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Sample records for atmospheric boundary layer

  1. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  2. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  3. Atmospheric boundary layer over steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil A.; Druzhinin, Oleg; Kandaurov, Alexander A.; Ermakova, Olga S.; Ezhova, Ekaterina V.; Esau, Igor; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-08-01

    Turbulent air-sea interactions coupled with the surface wave dynamics remain a challenging problem. The needs to include this kind of interaction into the coupled environmental, weather and climate models motivate the development of a simplified approximation of the complex and strongly nonlinear interaction processes. This study proposes a quasi-linear model of wind-wave coupling. It formulates the approach and derives the model equations. The model is verified through a set of laboratory (direct measurements of an airflow by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique) and numerical (a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique) experiments. The experiments support the central model assumption that the flow velocity field averaged over an ensemble of turbulent fluctuations is smooth and does not demonstrate flow separation from the crests of the waves. The proposed quasi-linear model correctly recovers the measured characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface.

  4. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  5. Turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, Ronald L.

    1990-05-01

    This conference addressed recent theoretical advancements of turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Activities were centered on the technical sessions of the conference. Sessions addressed clouds and the marine atmospheric boundary layer, field experimental techniques, physical and numerical simulations, transport and diffusion, surface properties, general boundary layer, stratified turbulence and turbulence in complex terrain. A jointly authored poster on an evaluation of the ARAC emergency response models with and without on-site sound detection and ranging systems (sodars) which measure vertical wind profiles was presented. Several scientists commented on our work and some requested further information. In addition, there was a workshop on dispersion around groups of buildings and a tour of Riso National Laboratory. Developments relevant to our work included work on dispersion model evaluation, especially using Monte Carlo random walk techniques, parameterizations of mixing height and turbulence from remote sensing systems such as sodars and radars, and measurements and parameterizations of enhanced turbulence around groups of buildings.

  6. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  7. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  8. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE ARCTIC: WINTERTIME BOUNDARY-LAYER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The wintertime arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated with micro-meteorological and SF6 tracer measurements collected in Prudhoe Bay, AK. he flat, snow-covered tundra surface at this site generates a very small (0.03 cm) surface roughness. he relatively warm maritime ...

  9. Regional scale evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlange, Marc B.; Eichinger, William E.; Albertson, John D.

    1995-01-01

    In this review we briefly summarize some current models of evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and discuss new experimental and computational oppurtunities that may aid our understanding of evaporation at these larger scales. In particular, consideration is given to remote sensing of the atmosphere, computational fluid dynamics and the role numerical models can play in understanding land-atmosphere interactions. These powerful modeling and measurement tools are allowing us to visualize and study spatial and temporal scales previously untouched, thereby increasing the oppurtunities to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere interaction.

  10. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  11. Wind Tunnel Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    To simulate the interaction of large Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in the laboratory, we implement a variant of Counihan's technique [Counihan 1969] in which a combination of a castellated barrier, elliptical vortex generators, and floor roughness elements is used to create an artificial ABL profile in a standard closed loop wind tunnel. To examine the development and formation of the artificial ABL hotwire and SPIV measurements were taken at various downstream locations with changes in wall roughness, wall type, and vortex generator arrangements. It was found possible to generate a boundary layer at Reθ ~106 , with a mean velocity that followed the 1/7 power law of a neutral ABL over rural terrain and longitudinal turbulence intensities and power spectra that compare well with the data obtained for high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layers [Hultmark et al. 2010]. Supported by Hopewell Wind Power Ltd., and the Princeton Grand Challenges Program.

  12. Wind Tunnel Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2012-11-01

    To simulate the interaction of large Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in the laboratory, we implement a variant of Counihan's technique in which a combination of a castellated barrier, elliptical vortex generators, and floor roughness elements is used to create an artificial ABL profile in a standard closed loop wind tunnel. We report hotwire measurements in a plane normal to the flow direction at various downstream positions and free stream velocities to examine the development and formation of the artificial ABL. It was found possible to generate a boundary layer at Reθ ~106 , with a mean velocity that followed the 1/7 power law of a neutral ABL over rural terrain and longitudinal turbulence intensities and power spectra that compare well with the data obtained by Hultmark in 2010 for high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layers. Supported by Hopewell Wind Power Ltd., and the Princeton Grand Challenges Program.

  13. Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Dynamics with Constant Bowen Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporato, Amilcare

    2009-08-01

    Motivated by the observation that the diurnal evolution of sensible and latent heat fluxes tends to maintain a constant Bowen ratio, we derive approximate solutions of the ordinary differential equations of a simplified atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) model. Neglecting the early morning transition, the potential temperature and specific humidity of the mixed layer are found to be linearly related to the ABL height. Similar behaviour is followed by the inversion strengths of temperature and humidity at the top of the ABL. The potential temperature of the mixed layer depends on the entrainment parameter and the free-atmosphere temperature lapse rate, while the specific humidity also depends on the free-atmosphere humidity lapse rate and the Bowen ratio. The temporal dynamics appear only implicitly in the evolution of the height of the boundary layer, which in turn depends on the time-integrated surface sensible heat flux. Studying the limiting behaviour of the Bowen ratio for very low and very large values of net available energy, we also show how the tendency to maintain constant Bowen ratio during midday hours stems from its relative insensitivity to the atmospheric conditions for large values of net available energy. The analytical expression for the diurnal evolution of the ABL obtained with constant Bowen ratio is simple and provides a benchmark for the results of more complex models.

  14. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  15. Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

  16. Behaviour of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, I.; Argentini, S.

    2009-09-01

    The Antarctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer presents characteristics which are substantially different from the mid-latitudes ABLs. On the Antarctic plateau two different extreme situations are observed. During the summer a mixing height develops during the warmer hours of the day although the sensible heat flux is reduced compared to that at mid-latitudes. During the winter a long lived stable boundary layer is continuously present, the residual layer is never observed, consequently the inversion layer is connected at the free atmosphere. To understand the stable ABL process the STABLEDC (Study of the STAble Boundary Layer Environmental at Dome C) experimental field was held at Concordia, the French Italian plateau station at Dome C, during 2005. In the same period the RMO (Routine Measurements Observations) started. The data included turbulence data at the surface, temperature profiles by a microwave profiler (MTP-5P), a mini-sodar and radio-soundings. In this work we will show the results of a comparison of the ABL height at Concordia (3233 m a.s.l) during the summer and the winter using direct measurements and parameterization. The winter ABL height was estimated directly using experimental data (radio-soundings and radiometer temperature and wind velocity profiles) and different methods proposed in literature. The stable ABL height was also estimated using the formulation proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007) for the long-lived stable boundary layer. The correlation of ABL height with the temperature and wind speed is also shown. The summer mixing height was instead estimated by mini-sodar data and compared with the height given by the model suggested by Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) which use as input the turbulence data.

  17. The Saharan atmospheric boundary layer: Turbulence, stratification and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Parker, Douglas J.; Marsham, John H.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Mcquaid, James B.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution large-eddy model simulations, combined with aircraft and radiosonde observations from the Fennec observational campaign are used to describe the vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL). The SABL, probably the deepest dry convective boundary layer on Earth, is crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust, heat, water and momentum in the Sahara, with significant implications for the large-scale Saharan heat low and West African monsoon systems. The daytime SABL has a unique structure, with an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, capped by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion and a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations were initialized with radiosonde data and driven by surface heat flux observations from Fennec supersite-1 at Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria. Aircraft observations are used to validate the processes of interest identified in the model, as well as providing unprecedented detail of the turbulent characteristics of the SABL. Regular radiosondes from BBM during June 2011 are used to generate a climatology of the day-time SABL structure, providing further evidence that the processes identified with the LEM are recurrent features of the real SABL. The model is shown to reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and different tracers are used to illustrate the penetration of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above as well as mixing processes internal to the residual layer. Despite the homogeneous surface fluxes and tracer initialization, the large characteristic length-scale of the turbulent eddies leads to large horizontal changes in boundary layer depth (which control the formation of clouds) and significant heterogeneity in tracer

  18. Atmospheric surface and boundary layers of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Three phases of work were performed: design of and preparation for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2-A); execution of the ABLE 2-A field program; and analysis of the ABLE 2-A data. Three areas of experiment design were dealt with: surface based meteorological measurements; aircraft missions; and project meteorological support. The primary goal was to obtain a good description of the structure of the atmosphere immediately above the rain forest canopy (top of canopy to a few thousand meters), to describe this region during the growing daytime phase of the boundary layer; and to examine the nighttime stratified state. A secondary objective was to examine the role that deep convective storms play in the vertical transport of heat, water vapor, and other trace gases. While significant progress was made, much of the analysis remains to be done.

  19. Problems in the simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows. [natural wind environment in atmospheric boundary layer for aerospace and aeronautical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    The realistic simulation of flow in the atmospheric boundary layers at heights greater than two kilometers is discussed. Information concerning horizontally homogeneous and statistically stationary atmospheric boundary layer flows is presented. The problems related to the incorporation of the information into atmospheric wind simulation programs are analyzed. The information which the meteorologist must acquire in order to provide a basis for improving the simulation of atmospheric boundary flows is explained.

  20. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John S.

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC's new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods calculate the

  1. Interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, G.-T.

    1974-01-01

    The two-layer system of an atmosphere over water bodies is reduced to a single-layer problem. Values of the interfacial quantities, such as the friction velocity, the surface velocity, the angles, alpha and beta, between the surface shear stress and the geostrophic wind velocity and the surface wind velocity, respectively, and the surface roughness, all of which depend upon external parameters, such as the geostrophic wind and stratifications, are obtained. The geostrophic drag coefficient, the geostrophic wind coefficient, and the angles alpha, and beta, of the turbulent flow at the sea-air interface are functions of a dimensionless number, mfG/kg, with S sub 1 and S sub 2 as two free stratification parameters. The surface roughness is uniquely determined from the geostrophic wind rather than from the wind profile in the boundary layer.

  2. Turbulent flux events in a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Roddam; Kumar, S Rudra; Prabhu, A; Kailas, S V

    2007-03-15

    We propose here a novel method of analysing turbulent momentum flux signals. The data for the analysis come from a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer and are taken at a height of 4m above ground corresponding to 1.1 x 10(5) wall units, within the log layer for the mean velocity. The method of analysis involves examining the instantaneous flux profiles that exceed a given threshold, for which an optimum value is found to be 1 s.d. of the flux signal. It is found feasible to identify normalized flux variation signatures separately for positive and negative 'flux events'-the sign being determined by that of the flux itself. Using these signatures, the flux signal is transformed to one of events characterized by the time of occurrence, duration and intensity. It is also found that both the average duration and the average time-interval between successive events are of order 1s, about four orders of magnitude higher than a wall unit in time. This episodic description of the turbulence flux in the time domain enables us to identify separately productive, counter-productive and idle periods (accounting, respectively, for 36, 15 and 49% of the time), taking as criterion the generation of the momentum flux. A 'burstiness' index of 0.72 is found for the data. Comparison with laboratory data indicates higher (/lower) ejection (/sweep) quadrant occupancy but lower (/higher) contributions to flux from the ejection (/sweep) quadrant at the high Reynolds numbers of the atmospheric boundary layer. Possible connections with the concept of active and passive motion in a turbulent boundary layer are briefly discussed. PMID:17244581

  3. Segregation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer - A Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugi, Ralph; Berger, Martina; Zelger, Michael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Rohrer, Franz; Holland, Frank; Lu, Keding; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Sörgel, Matthias; Kramm, Gerhard; Mölders, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Segregation is a well known topic in technical chemistry and means an incomplete mixing of the reactants. Incomplete mixing reduces the rate of reaction which is of utmost importance in technical chemistry but has been payed less attention in atmospheric chemistry. Different observational and modelling studies on chemical reactions in the turbulent and convective atmospheric boundary layer are analysed for the influences of segregation in the systems NO ‑ NO2 ‑ O3 and OH + V OCs (with main focus on isoprene). Also some estimates on reactions like HO2 + NO (an important recycling mechanism for OH) will be given. Especially, different terms of the intensity of segregation IS (correlation coefficients, standard deviations of mixing ratios) are compared and are related to characteristics of the flow regimes, such as mixing conditions and Damköhler numbers. Also influences of fluctuations of actinic fluxes are discussed which influence the mostly photo chemically driven reactions that were investigated.

  4. Vegetation-atmosphere interactions and boundary layer cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Jeffrey Michael

    2000-07-01

    A study of vegetation-atmosphere interactions and boundary layer cumulus clouds (``BLcu'') in terms of seasonal trends (i.e., heat and moisture tendencies) and short-term events (specifically the modification of in situ air masses) is presented. In the northeastern U.S., in response to increasing insolation and sensible heat flux, both the mixed layer height (zi) and lifting condensation level (LCL) peak (~1300 and 1700 m) just before the start of the growing season. With the commencement of transpiration, the Bowen ratio (β) falls abruptly (from greater than 3 to less than 1) as additional moisture is transpired into the boundary layer, and zi and the LCL decrease. By late spring, boundary layer cumulus cloud frequency increases sharply, as the mixed layer approaches a new equilibrium. At Harvard Forest during 1995, afternoon net carbon uptake (Fco2 ) was 52% greater on days with boundary layer cumulus clouds than clear days. For 1996-1998, afternoon Fco2 was also enhanced, especially during dry periods. The same enhancement, albeit reduced, was observed at a northern jack pine site during the BOREAS project, despite very different phenological, hydrological, and climatological regimes. Sixteen frontal sequences affecting the northeastern U.S. were analyzed in terms of local and regional contributions to the temperature and moisture tendency equations. A composite of sequences featuring the daily appearance of BLcu indicates a diminished role for entrainment and other external forcings due to the daily occurrence of a rapid growth phase in ML diurnal evolution subsequent to day 1. From the sequence minimum (day 2) in temperature and moisture, surface flux convergence accounts for about 50% of the overall net moistening and heating of the mixed layer. Model sensitivity tests show that changes in subsidence and γ θν affect ML processes most on day 1; dining subsequent days, the rapid growth phase dominates the ML growth equation, and reduces the impact of these

  5. Nonequilibrium Behavior of the Daytime Atmospheric Boundary Layer, from LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Balaji; Brasseur, James; McCandless, Tyler; Haupt, Sue

    2014-11-01

    LES of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat topography is universally developed as an equilibrium ABL with steady surface heat flux Q0 and steady unidirectional ``geostrophic'' wind vector Vg above a capping inversion, where Vg also defines a spatially uniform transverse mean pressure gradient. The LES approaches a quasiequilibrium state characterized statistically by the ratio of boundary layer depth to Obukhov length scale. In contrast, the true daytime ABL is driven by surface heat flux increases to peak mid-day and drops in the afternoon, and by mesoscale wind vectors Ug that change in magnitude and direction during the day. We study the consequences of mesoscale weather on ABL dynamics by forcing ABL LES with a WRF simulation of the Midwest during 3 days of frontal passage over Kansas. Assuming horizontal homogeneity, we derive the relationship between Ug and Vg and study ABL response with systematic variation in Q0 and the magnitude and direction of Ug. Interesting results include: (1) asymmetry nonequilibrium diurnal response of the ABL; (2) directional changes in surface layer winds relevant to wind turbine function; and (3) changes in ABL stability state arising solely from changes in the direction of Ug. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by NSF/XSEDE.

  6. Incorporation of the planetary boundary layer in atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Wyngaard, John; Pielke, Roger; Krueger, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: perspectives on planetary boundary layer (PBL) measurements; current problems of PBL parameterization in mesoscale models; and convective cloud-PBL interactions.

  7. Turbulence in a convective marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Atlas, D.; Yeh, E.-N.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and kinetic energy budget of turbulence in the convective marine atmospheric boundary layer as observed by aircraft during a cold air outbreak have been studied using mixed layer scaling. The results are significantly different from those of previous studies under conditions closer to free convection. The normalized turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport are about twice those found during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX). This implies that for a given surface heating the present case is dynamically more active. The difference is mainly due to the greater importance of wind shear in the present case. This case is closer to the roll vortex regime, whereas AMTEX observed mesoscale cellular convection which is closer to free convection. Shear generation is found to provide a significant energy source, in addition to buoyancy production, to maintain a larger normalized turbulent kinetic energy and to balance a larger normalized dissipation. The interaction between turbulent pressure and divergence (i.e., pressure scrambling) is also found to transfer energy from the vertical to the horizontal components, and is expected to be stronger in roll vortices than in m esoscale cells. The sensible heat flux is found to fit well with a linear vertical profile in a clear or subcloud planetary boundary layer (PBL), in good agreement with the results of Lenschow et al., (1980). The heat flux ratio between the PBL top and the surface, derived from the linear fitted curve, is approximately -0.14, in good agreement with that derived from the lidar data for the same case. Near the PBL top, the heat flux profiles are consistent with those of Deardoff (1979) and Deardorff et al. (1980).

  8. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures. PMID:23736241

  9. Urban atmospheric boundary layer height by aerosol lidar and ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. H.; Park, M. S.; Park, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of urban atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height on January, April, July and October 2014 using the gradient method by a ceilometer with a wavelength of 910 nm and an aerosol lidar with a wavelength of 532 and 1064 nm installed at two urban sites (Gwanghwamun and Jungnang) in Korea are analyzed. The Gwanghwamun site located at urban commercial area is 10 km apart from the Jungnang site located at urban residential area. The ABL height is determined by a height with a strong gradient of vertical backscatter intensity. It is found that the ABL height at both sites show a similar pattern and has a strong diurnal variation with a steep increase at 09-12 KST with a maximum in the late afternoon. And it is not determined clearly and the correlation between the ABL height by a ceilometer and that by an aerosol lidar is relatively low in case of high PM10 concentration such as Asian dust, haze and smog. Uncertainty of ABL height is also found to be strongly affected by the weather phenomena such as rain, haze or fog.

  10. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  11. Simultaneous profiling of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M.; Reuder, J.

    2009-04-01

    The structure of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (AABL) and the heat and moisture fluxes between relatively warm water and cold air above non-sea-ice-covered water (such as fjords, leads and polynyas) are of great importance for the sensitive Arctic climate system. So far, such processes are not sufficiently resolved in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. Especially for regions with complex topography as the Svalbard mountains and fjords the state and diurnal evolution of the AABL is not well known yet. Knowledge can be gained by novel and flexible measurement techniques such as the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV can perform vertical profiles as well as horizontal surveys of the mean meteorological parameters: temperature, relative humidity, pressure and wind. A corresponding UAV called Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) has been developed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Bergen in cooperation with Müller Engineering (www.pfump.org) and the Paparazzi Project (http://paparazzi.enac.fr). SUMO will be used under Arctic conditions in March/April 2009. This time the special purpose will be to send two SUMOs simultaneously on mission; one over the ice and snow-covered land surface and the other one above the open water of Isfjorden. This will be the first step of future multiple UAV operations in so called "swarms" or "flocks". With this, corresponding measurements of the diurnal evolution of the AABL can be achieved with minimum technical efforts and costs.

  12. FLUID MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Study of convective boundary layer (CBL) processes has depended largely upon laboratory analogs for many years. The pioneering work of Willis and Deardorff (1974) and some 35 subsequent papers by the same authors showed that much useful research could be accomplished with a re...

  13. Coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling: effects on atmospheric boundary layer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, F. K.; Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Daniels, M. H.; Rihani, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Newly-developed coupled land-atmosphere models which incorporate both subsurface and atmospheric moisture dynamics have the potential to change our understanding of the hydrologic cycle. This presentation describes the effects of coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling on simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer. Both field observations and simulations indicate strong sensitivity of atmospheric dynamics to land-surface conditions, in particular surface soil moisture. Simulations of atmospheric flow in Owens Valley (California) and in the Riviera Valley (Switzerland) show strong sensitivity to land-surface conditions, thus motivating the need for more accurate representations of soil moisture. In addition to influences from weather and seasonal changes, soil moisture dynamics respond to diurnal heat fluxes on the land surface. Using our new fully-coupled groundwater-atmosphere model, we have demonstrated correlations of soil moisture and land-surface heat fluxes with groundwater fluctuations on short, diurnal time scales. By explicitly calculating groundwater dynamics for our domain of interest, we are able to produce realistic time- and space-varying soil moisture distributions that naturally correspond to variations in topography and surface evaporation. Simulations in idealized and real watersheds are shown to illustrate these effects. The observed variations in surface moisture distribution have large impacts on the moisture and temperature structure in the atmosphere, leading to changes in boundary layer depth and convective motions as compared to standard soil moisture representations. Our coupled model framework will allow detailed investigation of the complex cycle of land-atmosphere processes affecting moisture distributions in the subsurface and the atmosphere.

  14. Simultaneous profiling of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M.; Reuder, J.

    2009-09-01

    The structure of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (AABL) and the heat and moisture fluxes between relatively warm water and cold air above non-sea-ice-covered water (such as fjords, leads and polynyas) are of great importance for the sensitive Arctic climate system (e.g. Andreas and Cash, 1999). So far, such processes are not sufficiently resolved in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models (e.g. Tjernström et al., 2005). Especially for regions with complex topography as the Svalbard mountains and fjords the state and diurnal evolution of the AABL is not well known yet. Knowledge can be gained by novel and flexible measurement techniques such as the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV can perform vertical profiles as well as horizontal surveys of the mean meteorological parameters: temperature, relative humidity, pressure and wind. A corresponding UAV, called Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO), has been developed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Bergen in cooperation with Müller Engineering (www.pfump.org) and the Paparazzi Project (http://paparazzi.enac.fr). SUMO has been used under Arctic conditions at Longyear airport, Spitsbergen in March/April 2009. Besides vertical profiles up to 1500 m and horizontal surveys at flight levels of 100 and 200 m, SUMO could measure vertical profiles for the first time simultaneously in a horizontal distance of 1 km; one over the ice and snow-covered land surface and the other one above the open water of Isfjorden. This has been the first step of future multiple UAV operations in so called "swarms” or "flocks”. With this, corresponding measurements of the diurnal evolution of the AABL can be achieved with minimum technical efforts and costs. In addition, the Advanced Research Weather Forecasting model (AR-WRF version 3.1) has been run in high resolution (grid size: 1 km). First results of a sensitivity study where ABL schemes have been tested and compared with

  15. One-dimensional simulation of temperature and moisture in atmospheric and soil boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, R. D.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    Meteorologists are interested in modeling the vertical flow of heat and moisture through the soil in order to better simulate the vertical and temporal variations of the atmospheric boundary layer. The one dimensional planetary boundary layer model of is modified by the addition of transport equations to be solved by a finite difference technique to predict soil moisture.

  16. Wind farm performance in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers with varying inversion strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In this study we consider large wind farms in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In large wind farms the energy extracted by the turbines is dominated by downward vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from the airflow above the farm. However, atmospheric boundary layers are almost always capped by an inversion layer which slows down the entrainment rate and counteracts boundary layer growth. In a suite of large eddy simulations the effect of the strength of the capping inversion on the boundary layer and on the performance of a large wind farm is investigated. For simulations with and without wind turbines the results indicate that the boundary layer growth is effectively limited by the capping inversion and that the entrainment rate depends strongly on the inversion strength. The power output of wind farms is shown to decrease for increasing inversions.

  17. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Modeling for Combined Meteorology and Air Quality Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric Eulerian grid models for mesoscale and larger applications require sub-grid models for turbulent vertical exchange processes, particularly within the Planetary Boundary Layer (PSL). In combined meteorology and air quality modeling systems consistent PSL modeling of wi...

