy. Further research is required to fully understand the psychosocial impact of lipodystrophy and to develop strategies that help individuals cope. PMID:11019453

  20. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Debes, José D; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R; Hansen, Bettina E; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74-10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5-6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina. PMID:27467394

  1. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Debes, José D.; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G.; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74–10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5–6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina. PMID:27467394

  2. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a clinical fellow in the department of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). " ... early [HIV] infection." Valcour is a professor of neurology at UCSF. "Additionally, the ubiquity of symptoms in ...

  3. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159344.html HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System But symptoms tend to subside once antiretroviral drugs ... mild, it is clear that HIV affects the nervous system within days of infection," she said in a ...

  4. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  5. Efficacy of an unsupervised 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. L.; Okwera, A.; Nsubuga, P.; Nakibali, J. G.; Whalen, C. C.; Hom, D.; Cave, M. D.; Yang, Z. H.; Mugerwa, R. D.; Ellner, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING National Tuberculosis Treatment Centre, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of a daily, self-administered 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults. DESIGN Treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary TB treated with a single 8-month regimen and followed in a prospective epidemiological study. RESULTS Two hundred and sixty-five HIV-infected and 26 non-HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with 2 months of daily isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), ethambutol and pyrazinamide followed by 6 months of daily INH + RMP. Median follow-up was 17.8 months. Ninety-five per cent of the HIV-infected and all of the non-HIV-infected patients who had sputum examined were sputum culture negative after 2 months of treatment. Twenty-two HIV-infected and no non-HIV-infected patients died during treatment. Relapse rates were 8.4% (5.9 per 100 person-years of observation [PYO], 95%CI 3.2–8.6) among HIV-infected patients and 4.5% (2.1/100 PYO, 95%CI 0–7.8) for non-HIV-infected patients. Adverse drug reactions occurred in 37% of the HIV-infected patients; most were minor and self-limiting. CONCLUSION An 8-month RMP-containing regimen was well tolerated and effective in the treatment of HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary TB. Relapse rates were similar to those reported with 6-month short-course regimens in HIV-infected individuals. Decisions about the duration of anti-tuberculosis treatment for HIV-infected adults must balance programme resources and the likelihood of poor compliance with longer regimens with the potential for a modest decrease in relapses with longer treatment. PMID:11092715

  6. Alcohol and Race/Ethnicity Elicit Different Changes in Lipid Profiles in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Míguez-Burbano, Maria J.; Lewis, John E.; Malow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the impact of alcohol consumption (88 hazardous and 76 nonhazardous drinkers) and race/ethnicity on lipid profiles in individuals starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). At baseline, Whites and Hispanics had the most adverse lipid profiles, whereas Blacks had the least atherogenic. Whites and Hispanics showed higher increases in cholesterol (W = 11%; H = 6%), triglycerides (W = 40%; H = 24%), and low-density lipoprotein (10%) than Blacks (cholesterol = 4%; triglycerides = 9%; low-density lipoprotein = 4%). Hazardous alcohol consumption was correlated with increased lipids in each group. Hispanics had a clear trait risk for hypertriglyceridemia with HAART (1.9-fold) and with hazardous drinking (3.2-fold; p = .04). The highest risk for hypertriglyceridemia was found in heavy drinkers (3.75-fold; p = .05). Results underscore the importance of an alcohol/race interactive effect on HAART-associated dyslipidemia and the need for assessment and treatment of alcohol disorders. PMID:19427595

  7. Magnitude of Virologic Blips Is Associated With a Higher Risk for Virologic Rebound in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Recurrent Events Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grennan, J. Troy; Loutfy, Mona R.; Su, DeSheng; Harrigan, P. Richard; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rourke, Sean; Tsoukas, Christos; Hogg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Taiwo and Bosch, on pages 1189–91.) Background. The importance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) blip magnitude on virologic rebound has been raised in clinical guidelines relating to viral load assays. Methods. Antiretroviral-naive individuals initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after 1 January 2000 and achieving virologic suppression were studied. Negative binomial models were used to identify blip correlates. Recurrent event models were used to determine the association between blips and rebound by incorporating multiple periods of virologic suppression per individual. Results. 3550 participants (82% male; median age, 40 years) were included. In a multivariable negative binomial regression model, the Amplicor assay was associated with a lower blip rate than branched DNA (rate ratio, 0.69; P < .01), controlling for age, sex, region, baseline HIV-1 RNA and CD4 count, AIDS-defining illnesses, year of cART initiation, cART type, and HIV-1 RNA testing frequency. In a multivariable recurrent event model controlling for age, sex, intravenous drug use, cART start year, cART type, assay type, and HIV-1 RNA testing frequency, blips of 500–999 copies/mL were associated with virologic rebound (hazard ratio, 2.70; P = .002), whereas blips of 50–499 were not. Conclusions. HIV-1 RNA assay was an important determinant of blip rates and should be considered in clinical guidelines. Blips ≥500 copies/mL were associated with increased rebound risk. PMID:22438396

  8. Genetic diversity and drug resistance among newly diagnosed and antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected individuals in western Yunnan: a hot area of viral recombination in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic in China was first recognized in Dehong, western Yunnan. Due to its geographic location, Dehong contributed greatly in bridging HIV-1 epidemics in Southeast Asia and China through drug trafficking and injection drug use; and also extensively to the HIV genetic diversity in Yunnan and China. We attempt to monitor HIV-1 in this area by studying the HIV-1 genetic distribution and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in various at-risk populations. Methods Blood samples from a total of 320 newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals, who were antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, were collected from January 2009 to December 2010 in 2 counties in Dehong. HIV-1 subtypes and pol gene drug resistance (DR) mutations were genotyped. Results Among 299 pol sequences successfully genotyped (93.4%), subtype C accounted for 43.1% (n=129), unique recombinant forms (URFs) for 18.4% (n=55), CRF01_AE for 17.7% (n=54), B for 10.7% (n=32), CRF08_BC for 8.4% (n=25) and CRF07_BC for 1.7% (n=5). Subtype distribution in patients infected by different transmission routes varied. In contract to the previous finding of CRF01_AE predominance in 2002-2006, subtype C predominated in both injecting drug users (IDUs) and heterosexually transmitted populations in this study. Furthermore, we found a high level of BC, CRF01_AE/C and CRF01_AE/B/C recombinants suggesting the presence of active viral recombination in the area. TDR associated mutations were identified in 4.3% (n=13) individuals. A total of 1.3% of DR were related to protease inhibitors (PIs), including I85IV, M46I and L90M; 0.3% to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), including M184I; and 2.7% to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), including K103N/S, Y181C, K101E and G190A. Conclusion Our work revealed diverse HIV-1 subtype distributions and intersubtype recombinations. We also identified a low but significant TDR mutation rate among ART-naive patients. These findings

  9. HIV infection in traditional rural communities.

    PubMed

    Carwein, V L; Sabo, C E; Berry, D E

    1993-03-01

    The challenge to rural nurses to deliver knowledgeable and skilled nursing and health care to individuals with HIV infection and AIDS is indeed tremendous. Isolation of rural communities and health care facilities coupled with limited resources, financial concerns, conservative values of many traditional rural communities, and the tendency to exclude those who do not conform to community norms make it difficult to integrate the individual with HIV disease into the rural health care delivery system fully. Issues of particular concern to the rural nurse include maintenance of client confidentiality, obtaining and maintaining current knowledge and skills necessary to the provision of quality HIV nursing care, management of complex client health care problems, and provision of appropriate support services. Rural nurses must be innovative and creative in developing mechanisms to deal with these concerns. In addition, because rural nurses are well respected by the community and viewed as possessing a great deal of expertise in the delivery of health care, they are well positioned to provide leadership to the community in developing educational and care strategies to more effectively provide HIV care. Indeed, the delivery of high-quality HIV care in rural areas across the United States will likely depend on the expertise and leadership provided by rural nurses. PMID:8451211

  10. Genetic correlates influencing immunopathogenesis of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kaur, Gurvinder; Mehra, Narinder

    2011-01-01

    Variability to HIV infection, its progression as well as responsiveness to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is observed among individuals including viraemia controllers or exposed uninfected, rapid versus slow progressors and ART responders compared to non responders. This differential responsiveness/vulnerability to HIV-1 is governed by multiple host genetic factors that include HLA, cytokines, chemokines, their receptors and others. This review highlights the influence of these genetic factors on HIV/AIDS outcome; however, in India, the information in this area is very limited and most of these genetic studies have been conducted in Caucasian and South African populations. Considering, the population specific differences in the frequencies of protective or susceptibility favouring alleles and their influence on the disease outcome, it is of utmost importance to strengthen ongoing efforts towards defining largely unknown genetic propensity in Indian population, particularly by recruitment of large cohorts of well categorized exposed uninfected individuals, rapid, long term non progressors and elite viraemic controllers. Multi-parametric analysis of these potentially interactive immunogenetic variables in these cohorts may help to define potential targets for diagnostics and therapy in a population specific manner. PMID:22310811

  11. Neurologic complications of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of HIV-1 in the nervous system are a topic of avid interest to investigators and clinicians focused on HIV, judging by the large and discriminating audience at the oral sessions and poster presentations relating to neuroscience at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Major areas of investigation at this year's conference included the use of neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging to assess the state of the central nervous system (CNS) and effects of antiretroviral therapy during HIV infection as well as basic and clinical studies of neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). Numerous important suggestions emerged during the meeting. Among them was the proposition that earlier initiation of therapy might benefit the CNS. Another was that the relationship between HIV and normal aging remains unclear and warrants further study. Still another was that ongoing abnormalities may persist despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy-including measurable brain microglial activation, detectable cerebrospinal fluid HIV, and progression of neurologic impairment. PMID:22710906

  12. College of Radiology, Academy of Medicine of Malaysia position on whole body screening CT scans in healthy asymptomatic individuals (2008)

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ELM; Abdullah, BJJ; Tang, AAL; Nordin, AJ; Nair, AR; Lim, GCC; Samad-Cheung, H; Ng, KH; Ponnusamy, S; Abbas, SF; Bux, SI; Arasaratnam, S; Abdul Aziz, YF; Venugopal, S; Musa, Z; Abdul Manaf, Z

    2008-01-01

    To date, the College of Radiology (CoR) does not see any clear benefit in performing whole body screening computed tomography (CT) examinations in healthy asymptomatic individuals. There are radiation risk issues in CT and principles of screening should be adhered to. There may be a role for targeted cardiac screening CT that derives calcium score, especially for asymptomatic medium-risk individuals and CT colonography when used as part of a strategic programme for colorectal cancer screening in those 50 years and older. However, population based screening CT examinations may become appropriate when evidence emerges regarding a clear benefit for the patient outweighing the associated radiation risks. PMID:21611021

  13. Mycobacterial Lung Disease Complicating HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michelle K; Daley, Charles L

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterial infections have caused enormous morbidity and mortality in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Of these, the most devastating has been tuberculosis (TB), the leading cause of death among HIV-positive persons globally. TB has killed more people living with HIV than any other infection. Diagnosis of latent TB infection (LTBI) is critical as treatment can prevent emergence of TB disease. Bacteriologic confirmation of TB disease should be sought whenever possible as well as drug susceptibility testing. When detected early, drug susceptible TB is curable. Similar to TB, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can also produce pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections including disseminated disease that can be fatal. Diagnosis through accurate identification of the pathogenic organism will greatly inform treatment. Depending on the NTM identified, treatment may not be curable. Ultimately, preventive strategies such as initiation of antiretroviral drugs and treatment of LTBI are interventions expected to have significant impacts on control of TB and NTM in the setting of HIV. This chapter will review the impact of pulmonary mycobacterial infections on HIV-positive individuals. PMID:26974300

  14. Expression of oral cytokines in HIV-infected subjects with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Amornthatree, Korntip; Kemapunmanus, Marisa; Talungchit, Sineepat; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine 1) the expression of oral pro-inflammatory cytokines in HIV-infected subjects compared with non-HIV individuals, 2) the cytokine expression in the subjects with antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared with those without ART, and 3) factors associated with the expression of the cytokines. Materials and methods Oral examination was performed and saliva samples were collected and analyzed for the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines using ELISA. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between HIV/ART status and the cytokine expression. Results One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects with and without ART, and 50 non-HIV individuals were enrolled. TNF-α and IL-6 in saliva were significantly decreased, while IL-8 was significantly increased in HIV infection (p< 0.05). Changes in the expression of IL-8 was also observed between HIV-infected subjects who were and were not on ART (p< 0.05). Duration of HIV infection and smoking were significantly associated with the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in saliva (p< 0.05). Conclusion Oral innate immunity is affected by HIV infection and use of ART. IL-8 may be the useful biomarker to identify subjects at risk of infection and malignant transformation due to HIV infection and long-term use of ART. PMID:23718561

  15. Assessment of East Asian-type cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori using stool specimens from asymptomatic healthy Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kimoto, Ai; Fujimoto, Saori; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2009-09-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that CagA, a virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori and known to have multiple genotypes, plays a critical role in the development of stomach cancer. However, the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori strains and the cagA genotypes have not been well studied in healthy individuals because of the difficulty in collecting gastric specimens. In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of infection with H. pylori, particularly the strains with the East Asian cagA genotype (which is more potent in causing gastric diseases), among healthy asymptomatic Japanese individuals by a noninvasive method using stool specimens. The H. pylori antigen was detected in 40.3 % of healthy asymptomatic adult individuals (n=186) enrolled in the study. For the detection and genotyping of the cagA gene, DNA was extracted from the stool specimens of these individuals and analysed by PCR. We detected the East Asian cagA genotype in the DNA samples of a significantly high number (63.1 %) of healthy asymptomatic Japanese individuals. These results indicate that a significant number of asymptomatic healthy Japanese individuals were infected with highly virulent H. pylori. PMID:19528144

  16. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Brittany E; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Jones, Cheron E; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi's sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  17. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brittany E.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Jones, Cheron E.; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M.; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  18. Advance Care Planning and HIV Infection in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sangarlangkarn, Aroonsiri; Merlin, Jessica S; Tucker, Rodney O; Kelley, Amy S

    In the era of antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection has become a chronic illness with associated multimorbidity, and practitioners are faced with an emerging population of HIV-infected patients with evolving needs for advance care planning (ACP), defined as communication between individuals and their proxies to plan for future health care decisions. This article provides a review of original research studies on ACP in HIV-infected adults in the era of antiretroviral therapy (1996-present) from PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. Eleven studies conducted between 1996 and 2015 met the selection criteria, with study sizes ranging from 9 to 2864 participants. Most studies consisted of white men in outpatient settings and had poorly defined definitions of ACP. Prevalence of ACP was variable (36%-54% had end-of-life communication, 8%-47% had advance directives). Lack of ACP was most commonly associated with low income, followed by lower severity of illness, low education level, black or Hispanic race, female sex, younger age, injection drug use, and social isolation. Practitioners reported limited time or energy and inadequate preparation or training as barriers to ACP. Existing literature on ACP in the era of antiretroviral therapy is limited, but shows that ACP prevalence in HIV-infected individuals is variable depending on socioeconomic factors, severity of illness, and practitioner resources and training. More research is needed to increase ACP among HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27398771

  19. Lipoprotein Particle Profiles by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Medically-Underserved HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Barbara; Sha, Beverly E.; Keithley, Joyce K.; Fogg, Louis; Nerad, Judith; Novak, Richard; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin

    2009-01-01

    Background HIV infection is associated with dyslipidemia and increased risk for cardiovascular events. Few studies have described lipid status in medically-underserved, HIV-infected ethnic minorities, a group that is characterized by health disparities. Objective The objective was to characterize the lipid profile of a medically-underserved, largely ethnic minority sample of HIV-infected persons using standard lipid panels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) -derived lipoprotein particle profiles. Methods Participants were recruited from a randomized controlled trial of a dietary supplement to manage HIV-related dyslipidemia (N=132). At the initial screening visit, sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral data were collected, and fasting peripheral venous blood specimens were obtained and lipid status was analyzed using the standard lipid panel and the NMR-derived lipoprotein particle profile. Results Using NMR-derived LDL particle cutoffs, a higher percentage of participants was outside the target range (50%) than when standard LDL cholesterol NCEP cutoffs were used (24%). Antiretroviral therapy, especially protease inhibitor-containing regimens, was associated with higher LDL particle concentration. Conclusion Substantial numbers of medically-underserved, asymptomatic HIV-infected minorities may be at increased risk for CHD based on NMR-derived lipoprotein values. PMID:20161509

  20. Hypogonadism in the HIV-infected man.

    PubMed

    Rochira, Vincenzo; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Androgen deficiency occurs frequently in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral treatments had reduced the prevalence of male hypogonadism. The pathogenesis of testosterone (T) deficiency in HIV is multifactorial. Several mechanisms have been proposed; among them, drugs, fat redistribution, and a poor health status could explain the mechanism leading to gonadotropins inhibition and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The diagnosis of hypogonadism in HIV-infected men should be made based on clinical symptoms and a specific workup including T measurement. The interpretation of the results of biochemical testing is more difficult in men with HIV due to several confounding factors. T treatment should be offered to HIV-infected men with documented clinical hypogonadism and symptoms, especially if they are losing lean mass. PMID:25169563

  1. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers. PMID:11441700

  2. Altered Functional Response to Risky Choice in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Colm G.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Jordan, Stephan J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J.; Paulus, Martin P.; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Background Risky decision-making is commonly observed in persons at risk for and infected with HIV and is associated with executive dysfunction. Yet it is currently unknown whether HIV alters brain processing of risk-taking decision-making. Methods This study examined the neural substrate of a risky decision-making task in 21 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 19 seronegative (HIV-) comparison participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed the risky-gains task, which involves choosing among safe (20 cents) and risky (40/80 cent win or loss) choices. Linear mixed effects analyses examining group and decision type were conducted. Robust regressions were performed to examine the relationship between nadir CD4 count and Kalichman sexual compulsivity and brain activation in the HIV+ group. The overlap between the task effects and robust regressions was explored. Results Although there were no serostatus effects in behavioral performance on the risky-gains task, HIV+ individuals exhibited greater activation for risky choices in the basal ganglia, i.e. the caudate nucleus, but also in the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and insula relative to the HIV- group. The HIV+ group also demonstrated reduced functional responses to safe choices in the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to the HIV- group. HIV+ individuals with higher nadir CD4 count and greater sexual compulsivity displayed lower differential responses to safe versus risky choices in many of these regions. Conclusions This study demonstrated fronto-striatal loop dysfunction associated with HIV infection during risky decision-making. Combined with similar between-group task behavior, this suggests an adaptive functional response in regions critical to reward and behavioral control in the HIV+ group. HIV-infected individuals with higher CD4 nadirs demonstrated activation patterns more similar to seronegative individuals. This

  3. Diagnosing and treating asymptomatic tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize relevant parts of the guidelines recommended by the Canadian and American Thoracic Societies for diagnosis and management of asymptomatic tuberculosis (TB) infection. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The latest guidelines published by the Canadian and American Thoracic Societies were reviewed. Unfortunately, neither of these guidelines state explicitly how recommendations were derived. The references accompanying each set of guidelines, however, suggest that they were developed by extensive literature review of the subject and consensus among expert panels. MAIN MESSAGE: Only higher-risk patients should receive a TB screening test (Mantoux test) to minimize the possibility of false-positive test results. The cutoff points for positive tests vary to reflect the pretest likelihood of TB infection. An induration 5 mm or greater is considered positive in patients at highest risk of TB infection, that is, HIV-infected patients, close contacts of active TB cases, and patients with chest x-ray abnormalities suggestive of previous untreated TB. All other patients are considered positive if they have induration greater than 10 mm according to the Canadian guideline. A 15-mm cutoff point, however, is used for patients without risk factors in the American guideline. All patients with positive Mantoux test results should be considered infected with TB. Infected patients should be offered 6 to 12 months of isoniazid prophylaxis if they have HIV infection, if they have medical conditions that increase the risk of TB activation, or if they are younger than 35 years. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic treatment of infected individuals effectively prevents the spread of TB infection. Family physicians, who most often see patients in the asymptomatic stage of TB infection, are uniquely situated to prevent secondary cases of TB by offering appropriate patients prophylactic treatment. Patients should be counseled about the risk and benefit of prophylactic treatment so they give

  4. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far. PMID:26365737

  5. HIV infection and the gastrointestinal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM; Douek, DC

    2009-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the gastrointestinal pathology observed in patients infected with HIV. The gastrointestinal tract is a major site of HIV replication, which results in massive depletion of lamina propria CD4 T cells during acute infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy leads to incomplete suppression of viral replication and substantially delayed and only partial restoration of gastrointestinal CD4 T cells. The gastrointestinal pathology associated with HIV infection comprises significant enteropathy with increased levels of inflammation and decreased levels of mucosal repair and regeneration. Assessment of gut mucosal immune system has provided novel directions for therapeutic interventions that modify the consequences of acute HIV infection. PMID:19079157

  6. A 15-year warranty period for asymptomatic individuals without coronary artery calcium: a prospective follow-up of 9715 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Valentina; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Heo, Ran; Cho, Iksung; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Gransar, Heidi; Truong, Quynh A.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Knapper, Joseph; Kelkar, Anita A.; Sandesara, Pratik; Lin, Fay Y.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Callister, Tracy Q.; Min, James K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine long-term prognosis of a zero coronary artery calcium (CAC) score among asymptomatic individuals and its associated warranty period. Background Emerging evidence supports CAC=0 as a favorable cardiovascular short-to-intermediate term prognostic factor. Methods 9715 individuals undergoing CAC imaging were stratified by age, Framingham risk score (FRS) and Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) categories and followed for a mean of 14.6 (12.9–16.8) years. Cox regression, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and net reclassification information (NRI) were used to assess all-cause mortality, discrimination and reclassification of CAC=0 compared with FRS and NCEP ATP III, respectively. A warranty period was pre-defined as <1% annual mortality rate. Vascular age was estimated by linear regression. Results Among 4864 individuals with baseline CAC=0 (mean age 52.1±10.8 years; 57.9% male), 229 deaths occurred. The warranty period of CAC=0 was almost 15 years for individuals at low and intermediate risk with no significant differences regarding age and gender. CAC=0 was associated with a vascular age of 1, 10, 20, and 30 years below chronologic age for individuals between 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and ≥80 years, respectively. CAC score was the strongest predictor of death (HR 2.67, 95% CI 2.29–3.11) that enabled discrimination and consistent reclassification beyond FRS (AUC 0.71 vs. 0.64, p<0.001) and NCEP ATP III (AUC 0.72 vs. 0.64, p<0.001). Conclusions CAC=0 confers a 15-year warranty period against mortality among individuals at low-to-intermediate risk, which is unaffected by age or gender. Furthermore, in individuals considered at high-risk by clinical risk scores the presence of CAC=0 confers better survival than in individuals at low-to-intermediate risk but with any CAC. PMID:26189116

  7. When to consider acute HIV infection in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Richard M; Hardwicke, Robin L; Grimes, Deanna E; DeGarmo, D Sean

    2016-01-16

    Patients presenting with fever, pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy are likely to have mononucleosis; however, patients with acute HIV infection may present with similar symptoms. Acute HIV infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis if test results for mononucleosis are negative. This article describes when to order HIV testing and discusses the importance of early intervention for acute HIV infection. PMID:26678418

  8. The Emerging Roles of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: Acute Chest Pain Evaluation and Screening for Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ning; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Lin, Po-Chih; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Yee-Fan; Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Bai-Chin; Lee, Wen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been widely available since 2004. After that, the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA has been extensively validated with invasive coronary angiography for detection of coronary arterial stenosis. In this paper, we reviewed the updated evidence of the role of CCTA in both scenarios including acute chest pain and screening in asymptomatic adults. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of CCTA in the context of acute chest pain patients. CCTA could play a role in delivering more efficient care. For risk stratification of asymptomatic patients using CCTA, latest studies have revealed incremental benefits. Future studies evaluating the totality of plaque characteristics may be useful for determining the role of noncalcified plaque for risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:27122947

  9. Cardiac effects in perinatally HIV-infected and HIV-exposed but uninfected children and adolescents: a view from the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Miller, Tracie L; Wilkinson, James D; Scott, Gwendolyn B; Somarriba, Gabriel; Cochran, Thomas R; Fisher, Stacy D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a primary cause of acquired heart disease, particularly of accelerated atherosclerosis, symptomatic heart failure, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Cardiac complications often occur in late-stage HIV infections as prolonged viral infection is becoming more relevant as longevity improves. Thus, multi-agent HIV therapies that help sustain life may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events and accelerated atherosclerosis. Discussion Before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the two-to-five-year incidence of symptomatic heart failure ranged from 4 to 28% in HIV patients. Patients both before and after HAART also frequently have asymptomatic abnormalities in cardiovascular structure. Echocardiographic measurements indicate left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction in 18%, LV hypertrophy in 6.5%, and left atrial dilation in 40% of patients followed on HAART therapy. Diastolic dysfunction is also common in long-term survivors of HIV infection. Accelerated atherosclerosis has been found in HIV-infected young adults and children without traditional coronary risk factors. Infective endocarditis, although rare in children, has high mortality in late-stage AIDS patients with poor nutritional status and severely compromised immune systems. Although lymphomas have been found in HIV-infected children, the incidence is low and cardiac malignancy is rare. Rates of congenital cardiovascular malformations range from 5.6 to 8.9% in cohorts of HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected children with HIV-infected mothers. In non-HIV-infected infants born to HIV-infected mothers, foetal exposure to ART is associated with reduced LV dimension, LV mass, and septal wall thickness and with higher LV fractional shortening and contractility during the first two years of life. Conclusions Routine, systematic, and comprehensive cardiac evaluation, including a thorough history and directed laboratory assays, is essential for

  10. Prevalence of oral lesions among HIV-infected intravenous drug abusers and other risk groups.

    PubMed

    Barone, R; Ficarra, G; Gaglioti, D; Orsi, A; Mazzotta, F

    1990-02-01

    To study the prevalence of oral manifestations, we examined 217 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Most of our patients were intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) (65%). Other risk categories were represented by IVDAs who were also male homosexuals or bisexuals (11%), male homosexuals and bisexuals (16%), sexual partners of HIV-infected patients (5%), and hemophilic persons and recipients of blood transfusions (3%). Forty-six patients were women and 171 were men, with a median age of 27 years (range, 11 to 65 years). At the time of first examination, 38% of patients had asymptomatic HIV infection, 36% had lymphadenopathy syndrome, 17% had AIDS-related complex, and 9% had AIDS. Oral manifestations were observed in 89 (41%) patients. Of these, 15 had asymptomatic infection, 23 had lymphadenopathy syndrome, 27 had AIDS-related complex, and 24 had AIDS. Increasing severity of disease was significantly associated with higher prevalence of oral lesions (p less than or equal to 0.0001). Candidiasis was the most common oral lesion, followed by hairy leukoplakia. Kaposi's sarcoma, melanotic macules, herpes labialis, condyloma acuminatum, perioral molluscum contagiosum, and bacterial glossitis due to Escherichia coli infection were found in a small number of patients. Results of culture for fungi, available for 203 patients, revealed that 51% of patients with positive Candida cultures had clinical evidence of candidiasis. Our study demonstrates that oral lesions are also important signs of HIV infection among IVDAs. Early diagnosis of these manifestations is becoming increasingly significant in the practice of dentistry. PMID:2304743

  11. Cultural influences on antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Reuben N; D'Aquila, Erica; Morgello, Susan; Byrd, Desiree; Remien, Robert H; Mindt, Monica Rivera

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is integral to the successful treatment of HIV infection. Research has indicated that HIV-infected Latinos may have difficulty adhering to ART. While studies have demonstrated strong relationships between numerous psychosocial factors and ART adherence, no research has examined if cultural factors are also involved in ART adherence among Latinos. Our study examined the relationship between acculturation to mainstream U.S. culture, bicultural self-efficacy, and ART adherence among HIV-infected Puerto Rican adults living in the United States. Participants with ≥ 95% adherence scored higher on U.S.- and Latino-involvement acculturation scales and on a measure of bicultural self-efficacy compared to those with suboptimal adherence. Among bicultural HIV-infected Puerto Ricans, both acculturation and self-efficacy to navigate between cultures were positively related to adherence. Understanding the role of an individual's sociocultural experience may help elucidate why HIV-infected Latinos have difficulties achieving optimal ART adherence and improve ART adherence interventions. PMID:22525858

  12. Predictors of HIV infection among women drug users in New York and Miami.

    PubMed

    Tortu, S; McCoy, H V; Beardsley, M; Deren, S; McCoy, C B

    1998-01-01

    In the US, the number of women diagnosed with AIDS continues to increase. In this study, women in New York City (East Harlem) and Miami, two sites with high rates of drug use and HIV infection, were first compared on sociodemographic variables and risk behaviors. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify significant, independent predictors of HIV infection in each city. In comparing women from the two cities, several differences in sociodemographic characteristics and drug use were observed. In both cities, ever exchanging sex for drugs and/or money was predictive of HIV infection; and in East Harlem only, other lifetime risk variables independently predicted HIV infection: drug injection, having a sexually transmitted disease, and not having graduated from high school. Results suggest that intervention efforts with women who exchange sex should be intensified in both cities. Also, further comparisons of women drug users in AIDS epicenter cities are necessary to provide information on similarities and differences in sociodemographic characteristics and individual risk behaviors. More research attention should be focused on examining the social context of HIV risk in order to develop innovative intervention strategies which focus on the link between contextual factors and HIV infection. PMID:9640642

  13. [Status of HIV-infections 2005].

    PubMed

    Potthoff, Anja; Brockmeyer, Norbert H

    2005-09-01

    The course of HIV infection has changed dramatically since the beginning of the epidemic. In Germany, 19 antiretrovirally active substances are available. They prevent viral penetration into the cell, inhibit the reverse transcriptase or the protease that are necessary to release infectious viral particles. According to German-Austrian therapy guidelines highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) should be started at the onset of HIV-related symptoms and/or when the CD4 cell count is < 350/microl. Patients should be treated in specialized centers because of the complexity of HIV infection and its management. For monitoring, CD4 cell counts and viral load are determined. Potential reasons for therapeutic failure include drug interactions, resistance, or compliance problems. Although HIV infection is often compared to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, psychological and social impact on HIV patients is still high. Increasing viral multi-drug resistance, long-term toxicity like lipodystrophy, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease are only some problems HIV-infected patients are facing in the next years. In Germany, 600-700 patients still die of AIDS every year. PMID:16170674

  14. Public Opinion, Public Policy, and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Jane

    1989-01-01

    A four-stage framework for considering the development of public policy in regard to the issue of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is offered. The phases are denial, irrationality, acceptance, and the development of a rational response. Federal antidiscrimination policies which include persons with HIV infections as disabled are…

  15. Development of a Policy on HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Barbara D.

    This sample policy, proposed by the Brandywine School District (Delaware), addresses the issue of HIV Infection of employees and/or students. The policy was developed by an AIDS Committee appointed by the superintendent in January 1988, and comprised of members from every area in the school district community. This policy acts as district policy…

  16. Examining the Relationship between Urogenital Schistosomiasis and HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mbabazi, Pamela Sabina; Andan, Olivia; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Chitsulo, Lester; Engels, Dirk; Downs, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Urogenital schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma haematobium, is widespread and causes substantial morbidity on the African continent. The infection has been suggested as an unrecognized risk factor for incident HIV infection. Current guidelines recommend preventive chemotherapy, using praziquantel as a public health tool, to avert morbidity due to schistosomiasis. In individuals of reproductive age, urogenital schistosomiasis remains highly prevalent and, likely, underdiagnosed. This comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the evidence for a cause-effect relationship between urogenital schistosomiasis and HIV/AIDS. The review aims to support discussions of urogenital schistosomiasis as a neglected yet urgent public health challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic search of the literature including online databases, clinical guidelines, and current medical textbooks. We describe plausible local and systemic mechanisms by which Schistosoma haematobium infection could increase the risk of HIV acquisition in both women and men. We also detail the effects of S. haematobium infection on the progression and transmissibility of HIV in co-infected individuals. We briefly summarize available evidence on the immunomodulatory effects of chronic schistosomiasis and the implications this might have for populations at high risk of both schistosomiasis and HIV. Conclusions/Significance Studies support the hypothesis that urogenital schistosomiasis in women and men constitutes a significant risk factor for HIV acquisition due both to local genital tract and global immunological effects. In those who become HIV-infected, schistosomal co-infection may accelerate HIV disease progression and facilitate viral transmission to sexual partners. Establishing effective prevention strategies using praziquantel, including better definition of treatment age, duration, and frequency of treatment for urogenital

  17. Cerebral white matter integrity during primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Patrick W.; Vaida, Florin F.; Fernández, Ricardo J.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Price, Richard W.; Lee, Evelyn; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shimony, Joshua S.; Robertson, Kevin R.; Walter, Rudolph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Spudich, Serena; Ances, Beau M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Inflammation and infection within the central nervous system is initiated during primary HIV infection (PHI), but the association of these processes with the integrity of brain white matter during PHI is unknown. Design We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in this prospective cross-sectional neuroimaging study to determine the extent of white matter involvement in early HIV infection. Methods Antiretroviral-naive PHI (defined as <1 year after infection, n = 62), chronic HIV infection (CHI, n = 16), and HIV-uninfected (n = 19) participants had DTI, laboratory, and neuropsychometric performance assessments. DTI metrics were examined using region of interest and whole brain voxelwise analyses. Linear mixed-effects models assessed correlations between DTI measures and laboratory and neuropsychometric performance values. Results PHI participants were assessed at a median 4.1 months after estimated infection, and had median CD4+ cell count of 573 cells/µl, and HIV-1 RNA viral load of 4.5 log10 copies/ml in plasma and 2.6 log10 copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). DTI metrics in PHI individuals were similar to HIV— participants and correlated with disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (indicated by CSF/plasma albumin ratio and CSF protein). CHI participants had significant loss of white matter integrity that correlated with biomarkers of infection and inflammation (blood viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and neopterin, and CSF white blood cell). Within the PHI group, DTI metrics inversely correlated with increasing days since infection. Conclusion In individuals assessed during PHI, group DTI measures suggested relative preservation of white matter microstructural integrity, but were associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier and estimated duration of infection. PMID:25513818

  18. [Heterosexual transmission of HIV infection

    PubMed

    Coulaud, J P

    1993-02-01

    The AIDS epidemic has spread rapidly in Africa among the urban impoverished where multiple sexual partners and sexually transmitted diseases are common. Over 80% of the 9 million Africans who will develop AIDS before the year 2000 will have been contaminated sexually. Poverty, multiple sexual partners in the framework of prostitution, and drug addiction are responsible for rapid spread of HIV infection in Southeast Asia, the West India, and Brazil. Drug addiction has played a major role in diffusion of HIV into the general population of Europe and the US. Prevalence rates are much higher in sexually transmitted disease centers in France and the US than among blood donors or pregnant women. Sexually transmitted diseases and heterosexual transmission have been studied in Africas since diagnostic tests became available. Several studies, the majority conducted among prostitutes in Nairobi or Kinshasa and their clients, allow establishment of a list of sexually transmitted diseases associated with increased risk of seroconversion. Genital ulcers within the past 6 months presented a relative risk of 2-4 depending on the series. Urethral or cervical gonorrhea has a lower relative risk of 1.2 in most studies. Absence of circumcision was also a risk factor. Studies were subsequently conducted in Europe on factors favoring sexual transmission. 513 heterosexual couples together for a minimum duration of 18 months and an average of 38 months were included in the Multicenter European Study conducted in 10 centers in 9 countries. The "index" subject was male in 400 cases and female in 113. At entry into the study, 73 of 400 males (18.2%) and 10 of 113 females (8.8%) had already infected their partners. Duration of union, frequency of intercourse, mode of transmission of the index subject, and oral contraceptive use had no effect on risk of transmission. Factors increasing risk of infection included the severity of immunosuppression of the index subject, whether judged by

  19. HIV infection and maternal and child health.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, P

    1988-01-01

    Collaborative studies to determine the consequences of pregnancy in HIV infected women have been begun in the last 2 years. Both HIV and HIV antibodies pass through the placenta, and 30-50% of infants born to HIV infected mothers are infected in utero. In developed countries it is feasible to screen pregnant women in high risk groups for HIV positivity. In developing countries, where heterosexual transmission is the main route of infection, there are no high risk groups, and it is not feasible to screen all pregnant women. Some data have shown that HIV infection in pregnancy is associated with intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, and high infant mortality. There is no evidence that cesarean section reduces infection in neonates, and it should not be performed on HIV infected women. By 1987 almost 1.5% of AIDS cases in the US were in vertically infected infants. In Africa also the main factor in HIV in infancy is vertical transmission. AIDS in infancy follows 1 of 2 distinct patterns: failure to thrive and death from Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia within the 1st year or else apparent health during infancy but death from opportunistic infections by age 3. HIV infection in childhood is uncommon and can usually be traced to blood transfusions or unsterilized needles used for vaccinations. Neurological symptoms often develop early in children. Breast feeding probably does not infect any infants who have not already been infected in utero, and in developing counties breast feeding is still the best assurance of total nutrition. Pooled, unpasteurized milk banks, on the other hand, represent an unnecessary danger, and milk donors should be screened. Since there is no evidence that routine immunization accelerates the course of HIV infection, and since mass screening is not feasible in developing countries, the World Health Organization recommends that routine immunizations be continued. Since the best protection from in utero HIV infection is the use of

  20. Thymic function in HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Lilian

    2013-04-01

    This thesis is based on seven previously published articles. The work was performed during my employment at The Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, as a scholarship student from 2000-2001 and as a research assistant in the period 2004-2010. HIV-infection is characterized by CD4+ cell depletion. The differences between patients in the degree of CD4+ cell recovery upon treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may in part be due to differences in the supply of naïve CD4+ cells from the thymus. The thymus atrophies with increasing age for which reason the adult thymus was previously assumed to be without function. The aim of these investigations was to examine the role of the thymus in different aspects of HIV-infection: In adult HIV-infected patients, during HIV-positive pregnancy, and in HIV-exposed uninfected (HIV-EU) children born to HIV-infected mothers. Thymic size and output were determined in 25 adult HIV-infected patients receiving HAART and in 10 controls. Larger thymic size was associated with higher CD4 counts and higher thymic output. Furthermore, patients with abundant thymic tissue seemed to have broader immunological repertoires, compared with patients with minimal thymic tissue. The study supports the mounting evidence of a contribution by the adult thymus to immune reconstitution in HIV-infection. In a follow-up study conducted till 5 years of HAART, the importance of the thymus to the rate of cellular restoration was found to primarily lie within the first two years of HAART. The effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was then investigated in a randomized, double-blinded placebo controlled trial in 46 adult HIV-infected patients on HAART. Daily treatment with a low dose of rhGH of 0.7mg for 40 weeks stimulated thymopoiesis as expressed by thymic size, density, and output strongly supporting the assumption that rhGH possesses the potential to stimulate the ageing thymus, holding

  1. Brief Report: HIV Infection Is Associated With Worse Bone Material Properties, Independently of Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Robert; Molina, Daniel; Villar-García, Judit; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Nogués, Xavier; González-Mena, Alicia; Guelar, Ana; Trenchs-Rodríguez, Marta; Herrera-Fernández, Sabina; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Knobel, Hernando

    2016-07-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected individuals has been documented in an increasing number of studies. However, it is not clear whether it is the infection itself or the treatment that causes bone impairment. Microindentation measures bone material strength (Bone Material Strength index) directly. We recruited 85 patients, 50 infected with HIV and 35 controls. Median Bone Material Strength index was 84.5 (interquartile range 83-87) in HIV-infected patients and 90 (88.5-93) in controls (P < 0.001). No significant differences in BMD between cases and controls at any of the sites examined (total hip, femoral neck, and lumbar spine). HIV infection is associated with bone damage, independently of BMD. PMID:26910501

  2. [Incidence and etiology of psychotic disorders in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Niederecker, M; Naber, D; Riedel, R; Perro, C; Goebel, F D

    1995-05-01

    There are numerous case reports on psychoses in AIDS patients and, although more seldom, also in HIV-positive patients in early stages of infection; however, systematic investigations on the frequency, e.g., relevant for the indication of an HIV test in psychiatric patients, are missing. For this study, 1046 HIV-positive patients were examined regarding psychoses. A total of 301 patients (28.8%) were HIV-positive but asymptomatic, and 380 patients (36.2%) had the lymphadenopathy syndrome. One hundred thirty-two patients (12.6%) suffered from an AIDS-related complex and 233 patients (22.3%) from AIDS. Of these 1046 patients, only 9 (0.9%) suffered from psychoses. One patient with a paranoid-hallucinatory syndrome was asymptomatic; one in the lymphadenopathy syndrome was manic. The other 7 patients were all in late stages of the infection. A causal relationship between HIV infection and psychosis and probable in only 3 patients. These data do not indicate a markedly elevated prevalence of psychosis in HIV-positive or AIDS patients. PMID:7609818

  3. Personalized Prediction of Lifetime Benefits with Statin Therapy for Asymptomatic Individuals: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferket, Bart S.; van Kempen, Bob J. H.; Heeringa, Jan; Spronk, Sandra; Fleischmann, Kirsten E.; Nijhuis, Rogier L. G.; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Background Physicians need to inform asymptomatic individuals about personalized outcomes of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, current prediction models focus on short-term outcomes and ignore the competing risk of death due to other causes. We aimed to predict the potential lifetime benefits with statin therapy, taking into account competing risks. Methods and Findings A microsimulation model based on 5-y follow-up data from the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort of individuals aged 55 y and older living in the Ommoord district of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, was used to estimate lifetime outcomes with and without statin therapy. The model was validated in-sample using 10-y follow-up data. We used baseline variables and model output to construct (1) a web-based calculator for gains in total and CVD-free life expectancy and (2) color charts for comparing these gains to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) charts. In 2,428 participants (mean age 67.7 y, 35.5% men), statin therapy increased total life expectancy by 0.3 y (SD 0.2) and CVD-free life expectancy by 0.7 y (SD 0.4). Age, sex, smoking, blood pressure, hypertension, lipids, diabetes, glucose, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and creatinine were included in the calculator. Gains in total and CVD-free life expectancy increased with blood pressure, unfavorable lipid levels, and body mass index after multivariable adjustment. Gains decreased considerably with advancing age, while SCORE 10-y CVD mortality risk increased with age. Twenty-five percent of participants with a low SCORE risk achieved equal or larger gains in CVD-free life expectancy than the median gain in participants with a high SCORE risk. Conclusions We developed tools to predict personalized increases in total and CVD-free life expectancy with statin therapy. The predicted gains we found are small. If the underlying model is validated in an independent cohort, the tools may be

  4. How can we better identify early HIV infections?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Nora E.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Busch, Michael P.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Detection of early HIV infections (EHIs), including acute HIV infection (AHI), is important for individual health, prevention of HIV transmission, and measurement of HIV incidence. We describe markers of EHI, diagnostic strategies for detecting these markers, and ways to incorporate these strategies into diagnostic and HIV incidence algorithms. Recent findings For individual diagnosis in the United States and Europe, laboratory-based diagnostic algorithms increasingly incorporate fourth-generation HIV antigen tests, allowing for earlier detection. In some sub-Saharan African settings, symptom-based screening is being explored to identify subsets of persons at high risk for AHI. Point-of-care diagnostics designed for AHI detection are in the pipeline and, if validated, represent an opportunity for real-time AHI diagnosis. At the population level, multiassay algorithms are promising new strategies for estimating HIV incidence on the basis of several assays applied to cross-sectional samples. These algorithms can be developed to optimize performance, in addition to cost and logistical considerations. Summary There are important recent advances in detection of EHIs at the individual and population levels. Applying optimal combinations of tests in diagnostic and HIV incidence algorithms is urgently needed to support the multiple goals derived from enhanced detection and discrimination of EHIs. PMID:25389806

  5. Increased Frequency of α-Synuclein in the Substantia Nigra in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Khanlou, Negar; Moore, David J.; Chana, Gursharan; Cherner, Mariana; Lazzaretto, Deborah; Dawes, Sharron; Grant, Igor; Masliah, Eliezer; Everall, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of neurodegenerative markers among long surviving HIV infected individuals is unknown, therefore, the present study investigated the frequency of α-synuclein, β-amyloid and HIV-associated brain pathology in the brains of older HIV infected individuals. We examined the substantia nigra of 73 clinically well-characterized HIV infected individuals aged 50 to 76 years from the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium. We also examined the frontal and temporal cortical regions of a subset of 36 individuals. The brain regions were examined for the presence of α-synuclein, β-amyloid and HIV-associated brain pathology. Neuritic α-synuclein expression was found in 16% (12/73) of the substantia nigra of the HIV+ cases and none of the older control cases (0/18). β-amyloid deposits were prevalent and found in nearly all of the HIV+ cases (35/36). Despite these increases of degenerative pathology, HIV-associated brain pathology was present in only 10% of cases. Among older HIV+ adults HIV-associated brain pathology does not appear elevated; however, the frequency of both α-synuclein and β-amyloid is higher than that found in older healthy persons. The increased prevalence of α-synuclein and β-amyloid in the brains of older HIV-infected individuals may predict an increased risk of developing neurodegenerative disease. PMID:19115126

  6. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Necchi, Francesca; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Young, Stephen P.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Gordon, Melita A.; Saul, Allan J.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both). IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing. Conclusion/Significance IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials

  7. Comparison of the specificities of IgG, IgG-subclass, IgA and IgM reactivities in African and European HIV-infected individuals with an HIV-1 clade C proteome-based array.

    PubMed

    Gallerano, Daniela; Ndlovu, Portia; Makupe, Ian; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Fauland, Kerstin; Wollmann, Eva; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Keller, Walter; Sibanda, Elopy; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive set of recombinant proteins and peptides of the proteome of HIV-1 clade C was prepared and purified and used to measure IgG, IgG-subclass, IgA and IgM responses in HIV-infected patients from Sub-Saharan Africa, where clade C is predominant. As a comparison group, HIV-infected patients from Europe were tested. African and European patients showed an almost identical antibody reactivity profile in terms of epitope specificity and involvement of IgG, IgG subclass, IgA and IgM responses. A V3-peptide of gp120 was identified as major epitope recognized by IgG1>IgG2 = IgG4>IgG3, IgA>IgM antibodies and a C-terminal peptide represented another major peptide epitope for the four IgG subclasses. By contrast, gp41-derived-peptides were mainly recognized by IgG1 but not by the other IgG subclasses, IgA or IgM. Among the non-surface proteins, protease, reverse transcriptase+RNAseH, integrase, as well as the capsid and matrix proteins were the most frequently and strongly recognized antigens which showed broad IgG subclass and IgA reactivity. Specificities and magnitudes of antibody responses in African patients were stable during disease and antiretroviral treatment, and persisted despite severe T cell loss. Using a comprehensive panel of gp120, gp41 peptides and recombinant non-surface proteins of HIV-1 clade C we found an almost identical antibody recognition profile in African and European patients regarding epitopes and involved IgG-sublass, IgA- and IgM-responses. Immune recognition of gp120 peptides and non-surface proteins involved all four IgG subclasses and was indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. The HIV-1 clade C proteome-based test allowed diagnosis and monitoring of antibody responses in the course of HIV-infections and assessment of isotype and subclass responses. PMID:25658330

  8. Comparison of the Specificities of IgG, IgG-Subclass, IgA and IgM Reactivities in African and European HIV-Infected Individuals with an HIV-1 Clade C Proteome-Based Array

    PubMed Central

    Gallerano, Daniela; Ndlovu, Portia; Makupe, Ian; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Fauland, Kerstin; Wollmann, Eva; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Keller, Walter; Sibanda, Elopy; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive set of recombinant proteins and peptides of the proteome of HIV-1 clade C was prepared and purified and used to measure IgG, IgG-subclass, IgA and IgM responses in HIV-infected patients from Sub-Saharan Africa, where clade C is predominant. As a comparison group, HIV-infected patients from Europe were tested. African and European patients showed an almost identical antibody reactivity profile in terms of epitope specificity and involvement of IgG, IgG subclass, IgA and IgM responses. A V3-peptide of gp120 was identified as major epitope recognized by IgG1>IgG2 = IgG4>IgG3, IgA>IgM antibodies and a C-terminal peptide represented another major peptide epitope for the four IgG subclasses. By contrast, gp41-derived-peptides were mainly recognized by IgG1 but not by the other IgG subclasses, IgA or IgM. Among the non-surface proteins, protease, reverse transcriptase+RNAseH, integrase, as well as the capsid and matrix proteins were the most frequently and strongly recognized antigens which showed broad IgG subclass and IgA reactivity. Specificities and magnitudes of antibody responses in African patients were stable during disease and antiretroviral treatment, and persisted despite severe T cell loss. Using a comprehensive panel of gp120, gp41 peptides and recombinant non-surface proteins of HIV-1 clade C we found an almost identical antibody recognition profile in African and European patients regarding epitopes and involved IgG-sublass, IgA- and IgM-responses. Immune recognition of gp120 peptides and non-surface proteins involved all four IgG subclasses and was indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. The HIV-1 clade C proteome-based test allowed diagnosis and monitoring of antibody responses in the course of HIV-infections and assessment of isotype and subclass responses. PMID:25658330

  9. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection. PMID:26310309

  10. Physical Exercise is Associated with Less Neurocognitive Impairment Among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Catherine A.; Marquine, Maria J.; Fazeli, Pariya L.; Henry, Brook L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains prevalent in HIV-infection. Randomized trials have shown that physical exercise improves NCI in non HIV-infected adults, but data on HIV-infected populations is limited. Community-dwelling HIV-infected participants (n=335) completed a comprehensive neurocognitive battery that was utilized to define both global and domain-specific NCI. Participants were divided into “Exercise” (n=83) and “No Exercise” (n=252) groups based on whether they self-reported engaging in any activity that increased heart rate in the last 72 hours or not. We also measured and evaluated a series of potential confounding factors, including demographics, HIV-disease characteristics, substance use and psychiatric comorbidities, and physical functioning. Lower rates of global NCI were observed among the Exercise group (15.7%) as compared to those in the No Exercise group (31.0%; p<.01). A multivariable logistic regression controlling for potential confounds (i.e., education, AIDS status, current CD4+ lymphocyte count, self-reported physical function, current depression) showed that being in the Exercise group remained significantly associated with lower global NCI (OR=2.63, p<.05). Similar models of domain-specific NCI showed that Exercise was associated with reduced impairment in working memory (p<.05) and speed of information processing (p<.05). The present findings suggest that HIV-infected adults who exercise are approximately half as likely to show NCI as compared to those who do not. Future longitudinal studies might be best suited to address causality and intervention trials in HIV-infected individuals will determine whether exercise can prevent or ameliorate NCI in this population. PMID:23934585

  11. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  12. Gut microbiota associated with HIV infection is significantly enriched in bacteria tolerant to oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dubourg, Grégory; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Hüe, Sophie; Surenaud, Mathieu; Bachar, Dipankar; Robert, Catherine; Michelle, Caroline; Ravaux, Isabelle; Mokhtari, Saadia; Million, Matthieu; Stein, Andreas; Brouqui, Philippe; Levy, Yves; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gut microbiota modifications occurring during HIV infection have recently been associated with inflammation and microbial translocation. However, discrepancies between studies justified a comprehensive analysis performed on a large sample size. Design and methods In a case–control study, next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was applied to the faecal microbiota of 31 HIV-infected patients, of whom 18 were treated with antiretroviral treatment (ART), compared with 27 healthy controls. 21 sera samples from HIV-infected patients and 7 sera samples from control participants were used to test the presence of 25 markers of inflammation and/or immune activation. Results Diversity was significantly reduced in HIV individuals when compared with controls and was not restored in the ART group. The relative abundance of several members of Ruminococcaceae such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was critically less abundant in the HIV-infected group and inversely correlated with inflammation/immune activation markers. Members of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae were found to be enriched and positively correlated with these markers. There were significantly more aerotolerant species enriched in HIV samples (42/52 species, 80.8%) when compared with the control group (14/87 species, 16.1%; χ2 test, p<10−5, conditional maximum-likelihood estimate (CMLE) OR=21.9). Conclusions Imbalance between aerobic and anaerobic flora observed in HIV faecal microbiota could be a consequence of the gut impairment classically observed in HIV infection via the production of oxygen. Overgrowth of proinflammatory aerobic species during HIV infection raises the question of antioxidant supplementation, such as vitamin C, E or N-acetylcysteine. PMID:27547442

  13. Sevelamer Does Not Decrease Lipopolysaccharide or Soluble CD14 Levels But Decreases Soluble Tissue Factor, Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol, and Oxidized LDL Cholesterol Levels in Individuals With Untreated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Netanya G.; Zhang, Xinyan; Bosch, Ronald J.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Choi, Andrew I.; Robinson, Janet K.; Fine, Derek M.; Coombs, Robert W.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Douek, Daniel C.; Tressler, Randall; Read, Sarah W.; Wilson, Cara C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Lederman, Michael M.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal levels of inflammation are associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. Microbial translocation, which may cause inflammation, is decreased by sevelamer in patients undergoing hemodialysis. In this single-arm study, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of sevelamer therapy on 36 HIV-infected subjects who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Sevelamer did not significantly change markers of microbial translocation, inflammation, or T-cell activation. During sevelamer treatment, however, levels of soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and oxidized LDL cholesterol decreased significantly, whereas D-dimer levels increased. Thus, in this study population, sevelamer did not reduce microbial translocation but may have yielded cardiovascular benefits. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT 01543958. PMID:24864123

  14. Comparing clinical outcomes in HIV-infected and uninfected older men hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, LA; Juthani-Mehta, M; Allore, H; Trentalange, M; Tate, J; Rimland, D; Pisani, M; Akgün, KM; Goetz, MB; Butt, AA; Rodriguez-Barradas, M; Duggal, M; Crothers, K; Justice, AC; Quagliarello, VJ

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Outcomes of community–acquired pneumonia (CAP) among HIV-infected older adults are unclear. Methods Associations between HIV infection and three CAP outcomes (30-day mortality, readmission within 30 days post-discharge, and hospital length of stay [LOS]) were examined in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) of male Veterans, age ≥ 50 years, hospitalized for CAP from 10/1/2002 through 08/31/2010. Associations between the VACS Index and CAP outcomes were assessed in multivariable models. Results Among 117 557 Veterans (36 922 HIV-infected and 80 635 uninfected), 1203 met our eligibility criteria. The 30-day mortality rate was 5.3%, the mean LOS was 7.3 days, and 13.2% were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. In unadjusted analyses, there were no significant differences between HIV-infected and uninfected participants regarding the three CAP outcomes (P > 0.2). A higher VACS Index was associated with increased 30-day mortality, readmission, and LOS in both HIV-infected and uninfected groups. Generic organ system components of the VACS Index were associated with adverse CAP outcomes; HIV-specific components were not. Among HIV-infected participants, those not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) had a higher 30-day mortality (HR 2.94 [95% CI 1.51, 5.72]; P = 0.002) and a longer LOS (slope 2.69 days [95% CI 0.65, 4.73]; P = 0.008), after accounting for VACS Index. Readmission was not associated with ART use (OR 1.12 [95% CI 0.62, 2.00] P = 0.714). Conclusion Among HIV-infected and uninfected older adults hospitalized for CAP, organ system components of the VACS Index were associated with adverse CAP outcomes. Among HIV-infected individuals, ART was associated with decreased 30-day mortality and LOS. PMID:25959543

  15. Children Who Acquire HIV Infection Perinatally Are at Higher Risk of Early Death than Those Acquiring Infection through Breastmilk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Marston, Milly; Dabis, François; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen M.; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan Z.; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Zaba, Basia; Ghys, Peter D.; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Assumptions about survival of HIV-infected children in Africa without antiretroviral therapy need to be updated to inform ongoing UNAIDS modelling of paediatric HIV epidemics among children. Improved estimates of infant survival by timing of HIV-infection (perinatally or postnatally) are thus needed. Methodology/Principal Findings A pooled analysis was conducted of individual data of all available intervention cohorts and randomized trials on prevention of HIV mother-to-child transmission in Africa. Studies were right-censored at the time of infant antiretroviral initiation. Overall mortality rate per 1000 child-years of follow-up was calculated by selected maternal and infant characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival curves by child's HIV infection status and timing of HIV infection. Individual data from 12 studies were pooled, with 12,112 children of HIV-infected women. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years follow-up were 39.3 and 381.6 for HIV-uninfected and infected children respectively. One year after acquisition of HIV infection, an estimated 26% postnatally and 52% perinatally infected children would have died; and 4% uninfected children by age 1 year. Mortality was independently associated with maternal death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95%CI 1.6–3.0), maternal CD4<350 cells/ml (1.4, 1.1–1.7), postnatal (3.1, 2.1–4.1) or peri-partum HIV-infection (12.4, 10.1–15.3). Conclusions/Results These results update previous work and inform future UNAIDS modelling by providing survival estimates for HIV-infected untreated African children by timing of infection. We highlight the urgent need for the prevention of peri-partum and postnatal transmission and timely assessment of HIV infection in infants to initiate antiretroviral care and support for HIV-infected children. PMID:22383946

  16. [Problems of early detection of HIV infection, medical and psychological support of HIV-infected soldiers].

    PubMed

    Uliukin, I M; Bolekhan, V N; Iusupov, V V; Bulan'kov, Iu I; Orlova, E S

    2015-01-01

    The article contains the analysis of materials about HIV infection and the status of work on its early detection among soldiers. Currently, the figures have a tendency to stabilization, but there is an increase in the persantage of HIV-infected persons performing military service under the contract, as well as the actualization sexual way of infection. The insufficient effectiveness of the barrier screening during the laboratory examination of recruits may contribute the increase in the incidence of HIV infection. Have been reviewed the questions medical-diagnostic and medical-psychological support of HIV-infected soldiers. Been analyzed the social consequences of delays in seeking medical help of patients in this group, the opportunities and challenges of their dispensary observation. It was noted that early detection of HIV infection and proper medical and psychological support in the dynamics of pathological process helps to reduce the number of new cases and improve their outcomes and to reduce the period of efficiency recovery of military personnel. PMID:25916037

  17. HIV Infection and Osteoarticular Tuberculosis: Strange Bedfellows

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, B.; Osman, N.; Botha-Scheepers, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 47-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and HIV infection presenting with a 3-week history of a painful swollen knee, increased serum inflammatory markers, and a low CD4 lymphocyte count. The diagnosis of TB arthritis was made by synovial fluid culture, GeneXpert/PCR, and confirmed by histopathology of a synovial biopsy. A mini literature review suggests that although HIV infection is associated with extrapulmonary TB, osteoarticular TB is a relatively unusual presentation in an HIV positive patient. The diagnostic utility of the GeneXpert test is explored. We also describe the patient's good response to an intra-articular corticosteroid injection in combination with standard anti-TB therapy. PMID:27366339

  18. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in Croatia: the role of transmission clusters of men who have sex with men carrying the T215S surveillance drug resistance mutation.