  18. Dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer during the 1980 total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric boundary layer experiment was conducted at Raichur, India to study the variations in the surface shear stress, heat flux and the meteorological processes that take place during a total solar eclipse. Interesting results were observed regarding the evolution of the planetary boundary layer. Changes in atmospheric stability from unstable to stable to unstable were observed during different phases of the eclipse. Downward propagation of negative heat flux associated with decreasing scales of convective eddies was also observed during the eclipse.

  19. Wind sensing in an atmospheric boundary layer by means of micropulse coherent Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, V. A.; Smalikho, I. N.

    2016-07-01

    An algorithm is developed and computer simulation of wind sensing by means of micropulse coherent Doppler lidars (CDLs) in the atmospheric boundary layer is conducted for low values of the signalto- noise (SNR) ratio. The accuracy of lidar wind measurements is studied numerically for parameters of micropulse Stream Line CDLs. Optimal parameters of the measurements and processing data obtained at low SNR, which allow reconstructing vertical profiles of the wind velocity vector with required accuracy within an entire atmospheric boundary layer, are determined.

  20. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  1. BIOGENIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, the state of the science ...

  2. Analytical damped-oscillator models for unsteady atmospheric boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical flows are dynamical systems that are evolving nonlinearly with time. Non-stationary shear and buoyancy forces are the main sources that drive the unsteadiness of such flows. However, due to their inherent complexity, most previous studies focused on steady-state conditions. In these boundary layers, the pressure gradient, buoyancy, Coriolis, and friction forces interact. The mean PDEs governing the unsteady version of the problem, which emerges when these forces are not in equilibrium, are solvable only for a limited set of forcing variability modes, and the resulting solutions are intricate and difficult to interpret. Here we derive a simpler physical model that reduces the governing RANS equations into a first-order ODE with non-constant coefficients. The origin of the non-stationarity of turbulence can be buoyant stabilization/destabilization and/or unsteady pressure gradient. The reduced model is straightforward and solvable for arbitrary turbulent viscosity variability, and it captures LES results for linearly variable buoyancy and pressure gradient pretty well. The suggested model is thus general and will be useful for elucidating some features of the diurnal cycle, for short-term wind forecast, and in meteorological applications. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752.

  3. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  4. Horton, pipe hydraulics, and the atmospheric boundary layer (The Robert E. Horton Memorial Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1993-01-01

    The early stages of Horton's scientific career which provided the opportunity and stimulus to delve into the origins of some contemporary concepts on the atmospheric boundary layer are reviewed. The study of Saph and Schoder provided basis for the experimental verification and validation of similarity by Blasius, Staton and Pannel, and for the subsequent developments that led to the present understanding of the turbulent boundary layer. Particular attention is given to incorporation of similarity and scaling in the analysis of turbulent flow.

  5. Observations of Wind Profile of Marine Atmosphere Boundary Layer by Shipborne Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Kailin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system is so good as to prove the feasibility of the marine atmosphere boundary layer detection. A ship-mounted Coherent Doppler lidar was used to measure the wind profile and vertical velocity in the boundary layer over the Yellow sea in 2014. Furthermore, for the purpose of reducing the impact of vibration during movement and correcting the LOS velocity, the paper introduces the attitude correction algorithm and comparison results.

  6. Modeling large wind farms in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers under varying initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers (ABL) are frequently capped by an inversion layer limiting the entrainment rate and boundary layer growth. Commonly used analytical models state that the entrainment rate is inversely proportional to the inversion strength. The height of the inversion turns out to be a second important parameter. Conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers (CNBL) are ABLs with zero surface heat flux developing against a stratified free atmosphere. In this regime the inversion-filling process is merely driven by the downward heat flux at the inversion base. As a result, CNBLs are strongly dependent on the heating history of the boundary layer and strong inversions will fail to erode during the course of the day. In case of large wind farms, the power output of the farm inside a CNBL will depend on the height and strength of the inversion above the boundary layer. On the other hand, increased turbulence levels induced by wind farms may partially undermine the rigid lid effect of the capping inversion, enhance vertical entrainment of air into the farm, and increase boundary layer growth. A suite of large eddy simulations (LES) is performed to investigate the effect of the capping inversion on the conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer and on the wind farm performance under varying initial conditions. For these simulations our in-house pseudo-spectral LES code SP-Wind is used. The wind turbines are modelled using a non-rotating actuator disk method. In the absence of wind farms, we find that a decrease in inversion strength corresponds to a decrease in the geostrophic angle and an increase in entrainment rate and geostrophic drag. Placing the initial inversion base at higher altitudes further reduces the effect of the capping inversion on the boundary layer. The inversion can be fully neglected once it is situated above the equilibrium height that a truly neutral boundary layer would attain under the same external conditions such as

  7. Measurements and Parametrizations of the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Height at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, Ilaria; Argentini, Stefania; Petenko, Igor; Sozzi, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    An experimental campaign, Study of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Environmental at Dome C, was held during 2005 at the French-Italian station of Concordia at Dome C. Ground-based remote sensors, as well as in situ instrumentation, were used during the experimental campaign. The measurements allowed the direct estimation of the polar atmospheric boundary-layer height and the test of several parametrizations for the unstable and stable boundary layers. During the months of January and February, weak convection was observed while, during the polar night, a long-lived stable boundary layer occurred continuously. Under unstable stratification the mixing-layer height was determined using the sodar backscattered echoes and potential temperature profiles. The two estimations are highly correlated, with the mixing height ranging between 30 and 350 m. A simple prognostic one-dimensional model was used to estimate the convective mixing-layer height, with the correlation coefficient between observations and model results being 0.66. The boundary-layer height under stable conditions was estimated from radiosounding profiles as the height where the critical Richardson number is reached; values between 10 and 150 m were found. A visual inspection of potential temperature profiles was also used as further confirmation of the experimental height; the results of the two methods are in good agreement. Six parametrizations from the literature for the stable boundary-layer height were tested. Only the parametrization that considers the long-lived stable boundary layer and takes into account the interaction of the stable layer with the free atmosphere is in agreement with the observations.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  9. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  10. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  12. Measurements of atmospheric hydrocarbons and biogenic emission fluxes in the Amazon boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, P. R.; Greenberg, J. P.; Westberg, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric mixing ratios of methane, C2-C10 hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were measured over the Amazon tropical forest near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, in July and August 1985. The measurements, consisting mostly of altitude profiles of these gases, were all made within the atmospheric boundary layer up to an altitude of 1000 m above ground level. Data characterize the diurnal hydrocarbon composition of the boundary layer. Biogenic emissions of isoprene control hydroxyl radical concentrations over the forest. Biogenic emission fluxes of isoprene and terpenes are estimated to be 25,000 micrograms/sq m per day and 5600 micrograms/sq m per day, respectively. This isoprene emission is equivalent to 2 percent of the net primary productivity of the tropical forest. Atmospheric oxidation of biogenic isoprene and terpenes emissions from the Amazon forest may account for daily increases of 8-13 ppb for carbon monoxide in the planetary boundary layer.

  13. Temporal Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Community Composition in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Fierer, N.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for significant microbial influences on atmospheric chemistry, cloud condensation, and ice nuclei concentrations, with known health impacts, yet we have a limited understanding of the types, abundances, and spatiotemporal dynamics of bacteria and fungi in the atmosphere. Here we use culture-independent molecular approaches, including targeted gene sequencing and quantitative PCR, to characterize bacterial and fungal community composition and abundance in the atmospheric boundary layer. We present results from 32 air samples, collected via vacuum filtration at 10 m and 250 m on the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower (Erie, CO) between November 2013 and April 2014. Samples were collected at night, and each sample was integrated over consecutive nights for approximately two weeks. Significant temporal shifts in bacterial and fungal community composition were observed over the course of the study, corresponding to changing bacterial and fungal concentrations. Within the same sampling time periods, bacterial and fungal communities from the near-surface atmosphere (10 m) were generally similar to those aloft (250 m), although coupled temporal and altitudinal effects were observed in some cases, particularly for fungi. Overall, our results indicate that bacterial and fungal communities exhibit minimal vertical stratification throughout the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer but show a high degree of variability on two-week timescales. This study paves the way for further research into the connections between boundary layer microbiology, atmospheric dynamics, emissions, and local meteorology.

  14. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  15. Dynamic Turbulence Modelling in Large-eddy Simulations of the Cloud-topped Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Mansour, N. N.; Ackerman, A. S.; Stevens, D. E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of large eddy simulation, or LES, to study the atmospheric boundary layer dates back to the early 1970s when Deardor (1972) used a three-dimensional simulation to determine velocity and temperature scales in the convective boundary layer. In 1974 he applied LES to the problem of mixing layer entrainment (Deardor 1974) and in 1980 to the cloud-topped boundary layer (Deardor 1980b). Since that time the LES approach has been applied to atmospheric boundary layer problems by numerous authors. While LES has been shown to be relatively robust for simple cases such as a clear, convective boundary layer (Mason 1989), simulation of the cloud-topped boundary layer has proved more of a challenge. The combination of small length scales and anisotropic turbulence coupled with cloud microphysics and radiation effects places a heavy burden on the turbulence model, especially in the cloud-top region. Consequently, over the past few decades considerable effort has been devoted to developing turbulence models that are better able to parameterize these processes. Much of this work has involved taking parameterizations developed for neutral boundary layers and deriving corrections to account for buoyancy effects associated with the background stratification and local buoyancy sources due to radiative and latent heat transfer within the cloud (see Lilly 1962; Deardor 1980a; Mason 1989; MacVean & Mason 1990, for example). In this paper we hope to contribute to this effort by presenting a number of turbulence models in which the model coefficients are calculated dynamically during the simulation rather than being prescribed a priori.

  16. Regional-scale evaluation of a land surface scheme from atmospheric boundary layer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noilhan, J.; Donier, S.; LacarrèRe, P.; Sarrat, C.; Le Moigne, P.

    2011-01-01

    The study describes an evaluation of three configurations of the Interactions Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface scheme fully coupled with the Meso-NH mesoscale atmospheric model. The ability of the modeling system to correctly reproduce the screen-level variables as well as the boundary layer characteristics is examined for more than 30 clear convective days monitored during the CERES 2005 and 2007 field campaigns. For the horizontal resolution considered (8 km), this study shows that the boundary layer characteristics and the low-level variables are better simulated when the subgrid-scale surface process variability is simulated explicitly using the so-called "tiling method." An additional improvement is brought when the CO2 diurnal cycle is used interactively because of the physical link between the stomatal conductance used both for CO2 assimilation and plant transpiration. The parameterization of this link between CO2 and evaporation fluxes improves the simulation of the Bowen ratio and therefore of the atmospheric boundary layer. The last part of the paper discusses the realism of the simulated regional field of CO2 when the carbon configuration is activated in the mesoscale model. Large regional variability of CO2 within the atmospheric boundary layer is found in response to the spatial and seasonal variability of CO2 surface fluxes with respect to the three main land covers in the area: pine forest, extensive winter (wheat), and summer (maize) crops.

  17. Approximate analytical solution to diurnal atmospheric boundary-layer growth under well-watered conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The system of governing equations of a simplified slab model of the uniformly-mixed, purely convective, diurnal atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is shown to allow immediate solutions for the potential temperature and specific humidity as functions of the ABL height and net radiation when expressed i...

  18. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  19. Pilot project of measuring and computing system for mesoscale monitoring of atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, V. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Telminov, A. E.; Komarov, A. I.; Kobzev, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Conception of design of measuring and computing system for monitoring atmospheric boundary layer is proposed. The system includes: stationary measuring complex consisting of four multiple-elevation ultrasonic weather stations and mobile measuring complex consisting of transportable weather station, touch probing system of weather data profile based on unmanned aerial vehicle and also Raman scattering gas analyzer, and new modification mercury gas analyzer.

  20. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer for wind energy and wind engineering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W6.0m, H2.7m, L=72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL): the stable, unstable, and neutral ABL. The neutral ABL is characterized by a zero potential temperature gradient, which is readily achieved in the FPF by operating when air and floor temperatures are close to equal. The stable and unstable ABLs have positive and negative vertical temperature gradients, respectively, which are more difficult to simulate without direct control of air or test section floor temperature. The test section floor is a 10 inch thick concrete cement slab and has significant thermal mass. When combined with the diurnal temperature variation of the ambient air, it is possible to achieve vertical temperature gradients in the test section, and produce weakly stable or weakly unstable boundary layer. Achievable Richardson numbers and Obukhov lengths are estimated. The different boundary layer profiles were measured, and compared to theoretical atmospheric models. Supported by UNH Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research SURF.

  1. Effects of turbulent dispersion of atmospheric balance motions of planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shikuo; Huang, Wei; Rong, Pingping

    1992-06-01

    New Reynolds’ mean momentum equations including both turbulent viscosity and dispersion are used to analyze atmospheric balance motions of the planetary boundary layer. It is pointed out that turbulent dispersion with γ 0 will increase depth of Ekman layer, reduce wind velocity in Ekman layer and produce a more satisfactory Ekman spiral lines fit the observed wind hodograph. The wind profile in the surface layer including turbulent dispersion is still logarithmic but the von Karman constant k is replaced by k 1 = √ 1 — k/2, the wind increases a little more rapidly with height.

  2. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Mishra, S.; Carney, M.; Jacobsen, E. P.; Wharton, Sonia; Newsom, Rob K.

    2015-10-23

    This paper presents an overview of the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE), which included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was conducted as a collaborative effort between the University of Oklahoma (OU), the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the ARM program. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. The main objective of LABLE was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrain using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques. Several instruments from OU and LLNL were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper provides an overview of the experiment including i) instruments deployed, ii) sampling strategies, iii) parameters observed, and iv) student involvement. To illustrate these components, the presented results focus on one particular aspect of LABLE, namely the study of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation and structure of nocturnal low-level jets. During LABLE, low-level jets were frequently observed and they often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages.

  3. The structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer as revealed by lidar and Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Doviak, R. J.

    1985-02-01

    Results on the structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer based on the analyses of data from the instrumented NSSL-KTVY tower, airborne Doppler lidar, and ground-based Doppler radars are presented. The vertically averaged wind over the boundary layer was found to be insensitive to baroclinicity, supporting the hypothesis of Arya and Wyngaard (1975). The computed momentum flux profiles were affected by baroclinicity. Horizontal wind spectra from lidar, radar, and tower data compared well with each other both in shape and magnitude. A consistent peak found near 4 km in all the computed spectra might have been caused by horizontally symmetric cells with horizontal wavelength 4 times the boundary-layer height as shown in Kuettner (1971) for the case of weak wind shear.

  4. The structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer as revealed by lidar and Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Doviak, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer based on the analyses of data from the instrumented NSSL-KTVY tower, airborne Doppler lidar, and ground-based Doppler radars are presented. The vertically averaged wind over the boundary layer was found to be insensitive to baroclinicity, supporting the hypothesis of Arya and Wyngaard (1975). The computed momentum flux profiles were affected by baroclinicity. Horizontal wind spectra from lidar, radar, and tower data compared well with each other both in shape and magnitude. A consistent peak found near 4 km in all the computed spectra might have been caused by horizontally symmetric cells with horizontal wavelength 4 times the boundary-layer height as shown in Kuettner (1971) for the case of weak wind shear.

  5. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Stephen; McCabe, Matthew; Griffiths, Alan; Wang, Lixin

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  6. Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Stuart; Hacker, Jorg M.; Cole, Jason N.; Hare, Jeffrey; Long, Charles N.; Reynolds, R. M.

    2007-03-01

    Nauru, a small island in the tropical pacific, generates plumes of clouds that may grow to several hundred km length. This study uses observations to examine the mesoscale disturbance of the marine atmospheric boundary layer by the island that produces these cloud streets. Observations of the surface layer were made from two ships in the vicinity of Nauru and from instruments on the island. The structure of the atmospheric boundary layer over the island was investigated using aircraft flights. Cloud production over Nauru was examined using remote sensing instruments. During the day the island surface layer was warmer than the marine surface layer and wind speed was lower than over the ocean. Surface heating forced the growth of a thermal internal boundary layer, above which a street of cumulus clouds formed. The production of clouds resulted in reduced downwelling shortwave irradiance at the island surface. A plume of warm-dry air was observed over the island which extended 15 – 20 km downwind.

  7. Implementation of a convective atmospheric boundary layer scheme in a tropospheric chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-Y.; Pyle, J. A.; Sanderson, M. G.; Bridgeman, C.

    1999-10-01

    A convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) scheme for the transport of trace gases in the lower troposphere has been implemented from the Community Climate Model, Version 2 [Hack et al., 1993] into a tropospheric chemistry transport model [Wang, 1998]. The atmospheric boundary layer scheme includes the calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and land surface temperature and has a specified annual variation of sea surface temperature. The calculated diurnal variation of the height of the boundary layer is similar to the results of Troen and Mahrt [1986] and is in a good agreement with Holtslag and Boville [1993]. The modeled height of the boundary layer shows a seasonal shift between land and sea in the Northern Hemisphere. In summer (June-July-August), the height of the boundary layer is deeper over land (850-2250 m) and shallower over sea (50-850 m); while in winter (December-January-February), it is shallower over land (50-850 m) and deeper over sea (850-2850 m). The coupled ABL-chemical transport model is verified against measurements of radon 222 and methane. Comparison of the coupled model with a non-ABL model indicates significant differences between these model simulations and a better agreement between the coupled model and measurements. There is a significant effect on the trace gas distribution when the ABL model is compared with the non-ABL schemes. For example, the ABL scheme shows more O3 transported from the middle troposphere down to the surface, while more CO is pumped up from the surface into the middle troposphere. The seasonal cycle of modeled CH4 is significantly improved with the inclusion of the new ABL scheme, especially in regions which are not remote from methane sources.

  8. Sea ice edge position impact on the atmospheric boundary layer temperature structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavina, Elena; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Processes happening in the Arctic region nowadays strongly influence global climate system; the polar amplification effect can be considered one of the main indicators of ongoing changes. Dramatic increase in amount of ice-free areas in the Arctic Ocean, which took place in 2000s, is one of the most significant examples of climate system dynamic in polar region. High amplitude of changes in Arctic climate, both observed and predicted, and existing inaccuracies of climate and weather forecasting models, enforce the development of a more accurate one. It is essential to understand the physics of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean in the Northern Polar area (particularly in boundary layer of the atmosphere) to improve the models. Ice conditions have a great influence on the atmospheric boundary layer in the Arctic. Sea ice inhibits the heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean water during the polar winter, while the heat exchange above the ice-free areas increases rapidly. Due to those significant temperature fluctuations, turbulence of heat fluxes grows greatly. The most intensive interaction takes place at marginal ice zones, especially in case of the cold outbreak - intrusion of cooled air mass from the ice to free water area. Still, thermal structure and dynamic of the atmosphere boundary layer are not researched and described thoroughly enough. Single radio sounding observations from the planes being done, bur they do not provide high-resolution data which is necessary for study. This research is based on continuous atmosphere boundary layer temperature and sea ice observation collected in the Arctic Ocean during the two NABOS expeditions in August and September in 2013 and 2015, as well as on ice conditions satellite data (NASA TEAM 2 and VASIA 2 data processing). Atmosphere temperature data has been obtained with Meteorological Temperature Profiler MTP-5 (ATTEX, Russia). It is a passive radiometer, which provides continuous data of atmospheric

  9. Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Dynamics and the Constancy of the Bowen Ratio (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporato, A.

    2009-12-01

    The diurnal evolution of sensible and latent heat fluxes tends to maintain a constant Bowen ratio, at least for the central part of the day. Using the solutions of the ordinary differential equations of a simplified atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) model, we find that neglecting the early morning transition the potential temperature and specific humidity of the mixed layer tend to be linearly related to the ABL height. Similar behavior is followed by the inversion strengths of temperature and humidity at the top of the ABL. The potential temperature of the mixed layer depends on the entrainment parameter and the free-atmosphere temperature lapse rate, while the specific humidity also depends on the free-atmosphere humidity lapse rate and the Bowen ratio. The temporal dynamics appear only implicitly in the evolution of the height of the boundary layer, which in turn depends on the time-integrated surface sensible heat flux. Studying the limiting behavior of the Bowen ratio for very low and very large values of net available energy, we also show how the tendency to maintain constant Bowen ratio during midday hours stems from its relative insensitivity to the atmospheric conditions for large values of net available energy. The analytical expression for the diurnal evolution of the ABL obtained with constant Bowen ratio is simple and provides a benchmark for the results of more complex models.

  10. Observed Changes in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Properties at Memphis International Airport During August 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity Program, Langley Research Center embarked on a series of field measurements of wake vortex characteristics and associated atmospheric boundary layer properties. One measurement period was at the Memphis International Airport in August 1995. Atmospheric temperature, humidity, winds, turbulence, radiation, and soil properties were measured from a variety of sensor systems and platforms including sodars, profilers, aircraft and towers. This research focused on: (1) changes that occurred in tower data during sunrise and sunset transitions, (2) vertical variation of temperature and cross-head winds at selected times utilizing combinations of sensors, and (3) changes measured by an OV-10 aircraft during approaches and level flights. Significant but not unusual changes are documented and discussed in terms of expected boundary layer behavior. Questions on measurement and prediction of these changes from existing and near-term capabilities are discussed in the context of a future Aircraft Vortex Spacing System.

  11. Study of the evening transition to the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer: statistical analysis and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Viana, Samuel; Maqueda, Gregorio; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Turbulence is probably the most important feature dealing with the diffusion of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer. The main characteristics of turbulence are governed, apart from synoptic conditions, by the daily cycle of the Earth surface heating and cooling, so that, simplifying, two configurations are often found: convective and stable. The transition from a diurnal convective boundary layer to a typically stable nocturnal one is not still well understood (Edwards, 2009). Different micrometeorological conditions at sunset or a few hours previously may be critical for the establishment of a strong surface-based stability or a weak one, even for similar synoptic conditions. This work focuses on the characterization of the evening transition which takes place at the atmospheric boundary layer, considering the temporal interval 17.00-23.00 GMT. The methodology includes looking for some relations between meteorological variables, turbulent parameters and particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) concentrations measured by a GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365). Observational data (Summer 2009) is provided from permanent instrumentation at the Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere (CIBA) in Valladolid (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000). A 10m height mast equipped with temperature, wind speed and direction, and moisture sensors at several levels are available. Also two sonic anemometers (20 Hz sampling rate) at 1.5 and 10m were deployed in the mast. The database is complemented by a triangle of microbarometers installed next to the surface, and another three microbarometers placed in a 100m meteorological tower at 20, 50 and 100m respectively, which are ideal to study coherent structures present in the boundary layer. Statistical parameters of meteorological variables have been calculated and studied in order to find out connections with the most relevant physical processes. Moreover different cases studies will be analyzed

  12. Temporal variation of heat and moisture flux divergence in the FIFE atmospheric boundary layer during spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    A one-day investigation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is reported in which an aircraft monitors the temporal and spatial variations of heat and moisture turbulent-flux divergences. Incoming solar radiation is similar over natural prairie land and agriculturally developed land although the heat and moisture values show significant differences over the surfaces. Other temporal variations are noted which demonstrate that ABL transport of sensible and latent heat is affected by complex variables even under simple synoptic conditions.

  13. Modelling the atmospheric boundary layer for remotely sensed estimates of daily evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurney, R. J.; Blyth, K.; Camillo, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    An energy and moisture balance model of the soil surface was used to estimate daily evaporation from wheat and barley fields in West Germany. The model was calibrated using remotely sensed surface temperature estimates. Complete atmospheric boundary layer models are difficult to use because of the number of parameters involved and a simplified model was used here. The resultant evaporation estimates were compared to eddy correlation evaporation estimates and good agreement was found.