    PubMed

    Grgic, Ivana; Lepej, Snjezana Zidovec; Lunar, Maja M; Poljak, Mario; Vince, Adriana; Vrakela, Ivana Baca; Planinic, Ana; Seme, Katja; Begovac, Josip

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in newly diagnosed and treatment-naive HIV-infected patients from Croatia and evaluate a possible contribution of transmission clusters to the spread of resistant virus. The study enrolled treatment-naive HIV-infected patients that entered clinical care at the Croatian Reference Center for HIV/AIDS between 2006 and 2008. The protease gene and a part of the reverse transcriptase gene of the HIV-1 genome were sequenced by using the Trugene HIV-1 Genotyping System. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was analyzed by using the surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) list recommended by the WHO in 2009. We report findings for 118 of 180 eligible patients (65.6% coverage). SDRM were detected in 26 of 118 patients (22.0%) who were infected with subtype B and belonged mostly to the men having sex with men (MSM). The majority of patients with primary resistance carried SDRM associated with resistance to nucleoside analogues reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 23 of 118 patients, 19.5%). The most frequently found NRTI SDRM was T215S (17 of 118 patients, 14.4%). SDRM associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were detected in three (2.5%) patients and primary resistance to protease inhibitors was not detected. Non-B subtypes were detected in 13/118 patients (11%). A total of 12 transmission pairs and eight distinct transmission clusters were identified with the largest cluster harboring sequences from 19 patients; among them all but two were carrying the T215S mutation. This study showed a high prevalence of TDR in newly diagnosed MSM from Croatia and is an important contribution concerning the relationship between local transmission clusters and the spread of resistant virus. PMID:22906365

  19. Evaluation of five conventional and molecular approaches for diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis in non-HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Zhou, Jie; Li, Juan; Li, Meng; Sun, Jun; Fang, Wen J; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Xu, Jianping; Boekhout, Teun; Liao, Wan Q; Pan, Wei H

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a life-threatening mycosis primarily occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Recently, non-HIV-infected hosts were increasingly reported to form a considerable proportion. However, the majority of the reported studies on the diagnosis of CM patients were performed on HIV-infected patients. For evaluation of various diagnostic approaches for CM in non-HIV-infected patients, a range of conventional and molecular assays used for diagnosis of CM were verified on 85 clinical CSFs from non-HIV-infected CM patients, including India ink staining, culture, a newly developed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), the lateral flow assay (LFA) of cryptococcal antigen detection and a qPCR assay. The LFA had the highest positive detection rate (97.6%; 95% CI, 91.8-99.7%) in non-HIV-infected CM patients, followed by the LAMP (87.1%; 95% CI, 78.0-93.4%), the qPCR (80.0%; 95% CI, 69.9-87.9%), India ink staining (70.6%; 95% CI, 59.7-80.0%) and culture (35.3%; 95% CI, 25.2-46.4%). All culture positive specimens were correctly identified by the LFA. PMID:27061343

  20. Cryptococcal Disease in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Kao, Carol; Goldman, David L

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungal pathogen that is remarkable for its tendency to cause meningoencephalitis, especially in patients with AIDS. While disease is less common in children than adults, it remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected children without access to anti-retroviral therapy. This review highlights recent insights into both the biology and treatment of cryptococcosis with a special emphasis on the pediatric literature. PMID:27443557

  1. HIV Infection in the Elderly: Arising Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Globally there is an increase in the number of people living with HIV at an advanced age (50 years and above). This is mainly due to prolonged survival following the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Living with HIV at an advanced age has been shown to be associated with a number of challenges, both clinical and immunological. This minireview aims at discussing the challenges encountered by elderly HIV-infected patients. PMID:27595022

  2. HIV Infection in the Elderly: Arising Challenges.

    PubMed

    Mpondo, Bonaventura C T

    2016-01-01

    Globally there is an increase in the number of people living with HIV at an advanced age (50 years and above). This is mainly due to prolonged survival following the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Living with HIV at an advanced age has been shown to be associated with a number of challenges, both clinical and immunological. This minireview aims at discussing the challenges encountered by elderly HIV-infected patients. PMID:27595022

  3. Human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer in the HIV-infected population.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Palefsky, J M

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted virus and an important etiologic factor in head and neck cancers. HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) compared with the general population. HPV-positive OPC are also increasingly a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected individuals in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapy. The epidemiology and natural history of oral HPV infection have not been well established, but it appears that oral HPV infection is less common than anal infection, and more common among HIV-infected persons than the general population. Prevention of OPC is therefore increasingly important in HIV-infected individuals. Although not demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, HPV vaccination may prevent oral HPV infection as well. The focus of organized HPV cancer prevention programs should include prophylactic HPV vaccination to reduce the burden of high-risk HPV and low-risk HPV types who have not yet been exposed. PMID:27109278

  4. Differences in antigen-specific CD4+ responses to opportunistic infections in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J; Cooke, Graham S; Kapembwa, Moses S; Kon, Onn M; Grass, Lisa; Sampson, Robert D; Taylor, Graham P; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals with severe immunodeficiency are at risk of opportunistic infection (OI). Tuberculosis (TB) may occur without substantial immune suppression suggesting an early and sustained adverse impact of HIV on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific cell mediated immunity (CMI). This prospective observational cohort study aimed to observe differences in OI-specific and MTB-specific CMI that might underlie this. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we compared CD4+ responses to MTB, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Candida albicans in individuals with and without HIV infection. MTB-specific CD4+ T-cells were more polyfunctional than virus specific (CMV/EBV) CD4+ T-cells which predominantly secreted IFN-gamma (IFN-γ) only. There was a reduced frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2 (IL-2)-dual-MTB-specific cells in HIV-infected individuals, which was not apparent for the other pathogens. MTB-specific cells were less differentiated especially compared with CMV-specific cells. CD127 expression was relatively less frequent on MTB-specific cells in HIV co-infection. MTB-specific CD4+ T-cells PD-1 expression was infrequent in contrast to EBV-specific CD4+ T-cells. The variation in the inherent quality of these CD4+ T-cell responses and impact of HIV co-infection may contribute to the timing of co-infectious diseases in HIV infection. PMID:26417433

  5. The Mucosae-Associated Epithelial Chemokine (MEC/CCL28) Modulates Immunity in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castelletti, Eleonora; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Kuhn, Louise; Borelli, Manuela; Gajardo, Johanna; Sinkala, Moses; Trabattoni, Daria; Kankasa, Chipepo; Lauri, Eleonora; Clivio, Alberto; Piacentini, Luca; Bray, Dorothy H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.; Thea, Donald M.; Veas, Francisco; Nebuloni, Manuela; Mazzotta, Francesco; Clerici, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Background CCL28 (MEC) binds to CCR3 and CCR10 and recruits IgA-secreting plasma cells (IgA-ASC) in the mucosal lamina propria (MLP). Mucosal HIV-specific IgA are detected in HIV-infection and exposure. The CCL28 circuit was analyzed in HIV-infected and-exposed individuals and in HIV-unexposed controls; the effect of CCL28 administration on gastrointestinal MLP IgA-ASC was verified in a mouse model. Methodology/Findings CCL28 was augmented in breast milk (BM) plasma and saliva of HIV-infected and –exposed individuals; CCR3+ and CCR10+ B lymphocytes were increased in these same individuals. Additionally: 1) CCL28 concentration in BM was associated with longer survival in HIV vertically-infected children; and 2) gastro-intestinal mucosal IgA-ASC were significantly increased in VSV-immunized mice receiving CCL28. Conclusions CCL28 mediates mucosal immunity in HIV exposure and infection. CCL28-including constructs should be considered in mucosal vaccines to prevent HIV infection of the gastro-intestinal MLP via modulation of IgA-ASC. PMID:17912348

  6. Hodgkin lymphoma in the elderly, pregnant, and HIV-infected.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, Veronika; Connors, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presenting in patients with co-incidental advanced age, pregnancy, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is uniquely challenging to manage. In this article we integrate recent evidence and clinical expertise to present recommendations for diagnosis and therapeutic management. Older patients with HL need to be carefully evaluated for comorbidies after which judicious choice of chemotherapy should minimize functional compromise. A pregnant patient with concurrent HL should be staged with minimal use of imaging requiring ionizing radiation and treated in an individualized manner optimally combining the strategies of treatment deferral when appropriate, use of single-agent vinblastine for symptomatic disease and reservation of multi-agent chemotherapy for the small minority of patients with aggressive clinical presentation. Treatment of HL coincident with HIV infection requires a combination of highly active anti-retroviral agents (HAART), standard multi-agent chemotherapy with meticulous attention to drug-drug interactions, and vigorous supportive care to ensure the best chance of cure. PMID:27496312

  7. Depressive symptoms in blood donors notified of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P D; Van Devanter, N; Rogers, T F; Singer, E; Shipton-Levy, R; Steilen, M; Stuart, A; Avorn, J; Pindyck, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Understanding more about the psychological state of persons notified of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is critical for designing notification and counseling programs that will have the most positive effect. METHODS. The subjects were blood donors who had been notified of HIV infection by the New York Blood Center. A nurse elicited a medical history, performed a limited medical examination, and asked the subjects to complete a questionnaire that included questions about drug use, sexual behavior, and psychological characteristics. The subjects completed another questionnaire approximately 2 weeks later. RESULTS. The average depressive symptom scores for both men and women were substantially higher than scores typically found in representative population samples. More than a quarter of the men and more than a third of the women reported seeking psychological or psychiatric services in the first few weeks following notification. CONCLUSIONS. Anticipating and meeting individuals' psychological needs may be necessary if HIV screening programs are to address effectively the needs of persons infected with HIV. PMID:8460730

  8. Counselling challenges in haemophilia and HIV infection/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Pittadaki, J

    1996-01-01

    The advent of AIDS has had such a deep-reaching effect on the international haemophilia community that one can make a reasonable distinction between a pre-AIDS and a post-AIDS era in haemophilia management. In the context of counselling, however, talking about a 'before' and an 'after' in haemophilia does not (and, in our opinion, should not) necessarily imply a separation of the past from the present. Dealing with the psycho-social implications of haemophilia and HIV infection does not mean focusing exclusively on HIV-generated problems at the expense of haemophilia-related issues. Since the HIV crisis, counselling has posed the multiple challenge of: (a) assessing and alleviating the more immediate emotional effects of HIV infection; (b) paying due attention to the underlying influence of haemophilia on reaction, defence and coping; (c) formulating a flexible approach that is based on close cooperation with the medical staff and effective interpersonal communication with the counsellees.* In practice, the flexibility and effectiveness of the counselling model are promoted by means of: (a) ongoing counselling, (b) multiple counselling sites (i.e. the Haemophilia Centre and other appropriate locations), (c) interdisciplinary team-work, (d) respect for individual/ ethnic values, (e) maintenance of exo-empathy (i.e. neutrality), and (f) transfer of coping skills. The above framework can help maximize the effectiveness of counselling sessions through a personalized rapport of mutual trust and confidence between the counselling team and the counsellees. PMID:27213898

  9. Dyslipidaemia associated with antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a significant impact on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, leading to a remarkable decrease in its morbidity and mortality, but is frequently associated with clinical and metabolic complications. Fat redistribution or lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus have been extensively reported in subjects treated with protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral regimens. In particular, dyslipidaemia occurs in up to 70-80% of HIV-infected individuals receiving HAART and can be associated with all the available PIs, although hypertriglyceridaemia appears to be more frequent in patients treated with ritonavir, ritonavir-saquinavir, or ritonavir-lopinavir. The potential long-term consequences of HAART-associated hyperlipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary artery disease has been reported in young HIV-positive persons receiving PIs. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a PI-sparing regimen may act favourably on dyslipidaemia. Lipid-lowering therapy is often required with statins or fibrates. The choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account potential pharmacological interactions with antiretroviral agents. PMID:14645323

  10. Fosamprenavir calcium plus ritonavir for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Torres, Harrys A; Arduino, Roberto C

    2007-06-01

    Fosamprenavir is a protease inhibitor (PI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Fosamprenavir is a prodrug of amprenavir developed to reduce the pill burden yet maintain the unique resistance pattern and efficacy associated with amprenavir. In a head-to-head, noninferiority trial in antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected patients, the antiviral efficacy and tolerability of ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir was not inferior to ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, when the PIs were combined with two other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. There are fewer studies published about fosamprenavir use in antiretroviral treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients. The high genetic barrier to the development of resistance to fosamprenavir and the low level of cross-resistance between ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir and other PI regimens are notable. As with amprenavir, gastrointestinal disturbance and rash are the most frequent short-term treatment-limiting events with fosamprenavir. Treatment with ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir can produce a durable response. To date, fosamprenavir is one of the recommended preferred PI components for the treatment of antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected patients. PMID:17547501

  11. Behavior changes after notification of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P D; Van Devanter, N; Rogers, T F; Singer, E; Shipton-Levy, R; Steilen, M; Stuart, A; Avorn, J; Pindyck, J

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. To learn more about how people who did not volunteer for testing react to information about HIV infection, we assessed short-term behavior changes in HIV-positive blood donors. METHODS. Blood donors who were notified at the New York Blood Center that they were HIV positive were asked to participate in a study. A nurse elicited a medical history, performed a limited medical examination, and asked participants to complete a questionnaire that included questions about drug use, sexual behavior, and psychological characteristics. Participants were asked to return in 2 weeks to complete another questionnaire. RESULTS. Many fewer men and women reported engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors in the 2 weeks preceding the follow-up visit than had reported such behaviors prior to notification. These changes were greater than those other investigators have reported, but about 40% of the participants still reported unsafe sexual activity at the follow-up interview. CONCLUSIONS. To make nonvolunteer screening programs for HIV infection more effective in reducing the spread of HIV infection, we need to learn more about how to help people change their high-risk behaviors. PMID:1746654

  12. Reversible Reprogramming of Circulating Memory T Follicular Helper Cell Function during Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cubas, Rafael; van Grevenynghe, Julien; Wills, Saintedym; Kardava, Lela; Santich, Brian H.; Buckner, Clarisa M.; Muir, Roshell; Tardif, Virginie; Nichols, Carmen; Procopio, Francesco; He, Zhong; Metcalf, Talibah; Ghneim, Khader; Locci, Michela; Ancuta, Petronella; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Trautmann, Lydie; Li, Yuxing; McDermott, Adrian B.; Koup, Rick A.; Petrovas, Constantinos; Migueles, Steven A.; Connors, Mark; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moir, Susan; Crotty, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the overwhelming benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in curtailing viral load in HIV-infected individuals, ART does not fully restore cellular and humoral immunity. HIV-infected individuals under ART show reduced responses to vaccination and infections and are unable to mount an effective antiviral immune response upon ART cessation. Many factors contribute to these defects, including persistent inflammation, especially in lymphoid tissues, where T follicular helper (Tfh) cells instruct and help B cells launch an effective humoral immune response. In this study we investigated the phenotype and function of circulating memory Tfh cells as a surrogate of Tfh cells in lymph nodes and found significant impairment of this cell population in chronically HIV-infected individuals, leading to reduced B cell responses. We further show that these aberrant memory Tfh cells exhibit an IL-2–responsive gene signature and are more polarized toward a Th1 phenotype. Treatment of functional memory Tfh cells with IL-2 was able to recapitulate the detrimental reprogramming. Importantly, this defect was reversible, as interfering with the IL-2 signaling pathway helped reverse the abnormal differentiation and improved Ab responses. Thus, reversible reprogramming of memory Tfh cells in HIV-infected individuals could be used to enhance Ab responses. Altered microenvironmental conditions in lymphoid tissues leading to altered Tfh cell differentiation could provide one explanation for the poor responsiveness of HIV-infected individuals to new Ags. This explanation has important implications for the development of therapeutic interventions to enhance HIV- and vaccine-mediated Ab responses in patients under ART. PMID:26546609

  13. Fertility intentions among HIV-infected, sero-concordant Kenyan couples in Nyanza Province, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Shari; Harrington, Elizabeth; Kwena, Zachary; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R.; Grossma, Daniel; Newmann, Sara J.

    2013-01-01

    Research in sub-Saharan Africa has shown significant diversity in how HIV influences infected couples’ fertility intentions. Supporting HIV-infected, sero-concordant couples in sub-Saharan Africa to make informed choices about their fertility options has not received sufficient attention. In-depth interviews were conducted among 23 HIV-positive, sero-concordant married couples in Kenya, to better understand how HIV impacted fertility intentions. HIV compelled many to reconsider fertility plans, sometimes promoting childbearing intentions in some individuals but often reducing fertility plans among most, largely due to fears of early death, health concerns, stigma, perinatal HIV transmission and financial difficulties (particularly in men). Preferences for sons and large families influenced some couples’ intentions to continue childbearing, although none had discussed their intentions with health care providers. Additional support and services for HIV-infected, sero-concordant couples are needed. Family planning counselling should be tailored to the unique concerns of HIV-infected couples, addressing perinatal transmission but also individual, couple-level, and socio-cultural fertility expectations. Community-level programmes are needed to reduce stigma and make HIV-infected couples more comfortable in discussing fertility intentions with health care providers. PMID:23885924

  14. Impact of Early Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with Acute HIV Infection in Vienna, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Herout, Sandra; Mandorfer, Mattias; Breitenecker, Florian; Reiberger, Thomas; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Rieger, Armin; Aichelburg, Maximilian C.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) should be initiated during acute HIV infection. Most recent data provides evidence of benefits of early ART. Methods We retrospectively compared the clinical and immunological course of individuals with acute HIV infection, who received ART within 3 months (group A) or not (group B) after diagnosis. Results Among the 84 individuals with acute HIV infection, 57 (68%) received ART within 3 months (A) whereas 27 (32%) did not receive ART within 3 months (B), respectively. Clinical progression to CDC stadium B or C within 5 years after the diagnosis of HIV was less common in (A) when compared to (B) (P = 0.002). After twelve months, both the mean increase in CD4+ T cell count and the mean decrease in viral load was more pronounced in (A), when compared to (B) (225 vs. 87 cells/μl; P = 0.002 and -4.19 vs. -1.14 log10 copies/mL; P<0.001). Twenty-four months after diagnosis the mean increase from baseline of CD4+ T cells was still higher in group A compared to group B (251 vs. 67 cells/μl, P = 0.004). Conclusions Initiation of ART during acute HIV infection is associated with a lower probability of clinical progression to more advanced CDC stages and significant immunological benefits. PMID:27065239

  15. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-03-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with amyloid

  16. Psychiatric Diagnoses among an HIV-Infected Outpatient Clinic Population.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Enbal; Önen, Nur F; Donovan, Michael F; Rosenburg, Neal; Overton, E Turner

    2016-01-01

    As individuals with HIV infection are living longer, the management of psychiatric disorders has increasingly been incorporated into comprehensive care. Individuals were recruited from an outpatient HIV clinic to assess the prevalence and related associations of current psychiatric disorders and biomarkers. Of the 201 participants who completed the interviews, the median age was 43.5 years, and the majority was male and African American. Most were receiving HIV therapy and 78% of those had achieved virologic suppression. Prevalent psychiatric diagnoses included major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety, and agoraphobia. Alcohol and cocaine/crack abuse and dependence were common substance use disorders. Current receipt of HIV therapy was less common among those diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. Agoraphobia was the only disorder associated with unsuppressed viral load. Psychiatric and substance use disorders are highly prevalent among an urban HIV clinic population, although we identified few associations between psychiatric diagnoses and HIV diseases status. PMID:25348798

  17. Endothelin-1 Predicts Hemodynamically Assessed Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Heringer, Amanda S.; Macgregor, John S.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Ganz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV infection is an independent risk factor for PAH, but the underlying pathogenesis remains unclear. ET-1 is a robust vasoconstrictor and key mediator of pulmonary vascular homeostasis. Higher levels of ET-1 predict disease severity and mortality in other forms of PAH, and endothelin receptor antagonists are central to treatment, including in HIV-associated PAH. The direct relationship between ET-1 and PAH in HIV-infected individuals is not well described. Methods We measured ET-1 and estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in 106 HIV-infected individuals. Participants with a PASP ≥ 30 mmHg (n = 65) underwent right heart catheterization (RHC) to definitively diagnose PAH. We conducted multivariable analysis to identify factors associated with PAH. Results Among 106 HIV-infected participants, 80% were male, the median age was 52 years and 77% were on antiretroviral therapy. ET-1 was significantly associated with higher values of PASP [14% per 0.1 pg/mL increase in ET-1, p = 0.05] and PASP ≥ 30 mmHg [PR (prevalence ratio) = 1.24, p = 0.012] on TTE after multivariable adjustment for PAH risk factors. Similarly, among the 65 individuals who underwent RHC, ET-1 was significantly associated with higher values of mean pulmonary artery pressure and PAH (34%, p = 0.003 and PR = 2.43, p = 0.032, respectively) in the multivariable analyses. Conclusions Higher levels of ET-1 are independently associated with HIV-associated PAH as hemodynamically assessed by RHC. Our findings suggest that excessive ET-1 production in the setting of HIV infection impairs pulmonary endothelial function and contributes to the development of PAH. PMID:26752193

  18. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  19. Use of a High Resolution Melting (HRM) Assay to Compare Gag, Pol, and Env Diversity in Adults with Different Stages of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Beauchamp, Geetha; Brookmeyer, Ronald; Towler, William I.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Khaki, Leila; Koblin, Beryl; Chesney, Margaret; Moore, Richard D.; Kelen, Gabor D.; Coates, Thomas; Celum, Connie; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Seage, George R.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional assessment of HIV incidence relies on laboratory methods to discriminate between recent and non-recent HIV infection. Because HIV diversifies over time in infected individuals, HIV diversity may serve as a biomarker for assessing HIV incidence. We used a high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay to compare HIV diversity in adults with different stages of HIV infection. This assay provides a single numeric HRM score that reflects the level of genetic diversity of HIV in a sample from an infected individual. Methods HIV diversity was measured in 203 adults: 20 with acute HIV infection (RNA positive, antibody negative), 116 with recent HIV infection (tested a median of 189 days after a previous negative HIV test, range 14–540 days), and 67 with non-recent HIV infection (HIV infected >2 years). HRM scores were generated for two regions in gag, one region in pol, and three regions in env. Results Median HRM scores were higher in non-recent infection than in recent infection for all six regions tested. In multivariate models, higher HRM scores in three of the six regions were independently associated with non-recent HIV infection. Conclusions The HRM diversity assay provides a simple, scalable method for measuring HIV diversity. HRM scores, which reflect the genetic diversity in a viral population, may be useful biomarkers for evaluation of HIV incidence, particularly if multiple regions of the HIV genome are examined. PMID:22073290

  20. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders in early stages of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, G R; Rundell, J R; McManis, S E; Kendall, S N; Zachary, R; Temoshok, L

    1992-01-01

    As part of a military universal HIV screening program, 442 men were assessed for the presence of DSM-III-R defined psychiatric disorders and symptoms of anxiety and depression after notification of HIV seroconversion. Of them, 84.4% were in the earliest, asymptomatic stages of disease at the time of interview (96% did not have AIDS). The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R and Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scales were used. Relevant comparisons were made to Epidemiologic Catchment Area prevalence data. HIV seropositive men were more likely than age-matched men in the community to have current diagnoses of major depression (ages 18-44) and anxiety disorders (ages 25-44). Higher lifetime rates of major depression and alcohol use disorder, and high current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (21.7%) were noted. We conclude that men who become HIV seropositive have high rates of mood and substance use disorders prior to knowledge of seroconversion, and that early in the course of HIV infection men are at risk for developing major depression, anxiety disorders, and disorders of sexual desire. PMID:1438661

  1. The role of enacted stigma in parental HIV disclosure among HIV-infected parents in China.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies have delineated that HIV-infected parents face numerous challenges in disclosing their HIV infection to the children ("parental HIV disclosure"), and practices of parental HIV disclosure vary with individual characteristics, family contexts, and social environment. Using cross-sectional data from 1254 HIV-infected parents who had children aged 5-16 years in southwest China, the current study examined the association of parental HIV disclosure with mental health and medication adherence among parents and explored the possible effect of enacted stigma on such association. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that parents who had experienced disclosure to children reported higher level enacted stigma, worse mental health conditions, and poorer medication adherence. Enacted stigma partially mediated the associations between disclosure and both mental health and medication adherence after controlling basic background characteristics. Our findings highlight the importance of providing appropriate disclosure-related training and counseling service among HIV-infected parents. In a social setting where HIV-related stigma is still persistent, disclosure intervention should address and reduce stigma and discrimination in the practice of parental HIV disclosure. PMID:26616123

  2. The role of enacted stigma in parental HIV disclosure among HIV-infected parents in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies have delineated that HIV-infected parents face numerous challenges in disclosing their HIV infection to the children (“parental HIV disclosure”), and practices of parental HIV disclosure vary with individual characteristics, family contexts, and social environment. Using cross-sectional data from 1254 HIV-infected parents who had children aged 5–16 years in southwest China, the current study examined the association of parental HIV disclosure with mental health and medication adherence among parents and explored the possible effect of enacted stigma on such association. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that parents who had experienced disclosure to children reported higher level enacted stigma, worse mental health conditions, and poorer medication adherence. Enacted stigma partially mediated the associations between disclosure and both mental health and medication adherence after controlling basic background characteristics. Our findings highlight the importance of providing appropriate disclosure-related training and counseling service among HIV-infected parents. In a social setting where HIV-related stigma is still persistent, disclosure intervention should address and reduce stigma and discrimination in the practice of parental HIV disclosure. PMID:26616123

  3. HIV Infection Among People Who Inject Drugs: The Challenge of Racial/Ethnic Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; McCarty, Dennis; Vega, William A.; Bramson, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection, with minority groups typically having higher rates of infection, are a formidable public health challenge. In the United States, among both men and women who inject drugs, HIV infection rates are elevated among non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics. A meta-analysis of international research concluded that among persons who inject drugs, racial and ethnic minorities were twice as likely to acquire an HIV infection, though there was great variation across the individual studies. To examine strategies to reduce racial/ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs, we reviewed studies on injection drug use and its role in HIV transmission. We identified four sets of evidence-based interventions that may reduce racial ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs: HIV counseling and testing, risk reduction services, access to anti-retroviral therapy, and drug abuse treatment. Implementation of these services, however, is insufficient in many countries, including the US. Persons who inject drugs appear to be changing drug use norms and rituals to reduce risks. The challenges are to 1) develop a validated model of how racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection arise, persist, and are reduced or eliminated over time, and 2) implement evidence-based services on a sufficient scale to eliminate HIV transmission among all persons who inject drugs. PMID:23688094

  4. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  5. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  6. A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) for Protease Inhibitor–Based Regimens in Antiretroviral-Experienced HIV-Infected Individuals: Week 48 Results of the A5146 Study

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Mary; Mukherjee, A. Lisa; Tierney, Camlin; Morse, Gene D.; Dykes, Carrie; Klingman, Karin L.; Demeter, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Background We devised an open-label, randomized trial to evaluate whether therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of protease inhibitors (PIs) and dose escalation based upon a normalized inhibitory quotient (NIQ), which integrates PI trough concentration and drug resistance, could improve virologic outcome in PI-experienced patients with treatment failure. Secondary analyses through 48 weeks are presented. Methods Eligible HIV-infected subjects with a screening viral load of ≥1000 copies/mL initiated a new PI-based regimen at entry and had NIQ performed at week 2. Subjects with an NIQ ≤1 were randomized at week 4 to a standard-of-care (SOC) arm or TDM arm featuring PI dose escalation. Results One hundred and eighty-three subjects were randomized. There was no significant treatment difference in change from randomization to week 48 in HIV-1 RNA [P = .13, median (25th, 75th percentile log10 copies/mL change): −0.03 (−0.74, 0.62) with TDM and 0.11 (−2.3, 0.82) with SOC]. In subgroup analysis, patients with ≥0.69 active PIs benefited from TDM compared to those with <0.69 active PIs (P = .05). Conclusions While the TDM strategy of PI dose escalation did not improve virologic response at week 48 overall, in subgroup analysis, TDM favorably impacted virologic outcome in subjects taking PI-based regimens with moderate antiviral activity. PMID:22044856

  7. Intimate partner violence and HIV infection among women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Marshall, Caitlin M; Rees, Hilary C; Nunez, Annabelle; Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Ehiri, John E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To assess evidence of an association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV infection among women. Methods Medline/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group's Specialized Register and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched up to 20 May 2013 to identify studies that examined the association between IPV and HIV infection in women. We included studies on women aged ≥15 years, in any form of sexually intimate relationship with a male partner. Results Twenty-eight studies [(19 cross-sectional, 5 cohorts and 4 case-control studies) involving 331,468 individuals in 16 countries – the US (eight studies), South Africa (four studies), East Africa (10 studies), India (three studies), Brazil (one study) and multiple low-income countries (two studies)] were included. Results were pooled using RevMan 5.0. To moderate effect estimates, we analyzed all data using the random effects model, irrespective of heterogeneity level. Pooled results of cohort studies indicated that physical IPV [pooled RR (95% CI): 1.22 (1.01, 1.46)] and any type of IPV [pooled RR (95% CI): 1.28 (1.00, 1.64)] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Results of cross-sectional studies demonstrated significant associations of physical IPV with HIV infection among women [pooled OR (95% CI): 1.44 (1.10, 1.87)]. Similarly, results of cross-sectional studies indicated that combination of physical and sexual IPV [pooled OR (95% CI): 2.00 (1.24, 3.22) and any type of IPV [pooled OR (95% CI): 1.41 (1.16, 1.73)] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Conclusions Available evidence suggests a moderate statistically significant association between IPV and HIV infection among women. To further elucidate the strength of the association between IPV and HIV infection among women, there is a need for high-quality follow-up studies conducted in different geographical regions of the world, and among

  8. HIV infection is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Copur, A Sinan; Smith, Peter R; Gomez, Victor; Bergman, Michael; Homel, Peter

    2002-05-01

    The reported incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has ranged from 0.25 to 0.96% in clinical studies, but up to 17% at autopsy. A preliminary analysis at our hospital suggested that the frequency of VTE among HIV-positive individuals might be higher than previously reported. To further evaluate this issue, we performed a retrospective study of patients with a diagnosis of VTE and/or HIV infection discharged from our hospital between July 1, 1998 and June 30, 1999. A total of 13,496 patients were discharged during the year of the study. There were 244 patients with VTE and 362 who were HIV-positive. Ten of the 244 patients with VTE were HIV-positive (4.1%). The frequency of VTE among HIV-positive individuals was 10/362 (2.8%) compared to 234/13134 (1.8%) in the non-HIV-positive group, but the difference is not statistically significant. However, in patients under age 50, the frequencies were significantly different: 10/302 (3.31%) versus 35/6594 (0.53%), respectively (p < 0.0001). The frequency of VTE in HIV-positive patients less than 50 years old (3.31%) was greater than in HIV-positive patients over 50 years of age (0/60), but the difference did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, in the non-HIV-positive group, VTE was significantly more frequent in those 50 and older compared to younger patients (3.04% versus 0.53%, p = 0.0001). Statistical analysis indicated that the direction of association between age and diagnosis of VTE differed for HIV-positive patients versus non-HIV-positive patients. Our results suggest that HIV-positive patients under age 50 are at increased risk for VTE compared with non-HIV-positive individuals. PMID:12055028

  9. Sequence analysis of East Asian cagA of Helicobacter pylori isolated from asymptomatic healthy Japanese and Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Yoshinaga, Aya; Kimoto, Ai; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2011-03-01

    CagA, especially East Asian type, is one of the most important virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori, which is believed to contribute to the gastric cancer development. There is extreme sequence heterogeneity on 3' region of cagA gene, demonstrated by the sequence analysis of cagA of H. pylori strains isolated from gastric disease patients. However, whether such heterogeneity of the cagA gene sequence is related to the pathogenicity of H. pylori in the gastric cancer development is not certain. Therefore, in this study, the 3' region of cagA sequences isolated from asymptomatic healthy individuals in Japan and Thailand, which show high and low gastric cancer prevalence, respectively, were analyzed and compared with those from patients with gastric cancer. The CagA sequences analysis in 21 and 12 H. pylori DNA samples obtained from Japanese and Thai individuals, respectively, by the molecular phylogenetic method showed that the sequences were more conserved in the Thai individuals (concordance rates among Thai sequences, 93.9-100%) than in the Japanese individuals (concordance rates among Japanese sequences, 82.8-100%) as shown by unrooted neighbor-joining (N-J) consensus trees constructed with the sequence between Asn869 and Ala967 in CagA. CagA sequences in gastric cancer patients were obtained from published data; analysis of these sequences revealed that CagA sequences from almost all Thai individuals were concentrated in one branch. In contrast, CagA sequences from Japanese individuals were uniformly distributed throughout the N-J consensus tree. These results suggest that the difference in the CagA sequences between asymptomatic healthy Japanese and Thai individuals may be linked to the incidence of gastric cancer in Japan and Thailand. PMID:21046394

  10. Humanized Mouse Models of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Paul W.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2013-01-01

    Because of the limited tropism of HIV, in vivo modeling of this virus has been almost exclusively limited to other lentiviruses such as SIV that reproduce many important characteristics of HIV infection. However, there are significant genetic and biological differences among lentiviruses and some HIV-specific interventions are not effective against other lentiviruses in non-human hosts. For these reasons much emphasis has recently been placed on developing alternative animal models that support HIV replication and recapitulate key aspects of HIV infection and pathogenesis in humans. Humanized mice, CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cell transplanted immunodeficient mice and in particular mice also implanted with human thymic/liver tissue (BLT mice) that develop a functional human immune system, have been the focus of a great deal of attention as possible models to study virtually all aspects of HIV biology and pathogenesis. Humanized mice are systemically reconstituted with human lymphoid cells offering rapid, reliable and reproducible experimental systems for HIV research. Peripheral blood of humanized mice can be readily sampled longitudinally to assess reconstitution with human cells and to monitor HIV replication permitting the evaluation of multiple parameters of HIV infection such as viral load levels, CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation, as well as the effects of therapeutic interventions. Of high relevance to HIV transmission is the extensive characterization and validation of the reconstitution with human lymphoid cells of the female reproductive tract and of the gastrointestinal tract of humanized BLT mice that renders them susceptible to both vaginal and rectal HIV infection. Other important attributes of all types of humanized mice include: 1) their small size and cost that make them broadly accessible; 2) multiple cohorts of humanized mice can be made from multiple human donors and each cohort has identical human cells, permitting control of

  11. The cytokine network in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Alfano, M; Poli, G

    2002-12-01

    Cytokines are major controller of HIV replication and represent, at the same time, a target for viral-induced immune dysregulation. This mutual relationship has profound implications for both active HIV replication and immune-mediated governance of latency; in addition, cytokines have therapeutic value in the perspective of immune reconstitution. In the current article we will review the most relevant aspects emerged in almost 20 years of research in this area with particular reference to the distinct, but interconnected contribution of the most simple (cell lines) to the most complex (animal) models of HIV infection. PMID:12462389

  12. Risk management information for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A J

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses HIV infection in terms of the risk manager's information needs in the health care environment. The malpractice problem, increasing workman's compensation suits, the greater role of the ombudsman, implementation of the National Practitioner Data Bank, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations' (JCAHO) emphasis on clinical excellence are conditions which have given greater importance to the risk manager's position. Included in this article are hedges to retrieve various components of risk management and a select bibliography from AIDSLINE. PMID:10110456

  13. Immunologic Biomarkers, Morbidity, and Mortality in Treated HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter W; Lee, Sulggi A; Siedner, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    Despite marked improvements in the modern treatment era, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, particularly those who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) at advanced disease stages, continue to have increased age-related morbidity and mortality, compared with the general population. Immune activation and inflammation persist despite suppressive ART and predict many of these morbidities. The goal of this review is to examine the evidence suggesting a link between the persistent inflammatory state and morbidity and mortality in this setting, to describe the impact of early ART initiation on these factors, and to highlight important unanswered questions for the field. We also advance a hypothesis to explain why some morbidities-and their root inflammatory drivers-may be prevented more than others by early ART initiation. PMID:27625430

  14. HIV Infection and TLR Signalling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Megan; Visvanathan, Kumar; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), liver disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals, specifically, in the presence of viral hepatitis coinfection. HIV, a single stranded RNA virus, can bind to and activate both Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR8 in circulating blood mononuclear cells, but little is known about the effect of HIV on TLRs expressed in the liver. HIV can directly infect cells of the liver and HIV-mediated depletion of CD4+ T-cells in the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) results in increased circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both of which may impact on TLR signaling in the liver and subsequent liver disease progression. The potential direct and indirect effects of HIV on TLR signaling in the liver will be explored in this paper. PMID:22474436

  15. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  16. T1ρ MRI detects cartilage damage in asymptomatic individuals with a cam deformity.

    PubMed

    Anwander, Helen; Melkus, Gerd; Rakhra, Kawan S; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-06-01

    Hips with a cam deformity are at risk for early cartilage degeneration, mainly in the anterolateral region of the joint. T1ρ MRI is a described technique for assessment of proteoglycan content in hyaline cartilage and subsequently early cartilage damage. In this study, 1.5 Tesla T1ρ MRI was performed on 20 asymptomatic hips with a cam deformity and compared to 16 healthy control hips. Cam deformity was defined as an alpha angle at 1:30 o'clock position over 60° and/or at 3:00 o'clock position over 50.5°. Hip cartilage was segmented and divided into four regions of interest (ROIs): anterolateral, anteromedial, posterolateral, and posteromedial quadrants. Mean T1ρ value of the entire weight bearing cartilage in hips with a cam deformity (34.0 ± 4.6 ms) was significantly higher compared to control hips (31.3 ± 3.2 ms, p = 0.050). This difference reached significance in the anterolateral (p = 0.042) and posteromedial quadrants (p = 0.041). No significant correlation between the alpha angle and T1ρ values was detected. The results indicate cartilage damage occurs in hips with a cam deformity before symptoms occur. A significant difference in T1ρ values was found in the anterolateral quadrant, the area of direct engagement of the deformity, and in the posteromedial quadrant. To conclude, T1ρ MRI can detect early chondral damage in asymptomatic hips with a cam deformity. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1004-1009, 2016. PMID:26573964

  17. Adenosine triphosphate released from HIV-infected macrophages regulates glutamatergic tone and dendritic spine density on neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Drewes, Julia; Graham, David R.; Haughey, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite wide spread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in developed countries, approximately half of HIV-infected patients will develop impairments in cognitive function. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction can be precipitated by HIV-infection of macrophages by mechanisms that involve alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV-infection of macrophages is known to increase the release of soluble neurotoxins. However, the composition of products released from infected macrophages is complex and not fully known. In this study we provide evidence that ATP and other immuno-/neuromodulatory nucleotides are exported from HIV-infected macrophages and modify neuronal structure. Supernatants collected from HIV-infected macrophages (HIV/MDM) contained large amounts of ATP, ADP, AMP and small amounts of adenosine, in addition to glutamate. Dilutions of these supernatants that were sub-threshold for glutamate receptor activation evoked rapid calcium flux in neurons that were completely inhibited by the enzymatic degradation of ATP, or by blockade of calcium permeable purinergic receptors. Applications of these high-dilution HIV/MDM onto neuronal cultures increased the amount of extracellular glutamate by mechanisms dependent on purinergic receptor activation, and downregulated spine density on neurons by mechanisms dependent on purinergic and glutamate receptor activation. We conclude from these data that ATP released from HIV-infected macrophages downregulates dendritic spine density on neurons by a mechanism that involves purinergic receptor mediated modulation of glutamatergic tone. These data suggest that neuronal function may be depressed in HIV infected individuals by mechanisms that involve macrophage release of ATP that triggers secondary effects on glutamate handling. PMID:23686368

  18. Expression of oral secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in HIV-infected subjects with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Kemapunmanus, Marisa; Yangngam, Supaporn; Talungchit, Sineepat; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objectives of this study were to determine 1) expression of oral secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in HIV-infected subjects compared to non-HIV controls, 2) the oral SLPI expression in HIV-infected subjects with ART compared to those without ART, and 3) factors associated with the expression of oral SLPI. METHODS Oral tissues and samples of both un-stimulated and stimulated saliva were collected from HIV-infected subjects with and without ART, and non-HIV individuals. The expression of SLPI mRNA in the tissue was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Salivary SLPI protein was detected using ELISA. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the association between HIV/ART status and the expression of oral SLPI. RESULTS One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects were enrolled; 99 on ART (age range 23–57 yr, mean 39 yr), 58 not on ART (age range 20–59 yr, mean 34 yr), and 50 non-HIV controls (age range 19–59 yr, mean 36 yr). The most common ART regimen was 2 NRTIs+1 NNRTI. The expression of oral SLPI in stimulated saliva was significantly decreased with HIV infection (p< 0.001). The expression was also significantly different with respect to ART use (p=0.007). Smoking, CD4+ cell count, and HIV viral load were the factors associated with the oral SLPI expression. CONCLUSION The expression of oral SLPI is altered by HIV infection and use of ART. Thus, oral SLPI may be the useful biomarker to identify subjects at risk of infections and malignant transformation due to HIV infection and long-term ART. PMID:23126266

  19. Finding those at risk: Acute HIV infection in Newark, NJ

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Eugene G.; Salaru, Gratian; Mohammed, Debbie; Coombs, Robert W.; Paul, Sindy M.; Cadoff, Evan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A screening strategy combining rapid HIV-1/2 (HIV) antibody testing with pooled HIV-1 RNA testing increases identification of HIV infections, but may have other limitations that restrict its usefulness to all but the highest incidence populations. Objective By combining rapid antibody detection and pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) testing, we sought to improve detection of early HIV-1 infections in an urban Newark, NJ hospital setting. Study design Pooled NAAT HIV-1 RNA testing was offered to emergency department patients and out-patients being screened for HIV antibodies by fingerstick-rapid HIV testing. For those negative by rapid HIV and agreeing to NAAT testing, pooled plasma samples were prepared and sent to the University of Washington where real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification was performed. Results Of 13,226 individuals screened, 6381 had rapid antibody testing alone, and 6845 agreed to add NAAT HIV screening. Rapid testing identified 115 antibody positive individuals. Pooled NAAT increased HIV-1 case detection by 7.0% identifying 8 additional cases. Overall, acute HIV infection yield was 0.12%. While males represent only 48.1% of those tested by NAAT, all samples that screened positive for HIV-1 RNA were obtained from men. Conclusion HIV-1 RNA testing of pooled, HIV antibody-negative specimens permits identification of recent infections. In Newark, pooled NAAT increased HIV-1 case detection and provided an opportunity to focus on treatment and prevention messages for those most at risk of transmitting infection. Although constrained by client willingness to participate in testing associated with a need to return to receive further results, use of pooled NAAT improved early infection sensitivity. PMID:23953941

  20. The Development and Implementation of an Outreach Program to Identify Acute and Recent HIV Infections in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Richard; Stein, Dylan; Hutt, Richard; Hagerty, Robert; Daskalakis, Demetre; Valentine, Fred; Marmor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2004, the authors have been operating First Call NYU, an outreach program to identify acute and recent HIV infections, also called primary HIV infections, among targeted at-risk communities in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. Materials and Methodology: First Call NYU employed mass media advertising campaigns, outreach to healthcare providers in NYC, and Internet-based efforts including search engine optimization (SEO) and Internet-based advertising to achieve these goals. Results: Between October 2004 and October 2008, 571 individuals were screened through this program, leading to 446 unique, in-person screening visits. 47 primary HIV infections, including 14 acute and 33 recent HIV infections, were identified. Discussion: Internet and traditional recruitment methods can be used to increase self-referrals for screening following possible exposure to HIV. Conclusion: Community education of at-risk groups, with the goal of increased self-diagnosis of possible acute HIV infection, may be a useful addition to traditional efforts to identify such individuals. PMID:20386719

  1. Change in Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy after Treatment during Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, William; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chalermchai, Thep; DeGruttola, Victor; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Pothisri, Mantana; Busovaca, Edgar; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Jagodzinski, Linda; Spudich, Serena; Michael, Nelson; Kim, Jerome H.; Valcour, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Objective Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to monitor changes in brain inflammation and neuronal integrity associated with HIV infection and its treatments. We used MRS to measure brain changes during the first weeks following HIV infection and in response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Brain metabolite levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCHO), creatine (CR), myoinositol (MI), and glutamate and glutamine (GLX) were measured in acute HIV subjects (n = 31) and compared to chronic HIV+individuals (n = 26) and HIV negative control subjects (n = 10) from Bangkok, Thailand. Metabolites were measured in frontal gray matter (FGM), frontal white matter (FWM), occipital gray matter (OGM), and basal ganglia (BG). Repeat measures were obtained in 17 acute subjects 1, 3 and 6 months following initiation of ART. Results After adjustment for age we identified elevated BG tCHO/CR in acute HIV cases at baseline (median 14 days after HIV infection) compared to control (p = 0.0014), as well as chronic subjects (p = 0.0023). A similar tCHO/CR elevation was noted in OGM; no other metabolite abnormalities were seen between acute and control subjects. Mixed longitudinal models revealed resolution of BG tCHO/CR elevation after ART (p = 0.022) with tCHO/CR similar to control subjects at 6 months. Interpretation We detected cellular inflammation in the absence of measurable neuronal injury within the first month of HIV infection, and normalization of this inflammation following acutely administered ART. Our findings suggest that early ART may be neuroprotective in HIV infection by mitigating processes leading to CNS injury. PMID:23229129

  2. Revised surveillance case definition for HIV infection--United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2014-04-11

    Following extensive consultation and peer review, CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have revised and combined the surveillance case definitions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a single case definition for persons of all ages (i.e., adults and adolescents aged ≥13 years and children aged <13 years). The revisions were made to address multiple issues, the most important of which was the need to adapt to recent changes in diagnostic criteria. Laboratory criteria for defining a confirmed case now accommodate new multitest algorithms, including criteria for differentiating between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection and for recognizing early HIV infection. A confirmed case can be classified in one of five HIV infection stages (0, 1, 2, 3, or unknown); early infection, recognized by a negative HIV test within 6 months of HIV diagnosis, is classified as stage 0, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is classified as stage 3. Criteria for stage 3 have been simplified by eliminating the need to differentiate between definitive and presumptive diagnoses of opportunistic illnesses. Clinical (nonlaboratory) criteria for defining a case for surveillance purposes have been made more practical by eliminating the requirement for information about laboratory tests. The surveillance case definition is intended primarily for monitoring the HIV infection burden and planning for prevention and care on a population level, not as a basis for clinical decisions for individual patients. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommend that all states and territories conduct case surveillance of HIV infection using this revised surveillance case definition. PMID:24717910

  3. Plasma and breastmilk selenium in HIV-infected Malawian mothers is positively associated with infant selenium status at 2 or 6 and 24 weeks post-partum but is not associated with supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) levels are typically low in HIV-infected individuals, but have been increased by supplementation in previous studies. In HIV-infected populations, the effect of Se supplementation on breastmilk Se and, consequently, plasma Se levels in exclusively breastfed infants is unknown. HIV-inf...

  4. Microbiome alterations in HIV infection a review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Landay, Alan; Presti, Rachel M

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in molecular techniques have allowed researchers to identify previously uncultured organisms, which has propelled a vast expansion of our knowledge regarding our commensal microbiota. Interest in the microbiome specific to HIV grew from earlier findings suggesting that bacterial translocation from the intestines is the cause of persistent immune activation despite effective viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Studies of SIV infected primates have demonstrated that Proteobacteria preferentially translocate and that mucosal immunity can be restored with probiotics. Pathogenic SIV infection results in a massive expansion of the virome, whereas non-pathogenic SIV infection does not. Human HIV infected cohorts have been shown to have microbiota distinctive from that of HIV negative controls and efforts to restore the intestinal microbiome via probiotics have often had positive results on host markers. The microbiota of the genital tract may play a significant role in acquisition and transmission of HIV. Modification of commensal microbial communities likely represents an important therapeutic adjunct to treatment of HIV. Here we review the literature regarding human microbiome in HIV infection. PMID:26945815

  5. Provider perspectives regarding the health care needs of a key population: HIV-infected prisoners after incarceration.

    PubMed

    Sidibe, Turquoise; Golin, Carol; Turner, Kea; Fray, Niasha; Fogel, Cathie; Flynn, Patrick; Gould, Michele; Knight, Kevin; Wohl, David

    2015-01-01

    During incarceration, many HIV-infected prisoners receive care and are adherent to medication. However, following release, many have difficulty engaging in HIV care and remaining on antiretroviral therapy. Community-based service providers for HIV-infected releasees have a deep understanding of the health needs and challenges these individuals face on community re-entry. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 38 health care and service professionals in two southern U.S. states regarding the barriers releasees faced in meeting their health needs, including HIV care and treatment post release. Individual, community, and organization-level barriers to HIV care and treatment adherence post release were identified, and offered unique insight into the ways that these multilevel obstacles affect HIV-infected former prisoners' abilities to engage in care and access necessary social services. Provider perspectives should be considered when designing interventions to support HIV care after release. PMID:26279385

  6. Individualized Follow-up of Pregnant Women with Asymptomatic Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, Dana; Pantea, Stelian; Margan, Madalin; Timar, Bogdan; Borcan, Florin; Craina, Marius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Maternal hormones are essential for the normal fetal development during pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid disease is a frequent pathology in our iodine replete region. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in cases with known autoimmune thyroid disease, which were in a euthyroid state prior to pregnancy, and to assess the association between supplemental treatments administered and the outcome of the pregnancy. The study is a prospective interventional controlled study. The two cohorts comprise the interventional group, consisting of 109 pregnant women with known autoimmune asymptomatic thyroid disease, without any levothyroxine (LT4) treatment and an aged-matched control group, with an unknown thyroid disease. After the pregnancy, a monthly evaluation of TSH, FT3, and FT4 was performed. Offspring evaluation was made at birth time. 88.8% of the women developed SCH in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Average LT4 doses increased as the pregnancy progressed. The monthly adjustment was 12.5 or 25 μg. All SCH cases developed in the first trimester of pregnancy. There was no significant difference regarding the gestational week, weight, or length at birth between the interventional group and controls, when TSH values were in the optimal range, during the whole pregnancy. Premature birth was described in one case in the interventional group. PMID:26771604

  7. Escherichia coli Isolates Causing Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Catheterized and Noncatheterized Individuals Possess Similar Virulence Properties ▿

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Rebecca E.; Hancock, Viktoria; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Totsika, Makrina; Looke, David F.; Nimmo, Graeme R.; Klemm, Per; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli being responsible for >80% of all cases. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) occurs when bacteria colonize the urinary tract without causing clinical symptoms and can affect both catheterized patients (catheter-associated ABU [CA-ABU]) and noncatheterized patients. Here, we compared the virulence properties of a collection of ABU and CA-ABU nosocomial E. coli isolates in terms of antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping, specific UTI-associated virulence genes, hemagglutination characteristics, and biofilm formation. CA-ABU isolates were similar to ABU isolates with regard to the majority of these characteristics; exceptions were that CA-ABU isolates had a higher prevalence of the polysaccharide capsule marker genes kpsMT II and kpsMT K1, while more ABU strains were capable of mannose-resistant hemagglutination. To examine biofilm growth in detail, we performed a global gene expression analysis with two CA-ABU strains that formed a strong biofilm and that possessed a limited adhesin repertoire. The gene expression profile of the CA-ABU strains during biofilm growth showed considerable overlap with that previously described for the prototype ABU E. coli strain, 83972. This is the first global gene expression analysis of E. coli CA-ABU strains. Overall, our data suggest that nosocomial ABU and CA-ABU E. coli isolates possess similar virulence profiles. PMID:20444967

  8. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Willard

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Treatment Guidelines were last updated in 2006. To update the “Clinical Guide to Prevention Services” section of the 2010 CDC STD Treatment Guidelines, we reviewed the recent science with reference to interventions designed to prevent acquisition of STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Major interval developments include (1) licensure and uptake of immunization against genital human papillomavirus, (2) validation of male circumcision as a potent prevention tool against acquisition of HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (3) failure of a promising HIV vaccine candidate to afford protection against HIV acquisition, (4) encouragement about the use of antiretroviral agents as preexposure prophylaxis to reduce risk of HIV and herpes simplex virus acquisition, (5) enhanced emphasis on expedited partner management and rescreening for persons infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, (6) recognition that behavioral interventions will be needed to address a new trend of sexually transmitted hepatitis C among men who have sex with men, and (7) the availability of a modified female condom. A range of preventive interventions is needed to reduce the risks of acquiring STI, including HIV infection, among sexually active people, and a flexible approach targeted to specific populations should integrate combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions. These would ideally involve an array of prevention contexts, including (1) communications and practices among sexual partners, (2) transactions between individual clients and their healthcare providers, and (3) comprehensive population-level strategies for prioritizing prevention research, ensuring accurate outcome assessment, and formulating health policy. PMID:22080271

  9. Effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from an acute manic episode

    PubMed Central

    Nakimuli-Mpungu, E; Mutamba, B; Nshemerirwe, S; Kiwuwa, MS; Musisi, S

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Understanding factors affecting the time to recovery from acute mania is critical in the management of manic syndromes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from acute mania. Methods We performed a retrospective study in which medical charts of individuals who were treated for acute mania were reviewed. Survival analysis with Cox regression models were used to compare time to recovery from an acute manic episode between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals and HIV-negative individuals. Results Median survival time was one week for HIV-positive individuals and more than four weeks for HIV-negative individuals (χ2 = 18.4, P value = 0.000). HIV infection was the only marginally significant independent predictor of survival probability on the acute admission ward (hazards ratio 2.87, P = 0.06). Conclusion Acute mania in HIV-infected persons responds faster to psychotropic drugs compared with that in HIV-negative persons. PMID:22096397

  10. QTc interval prolongation in HIV-infected patients: a case–control study by 24-hour Holter ECG recording

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aim of the study was to assess QTc interval by a 24-hour ECG recording in a group of HIV-infected individuals with a basal prolonged QTc. The risk factors associated with QTc prolongation and the indices of cardiovascular autonomic control were also evaluated. Methods A case–control study was performed using as cases 32 HIV-infected patients with prolonged (>440 msec) QTc interval as assessed by Holter ECG, and as controls 64 HIV-infected subjects with normal QTc interval. Autonomic function was evaluated by heart rate variability analysis during 24-hour recording. Results Duration of HIV disease was significantly longer among cases than among controls (p=0.04). Waist/hip ratio was also higher among cases than among controls (p=0.05). Frequency domain analysis showed the absence of physiologic decrease of low frequency (LF) in the night period in both cases and controls. The LF night in cases showed a statistically significant reduction when compared with controls (p=0.007). Conclusions In our study group, QTc interval prolongation was associated with a longer duration of HIV infection and with a greater waist/hip ratio. HIV patients with QTc interval prolongation and with a longer duration of HIV infection were more likely to have an impairment of parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac component. PMID:23259665

  11. Mild Joint Symptoms Are Associated with Lower Risk of Falls than Asymptomatic Individuals with Radiological Evidence of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chin Teck; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul I.; Khoo, Ee Ming; Hill, Keith D.; Tan, Maw Pin

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) exacerbates skeletal muscle functioning, leading to postural instability and increased falls risk. However, the link between impaired physical function, OA and falls have not been elucidated. We investigated the role of impaired physical function as a potential mediator in the association between OA and falls. This study included 389 participants [229 fallers (≥2 falls or one injurious fall in the past 12 months), 160 non-fallers (no history of falls)], age (≥65 years) from a randomized controlled trial, the Malaysian Falls Assessment and Intervention Trial (MyFAIT). Physical function was assessed using Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Functional Reach (FR) tests. Knee and hip OA were diagnosed using three methods: Clinical, Radiological and Self-report. OA symptom severity was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). The total WOMAC score was categorized to asymptomatic, mild, moderate and severe symptoms. Individuals with radiological OA and ‘mild’ overall symptoms on the WOMAC score had reduced risk of falls compared to asymptomatic OA [OR: 0.402(0.172–0.940), p = 0.042]. Individuals with clinical OA and ‘severe’ overall symptoms had increased risk of falls compared to those with ‘mild’ OA [OR: 4.487(1.883–10.693), p = 0.005]. In individuals with radiological OA, mild symptoms appear protective of falls while those with clinical OA and severe symptoms have increased falls risk compared to those with mild symptoms. Both relationships between OA and falls were not mediated by physical limitations. Larger prospective studies are needed for further evaluation. PMID:26491868

  12. Dynamics of HIV infection in lymphoid tissue network.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a fast replicating ribonucleic acid virus, which can easily mutate in order to escape the effects of drug administration. Hence, understanding the basic mechanisms underlying HIV persistence in the body is essential in the development of new therapies that could eradicate HIV infection. Lymphoid tissues are the primary sites of HIV infection. Despite the recent progress in real-time monitoring technology, HIV infection dynamics in a whole body is unknown. Mathematical modeling and simulations provide speculations on global behavior of HIV infection in the lymphatic system. We propose a new mathematical model that describes the spread of HIV infection throughout the lymphoid tissue network. In order to represent the volume difference between lymphoid tissues, we propose the proportionality of several kinetic parameters to the lymphoid tissues' volume distribution. Under this assumption, we perform extensive numerical computations in order to simulate the spread of HIV infection in the lymphoid tissue network. Numerical computations simulate single drug treatments of an HIV infection. One of the important biological speculations derived from this study is a drug saturation effect generated by lymphoid network connection. This implies that a portion of reservoir lymphoid tissues to which drug is not sufficiently delivered would inhibit HIV eradication despite of extensive drug injection. PMID:26507442

  13. Lymphnodal Co-infection of Cryptococcus and Histoplasma in a HIV-Infected Patient and Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Tilak, Ragini; Bhushan, Ravi; Dhameja, Neeraj; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2015-08-01

    Human infection with Histoplasma capsulatum and Cryptococcus runs the gamut from asymptomatic illness to disseminated disease. Though both are the most prevalent systemic mycoses in HIV-infected patients, simultaneous infection by both the pathogens rarely occurs. We document the first case from Asian subcontinent with concurrent infection with disseminated cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis infections in a HIV-infected Indian patient diagnosed by morphological examination of fine-needle aspiration cytology samples obtained from the enlarged lymph nodes on light microscopy and were later confirmed by culture studies. A prompt, accurate and timely diagnosis of the disseminated form of dual mycosis (or either of the mycosis as well) is of utmost importance which has obvious impact on early initiation of treatment. Fine-needle aspiration cytology is a rapid, cost-effective and reliable method to identify infection with Cryptococcus and Histoplasma and is comparable with the essential culture studies. PMID:25743378

  14. High prevalence of high grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected women screened for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, June Y; Smotkin, David; Grossberg, Robert; Suhrland, Mark; Levine, Rebecca; Smith, Harriet O; Negassa, Abdissa; McAndrew, Thomas C; Einstein, Mark H

    2012-06-01

    There is no consensus on optimal screening for anal cancer (AC) in HIV+ women. Seven hundred fifteen unique asymptomatic women in a high-prevalence HIV+ community were screened for AC with anal cytology and triage to high-resolution anoscopy after routine screening was implemented in a large urban hospital system. Of these, 75 (10.5%) had an abnormal anal cytology and 29 (38.7%) of those with an abnormality had high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Women with poorly controlled HIV were significantly more likely to have high-grade AIN (P = 0.03). Given the high rate of AIN in screened HIV-infected women, routine AC screening in all HIV-infected women should be strongly considered. PMID:22466085

  15. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  16. Physical Activity and Health Outcomes among HIV-infected Men who have Sex with Men: A Longitudinal Mediational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blashill, Aaron J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Crane, Heidi; Magidson, Jessica F.; Grasso, Chris; Mathews, W. Christopher; Saag, Michael S.; Safren, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low physical activity is associated with depression, which may in turn, negatively impact antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV-infected individuals; however, prior studies have not investigated the relationships between physical inactivity and ART non-adherence. Purpose To examine the association of physical inactivity, depression, ART non-adherence, and viral load in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. Methods The sample (N = 860) was from a large, multicenter cohort of HIV-infected patients engaged in clinical care. Results Across time, depression mediated the relationship between physical inactivity and ART non-adherence, γ = .075, and the relationship between physical inactivity and viral load, γ = .05. ART non-adherence mediated the relationship between depression and viral load, γ = .002, and the relationship between physical inactivity and viral load, γ = .009. Conclusions Low levels of physical activity predicted increased depression and poor ART adherence over time, which subsequently predicted higher viral load. PMID:23483379

  17. [Prevention and screening of HIV infection ].