  14. Amendment to "Analytical Solution for the Convectively-Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer": Inclusion of Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwersloot, H. G.; de Arellano, J. Vilà-Guerau

    2013-09-01

    In Ouwersloot and Vilà-Guerau de Arellano (Boundary-Layer Meteorol. doi: 10.1007/s10546-013-9816-z , 2013, this issue), the analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height and scalar evolutions are derived for the convective boundary layer, based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer slab models without taking subsidence into account. Here, we include and quantify the added effect of subsidence if the subsidence velocity scales linearly with height throughout the atmosphere. This enables analytical analyses for a wider range of observational cases. As a demonstration, the sensitivity of the boundary-layer height and the potential temperature jump to subsidence and the free tropospheric stability is graphically presented. The new relations show the importance of the temporal distribution of the surface buoyancy flux in determining the evolution if there is subsidence.

  15. On the Impact of Wind Farms on a Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid growth in the number of wind turbines installed worldwide, a demand exists for a clear understanding of how wind farms modify land-atmosphere exchanges. Here, we conduct three-dimensional large-eddy simulations to investigate the impact of wind farms on a convective atmospheric boundary layer. Surface temperature and heat flux are determined using a surface thermal energy balance approach, coupled with the solution of a three-dimensional heat equation in the soil. We study several cases of aligned and staggered wind farms with different streamwise and spanwise spacings. The farms consist of Siemens SWT-2.3-93 wind turbines. Results reveal that, in the presence of wind turbines, the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer is modified, the boundary-layer height is increased, and the magnitude of the surface heat flux is slightly reduced. Results also show an increase in land-surface temperature, a slight reduction in the vertically-integrated temperature, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the surface heat flux.

  16. Large-eddy simulation of an infinitely large wind farm in a stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2010-09-01

    When deployed as large arrays, wind turbines interact among themselves and with atmospheric boundary layer. To optimize their geometric arrangements, accurate knowledge of wind-turbine array boundary layer is of great importance. In this study, we integrated large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique, and used it to study the characteristics of wind-turbine wake in an idealized wind farm inside a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer (SBL). The wind turbines, with a rotor diameter of 112m and a tower height of 119m, were placed in a well-known SBL turbulent case that has a boundary layer height of approximately 180m. The super-geostrophic nocturnal jet near the top of the boundary layer was eliminated due to the energy extraction and the enhanced mixing of momentum. Non-axisymmetric behavior of wake structure was observed in response to the non-uniform incoming turbulence, the Coriolis effects, and the rotational effects induced by blade motions. The turbulence intensity in the simulated turbine wakes was found to reach a maximum at the top-tip level and a downwind distance of approximately 3-5 rotor diameters from the turbines. The Coriolis effects caused a skewed spatial structure and drove certain amount of turbulent energy away from the center of the wake. The SBL height was increased, while the magnitudes of the surface momentum flux and the surface buoyancy flux were reduced by approximately 30%. The wind farm was also found to have a strong effect on area-averaged vertical turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat, which highlights the potential impact of wind farms on local meteorology.

  17. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Vanheerwaarden, C.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-12-01

    We will present and discuss a conceptual modelling framework that can facilitate the understanding of the interactions between land processes and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics/chemistry at diurnal scales. This framework has been successful applied to the interpretation of field experiments, but also to identify the non-linear relations that occur at larger spatial and temporal scales. We will then discuss in depth the link between shallow cumulus and vegetation exchange of water and carbon dioxide. Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms, and in modulating the Earth's reflectivity and climate. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cycle is poorly understood. It is expected that as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 the plant stomata will close leading to lower latent heat fluxes and higher sensible heat fluxes. During the presentation, we will show that this causes a decline in boundary layer cloud formation in middle latitudes. This could be partly counteracted by the greater ability of a warmer atmosphere to take up water and by a growth in biomass due to CO2 fertilization. Our results are based on a new soil-water-atmosphere-plant model supported by comprehensive observational evidence, from which we identify the dominant atmospheric responses to plant physiological processes. They emphasize the intricate connection between biological and physical aspects of the climate system and the relevance of short-term and small-scale processes in establishing this connection

  18. The vertical turbulence structure of the coastal marine atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M.; Smedman, A.S. )

    1993-03-15

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere along a shoreline has been investigated using data from tower and aircraft measurements performed along the Baltic coast in the southeast of Sweden. Two properties make the Baltic Sea particularly interesting. It is surrounded by land in all directions within moderate advection distances, and it features a significant annual lag in sea surface temperature as compared with inland surface temperature. The present data were collected mostly during spring or early summer, when the water is cool, i.e., with a stably or neutrally stratified marine boundary layer usually capped by an inversion. Substantial daytime heating over the land area results in a considerable horizontal thermal contrast. Measurements were made on a small island, on a tower with a good sea fetch, and with an airborne instrument package. The profile data from the aircraft is from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low level boundary layer flights. The results from the profiles are extracted through filtering techniques on individual time (space) series (individual profiles), applying different normalization and finally averaging over all or over groups of profiles. The land-based data are from a low tower situated on the shoreline of a small island with a wide sector of unobstructed sea fetch. Several factors are found that add to the apparent complexity of the coastal marine environment: the state of the sea appears to have a major impact on the turbulence structure of the surface layer, jet-shaped wind speed profiles were very common at the top of the boundary layer (in about 50% of the cases) and distinct layers with increased turbulence were frequently found well above the boundary layer (in about 80% of the cases). The present paper will concentrate on a description of the experiment, the analysis methods, and a general description of the boundary layer turbulence structure over the Baltic Sea. 40 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A Sensitivity Analysis of the Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Properties to Atmospheric Emissivity Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Mario B.; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2010-02-01

    A one-dimensional model for the mean potential temperature within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) was used to assess the sensitivity of three NBL properties (height, thermal stratification strength, and near-surface cooling) to three widely used atmospheric emissivity formulations. The calculations revealed that the NBL height is robust to the choice of the emissivity function, though this is not the case for NBL Richardson number and near-surface cooling rate. Rather than endorse one formulation, our analysis highlights the importance of atmospheric emissivity in modelling the radiative properties of the NBL especially for clear-sky conditions.

  20. Complex measurements of aerosol and ion characteristics in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Iu. E.; Kolomiets, S. M.; Kornienko, V. I.; Mirme, A. A.; Sal'm, Ia. I.; Sergeev, I. Ia.; Tammet, Kh. F.

    Results of a comprehensive study of the characteristics of atmospheric ions and aerosols in the boundary layer during the summer season are reported. A study is also made of the kinetics of aerosol formation under conditions of high artificial ionization of the air by alpha and UV radiation. A high degree of correlation is shown to exist between atmospheric concentrations of medium ions and fine (less than 0.01 micron) aerosol. The results obtained support the radiation-chemical mechanism of aerosol formation.

  1. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    1991-01-01

    An atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) model is coupled to an ocean mixed-layer (OML) model in order to study the equilibrium state of the coupled system in the tropics, particularly in the Pacific region. The equilibrium state of the coupled system is solved as a function of sea-surface temperature (SST) for a given surface wind and as a function of surface wind for a given SST. It is noted that in both cases, the depth of the CBL and OML increases and the upwelling below the OML decreases, corresponding to either increasing SST or increasing surface wind. The coupled ocean-atmosphere model is solved iteratively as a function of surface wind for a fixed upwelling and a fixed OML depth, and it is observed that SST falls with increasing wind in both cases. Realistic gradients of mixed-layer depth and upwelling are observed in experiments with surface wind and SST prescribed as a function of longitude.

  2. Impact of soil water property parameterization on atmospheric boundary layer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Ek, Michael; Mahrt, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Both the form of functional relationships applied for soil water properties and the natural field-scale variability of such properties can significantly impact simulation of the soil-plant-atmosphere system on a diurnal timescale. Various input parameters for soil water properties including effective saturation, residual water content, anerobiosis point, field capacity, and permanent wilting point are incorporated into functions describing soil water retention, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, sorptivity, and the plant sink function. The perception of the meaning of these values and their variation within a natural environment often differs from the perspective of the soil physicist, plant physiologist, and atmospheric scientist. This article investigates the sensitivity of energy balance and boundary layer simulation to different soil water property functions using the Oregon State University coupled atmosphere-plant-soil (CAPS) simulation model under bare soil conditions. The soil parameterizations tested in the CAPS model include those of Clapp and Hornberger [1978], van Genuchten [1980], and Cosby et al. [1984] using initial atmospheric conditions from June 16, 1986 in Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPEX-MOBILHY). For the bare soil case these results demonstrate unexpected model sensitivity to soil water property parameterization in partitioning all components of the diurnal energy balance and corresponding boundary layer development.

  3. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arellano, Jordi Vilà-Guerau; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2012-10-01

    Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms and in modulating Earth's reflectivity and climate. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cycle are poorly understood. It is expected that as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations the plant stomata will close, leading to lower latent heat fluxes and higher sensible heat fluxes. Here we show that this causes a decline in boundary-layer cloud formation in middle latitudes. This could be partly counteracted by the greater ability of a warmer atmosphere to take up water and by a growth in biomass due to CO2 fertilization. Our results are based on a new soil-water-atmosphere-plant model supported by comprehensive observational evidence, from which we identify the dominant atmospheric responses to plant physiological processes. They emphasize the intricate connection between biological and physical aspects of the climate system and the relevance of short-term and small-scale processes in establishing this connection.

  4. How can a dusty cold pool change the diurnal evolution of the Saharan Atmospheric Boundary Layer ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocha, Cécile; Flamant, Cyrille; Berckmans, Julie; Fink, Andreas; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Knippertz, Peter; Lafore, Jean-Philippe; Marnas, Fabien; Marsham, John; Parker, Doug; Rosenberg, Philip; Ryder, Claire; Tulet, Pierre; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the Fennec 2011 Special Observing period, a large and dusty density current (known as a haboob) was observed on the 21 June to cover half of the western part of the Sahara. Thanks to the AROME high resolution model used to forecast this event in real time, two research aircraft (the SAFIRE Falcon and the FAAM BAe 146) operated over Mauritania and Mali on that day, and we are able to document its characteristics in detail. Particularly large dust particles were observed in this haboob. These particles are known to absorb and scatter solar and thermal radiation. The comparison of AROME simulations with and without coupling with dust shows that the radiative impact of the dust induced a decrease of sensible heat fluxes by 200W/m²/AOD and an increase of the temperature in the atmospheric boundary layer by 1°C. Surface fluxes are one of the principal parameters controlling the growth of the boundary layer. However, during the day, the simulation coupled with dust shows a deeper boundary layer (reaching ~5km high) than the simulation without dust. Here, we explore the competition between surface heating and elevated heating in the boundary-layer development.

  5. Near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Tariq; Zeller, John; Magee, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Currently there are extensive modeling and measurement capabilities for the region extending from 100 ft above sea surface to space, but few such capabilities exist for the region extending up to 10 ft above the sea surface. By measuring and characterizing conditions in the marine boundary layer existing below 30 ft above the sea surface such as turbulence and extinction, the optical communication capabilities of maritime vessels when operating at or near the surface may be extended and enhanced. Key physical parameters such as absorption, scattering, and turbulence strength (Cn 2) along the propagation path have a degree of variability on meteorological conditions as well optical wavelength. Modeling of the atmospheric environment is thus critical in order to generate a good understanding of optical propagation through the atmosphere. NUWC is utilizing software provided by MZA to model Cn 2 and resultant beam propagation characteristics through the near-marine boundary layer. We are developing the capability of near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurements and modeling as well as optical laser link testing at outdoor test sites. Measurements are performed with optical laser links (e.g., bit rate error), scintillometer, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) cameras, while turbulence and propagation modeling is achieved using MODTRAN5, ATMTools, NSLOT, LEEDR, and WaveTrain modeling and simulation code. By better understanding the effects of turbulence on optical transmission in the near-marine boundary layer through modeling and experimental measurements, measures can be implemented to reduce the bit error rate and increase data throughput, enabling more efficient and accurate communication link capabilities.

  6. The impact of vegetation on the atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsengdar John

    1992-01-01

    The impact of vegetation on atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms is examined through the construction and testing of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model. The Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere (LEAF) model is developed using an elevated canopy structure, an above-canopy aerodynamic resistance, two in-canopy aerodynamic resistances, and one stomatal conductance functions. The air temperature and humidity are assumed to be constant in the canopy whereas the wind and radiation follow a specified vertical profile. A simple dump-bucket method is used to parameterize the interception of precipitation and a multi-layer soil model is utilized to handle the vertical transfer of soil water. Evaporation from soil and wet leaves and transpiration from dry leaves are evaluated separately. The solid water uptake is based on soil water potential rather than on the length of roots. Separate energy budgets for vegetation and for the soil are used in order to remove unnecessary assumptions on energy partition between the vegetation and the substrate. Primary parameters are LAI, maximum stomatal conductance, and albedo. Secondary parameters include displacement height and environmental controls on stomatal resistance function. Due to the complexity of the LEAF model, statistical methods are used to improve LEAF model performance. The Multi-response Randomized Bock Permutation (MRBP) procedure is used to guide the choice of model parameter values. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) is applied to better understand the model behavior in response to the changes in model parameters. Finally, LEAF is used to study the growth of boundary layer and the local thermal circulations generated by surface inhomogeneities. Results show the atmospheric boundary layer is substantially cooler and more moist over unstressed vegetation than over bare dry soil. Thermally forced circulation can result from the juxtaposition of two vegetation types due to different biophysical

  7. The Impact of Vegetation on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Convective Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsengdar John

    The impact of vegetation on atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms is examined through the construction and testing of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model. The Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere (LEAF) model is developed using an elevated canopy structure, an above -canopy aerodynamic resistance, two in-canopy aerodynamic resistances, and one stomatal conductance functions. The air temperature and humidity are assumed to be constant in the canopy whereas the wind and radiation follow a specified vertical profile. A simple dump-bucket method is used to parameterize the interception of precipitation and a multi-layer soil model is utilized to handle the vertical transfer of soil water. Evaporation from soil and wet leaves and transpiration from dry leaves are evaluated separately. The solid water uptake is based on soil water potential rather than on the length of roots. Separate energy budgets for vegetation and for the soil are used in order to remove unnecessary assumptions on energy partition between the vegetation and the substrate. Primary parameters are LAI, maximum stomatal conductance, and albedo. Secondary parameters include displacement height and environmental controls on stomatal resistance function. Due to the complexity of the LEAF model, statistical methods are used to improve LEAF model performance. The Multi-response Randomized Bock Permutation (MRBP) procedure is used to guide the choice of model parameter values. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) is applied to better understand the model behavior in response to the changes in model parameters. Finally, LEAF is used to study the growth of boundary layer and the local thermal circulations generated by surface inhomogeneities. Results show the atmospheric boundary layer is substantially cooler and more moist over unstressed vegetation than over bare dry soil. Thermally forced circulation can result from the juxtaposition of two vegetation types due to different biophysical

  8. Instability of wind turbine wakes immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, François

    2015-06-01

    In this work a technique capable to investigate the near-wake stability properties of a wind turbine immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer is presented. Specifically, a 2D local spatial stability analysis is developed in order to take into account typical flow features of real operating wind turbines, such as the presence of the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbulence heterogeneity of the oncoming wind. This stability analysis can be generally applied on either experimental measurements or numerical data. In this paper it was carried out on wind tunnel experiments, for which a downscaled wind turbine is immersed in a turbulent boundary layer. Through spatial stability analysis, the dominant mode in the near wake, i.e. the most amplified one, is characterized and its frequency matches the hub-vortex instability frequency measured in the wind tunnel. As in the case of [10], where an axisymmetric wake condition was investigated, the hub-vortex instability results in a single-helical mode.

  9. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  10. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  11. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  12. Investigating the Source, Transport, and Isotope Composition of Water in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T. J.; Schultz, N. M.; Lee, X.

    2011-12-01

    The isotope composition of water (liquid and vapor phases) can provide important insights regarding the source of water used by plants, the origins of atmospheric water vapor, and the sources of carbon dioxide. In recent years there have been significant advances in the ability to quantify the isotope composition of water and water vapor using optical isotope techniques. We have used and helped develop some of these techniques to determine the isotope composition of soil and plant waters, to measure the isoflux of water vapor between the land surface and atmosphere, and to examine the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this presentation we will discuss three related issues: 1) Identification and correction of spectral contamination in soil and plant water samples using optical techniques; 2) The benefits and practical limitations of quantifying the isotope composition of evapotranspiration using the eddy covariance approach; and 3) The scientific value and feasibility of tracking the long-term (seasonal and interannual) behavior of the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. A few short stories will be provided from experiments conducted in the lab, at the field scale, and from a very tall tower at the University of Minnesota from 2008 to 2011.

  13. Intercomparison of Martian Lower Atmosphere Simulated Using Different Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We use the mesoscale modeling capability of Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model to study the sensitivity of the simulated Martian lower atmosphere to differences in the parameterization of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Characterization of the Martian atmosphere and realistic representation of processes such as mixing of tracers like dust depend on how well the model reproduces the evolution of the PBL structure. MarsWRF is based on the NCAR WRF model and it retains some of the PBL schemes available in the earth version. Published studies have examined the performance of different PBL schemes in NCAR WRF with the help of observations. Currently such assessments are not feasible for Martian atmospheric models due to lack of observations. It is of interest though to study the sensitivity of the model to PBL parameterization. Typically, for standard Martian atmospheric simulations, we have used the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) PBL scheme, which considers a correction term to the vertical gradients to incorporate nonlocal effects. For this study, we have also used two other parameterizations, a non-local closure scheme called Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme and a turbulent kinetic energy closure scheme called Mellor- Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) PBL scheme. We will present intercomparisons of the near surface temperature profiles, boundary layer heights, and wind obtained from the different simulations. We plan to use available temperature observations from Mini TES instrument onboard the rovers Spirit and Opportunity in evaluating the model results.

  14. Large-eddy simulation of very-large-scale motions in atmospheric boundary-layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiannong; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In the last few decades, laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers, performed at low to moderate Reynolds numbers, have found very-large-scale motions (VLSMs) in the logarithmic and outer regions. The size of VLSMs was found to be 10-20 times as large as the boundary-layer thickness. Recently, few studies based on field experiments examined the presence of VLSMs in neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flows, which are invariably at very high Reynolds numbers. Very large scale structures similar to those observed in laboratory-scale experiments have been found and characterized. However, it is known that field measurements are more challenging than laboratory-based measurements, and can lack resolution and statistical convergence. Such challenges have implications on the robustness of the analysis, which may be further adversely affected by the use of Taylor's hypothesis to convert time series to spatial data. We use large-eddy simulation (LES) to investigate VLSMs in atmospheric boundary-layer flows. In order to make sure that the largest flow structures are properly resolved, the horizontal domain size is chosen to be much larger than the standard domain size. It is shown that the contributions to the resolved turbulent kinetic energy and shear stress from VLSMs are significant. Therefore, the large computational domain adopted here is essential for the purpose of investigating VLSMs. The spatially coherent structures associated with VLSMs are characterized through flow visualization and statistical analysis. The instantaneous velocity fields in horizontal planes give evidence of streamwise-elongated flow structures of low-speed fluid with negative fluctuation of the streamwise velocity component, and which are flanked on either side by similarly elongated high-speed structures. The pre-multiplied power spectra and two-point correlations indicate that the scales of these streak-like structures are very large. These features

  15. Disturbance of the Boundary Layer at Summit Station, Greenland by an Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, William; Shupe, Mathew; Ralph, Marty

    2014-05-01

    On 11 July 2012, a rare melt episode occurred at Summit Station Greenland. As described by Neff et al. 2014 (Submitted JGR), a major factor in this melt event was an Atmospheric River (AR), a narrow corridor of high water-vapor content. This AR transited the western Atlantic and theen moved up the west coast of Greenland and thence over Greenland. Back trajectories also indicated significant warm air advection from mid-North America during a major heat wave. We present here the boundary layer changes during this event using sodar to distinguish well-mixed from stable periods and relate these to changes in synoptic forcing and resulting changes in radiative forcing by low-level, shallow, warm clouds. A second near-melt episode also occurred on 29 July which provides an opportunity to compare and contrast boundary layer responses in the two cases.

  16. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  17. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-05-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response.

  18. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth.

    PubMed

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  19. Ammonia Surface-Atmosphere Exchange in the Arctic Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Tremblay, J. E.; Gagnon, J.; Côté, J. S.; Courchesne, I.

    2014-12-01

    The net flux of ammonia between the ocean and the atmosphere is poorly known on global and regional scales. Data from high-latitude research cruises suggest that deposition from the atmosphere to the surface dominates, but the magnitude and drivers of this flux are not well understood. In the polar marine boundary layer, the surface may be composed of not only open ocean, but also first-year or multi-year sea ice which may be covered with meltponds. To characterize the air-sea exchange of ammonia in the polar marine boundary layer, data were collected aboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen between July 10 and Aug 14, 2014 in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. The Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph was used to make hourly measurements of the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, and the water-soluble constituents of fine particle matter (PM2.5). Fluorometry was used to measure dissolved ammonium concentrations in the ocean between 0 and 20 m, and in low-salinity melt ponds encountered in regions of extensive sea ice. Observations indicate that the atmosphere contains higher levels of ammonia than are calculated to be in equilibrium with surface reservoirs, implying net deposition of ammonia from the atmosphere. While ammonium levels tended to be higher in melt ponds, the lower water temperatures still mean that these are unlikely to be sources of NH3 to the atmosphere. The disequilibrium between atmospheric and surface reservoirs of ammonia imply relatively large sources to the atmosphere (possibly nearby bird colonies) or high consumption rates in surface waters.

  20. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  1. Influence of a high aerosol concentration on the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, M. N.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Kadygrov, E. N.

    2006-12-01

    The influence of increased concentrations of submicron aerosol produced by forest fires on thermal characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in Moscow and its remote vicinity (the town of Zvenigorod) are analyzed on the basis of regular remote measurements of the ABL temperature profile with the use of MTP-5 profilers. In the air basin of a large city, additional aerosol and accompanying pollutants in early morning hours (at small heights of the Sun) most frequently did not cause substantial changes in the ABL thermal structure. In the locality remote from the megalopolis (Zvenigorod), the atmospheric pollution by aerosol led to noticeable changes in the ABL thermal characteristics. Especially strong changes were observed in the daytime, during the maximum supply of solar radiation. In morning hours, the heating rate of the lower 100-m layer of the polluted air exceeded the heating rate of a relatively pure air by more than one degree. In higher layers, the differences between the rates of temperature changes in a relatively clean atmosphere and in an atmosphere polluted by aerosol (in the suburb) were insignificant.

  2. Preliminary analysis of the Nocturnal Atmospheric Boundary Layer during the experimental campaign CIBA 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, C.; Maqueda, G.; Ramos, D.; Sastre, M.; Viana, S.; Serrano, E.; Morales, G.; Ayarzagüena, B.; Viñas, C.; Sánchez, E.