    PubMed

    Bourdillon, François

    2014-10-01

    The prevention of the HIV infection remains relevant considering the dynamics of the epidemic and the slackening of the preventive behavior of certain populations. The strategies associate initiatives of universal prevention: information, education, communication, screening; and specific actions in the direction of the most exposed populations. The paradigms of prevention evolved a lot these last years to take into account the preventive efficiency of antiretrovirals. If the condom remains the reference method, it is advisable for the populations the most exposed today to associate all the tools of prevention: behavioral methods, screening and antiretroviral. The possibility given to non-governmental organizations to realize test of fast screening allowed to go to closer of the most exposed populations.The arrival on the market of the autotests must be supervised to touch the people who do not turn to the screening. PMID:25510127

  18. HIV infection surveillance in Mogadishu, Somalia.

    PubMed

    Burans, J P; Fox, E; Omar, M A; Farah, A H; Abbass, S; Yusef, S; Guled, A; Mansour, M; Abu-Elyazeed, R; Woody, J N

    1990-07-01

    A group of 89 prostitutes and 45 patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in Mogadishu, Somalia were examined for evidence of HIV infection. Both groups reported more than 1 sexual partner routinely and had sexual contacts with prostitutes. There was a significant amount of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in these two groups, with 11.2% and 6.7% respectively being culture positive for N. gonorrhoea. Among the prostitutes, 28.1% were positive for antibodies to T. pallidum while only 4.4% of the STD patients were positive. One isolate of N. gonorrhoea was resistant to penicillin. All study participants were negative for antibodies to HIV suggesting an extremely low prevalence of HIV in high risk behaviour groups in the capital city of Somalia. PMID:2226225

  19. Insulin resistance and diabetes in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Das, Satyajit

    2011-09-01

    Insulin resistance is an important and under recognized consequence of HIV treatment. Different studies have yielded widely varying estimates of the prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism in people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The risk increases further with hepatitis C co infection. Although Protease inhibitors (PIs) are the main drug class implicated in insulin resistance, some studies have shown an association of increased risk of diabetes with cumulative exposure of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The effect of switching to other antiretrovirals has not been fully determined and the long-term consequences of insulin resistance in this population are not known. Treatment of established diabetes mellitus should generally follow existing guidelines. It is therefore reasonable to recommend general measures to increase insulin sensitivity in all patients infected with HIV, such as regular aerobic exercise and weight reduction for overweight persons. The present review article has the information of some recent patents regarding the insulin resistance in HIV infection. PMID:21824074

  20. Evidence for Within-Host Genetic Recombination among the Human Pegiviral Strains in HIV Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoming; Padhi, Abinash; Xu, Junqiang; Gong, Xiaoyan; Tien, Po

    2016-01-01

    The non-pathogenic Human Pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C/HGV), the most prevalent RNA virus worldwide, is known to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Although previous studies documented its ubiquity and important role in HIV-infected individuals, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms that maintain high genetic diversity of HPgV within the HIV-infected individuals. To assess the within-host genetic diversity of HPgV and forces that maintain such diversity within the co-infected hosts, we performed phylogenetic analyses taking into account 229 HPgV partial E1-E2 clonal sequences representing 15 male and 8 female co-infected HIV patients from Hubei province of central China. Our results revealed the presence of eleven strongly supported clades. While nine clades belonged to genotype 3, two clades belonged to genotype 2. Additionally, four clades that belonged to genotype 3 exhibited inter-clade recombination events. The presence of clonal sequences representing multiple clades within the HIV-infected individual provided the evidence of co-circulation of HPgV strains across the region. Of the 23 patients, six patients (i.e., five males and one female) were detected to have HPgV recombinant sequences. Our results also revealed that while male patients shared the viral strains with other patients, viral strains from the female patients had restricted dispersal. Taken together, the present study revealed that multiple infections with divergent HPgV viral strains may have caused within-host genetic recombination, predominantly in male patients, and therefore, could be the major driver in shaping genetic diversity of HPgV. PMID:27560699

  1. Evidence for Within-Host Genetic Recombination among the Human Pegiviral Strains in HIV Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoming; Padhi, Abinash; Xu, Junqiang; Gong, Xiaoyan; Tien, Po

    2016-01-01

    The non-pathogenic Human Pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C/HGV), the most prevalent RNA virus worldwide, is known to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Although previous studies documented its ubiquity and important role in HIV-infected individuals, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms that maintain high genetic diversity of HPgV within the HIV-infected individuals. To assess the within-host genetic diversity of HPgV and forces that maintain such diversity within the co-infected hosts, we performed phylogenetic analyses taking into account 229 HPgV partial E1-E2 clonal sequences representing 15 male and 8 female co-infected HIV patients from Hubei province of central China. Our results revealed the presence of eleven strongly supported clades. While nine clades belonged to genotype 3, two clades belonged to genotype 2. Additionally, four clades that belonged to genotype 3 exhibited inter-clade recombination events. The presence of clonal sequences representing multiple clades within the HIV-infected individual provided the evidence of co-circulation of HPgV strains across the region. Of the 23 patients, six patients (i.e., five males and one female) were detected to have HPgV recombinant sequences. Our results also revealed that while male patients shared the viral strains with other patients, viral strains from the female patients had restricted dispersal. Taken together, the present study revealed that multiple infections with divergent HPgV viral strains may have caused within-host genetic recombination, predominantly in male patients, and therefore, could be the major driver in shaping genetic diversity of HPgV. PMID:27560699

  2. Early syphilis affects markers of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kotsafti, Ourania; Paparizos, Vassilios; Kourkounti, Sofia; Chatziioannou, Argiro; Nicolaidou, Electra; Kapsimali, Violetta; Antoniou, Christina

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if early syphilis infection affects markers of HIV infection; CD4 T cells and viral load (VL). A retrospective study was performed on 160 HIV-positive patients (111 receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART] and 49 without ART). Early syphilis diagnosis was made in HIV patients during their follow-up at the HIV/AIDS Unit at a Greek Dermatology and Venereology Unit. The patients' blood tests were available at the time of diagnosis, as well as before and 12 weeks after early syphilis diagnosis. CD4 T cell counts and VL levels were measured. It was found that syphilis infection had a negative impact on the CD4 T cell counts in both groups, with reduced CD4 T cell counts observed in 84.6% (99/111) and 79.5% (39/49) of patients receiving and not receiving ART, respectively. After treatment for syphilis, CD4 T cell counts returned to pre-treatment levels in most patients, especially those receiving ART. There was a slight and transient VL increase. Patients receiving ART had a 27% increase in VL, compared to 71.4% among patients not receiving ART. Although the VL increase was slight (41-14,000 copies/ml) in the group under treatment, 4-5% (5/111) patients did not return to pre-treatment levels. Moreover, viral mutations associated with treatment resistance were identified in these patients. Early syphilis accelerates and complicates the progression of HIV infection. Early diagnosis and treatment of syphilis may prevent infection-associated complications in most instances. Consequently, prevention of syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections is of great importance for patients infected with HIV. PMID:26113517

  3. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis. PMID:22761210

  4. HIV Infection is associated with compositional and functional shifts in the rectal mucosal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regardless of infection route, the intestine is the primary site for HIV-1 infection establishment and results in significant mucosal CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion, induces an inflammatory state that propagates viral dissemination, facilitates microbial translocation, and fosters establishment of one of the largest HIV reservoirs. Here we test the prediction that HIV infection modifies the composition and function of the mucosal commensal microbiota. Results Rectal mucosal microbiota were collected from human subjects using a sponge-based sampling methodology. Samples were collected from 20 HIV-positive men not receiving combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART), 20 HIV-positive men on cART and 20 healthy, HIV-negative men. Microbial composition of samples was analyzed using barcoded 16S Illumina deep sequencing (85,900 reads per sample after processing). Microbial metagenomic information for the samples was imputed using the bioinformatic tools PICRUST and HUMAnN. Microbial composition and imputed function in HIV-positive individuals not receiving cART was significantly different from HIV-negative individuals. Genera including Roseburia, Coprococcus, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Alistipes and Lachnospira were depleted in HIV-infected subjects not receiving cART, while Fusobacteria, Anaerococcus, Peptostreptococcus and Porphyromonas were significantly enriched. HIV-positive subjects receiving cART exhibited similar depletion and enrichment for these genera, but were of intermediate magnitude and did not achieve statistical significance. Imputed metagenomic functions, including amino acid metabolism, vitamin biosynthesis, and siderophore biosynthesis differed significantly between healthy controls and HIV-infected subjects not receiving cART. Conclusions HIV infection was associated with rectal mucosal changes in microbiota composition and imputed function that cART failed to completely reverse. HIV infection was associated with depletion of some commensal

  5. Coping and perception of women with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, Helana Maria Ferreira; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Souza, Edvaldo; Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze women’s perceptions and coping regarding the discovery of an HIV infection. METHODS A qualitative study in an HIV/AIDS Specialist Helpdesk in Recife, PE, Northeastern Brazil, from January to September 2010, involving eight women living with asymptomatic HIV aged between 27 and 37 years, without criteria for diagnosis of AIDS infected through intercourse and monitored by the service for at least one year. Forms were used to characterize the clinical situation and semi-structured interviews to understand perceptions and feelings related to personal trajectory after diagnosis and different ways of facing the diagnosis in family and social life. Content analysis was performed as suggested by Bardin. RESULTS The thematic category that emerged was stigma and discrimination. The women had life trajectories marked by stigma, which was perceived as discrimination after the diagnosis and in the experiences of everyday life. The revelation of the infection was perceived as limiting to a normal life, leading to the need to conceal the diagnosis. The discriminatory attitudes of some health care professionals, non-specialist in HIV/AIDS, had a negative impact on future experiences in other health services. Besides the effects of institutional stigma, the perception of women was that the service did not include dedicated space for the expression of other needs beyond the disease, which could help in fighting the infection. CONCLUSIONS Living with HIV was strongly linked to stigma. The results show the importance of strengthening educational approaches and emotional support at the time of diagnosis in order to facilitate coping with the condition of seropositivity. PMID:24789635

  6. [Coping and perception of women with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Renesto, Helana Maria Ferreira; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Souza, Edvaldo; Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze women's perceptions and coping regarding the discovery of an HIV infection. METHODS A qualitative study in an HIV/AIDS Specialist Helpdesk in Recife, PE, Northeastern Brazil, from January to September 2010, involving eight women living with asymptomatic HIV aged between 27 and 37 years, without criteria for diagnosis of AIDS infected through intercourse and monitored by the service for at least one year. Forms were used to characterize the clinical situation and semi-structured interviews to understand perceptions and feelings related to personal trajectory after diagnosis and different ways of facing the diagnosis in family and social life. Content analysis was performed as suggested by Bardin. RESULTS The thematic category that emerged was stigma and discrimination. The women had life trajectories marked by stigma, which was perceived as discrimination after the diagnosis and in the experiences of everyday life. The revelation of the infection was perceived as limiting to a normal life, leading to the need to conceal the diagnosis. The discriminatory attitudes of some health care professionals, non-specialist in HIV/AIDS, had a negative impact on future experiences in other health services. Besides the effects of institutional stigma, the perception of women was that the service did not include dedicated space for the expression of other needs beyond the disease, which could help in fighting the infection. CONCLUSIONS Living with HIV was strongly linked to stigma. The results show the importance of strengthening educational approaches and emotional support at the time of diagnosis in order to facilitate coping with the condition of seropositivity. PMID:24789635

  7. Social ecological factors associated with future orientation of children affected by parental HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiuyun; Fang, Xiaoyi; Chi, Peilian; Heath, Melissa Allen; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Wenrui

    2016-07-01

    From a social ecological perspective, this study examined the effects of stigma (societal level), trusting relationships with current caregivers (familial level), and self-esteem (individual level) on future orientation of children affected by HIV infection and AIDS. Comparing self-report data from 1221 children affected by parental HIV infection and AIDS and 404 unaffected children, affected children reported greater stigma and lower future orientation, trusting relationships, and self-esteem. Based on structural equation modeling, stigma experiences, trusting relationships, and self-esteem had direct effects on future orientation, with self-esteem and trusting relationships partially mediating the effect of stigma experiences on children's future orientation. Implications are discussed. PMID:25370572

  8. Acute lower motor neuron syndrome and spinal cord gray matter hyperintensities in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Chad, David A.; Venna, Nagagopal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel manifestation of lower motor neuron disease in patients with well-controlled HIV infection. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to identify HIV-positive individuals with acute, painful lower motor neuron diseases. Results: Six patients were identified with HIV and lower motor neuron disease. Two patients met the inclusion criteria of well-controlled, chronic HIV infection and an acute, painful, unilateral lower motor neuron paralytic syndrome affecting the distal portion of the upper limb. These patients had segmental T2-hyperintense lesions in the central gray matter of the cervical spinal cord on MRI. One patient stabilized and the second patient improved with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: This newly described syndrome expands the clinical spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases in HIV. PMID:26015990

  9. Role of the dental surgeon in the early detection of adults with underlying HIV infection / AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Jorge; del Romero, Jorge; Hernando, Victoria; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    A review is made of the late diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a subject of growing interest in public health. It has been estimated that in Europe 30% of all HIV-infected people are unaware of their seropositive condition, and this in turn is associated with a poorer long-term disease prognosis and an increased risk of transmission to other individuals. The role of the dental surgeon in this context could be of great importance, since there are many oral lesions that can suggest the existence of underlying infection. The study also addresses the controversial subject of rapid HIV testing, and whether these tests should be performed on a routine basis in the dental clinic, or whether it is preferable to refer the patient to a specialized center. Key words:HIV in Spain, HIV screening, early diagnosis. PMID:22143719

  10. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies in HIV-infection and -exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies constitute a first-line of defence against pathogens; they may also play other roles in immune regulation and homeostasis, through their ability to bind host antigens, surface molecules and receptors. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies can be decisive in preventing HIV infection in mucosal tissues and offer prompt and effective protection just at major sites of virus entry. Among natural anti-CCR5 antibodies, IgG and IgA to the ECL1 domain have been shown to block HIV effectively and durably without causing harm to the host. Their biological properties and their uncommon generation in subsets of HIV-infected and HIV-exposed individuals (so called ESN) will be introduced and discussed, with the aim at exploiting their potential in therapy and prevention. PMID:21284903

  11. [HIV infection and parenteral virus hepatitis in the Krasnodar territory].

    PubMed

    Larin, F I; Lebedev, V V; Red'ko, A N

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the morbidity dynamics of HIV infection, hepatitis B and C in the Krasnodar territory for 1996-2003 is presented. The tendency of strengthening direct correlation between age-dependent rates in these groups of diseases has been established. The correlation coefficient (rxy) is at present +0.851 (HIV infection-virus hepatitis B) and +0.892 (HIV infection-virus hepatitis C). The highest levels of primary morbidity are registered in persons aged 20-39 years. The established epidemiological parallels between HIV infection and parenteral hepatitis require the development of the unified strategy of the prophylaxis of these diseases on the federal and regional levels. PMID:16028521

  12. Dendritic cells in progression and pathology of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Manches, Olivier; Frleta, Davor; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Although the major targets of HIV infection are CD4+ T cells, dendritic cells (DC) represent a crucial subset in HIV infection as they influence viral transmission, target cell infection and antigen presentation of HIV antigens. DC are potent antigen presenting cells that can modulate anti-viral immune responses. Through secretion of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN), DC also alter T cell proliferation and differentiation, participating in the immune dysregulation characteristic of chronic HIV infection. Their wide distribution in close proximity with the mucosal epithelia makes them one of the first cell types to encounter HIV during sexual transmission [1]. We will discuss here the multiple roles that DC play at different stages of HIV infection, emphasizing their relevance to HIV pathology and progression. PMID:24246474

  13. C-Reactive Protein Modifies the Association of Plasma Leptin With Coronary Calcium in Asymptomatic Overweight Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Seth S.; Qasim, Atif N.; Rader, Dan J.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests putative interactions of leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the pathogenesis of adiposity-related atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated whether CRP levels modify the relationship of leptin levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC). We examined 1,460 asymptomatic individuals from two community-based cross-sectional studies coordinated at a single, university-based research center. We focused on subjects who were overweight or obese (BMI ≥25) given greater biologic plausibility in this setting. In multivariable CAC models, we analyzed the interaction of log-transformed plasma leptin levels with higher CRP levels as defined by three cut-points: two clinically based (2 mg/l, 3 mg/l) and one dataset specific (sex-specific upper quartile). The association of plasma leptin with CAC was modified by higher CRP regardless of cut-point (interaction term P values all <0.01 in fully adjusted models). Leptin levels were associated with CAC in those with high, but not low CRP levels (e.g., tobit ratio for a 1 unit increase in ln(leptin) (95% CI): 2.18 (1.29–3.66) if CRP level ≥3 mg/l; N = 461 vs. 0.94 (0.67–1.31) if CRP levels <3 mg/l; N = 999) in fully adjusted models. No interaction with CRP was present in control analyses with adiponectin, BMI and waist circumference. In conclusion, in asymptomatic overweight and obese adults, increased leptin levels were independently associated with increased CAC in the presence of high, but not low CRP levels, supporting a leptin-CRP interface in atherosclerosis risk. PMID:21738237

  14. Lack of Evidence for Molecular Mimicry in HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Klimavicz, James S.; Deeks, Steve G.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Ragheb, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in HIV patients have reported autoantibodies to several human proteins, including erythropoietin (EPO), interferon-α (IFN-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and HLA-DR, as potential mediators of anemia or immunosuppression. The etiology of these autoantibodies has been attributed to molecular mimicry between HIV epitopes and self-proteins. Here, the Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) was used to investigate the presence of such autoantibodies in HIV-infected adults. High levels of antibodies to HIV proteins such as capsid (p24), matrix (p17), envelope (gp41), and reverse transcriptase (RT) were detected using LIPS in both untreated and anti-retroviral-treated HIV-infected individuals but not in uninfected controls. LIPS readily detected anti-EPO autoantibodies in serum samples from subjects with presumptive pure red cell aplasia but not in any of the samples from HIV-infected or uninfected individuals. Similarly, subjects with HIV lacked autoantibodies to IFN-α, IL-2, HLA-DR and the immunoglobulin lambda light chain; all purported targets of molecular mimicry. While molecular mimicry between pathogen proteins and self-proteins is a commonly proposed mechanism for autoantibody production, the findings presented here indicate such a process is not common in HIV disease. PMID:26599070

  15. YELLOW FEVER PREVENTION STRATEGIES AWARENESS AMONG HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Francelino, Hilario Sousa; Kallás, Esper Georges

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccination is the main preventive strategy against Yellow Fever (YF), which is a public health concern in Brazil. However, HIV-infected patients might have insufficient knowledge regarding YF, YF prevention, and vaccines in general. Methods: In this questionnaire-based study, data from 158 HIV-infected individuals were addressed in three distinct outpatient clinics in São Paulo. Information was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patients' knowledge of vaccines, YF and YF preventive strategies. In addition, individual YF vaccine recommendations and vaccine status were investigated. Results: Although most participants adequately ascertain the vaccine as the main prevention strategy against YF, few participants were aware of the severity and lack of specific treatment for YF. Discrepancy in YF vaccine (patients who should have taken the vaccine, but did not) was observed in 18.8% of participants. Conclusion: YF is an important and preventable public health concern, and these results demonstrate that more information is necessary for the HIV-infected population. PMID:25229222

  16. HIV infection in Malaysia: a report of cases seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R; Doi, S; Naganathna, N

    1995-12-01

    The spread of HIV infection into Malaysia is estimated to have occurred in the early 1980's. The first case of AIDS was reported here in 1986. As of March 31, 1994, the numbers have increased to 8049 HIV positive individuals detected in the country. The risk behaviours among those tested positive were intravenous drug use in 77.2%, sexual transmission in 4.5%, while the remainder are still under investigation. Pediatric AIDS constitutes 0.2% of positives. The high prevalence among intravenous drug users (IVDU) is likely to be due to mandatory testing for HIV upon entry to rehabilitation centres. The trend of HIV infection in this country seems to be highest amongst the intravenous drug users. The increasing number of HIV infected prostitutes and heterosexuals in our population is worrying. Since 1986, a total of 104 HIV positive individuals have been treated at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Of these, 25 have died and of those still alive, 5 have symptomatic disease. The most common AIDS-defining illness is Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Education programmes have been developed targeting the various high risk groups and the general population. PMID:8668046

  17. Understanding the modes of transmission model of new HIV infection and its use in prevention planning

    PubMed Central

    Ghys, Peter D; Gouws, Eleanor; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Borquez, Annick; Stover, John; Cuchi, Paloma; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Garnett, Geoffrey P; Hallett, Timothy B

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The modes of transmission model has been widely used to help decision-makers target measures for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The model estimates the number of new HIV infections that will be acquired over the ensuing year by individuals in identified risk groups in a given population using data on the size of the groups, the aggregate risk behaviour in each group, the current prevalence of HIV infection among the sexual or injecting drug partners of individuals in each group, and the probability of HIV transmission associated with different risk behaviours. The strength of the model is its simplicity, which enables data from a variety of sources to be synthesized, resulting in better characterization of HIV epidemics in some settings. However, concerns have been raised about the assumptions underlying the model structure, about limitations in the data available for deriving input parameters and about interpretation and communication of the model results. The aim of this review was to improve the use of the model by reassessing its paradigm, structure and data requirements. We identified key questions to be asked when conducting an analysis and when interpreting the model results and make recommendations for strengthening the model’s application in the future. PMID:23226895

  18. Understanding the modes of transmission model of new HIV infection and its use in prevention planning.

    PubMed

    Case, Kelsey K; Ghys, Peter D; Gouws, Eleanor; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Borquez, Annick; Stover, John; Cuchi, Paloma; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Garnett, Geoffrey P; Hallett, Timothy B

    2012-11-01

    The modes of transmission model has been widely used to help decision-makers target measures for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The model estimates the number of new HIV infections that will be acquired over the ensuing year by individuals in identified risk groups in a given population using data on the size of the groups, the aggregate risk behaviour in each group, the current prevalence of HIV infection among the sexual or injecting drug partners of individuals in each group, and the probability of HIV transmission associated with different risk behaviours. The strength of the model is its simplicity, which enables data from a variety of sources to be synthesized, resulting in better characterization of HIV epidemics in some settings. However, concerns have been raised about the assumptions underlying the model structure, about limitations in the data available for deriving input parameters and about interpretation and communication of the model results. The aim of this review was to improve the use of the model by reassessing its paradigm, structure and data requirements. We identified key questions to be asked when conducting an analysis and when interpreting the model results and make recommendations for strengthening the model's application in the future. PMID:23226895

  19. Elevated Levels of Monocyte Activation Markers Are Associated With Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Men With and Those Without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, Rebeccah A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Grinspoon, Steven; Li, Xiuhong; Palella, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Witt, Mallory D.; George, Richard T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Budoff, Matthew; Tracy, Russell P.; Brown, Todd T.; Post, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Heightened immune activation among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected persons may contribute to atherosclerosis. We assessed associations of serologic markers of monocyte activation, soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble CD14 (sCD14), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2) with subclinical atherosclerosis among men with and those without HIV infection in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Methods. We performed noncontrast computed tomography on 906 men (566 HIV-infected men and 340 HIV-uninfected men), 709 of whom also underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography. Associations between each biomarker and the prevalence of coronary plaque, the prevalence of stenosis of ≥50%, and the extent of plaque were assessed by logistic and linear regression, adjusting for age, race, HIV serostatus, and cardiovascular risk factors. Results. Levels of all biomarkers were higher among HIV-infected men, of whom 81% had undetectable HIV RNA, and were associated with lower CD4+ T-cell counts. In the entire population and among HIV-infected men, higher biomarker levels were associated with a greater prevalence of coronary artery stenosis of ≥50%. Higher sCD163 levels were also associated with greater prevalences of coronary artery calcium, mixed plaque, and calcified plaque; higher CCL2 levels were associated with a greater extent of noncalcified plaque. Conclusions. sCD163, sCD14, and CCL2 levels were elevated in treated HIV-infected men and associated with atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease in individuals with HIV infection. PMID:25362192

  20. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder in HIV-infected Koreans: Korean NeuroAIDS Project

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Nam Su; Lee, Youngjoon; Ahn, Jin Young; Song, Je Eun; Kim, Min Hyung; Kim, Sun Bean; Jeong, Su Jin; Hong, Kyung-Wook; Kim, Eosu; Han, Sang Hoon; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Woo Joo; Kim, June Myung; Smith, Davey M.; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is an independent predictor of early mortality and is associated with many difficulties in activities of daily living. We sought to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for HAND in HIV-infected Koreans. In addition, we investigated the performance of screening tools and components of neuropsychological (NP) tests for diagnosing HAND. Methods HIV-infected patients were enrolled consecutively from two different urban teaching hospitals in Seoul, South Korea between March 2012 and September 2012. Participants completed a detailed NP assessment of six cognitive domains commonly affected by HIV. The Frascati criteria were used for diagnosing HAND. Four key questions, international HIV dementia scale (IHDS) and MoCA-K were also assessed as potential tools for screening for HAND. Results Among the 194 participants, the prevalence of HAND was 26.3%. Asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, minor neurocognitive disorder accounted for 52.9% and 47.1% of the patients with HAND, respectively. In multivariate analysis, hemoglobin levels ≤13g/dL (p=0.046) and the current use of protease inhibitor-based regimen (p=0.031) were independent risk factors for HAND. The sensitivity and specificity of IHDS were 72.6% and 60.8%, and MoCA-K were 52.9% and 73.4%, respectively. IHDS (p<0.001) and MoCA-K (p<0.001) were both useful for screening for HAND. Among NP tests, the sensitivity and specificity of the Grooved Pegboard Test were 90.2% and 72.0%, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test were 61.2% and 84.4%, respectively. Conclusions HAND is a prevalent comorbidity in HIV-infected Koreans. Active screening and diagnosis with useful tools, like IHDS, MoCA-K and Grooved Pegboard Test, could be used to identify this important complication. PMID:24580888

  1. The EPIICAL project: an emerging global collaboration to investigate immunotherapeutic strategies in HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Palma, P; Foster, C; Rojo, P; Zangari, P; Yates, A; Cotugno, N; Klein, N; Luzuriaga, K; Pahwa, S; Nastouli, E; Gibb, DM; Borkowsky, W; Bernardi, S; Calvez, V; Manno, E; Mora, Nadia; Compagnucci, A; Wahren, B; Muñoz-Fernández, MÁ; De Rossi, A; Ananworanich, J; Pillay, D; Giaquinto, C; Rossi, P

    2016-01-01

    Short summary The EPIICAL (Early-treated Perinatally HIV-infected Individuals: Improving Children’s Actual Life with Novel Immunotherapeutic Strategies) project arises from the firm belief that perinatally infected children treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) from early infancy represent the optimal population model in which to study novel immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at achieving ART-free remission. This is because HIV-infected infants treated within 2–3 months of life have a much reduced viral reservoir size, and rarely show HIV-specific immunity but preserve normal immune development. The goal of EPIICAL is the establishment of an international collaboration to develop a predictive platform using this model to select promising HIV therapeutic vaccine candidates, leading to prioritisation or deprioritisation of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. To establish this platform, the EPIICAL Consortium aims to: develop predictive models of virological and immunological dynamics associated with response to early ART and to treatment interruption using available data from existing cohorts/studies of early-treated perinatally HIV-infected children; optimise methodologies to better characterise immunological, virological and genomic correlates/profiles associated with viral control; test novel immunotherapeutic strategies using in vivo proof-of-concept (PoC) studies with the aim of inducing virological, immunological and transcriptomic correlates/profiles equivalent to those defined by the predictive model. This approach will strengthen the capacity for discovery, development and initial testing of new therapeutic vaccine strategies through the integrated efforts of leading international scientific groups, with the aim of improving the health of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26893908

  2. Increased Coronary Vessel Wall Thickness in HIV-Infected Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.; Unsal, Aylin B.; Eshera, Sarah; Matta, Jatin R.; Muldoon, Nancy; McAreavey, Dorothea; Purdy, Julia B.; Hazra, Rohan; Hadigan, Colleen; Gharib, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Individuals with long-term human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at risk for premature vasculopathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated coronary vessel wall thickening, coronary plaque, and epicardial fat in patients infected with HIV early in life compared with healthy controls. Methods. This is a prospective cross-sectional study of 35 young adults who acquired HIV in early life and 11 healthy controls, free of CVD. Time resolved phase-sensitive dual inversion recovery black-blood vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (TRAPD) was used to measure proximal right coronary artery (RCA) wall thickness, and multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography was used to quantify coronary plaque and epicardial fat. Results. RCA vessel wall thickness was significantly increased in HIV-infected patients compared with sex- and race-matched controls (1.32 ± 0.21 mm vs 1.09 ± 0.14 mm, P = .002). No subject had discrete plaque on CT sufficient to cause luminal narrowing, and plaque was not related to RCA wall thickness. In multivariate regression analyses, smoking pack-years (P = .004) and HIV infection (P = .007) were independently associated with thicker RCA vessel walls. Epicardial fat did not differ between groups. Among the HIV-infected group, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (P = .02), duration of stavudine exposure (P < .01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = .04), and smoking pack-years (P < .01) were positively correlated with RCA wall thickness. Conclusions. This investigation provides evidence of subclinical coronary vascular disease among individuals infected with HIV in early life. Increased duration of ART, hyperlipidemia, and smoking contributed to proximal RCA thickening, independent of atherosclerotic plaque quantified by CT. These modifiable risk factors appear to influence early atherogenesis as measured by coronary wall thickness and may be important targets for CVD risk reduction. PMID:25159580

  3. Supplementation With Multivitamins and Vitamin A and Incidence of Malaria Among HIV-Infected Tanzanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Aboud, Said; Duggan, Christopher; Danaei, Goodarz; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: HIV and malaria infections occur in the same individuals, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined whether daily multivitamin supplementation (vitamins B complex, C, and E) or vitamin A supplementation altered malaria incidence in HIV-infected women of reproductive age. Methods: HIV-infected pregnant Tanzanian women recruited into the study were randomly assigned to daily multivitamins (B complex, C, and E), vitamin A alone, both multivitamins and vitamin A, or placebo. Women received malaria prophylaxis during pregnancy and were followed monthly during the prenatal and postpartum periods. Malaria was defined in 2 ways: presumptive diagnosis based on a physician's or nurse's clinical judgment, which in many cases led to laboratory investigations, and periodic examination of blood smears for malaria parasites. Results: Multivitamin supplementation compared with no multivitamins significantly lowered women's risk of presumptively diagnosed clinical malaria (relative risk: 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.67 to 0.92), although multivitamins increased their risk of any malaria parasitemia (relative risk: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.02 to 1.50). Vitamin A supplementation did not change malaria incidence during the study. Conclusions: Multivitamin supplements have been previously shown to reduce HIV disease progression among HIV-infected women, and consistent with that, these supplements protected against development of symptomatic malaria. The clinical significance of increased risk of malaria parasitemia among supplemented women deserves further research, however. Preventive measures for malaria are warranted as part of an integrated approach to the care of HIV-infected individuals exposed to malaria. PMID:25436815

  4. Evaluation of Olfactory and Gustatory Function of HIV Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Kehinde Mobolanle; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere George; Akinyinka, Olusina Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Compliance with medication requires good sense of smell and taste. Objective. To evaluate the olfactory and gustatory function of HIV infected women in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods. A case control study of women comprising 83 HIV infected women and 79 HIV uninfected women. Subjective self-rating of taste and smell function was by visual analogue scale. Olfactory function was measured via olfactory threshold (OT), olfactory discrimination (OD), olfactory identification (OI), and TDI using “Sniffin' sticks” kits and taste function (Total Taste Strips (TTS) score) measurement was by taste strips. Results. The mean age of the HIV infected women was 43.67 years ± 10.72 and control was 41.48 years ± 10.99. There was no significant difference in the self-reported assessment of smell (p = 0.67) and taste (p = 0.84) of HIV infected and uninfected women. Although the mean OT, OD, OI, TDI, and TTS scores of HIV infected and uninfected women were within the normosmic and normogeusic values, the values were significantly higher in the controls (p < 0.05). Hyposmia was in 39.7% of subjects and 12.6% of controls while hypogeusia was in 15.7% of subjects and 1.3% of controls. Conclusions. Hyposmia and hypogeusia are commoner among the HIV infected women than the HIV uninfected women and the risk increases with an increased duration of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27047688

  5. Women and HIV infection: the makings of a midlife crisis.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Nanette; Fan, Maria; Maslow, BatSheva; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2009-11-20

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral agents, women with HIV infection can expect to live longer than ever before. This increased survival has led to concerns about the long-term implications of HIV disease and its treatment. Women with HIV infection appear to lose ovarian function earlier in life than women without HIV infection. They also have evidence of reduced bone mineral density and increased cardiovascular risk. Moreover, many of these increases in risk factors are present even prior to the menopausal transition. All of these risks, present at midlife, augur poorly for future health and describe a substantially increased burden of disease likely to accrue to HIV-infected women as they enter older age groups. Further compounding the adversity faced by the HIV infected, the demographics of women most vulnerable to this disease include adverse social and economic influences, both of which worsen their long-term prognosis. For example, drug use and poverty are related to more severe menopausal symptoms and chronic stress is related to worse psychological and cardiovascular risk. An understanding of how menopause interacts with HIV infection is therefore most important to alert the clinician to perform surveillance for common health problems in postmenopausal women, and to address directly and appropriately symptomatology during the menopausal transition. PMID:19783389

  6. Women and HIV Infection: The Makings of a Midlife Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Nanette; Fan, Maria; Maslow, BatSheva; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral agents, women with HIV infection can expect to live longer than ever before. This increased survival has led to concerns about the long-term implications of HIV disease and its treatment. Women with HIV infection appear to lose ovarian function earlier in life than women without HIV infection. They also have evidence of reduced bone mineral density and increased cardiovascular risk. Moreover, many of these increases in risk factors are present even prior to the menopausal transition. All of these risks, present at mid-life, augur poorly for future health and describe a substantially increased burden of disease likely to accrue to HIV infected women as they enter older age groups. Further compounding the adversity faced by the HIV infected, the demographics of women most vulnerable to this disease include adverse social and economic influences, both of which worsen their long term prognosis. For example, drug use and poverty are related to more severe menopausal symptoms and chronic stress is related to worse psychological and cardiovascular risk. An understanding of how menopause interacts with HIV infection is therefore most important to alert the clinician to perform surveillance for common health problems in postmenopausal women, and to address directly and appropriately symptomatology during the menopausal transition. PMID:19783389

  7. Treatment of Acute HIV Infection and the Potential Role of Acutely HIV-Infected Persons in Cure Studies.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan J

    Diagnosis of acute HIV infection is important for accurate estimation of HIV incidence, identifying persons who are unaware of their HIV infection, and offering immediate treatment and risk-reduction strategies. The higher viral loads associated with acute HIV infection are associated with an increased risk of transmission. Current treatment recommendations are the same for acute and established infections. Studies of acute HIV infection indicate that initiation of antiretroviral therapy during this period may allow greater recovery of CD4+ T-cell count and function and may result in a smaller latent viral reservoir and a skewing of infection away from central memory CD4+ T cells toward shorter-lived transitional memory CD4+ T cells. This article summarizes a presentation by Susan J. Little, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Improving the Management of HIV Disease, held in Los Angeles, California, in April 2015. PMID:27398768

  8. Plasma Mitochondrial DNA Levels as a Biomarker of Lipodystrophy Among HIV-infected Patients Treated with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART).

    PubMed

    Dai, Z; Cai, W; Hu, F; Lan, Y; Li, L; Chung, C; Caughey, B; Zhang, K; Tang, X

    2015-01-01

    Lipodystrophy is a common complication in HIV-infected patients taking highly active antiretroviral therapy. Its early diagnosis is crucial for timely modification of antiretroviral therapy. We hypothesize that mitochondrial DNA in plasma may be a potential marker of LD in HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we compared plasma mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV-infected individuals and non-HIV-infected individuals to investigate its potential diagnostic value. Total plasma DNA was extracted from 67 HIV-infected patients at baseline and 12, 24 and 30 months after initiating antiretroviral therapy. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to determine the mitochondrial DNA levels in plasma. Lipodystrophy was defined by the physician-assessed presence of lipoatrophy or lipohypertrophy in one or more body regions. The mitochondrial DNA levels in plasma were significantly higher at baseline in HIV-infected individuals than in non-HIV-infected individuals (p<0.05). At month 30, 33 out of 67 patients (49.2%) showed at least one sign of lipodystrophy. The mean plasma mitochondrial DNA levels in lipodystrophy patients were significantly higher compared to those without lipodystrophy at month 24 (p<0.001). The receiver operating curve analysis demonstrated that using plasma mitochondrial DNA level (with cut-off value <5.09 log10 copies/ml) as a molecular marker allowed identification of patients with lipodystrophy with a sensitivity of 64.2% and a specificity of 73.0%. Our data suggest that mitochondrial DNA levels may help to guide therapy selection with regards to HIV lipodystrophy risk. PMID:26592244

  9. Antibody Response to Achromobacter xylosoxidans during HIV Infection Is Associated with Lower CD4 Levels and Increased Lymphocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Purnajo, Intan; Richman, Douglas D.; Smith, Davey M.; Gianella, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation during HIV infection is associated with worse disease outcomes and progression. Many mechanisms have been indicted, including HIV itself, coinfections, and gut microbial translocation. Concerning microbial translocation, we hypothesized that adaptive immune responses to a specific bacterial species known to be present in gut-associated lymphoid tissue are higher among HIV-infected individuals than among HIV-uninfected controls and are associated with T cell activation and lower CD4 T cell counts. By characterizing the IgG response to Achromobacter xylosoxidans, we found that HIV-infected participants who were immunoresponsive (n = 48) had significantly lower CD4 percentages (P = 0.01), greater CD4 activation (percentages of RA− CD38+) (P = 0.03), and higher soluble CD14 (P = 0.01). HIV-positive individuals had higher anti-A. xylosoxidans IgG titers than HIV-uninfected individuals (P = 0.04). The results suggest an abnormal adaptive immune activation to gut microflora during HIV infection. PMID:24173027

  10. HIV Infection and the Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD) in South African Adults and Older Children Prior to the Introduction of a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV)

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Susan; Cohen, Cheryl; Quan, Vanessa; de Gouveia, Linda; Feldman, Charles; Karstaedt, Alan; Klugman, Keith P.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Rabie, Helene; Sriruttan, Charlotte; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus pneumoniae is the commonest cause of bacteremic pneumonia among HIV-infected persons. As more countries with high HIV prevalence are implementing infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programs, we aimed to describe the baseline clinical characteristics of adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the pre-PCV era in South Africa in order to interpret potential indirect effects following vaccine use. Methods National, active, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD was conducted in South Africa from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2008. At 25 enhanced surveillance (ES) hospital sites, clinical data, including HIV serostatus, were collected from IPD patients ≥ 5 years of age. We compared the clinical characteristics of individuals with IPD in those HIV-infected and -uninfected using multivariable analysis. PCV was introduced into the routine South African Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in 2009. Results In South Africa, from 2003–2008, 17 604 cases of IPD occurred amongst persons ≥ 5 years of age, with an average incidence of 7 cases per 100 000 person-years. Against a national HIV-prevalence of 18%, 89% (4190/4734) of IPD patients from ES sites were HIV-infected. IPD incidence in HIV-infected individuals is 43 times higher than in HIV-uninfected persons (52 per 100 000 vs. 1.2 per 100 000), with a peak in the HIV-infected elderly population of 237 per 100 000 persons. Most HIV-infected individuals presented with bacteremia (74%, 3 091/4 190). HIV-uninfected individuals were older; and had more chronic conditions (excluding HIV) than HIV-infected persons (39% (210/544) vs. 19% (790/4190), p<0.001). During the pre-PCV immunization era in South Africa, 71% of serotypes amongst HIV-infected persons were covered by PCV13 vs. 73% amongst HIV-uninfected persons, p = 0.4, OR 0.9 (CI 0.7–1.1). Conclusion Seventy to eighty-five percent of adult IPD in the pre-PCV era were vaccine serotypes and 93% of cases had recognized risk

  11. Persisting high prevalence of pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heinsbroek, Ellen; Tafatatha, Terence; Phiri, Amos; Ngwira, Bagrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Read, Jonathan M.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HIV-infected adults have high rates of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults prior to infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) rollout. Design: Observational cohort study. Methods: We recruited HIV-infected adults newly attending a rural HIV clinic in northern Malawi between 2008 and 2010. Nasopharyngeal samples were taken at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. We compared pneumococcal carriage by ART status using generalized estimated equation models adjusted for CD4+ cell count, sex, seasonality, and other potential confounders. Results: In total, 336 individuals were included, of which 223 individuals started ART during follow-up. Individuals receiving ART had higher pneumococcal carriage than individuals not receiving ART (25.9 vs. 19.8%, P = 0.03) particularly for serotypes not included in PCV13 (16.1 vs. 9.6% P = 0.003). Following adjustment, increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes was still observed for individuals on ART, but results for all serotypes were nonsignificant [all serotypes: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.22 (0.95–1.56); non-PCV13 serotypes: aRR 1.72, 95% CI 1.13–2.62]. Conclusion: Pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults in Malawi remained high despite use of ART, consistent with failure of mucosal immune reconstitution in the upper respiratory tract. There was evidence of increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes. HIV-infected adults on ART could remain an important reservoir for pneumococcal diversity post infant pneumococcal vaccine introduction. Control of pneumococcal disease in African HIV remains a priority. PMID:26218599

  12. Social care of children born to HIV-infected mothers in Europe. European Collaborative Study.

    PubMed

    Thorne, C; Newell, M L; Peckham, C

    1998-02-01

    Children of HIV-infected women are likely to be profoundly affected by their mothers' infection, regardless of their own infection status and their number will increase with the spread of infection among women in Europe. This article describes the family circumstances and social care of 1,123 children born to HIV-infected women enrolled in the European Collaborative Study and followed prospectively from birth. Most mothers were white, married or cohabiting, asymptomatic and had a history of drug use, with 45% currently using injecting drugs at the time of enrollment. Seventy percent of children were cared for by their mothers and/or fathers consistently in their first four years of life, but by age eight an estimated 60% will have lived away from their parents (i.e. with foster or adoptive parents, other relatives or in an institution). Whether or not a child was infected did not influence the likelihood of living in alternative care. Maternal injecting drug use, single parenthood and health status were the major reasons necessitating alternative care. The type of alternative care varied according to maternal characteristics, child's age and geographic location. The mothers of 98 children had died and average age at maternal death was four years. PMID:9536198

  13. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yean K.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Westhorpe, Clare L.V.; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/−260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/−260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  14. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yean K; Shankar, Esaki M; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-08-01

    HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/-260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/-260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  15. Alcohol-Related Diagnoses and All-Cause Hospitalization Among HIV-Infected and Uninfected Patients: A Longitudinal Analysis of United States Veterans from 1997 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Christopher; Tate, Janet P; Akgün, Kathleen M; Crystal, Stephen; Wang, Karen H; Ryan Greysen, S; Wang, Emily A; Bryant, Kendall J; Fiellin, David A; Justice, Amy C; Rimland, David

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with HIV infection are living substantially longer on antiretroviral therapy, but hospitalization rates continue to be relatively high. We do not know how overall or diagnosis-specific hospitalization rates compare between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals or what conditions may drive hospitalization trends. Hospitalization rates among United States Veterans were calculated and stratified by HIV serostatus and principal diagnosis disease category. Because alcohol-related diagnoses (ARD) appeared to have a disproportional effect, we further stratified our calculations by ARD history. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to assess the relative risk of hospitalization controlling for demographic and other comorbidity variables. From 1997 to 2011, 46,428 HIV-infected and 93,997 uninfected patients were followed for 1,497,536 person-years. Overall hospitalization rates decreased among HIV-infected and uninfected patients. However, cardiovascular and renal insufficiency admissions increased for all groups while gastrointestinal and liver, endocrine, neurologic, and non-AIDS cancer admissions increased among those with an alcohol-related diagnosis. After multivariable adjustment, HIV-infected individuals with an ARD had the highest risk of hospitalization (hazard ratio 3.24, 95 % CI 3.00, 3.49) compared to those free of HIV infection and without an ARD. Still, HIV alone also conferred increased risk (HR 2.08, 95 % CI 2.04, 2.13). While decreasing overall, risk of all-cause hospitalization remains higher among HIV-infected than uninfected individuals and is strongly influenced by the presence of an ARD. PMID:25711299

  16. Impaired glucose metabolism in HIV-infected pregnant women: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Rebecca; Adler, Hugh; Jackson, Valerie; Lawless, Mairead; Byrne, Maria; Eogan, Maeve; Lambert, John S

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic complications, including diabetes mellitus, have been increasingly recognised in HIV-infected individuals since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, particularly protease inhibitors (PIs). Pregnancy is also a risk factor for impaired glucose metabolism, and previous studies have given conflicting results regarding the contribution of PIs to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in pregnant HIV-infected women. We conducted a retrospective review of all HIV-infected women attending a combined infectious disease and antenatal clinic between 2007 and 2013 who underwent a 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 24-28 weeks. We grouped the patients based on whether their OGTT result was normal or abnormal, and compared the groups using standard parametric tests (t-test and Fisher's exact test). Of 263 women with HIV who attended the clinic, 142 (53.9%) attended for OGTT and were eligible for inclusion. The mean age was 31 years (SD 5.37), all women were of European or African origin and 33.7% had a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) About 93.7% were on PI-based regimens. At delivery, the mean CD4 count was 526 cells/µL, and 13% of patients had a detectable viraemia. The prevalence of IGT was 2.8%, while the prevalence of GDM was 2.1%. Also, 71.4% (n = 5) of women with abnormal glucose metabolism were taking PIs versus 94.8% (n = 128) of normoglycaemic women (p = 0.06). We did not confirm an increased rate of GDM in HIV-infected women in our patient population and found no association between PI use and GDM. PMID:25999164

  17. Cirrhosis, Liver Transplantation and HIV Infection Are Risk Factors Associated with Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, María; Homs, María; Campos-Varela, Isabel; Cantarell, Carmen; Crespo, Manuel; Castells, Lluís; Tabernero, David; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Rafael; Rodriguez-Frías, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic hepatitis E have been associated with high mortality and development of cirrhosis, particularly in solid-organ recipients and patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus. However, data regarding the epidemiology of hepatitis E in special populations is still limited. Aims Investigate seroprevalence and possible factors associated with HEV infection in a large cohort of immunosuppressed patients. Methods Cross-sectional study testing IgG anti-HEV in serum samples from 1373 consecutive individuals: 332 liver-transplant, 296 kidney-transplant, 6 dual organ recipients, 301 non-transplanted patients with chronic liver disease, 238 HIV-infected patients and 200 healthy controls. Results IgG anti-HEV was detected in 3.5% controls, 3.7% kidney recipients, 7.4% liver transplant without cirrhosis and 32.1% patients who developed post-transplant cirrhosis (p<0.01). In patients with chronic liver disease, IgG anti-HEV was also statistically higher in those with liver cirrhosis (2% vs 17.5%, p<0.01). HIV-infected patients showed an IgG anti-HEV rate of 9.2%, higher than those patients without HIV infection (p<0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that the factors independently associated with anti-HEV detection were liver cirrhosis, liver transplantation and HIV infection (OR: 7.6, 3.1 and 2.4). HCV infection was a protective factor for HEV infection (OR: 0.4). Conclusions HEV seroprevalence was high in liver transplant recipients, particularly those with liver cirrhosis. The difference in anti-HEV prevalence between Liver and Kidney transplanted cases suggests an association with advanced liver disease. Further research is needed to ascertain whether cirrhosis is a predisposing factor for HEV infection or whether HEV infection may play a role in the pathogeneses of cirrhosis. PMID:25068388

  18. Epidemiologic contributions to recent cancer trends among HIV-infected people in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A.; Shiels, Meredith S.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected people have elevated risk for some cancers. Changing incidence of these cancers over time may reflect changes in three factors: HIV population demographic structure (e.g. age distribution), general population (background) cancer rates, and HIV-associated relative risks. We assessed the contributions of these factors to time trends for 10 cancers during 1996–2010. Design Population-based registry linkage study. Methods We applied Poisson models to data from the U.S. HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study to estimate annual percent changes (APCs) in incidence rates of AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs: Kaposi sarcoma (KS), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and cervical cancer) and 7 non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs). We evaluated HIV-infected cancer trends with and without adjustment for demographics, trends in background rates, and trends in standardized incidence ratios (SIRs, to capture relative risk). Results Cancer rates among HIV-infected people rose over time for anal (APC 3.8%), liver (8.5%), and prostate (9.8%) cancers, but declined for KS (1996–2000: −29.3%; 2000–2010: −7.8%), NHL (1996–2003: −15.7%; 2003–2010: −5.5%), cervical cancer (−11.1%), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, −4.0%), and lung cancer (−2.8%). Breast and colorectal cancer incidence did not change over time. Based on comparison to adjusted models, changing demographics contributed to trends for KS and breast, colorectal, liver, lung, and prostate cancers (all p<0.01). Trends in background rates were notable for liver (APC 5.6%) and lung (−3.2%) cancers. SIRs declined for ADCs, HL (APC −3.2%), and lung cancer (−4.4%). Conclusions Demographic shifts influenced several cancer trends among HIV-infected individuals. Falling relative risks largely explained ADC declines, while background incidence contributed to some NADC trends. PMID:24300545

  19. No Association Between Apoε4 Alleles, HIV Infection, Age, Neuropsychological Outcome or Death

    PubMed Central

    Becker, James T.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Kingsley, Lawrence; Molsberry, Samantha; Wolinsky, Steven; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ε4 allele of the ApoE gene may have important interactions with physical health and cognitive function among individuals with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between ε4, HIV disease, age, neuropsychological impairment and death in a large, well-characterized study sample. 2,846 men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study had ApoE genotyping and neuropsychological test data available for analysis. We found a significant association between HIV infection and time to death (from any cause), as well as older age, race, and education. But, ApoE status was not significantly associated with time to death. Similarly, we found a significant association between HIV infection and time to incident cognitive impairment, as well as age, education, and HIV serostatus; Apoε4 status was not related to incident cognitive impairment. There were no significant interactions between ApoE, HIV infection, and age on cognitive impairment. These data replicate and strengthen prior findings of the lack of association between ApoE ε4 and cognitive outcomes in HIV disease. We conclude that within the specific constraints of an exclusively male study in which the majority of participants were less than 65 years of age (range: 22-87 years), it appears reasonable to conclude that the ε4 allele is not significantly interacting with HIV serostatus. PMID:25388225

  20. No association between Apoε4 alleles, HIV infection, age, neuropsychological outcome, or death.

    PubMed

    Becker, James T; Martinson, Jeremy J; Penugonda, Sudhir; Kingsley, Lawrence; Molsberry, Samantha; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N; Munro, Cynthia A; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned

    2015-02-01

    The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene may have important interactions with physical health and cognitive function among individuals with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between ε4, HIV disease, age, neuropsychological impairment, and death in a large, well-characterized study sample. A total of 2846 men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study had ApoE genotyping and neuropsychological test data available for analysis. We found a significant association between HIV infection and time to death (from any cause), as well as older age, race, and education. But, ApoE status was not significantly associated with time to death. Similarly, we found a significant association between HIV infection and time to incident cognitive impairment, as well as age, education, and HIV serostatus; Apoε4 status was not related to incident cognitive impairment. There were no significant interactions between ApoE, HIV infection, and age on cognitive impairment. These data replicate and strengthen prior findings of the lack of association between ApoE ε4 and cognitive outcomes in HIV disease. We conclude that within the specific constraints of an exclusively male study in which the majority of participants were less than 65 years of age (range 22-87 years), it appears reasonable to conclude that the ε4 allele is not significantly interacting with HIV serostatus. PMID:25388225

  1. Risk of premature atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease associated with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Pocaterra, Daria; Chiodo, Francesco

    2008-07-01

    The use of new potent protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapies in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been increasingly associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including hyperlipidaemia, fat redistribution syndrome, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in clinical practice has remarkably changed the natural history of HIV disease, leading to a notable extension of life expectancy, and prolonged lipid and glucose metabolism abnormalities are expected to lead to significant effects on the long-term prognosis and outcome of HIV-infected patients. Prediction modeling, surrogate markers and hard cardiovascular endpoints suggest an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART, even though the absolute risk of cardiovascular complications remains still low, and must be balanced against the evident virological, immunological, and clinical benefits descending from combination antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless, the assessment of cardiovascular risk should be performed on regular basis in HIV-positive individuals, especially after initiation or change of antiretroviral treatment. Appropriate lifestyle measures (including smoking cessation, dietary changes, and aerobic physical activity) are critical points, and switching HAART may be considered, although maintaining viremic control should be the main goal of therapy. Pharmacological treatment of dyslipidaemia (usually with statins and fibrates), and hyperglycaemia (with insulin-sensitizing agents and thiazolidinediones), becomes suitable when lifestyle modifications and switching therapy are ineffective or not applicable. PMID:18358535

  2. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infectedmore » cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  3. A case of symptomatic primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satomi; Segawa, Satoko; Kawashima, Makoto; Itoda, Ichiro; Shima, Takako; Imai, Mitsunobu

    2005-02-01

    A 30-year-old homosexual Japanese man had fourteen days of fever, malaise, appetite loss, sore throat, and four days of diarrhea and slightly congested eyes before he developed a skin eruption. He presented with measles-like exanthems on his face, trunk, and extremities. Deep red enanthems were seen on his left buccal mucosa opposite the premolar teeth, and whitish enanthems were seen on the buccal and gingival mucosa. HIV RNA was detected at the high concentration of 5.8 x 10(6) copies /ml in his serum. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed aseptic meningitis with 5,488 copies /ml of HIV RNA. Anti-HIV 1 antibodies against Gp160 and p24 tested by Western blot assay showed seroconversion on day 5 of his admission, seven days after he developed the skin eruptions. The fever lasted for three weeks from the initial onset, and the skin eruptions lasted for twelve days. Histopathologically, a mononuclear cell infiltration was seen mainly in the upper dermis surrounding small vessels and sweat ducts, with CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes predominant. Additionally, CD1a+ putative interdigitating dendritic cells had also infiltrated perivascularly, and were surrounded by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. In situ hybridization study failed to detect HIV products in skin biopsy specimens. Our findings suggested that CD8+ T cells and their interaction with CD1a+ dendritic cells in the skin may be important in inducing skin manifestations in acute HIV infections. PMID:15906546

  4. Nanotechnology and the Treatment of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Parboosing, Raveen; Maguire, Glenn E. M.; Govender, Patrick; Kruger, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Suboptimal adherence, toxicity, drug resistance and viral reservoirs make the lifelong treatment of HIV infection challenging. The emerging field of nanotechnology may play an important role in addressing these challenges by creating drugs that possess pharmacological advantages arising out of unique phenomena that occur at the “nano” scale. At these dimensions, particles have physicochemical properties that are distinct from those of bulk materials or single molecules or atoms. In this review, basic concepts and terms in nanotechnology are defined, and examples are provided of how nanopharmaceuticals such as nanocrystals, nanocapsules, nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanocarriers, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers have been investigated as potential anti-HIV therapies. Such drugs may, for example, be used to optimize the pharmacological characteristics of known antiretrovirals, deliver anti-HIV nucleic acids into infected cells or achieve targeted delivery of antivirals to the immune system, brain or latent reservoirs. Also, nanopharmaceuticals themselves may possess anti-HIV activity. However several hurdles remain, including toxicity, unwanted biological interactions and the difficulty and cost of large-scale synthesis of nanopharmaceuticals. PMID:22590683

  5. Neurologic diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Mohammed; O'Keefe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy there has been an improvement in the quality of life for people with HIV infection. Despite the progress made, about 70% of HIV patients develop neurologic complications. These originate either in the central or the peripheral nervous system (Sacktor, 2002). These neurologic disorders are divided into primary and secondary disorders. The primary disorders result from the direct effects of the virus and include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy (VM), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). Secondary disorders result from marked immunosuppression and include opportunistic infections and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A differential diagnosis which can be accomplished by detailed history, neurologic examination, and by having a good understanding of the role of HIV in various neurologic disorders will help physicians in approaching these problems. The focus of this chapter is to discuss neuropathogenesis of HIV, the various opportunistic infections, primary CNS lymphoma, neurosyphilis, CNS tuberculosis, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), and vacuolar myelopathy (VM). It also relies on the treatment recommendations and guidelines for the above mentioned neurologic disorders proposed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. PMID:24365422

  6. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infected cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.

  7. Low rate of sustained virological response in an outbreak of acute hepatitis C in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Laguno, Montserrat; Martínez-Rebollar, Maria; Perez, Iñaki; Costa, Josep; Larrousse, Maria; Calvo, Marta; Loncá, Montse; Muñoz, Ana; González-Cordón, Ana; Blanco, José Luís; Martínez, Esteban; Gatell, Josep Maria; Mallolas, Josep

    2012-10-01

    Recent reports have suggested an increased risk of acute hepatitis C (AHC) infection in homosexual HIV-infected men and that early treatment with interferon-alfa, alone or associated with ribavirin, significantly reduces the risk of chronic evolution. A retrospective analysis of 38 HIV-infected patients who were consecutively diagnosed as developing AHC, defined by both seroconversion of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies and detection of serum HCV-RNA in those with previous negative results. Thirty-six patients were men with history of unprotected sexual intercourse with men and two were women with sexual and nosocomial risk factors. AHC infection was asymptomatic in 26 patients; asthenia and jaundice were the most frequent symptoms. HCV genotype 1 was present in 19 patients and genotype 4 in 14 patients. Thirty-five patients received early antiviral treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa associated with ribavirin; 15 of the 32 patients who completed the follow-up (47%) achieved a sustained virological response, as defined by undetectable HCV-RNA 6 months after the end of therapy. There is a risk of sexual transmission of HCV in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In our experience, early treatment of AHC with pegylated interferon-alfa plus ribavirin in HIV patients achieves poor results. PMID:22428909

  8. Incarceration and Health Outcomes in HIV-Infected Patients: The Impact of Substance Use, Primary Care Engagement, and Antiretroviral Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Emily A.; McGinnis, Kathleen A.; Long, Jessica B.; Akgün, Kathleen M.; Edelman, E. Jennifer; Rimland, David; Wang, Karen H.; Justice, Amy C.; Fiellin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives One in seven HIV-infected individuals is incarcerated each year. We used data from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) to explore the relationship between incarceration and HIV disease outcomes and evaluate potential mediators of this relationship. Methods HIV disease outcomes included: low CD4 counts (<200 cells/mL), detectable viral RNA loads (>500 copies/mL), and the VACS Index score. We performed a mediation analysis among 1,591 HIV-infected patients to examine whether unhealthy alcohol use, drug use, primary care engagement, or antiretroviral adherence mediated observed associations. Results Among 1,591 HIV-infected patients, 47% reported having a history of incarceration. In multivariate analyses, a history of incarceration was associated with a higher VACS Index score (β 2.47, 95% CI 0.52–4.43). Mediation analysis revealed that recent drug use attenuated the association by 22% (β 1.93, 95% CI −0.06, 3.91) while other proposed mediators did not. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Improving access to drug treatment when incarcerated and upon release may be an important target to improving the health of HIV-infected individuals with a history of incarceration. PMID:25662297

  9. Sociometric risk networks and risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S R; Neaigus, A; Jose, B; Curtis, R; Goldstein, M; Ildefonso, G; Rothenberg, R B; Des Jarlais, D C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether networks of drug-injecting and sexual relationships among drug injectors are associated with individual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serostatus and with behavioral likelihood of future infection. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 767 drug injectors in New York City was performed with chain-referral and linking procedures to measure large-scale (sociometric) risk networks. Graph-theoretic algebraic techniques were used to detect 92 connected components (drug injectors linked to each other directly or through others) and a 105-member 2-core within a large connected component of 230 members. RESULTS: Drug injectors in the 2-core of the large component were more likely than others to be infected with HIV. Seronegative 2-core members engaged in a wide range of high-risk behaviors, including engaging in risk behaviors with infected drug injectors. CONCLUSIONS: Sociometric risk networks seem to be pathways along which HIV travels in drug-injecting peer groups. The cores of large components can be centers of high-risk behaviors and can become pockets of HIV infection. Preventing HIV from reaching the cores of large components may be crucial in preventing widespread HIV epidemics. PMID:9279263

  10. Ocular Manifestations in Patients with HIV Infection/AIDS who were Referred from the ART Centre, Hassan, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Pavana Krishnaraj; Venugopal, Kavitha Chikkanayakanahalli; Karimsab, Dada Peer; Balasubramanya, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Ocular involvement in HIV infection/AIDS is very common and it includes various clinical presentations which may be asymptomatic or atypical or they may be the initial manifestations of the underlying disease. The severity of these lesions increases as the immune competency decreases, leading to visual impairment or blindness. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and the types of HIV associated ocular conditions and their effect on the vision in patients with HIV/AIDS. Methods This cross sectional study was based on the patients with HIV infection/AIDS, who were referred to the Ophthalmic OPD, District hospital, Hassan. These patients were referred from the District ART Centre for a complete ophthalmic evaluation, irrespective of their immune status and the presence or absence of symptoms. All the patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, which included both anterior and posterior segment evaluation and colour vision assessment. Results Out of the 553 patients, 66% belonged to the age group of 21-40 years. 87% of the patients had a BCVA of >6/18, whereas 4.7% had very poor vision. 37.6% of the patients had ocular manifestations. Anterior segment, posterior segment and neuro-ophthalmic manifestations were seen in 7%, 9.94% and 5.79% of the patients respectively. The most common anterior segment manifestation was recurrent lid infections, while HIV microangiopathy was the most common posterior segment manifestation. The other unusual findings included an abnormal colour vision in 6.3% of the patients and bilateral lid retraction in 8.5% of the patients. Conclusion Since ocular manifestations are very common and as they can occur at any time during the course of HIV infection, an awareness on various patterns of the ocular disease and the screening of all the patients with HIV infection/AIDS is a must. PMID:23373045