    2009-04-01

    An Atmospheric Boundary Layer campaign was developed in Spain along June 2008 at the CIBA (Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere) site which is placed on a fairly homogeneous terrain in the centre of an extensive plateau (41°49' N, 4°56' W). Different instrumentation at several levels was available on a new 10m meteorological mast, including temperature and humidity sensors, wind vanes and cup anemometers, as well as one sonic anemometer. Besides, two quartz-based microbarometers were installed at 50 and 100m on the main permanent 100m tower placed at CIBA. Three additional microbarometers were deployed on the surface on a triangular array of approximately 200 m side, and a tethered balloon was used in order to record vertical profiles of temperature, wind and humidity up to 1000m. Finally, a GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365), which can be used to continuously measure each six seconds simultaneously the PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 values, was deployed at 1.5m. This work will show some preliminary results from the campaign CIBA 2008, analysing the main physical processes present in the atmospheric Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL), the different stability periods observed and the corresponding turbulent parameters, as well as the coherent structures detected. The pressure perturbations measured from the surface and tower levels make possible to study the main wave parameters from wavelet transform, and compared the structures detected by the microbarometers with those detected in the wind and particles records.

  3. The atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions: an observational and numerical study from two different datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the temporal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) along the transition period from a diurnal typical convection to a nocturnal more frequently stable situation. This period is known as late afternoon or evening transition, depending on the specific definitions employed by different authors [1]. In order to obtain a proper characterization, we try to learn whether or not the behaviour of these transitional boundary layers is strongly dependent on local conditions. To do so, two sets of evening transitions are studied from data collected at two different experimental sites. These locations correspond to research facilities named CIBA (Spain) and CRA (France), which are the places where atmospheric field campaigns have been conducted during the last years, such as CIBA2008 and BLLAST 2011, respectively. In order to get comparable situations, we focus especially on transitions with weak synoptic forcing, and consider daily astronomical sunset as a reference time. A statistical analysis on main parameters related to the transition is carried out for both locations, and the average behaviour is shown as well as extreme values according to the timing. A similar pattern in the qualitative evolution of many variables is found. Nevertheless, several relevant differences in the progress of key variables are obtained too. Moisture, both from the soil and the air, is thought to have great relevance in explaining many of the differences found between the two sites. Some case studies are explored, focusing on the role played by the atmospheric turbulence. Complementary, numerical experiments are also performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, in order to test the role of humidity, by artificially varying it in some of the simulations. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960.

  4. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  5. The groundwater land-surface atmosphere connection: Soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Chow, Fotini Katopodes; Kollet, Stefan J.

    2007-12-01

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can simulate spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-h period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land-surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  6. Sodar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean during ASTEX-91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petenko, I. V.; Bedulin, A. N.; Shurygin, Ye. A.

    1996-10-01

    A complex marine experiment was conducted in autumn 1991 on the research vessel Dmitry Mendelev in association with the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX). A three-axis Doppler sodar designed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow, was used in this experiment. Total observation time was about 770 hours from 6 October to 23 November. Besides facsimile records illustrating spatial and temporal structure of the turbulence distribution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), routine quantitative measurements of profiles of wind and echo-signal strength were taken. Some main characteristics of the ABL behavior over the ocean were revealed through an analysis of these data as well as the results of other kinds of measurements. An important peculiarity of the ABL observed between the Canary Islands and the Azores was the presence of diurnal variation of convective turbulence strength having a maximum between 04:00 and 07:00 LT. A similar diurnal variation was observed for low-level cloud cover. Occurrence of various types of thermal stratification and their diurnal variation were obtained. Comparison of elevated stable layers and low-level cumulus showed that the lower boundary of clouds correlates well with the height of the bottom of elevated inversion layers (at heights of 200 600 m). Canary and Cabo Verde observations showed that islands strongly affect the ABL structure. The strong effect of a surface water temperature gradient on the ABL stability was observed when crossing the Canary, Azores, and Labrador currents and the Gulf Stream.

  7. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1 . This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  8. Countergradient heat transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer over a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatskiy, A. F.

    2008-04-01

    The nonlocality of the mechanism of turbulent heat transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer over a rough surface manifests itself in the form of bounded areas of countergradient heat transfer, which are diagnosed from analysis of balance items in the transport equation for the variance of temperature fluctuations and from calculation of the coefficients of turbulent momentum and heat transfer invoking the model of “gradient diffusion.” It is shown that countergradient heat transfer in local regions is caused by turbulent diffusion or by the term of the divergence of triple correlation in the balance equation for the temperature variance.

  9. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  10. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Evolution with Lidar in Buenos Aires from 2008 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer top height evolution is obtained from 2008 to 2011 in Buenos Aires using the multiwavelength lidar located at CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) (34°33' S; 58°30' W; 17 m asl). Algorithms recognition based on covariance wavelet transform are applied to obtain seasonal statistics. This method is being evaluated for use in the Lidar Network in Argentina and it is being deployed in Patagonia region currently. The technique operates in real time in both low and high aerosol loads and with almost no human supervision.

  11. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  12. Structure and Optical Properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Dusty Hot Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalermthai, B.; Al Marzooqi, M.; Basha, G.; Ouarda, T.; Armstrong, P.; Molini, A.

    2014-12-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main common features however, desert boundary layers present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as transport and deposition of dust and pollutants, local wind fields, turbulent fluxes and their impacts on the sustainable development, human health and solar energy harvesting in these regions. In this study, we explore the potential of the joint usage of Lidar Ceilometer backscattering profiles and sun-photometer optical depth retrievals to quantitatively determine the vertical aerosol profile over dusty hot desert regions. Toward this goal, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4425N 54.6163E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013, and the concurrent measurements of aerosol optical depth derived independently from the Masdar Institute AERONET sun-photometer. The main features of the desert ABL are obtained from the ceilometer range corrected backscattering profiles through bi-dimensional clustering technique we developed as a modification of the recently proposed single-profile clustering method, and therefore "directly" and "indirectly" calibrated to obtain a full diurnal cycle climatology of the aerosol optical depth and aerosol profiles. The challenges and the advantages of applying a similar methodology to the monitoring of aerosols and dust over hyper-arid regions are also discussed, together with the issues related to the sensitivity of commercial ceilometers to changes in the solar background.

  13. Numerical study of the anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, I. L.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Reisgen, U.

    2016-03-01

    The anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges is studied numerically on the basis of the hydrodynamic (diffusion) equations for plasma components. The governing equations are formulated in a unified manner without the assumptions of thermal equilibrium, ionization equilibrium or quasi-neutrality. For comparison, a quasi-neutral model of the anode layer is also considered. The numerical computations are performed for an argon arc at typical values of the current density in anode layers (500-2000 A cm-2). The results of numerical modelling show that the common collisionless model of the sheath fails to describe the sheath region for the problem under consideration. For this reason, a detailed analysis of the anode sheath is performed using the results of unified modelling. In addition, the distributions of plasma parameters in the anode layer are analysed and the basic characteristics of the layer (anode voltage drop, sheath voltage drop, anode layer thickness, sheath thickness, heat flux to the anode) are calculated. Our results are found to be in good agreement with the existing theoretical predictions and experimental data. The dependence of the anode layer characteristics on the current density is also discussed.

  14. Atmospheric Boundary Layer of a pasture site in Amazônia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade de Araújo Tiburtino Neves, Theomar; Fisch, Gilberto; Raasch, Siegfried

    2013-04-01

    A great effort has been made by the community of micrometeorology and planetary boundary layer for a better description of the properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), such as its height, thermodynamics characteristics and its time evolution. This work aims to give a review of the main characteristics of Atmospheric Boundary Layer over a pasture site in Amazonia. The measurements dataset was carried out from 3 different LBA field campaigns: RBLE 3 (during the dry season from 1993), RaCCI (during the dry-to-wet transition season from 2002) and WetAMC (during the wet season from 1999), collected with tethered balloon, radiosondes and eddy correlation method in a pasture site in the southwestern Amazonia. Different techniques and instruments were used to estimate the ABĹs properties. During the daytime, it was possible to observe that there is an abrupt growth of the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) between 08 and 11 LT, with a stationary pattern between 14 and 17 LT. The maximum heights at late afternoon were around 1600 m during the dry season, whilst the wet season it only reached 1000 m. This is due to the lower surface turbulent sensible heat flux as the soil is wetter and the partition of energy is completely different between wet to the dry season. For the transition period (RaCCI 2002), it was possible to analyze and compare several estimates from different instruments and methods. It showed that the parcel method overestimates the heights of all measurements (mainly at 14 LT) due to the high incidence of solar radiation and superadiabatic gradients. The profile and Richardson number methods gave results very similar to estimate the height of the CBL. The onset of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) occurs before the sunset (18 LT) and its height is reasonable stable during the night (typical values around 180-250 m). An alternative method (Vmax) which used the height of the maximum windspeed derived from a SODAR instrument during RaCCI 2002 was

  15. Immersed boundary methods for high-resolution simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  16. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A

    2010-05-12

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  17. Experimental Study of the EM Transmission Properties of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, T.; Friehe, C.; Anderson, K.

    2003-04-01

    The propagation of electro-magnetic signals over the ocean is primarily affected by atmospheric refraction and scattering from the rough ocean surface. Wave-guides (also known as refractive ducts) occurring in the first tens of meters above the sea surface have been modeled extensively, as they influence communications. However, discrepancies between models and measurements have been detected. Here we study experimentally the structure of the atmospheric refractive index and the ocean surface statistics, pertinent to EM signals scattering. The structure and the dynamics the marine atmospheric boundary layer is profoundly affected by the ocean surface waves, which deform the mean wind flow streamlines. In the presence of gradients of the atmospheric humidity and temperature, the deformation of the streamlines displaces the sheared profiles of these quantities and leads to wave-induced fluctuations of the atmospheric refractive index. As a result, radio and optical signals propagating over the ocean encounter a semi-periodic refractive structure, which along with the turbulence can degrade signal's energy. The wave-induced fluctuations of the refractive index are unique to the oceanic environment. Their structure function does not follow the power 2/3 scaling law, valid for turbulent fluctuations, and thus their influence should be studied separately. We analyze data of atmospheric turbulence, humidity, temperature, and sea surface temperature and waves from the Rough Evaporation Duct experiment, conducted in part from the instrument platform FLIP in the open ocean North of Oahu, Hawaii.

  18. Equilibrium Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow: Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation with Balanced Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuhui; Huo, Qing; Kang, Ling; Song, Yu

    2014-09-01

    Forcing relationships in steady, neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) flow are thoroughly analyzed. The ABL flow can be viewed as balanced between a forcing and a drag term. The drag term results from turbulent stress divergence, and above the ABL, both the drag and the forcing terms vanish. In computational wind engineering applications, the ABL flow is simulated not by directly specifying a forcing term in the ABL but by specifying boundary conditions for the simulation domain. Usually, these include the inflow boundary and the top boundary conditions. This `boundary-driven' ABL flow is dynamically different from its real counterpart, and this is the major reason that the simulated boundary-driven ABL flow does not maintain horizontal homogeneity. Here, first a dynamical approach is proposed to develop a neutrally stratified equilibrium ABL flow. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software (Fluent 6.3) with the standard - turbulence model is employed, and by applying a driving force profile, steady equilibrium ABL flows are simulated by the model. Profiles of wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) derived using this approach are reasonable in comparison with the conventional logarithmic law and with observational data respectively. Secondly, the equilibrium ABL profiles apply as inflow conditions to simulate the boundary-driven ABL flow. Simulated properties between the inlet and the outlet sections across a fetch of 10 km are compared. Although profiles of wind speed, TKE, and its dissipation rate are consistently satisfactory under higher wind conditions, a deviation of TKE and its dissipation rate between the inlet and outlet are apparent (7-8 %) under lower wind-speed conditions (2 m s at 10 m). Furthermore, the simulated surface stress systematically decreases in the downwind direction. A redistribution of the pressure field is also found in the simulation domain, which provides a different driving pattern from the realistic case in

  19. Short term variations of 7Be, 10Be concentrations in atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Takeyasu; Sugihara, Sinji; Morinaga, Ichiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Hisao

    2010-04-01

    To compare meteorological conditions, short term variations of atmospheric concentrations of 7Be ( T1/2 = 53.3 days) and 10Be ( T1/2 = 1.5 × 10 6 years) were investigated at Tokyo and Fukuoka, Japan, and Pacific Ocean nearby Japan. Atmospheric concentrations of 7Be and 10Be at anticyclone condition were higher than that at cyclone condition to a factor of 2-10. Because of being influenced by re-suspended components from soil ( 10Be/ 7Be > 1000), temporal variability of 10Be/ 7Be was high in daytime and low in nighttime. But when corrected for re-suspended component using Al concentration as an indicator of soil the 10Be/ 7Be ratio was constant. Comparing 7Be and 10Be concentrations with 212Pb concentration as soil-generated component, we make a conclusion that high 7Be and 10Be concentration air mass is brought into boundary layer by high convection at daytime. Those diurnal variations were not observed in marine boundary layer. When cyclone passed through Fukuoka to Tokyo, which is 12 h behind, 7Be and 10Be concentrations also decreased with 12 h lag between Fukuoka and Tokyo. The 10Be/ 7Be ratio was constant during anticyclone to cyclone condition, and between Tokyo and Fukuoka. We conclude that after stratospheric aerosols enter into the upper troposphere they reside there for a certain period and mix uniformly in horizontal strata; later they are transported down to lower troposphere by anticyclone and penetrate into ground level air at daytime by convective strong mixing of boundary layer.

  20. Boundary Layer Flow Control with a One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Surface Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. Reece; Sherman, Daniel M.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel data have been acquired for planar panels covered by a uniform, glow-discharge surface plasma in atmospheric pressure air known as the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP). Streamwise and spanwise arrays of flush, plasma-generating surface electrodes have been studied in laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent boundary layer flow. Plasma between symmetric streamwise electrode strips caused large increases in panel drag, whereas asymmetric spanwise electrode configurations produced a significant thrust. Smoke wire flow visualization and mean velocity diagnostics show the primary cause of the phenomena to be a combination of mass transport and vortical structures induced by strong paraelectric ElectroHydroDynamic (EHD) body forces on the flow.

  1. Flow around new wind fence with multi-scale fractal structure in an atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Sarah; Lee, Sang-Joon; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling atmospheric boundary-layer flows with engineered structures, such as porous wind fences or windbreaks, has been of great interest to the fluid mechanics and wind engineering community. Previous studies found that the regular mono-scale grid fence of 50% porosity and a bottom gap of 10% of the fence height are considered to be optimal over a flat surface. Significant differences in turbulent flow structure have recently been noted behind multi-scale fractal wind fences, even with the same porosity. In this study, wind-tunnel tests on the turbulent flow and the turbulence kinetic energy transport of 1D and 2D multi-scale fractal fences under atmospheric boundary-layer were conducted. Velocity fields around the fractal fences were systematically measured using Particle Image Velocimetry to uncover effects of key parameters on turbulent flows around the fences at a Reynolds number of approximately 3.6x104 based on the free-stream speed and fence height. The turbulent flow structures induced by specific 1D/2D multi-scale fractal wind fences were compared to those of a conventional grid fence. The present results would contribute to the design of new-generation wind fences to reduce snow/sand deposition on critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges.

  2. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  3. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  4. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  5. The Martian atmospheric planetary boundary layer stability, fluxes, spectra, and similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillman, James E.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first analysis of the high frequency data from the Viking lander and spectra of wind, in the Martian atmospheric surface layer, along with the diurnal variation of the height of the mixed surface layer, are calculated for the first time for Mars. Heat and momentum fluxes, stability, and z(sub O) are estimated for early spring, from a surface temperature model and from Viking Lander 2 temperatures and winds at 44 deg N, using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The afternoon maximum height of the mixed layer for these seasons and conditions is estimated to lie between 3.6 and 9.2 km. Estimations of this height is of primary importance to all models of the boundary layer and Martian General Circulation Models (GCM's). Model spectra for two measuring heights and three surface roughnesses are calculated using the depth of the mixed layer, and the surface layer parameters and flow distortion by the lander is also taken into account. These experiments indicate that z(sub O), probably lies between 1.0 and 3.0 cm, and most likely is closer to 1.0 cm. The spectra are adjusted to simulate aliasing and high frequency rolloff, the latter caused both by the sensor response and the large Kolmogorov length on Mars. Since the spectral models depend on the surface parameters, including the estimated surface temperature, their agreement with the calculated spectra indicates that the surface layer estimates are self consistent. This agreement is especially noteworthy in that the inertial subrange is virtually absent in the Martian atmosphere at this height, due to the large Kolmogorov length scale. These analyses extend the range of applicability of terrestrial results and demonstrate that it is possible to estimate the effects of severe aliasing of wind measurements, to produce a models which agree well with the measured spectra. The results show that similarity theory developed for Earth applies to Mars, and that the spectral models are universal.

  6. Response of the atmospheric boundary layer to changes in surfaces fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owinoh, A. Z.; Hunt, J. C.; Orr, A.; Clark, P.

    2003-04-01

    The response of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to varying surface fluxes such as surface heat fluxes and roughness changes is a common element in several problems in mesoscale dynamics. We study some of these problems by reducing the complexity of the physical processes that are relevant to mechanism of interest so that analytical solutions can be obtained. Our presentation begins with the examination of the time dependent response and the influence of a 2-D low hill on the flow in a neutral boundary layer to a uniform surface heat flux switched at time, t=0. Analytical solutions for changes in temperature, mean wind and shear stress profiles in the ABL are sought. The modelled profiles are compared with those obtained from the UK Unified Model run on a idealised mode at 12km horizontal resolution. To understand the time and spatial dependence, perturbations are analysed of stratified ABL equations as they pass over areas where there is sharply differing surface heat flux and roughness; a situation freqently observed between rural and urban areas, or across coastline or across sea-ice boundaries. New estimates are derived for the transition distance and how the fluxes, temperature and velocity, vary in the transition distance zone. These simple estimates are compared with Rider et al. (1963) experimental data. Rider N. E., Philip J. R. &Bradley E. F. (1963), The horizontal transport of heat and moisture - A micrometeorological study. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc, 89, 507-531.

  7. The detection of clouds, aerosols and marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics from simulated GLAS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2001 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will provide continuous laser sounding of the earth's atmosphere from space for the first time. From its polar orbit about 600 km above the surface, GLAS will employ a 40 Hz solid state laser operating at 1064 nm to measure topography to an accuracy of 10 cm. Simultaneously, the atmospheric channels (1064 and 532 nm) of GLAS will provide profiles of atmospheric backscatter from 40 km to the ground with 75 meter vertical resolution (Spinhirne and Palm, 1996). These measurements will give scientists an unprecedented global data set on the vertical structure of clouds and aerosols which will greatly aid research efforts aimed at understanding their effects on climate and their role in climate change (Hartman, 1994). To better understand and predict the performance of the GLAS atmospheric channels, a computer model was developed to simulate the type of signal that the instrument would likely produce. The model uses aircraft lidar data and provides realistic simulated GLAS data sets over large areas spanning a wide range of atmospheric conditions. These simulated GLAS datasets are invaluable for designing and testing algorithms for the retrieval of parameters such as cloud and aerosol layer height, optical depth and extinction cross section. This work is currently proceeding and in this paper we will present results of the cloud and aerosol detection algorithm with emphasis on the detection of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) aerosol. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to ascertain the feasability of estimating MABL moisture and temperature structure from spaceborne systems such as GLAS.

  8. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  9. WRF simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions during the BLLAST field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre Marugán, Mariano; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; van de Boer, Anneke

    2013-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is mainly ruled by both mechanical and thermal turbulence, and shows an evident diurnal cycle. In the evening transitional period, decay in turbulent kinetic energy occurs, but all the mechanisms behind this decay are still not well understood. In this framework, the BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims to improve the knowledge on the physical processes taking place during the late afternoon and evening transition in the lower troposphere. The BLLAST field campaign was organized in Lannemezan (France) from 14th June to 8th July 2011 [1]. Both in situ measurements (i.e., with meteorological towers, surface based instruments, tethered balloons…) and remote sensors (i.e., SODAR, scintillometer…) were used for this purpose, and two different approaches were developed: vertical structure of the boundary layer and spatial heterogeneity. Besides, Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models have exhibited substantial difficulties to properly simulate the diurnal cycle in the atmosphere and also the PBL afternoon and evening transition. Typically, some errors are found in air temperature and wind speed close to the surface. Regarding this fact, the main goal of this work is to study how the mesoscale model WRF (Weather Research and Forecast) performs simulations of the evening transition during the BLLAST field campaign. In particular, it is tested for permutations of different PBL and Land Surface Model (LSM) schemes. We try to understand why some differences in model results appear. A comparison between observations and combinations of PBL and LSM parameterizations is shown, testing the sensitivity to these options. We specifically evaluate the surface radiation budget (out- and incoming long- and shortwave radiation), and the surface energy budget variables (latent and sensible heat fluxes, as well as soil heat flux). Furthermore, the vertical profiles of some key variables (such as potential

  10. Some Aspects of the Interaction of Blowing Snow with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déry, Stephen J.; Taylor, Peter A.

    1996-10-01

    Several possible effects of blowing snow on the atmospheric boundary layer are investigated, mostly within the general framework of the Prairie Blowing Snow Model (PBSM). The processes of snow saltation and suspension are first described. Variations to the drift density profile are tested and the effects of stratification and density variation calculations are evaluated. Despite high density gradients of blowing snow, stratification effects on turbulence and the velocity profiles can generally be neglected. However, with saltating or suspended snow in a constant shear stress layer, part of the shear stress is carried by the particles. A highly simplified, single-phase approach, based on the density variation of the air-snow mixture coupled to a simple turbulent stress-strain relationship, is used to illustrate this. Sublimation rates in a column of blowing snow are calculated using the PBSM and results are compared with those obtained with a modified formulation which incorporates a spectrum of sublimating particles of varying sizes at each height in a steady-state surface boundary layer and different specifications of the ventilation velocity.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  12. Isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate in a tropical marine boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Joel; Morin, Samuel; Erbland, Joseph; Grannec, Francis; Patey, Matthew D.; Vicars, William; Alexander, Becky; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term observations of the reactive chemical composition of the tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) are rare, despite its crucial role for the chemical stability of the atmosphere. Recent observations of reactive bromine species in the tropical MBL showed unexpectedly high levels that could potentially have an impact on the ozone budget. Uncertainties in the ozone budget are amplified by our poor understanding of the fate of NOx (= NO + NO2), particularly the importance of nighttime chemical NOx sinks. Here, we present year-round observations of the multiisotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate in the tropical MBL at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory. We show that the observed oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate are compatible with nitrate formation chemistry, which includes the BrNO3 sink at a level of ca. 20 ± 10% of nitrate formation pathways. The results also suggest that the N2O5 pathway is a negligible NOx sink in this environment. Observations further indicate a possible link between the NO2/NOx ratio and the nitrogen isotopic content of nitrate in this low NOx environment, possibly reflecting the seasonal change in the photochemical equilibrium among NOx species. This study demonstrates the relevance of using the stable isotopes of oxygen and nitrogen of atmospheric nitrate in association with concentration measurements to identify and constrain chemical processes occurring in the MBL. PMID:23431201

  13. Applications of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) 'MASC' in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, Norman; Platis, Andreas; Tupman, David-James; Bange, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) MASC (Multipurpose Airborne Sensor Carrier) was developed at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with the University of Stuttgart, University of Applied Sciences Ostwestfalen-Lippe and 'ROKE-Modelle'. Its purpose is the investigation of thermodynamic processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), including observations of temperature, humidity and wind profiles, as well as the measurement of turbulent heat, moisture and momentum fluxes. The aircraft is electrically powered, has a maximum wingspan of 3.40~m and a total weight of 5-8~kg, depending on the battery- and payload. The standard meteorological payload consists of two temperature sensors, a humidity sensor, a flow probe, an inertial measurement unit and a GNSS. The sensors were optimized for the resolution of small-scale turbulence down to length scales in the sub-meter range. In normal operation, the aircraft is automatically controlled by the ROCS (Research Onboard Computer System) autopilot to be able to fly predefined paths at constant altitude and airspeed. Only take-off and landing are carried out by a human RC pilot. Since 2012, the system is operational and has since then been deployed in more than ten measurement campaigns, with more than 100 measurement flights. The fields of research that were tackled in these campaigns include sensor validation, fundamental boundary-layer research and wind-energy research. In 2014, for the first time, two MASC have been operated at the same time within a distance of a few kilometres, in order to investigate the wind field over an escarpment in the Swabian Alb. Furthermore, MASC was first deployed off-shore in October 2014, starting from the German island Heligoland in the North Sea, for the purpose of characterization of the marine boundary layer for offshore wind parks. Detailed descriptions of the experimental setup and first preliminary results will be presented.

  14. Application of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) 'MASC' in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, Norman; Bange, Jens

    2014-05-01

    The remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) MASC (Multipurpose Airborne Sensor Carrier) was developed at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with the University of Stuttgart, University of Applied Sciences Ostwestfalen-Lippe and 'ROKE-Modelle'. Its purpose is the investigation of thermodynamic processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), including observations of temperature, humidity and wind profiles, as well as the measurement of turbulent heat, moisture and momentum fluxes. The aircraft is electrically powered, has a maximum wingspan of 3.40 m and a total weight of 5-8 kg, depending on battery- and payload. The standard meteorological payload consists of temperature sensors, a humidity sensor, a flow probe, an inertial measurement unit and a GNSS. In normal operation, the aircraft is automatically controlled by the ROCS (Research Onboard Computer System) autopilot to be able to fly predefined paths at constant altitude and airspeed. Since 2010 the system has been tested and improved intensively. In September 2012 first comparative tests could successfully be performed at the Lindenberg observatory of Germany's National Meteorological Service (DWD). In 2013, several campaigns were done with the system, including fundamental boundary layer research, wind energy meteorology and assistive measurements to aerosol investigations. The results of a series of morning transition experiments in summer 2013 will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the measurement system. On several convective days between May and September, vertical soundings were done to record the evolution of the ABL in the early morning, from about one hour after sunrise, until noon. In between the soundings, flight legs of up to 1 km length were performed to measure turbulent statistics and fluxes at a constant altitude. With the help of surface flux measurements of a sonic anemometer, methods of similarity theory could be applied to the RPA flux measurements to compare them to

  15. Dynamics above a dense equatorial rain forest from the surface boundary layer to the free atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, R.; Druilhet, A.; Benech, B.; Biona, C. Bouka

    1992-08-01

    During the Dynamique et Chimie de l'Atmosphère en Forêt Equatoriale (DECAFE) campaign, dynamical and thermodynamical measurements were made at Impfondo (1°37'N, 18°04'W), over the dense rain forest of northern Congo during the dry season (February 1988). During the measurement period the experimental site was located south of the intertropical convergence zone ground track which manages the dynamics of the large scale. Above the experimental site, the atmospheric low layers are supplied by monsoon air coming from the Guinean gulf; the upper layers (>1500 m) are supplied by warm and dry air (trade winds) coming from the northern desert region and the savanna. Our experimental approach consists of analyzing the heat and moisture content in the low troposphere from vertical soundings made by a tethered balloon (0-400 m) and an aircraft (0-4000 m). The analysis of the evolution of the observed planetary boundary layer (PBL) is made with a mixed layer one-dimensional model which is forced to represent correctly the observed PBL height growth. The simulated and observed budgets of the heat and moisture in the PBL are balanced by adding dry air to the simulated PBL in the afternoon. This drying out can be maintained only by high levels of entrainment flux at the PBL top. An entrainment velocity of 3 cm s-1 enables the balancing of the moisture budget. This entrainment velocity seems compatible with physicochemical transfers as those of methane and ozone.

  16. Atmospheric Aerosol and Thermal Structure in the Boundary Layer Over the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Warren B.

    1973-01-01

    A field study using a mobile lidar was recently conducted in the L. A. Basin, California, to (1) examine the relationship between the vertical aerosol and the thermal structure, and (2) map the vertical aerosol structure in the atmospheric boundary layer over the basin. These data are needed for use in the development of a mixing-depth submodel required for photochemical air Quality simulation models. Toward these ends, a series of lidar aerosol measurements in conjunction with balloon and aircraft temperature soundings were taken at a site in El Monte, and in a mobile mode along a 90-mile freeway loop between El Monte, Santa Monica, and Long Beach. The lidar data are presented in the form of time-height and distance-height cross sections. The results indicate that, although aerosol concentrations are frequently present above the base of the marine inversion, these are generally in stratified layers in contrast to the more uniform nature of the lower convective layer, permitting the mixing depth to be distinguished on this basis. The lidar-derived mixing depths are well correlated (within 100 m) with daytime temperature inversions. Other significant features shown by the lidar data include large Basin-wide mixing-depth variations, waves with amplitudes of 200-300 m and wavelengths of 1000-1500 m on the lower aerosol layer, and apparent aerosol "chimneys" with overrunning in the vicinity of convergence zones.

  17. Interaction of the atmospheric boundary layer with large-scale processes over the Bay of Bengal during MONEX79

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Bay of Bengal cyclogenesis processes. The boundary layer experiment at Digha consisted of three main components: (1) a 10 m micrometeorological tower at the beach with instruments to observe turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum over the ocean; (2) a weather station that continuously recorded mean parameters; and (3) pilot balloon observations to a height of about 1000 m.

  18. Polarized light scattering by aerosols in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.; Erskine, Lael L.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1997-07-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered from marine aerosols affect visibility and contrast in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). The polarization properties of scattered light in the MABL vary with size, refractive index, number distributions, and environmental conditions. Laboratory measurements were used to determine the characteristics and variability of the polarization of light scattered by aerosols similar to those in the MABL. Scattering from laboratory-generated sea-salt-containing (SSC) NaCl, (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , and seawater components of marine aerosols was measured with a scanning polarization-modulated nephelometer. Mie theory with Gaussian and log normal size distributions of spheres was used to calculate the polarized light scattering from various aerosol composition models and from experimentally determined distributions of aerosols in the marine boundary layer. The modeling was verified by comparison with scattering from distilled water aerosols. The study suggests that polarimetric techniques can be used to enhance techniques for improving visibility and remote imaging for various aerosol types, Sun angles, and viewing conditions.

  19. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Sensors for Application in a Wake Vortex Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rutishauser, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric boundary layer has advanced in recent years with the development of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radar, sodar, and lidar wind profiling technology. Radio acoustic sounding systems for vertical temperature profiles of high temporal scales (when compared to routine balloon soundings- (radiosondes) have also become increasingly available as COTS capabilities. Aircraft observations during landing and departures are another source of available boundary layer data. This report provides an updated assessment of available sensors, their performance specifications and rough order of magnitude costs for a potential future aircraft Wake Vortex Avoidance System (WakeVAS). Future capabilities are also discussed. Vertical profiles of wind, temperature, and turbulence are anticipated to be needed at airports in any dynamic wake avoidance system. Temporal and spatial resolution are dependent on the selection of approach and departure corridors to be protected. Recommendations are made for potential configurations of near-term sensor technologies and for testing some of the sensor systems in order to validate performance in field environments with adequate groundtruth.

  20. Characteristics of Spatiotemporally Homogenized Boundary Layers at Atmospheric Reentry-like Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers approximating those found on the NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle thermal protection system during atmospheric reentry from the International Space Station have been studied by direct numerical simulation using a ``slow growth'' spatiotemporal homogenization approach recently developed by Topalian et al. The two data sets generated were Mae ~ 0 . 9 and 1 . 15 homogenized boundary layers possessing Reθ ~ 382 and 531, respectively. Edge-to-wall temperature ratios were approximately 4.15 and wall blowing velocities, vw+ =vw /uτ , were roughly 8 ×10-3 . The favorable pressure gradients had Pohlhausen parameters between 25 and 42. Nusselt numbers under 22 were observed. Small or negative displacement effects are evident. Near-wall vorticity fluctuations show qualitatively different profiles than observed by Spalart [J. Fluid Mech. 187 (1988)] or Guarini et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 414 (2000)] suggesting that the simulations have atypical structures perhaps as a consequence of wall blowing or the homogenization. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  1. Improved Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations of Tropical Cyclones with the Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, D. Esteban; Chang, P.; Carswel, J.; Contreras, R.; Chu, T.; Asuzu, P.; Black, P.; Marks, F.

    2006-01-01

    The Imaging Wind and Rain Arborne Profilers (IWRAP) is a dual-frequency, conically-scanning Doppler radar that measures high-resolution, dual-polarized, multi-beam C- and Ku-band reflectivity and Doppler velocity profiles of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) within the inner core of hurricanes.From the datasets acquired during the 2002 through 20O5 hurricane seasons as part of the ONR Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program and the NOAA/NESDIS Ocean Winds and Rain experiments, very high resolution radar observations of hurricanes have been acquired and made available to the CBLAST community. Of particular interest am the ABL wind fields and 3-D structures found within the inner core of hurricanes. As a result of these analysis, a limitation in the ability to retrieve the ABL wind field at very low altitudes was identified. This paper shows how this limitation has been removed and presents initial results demonstrating its new capabilities to derive the ABL wind field within the inner are of hurricanes to much lower altitudes than the ones the original system was capable of.

  2. Influence of the characteristics of atmospheric boundary layer on the vertical distribution of air pollutant in China's Yangtze River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenggang; Cao, Le

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution occurring in the atmospheric boundary layer is a kind of weather phenomenon which decreases the visibility of the atmosphere and results in poor air quality. Recently, the occurrence of the heavy air pollution events has become more frequent all over Asia, especially in Mid-Eastern China. In December 2015, the most severe air pollution in recorded history of China occurred in the regions of Yangtze River Delta and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei. More than 10 days of severe air pollution (Air Quality Index, AQI>200) appeared in many large cities of China such as Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Baoding. Thus, the research and the management of the air pollution has attracted most attentions in China. In order to investigate the formation, development and dissipation of the air pollutions in China, a field campaign has been conducted between January 1, 2015 and January 28, 2015 in Yangtze River Delta of China, aiming at a intensive observation of the vertical structure of the air pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer during the time period with heavy pollution. In this study, the observation data obtained in the field campaign mentioned above is analyzed. The characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer and the vertical distribution of air pollutants in the city Dongshan located in the center of Lake Taihu are shown and discussed in great detail. It is indicated that the stability of the boundary layer is the strongest during the nighttime and the early morning of Dongshan. Meanwhile, the major air pollutants, PM2.5 and PM10 in the boundary layer, reach their maximum values, 177.1μg m-3 and 285μg m-3 respectively. The convective boundary layer height in the observations ranges from approximately 700m to 1100m. It is found that the major air pollutants tend to be confined in a relatively shallow boundary layer, which represents that the boundary layer height is the dominant factor for controlling the vertical distribution of the air pollutants. In

  3. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  4. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  5. Aerosols in the Convective Boundary Layer: Radiation Effects on the Coupled Land-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Schroter, J.; Donovan, D. P.; Krol, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols using a combination of observations and numerical simulations. A detailed observational dataset containing (thermo)dynamic variables observed at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) and aerosol information from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud, Climate, and Air Quality Interactions (IMPACT/EUCAARI) campaign is employed to design numerical experiments reproducing two prototype clear-sky days characterized by: (i) a well-mixed residual layer above a ground inversion and (ii) a continuously growing CBL. A large-eddy simulation (LES) model and a mixed-layer (MXL) model, both coupled to a broadband radiative transfer code and a land-surface model, are used to study the impacts of aerosol scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation on the land-atmosphere system. We successfully validate our model results using the measurements of (thermo)dynamic variables and aerosol properties for the two different CBL prototypes studied here. Our findings indicate that in order to reproduce the observed surface energy budget and CBL dynamics, information of the vertical structure and temporal evolution of the aerosols is necessary. Given the good agreement between the LES and the MXL model results, we use the MXL model to explore the aerosol effect on the land-atmosphere system for a wide range of optical depths and single scattering albedos. Our results show that higher loads of aerosols decrease irradiance, imposing an energy restriction at the surface. Over the studied well-watered grassland, aerosols reduce the sensible heat flux more than the latent heat flux. As a result, aerosols increase the evaporative fraction. Moreover, aerosols also delay the CBL morning onset and anticipate its afternoon collapse. If also present above the CBL during the morning transition, aerosols maintain a persistent near

  6. Isotope discrimination and partitioning exercises at the scale of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, J.; Helliker, B.; Bakwin, P.; Davis, K.; Torn, M.

    2003-12-01

    During the daytime the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is typically well mixed by convection up to about 1.5 km and moves across the land about 500 km per day. Underlying ecosystems modify carbon dioxide in the ABL through photosynthesis and respiration, and ABL air is ultimately replaced by air from the overlying free troposphere. Hence, measurements of carbon dioxide and isotopes in the ABL and the free troposphere offer the potential for regionally integrated estimates of isotope discrimination. We use tall-tower and airplane measurements of carbon dioxide and carbon and oxygen isotopes to develop estimates of ABL-scale isotope discrimination. We then utilize ecosystem-level measurements of the isotope ratio of respiration and land surface model estimates of photosynthetic discrimination to deconvolve net carbon dioxide fluxes into the gross components of photosynthesis and respiration at the regional scale.

  7. On Lamb wave propagation from small surface explosions in the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    ReVelle, D.O.; Kulichkov, S.N.

    1998-12-31

    The problem of Lamb waves propagation from small explosions in the atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. The results of lamb waves registrations from surface explosions with yields varied from 3 tons up to a few hundred tons (TNT equivalent) are presented. The source-receiver distances varied from 20 km up to 310 km. Most of the explosions were conducted during the evening and early morning hours when strong near-surface temperature and wind inversions existed. The corresponding profiles of effective sound velocity are presented. Some of the explosions had been realized with 15 minute intervals between them when morning inversion being destroyed. Corresponding transformation of Lamb waves was observed. The Korteveg-de Vrize equation to explain experimental data on Lamb waves propagation along earth surface is used.

  8. The influence of Nunataks on atmospheric boundary layer convection during summer in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenmark, Aurora; Hole, Lars Robert; Voss, Paul; Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius O.

    2014-06-01

    The effects of nunataks on temperature profiles and wind patterns are studied using simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Simulations are compared to hourly observations from an automatic weather station located at the Troll Research Station in Dronning Maud Land. Areas of bare ground have been implemented in the model, and the simulations correspond well with meteorological measurements acquired during the 4 day simulation period. The nunataks are radiatively heated during daytime, and free convection occurs in the overlying atmospheric boundary layer. The inflow below the updraft forces strong horizontal convergence at the surface, whereas weaker divergence appears aloft. In a control run with a completely ice-covered surface, the convection is absent. In situ observations carried out by a remotely controlled balloon and a small model airplane compare well with model temperature profiles, but these are only available over the ice field upwind to the nunatak.

  9. Interaction of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow With Permeable Tapered Forest Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruck, B.; Frank, C.; Tischmacher, M.

    2010-05-01

    Experimental investigations in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel were carried out in order to study the influence of the windward forest edge structure on the flow characteristics above the canopy. Two different types of forest edges were used: abstracted edges, made of highly porous foam, and more realistic edges, consisting of individual model trees. The taper angle of the edge was varied three times for both edge types and all edges were combined with both dense and sparse forest stands. Time-averaged mean and turbulent flow quantities were measured by means of a two-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer system (LDA) and are presented in form of horizontal profiles near the canopy top.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-11-01

    The development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and contamination of natural plant populations enhanced the importance of understanding wind dispersion of airborne pollen. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using large eddy simulation. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of great importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. The velocity field is discretized using a pseudospectral approach. However the application of the same discretization scheme to the pollen equation generates unphysical solutions (i.e. negative concentrations). The finite-volume bounded scheme SMART is used for the pollen equation. A conservative interpolation scheme to determine the velocity field on the finite volume surfaces was developed. The implementation is validated against field experiments of point source and area field releases of pollen.

  11. Acid–base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L.; Eisele, Fred L.; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Hanson, David R.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid–base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta. PMID:23091030

  12. Large eddy simulations and reduced models of the Unsteady Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, M.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2013-12-01

    Most studies of the dynamics of Atmospheric Boundary Layers (ABLs) have focused on steady geostrophic conditions, such as the classic Ekman boundary layer problem. However, real-world ABLs are driven by a time-dependent geostrophic forcing that changes at sub-diurnal scales. Hence, to advance our understanding of the dynamics of atmospheric flows, and to improve their modeling, the unsteady cases have to be analyzed and understood. This is particularly relevant to new applications related to wind energy (e.g. short-term forecast of wind power changes) and pollutant dispersion (forecasting of rapid changes in wind velocity and direction after an accidental spill), as well as to classic weather prediction and hydrometeorological applications. The present study aims to investigate the ABL behavior under variable forcing and to derive a simple model to predict the ABL response under these forcing fluctuations. Simplifications of the governing Navier-Stokes equations, with the Coriolis force, are tested using LES and then applied to derive a physical model of the unsteady ABL. LES is then exploited again to validate the analogy and the output of the simpler model. Results from the analytical model, as well as LES outputs, open the way for inertial oscillations to play an important role in the dynamics. Several simulations with different variable forcing patterns are then conducted to investigate some of the characteristics of the unsteady ABL such as resonant frequency, ABL response time, equilibrium states, etc. The variability of wind velocity profiles and hodographs, turbulent kinetic energy, and vertical profiles of the total stress and potential temperature are also examined. Wind Hodograph of the Unsteady ABL at Different Heights - This figure shows fluctuations in the mean u and v components of the velocity as time passes due to variable geostrophic forcing

  13. Atmospheric new particle formation as source of CCN in the Eastern Mediterranean marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Stavroulas, I.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2015-04-01

    While Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) production associated with atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is thought to be frequent throughout the continental boundary layers, few studies on this phenomenon in marine air exist. Here, based on simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions, CCN properties and aerosol chemical composition, we present the first direct evidence on CCN production resulting from NPF in the Eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. We show that condensation of both gaseous sulfuric acid and organic compounds from multiple sources leads to the rapid growth of nucleated particles to CCN sizes in this environment during the summertime. Sub-100 nm particles were found to be substantially less hygroscopic than larger particles during the period with active NPF and growth (0.2-0.4 lower κ between the 60 and 120 nm particles), probably due to enrichment of organic material in the sub-100 nm size range. The aerosol hygroscopicity tended to be at minimum just before the noon and at maximum in afternoon, which was very likely due to the higher sulfate to organic ratios and higher degree of oxidation of the organic material during the afternoon. Simultaneously to the formation of new particles during daytime, particles formed in the previous day or even earlier were growing into the size range relevant to cloud droplet activation, and the particles formed in the atmosphere were possibly mixed with long-range transported particles.

  14. Atmospheric new particle formation as a source of CCN in the eastern Mediterranean marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Stavroulas, I.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2015-08-01

    While cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production associated with atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is thought to be frequent throughout the continental boundary layers, few studies on this phenomenon in marine air exist. Here, based on simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions, CCN properties and aerosol chemical composition, we present the first direct evidence on CCN production resulting from NPF in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. We show that condensation of both gaseous sulfuric acid and organic compounds from multiple sources leads to the rapid growth of nucleated particles to CCN sizes in this environment during the summertime. Sub-100 nm particles were found to be substantially less hygroscopic than larger particles during the period with active NPF and growth (the value of κ was lower by 0.2-0.4 for 60 nm particles compared with 120 nm particles), probably due to enrichment of organic material in the sub-100 nm size range. The aerosol hygroscopicity tended to be at minimum just before the noon and at maximum in the afternoon, which was very likely due to the higher sulfate-to-organic ratios and higher degree of oxidation of the organic material during the afternoon. Simultaneous with the formation of new particles during daytime, particles formed during the previous day or even earlier were growing into the size range relevant to cloud droplet activation, and the particles formed in the atmosphere were possibly mixed with long-range-transported particles.

  15. Large eddy simulation of a large wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Under conventionally neutral conditions, the boundary layer is frequently capped by an inversion layer, which counteracts vertical entrainment of kinetic energy. Very large wind farms are known to depend on vertical entrainment to transport energy from above the farm towards the turbines. In this study, large eddy simulations of an infinite wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer are performed. By carefully selecting the initial potential-temperature profile, the influence of the height and the strength of a capping inversion on the power output of a wind farm is investigated. Results indicate that both the height and the strength have a significant effect on the boundary layer flow, and that the height of the neutral boundary layer is effectively controlled by the capping inversion. In addition, it is shown that the vertical entrainment rate decreases for increasing inversion strength or height. In our infinite wind-farm simulations, varying the inversion characteristics leads to differences in power extraction on the order of 13% ± 0.2% (for increasing the strength from 2.5 to 10 K), and 31% ± 0.4% (for increasing the height from 500 to 1500 m). A detailed analysis of the mean kinetic-energy equation is included, showing that the variation in power extraction originates from the work done by the driving pressure gradient related to the boundary layer height and the geostrophic angle, while entrainment of kinetic energy from the free atmosphere does not play a significant role. Also, the effect of inversion strength on power extraction is energetically not related to different amounts of energy entrained, but explained by a difference in boundary layer growth, leading to higher boundary layers for lower inversion strengths. We further present a simple analytical model that allows to obtain wind-farm power output and driving power for the fully developed regime as function of Rossby number and boundary layer height.

  16. Radical product yields from the ozonolysis of short chain alkenes under atmospheric boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Rickard, Andrew R; Camredon, Marie; Wyche, Kevin P; Carr, Timo; Hornsby, Karen E; Monks, Paul S; Bloss, William J

    2013-11-27

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), alkenes, is an important source of the critical atmospheric oxidant OH, especially at night when other photolytic radical initiation routes cannot occur. Alkene ozonolysis is also known to directly form HO2 radicals, which may be readily converted to OH through reaction with NO, but whose formation is poorly understood. We report a study of the radical (OH, HO2, and RO2) production from a series of small alkenes (propene, 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, 2-methylpropene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (tetramethyl ethene, TME), and isoprene). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) atmospheric simulation chamber, with OH and HO2 levels directly measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and HO2 + ΣRO2 levels measured by peroxy-radical chemical amplification (PERCA). OH yields were found to be in good agreement with the majority of previous studies performed under comparable conditions (atmospheric pressure, long time scales) using tracer and scavenger approaches. HO2 yields ranged from 4% (trans-2-butene) to 34% (2-methylpropene), lower than previous experimental determinations. Increasing humidity further reduced the HO2 yields obtained, by typically 50% for an RH increase from 0.5 to 30%, suggesting that HOx production from alkene ozonolysis may be lower than current models suggest under (humid) ambient atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The mechanistic origin of the OH and HO2 production observed is discussed in the context of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:24171583

  17. Multiyear measurements of the oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers at the Brazil-Malvinas confluence region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi; de Souza, Ronald Buss; Acevedo, OtáVio; Wainer, Ilana; Mata, Mauricio M.; Garcia, Carlos A. E.; de Camargo, Ricardo

    2009-10-01

    This study analyzes and discusses data taken from oceanic and atmospheric measurements performed simultaneously at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) region in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. This area is one of the most dynamical frontal regions of the world ocean. Data were collected during four research cruises in the region once a year in consecutive years between 2004 and 2007. Very few studies have addressed the importance of studying the air-sea coupling at the BMC region. Lateral temperature gradients at the study region were as high as 0.3°C km-1 at the surface and subsurface. In the oceanic boundary layer, the vertical temperature gradient reached 0.08°C m-1 at 500 m depth. Our results show that the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) at the BMC region is modulated by the strong sea surface temperature (SST) gradients present at the sea surface. The mean MABL structure is thicker over the warmside of the BMC where Brazil Current (BC) waters predominate. The opposite occurs over the coldside of the confluence where waters from the Malvinas (Falkland) Current (MC) are found. The warmside of the confluence presented systematically higher MABL top height compared to the coldside. This type of modulation at the synoptic scale is consistent to what happens in other frontal regions of the world ocean, where the MABL adjusts itself to modifications along the SST gradients. Over warm waters at the BMC region, the MABL static instability and turbulence were increased while winds at the lower portion of the MABL were strong. Over the coldside of the BC/MC front an opposite behavior is found: the MABL is thinner and more stable. Our results suggest that the sea-level pressure (SLP) was also modulated locally, together with static stability vertical mixing mechanism, by the surface condition during all cruises. SST gradients at the BMC region modulate the synoptic atmospheric pressure gradient. Postfrontal and prefrontal conditions produce opposite thermal

  18. Stability and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer: A comparison of remote sensing and tower observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Katja; Lundquist, Julie K.; Aitken, Matthew; Kalina, Evan A.; Marshall, Robert F.