  11. HIV Infection and Microbial Diversity in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Deepak; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Gaoxia; Abrams, Willam R.; Phelan, Joan A.; Norman, Robert G.; Fisch, Gene S.; Corby, Patricia M.; Dewhirst, Floyd; Paster, Bruce J.; Kokaras, Alexis S.; Malamud, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the effects of HIV and subsequent antiretroviral treatment on host-microbe interactions. This study aimed to determine the salivary microbial composition for 10 HIV-seropositive subjects, before and 6 months after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), compared with that for 10 HIV-seronegative subjects. A conventional culture and two culture-independent analyses were used and consistently demonstrated differences in microbial composition among the three sets of samples. HIV-positive subjects had higher levels of total cultivable microbes, including oral streptococci, lactobacilli, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida, in saliva than did HIV-negative subjects. The total cultivable microbial levels were significantly correlated with CD4+ T cell counts. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which compared the overall microbial profiles, showed distinct fingerprinting profiles for each group. The human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) assay, which compared the 16S rRNA genes, showed clear separation among the three sample groups. Veillonella, Synergistetes, and Streptococcus were present in all 30 saliva samples. Only minor changes or no changes in the prevalence of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Gemella, Leptotrichia, Solobacterium, Parvimonas, and Rothia were observed. Seven genera, Capnocytophaga, Slackia, Porphyromonas, Kingella, Peptostreptococcaceae, Lactobacillus, and Atopobium, were detected only in HIV-negative samples. The prevalences of Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Selenomonas, Actinomyces, Granulicatella, and Atopobium were increased after HAART. In contrast, the prevalence of Aggregatibacter was significantly decreased after HAART. The findings of this study suggest that HIV infection and HAART can have significant effects on salivary microbial colonization and composition. PMID:24523469

  12. HIV infection and microbial diversity in saliva.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihong; Saxena, Deepak; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Gaoxia; Abrams, Willam R; Phelan, Joan A; Norman, Robert G; Fisch, Gene S; Corby, Patricia M; Dewhirst, Floyd; Paster, Bruce J; Kokaras, Alexis S; Malamud, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Limited information is available about the effects of HIV and subsequent antiretroviral treatment on host-microbe interactions. This study aimed to determine the salivary microbial composition for 10 HIV-seropositive subjects, before and 6 months after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), compared with that for 10 HIV-seronegative subjects. A conventional culture and two culture-independent analyses were used and consistently demonstrated differences in microbial composition among the three sets of samples. HIV-positive subjects had higher levels of total cultivable microbes, including oral streptococci, lactobacilli, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida, in saliva than did HIV-negative subjects. The total cultivable microbial levels were significantly correlated with CD4+ T cell counts. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which compared the overall microbial profiles, showed distinct fingerprinting profiles for each group. The human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) assay, which compared the 16S rRNA genes, showed clear separation among the three sample groups. Veillonella, Synergistetes, and Streptococcus were present in all 30 saliva samples. Only minor changes or no changes in the prevalence of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Gemella, Leptotrichia, Solobacterium, Parvimonas, and Rothia were observed. Seven genera, Capnocytophaga, Slackia, Porphyromonas, Kingella, Peptostreptococcaceae, Lactobacillus, and Atopobium, were detected only in HIV-negative samples. The prevalences of Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Selenomonas, Actinomyces, Granulicatella, and Atopobium were increased after HAART. In contrast, the prevalence of Aggregatibacter was significantly decreased after HAART. The findings of this study suggest that HIV infection and HAART can have significant effects on salivary microbial colonization and composition. PMID:24523469

  13. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  14. Posttraumatic stress disorder in response to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B; Raphael, B; Judd, F; Perdices, M; Kernutt, G; Burnett, P; Dunne, M; Burrows, G

    1998-11-01

    This study investigated the psychological impact of HIV infection through assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder in response to HIV infection. Sixty-one HIV-positive homosexual/bisexual men were assessed for posttraumatic stress disorder in response to HIV infection (PTSD-HIV) using a modified PTSD module of the DIS-III-R. Thirty percent met criteria for a syndrome of posttraumatic stress disorder in response to HIV diagnosis (PTSD-HIV). In over one-third of the PTSD cases, the disorder had an onset greater than 6 months after initial HIV infection diagnosis. PTSD-HIV was associated with other psychiatric diagnoses, particularly the development of first episodes of major depression after HIV infection diagnosis. PTSD-HIV was significantly associated with a pre-HIV history of PTSD from other causes, and other pre-HIV psychiatric disorders and neuroticism scores, indicating a similarity with findings in studies of PTSD from other causes. The findings from this preliminary study suggest that a PTSD response to HIV diagnosis has clinical validity and requires further investigation in this population and other medically ill groups. The results support the inclusion of the diagnosis of life-threatening illness as a traumatic incident that may lead to a posttraumatic stress disorder, which is consistent with the DSM-IV criteria. PMID:9854646

  15. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  16. What Triggers a Diagnosis of HIV Infection in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area? Implications for Preventing the Spread of HIV Infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Takano, Misao; Matsumoto, Shoko; Koyama, Miki; Sugino, Yuko; Ogane, Miwa; Ikeda, Kazuko; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Japan has not succeeded in reducing the annual number of new HIV-infected patients, although the prevalence of HIV infection is low (0.02%). Methods A single-center observational study was conducted at the largest HIV clinic in Tokyo, which treats 15% of the total patients in Japan, to determine the reasons for having diagnostic tests in newly infected individuals. HIV-infected patients who visited our clinic for the first time between 2011 and 2014 were analyzed. Results The 598 study patients comprised one-third of the total reported number of new patients in Tokyo during the study period. 76% were Japanese MSM. The reasons for being tested which led to the diagnosis was voluntary testing in 32%, existing diseases in 53% (AIDS-defining diseases in 22%, sexually transmitted infections (STI) in 8%, diseases other than AIDS or STIs in 23%) and routine pre-surgery or on admission screening in 15%. 52% and 74% of the study patients and patients presented with AIDS, respectively, had never been tested. The median CD4 count in patients with history of previous testing (315/μL) was significantly higher than that of patients who had never been tested (203/μL, p<0.001). Conclusions Only 32% of the newly HIV diagnosed patients were diagnosed because of voluntary testing, and 53% were diagnosed due to presence of other diseases. These results remain unchanged from our previous report 10 years earlier (2000–2004) on newly diagnosed patients at the same clinic. HIV testing has not been widely used by newly diagnosed patients in the Tokyo metropolitan area. PMID:26606382

  17. Starting treatment in pediatric HIV infection: try to clarify a gray area.

    PubMed

    Prato, Manuela; Venturini, Elisabetta; Chiappini, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected children led to a dramatic reduction in HIV-related morbidity and mortality. The decision about which ART regimen to use on children and when to start the treatment needs to focus on assuring normal growth and neuropsychological development. According to the available treatment guidelines, all infants under 1 year of age with HIV should be started on an ART at diagnosis. It is difficult to balance between the benefits of providing treatment to asymptomatic children >1 year and the concerns about long-term resistance and antiretroviral drug side effects if the treatment is started too early. Current guidelines agree that the need for antiretroviral treatment among asymptomatic children >12 months depends on age-specific CD4+ T-cell count thresholds and viral loads. Recent studies showed that the introduction of combination ART during the first year of life preserves a good function of B-cell and T-cell compartments. Starting treatment earlier might have fundamental roles both in preserving the not yet depleted immune function and in preventing the progressive HIV encephalopathy. The comparison of the international guidelines available for starting HIV treatment in children in developed countries highlights a gray area. New randomized controlled studies are needed to clarify the appropriate approach in asymptomatic children between 2 and 5 years of age. PMID:25886774

  18. Keep them in school: the importance of education as a protective factor against HIV infection among young South African women

    PubMed Central

    Pettifor, Audrey E; Levandowski, Brooke A; MacPhail, Catherine; Padian, Nancy S; Cohen, Myron S; Rees, Helen V

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for HIV infection among young women aged 15–24 years reporting one lifetime partner in South Africa. Design In 2003, we conducted a nationally representative household survey of sexual behaviour and HIV testing among 11 904 young people aged 15–24 years in South Africa. This analysis focuses on the subset of sexually experienced young women with only one reported lifetime sex partner (n = 1708). Methods Using the proximate determinants framework and the published literature we identified factors associated with HIV in young women. The associations between these factors and HIV infection were explored in multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of the young women, 15% reporting one lifetime partner were HIV positive. In multivariable analyses, young women who had not completed high school were more likely to be infected with HIV compared with those that had completed high school (AOR 3.75; 95% CI 1.34–10.46). Conclusions Young South African women in this population were at high risk of HIV infection despite reporting only having one lifetime partner. Few individual level factors were associated with HIV infection, emphasizing the importance of developing HIV prevention interventions that address structural and partner level risk factors. PMID:18614609

  19. Methylome-wide Analysis of Chronic HIV Infection Reveals Five-Year Increase in Biological Age and Epigenetic Targeting of HLA.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andrew M; Jaeger, Philipp A; Kreisberg, Jason F; Licon, Katherine; Jepsen, Kristen L; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Morsey, Brenda M; Swindells, Susan; Shen, Hui; Ng, Cherie T; Flagg, Ken; Chen, Daniel; Zhang, Kang; Fox, Howard S; Ideker, Trey

    2016-04-21

    HIV-infected individuals are living longer on antiretroviral therapy, but many patients display signs that in some ways resemble premature aging. To investigate and quantify the impact of chronic HIV infection on aging, we report a global analysis of the whole-blood DNA methylomes of 137 HIV+ individuals under sustained therapy along with 44 matched HIV- individuals. First, we develop and validate epigenetic models of aging that are independent of blood cell composition. Using these models, we find that both chronic and recent HIV infection lead to an average aging advancement of 4.9 years, increasing expected mortality risk by 19%. In addition, sustained infection results in global deregulation of the methylome across >80,000 CpGs and specific hypomethylation of the region encoding the human leukocyte antigen locus (HLA). We find that decreased HLA methylation is predictive of lower CD4 / CD8 T cell ratio, linking molecular aging, epigenetic regulation, and disease progression. PMID:27105112

  20. A Meta-Analysis of the Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence in the Global HIV-Infected Population

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim A.; Peer, Nasheeta; Mills, Edward J.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardio-metabolic risk factors are of increasing concern in HIV-infected individuals, particularly with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the subsequent rise in longevity. However, the prevalence of cardio-metabolic abnormalities in this population and the differential contribution, if any, of HIV specific factors to their distribution, are poorly understood. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the global prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected populations, its variation by the different diagnostic criteria, severity of HIV infection, ART used and other major predictive characteristics. Methods We performed a comprehensive search on major databases for original research articles published between 1998 and 2015. The pooled overall prevalence as well as by specific groups and subgroups were computed using random effects models. Results A total of 65 studies across five continents comprising 55094 HIV-infected participants aged 17–73 years (median age 41 years) were included in the final meta-analysis. The overall prevalence of MS according to the following criteria were: ATPIII-2001:16.7% (95%CI: 14.6–18.8), IDF-2005: 18% (95%CI: 14.0–22.4), ATPIII-2004-2005: 24.6% (95%CI: 20.6–28.8), Modified ATPIII-2005: 27.9% (95%CI: 6.7–56.5), JIS-2009: 29.6% (95%CI: 22.9–36.8), and EGIR: 31.3% (95%CI: 26.8–36.0). By some MS criteria, the prevalence was significantly higher in women than in men (IDF-2005: 23.2% vs. 13.4, p = 0.030), in ART compared to non-ART users (ATPIII-2001: 18.4% vs. 11.8%, p = 0.001), and varied significantly by participant age, duration of HIV diagnosis, severity of infection, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) use and date of study publication. Across criteria, there were significant differences in MS prevalence by sub-groups such as in men, the Americas, older publications, regional studies, younger adults, smokers, ART-naïve participants

  1. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of antiretroviral therapy and improved access to care, the average life expectancy of patients with HIV infection receiving optimal treatment approaches that of patients in the general population. AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies are no longer the primary issues; instead, traditional age- and lifestyle-related conditions are a growing concern. Patients with HIV infection are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and some non-AIDS-related cancers than patients in the general population. Family physicians need to be knowledgeable about screening for and managing chronic comorbid conditions as this population ages. Health maintenance, including appropriate vaccinations, prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, and routine screening for sexually transmitted infections, remains an important part of care. As HIV infection becomes a chronic condition, emerging strategies in prevention, including preexposure prophylaxis, fall within the scope of practice of the family physician. PMID:27092565

  2. Early Life Circumstances as Contributors to HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Karolynn; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Ramjohn, Destiny; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; VanDevanter, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents may come from family settings that heighten their vulnerability to early sexual initiation, promiscuity and sexual exploitation. To illuminate how this may occur, we present a set of five representative cases of HIV-infected females from a sample of 26 adolescent and young adult HIV-infected females (ages 16–24) enrolled in a study about the adaptive challenges people their age faced living with the disease. Study participants were recruited from five New York City adolescent HIV clinics that provided comprehensive specialty medical and supportive ancillary social services to adolescents and young adults with HIV. Study participants completed a battery of standardizes measures, using ACASI, and participated in a semi-structured in-depth interview. Using the qualitative interview data, we illustrate how early life and family circumstances including neglectful or dysfunctional parenting (e.g., low parental supervision), sexual abuse, and unstable housing placed these young women on a risk trajectory for HIV infection. PMID:25397349

  3. Urinary Markers of Tubular Injury in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gebreweld, Angesom

    2016-01-01

    Renal disease is a common complication of HIV-infected patients, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events, progression to AIDS, AIDS-defining illness, and mortality. Early and accurate identification of renal disease is therefore crucial to improve patient outcomes. The use of serum creatinine, along with proteinuria, to detect renal involvement is essentially to screen for markers of glomerular disease and may not be effective in detecting earlier stages of renal injury. Therefore, more sensitive and specific markers are needed in order to early identify HIV-infected patients at risk of renal disease. This review article summarizes some new and important urinary markers of tubular injury in HIV-infected patients and their clinical usefulness in the renal safety follow-up of TDF-treated patients. PMID:27493802

  4. Polyclonal B-cell activation reveals antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in HIV-1-seronegative individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Jehuda-Cohen, T; Slade, B A; Powell, J D; Villinger, F; De, B; Folks, T M; McClure, H M; Sell, K W; Ahmed-Ansari, A

    1990-01-01

    Identification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals is of paramount importance for the control of the spread of AIDS worldwide. Currently, the vast majority of screening centers throughout the world rely on serological techniques. As such, clinically asymptomatic but HIV-infected, seronegative individuals are rarely identified. In this report we show that 18% (30/165) of seronegative individuals who were considered to be a unique cohort of patients at high risk for HIV infection had circulating B cells that, upon in vitro polyclonal activation with pokeweed mitogen, produced antibodies reactive with HIV. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA obtained from aliquots of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these seronegative but pokeweed mitogen assay-positive individuals tested revealed the presence of HIV-specific sequences in a significant number of samples. In addition, depletion of CD8+ T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-seronegative individuals prior to in vitro culture with pokeweed mitogen resulted in increased sensitivity for detecting HIV-reactive antibodies. This assay has obvious epidemiological implications, especially in the case of high-risk groups, and also provides a simple technique to enhance detection of HIV-infected individuals. Of further interest is the determination of the mechanisms related to the lack of HIV-specific antibodies in the serum of these infected individuals. Images PMID:2111024

  5. The 3-dimensional cellular automata for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Youbin; Ren, Bin; Yang, Wencao; Shuai, Jianwei

    2014-04-01

    The HIV infection dynamics is discussed in detail with a 3-dimensional cellular automata model in this paper. The model can reproduce the three-phase development, i.e., the acute period, the asymptotic period and the AIDS period, observed in the HIV-infected patients in a clinic. We show that the 3D HIV model performs a better robustness on the model parameters than the 2D cellular automata. Furthermore, we reveal that the occurrence of a perpetual source to successively generate infectious waves to spread to the whole system drives the model from the asymptotic state to the AIDS state.

  6. Brucella canis causing infection in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nidia E; Maldonado, Patricia I; Kaufman, Sara; Escobar, Gabriela I; Boeri, Eduardo; Jacob, Néstor R

    2010-06-01

    From the blood culture of an HIV-positive patient with a febrile syndrome (CD4 count 385 cells/microL and viral load nondetectable), Brucella canis was isolated. The patient was presumptively infected from his dogs, which tested positive, and showed good outcome after the therapy with doxycycline-ciprofloxacin, and the HIV infection would seem not to have been influenced by brucellosis. To our knowledge, no other case of B. canis in the setting of HIV infection has been reported in the literature, and the emerging zoonotic potential of the disease in urban areas should be considered. PMID:19725766

  7. Strategies for addressing restorative challenges in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Abdelnur, Juliana Pires; Cerqueira, Daniella Ferraz; Castro, Gloria Fernanda; Maia, Lucianne Cople; de Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    The complete caries removal of deep/extensive dentin carious lesions with conventional procedures (high- and low-speed bur) may increase the risk of pulp exposure. In children with systemic diseases, such as HIV-infected children, the dental treatment proposed for the primary dentition with pulp involvement is tooth extraction once endodontic therapies cannot be guaranteed successfully. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe 3 cases of alternative techniques for caries removal in extensive and/or deep dentin carious lesions in the primary dentition of HIV-infected children: (1) atraumatic restorative treatment (ART); (2) Carisolv; and (3) Papacarie. PMID:18505652

  8. Determinants for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta; Awoke, Worku; Wilder-Smith, Annalies

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify determinants for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia. Design Case–control study. Setting Three hospitals and 10 health centres in Northwest Ethiopia. Participants A total of 446 individuals consented to participate in the study (150 cases and 296 controls). Cases were HIV-infected adults diagnosed with active TB, and controls were HIV-infected adults without active TB. Main outcome measure The link between TB and determinants was assessed using logistic regression. Determinants were categorised as sociodemographic, host-related, clinical and environmental. Results Smoking (adjusted OR (AOR) 5.47; 95% CI 2.26 to 13.22), presence of a TB patient in the family (AOR 2.66; 95% CI 1.25 to 5.66), alcohol consumption (AOR 2.49; 95% CI 1.29 to 4.80) and chewing khat (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.41) were independent determinants for increased occurrence of TB. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (AOR 0.25; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.51), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.41) and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (AOR 0.32; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55) had a protective effect against TB. Conclusions HIV-infected adults with substance abuse (tobacco smoking, khat chewing and alcohol) should be prioritised for TB screening. This study reaffirmed that HAART and IPT are some of the best strategies for reducing TB occurrence in HIV-infected adults. These findings provide impetus to intensify tracing of TB household contacts. PMID:27084271

  9. Interactive effects of cocaine on HIV infection: implication in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Santosh; Chitti, Sai V P; Nair, Madhavan P N; Saxena, Shailendra K

    2015-01-01

    Substantial epidemiological studies suggest that not only, being one of the reasons for the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but drug abuse also serves its role in determining the disease progression and severity among the HIV infected population. This article focuses on the drug cocaine, and its role in facilitating entry of HIV into the CNS and mechanisms of development of neurologic complications in infected individuals. Cocaine is a powerfully addictive central nervous system stimulating drug, which increases the level of neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in the brain, by blocking the dopamine transporters (DAT) which is critical for DA homeostasis and neurocognitive function. Tat protein of HIV acts as an allosteric modulator of DAT, where as cocaine acts as reuptake inhibitor. When macrophages in the CNS are exposed to DA, their number increases. These macrophages release inflammatory mediators and neurotoxins, causing chronic neuroinflammation. Cocaine abuse during HIV infection enhances the production of platelet monocyte complexes (PMCs), which may cross transendothelial barrier, and result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). HAND is characterized by neuroinflammation, including astrogliosis, multinucleated giant cells, and neuronal apoptosis that is linked to progressive virus infection and immune deterioration. Cocaine and viral proteins are capable of eliciting signaling transduction pathways in neurons, involving in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, oxidative stress, activation of JNK, p38, and ERK/MAPK pathways, and results in downstream activation of NF-κB that leads to HAND. Tat-induced inflammation provokes permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in the platelet dependent manner, which can potentially be the reason for progression to HAND during HIV infection. A better understanding on the role of cocaine in HIV infection can give a clue in developing novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection

  10. Interactive effects of cocaine on HIV infection: implication in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder and neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Santosh; Chitti, Sai V. P.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.; Saxena, Shailendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial epidemiological studies suggest that not only, being one of the reasons for the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but drug abuse also serves its role in determining the disease progression and severity among the HIV infected population. This article focuses on the drug cocaine, and its role in facilitating entry of HIV into the CNS and mechanisms of development of neurologic complications in infected individuals. Cocaine is a powerfully addictive central nervous system stimulating drug, which increases the level of neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in the brain, by blocking the dopamine transporters (DAT) which is critical for DA homeostasis and neurocognitive function. Tat protein of HIV acts as an allosteric modulator of DAT, where as cocaine acts as reuptake inhibitor. When macrophages in the CNS are exposed to DA, their number increases. These macrophages release inflammatory mediators and neurotoxins, causing chronic neuroinflammation. Cocaine abuse during HIV infection enhances the production of platelet monocyte complexes (PMCs), which may cross transendothelial barrier, and result in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). HAND is characterized by neuroinflammation, including astrogliosis, multinucleated giant cells, and neuronal apoptosis that is linked to progressive virus infection and immune deterioration. Cocaine and viral proteins are capable of eliciting signaling transduction pathways in neurons, involving in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, oxidative stress, activation of JNK, p38, and ERK/MAPK pathways, and results in downstream activation of NF-κB that leads to HAND. Tat-induced inflammation provokes permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in the platelet dependent manner, which can potentially be the reason for progression to HAND during HIV infection. A better understanding on the role of cocaine in HIV infection can give a clue in developing novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection

  11. Altered Memory Circulating T Follicular Helper-B Cell Interaction in Early Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Roshell; Metcalf, Talibah; Tardif, Virginie; Takata, Hiroshi; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Kroon, Eugene; Colby, Donn J.; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Valcour, Victor; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Trautmann, Lydie; Haddad, Elias K.

    2016-01-01

    The RV254 cohort of HIV-infected very early acute (4thG stage 1 and 2) (stage 1/2) and late acute (4thG stage 3) (stage 3) individuals was used to study T helper- B cell responses in acute HIV infection and the impact of early antiretroviral treatment (ART) on T and B cell function. To investigate this, the function of circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) from this cohort was examined, and cTfh and memory B cell populations were phenotyped. Impaired cTfh cell function was observed in individuals treated in stage 3 when compared to stage 1/2. The cTfh/B cell cocultures showed lower B cell survival and IgG secretion at stage 3 compared to stage 1/2. This coincided with lower IL-10 and increased RANTES and TNF-α suggesting a role for inflammation in altering cTfh and B cell responses. Elevated plasma viral load in stage 3 was found to correlate with decreased cTfh-mediated B cell IgG production indicating a role for increased viremia in cTfh impairment and dysfunctional humoral response. Phenotypic perturbations were also evident in the mature B cell compartment, most notably a decrease in resting memory B cells in stage 3 compared to stage 1/2, coinciding with higher viremia. Our coculture assay also suggested that intrinsic memory B cell defects could contribute to the impaired response despite at a lower level. Overall, cTfh-mediated B cell responses are significantly altered in stage 3 compared to stage 1/2, coinciding with increased inflammation and a reduction in memory B cells. These data suggest that early ART for acutely HIV infected individuals could prevent immune dysregulation while preserving cTfh function and B cell memory. PMID:27463374

  12. Successful Antiretroviral Therapy Delivery and Retention in Care Among Asymptomatic Individuals with High CD4+ T Cell Counts ≥350 cells/uL in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Byonanebye, Dathan M.; Amanyire, Gideon; Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Black, Doug; Kabami, Jane; Chamie, Gabriel; Clark, Tamara D.; Rooney, James F.; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Kamya, Moses R.; Havlir, Diane V.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being rapidly scaled up in Sub-Saharan Africa, including recently to patients with CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/uL. However, concerns persist about adherence and virologic suppression among these asymptomatic, high CD4+ count individuals. Objective To determine the virologic efficacy and safety of ART among asymptomatic HIV-positive Ugandan adults with high CD4+ counts ≥350 cells/uL via a streamlined model of care. Design Prospective non-randomized clinical study (EARLI Study: clinicaltrials.gov NCT#01479634). Setting Prototypic rural Ugandan HIV clinic. Subjects/Participants N=197 asymptomatic ART-naïve adults (age>18) with CD4+ ≥350, without pregnancy or WHO stage 3/4 illness. Interventions ART included tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz, with ritonavir/lopinavir substitution for efavirenz available. Streamlined ART model included nurse-driven visits with physician backup, basic safety laboratory monitoring with HIV viral load (VL), clinician telephone contact, and defaulter tracking. No incentives were provided. Outcomes Undetectable VL (≤400 copies/mL) at 24 and 48 weeks (intention-to-treat [ITT]; missing=detectable), self-reported ART adherence, retention in care, and laboratory/clinical ART toxicities. Results Of 197 patients with CD4>350, median CD4 was 569 (IQR 451-716). Undetectable VL was achieved in 189/197 (95.9%, ITT) and 189/195 (96.9%, ITT) of participants at weeks 24 and 48, respectively. Self-reported adherence was 98% and 192/197 (97%) of patients were retained at week 48. Laboratory adverse events and hospitalizations were rare. Conclusions We demonstrate high virologic suppression, retention, and safety among asymptomatic individuals with CD4>350 in a prototypic Ugandan clinic. Our results challenge current concerns that high CD4+ count individuals lack motivation for ART, and may not achieve sustained virologic suppression. PMID:25022596

  13. Gonadal function and reproductive health in women with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Yalamanchi, Swaytha; Dobs, Adrian; Greenblatt, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Most HIV infections among women occur early in reproductive life, which highlights the importance of understanding the impact of HIV on reproductive functions, and also the potential implications of reproductive function and aging on the course of HIV disease. HIV infection may influence reproductive biology via multiple mechanisms including: potential directs effects on HIV on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes, implications of HIV-related immune dysfunction on reproductive biology, effects of antiretroviral treatments on reproductive functions and the impact of treatment related immune reconstitution on reproductive health. Ovarian function is a crucial component of reproductive biology in women, but standard assessment methods are of limited applicability to women with some chronic diseases, such as HIV. New antiretroviral treatments have the potential to increase the ease of conception planning, and to improve fertility. Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral medications and hormonal contraceptives are potentially significant and merit careful provider attention. While HIV infection is not a major cause of infertility, high level viremia and low CD4 lymphocyte counts are associated with reduced fertility rates. Conception and pregnancy can now be achieved without transmission of HIV to sexual partner or new born, but complications of pregnancy may be more common in HIV infected women than uninfected women. PMID:25169564

  14. Bone health in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Siberry, George K

    2013-01-01

    The long-term impact on bone health of lifelong HIV infection and prolonged ART in growing and developing children is not yet known. Measures of bone health in youth must be interpreted in the context of expected developmental and physiologic changes in bone mass, size, density and strength that occur from fetal through adult life. Low bone mineral density (BMD) appears to be common in perinatally HIV-infected youth, especially outside of high-income settings, but data are limited and interpretation complicated by the need for better pediatric norms. The potential negative effects of tenofovir on BMD and bone mass accrual are of particular concern as this drug may be used more widely in younger children. Emphasizing good nutrition, calcium and vitamin D sufficiency, weight-bearing exercise and avoidance of alcohol and smoking are effective and available approaches to maintain and improve bone health in all settings. More data are needed to inform therapies and monitoring for HIV-infected youth with proven bone fragility. While very limited data suggest lack of marked increase in fracture risk for youth with perinatal HIV infection, the looming concern for these children is that they may fail to attain their expected peak bone mass in early adulthood which could increase their risk for fractures and osteoporosis later in adulthood. PMID:23782476

  15. Liver involvement in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis.

    PubMed

    Palacios, R; Navarro, F; Narankiewicz, D; Marcos, M; Jiménez-Oñate, F; de la Torre, J; Santos, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyse the prevalence of liver involvement and related factors in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis (<2 years). Liver involvement was defined as an elevation above normal ranges of alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase and/or alkaline phosphatase during early syphilis, or doubling of previous levels in patients with liver enzyme elevation before syphilis. We undertook a multicentre study and of the 147 cases, 86.4% were men who had sex with men, and the diagnoses of syphilis and HIV infection were coincident in 48 (32.7%). Liver involvement was detected in 45 (30.6%) and the only related factor was a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titre ≥1/64 (odds ratio 3.76; 95% confidence interval 1.3-10.5; P = 0.012). In conclusion, liver involvement occurs in around one-third of HIV-infected patients with early syphilis and is associated with high RPR levels. Syphilis should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver enzyme elevation in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23467288

  16. Ethanol stimulation of HIV infection of oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Otto O; Xie, Yiming; Campbell, Richard; Chen, Irvin S Y; Pang, Shen

    2004-12-01

    Oral mucosal cells can be infected by exogenous HIV during receptive oral sex or breast-feeding. The risk of oral mucosal infection depends on the infection efficiency of the HIV strains present in the oral cavity, the viral titers, and the defense mechanisms in the oral cavity environment. It is expected that alcohol can weaken the host defense mechanism against HIV infection in the oral cavity. We modified an HIV strain, NL4-3, by inserting the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene and used this virus to infect oral epithelial cells obtained from patients. Various concentrations of ethanol (0%-4%) were added to the infected cells. HIV-infected cells were detected by fluorescent microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that ethanol significantly increases HIV infection of primary oral epithelial cells (POEs). POEs pretreated with 4% ethanol for less than 10 minutes demonstrated 3- to 6-fold higher susceptibility to infection by the CXCR-4 HIV strain NL4-3. Our studies also demonstrated that HIV infects POEs through a gp120-independent mechanism. We tested an HIV CCR5 strain, JRCSF, and also found its infection efficiency to be stimulated by alcohol. Our results indicate that in cell culture conditions, the ranges of concentrations of alcohol that are commercially available are able to stimulate the infection efficiency of HIV in POEs. PMID:15602121

  17. Alcohol abuse and HIV infection: role of DRD2.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Marisela; Khatavkar, Pradnya; Yndart, Adriana; Yoo, Changwon; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Devieux, Jessy G; Malow, Robert M; Nair, Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    According to a survey from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), approximately 53% of HIV-infected patients reported drinking alcohol and 8% were classified as heavy drinkers. The role of alcohol as a risk factor for HIV infection has been widely studied and recent research has found a significant association between heavy alcohol consumption and lower levels of CD4 T cells among HIV-infected alcoholics. Although there is evidence on the role of alcohol as a risk factor for HIV transmission and disease progression, there is a need for population studies to determine the genetic mechanisms that affect alcohol's role in HIV disease progression. One of the mechanisms of interest is the dopaminergic system. To date, the effects of dopamine on HIV neuroimmune pathogenesis are not well understood; however, dopaminergic neural degeneration due to HIV is known to occur by viral invasion into the brain via immune cells, and modulation of dopamine in the CNS may be a common mechanism by which different types of substances of abuse impact HIV disease progression. Although previous studies have shown an association of D(2) dopamine receptor (DRD2) polymorphisms with severity of alcohol dependence, the expression of this allele risk on HIV patients with alcohol dependence has not been systematically explored. In the current study, DRD2 Taq1A and C957T SNP genotyping analyses were performed in 165 HIV-infected alcohol abusers and the results were examined with immune status and CD4 counts. PMID:25053368

  18. Confidentiality and Public Policy Regarding Children with HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Addresses the relationship between law and policy, examining significant gains in establishing legal precedents for protecting the educational rights of children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection in confronting HIV-related discrimination. The article looks at legal principles of confidentiality, disclosure, negligence and potential…

  19. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J.; Jellinger, Robert M.; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  20. Parentification and Maternal HIV Infection: Beneficial Role or Pathological Burden?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Tanya L.