    2012-02-01

    When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Väisälä frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

  19. Stability and Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Comparison of Remote Sensing and Tower Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Kalina, E. A.; Marshall, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Vaisala frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

  20. Internal gravity-shear waves in the atmospheric boundary layer from acoustic remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulyukin, V. S.; Kallistratova, M. A.; Kouznetsov, R. D.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Chirokova, G. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The year-round continuous remote sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by means of the Doppler acoustic radar (sodar) LATAN-3 has been performed at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, since 2008. A visual analysis of sodar echograms for four years revealed a large number of wavelike patterns in the intensity field of a scattered sound signal. Similar patterns were occasionally identified before in sodar, radar, and lidar sounding data. These patterns in the form of quasi-periodic inclined stripes, or cat's eyes, arise under stable stratification and significant vertical wind shears and result from the loss of the dynamic stability of the flow. In the foreign literature, these patterns, which we call internal gravity-shear waves, are often associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. In the present paper, sodar echograms are classified according to the presence or absence of wavelike patterns, and a statistical analysis of the frequency of their occurrence by the year and season was performed. A relationship between the occurrence of the patterns and wind shear and between the wave length and amplitude was investigated. The criteria for the identification of gravity-shear waves, meteorological conditions of their excitation, and issues related to their observations were discussed.

  1. The Relation Between Wind Speed and Air-Sea Temperature Difference in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer off Northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Wind speed and atmospheric stability have an important role in determining the turbulence in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as well as the surface wave field. The understanding of MABL dynamics in northwest Europe is complicated by fetch effects, the proximity of coastlines, shallow topography, and larger scale circulation patterns (e.g., cold air outbreaks). Numerical models have difficulty simulating the marine atmospheric boundary layer in coastal areas and partially enclosed seas, and this is partly due to spatial resolution problems at coastlines. In these offshore environments, the boundary layer processes are often best understood directly from time series measurements from fixed platforms or buoys, in spite of potential difficulties from platform flow distortion as well as the spatial sparseness of the data sets. This contribution presents the results of time series measurements from offshore platforms in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea in terms of a summary diagnostic - wind speed versus air-sea temperature difference (U-ΔT) - with important implications for understanding atmospheric boundary layer processes. The U-ΔT diagram was introduced in earlier surveys of data from coastal (Sletringen; O.J. Andersen and J. Løvseth, J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 57, 97-109, 1995) and offshore (Statfjord A; K.J. Eidsvik, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 32, 103-132, 1985) sites in northwest Europe to summarize boundary layer conditions at a given location. Additional information from a series of measurement purpose-built offshore measurement and oil/gas production platforms from the southern North Sea to the Norwegian Sea illustrates how the wind characteristics vary spatially over large distances, highlighting the influence of cold air outbreaks, in particular. The results are important for the offshore wind industry because of the way that wind turbines accrue fatigue damage in different conditions of atmospheric stability and wind speed.

  2. Atmospheric Feedback of Urban Boundary Layer with Implications for Climate Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Marissa S; Keener, Timothy C

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric structure changes in response to the urban form, land use, and the type of land cover (LULC). This interaction controls thermal and air pollutant transport and distribution. The interrelationships among LULC, ambient temperature, and air quality were analyzed and found to be significant in a case study in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. Within the urban canopy layer (UCL), traffic-origin PM2.5 and black carbon followed Gaussian dispersion in the near road area in the daytime, while higher concentrations, over 1 order of magnitude, were correlated to the lapse rate under nocturnal inversions. In the overlying urban boundary layer (UBL), ambient temperature and PM2.5 variations were correlated among urban-wide locations indicating effective thermal and mass communications. Beyond the spatial correlation, LULC-related local urban heat island effects are noteworthy. The high-density urbanized zone along a narrow highway-following corridor is marked by higher nighttime temperature by ∼1.6 °C with a long-term increase by 2.0 °C/decade, and by a higher PM2.5 concentration, than in the low-density residential LULC. These results indicate that the urban LULC may have contributed to the nocturnal thermal inversion affecting urban air circulation and air quality in UCL and UBL. Such relationships point to the potentials of climate adaptation through urban planning. PMID:26237246

  3. Nonequilibrium Response of the Daytime Atmospheric Boundary Layer to Mesoscale Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James; Jayaraman, Bajali; Haupt, Sue; Lee, Jared

    2015-11-01

    The essential turbulence structure of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is driven by interactions between shear and buoyancy. A relatively strong inversion layer ``lid'' typically confines the ABL turbulence, whose height grows during the day with increasing surface heat flux (Q0) to ~ 1-2 km before collapsing with Q0 towards the day's end. The 3D ``microscale'' ABL turbulence is forced largely in the horizontal by winds above the capping inversion at the ``mesoscale'' at the O(100) km scale. Whereas the ``canonical'' ABL is in equilibrium and quasi-stationary, quasi-2D weather dynamics at the mesoscale is typically nonstationary at sub-diurnal time scales. We study the consequences of nonstationarity in the quasi-2D mesoscale forcing in horizontal winds and solar heating on the dynamics of ABL turbulence and especially on the potential for significant deviations from the canonical equilibrium state. We apply high-fidelity LES of the dry cloudless ABL over Kansas in July forced at the mesoscale (WRF) with statistical homogeneity in the horizontal. We find significant deviations from equilibrium that appear in a variety of interesting ways. One of the more interesting results is that the changes in mesoscale wind direction at the diurnal time scale can destabilize the ABL and sometimes cause a transition in ABL eddy structure that are normally associated with increased surface heating. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by the Penn State ICS.

  4. Dust aerosol radiative effect and influence on urban atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Chen, M.; Li, L.

    2007-11-01

    An 1.5-level-closure and 3-D non-stationary atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model and a radiation transfer model with the output of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model and lidar AML-1 are employed to simulate the dust aerosol radiative effect and its influence on ABL in Beijing for the period of 23-26 January 2002 when a dust storm occurred. The simulation shows that daytime dust aerosol radiative effect heats up the ABL at the mean rate of about 0.68 K/h. The horizontal wind speed from ground to 900 m layer is also overall increased, and the value changes about 0.01 m/s at 14:00 LT near the ground. At night, the dust aerosol radiative effect cools the ABL at the mean rate of -0.21 K/h and the wind speed lowers down at about -0.19 m/s at 02:00 LT near the ground.

  5. A Study On Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Characteristics At Anand, India Using Lsp Experimental Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Lykossov, V. N.; Mohanty, U. C.

    An attempt is made to study the planetary boundary layer (PBL) characteristics during the winter period at Anand (22.4°N, 72.6°E), a semi-arid region, which is located in the western part of India. A one-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) closure model is used for the study. The structure of the PBL,which consists of profiles of zonal and meridional components of wind,potential temperature and specific humidity, is simulated. A one-dimensional soil heat and moisture transport parameterization scheme is incorporated for the accurate representation of the energy exchange processes at the soil-atmosphere interface. The diurnal variation of fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, shortwave radiation, net radiation and soil flux, soil temperature at different depths, Richardson number and TKE at the height of the constant flux layer is studied. The model predictions are compared with the available observations obtained from a special Land Surface Processes (LSP) experiment.

  6. Comparing modeled isoprene with aircraft-based measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.; Gao, W.

    1997-12-12

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are involved in a complex series of reactions that regulate the levels of oxidants in the troposphere. Isoprene (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}), the primary NMHC emitted from deciduous trees, is one of the most important reactive hydrocarbons in the troposphere. The amount of isoprene entering the free troposphere is regulated by the compound's rate of emission from leaves and by chemical and physical processes in the forest canopy and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This study uses a coupled canopy-ABL model to simulate these complex processes and compares calculated isoprene concentration profiles with those measured during aircraft flights above a forested region in the northeastern US. Land use information is coupled with satellite remote sensing data to describe spatial changes in canopy density during the field measurements. The high-resolution transport-chemistry model of Gao et al. (1993) for the ABL and the forest canopy layer is used to simulate vertical changes in isoprene concentration due to turbulent mixing and chemical reactions. The one-dimensional (1-D) ABL model includes detailed radiation transfer, turbulent diffusion, biogenic emissions, dry deposition, and chemical processes within the forest canopy and the ABL. The measured profiles are compared with the model simulations to investigate the biological, physical, and chemical processes that regulate the levels of isoprene within the ABL.

  7. Pollutant Plume Dispersion in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Idealized Urban Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Colman C. C.; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2013-05-01

    The Gaussian model of plume dispersion is commonly used for pollutant concentration estimates. However, its major parameters, dispersion coefficients, barely account for terrain configuration and surface roughness. Large-scale roughness elements (e.g. buildings in urban areas) can substantially modify the ground features together with the pollutant transport in the atmospheric boundary layer over urban roughness (also known as the urban boundary layer, UBL). This study is thus conceived to investigate how urban roughness affects the flow structure and vertical dispersion coefficient in the UBL. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is carried out to examine the plume dispersion from a ground-level pollutant (area) source over idealized street canyons for cross flows in neutral stratification. A range of building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios, covering the regimes of skimming flow, wake interference, and isolated roughness, is employed to control the surface roughness. Apart from the widely used aerodynamic resistance or roughness function, the friction factor is another suitable parameter that measures the drag imposed by urban roughness quantitatively. Previous results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modelling also support the aforementioned approach for both two- and three-dimensional roughness elements. Comparing the UBL plume behaviour, the LES results show that the pollutant dispersion strongly depends on the friction factor. Empirical studies reveal that the vertical dispersion coefficient increases with increasing friction factor in the skimming flow regime (lower resistance) but is more uniform in the regimes of wake interference and isolated roughness (higher resistance). Hence, it is proposed that the friction factor and flow regimes could be adopted concurrently for pollutant concentration estimate in the UBL over urban street canyons of different roughness.

  8. Global pollution aerosol monitoring (GPAM) in the atmospheric boundary layer using future earth observing satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianhe; Kafatos, Menas; Yang, Ruixin; Chiu, Long S.; Riebau, Allen R.

    2003-04-01

    Global pollution aerosol monitoring is a very important climatic and environmental problem. It affects not only human health but also ecological systems. Because most pollution aerosols are concentrated in the atmospheric boundary layer where human, animal and vegetation live, global pollution aerosol stuides have been an important topic since about a decade ago. Recently, many new chemistry remote sensing satellite systems, such as NASA's Aura (EOS-CHEM), have been established. However, pollution aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer cannot be detected using current remote sensing technologies. George Mason University (GMU) proposes to design scientific algorithms and technologies to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer pollution aerosols, using both satellite remote sensing measurements and ground measurements, collaborating with NASA and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Forest Services (FS). Boundary layer pollution aerosols result from industrial pollution, desert dust storms, smoke from wildfires and biomass burning, volcanic eruptions, and from other trace gases. The current and next generation satellite instruments, such as The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) can be used for this study. Some surface measurements from USDA/FS and other agencies may also be used in this study. We will discuss critical issues for GPAM in the boundary layer using Earth observing satellite remote sensing in detail in this paper.

  9. An Evaluation of Land-Surface Heterogeneity Effects on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes at Various Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolch, M. A.; Avissar, R.

    2010-12-01

    Land-surface heterogeneity (LSH) at different scales has significant influence on atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) buoyant and shear turbulence generation and transfers of water, carbon and heat. The extent of proliferation of this influence into larger-scale circulations and atmospheric structures is a topic continually investigated in experimental and numerical studies, in many cases with the hopes of improving land-atmosphere parameterizations for modeling purposes. The blending height is a potential measure for the vertical propagation of LSH effects into the ABL, and has been the subject of study for several decades. Its potential as a powerful metric and the lack of combined efforts of modeling and observations are the motivations for this study. The central goal of this project is to assess how blending height estimates compare with observed and modeled vertical propagation of heterogeneity. To accomplish this, a Helicopter Observation Platform (HOP) will provide in-situ atmospheric observations at a range of different altitudes, especially in the lower ABL, where the effects of LSH are expected to be the strongest. Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) will be used to filter noise and unwanted trends from the HOP data and to assess possible LSH correlations. An Ocean-Land-Atmosphere-Model (OLAM), a state-of-the-art numerical model will provide high horizontal resolution mesh refinement to resolve large-eddy scale turbulence throughout the observation area. And the modeling and observations are linked through the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) field campaign sites, which supply a host of additional data as well as sites with varying LSH regimes. The patchwork of different crops at the Central Facility (CF) provides a relatively small LSH scale, the forest site at Okmulgee (FS) has vegetated, bare and water areas aggregated at a larger LSH scale, and the Fort Cobb watershed (FC) is dominated by the Fort Cobb Lake, giving the largest scale

  10. The NOx dependence of bromine chemistry in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custard, K. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Pratt, K. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Orlando, J. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E.; Hall, S. R.; Flocke, F.; Mauldin, L.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Pöhler, D.; S., General; Zielcke, J.; Simpson, W. R.; Platt, U.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Cantrell, C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    Arctic boundary layer nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO) are naturally produced in and released from the sunlit snowpack and range between 10 to 100 pptv in the remote background surface layer air. These nitrogen oxides have significant effects on the partitioning and cycling of reactive radicals such as halogens and HOx (OH + HO2). However, little is known about the impacts of local anthropogenic NOx emission sources on gas-phase halogen chemistry in the Arctic, and this is important because these emissions can induce large variability in ambient NOx and thus local chemistry. In this study, a zero-dimensional photochemical kinetics model was used to investigate the influence of NOx on the unique springtime halogen and HOx chemistry in the Arctic. Trace gas measurements obtained during the 2009 OASIS (Ocean - Atmosphere - Sea Ice - Snowpack) field campaign at Barrow, AK were used to constrain many model inputs. We find that elevated NOx significantly impedes gas-phase halogen radical-based depletion of ozone, through the production of a variety of reservoir species, including HNO3, HO2NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), BrNO2, ClNO2 and reductions in BrO and HOBr. The effective removal of BrO by anthropogenic NOx was directly observed from measurements conducted near Prudhoe Bay, AK during the 2012 Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX). Thus, while changes in snow-covered sea ice attributable to climate change may alter the availability of molecular halogens for ozone and Hg depletion, predicting the impact of climate change on polar atmospheric chemistry is complex and must take into account the simultaneous impact of changes in the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic combustion sources. This is especially true for the Arctic, where NOx emissions are expected to increase because of increasing oil and gas extraction and shipping activities.

  11. The NOx dependence of bromine chemistry in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custard, K. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Pratt, K. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Orlando, J. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E.; Hall, S. R.; Flocke, F.; Mauldin, L.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Pöhler, D.; General, S.; Zielcke, J.; Simpson, W. R.; Platt, U.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Cantrell, C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.

    2015-03-01

    Arctic boundary layer nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO) are naturally produced in and released from the sunlit snowpack and range between 10 to 100 pptv in the remote background surface layer air. These nitrogen oxides have significant effects on the partitioning and cycling of reactive radicals such as halogens and HOx (OH + HO2). However, little is known about the impacts of local anthropogenic NOx emission sources on gas-phase halogen chemistry in the Arctic, and this is important because these emissions can induce large variability in ambient NOx and thus local chemistry. In this study, a zero-dimensional photochemical kinetics model was used to investigate the influence of NOx on the unique springtime halogen and HOx chemistry in the Arctic. Trace gas measurements obtained during the 2009 OASIS (Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack) field campaign at Barrow, AK were used to constrain many model inputs. We find that elevated NOx significantly impedes gas-phase radical chemistry, through the production of a variety of reservoir species, including HNO3, HO2NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), BrNO2, ClNO2 and reductions in BrO and HOBr, with a concomitant, decreased net O3 loss rate. The effective removal of BrO by anthropogenic NOx was directly observed from measurements conducted near Prudhoe Bay, AK during the 2012 Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX). Thus, while changes in snow-covered sea ice attributable to climate change may alter the availability of molecular halogens for ozone and Hg depletion, predicting the impact of climate change on polar atmospheric chemistry is complex and must take into account the simultaneous impact of changes in the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic combustion sources. This is especially true for the Arctic, where NOx emissions are expected to increase because of increasing oil and gas extraction and shipping activities.

  12. Atmospheric boundary layer characteristics and land-atmosphere energy transfer in the Third Pole area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Zhu, Z.; Amatya, P. M.; Chen, X.; Hu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Li, M.; Ma, W.

    2015-05-01

    The Tibetan Plateau and nearby surrounding area (the Third Pole area) dramatically impacts the world's environment and especially controls climatic and environmental changes in China, Asia and even in the Northern Hemisphere. Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and some international organizations, the Third Pole Environment (TPE) Programme is now under way. First, the background of the establishment of the TPE, the establishment and monitoring plans on long-term for the TPE and six comprehensive observation and study stations are introduced. Then the preliminary observational analysis results on atmosphere-land interaction are presented. The study on the regional distribution of land surface heat fluxes is of paramount importance over the heterogeneous landscape of the Third Pole area. A parameterization methodology based on satellite and in situ data is described and tested for deriving the regional surface heat fluxes (net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux) over the heterogeneous landscape. As a case study, the methodology was applied to the whole Tibetan Plateau area. Eight images of MODIS data and four images of AVHRR data were used for the comparison among winter, spring, summer and autumn, and the annual variation analyses. The derived results were also validated by using the ``ground truth'' measured in the stations of the TPE. The results show that the derived surface heat fluxes in the four different seasons over the Tibetan Plateau area are in good agreement with the ground measurements. The results from AVHRR were also in agreement with MODIS. It is therefore concluded that the proposed methodology is successful for the retrieval of surface heat fluxes using the MODIS data, AVHRR data and in situ data over the Tibetan Plateau area.

  13. Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, Jehan Fouad

    Previous observational and modeling studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of atmospheric processes to land surface and subsurface conditions. The extent of the connection between these processes, however, is not yet fully understood. A sufficient understanding is needed of the circumstances under which these coupled processes might play a more significant role and when they might be simplified into the decoupled systems so frequently modeled in practice. This work focuses on the effects of terrain and soil moisture heterogeneity in changing water table depth and energy fluxes at the land surface, and how this might impact the development and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. A three-dimensional, variably saturated groundwater model coupled to a three dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (PF.ARPS) is used here to study the two-way feedback between the subsurface, land-surface, and atmosphere for both idealized cases and a real watershed. This is done by addressing the following key questions: How do terrain, soil moisture heterogeneity, and subsurface properties affect the planetary boundary layer? What are the effects of water table depth on land surface fluxes and boundary layer development and depth? What times of the diurnal cycle and which locations within a watershed demonstrate stronger feedbacks between the subsurface and the atmosphere? These questions are first addressed for idealized simulations designed to illustrate subsurface-surface feedbacks on one hand, and land-atmosphere feedbacks on the other hand. The coupled hydrologic model is then used to simulate real conditions over the Little Washita watershed in Oklahoma with the goal of addressing the above questions for a real watershed, and exploring the two-way feedback between the atmospheric boundary layer and the water table. The coupled simulations are compared to non-coupled atmospheric simulations initialized with simplified and realistic soil moisture profiles. Effects of a

  14. Rotational Raman lidar with a multispectral detector for temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer is essential for studying atmospheric processes such as dynamics, thermodynamics, and cloud physics. The rotational Raman (RR) lidar has the ability to conduct continuous observation of the spatial distributions of atmospheric temperature. In this study, a combination of the temperature lidar with a multispectral detector is proposed, in order to construct a system that is compact, robust, and easy to align for the detection of RR signals. The multispectral detector enables simultaneous acquisition of multi-channel photon counts and provides spectral and range-resolved data by applying lidar techniques. Conventional temperature lidar detects the ratio of two RR lidar signals of opposite temperature dependence in combination with several edge- and interference-filters. Conversely, the multispectral detector can define the shape of the RR spectrum. Therefore, the proposed system with a multispectral detector detects the variation of the lidar signals by temperature as well as that of the wavelength shift of the emitted laser. It is suggested that this technique can reduce uncertainties in the optical alignment of the polychromator and in the stability of laser wavelength. The statistical temperature-error derived from the proposed method depends on both the spectral resolution and the spectral range of the multispectral detector. The ideal settings for multispectral observation were estimated by the theoretical simulation of the effect of both spectral resolution and spectral range on the accuracy of temperature estimation. Further, we construct the temperature lidar by employing the multispectral detector with the ideal spectral resolution derived from the simulation. In this presentation, we introduce our proposed system and the preliminary results of the temperature observation from RR lidar with a multi spectral detector.

  15. Ocean front-atmosphere interactions in the marine boundary layer and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Xu, H.; Minobe, S.; Zhang, S.; Liu, J.

    2012-12-01

    A bottle neck for extratropical climate prediction is insufficient understanding of how the atmosphere responds to oceanic changes. On the basin scale, interannual variability tends to be negatively correlated between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed, indicative of the atmosphere forcing ocean. Recent satellite observations reveal ubiquitous positive correlations between SST and wind on the ocean mesoscale (1,000km or less), indicating that ocean forces the atmosphere near SST fronts and over ocean eddies. Such ocean frontal effects are recorded in high-wind (>20 m/s) occurrence along the Gulf Stream and Southern Ocean circumpolar current. The SST effect is also evident in low cloud occurrence and type (fog vs. stratocumulus) across ocean fronts. An important question is whether such ocean frontal effects are confined to the marine boundary layer (MBL) or extend into the troposphere. Deep response has been observed along the Gulf Stream, Kuroshio and its extension. The second half of the paper focuses on the East China Sea, which the Kuroshio flows through. Meiyu-Baiu is an elongated rain band that extends from eastern China through Japan. Bringing much needed rain to the region, it is the single most important climate phenomenon of East Asia. Evidence is emerging that the warm Kuroshio anchors active convection and heavy rainfall during late spring to summer, presumably through surface wind convergence and locally enhanced evaporation. Fog frequents the East China Sea and its coasts during the Meiyu-Baiu season as the broad southerly monsoon embrace East Asia. Sea fog visualizes suppressed surface evaporation, which in turn modulates the regional rainfall distribution. Several field experiments are ongoing/planned to explore the rich interactions between the Kuroshio, MBL, and troposphere.

  16. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  17. Speciated atmospheric mercury in the marine boundary layer of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunjie; Ci, Zhijia; Wang, Zhangwei; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Guo, Jia

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to identify the spatial and temporal distributions of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), and fine particulate mercury (HgP2.5) in the marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS), and to investigate the relationships between mercury species and meteorological parameters. The mean concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP2.5 were 2.03 ng m-3, 2.5 pg m-3, and 8.2 pg m-3 in spring, and 2.09 ng m-3, 4.3 pg m-3, and 8.3 pg m-3 in fall. Reactive mercury (RGM + HgP2.5) represented < 1% of total atmospheric mercury (GEM + RGM + HgP2.5), which indicated that most mercury export in the MBL was GEM and the direct outflow of reactive mercury was very small. Moreover, GEM concentrations over the BS were generally higher than those over the YS both in spring and fall. Although RGM showed a homogeneous distribution over the BS and YS both in spring and fall, the mean RGM concentration in fall was significantly higher than that in spring. In contrast, the spatial distribution of HgP2.5 generally reflected a gradient with high levels near the coast of China and low levels in the open sea, suggesting the significant atmospheric mercury outflow from China. Interestingly, the mean RGM concentrations during daytime were significantly higher than those during nighttime both in spring and fall, while the opposite results were observed for HgP2.5. Additionally, RGM positively correlates with air temperature while negatively correlates with relative humidity. In conclusion, the elevated atmospheric mercury levels in the BS and YS compared to other open seas suggested that the human activities had a significant influence on the oceanic mercury cycle downwind of China.

  18. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  19. The Morning NO x maximum in the forest atmosphere boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghmand, M.; Shepson, P. B.; Starn, T. K.; Jobson, B. T.; Wallace, H. W.; Carroll, M. A.; Bertman, S. B.; Lamb, B.; Edburg, S. L.; Zhou, X.; Apel, E.; Riemer, D.; Stevens, P.; Keutsch, F.

    2011-10-01

    During the 1998, 2000, 2001, 2008, and 2009 summer intensives of the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions and Transport (PROPHET), ambient measurement of nitrogen oxides (NO + NO2 = NOx) were conducted. NO and NOx mole fractions displayed a diurnal pattern with NOx frequently highest in early morning. This pattern has often been observed in other rural areas. In this paper, we discuss the potential sources and contributing factors of the frequently observed morning pulse of NOx. Of the possible potential contributing factors to the observed morning pulse of NO and NOx, we find that surface-layer transport and slow upward mixing from soil emissions, related to the thermodynamic stability in the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) before its morning breakup are the largest contributors. The morning NOx peak can significantly impact boundary layer chemistry, e.g. through production of HONO on surfaces, and by increasing the importance of NO3 chemistry in the morning boundary layer.

  20. Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, J. F.; Maxwell, R. M.; Katopodes Chow, F.

    2008-12-01

    There is a growing body of literature recognizing the connection between atmospheric boundary layer processes and surface and subsurface heterogeneity and flow, but much remains unknown about the nature of these hydrologic feedbacks. In recent work, the three-dimensional, variably saturated groundwater model ParFlow (PF) was coupled to the three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System). The coupled model, PF.ARPS, was used to demonstrate atmosphere-land surface-subsurface interactions for a watershed in Oklahoma. In the current work, this coupled model is used to study effects of water table dynamics and soil moisture heterogeneity on the development and behavior of the atmospheric boundary layer for a set of idealized test cases. Numerical experiments that isolate the effects of subsurface heterogeneity, terrain, soil moisture initialization, and atmospheric conditions are performed. Detailed soil moisture distributions from offline spinups using ParFlow coupled to the Common Land Model (PF.CLM) are used to initialize idealized PF.ARPS runs. Results indicate that the water table becomes more dynamic as subsurface heterogeneity increases. This is reflected in soil moisture profiles and thus energy fluxes and evaporation at the land surface. Our results also illustrate the role of terrain in inducing differential land surface heating and cooling which stimulates the development of convective circulations in addition to those induced from heterogeneous soil moisture. Subsequent effects on atmospheric boundary layer development are discussed.

  1. On the characterization of coherent structures within a neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, Giuseppe; Le Bastide, Benen; Gaebler, Julia; Kinzel, Matias; Rival, David

    2012-11-01

    Up to this point, a clear characterization of wind turbulence and extreme gust events through experimentation has frustrated countless researchers. The statistical analysis of fluctuating components has been exhausted while the conditional analysis of extreme events, though insightful, often results in constricted conclusions that cannot be bridged from study to study. Thus the current study shifts towards an understanding of the fundamental turbulent flow structures within a neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layer. Two approaches to characterize coherent wind structures are presented. The first approach identifies hairpin-vortex heads by correlating three-dimensional, fluctuating data from two high-speed anemometers situated at 40m and 50m heights on a wind mast. The model assumes that a hairpin-vortex head can be approximated as a transverse vortex with a Vatistas viscous core of assumed radius when the hairpin-vortex head impinges onto the two anemometers. The second approach employs large-scale particle tracking velocimetry to follow seeded bubbles next to the wind mast. The results obtained with both approaches are then compared, and the advantages and shortcomings of each method are discussed.

  2. Near-wake instability and sensitivity analysis of wind turbines immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, François

    2014-11-01

    In wind farms, the separation distance among wind turbines is mainly determined by the downstream recovery of wind turbine wakes, which affects in turn power production and fatigue loads of downstream turbines. Thus, the optimization of a wind farm relies on the understanding of the single wake dynamics and a better characterization of their interactions within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This work is focused on the stability analysis of vorticity structures present in wind turbine wakes. In order to take into account the effects of a non-uniform incoming wind investing the turbine, a 3D local stability analysis is performed on the non-axisymmetric swirling wake prevailing at different downstream stations. Different wind shear and veer of the incoming wind can now be investigated, together with a 3D non-isotropic turbulent velocity field. This procedure enables to perform stability analysis of wind turbine wakes for wind conditions very similar to the ones experienced in reality. The present analysis is carried out on wind tunnel data acquired in the wake of a down-scaled three-bladed wind turbine. The Reynolds stresses are taken into account via eddy-viscosity models calibrated on the experimental data. Furthermore, the effect of an external perturbation in the wake flow is investigated through linear sensitivity. This analysis represents a preliminary step for control of wind turbine wakes, and optimization of wake interactions and power harvesting.

  3. Scaling laws of turbulence intermittency in the atmospheric boundary layer: the role of stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Cesari, Rita; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Bursting and intermittent behavior is a fundamental feature of turbulence, especially in the vicinity of solid obstacles. This is associated with the dynamics of turbulent energy production and dissipation, which can be described in terms of coherent motion structures. These structures are generated at random times and remain stable for long times, after which they become suddenly unstable and undergo a rapid decay event. This intermittent behavior is described as a birth-death point process of self-organization, i.e., a sequence of critical events. The Inter-Event Time (IET) distribution, associated with intermittent self-organization, is typically a power-law decay, whose power exponent is known as complexity index and characterizes the complexity of the system, i.e., the ability to develop self-organized, metastable motion structures. We use a method, based on diffusion scaling, for the estimation of system's complexity. The method is applied to turbulence velocity data in the atmospheric boundary layer. A neutral condition is compared with a stable one, finding that the complexity index is lower in the neutral case with respect to the stable one. As a consequence, the crucial birth-death events are more rare in the stable case, and this could be associated with a less efficient transport dynamics.

  4. Adjustment of the summertime marine atmospheric boundary layer to the western Iberia coastal morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Isabel T.; Santos, Aires J.; Belo-Pereira, Margarida; Oliveira, Paulo B.

    2016-04-01

    During summer (June, July, and August), northerly winds driven by the Azores anticyclone are prevalent over western Iberia. The Quick Scatterometer Satellite 2000 to 2009 summertime estimates reveal a broad high wind speed (≥7 ms-1) area extending about 300 km from shore and along the entire Iberian west coast. Nested in this large high-speed region, preferred maximum regions anchored in the Iberian major capes, Finisterre, Roca, and S. Vicente, are found. Composite analyses of wind maxima were performed to diagnose the typical summertime synoptic-scale pressure distribution associated with these smaller size high-speed regions. The flow low-level structure was further studied with a mesoscale numerical prediction model for three northerly events characterized by typical summertime synoptic conditions. A low-level coastal jet, setting the background conditions to the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) response to topography, was found in the three cases. The causes for wind maximum downwind capes were investigated, focusing on the hypothesis that western Iberia MABL responds to hydraulic forcing. For the three events supercritical and transcritical flow conditions were identified and expansion fan signatures were found downwind each cape. Aircraft measurements, performed during one of the events, gave additional evidence of the expansion fan leeward Cape Roca. The importance of other forcing mechanisms was also assessed by considering the hypothesis of downslope wind acceleration and found to be in direct conflict with soundings and surface observations.

  5. Simulations of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Farms in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Seyed Hossein; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Lohry, Mark; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    Wind power is an abundant and clean source of energy that is increasingly being tapped to reduce the environmental footprint of anthropogenic activities. The vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) technology is now being revisited due to some important advantages over horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTS) that are particularly important for farms deployed offshore or in complex terrain. In this talk, we will present the implementation and testing of an actuator line model (ALM) for VAWTs in a large eddy simulation (LES) code for the atmospheric boundary layer, with the aim of optimizing large VAWT wind farm configurations. The force coefficients needed for the ALM are here obtained from blade resolving RANS simulations of individual turbines for each configuration. Comparison to various experimental results show that the model can very successfully reproduce observed wake characteristic. The influence of VAWT design parameters such as solidity, height to radius ratio, and tip speed ratio (TSR) on these wake characteristics, particularly the velocity deficit profile, is then investigated.

  6. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  7. Turbulent Transfer Between Street Canyons and the Overlying Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salizzoni, Pietro; Marro, Massimo; Soulhac, Lionel; Grosjean, Nathalie; Perkins, Richard J.

    2011-12-01

    The turbulent exchange of momentum between a two-dimensional cavity and the overlying boundary layer has been studied experimentally, using hot-wire anemometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Conditions within the boundary layer were varied by changing the width of the canyons upstream of the test canyon, whilst maintaining the square geometry of the test canyon. The results show that turbulent transfer is due to the coupling between the instabilities generated in the shear layer above the canyons and the turbulent structures in the oncoming boundary layer. As a result, there is no single, unique velocity scale that correctly characterizes all the processes involved in the turbulent exchange of momentum across the boundary layer. Similarly, there is no single velocity scale that can characterize the different properties of the turbulent flow within the canyon, which depends strongly on the way in which turbulence from the outer flow is entrained into the cavity and carried round by the mean flow. The results from this study will be useful in developing simple parametrizations for momentum exchange in the urban canopy, in situations where the street geometry consists principally of relatively long, uniform streets arranged in grid-like patterns; they are unlikely to be applicable to sparse geometries composed of isolated three-dimensional obstacles.

  8. Interactions between soil moisture and Atmospheric Boundary Layer at the Brazilian savana-type vegetation Cerrado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, L. R.; Siqueira, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Before the large people influx and development of the central part of Brazil in the sixties, due to new capital Brasília, Cerrado, a typical Brazilian savanna-type vegetation, used to occupy about 2 million km2, going all the way from the Amazon tropical forest, in the north of the country, to the edges of what used to be of the Atlantic forest in the southeast. Today, somewhat 50% of this area has given place to agriculture, pasture and managed forests. It is forecasted that, at the current rate of this vegetation displacement, Cerrado will be gone by 2030. Understanding how Cerrado interacts with the atmosphere and how this interaction will be modified with this land-use change is a crucial step towards improving predictions of future climate-change scenarios. Cerrado is a vegetation adapted to a climate characterized by two very distinct seasons, a wet season (Nov-Mar) and dry season (May-Ago), with April and October being transitions between seasons. Typically, based on measurements in a weather station located in Brasilia, 75% of precipitation happens in the wet-season months and only 5% during dry-season. Under these circumstances, it is clear that the vegetation will have to cope with long periods of water stress. In this work we studied using numerical simulations, the interactions between soil-moisture, responsible for the water stress, with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). The numerical model comprises of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere model where the biophysical processes are represented with a big-leaf approach. Soil water is estimated with a simple logistic model and with water-stress effects on stomatal conductance are parameterized from local measurements of simultaneous latent-heat fluxes and soil moisture. ABL evolution is calculate with a slab model that considers independently surface and entrainment fluxes of sensible- and latent- heat. Temperature tropospheric lapse-rate is taken from soundings at local airport. Simulations of 30-day dry

  9. Effects on the atmospheric boundary layer of a solar eclipse in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöblom, Anna

    2010-05-01

    On 1 August 2008, a total solar eclipse took place in the Arctic and in Longyearbyen, the main settlement in the High Arctic archipelago of Svalbard (78° 13' N, 15° 37' E), the maximum solar coverage was 93%. The eclipse had a large impact on the atmospheric boundary layer and the local weather in general around Longyearbyen triggering a fog that lasted for three days. This fog grounded all air traffic to and from Svalbard and so in addition to the change in local weather, the eclipse also had economic and social consequences. Approximately 60% of Svalbard is covered with permanent ice and snow. Permafrost underlies most of the surface. In Longyearbyen, the midnight sun is present between 19 April and 23 August and so on the day of the eclipse the sun was about 30 degrees above the horizon at noon and 6 degrees above at midnight. A rare opportunity therefore occurred to study what happens when the sunlight is suddenly decreased after several months with no dark night. The maximum solar coverage at Longyearbyen took place at 10.41 Local Standard Time. The incoming shortwave radiation had then decreased from approximately 300 W m-2 before the start of the eclipse to 20 W m-2, i.e. less radiation than during a normal cloud free night at the same location at the same time of the year. Observations of turbulence and mean meteorological parameters were taken both over land and over a large fjord in the vicinity of Longyearbyen. In addition, cloud observations were recorded. Data have been analysed in detail from 31 July to 2 August, i.e., from one day before to one day after the eclipse. The simultaneous observations over land and over water showed that the atmospheric response was much faster and stronger over land than over water. Over land, the air temperature sank by 0.3-1.5°C, wind speed decreased, turbulent fluctuations were significantly reduced and the atmospheric stability changed from unstable to stable. Over the fjord, no clear minima in these parameters

  10. Large-eddy Simulation of the Nighttime Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bowen

    A stable atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) develops over land at night due to radiative surface cooling. The state of turbulence in the stable boundary layer (SBL) is determined by the competing forcings of shear production and buoyancy destruction. When both forcings are comparable in strength, the SBL falls into an intermittently turbulent state, where intense turbulent bursts emerge sporadically from an overall quiescent background. This usually occurs on clear nights with weak winds when the SBL is strongly stable. Although turbulent bursts are generally short-lived (half an hour or less), their impact on the SBL is significant since they are responsible for most of the turbulent mixing. The nighttime SBL can be modeled with large-eddy simulation (LES). LES is a turbulence-resolving numerical approach which separates the large-scale energy-containing eddies from the smaller ones based on application of a spatial filter. While the large eddies are explicitly resolved, the small ones are represented by a subfilter-scale (SFS) stress model. Simulation of the SBL is more challenging than the daytime convective boundary layer (CBL) because nighttime turbulent motions are limited by buoyancy stratification, thus requiring fine grid resolution at the cost of immense computational resources. The intermittently turbulent SBL adds additional levels of complexity, requiring the model to not only sustain resolved turbulence during quiescent periods, but also to transition into a turbulent state under appropriate conditions. As a result, LES of the strongly stable SBL potentially requires even finer grid resolution, and has seldom been attempted. This dissertation takes a different approach. By improving the SFS representation of turbulence with a more sophisticated model, intermittently turbulent SBL is simulated, to our knowledge, for the first time in the LES literature. The turbulence closure is the dynamic reconstruction model (DRM), applied under an explicit filtering

  11. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  12. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (< 100 m resolution). It has been proved by LES analysis that, in convective boundary layers, the horizontal production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  13. Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

    2007-12-01

    Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. Estimations of atmospheric boundary layer fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.

    1992-11-01

    Techniques for extraction of boundary layer parameters from measurements of a short pulse (~0.4 μs) CO2 Doppler lidar (λ=10.6 μm) are described. The lidar is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL). The measurements are those collected during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE). The recorded radial velocity measurements have a range resolution of 150 m. With a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz it is possible to perform scannings in two perpendicular vertical planes (x-z and y-z) in approximately 72 s. By continuously operating the lidar for about an hour, one can extract stable statistics of the radial velocities. Assuming that the turbulence is horizontally homogeneous, we have estimated the mean wind, its standard deviations, and the momentum fluxes. We have estimated the first, second, and, third moments of the vertically velocity from the vertical pointing beam. Spectral analysis of the radial velocities is also performed, from which (by examining the amplitude of the power spectrum at the inertial range) we have deduced the kinetic energy dissipation. Finally, using the statistical form of the Navier-Stokes equations, the surface heat flux is derived as the residual balance between the vertical gradient of the third moment of the vertical velocity and the kinetic energy dissipation. With the exception of the vertically pointing beam an individual radial velocity estimate is accurate only to +/-0.7 ms-1. Combining many measurements would normally reduce the error, provided that it is unbiased and uncorrelated. The nature of some of the algorithms, however, is such that biased and correlated errors may be generated even though the ``raw'' measurements are not. We have developed data processing procedures that eliminate bias and minimize error correlation. Once bias and error correlations are accounted for, the large sample size is

  15. Estimations of atmospheric boundary layer fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Xu, Mei; Eberhard, Wynn L.

    1992-11-01

    Techniques for extraction of boundary layer parameters from measurements of a short pulse (≈0.4 μs) CO2 Doppler lidar (λ = 10.6 μm) are described. The lidar is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL). The measurements are those collected during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE). The recorded radial velocity measurements have a range resolution of 150 m. With a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz it is possible to perform scannings in two perpendicular vertical planes (x-z and y-z) in approximately 72 s. By continuously operating the lidar for about an hour, one can extract stable statistics of the radial velocities. Assuming that the turbulence is horizontally homogeneous, we have estimated the mean wind, its standard deviations, and the momentum fluxes. We have estimated the first, second, and, third moments of the vertical velocity from the vertically pointing beam. Spectral analysis of the radial velocities is also performed, from which (by examining the amplitude of the power spectrum at the inertial range) we have deduced the kinetic energy dissipation. Finally, using the statistical form of the Navier-Stokes equations, the surface heat flux is derived as the residual balance between the vertical gradient of the third moment of the vertical velocity and the kinetic energy dissipation. With the exception of the vertically pointing beam an individual radial velocity estimate is accurate only to ±0.7 m s-1. Combining many measurements would normally reduce the error, provided that it is unbiased and uncorrelated. The nature of some of the algorithms, however, is such that biased and correlated errors may be generated even though the "raw" measurements are not. We have developed data processing procedures that eliminate bias and minimize error correlation. Once bias and error correlations are accounted for, the large sample size is

  16. Urban Heat Island and Its Influence on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadygrov, N.; Kruchenitsky, G.; Lykov, A.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of megacity on atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) temperature is a well known phenomenon called "Urban Heat Island" revealed in increasing temperature over megacity relative to its suburb. Until recently the only way to investigate and gather the data about its vertical distribution was to observe temperature on the meteorological, TV towers and by radiosonde. The available information appears to be irregular in time and space. The situation has changed in recent years since the advent of temperature profiler based on microwave radiometer, which can produce the vertical distribution of ABL temperature up to 600 meters ASL with 5 minute sampling period. The station in the center of Moscow megacity and 2 observation sites near Moscow (20 km and 50 km away from city center) were equipped by MTP-5 radiometer in order to get quantitative estimations of the Heat Island Effect on ABL temperature field. Three sites were selected in order to look at transition from megacity to suburb. The main aim was not to get the climatological averages but to get the differences between Heat Island and its background (suburb). The period of observation was from beginning of 2000 till the middle of 2004. The ABL temperature model was developed separately for each station in the multiplicative manner as the product of seasonal and diurnal variations of ABL temperature in order to obtain the differences between Urban Heat Island and suburb ABL temperatures. As the result of data analysis, the amplitudes and phases of seasonal and diurnal harmonics, average annual noon temperature value, average temperature gradients and daily altitude-time crossection of ABL temperature were obtained. The analysis performed in this work has given us a better insight into the mechanism of Urban Heat Island influence on ABL temperature field with quantitative estimations of such influence.

  17. Modelling of atmospheric boundary-layer flow in complex terrain with different forest parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez Arroyo, R.; Sanz Rodrigo, J.; Gankarski, P.

    2014-06-01

    This work explores the accuracy of two approaches that account for the effects of the forest canopy on the wind flow by using a RANS-based model. The first approach implements additional terms in the RANS equations (canopy model), whilst the second one uses large values of roughness length and a zero-plane displacement height. The model uses a limited-length-scale k-epsilon turbulence closure that considers processes occurring in the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer (ABL) such as the Coriolis effects. Both the forest and the ABL implementations are compared with experimental data obtained from 118 m high met masts installed in a large mountain- range site with mixed forest characteristics for neutral stability cases. In order to perform a meaningful comparison at multiple mast locations, a novel methodology is presented which allows the selection of a velocity bin for a given wind direction and a stability class that minimizes the error of using short-term measurement periods at some masts compared to long-term wind statistics from a reference mast. Based on the outcome of the model validation it is possible to conclude that more consistent results are obtained by the canopy model since it reduces the uncertainty in the selection of correct input parameters in the large-roughness approach. The errors in the vertical profiles of velocity and turbulence intensity are reduced by the forest model by almost 63% and 11%, respectively, compared to the standard configuration (no forest). The large-roughness method reduces the error in the velocity profiles by 54% while the predictions of turbulence intensity are barely improved.

  18. Two-phase measurements of wind and saltating sand in an atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2007-07-01

    Wind-blown sand movement is a particle-laden two-phase flow related to wind erosion in which the velocity distributions of both wind and sand are of particular interest. In the present study, two types of natural sand, one collected from the Pohang beach (diameter d = 200-300 μm) in South Korea and the other from the Taklimakan desert ( d = 100-125 μm) in China, were tested in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer. A high-speed digital camera system was used to capture images of the saltating sand particles at 2000 fps with an exposure time of 1/3000 s. Instantaneous velocity fields of the saltating sand particles were obtained using a particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) method. From these data, the particle resultant velocity, volume concentration, and streamwise mass flux were estimated as a function of height. The results reveal that the resultant particle velocity has an approximate log-linear profile with vertical height. Both the particle concentration and streamwise mass flux decay dramatically in the near surface region ( z < 20 mm for the beach sand, and z < 15 mm for the desert sand), then decline mildly beyond this region. To investigate the modification of the surrounding wind by the saltating sand particles, a hot-wire anemometry with a robust hot-film probe was employed to measure the wind velocity profiles with and without saltation. The present experimental data on both the saltating sand and wind provide useful information that enhances our understanding of saltation transport and further development of control techniques of wind erosion.