    2007-01-01

    Parentification, along with parenting and child adjustment, were examined in 23 9-through 16-year-old youth from families affected by maternal HIV infection and 20 same-age peers whose mothers were not infected. Children whose mothers were HIV-positive reported to more often engage in parental role behaviors, relative to children of HIV-negative…

  1. The challenges of success: adolescents with perinatal HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    The great success in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV in high resource countries, and now in low resource countries, has changed the face of the HIV epidemic in children from one of near certain mortality to that of a chronic disease. However, these successes pose new challenges as perinatally HIV-infected youth survive into adulthood. Increased survival of HIV-infected children is associated with challenges in maintaining adherence to what is likely life-long therapy, and in selecting successive antiretroviral drug regimens, given the limited availability of pediatric formulations, limitations in pharmacokinetic and safety data of drugs in children, and the development of extensive drug resistance in multi-drug-experienced children. Pediatric HIV care must now focus on morbidity related to long-term HIV infection and its treatment. Survival into adulthood of perinatally HIV-infected youth in high resource countries provides important lessons about how the epidemic will change with increasing access to antiretroviral therapy for children in low resource countries. This series of papers will focus on issues related to management of perinatally infected youth and young adults. PMID:23782484

  2. The challenges of success: adolescents with perinatal HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Cotton, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    The great success in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV in high resource countries, and now in low resource countries, has changed the face of the HIV epidemic in children from one of near certain mortality to that of a chronic disease. However, these successes pose new challenges as perinatally HIV-infected youth survive into adulthood. Increased survival of HIV-infected children is associated with challenges in maintaining adherence to what is likely life-long therapy, and in selecting successive antiretroviral drug regimens, given the limited availability of pediatric formulations, limitations in pharmacokinetic and safety data of drugs in children, and the development of extensive drug resistance in multi-drug-experienced children. Pediatric HIV care must now focus on morbidity related to long-term HIV infection and its treatment. Survival into adulthood of perinatally HIV-infected youth in high resource countries provides important lessons about how the epidemic will change with increasing access to antiretroviral therapy for children in low resource countries. This series of papers will focus on issues related to management of perinatally infected youth and young adults. PMID:23782484

  3. The Experience of Children with Hemophilia and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Children with hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are not a transmission risk to other children, and they can help enact best practices for school attendance by other such children. The article examines the National Hemophilia Foundation's work to promote appropriate inclusion of students with hemophilia and HIV in all…

  4. [HIV infection, gonorrhea and syphilis from Thailand to Norway].

    PubMed

    Aavitsland, P; Nilsen, O

    1999-10-30

    Thailand, a popular tourist destination for Norwegians, is experiencing an increasing epidemic of HIV infection. We used the Norwegian surveillance system for communicable diseases to assess the connections between the Norwegian and Thai epidemics. Before 1999, 1,869 cases of HIV-infection had been reported in Norway. From 1993 to 1998, 1,334 cases of gonorrhoea and 62 cases of syphilis were reported. We studied cases with a Thai patient or source partner and cases acquired in Thailand. 56 (3%) of HIV-infection cases, 64 (5%) of gonorrhoea cases and two (3%) of syphilis cases were connected to Thailand. All the Norwegians who acquired HIV in Thailand were males, with a median age of 39. Eight of them were diagnosed in 1998 as compared to 16 during the previous ten-year period. 21 Thai women and seven males were diagnosed with HIV infection in Norway, eight in 1998 and 20 in the previous ten-year period. The Norwegian HIV epidemic is influenced by the Thai epidemic. Norwegian men are infected in Thailand during holidays. Thai women come with their Norwegian partner to Norway and later discover their HIV status. We recommend raising the awareness of the Thai epidemic among Norwegian tourists. Immigrants to Norway from highly endemic countries should be offered HIV counselling and testing. PMID:10592752

  5. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  6. Pediatric HIV Infection: A Neuropsychological and Educational Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, F. Daniel; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews the effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on the central nervous system and the educational implications of increasing numbers of students with perinatal HIV infection and pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Studies on the relationship between HIV and child development are urged. (Author/DB)

  7. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J; Jellinger, Robert M; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M C

    2016-04-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  8. Evidence of dysregulation of dendritic cells in primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; O'Brien, Meagan; Subedi, Abhignya; Qin, Li; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Elizabeth; Dibben, Oliver; Stacey, Andrea; Fellay, Jacques; Shianna, Kevin V.; Siegal, Frederick; Shodell, Michael; Shah, Kokila; Larsson, Marie; Lifson, Jeffrey; Nadas, Arthur; Marmor, Michael; Hutt, Richard; Margolis, David; Garmon, Donald; Markowitz, Martin; Valentine, Fred; Borrow, Persephone

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of both innate and adaptive immunity against pathogens such as HIV. During the course of HIV infection, blood DC numbers fall substantially. In the present study, we sought to determine how early in HIV infection the reduction occurs and whether the remaining DC subsets maintain functional capacity. We find that both myeloid DC and plasmacytoid DC levels decline very early during acute HIV in-fection. Despite the initial reduction in numbers, those DCs that remain in circulation retain their function and are able to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses, and up-regulate maturation markers plus produce cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists. Notably, DCs from HIV-infected subjects produced significantly higher levels of cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists than DCs from uninfected controls. Further examination of gene expression profiles indicated in vivo activation, either directly or indirectly, of DCs during HIV infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that despite the reduction in circulating DC numbers, those that remain in the blood display hyperfunctionality and implicates a possible role for DCs in promoting chronic immune activation. PMID:20693428

  9. Adherence to Tobacco Dependence Treatment Among HIV-Infected Smokers.

    PubMed

    Browning, Kristine K; Wewers, Mary Ellen; Ferketich, Amy K; Diaz, Philip; Koletar, Susan L; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2016-03-01

    High prevalence of tobacco use and low success in quitting remain significant problems for reducing disease burden among HIV-infected persons. This study's purpose was to examine participant responsiveness and tobacco dependence treatment adherence and their influences on tobacco abstinence among HIV-infected patients. This non-randomized study included HIV-infected smokers 18 years of age or older, who smoked at least 5 cigarettes per day, and had an interest in quitting smoking in the next 30 days. HIV-infected smokers (n = 247) received a 12-week tobacco dependence treatment intervention that included pharmacotherapy and telephone counseling. Younger age and non-White race were associated with lower adherence to pharmacotherapy. Younger age, non-White race, and increased monthly binge drinking were associated with lower adherence to telephone counseling. High participant responsiveness was associated with adherence to pharmacotherapy, counseling, and abstinence. Development and testing of interventions to improve adherence to evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment is warranted. PMID:25855045

  10. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach to Estimate AIDS after HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Apenteng, Ofosuhene O; Ismail, Noor Azina

    2015-01-01

    The spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the resulting acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health concern in many parts of the world, and mathematical models are commonly applied to understand the spread of the HIV epidemic. To understand the spread of HIV and AIDS cases and their parameters in a given population, it is necessary to develop a theoretical framework that takes into account realistic factors. The current study used this framework to assess the interaction between individuals who developed AIDS after HIV infection and individuals who did not develop AIDS after HIV infection (pre-AIDS). We first investigated how probabilistic parameters affect the model in terms of the HIV and AIDS population over a period of time. We observed that there is a critical threshold parameter, R0, which determines the behavior of the model. If R0 ≤ 1, there is a unique disease-free equilibrium; if R0 < 1, the disease dies out; and if R0 > 1, the disease-free equilibrium is unstable. We also show how a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach could be used as a supplement to forecast the numbers of reported HIV and AIDS cases. An approach using a Monte Carlo analysis is illustrated to understand the impact of model-based predictions in light of uncertain parameters on the spread of HIV. Finally, to examine this framework and demonstrate how it works, a case study was performed of reported HIV and AIDS cases from an annual data set in Malaysia, and then we compared how these approaches complement each other. We conclude that HIV disease in Malaysia shows epidemic behavior, especially in the context of understanding and predicting emerging cases of HIV and AIDS. PMID:26147199

  11. Liver Stiffness Is Associated With Monocyte Activation in HIV-Infected Ugandans Without Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, Sarah K.; Grabowski, Mary K.; Ocama, Ponsiano; Kiggundu, Valerian; Bbosa, Francis; Boaz, Iga; Balagopal, Ashwin; Reynolds, Steven J.; Gray, Ronald H.; Serwadda, David; Kirk, Gregory D.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Stabinski, Lara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A high prevalence of liver stiffness, as determined by elevated transient elastography liver stiffness measurement, was previously found in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandans in the absence of chronic viral hepatitis. Given the role of immune activation and microbial translocation in models of liver disease, a shared immune mechanism was hypothesized in the same cohort without other overt causes of liver disease. This study examined whether HIV-related liver stiffness was associated with markers of immune activation or microbial translocation (MT). A retrospective case-control study of subjects with evidence of liver stiffness as defined by a transient elastography stiffness measurement ≥9.3 kPa (cases=133) and normal controls (n=133) from Rakai, Uganda was performed. Cases were matched to controls by age, gender, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) status. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), endotoxin IgM antibody, soluble CD14 (sCD14), C-reactive protein (CRP), and D-dimer levels were measured. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted matched odds ratios (adjMOR) and 95% confidence intervals. Higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 19% increased odds of liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.19, p=0.002). In HIV-infected individuals, higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 54% increased odds of having liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.54, p<0.001); however, the opposite was observed in HIV-negative individuals (adjMOR=0.57, p=0.001). No other biomarker was significantly associated with liver stiffness, and only one subject was found to have detectable LPS. Liver stiffness in HIV-infected Ugandans is associated with increased sCD14 indicative of monocyte activation in the absence of viral hepatitis or microbial translocation, and suggests that HIV may be directly involved in liver disease. PMID:23548102

  12. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach to Estimate AIDS after HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Apenteng, Ofosuhene O.; Ismail, Noor Azina

    2015-01-01

    The spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the resulting acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health concern in many parts of the world, and mathematical models are commonly applied to understand the spread of the HIV epidemic. To understand the spread of HIV and AIDS cases and their parameters in a given population, it is necessary to develop a theoretical framework that takes into account realistic factors. The current study used this framework to assess the interaction between individuals who developed AIDS after HIV infection and individuals who did not develop AIDS after HIV infection (pre-AIDS). We first investigated how probabilistic parameters affect the model in terms of the HIV and AIDS population over a period of time. We observed that there is a critical threshold parameter, R0, which determines the behavior of the model. If R0 ≤ 1, there is a unique disease-free equilibrium; if R0 < 1, the disease dies out; and if R0 > 1, the disease-free equilibrium is unstable. We also show how a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach could be used as a supplement to forecast the numbers of reported HIV and AIDS cases. An approach using a Monte Carlo analysis is illustrated to understand the impact of model-based predictions in light of uncertain parameters on the spread of HIV. Finally, to examine this framework and demonstrate how it works, a case study was performed of reported HIV and AIDS cases from an annual data set in Malaysia, and then we compared how these approaches complement each other. We conclude that HIV disease in Malaysia shows epidemic behavior, especially in the context of understanding and predicting emerging cases of HIV and AIDS. PMID:26147199

  13. Central Nervous System Viral Invasion and Inflammation During Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor; Chalermchai, Thep; Sailasuta, Napapon; Marovich, Mary; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Suttichom, Duanghathai; Suwanwela, Nijasri C.; Jagodzinski, Linda; Michael, Nelson; Spudich, Serena; van Griensven, Frits; de Souza, Mark; Kim, Jerome; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the earliest central nervous system (CNS) events during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is crucial to knowledge of neuropathogenesis, but these have not previously been described in humans. Methods. Twenty individuals who had acute HIV infection (Fiebig stages I-IV), with average 15 days after exposure, underwent clinical neurological, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characterization. Results. HIV RNA was detected in the CSF from 15 of 18 subjects as early as 8 days after estimated HIV transmission. Undetectable CSF levels of HIV (in 3 of 18) was noted during Fiebig stages I, II, and III, with plasma HIV RNA levels of 285 651, 2321, and 81 978 copies/mL, respectively. On average, the CSF HIV RNA level was 2.42 log10 copies/mL lower than that in plasma. There were no cases in which the CSF HIV RNA level exceeded that in plasma. Headache was common during the acute retroviral syndrome (in 11 of 20 subjects), but no other neurological signs or symptoms were seen. Intrathecal immune activation was identified in some subjects with elevated CSF neopterin, monocyte chemotactic protein/CCL2, and interferon γ–induced protein 10/CXCL-10 levels. Brain inflammation was suggested by MRS. Conclusions. CSF HIV RNA was detectable in humans as early as 8 days after exposure. CNS inflammation was apparent by CSF analysis and MRS in some individuals during acute HIV infection. PMID:22551810

  14. Progression of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Berry, J Michael; Jay, Naomi; Cranston, Ross D; Darragh, Teresa M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Welton, Mark L; Palefsky, Joel M

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) compared to the general population. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) are common in HIV-infected MSM and the presumed precursors to anal squamous cell cancer; however, direct progression of HSIL to anal cancer has not been previously demonstrated. The medical records were reviewed of 138 HIV-infected MSM followed up at the University of California, San Francisco, who developed anal canal or perianal squamous cancer between 1997 and 2011. Men were followed up regularly with digital anorectal examination (DARE), high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and HRA-guided biopsy. Although treatment for HSIL and follow-up were recommended, not all were treated and some were lost to follow-up. Prevalent cancer was found in 66 men. Seventy-two HIV-infected MSM developed anal cancer while under observation. In 27 men, anal cancer developed at a previously biopsied site of HSIL. An additional 45 men were not analyzed in this analysis due to inadequate documentation of HSIL in relation to cancer location. Of the 27 men with documented progression to cancer at the site of biopsy-proven HSIL, 20 men progressed from prevalent HSIL identified when first examined and seven men from incident HSIL. Prevalent HSIL progressed to cancer over an average of 57 months compared to 64 months for incident HSIL. Most men were asymptomatic, and cancers were detected by DARE. Anal HSIL has clear potential to progress to anal cancer in HIV-infected MSM. Early diagnosis is facilitated by careful follow-up. Carefully controlled studies evaluating efficacy of screening for and treatment of HSIL to prevent anal cancer are needed. PMID:23934991

  15. Missed Connections: HIV-Infected People Never in Care

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Pamela Morse; Valverde, Eduardo E.; Beer, Linda; Fagan, Jennifer L.; Hart, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    Objective Clinical interventions that lengthen life after HIV infection and significantly reduce transmission could have greater impact if more HIV-diagnosed people received HIV care. We tested a surveillance-based approach to investigating reasons for delayed entry to care. Methods Health department staff in three states and two cities contacted eligible adults diagnosed with HIV four to 24 months previously who had no reported CD4+ lymphocyte (CD4) or viral load (VL) tests. The staff conducted interviews, performed CD4 and VL testing, and provided referrals to HIV medical care. Reported CD4 and VL tests were prospectively monitored to determine if respondents had entered care after the interview. Results Surveillance-based follow-up uncovered problems with reporting CD4 and VL tests, resulting in surveillance improvements. However, reporting problems led to misspent effort locating people who were already in care. Follow-up proved difficult because contact information in surveillance case records was often outdated or incorrect. Of those reached, 37% were in care and 29% refused participation. Information from 132 people interviewed generated ideas for service improvements, such as emphasizing the benefits of early initiation of HIV care, providing coverage eligibility information soon after diagnosis, and leveraging other medical appointments to provide assistance with linkage to HIV care. Conclusions Surveillance-based follow-up of HIV-diagnosed individuals not linked to care provided information to improve both surveillance and linkage services, but was inefficient because of difficulties identifying, locating, and recruiting eligible people. Inefficiencies attributable to missing, incomplete, or inaccurate surveillance records are likely to diminish as data quality is improved through ongoing use. PMID:23450876

  16. Poor Aerobic Fitness May Contribute to Cognitive Decline in HIV-infected Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mapstone, Mark; Hilton, Tiffany N; Yang, Hongmei; Guido, Joseph J; Luque, Amneris E; Hall, William J; Dewhurst, Stephen; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-infected older adult (HOA) community is particularly vulnerable to cognitive impairment. Previous studies in the general older adult population have reported that lower scores on tests of cognitive function often correlate negatively with aerobic fitness [5-7]. HIV-infected individuals have significantly reduced aerobic fitness and physical function compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. Determining important correlates of cognitive ability may be beneficial in not only detecting precursors to future cognitive impairments, but also target areas for interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and aerobic fitness in HIV-infected older adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HOA on antiretroviral therapy (ART) >50 years of age. Domain specific cognitive function was assessed by means of a neuropsychological battery. Aerobic fitness (VO2peak) was assessed using a graded, progressive treadmill test. Thirty-seven HOA on ART (mean±SD: age 59±6 years, BMI 28±5, CD4 663±337 cells/ml, duration since HIV diagnosis 17±7 years; 81% males) completed the cognitive tests. Several domains of cognition were significantly associated with VO2peak by Spearman correlation analysis (p<0.05). By step-wise adjusted regression VO2peak was most frequently and significantly related to many cognitive domains such as verbal and visual memory, visual perception, and language (p<0.05). We found that participants with higher Vo2peak were less likely to have more severe forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) such as mild neurocognitive disorder (OR=0.65; p=0.01) and HIV-associated dementia (OR=0.64; p=0.0006). In HOA and in conclusion, aerobic fitness is related to cognitive performance on various tasks. The likelihood of cognitive impairment increased with lower fitness levels. Therefore, increased fitness may serve an important factor in maintenance of cognition and neural integrity for aging HIV-infected

  17. Albuminuria is associated with elevated acute phase reactants and proinflammatory markers in HIV-infected patients receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    O-charoen, Pichaya; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Keating, Sheila M; Norris, Philip J; Ng, Roland C K; Mitchell, Brooks I; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Chow, Dominic C

    2014-12-01

    Albuminuria among HIV-infected individuals has been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Inflammation has been associated with albuminuria. The pathophysiology of albuminuria in HIV-infected individuals is poorly understood. We investigated the association of albuminuria with inflammatory biomarkers among HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This is a cross-sectional analysis of participants enrolled in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular Cohort. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers were assessed using the Milliplex Human Cardiovascular disease multiplex assays. A random urine sample was collected for albumin measurement. Albuminuria was defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio of ≥30 mg/g. Framingham risk score was calculated and divided into three classes. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were utilized to assess the correlation between plasma inflammatory biomarkers and albuminuria and were adjusted for Framingham risk category. Among 111 HIV-infected patients [median (IQR) age of 52 (46-57) years, 86% male, median (IQR) CD4 count of 489 (341-638) cells/mm(3), 85% with HIV RNA <50 copies/ml], 18 subjects (16.2%) had moderately increased albuminuria (albuminuria range between 30 and 300 mg/g) and 2 subjects (1.8%) had severely increased albuminuria (albuminuria more than 300 mg/g). In multivariable logistic models, sE-selectin, sVCAM-1, CRP, SAA, and SAP remained significantly associated with albuminuria after adjustment of CVD risk factors. This study showed an association between inflammation and albuminuria independent of previously reported risk factors for albuminuria in HIV-infected subjects who were on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Chronic inflammation despite potent antiretroviral treatment may contribute to higher rates of albuminuria among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25205472

  18. Psychological and social problems in HIV infection: interviews with general practitioners in London.

    PubMed

    King, M B

    1989-09-16

    A random sample of 270 general practitioners in London was interviewed to assess current practice and opinions about managing psychological and social problems related to HIV infection. Physicians caring for patients with HIV infection were asked about numbers of patients in their pratice with HIV or AIDS; consultation with third parties such as sexual partners or family; reports to employers and other third parties; terminal care; contact with HIV clinics; testing for HIV infection without consent; and the impact of patients with HIV infection on their practice. All physicians were asked about patients concerned with HIV infection; awareness of other health resources for patients with HIV infection; terminal care; "safer sex" education; confidentiality; interest in AIDS; intravenous drug users as patients; managing homosexual patients; and ethical considerations. King discusses the findings and draws conclusions about primary care of HIV-infected patients in London. PMID:2508884

  19. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. PMID:25331221

  20. Differences between the course of the drug addict's HIV infection and that of other HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gölz, J

    1993-11-01

    Drug addicts have, in general, a less complicated course of HIV infection than homosexual HIV patients. They show fewer opportunistic infections and tumors. But this advantage is lost by unnecessary complications due to their psychic disorders. Their non-compliance and concealment of signs of disease lead to worse outcomes of infections, which could be well-treated or prevented. PMID:8300042

  1. Antibody recognition of Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells by symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Fratus, Alessandra Sampaio Bassi; Cabral, Fernanda Janku; Fotoran, Wesley Luzetti; Medeiros, Márcia Melo; Carlos, Bianca Cechetto; Martha, Rosimeire dalla; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira; Lopes, Stefanie Costa Pinto; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Wunderlich, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In the Amazon Region, there is a virtual absence of severe malaria and few fatal cases of naturally occurring Plasmodium falciparum infections; this presents an intriguing and underexplored area of research. In addition to the rapid access of infected persons to effective treatment, one cause of this phenomenon might be the recognition of cytoadherent variant proteins on the infected red blood cell (IRBC) surface, including the var gene encoded P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1. In order to establish a link between cytoadherence, IRBC surface antibody recognition and the presence or absence of malaria symptoms, we phenotype-selected four Amazonian P. falciparum isolates and the laboratory strain 3D7 for their cytoadherence to CD36 and ICAM1 expressed on CHO cells. We then mapped the dominantly expressed var transcripts and tested whether antibodies from symptomatic or asymptomatic infections showed a differential recognition of the IRBC surface. As controls, the 3D7 lineages expressing severe disease-associated phenotypes were used. We showed that there was no profound difference between the frequency and intensity of antibody recognition of the IRBC-exposed P. falciparum proteins in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic infections. The 3D7 lineages, which expressed severe malaria-associated phenotypes, were strongly recognised by most, but not all plasmas, meaning that the recognition of these phenotypes is frequent in asymptomatic carriers, but is not necessarily a prerequisite to staying free of symptoms. PMID:25099336

  2. Early diagnosis and retention in care of HIV-infected patients through rapid salivary testing: a test-and-treat fast track pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Negri, Silvia; Vidoni, Gian Marino; Gianotti, Nicola; Nozza, Silvia; Schlusnus, Karin; Dorigatti, Fernanda; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and the retention-in-care of individuals diagnosed during six years of salivary HIV testing (EASY-test project). Among those linked-to-care at the Infectious Diseases Department of San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy), the proportion of patients engaged, retained in care and virologically suppressed after the antiretroviral treatment was 96%, 100% and 95.2%, respectively. Results from our study suggest that salivary HIV testing may help bring to light cases of HIV infection otherwise undiagnosed, and thus favour a more rapid and wider reduction of the HIV infection burden at the population level. PMID:26922986

  3. Differential profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity between endocervical and vaginal secretions from women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection: A pilot study☆

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Rhoda; Kraus, Thomas A.; Ding, Jian; Veretennikova, Alina; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Singh, Tricia; Lo, Yungtai; Quayle, Alison J.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is one of the most prevalent bacterial STIs in the USA and worldwide, and women with C. trachomatis infection are at increased risk of acquiring HIV. Because immune activation at the genital mucosa facilitates HIV/SIV infection, C. trachomatis-mediated cytokine induction may contribute to increased HIV transmission in asymptomatic women. To begin to elucidate the mechanisms, we longitudinally analyzed profiles of innate immune factors and HIV infectivity in genital secretions from anatomically specific sites in asymptomatic women during C. trachomatis infection and post-antibiotic treatment. We found higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in endocervical secretions than vaginal secretions. Compared with the convalescent state, G-CSF, IL-1α, and RANTES were elevated in endocervical secretions, IFN-γ and TNF-α were elevated in vaginal secretions, and IFNγ, IL-1β, and MIP1-α were elevated in cervicolavage fluid (CVL), before adjustment of multiple comparisons. Elevated endocervical levels of IP-10 and MCP-1 were associated with the use of hormonal contraception in infected women after successful treatment, suggesting the role of hormonal contraception in inflammation independent of STIs. Importantly, soluble factors found in endocervical secretions during infection enhanced HIV infectivity while no difference in HIV infectivity was found with vaginal secretions or CVL during infection or at convalescence. Taken together, the profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity indicate that the endocervical and vaginal mucosa are immunologically distinct. Our results underscore the importance of considering anatomical site and local sampling methodology when measuring mucosal responses, particularly in the presence of C. trachomatis infection. PMID:23993451

  4. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadlier, C.; O’Dea, S.; Bennett, K.; Dunne, J.; Conlon, N.; Bergin, C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46–2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40–2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22–2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15–2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  5. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40-2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... need treatment. This makes it different from a urinary tract infection that is caused by bacteria. Causes Asymptomatic bacteriuria ... bacteriuria causes no symptoms. The symptoms of a urinary tract infection include burning during urination, an increased urgency to ...

  7. Cytokine and chemokine expression profiles in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulation are altered in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected subjects with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Waruk, Jillian L M; Machuki, Zipporah; Mesa, Christine; Juno, Jennifer A; Anzala, Omu; Sharma, Meenu; Ball, T Blake; Oyugi, Julius; Kiazyk, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects nearly 2 million people annually and is the most common cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. Tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics cater to HIV-uninfected individuals in non-endemic countries, are expensive, slow, and lack sensitivity for those most affected. Patterns of soluble immune markers from Mtb-stimulated immune cells are not well defined in HIV co-infection. We assessed immune differences between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals with active TB utilizing IFNγ-based QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) testing in Nairobi, Kenya. Excess QFT supernatants were used to measure cytokine and chemokine responses by a 17-plex bead array. Mtb/HIV co-infected participants were significantly less likely to be QFT+ (47.2% versus 84.2% in the HIV-uninfected group), and demonstrated lower expression of all cytokines except for IFNα2. Receiver operator characteristic analyses identified IL-1α as a potential marker of co-infection. Among HIV-infected individuals, CD4+ T cell count correlated weakly with the expression of several analytes. Co-expression analysis highlighted differences in immune profiles between the groups. These data suggest that there is a unique and detectable Mtb-specific immune response in co-infection. A better understanding of Mtb immunology can translate into much needed immunodiagnostics with enhanced sensitivity in HIV-infected individuals, facilitating their opportunity to obtain live-saving treatment. PMID:26073895

  8. Barriers and facilitators to dental care among HIV-Infected adults.

    PubMed

    Parish, Carrigan; Siegel, Karolynn; Pereyra, Margaret; Liguori, Terri; Metsch, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Oral health problems can significantly compromise HIV-infected individuals' general health and well-being, yet many of them experience an unmet need for oral care. The barriers and facilitators of obtaining dental care in a sample of HIV-infected adults, all of whom were eligible for Ryan White Part A funding for their treatment, were investigated through qualitative interviews with HIV-positive individuals who had not received dental services in the prior 12 months (n = 44). Identified barriers were as follows: (1) dental anxiety and fear, (2) cumbersome administrative procedures, (3) long waits at the dental office, (4) problem focused care-seeking behavior, (5) transportation difficulties, (6) dentists' reluctance to treat people like them, and (7) psychological issues. Identified facilitating factors were as follows: (1) coverage for dental care, (2) being treated with respect and acceptance, and (3) having an assigned case manager or social worker. Many of the barriers uncovered in this qualitative study can be addressed and overcome by case management services, but other approaches are needed to address the additional psychological and stigma-related factors that are impeding access to oral healthcare in this population. PMID:26336866

  9. A pilot survey of attitudes and knowledge about opioid substitution therapy for HIV-infected prisoners.

    PubMed

    Springer, Sandra A; Bruce, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    A majority of inmates in the state of Connecticut Department of Corrections use opioids or are opioid dependent before incarceration. None of the state's prisons offer opioid substitution therapy other than for detoxification or maintenance therapy for women during pregnancy. On release to the community, most prisoners relapse to drug use and this has been associated with higher recidivism rates, and less adherence to antiretroviral medications for HIV-infected persons. Nationally and internationally, methadone (METH) and buprenorphine (BUP) have been found to decrease relapse to drug use, decrease recidivism rates, improve adherence to antiretroviral medications, decrease HIV-risk taking behaviors, and improve mortality. However, the general knowledge about opioid substitution therapy among correctionalfacility staff has been reported as substandard. This pilot study compiled results of answers to anonymous surveys from 27 individuals who work directly with inmates in a patient-care capacity for the Connecticut Department of Corrections (CT DOC) and CT DOC case-management referral program (Project TLC) in the year 2006. The surveys included questions regarding current attitudes and knowledge about opioid substitution therapy for prisoners. A minority of respondents refer released prisoners with a history of opioid dependency to METH or BUP treatment. The majority of correctional workers and case-management referral workers did not have knowledge about BUP or METH's ability to improve health and decrease HIV risk taking behaviors. This study found that more education of individuals treating and caring for HIV-infected opioid dependent prisoners is needed. PMID:18557164

  10. Maraviroc Reduces Arterial Stiffness in PI-Treated HIV-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Piconi, Stefania; Pocaterra, Daria; Rainone, Veronica; Cossu, Maria; Masetti, Michela; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The Δ32-CCR5 deletion of the CCR5 receptor is protective toward coronary artery pathology and myocardial infarction. Maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist, was recently introduced in the therapy of HIV infection; we evaluated whether this drug could modulate the atherosclerotic burden in aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals who underwent MVC intensification. Thus, the effect of MVC on intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, metabolic parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, and microbial traslocation markers was analyzed in 6 aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals and were compared to those obtained in 9 additional aviremic PI-treated subjects that were enrolled retrospectively from our outpatients cohort. MVC intensification resulted in a significant reduction in intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity and triglycerides compared to baseline. Notably, MVC was also associated with a significant reduction of IL-6, microbial translocation indexes, sICAM and sVCAM; these changes were maintained throughout the 6 months of MVC intensification. No si