  19. Atmospheric controls on soil moisture-boundary layer interactions: Three-dimensional wind effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findell, Kirsten L.; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2003-04-01

    This paper expands the one-dimensionally based CTP-HIlow framework for describing atmospheric controls on soil moisture-boundary layer interactions [, 2003] to three dimensions by including low-level wind effects in the analysis. The framework is based on two measures of atmospheric thermodynamic properties: the convective triggering potential (CTP), a measure of the temperature lapse rate between approximately 1 and 3 km above the ground surface, and a low-level humidity index, HIlow. These two measures are used to distinguish between three types of early morning soundings: those favoring rainfall over dry soils, those favoring rainfall over wet soils, and those whose convective potential is unaffected by the partitioning of fluxes at the surface. The focus of this paper is the additional information gained by incorporating information about low-level winds into the CTP-HIlow framework. Three-dimensional simulations using MM5 and an analysis of observations from the FIFE experiment within this framework highlight the importance of the winds in determining the sensitivity of convection to fluxes from the land surface. A very important impact of the 3D winds is the potential for low-level backing or unidirectional winds with great shear to suppress convective potential. Because of this suppression of convection in certain wind conditions, far fewer simulations produced rain than would be anticipated based solely on the 1D framework of understanding. However, when the winds allowed, convection occurred in a manner consistent with the 1D-based expectations. Generally speaking, in the regime where dry soils were expected to have an advantage, convection was triggered over dry soils more often than over wet; in the regime where wet soils were expected to have an advantage, convection was more frequently triggered over wet soils than over dry. Additionally, when rainfall occurred in both simulations with wet soils and simulations with dry soils for a given day, rainfall

  20. Atmospheric boundary layer top height in South Africa: measurements with lidar and radiosonde compared to three atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, K.; Giannakaki, E.; Mielonen, T.; Pfüller, A.; Laakso, L.; Vakkari, V.; Baars, H.; Engelmann, R.; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, P. G.; Ramandh, A.; Ntsangwane, L.; Josipovic, M.; Tiitta, P.; Fourie, G.; Ngwana, I.; Chiloane, K.; Komppula, M.

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric lidar measurements were carried out at Elandsfontein measurement station, on the eastern Highveld approximately 150 km east of Johannesburg in South Africa throughout 2010. The height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) top was continuously measured using a Raman lidar, PollyXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended). High atmospheric variability together with a large surface temperature range and significant seasonal changes in precipitation were observed, which had an impact on the vertical mixing of particulate matter, and hence, on the PBL evolution. The results were compared to radiosondes, CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) space-borne lidar measurements and three atmospheric models that followed different approaches to determine the PBL top height. These models included two weather forecast models operated by ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts) and SAWS (South African Weather Service), and one mesoscale prognostic meteorological and air pollution regulatory model TAPM (The Air Pollution Model). The ground-based lidar used in this study was operational for 4935 h during 2010 (49% of the time). The PBL top height was detected 86% of the total measurement time (42% of the total time). Large seasonal and diurnal variations were observed between the different methods utilised. High variation was found when lidar measurements were compared to radiosonde measurements. This could be partially due to the distance between the lidar measurements and the radiosondes, which were 120 km apart. Comparison of lidar measurements to the models indicated that the ECMWF model agreed the best with mean relative difference of 15.4%, while the second best correlation was with the SAWS model with corresponding difference of 20.1%. TAPM was found to have a tendency to underestimate the PBL top height. The wind speeds in the SAWS and TAPM models were strongly underestimated which probably led to underestimation of the vertical wind

  1. Visualization of the flow field around a generic destroyer model in a simulated turbulent atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinger, William K.

    1987-06-01

    An experimental flow visualization study was performed on a rectangular block and other elements that could be assembled in the form of a generic destroyer ship model. The purpose of the study was to visually analyze the flow field around the model in a simulated open ocean atmospheric boundary layer. To ensure correct simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer, both velocity profile and longitudinal turbulence intensities were matched. For the actual flow visualization studies, two techniques were used. During the on-body portion of the study, the ultraviolet lighting/fluorescent minituft technique was used. For the off-body portion, helium bubble system, with a neutral density centrifuge, was utilized. Both techniques produced excellent photographic results and allowed for direct comparison of the flow fields using the two flow visualization techniques.

  2. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: Recent developments and applications of a micro-UAS for atmospheric boundary layer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2012-10-01

    During the last 5 years, the Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a flexible tool for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research to be operated as sounding system for the lowest 4 km of the atmosphere. Recently two main technical improvements have been accomplished. The integration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the Paparazzi autopilot system has expanded the environmental conditions for SUMO operation. The implementation of a 5-hole probe for determining the 3D flow vector with 100 Hz resolution and a faster temperature sensor has enhanced the measurement capabilities. Results from two recent field campaigns are presented. During the first one, in Denmark, the potential of the system to study the effects of wind turbines on ABL turbulence was shown. During the second one, the BLLAST field campaign at the foothills of the Pyrenees, SUMO data proved to be highly valuable for studying the processes of the afternoon transition of the convective boundary layer.

  3. Differences in the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases in and above the tropical boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. A. K.

    1981-01-01

    Weekly air samples were collected at Cape Kumakahi (0 km) and at nearby Mauna Loa Observatory (3.4 km) which is above the boundary layer. EC/GC and GC/FID techniques were used to measure CH3I, CHCl3, CO and CH4 which are largely natural in origin, and C2Cl4, CCl4, CH3CCl3, (F-11), CCl2F2, (F-12), CHClF, (F-22) and C2F3Cl3 (F-113), which are due to anthropogenic (CCl3F) etc. activities. It was found that all these gases are significantly (alpha is equal to or less than 0.05) more abundant in the boundary layer than above it.

  4. Quantitative estimates of disturbances contributed by a megalopolis to the temperature field of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadygrov, N. E.; Kruchenitskii, G. M.; Lykov, A. D.

    2007-02-01

    Seasonal and diurnal variations in the temperature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are analyzed, and the features of spatial and temporal variations in ABL temperature that are caused by the influence of a megalopolis are revealed. The gradients of air temperature for the megalopolis, its vicinity, and background conditions are compared. A multiplicative model of the seasonal diurnal variability of ABL temperature is constructed, and the relative frequencies of unstable ABL-temperature stratification are studied.

  5. Atmospheric marine boundary layer mixing rates in the California coastal region. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schacher, G.E.; Fairall, C.W.; Davidson, K.L.

    1980-05-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School has conducted five research cruises in California coastal waters for which sufficient data was obtained to allow boundary layer mixing rates to be determined. These data have been processed to determine the mixing rates. The rates have been correlated with meteorological conditions and geographical location and average values for use in air pollution models have been determined. A simplified method for calculating the mixing rate from mean meteorological parameters is presented.

  6. Western Pacific Warm Pool Region Sensitivity to Convective Triggering byBoundary Layer Thermals in the NOGAPS Atmospheric GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridout, James A.; Reynolds, Carolyn A.

    1998-07-01

    The sensitivity of the atmospheric general circulation model of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System to a parameterization of convective triggering by atmospheric boundary layer thermals is investigated. The study focuses on the western Pacific warm pool region and examines the results of seasonal integrations of the model for the winter of 1987/88. A parameterization for thermal triggering of deep convection is presented that is based on a classification of the unstable boundary layer. Surface-based deep convection is allowed only for boundary layer regimes associated with the presence of thermals. The regime classification is expressed in terms of a Richardson number that reflects the relative significance of buoyancy and shear in the boundary layer. By constraining deep convection to conditions consistent with the occurrence of thermals (high buoyancy to shear ratios), there is a significant decrease in precipitation over the southern portion of the northeast trade wind zone in the tropical Pacific and along the ITCZ. This decrease in precipitation allows for an increased flux of moisture into the region south of the equator corresponding to the warmest portion of the Pacific warm pool. Improvements in the simulated distribution of precipitation, precipitable water, and low-level winds in the tropical Pacific are demonstrated. Over the western Pacific, the transition from free convective conditions associated with thermals to forced convective conditions is found to be primarily due to variations in mixed layer wind speed. Low-level winds thus play the major role in regulating the ability of thermals to initiate deep convection. The lack of coupling with the ocean in these simulations may possibly produce a distorted picture in this regard.

  7. Characterization of wake turbulence in a wind turbine array submerged in atmospheric boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar

    Wind energy is becoming one of the most significant sources of renewable energy. With its growing use, and social and political awareness, efforts are being made to harness it in the most efficient manner. However, a number of challenges preclude efficient and optimum operation of wind farms. Wind resource forecasting over a long operation window of a wind farm, development of wind farms over a complex terrain on-shore, and air/wave interaction off-shore all pose difficulties in materializing the goal of the efficient harnessing of wind energy. These difficulties are further amplified when wind turbine wakes interact directly with turbines located downstream and in adjacent rows in a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In the present study, an ABL solver is used to simulate different atmospheric stability states over a diurnal cycle. The effect of the turbines is modeled by using actuator methods, in particular the state-of-the-art actuator line method (ALM) and an improved ALM are used for the simulation of the turbine arrays. The two ALM approaches are used either with uniform inflow or are coupled with the ABL solver. In the latter case, a precursor simulation is first obtained and data saved at the inflow planes for the duration the turbines are anticipated to be simulated. The coupled ABL-ALM solver is then used to simulate the turbine arrays operating in atmospheric turbulence. A detailed accuracy assessment of the state-of-the-art ALM is performed by applying it to different rotors. A discrepancy regarding over-prediction of tip loads and an artificial tip correction is identified. A new proposed ALM* is developed and validated for the NREL Phase VI rotor. This is also applied to the NREL 5-MW turbine, and guidelines to obtain consistent results with ALM* are developed. Both the ALM approaches are then applied to study a turbine-turbine interaction problem consisting of two NREL 5-MW turbines. The simulations are performed for two ABL stability

  8. Advances and Limitations of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations with GPS Occultation over Southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, F.; Wu, D. L.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A. J.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the southeast (SE) Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere & Climate (COSMIC) GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1-2 kilometer) as observed from the radiosondes. However, the ECMWF analysis systematically underestimates the ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., -157 N-unit per kilometer) and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in a systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias) inside the ABL. Simulation study based on radiosonde profiles reveals the magnitudes of the N-biases are vertical resolution dependent. The N-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding -110 N-unit per kilometer) at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very large RO bending angle and the sharp refractivity gradient due to ducting allow reliable detection of the ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show an increase of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows an overall deeper ABL and reveals different locations of the minimum and maximum ABL heights as compared to the ECMWF analysis

  9. A comprehensive investigation on afternoon transition of the atmospheric boundary layer over a tropical rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, A.; Rao, T. N.; Rao, S. V. B.

    2015-07-01

    The transitory nature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) a few hours before and after the time of sunset has been studied comprehensively over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E), using a suite of in situ and remote sensing devices. This study addresses the following fundamental and important issues related to the afternoon transition (AT): which state variable first identifies the AT? Which variable best identifies the AT? Does the start time of the AT vary with season and height? If so, which physical mechanism is responsible for the observed height variation in the start time of the transition? At the surface, the transition is first seen in temperature (T) and wind variance (σ2WS), ~ 100 min prior to the time of local sunset, then in the vertical temperature gradient and finally in water vapor mixing ratio variations. Aloft, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral width (σ) show the AT nearly at the same time. The T at the surface and SNR aloft are found to be the best indicators of transition. Their distributions for the start time of the AT with reference to time of sunset are narrow and consistent in both total and seasonal plots. The start time of the transition shows some seasonal variation, with delayed transitions occurring mostly in the rainy and humid season of the northeast monsoon. Interestingly, in contrast to the general perception, the signature of the transition is first seen in the profiler data, then in the sodar data, and finally in the surface data. This suggests that the transition follows a top-to-bottom evolution. It indicates that other processes, like entrainment, could also play a role in altering the structure of the ABL during the AT, when the sensible heat flux decreases progressively. These mechanisms are quantified using a unique high-resolution data set to understand their variation in light of the intriguing height dependency of the start time of the AT.

  10. Isolating effects of terrain and soil moisture heterogeneity on the atmospheric boundary layer: Idealized simulations to diagnose land-atmosphere feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, Jehan F.; Chow, Fotini K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of terrain, soil moisture heterogeneity, subsurface properties, and water table dynamics on the development and behavior of the atmospheric boundary layer are studied through a set of idealized numerical experiments. The mesoscale atmospheric model Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) is used to isolate the effects of subsurface heterogeneity, terrain, and soil moisture initialization. The simulations are initialized with detailed soil moisture distributions obtained from offline spin-ups using a coupled surface-subsurface model (ParFlow-CLM). In these idealized simulations, we observe that terrain effects dominate the planetary boundary layer (PBL) development during early morning hours, while the soil moisture signature overcomes that of terrain during the afternoon. Water table and subsurface properties produce a similar effect as that of soil moisture as their signatures (reflected in soil moisture profiles, energy fluxes, and evaporation at the land surface) can also overcome that of terrain during afternoon hours. This is mostly clear for land surface energy fluxes and evaporation at the land surface. We also observe the coupling between water table depth and planetary boundary layer depth in our cases is strongest within wet-to-dry transition zones. This extends the findings of previous studies which demonstrate the subsurface connection to surface energy fluxes is strongest in such transition zones. We investigate how this connection extends into the atmosphere and can affect the structure and development of the convective boundary layer.

  11. Estimation of the ozone formation rate in the atmospheric boundary layer over a background region of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhin, P. N.; Antokhina, O. Y.; Belan, B. D.

    2015-11-01

    The ozone formation rate in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the ozone inflow from the free atmosphere have been studied experimentally. The obtained estimates are based on the data of airborne sounding carried out over a background region of Western Siberia. As a result, it is obtained that the rate of ozone inflow from the upper atmospheric layers is only 20% of the rate of photochemical formation of ozone inside ABL. The vertical profiles of ozone flows in ABL have been additionally calculated based on the k-theory with the approach proposed by Troen and Mahrt. It has been shown in the calculations that the maximum of the ozone concentration in ABL is formed due to photochemical reactions from precursor gases.

  12. Lidar Applications in Atmospheric Dynamics: Measurements of Wind, Moisture and Boundary Layer Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Whiteman, David; Gentry, Bruce; Schwemmer, Geary; Evans, Keith; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Comer, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    A large array of state-of-the-art ground-based and airborne remote and in-situ sensors were deployed during the International H2O Project (THOP), a field experiment that took place over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States from 13 May to 30 June 2002. These instruments provided extensive measurements of water vapor mixing ratio in order to better understand the influence of its variability on convection and on the skill of quantitative precipitation prediction (Weckwerth et all, 2004). Among the instrument deployed were ground based lidars from NASA/GSFC that included the Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), the Goddard Laboratory for Observing Winds (GLOW), and the Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE). A brief description of the three lidars is given below. This study presents ground-based measurements of wind, boundary layer structure and water vapor mixing ratio measurements observed by three co-located lidars during MOP at the MOP ground profiling site in the Oklahoma Panhandle (hereafter referred as Homestead). This presentation will focus on the evolution and variability of moisture and wind in the boundary layer when frontal and/or convergence boundaries (e.g. bores, dry lines, thunderstorm outflows etc) were observed.

  13. Heat transport in the marine atmospheric boundary layer during an intense cold air outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    1988-01-01

    The generation of the virtual heat flux in the convective MABL associated with the January 28, 1986 intense cold air airbreak offshore of the Carolinas is studied. A technique based on the joint frequency distribution of the virtual potential temperature and vertical motion (Mahrt and Paumier, 1984) is used. The results suggest that, if buoyancy is mainly driven by the temperature flux, the physical processes for generating buoyancy flux are about the same for boundary layers over land and ocean, even with different convective regimes.

  14. Non-steady dynamics of atmospheric turbulence interaction with wind turbine loadings through blade-boundary-layer-resolved CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh

    Modern commercial megawatt-scale wind turbines occupy the lower 15-20% of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). The current trend of increasing wind turbine diameter and hub height increases the interaction of the wind turbines with the upper ASL which contains spatio-temporal velocity variations over a wide range of length and time scales. Our interest is the interaction of the wind turbine with the energetic integral-scale eddies, since these cause the largest temporal variations in blade loadings. The rotation of a wind turbine blade through the ABL causes fluctuations in the local velocity magnitude and angle of attack at different sections along the blade. The blade boundary layer responds to these fluctuations and in turn causes temporal transients in local sectional loads and integrated blade and shaft bending moments. While the integral scales of the atmospheric boundary layer are ˜ O(10--100m) in the horizontal with advection time scales of order tens of seconds, the viscous surface layer of the blade boundary layer is ˜ O(10 -- 100 mum) with time scales of order milliseconds. Thus, the response of wind turbine blade loadings to atmospheric turbulence is the result of the interaction between two turbulence dynamical systems at extremely disparate ranges of length and time scales. A deeper understanding of this interaction can impact future approaches to improve the reliability of wind turbines in wind farms, and can underlie future improvements. My thesis centers on the development of a computational framework to simulate the interaction between the atmospheric and wind turbine blade turbulence dynamical systems using a two step one-way coupled approach. Pseudo-spectral large eddy simulation (LES) is used to generate a true (equilibrium) atmospheric boundary layer over a flat land with specified surface roughness and heating consistent with the stability state of the daytime lower troposphere. Using the data from the

  15. Detecting surface roughness effects on the atmospheric boundary layer via AIRSAR data: A field experiment in Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    The part of the troposphere influenced by the surface of the earth is termed the atmospheric boundary layer. Flow within this layer is influenced by the roughness of the surface; rougher surfaces induce more turbulence than smoother surfaces and, hence, higher atmospheric transfer rates across the surface. Roughness elements also shield erodible particles, thus decreasing the transport of windblown particles. Therefore, the aerodynamic roughness length (z(sub 0)) is an important parameter in aeolian and atmospheric boundary layer processes as it describes the aerodynamic properties of the underlying surface. z(sub 0) is assumed to be independent of wind velocity or height, and dependent only on the surface topography. It is determined using in situ measurements of the wind speed distribution as a function of height. For dry, unvegetated soils the intensity of the radar backscatter (sigma(sup 0)) is affected primarily by surface roughness at a scale comparable with the radar wavelength. Thus, both wind and radar respond to surface roughness variations on a scale of a few meters or less. Greeley showed the existence of a correlation between z(sub 0) and sigma(sup 0). This correlation was based on measurements over lava flows, alluvial fans, and playas in the southwest deserts of the United States. It is shown that the two parameters behave similarly also when there are small changes over a relatively homogeneous surface.

  16. DIFFUSION IN THE VICINITY OF STANDARD-DESIGN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS-I. WIND-TUNNEL EVALUATION OF DIFFUSIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A SIMULATED SUBURBAN NEUTRAL ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large meteorological wind tunnel was used to simulate a suburban atmospheric boundary layer. The model-prototype scale was 1:300 and the roughness length was approximately 1.0 m full scale. The model boundary layer simulated full scale dispersion from ground-level and elevated ...

  17. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: Recent developments and applications of a Micro-UAS for atmospheric boundary layer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuder, J.; Jonassen, M. O.; Ólafsson, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last 5 years, the Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a new and flexible tool for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research to be operated as controllable and recoverable atmospheric sounding system for the lowest 4 km above the Earth's surface. In the year 2011 two main technical improvements of the system have been accomplished. The integration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the Paparazzi autopilot system has expanded the environmental conditions for SUMO operation to now even allowing incloud flights. In the field of sensor technology the implementation of a 5-hole probe for the determination of the 3 dimensional flow vector impinging the aircraft with a 100 Hz resolution and of a faster Pt1000 based temperature sensor have distinctly enhanced the meteorological measurement capabilities. The extended SUMO version has recently been operated during two field campaigns. The first one in a wind farm close to Vindeby on Lolland, Denmark, was dedicated to the investigation of the effects of wind turbines on boundary layer turbulence. In spite of a few pitfalls related to configuration and synchronisation of the corresponding data logging systems, this campaign provided promising results indicating the capability and future potential of small UAS for turbulence characterization in and around wind farms. The second one, the international BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Transition) field campaign at the foothills of the Pyrenees in Lannemezan, France was focussing on processes related to the afternoon transition of the convective boundary layer. On a calm sunny day during this experiment, the SUMO soundings revealed an unexpected 2°C cooling in the ABL during morning hours. By a comparison with model simulations this cooling can be associated with thermally-driven upslope winds and the subsequent advection of relatively cool air from the lowlands north of the Pyrenees.

  18. An Observational Case Study on the Influence of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Dynamics on New Particle Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platis, Andreas; Altstädter, Barbara; Wehner, Birgit; Wildmann, Norman; Lampert, Astrid; Hermann, Markus; Birmili, Wolfram; Bange, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the influence of atmospheric boundary-layer development on new particle formation (NPF) during the morning transition. Continuous in-situ measurements of vertical profiles of temperature, humidity and aerosol number concentrations were quasi-continously measured near Melpitz, Germany, by unmanned aerial systems to investigate the potential connection between NPF and boundary-layer dynamics in the context of turbulence, temperature and humidity fluctuations. On 3 April 2014 high number concentrations of nucleation mode particles up to 6.0 × 10^4 cm^{-3} were observed in an inversion layer located about 450 m above ground level. The inversion layer exhibited a spatial temperature structure parameter C_T^2 15 times higher and a spatial humidity structure parameter C_q^2 5 times higher than in the remaining part of the vertical profile. The study provides hints that the inversion layer is responsible for creating favorable thermodynamic conditions for a NPF event. In addition, this layer showed a strong anti-correlation of humidity and temperature fluctuations. Using estimates of the turbulent mixing and dissipation rates, it is concluded that the downward transport of particles by convective mixing was also the reason of the sudden increase of nucleation mode particles measured on ground. This work supports the hypothesis that many of the NPF events that are frequently observed near the ground may, in fact, originate at elevated altitude, with newly formed particles subsequently being mixed down to the ground.

  19. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  20. Exploring the Effects of Atmospheric Forcings on Evaporation: Experimental Integration of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Shallow Subsurface.

    PubMed

    Smits, Kathleen; Eagen, Victoria; Trautz, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation is directly influenced by the interactions between the atmosphere, land surface and soil subsurface. This work aims to experimentally study evaporation under various surface boundary conditions to improve our current understanding and characterization of this multiphase phenomenon as well as to validate numerical heat and mass transfer theories that couple Navier-Stokes flow in the atmosphere and Darcian flow in the porous media. Experimental data were collected using a unique soil tank apparatus interfaced with a small climate controlled wind tunnel. The experimental apparatus was instrumented with a suite of state of the art sensor technologies for the continuous and autonomous collection of soil moisture, soil thermal properties, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. This experimental apparatus can be used to generate data under well controlled boundary conditions, allowing for better control and gathering of accurate data at scales of interest not feasible in the field. Induced airflow at several distinct wind speeds over the soil surface resulted in unique behavior of heat and mass transfer during the different evaporative stages. PMID:26131928

  1. Meteorological responses in the atmospheric boundary layer over southern England to the deep partial eclipse of 20 March 2015.

    PubMed

    Burt, Stephen

    2016-09-28

    A wide range of surface and near-surface meteorological observations were made at the University of Reading's Atmospheric Observatory in central southern England (latitude 51.441° N, longitude 0.938° W, altitude 66 m above mean sea level) during the deep partial eclipse on the morning of 20 March 2015. Observations of temperature, humidity, radiation, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric pressure were made by computerized logging equipment at 1 Hz, supplemented by an automated cloud base recorder sampling at 1 min intervals and a high-resolution (approx. 10 m vertical interval) atmospheric sounding by radiosonde launched from the same location during the eclipse. Sources and details of each instrumental measurement are described briefly, followed by a summary of observed and derived measurements by meteorological parameter. Atmospheric boundary layer responses to the solar eclipse were muted owing to the heavily overcast conditions which prevailed at the observing location, but instrumental records of the event documented a large (approx. 80%) reduction in global solar radiation, a fall in air temperature of around 0.6°C, a decrease in cloud base height, and a slight increase in atmospheric stability during the eclipse. Changes in surface atmospheric moisture content and barometric pressure were largely insignificant during the event.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550762

  2. An Experimental Study of the Statistics of Temperature Fluctuations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Frola, Elena; Mazzino, Andrea; Cassola, Federico; Mortarini, Luca; Ferrero, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    A statistical characterization for two-point temperature fluctuations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is analyzed and its implications on the long-standing closure problem discussed. Despite the non-triviality of the dynamics of temperature fluctuations, our analysis supports the idea that the most relevant statistical properties can be captured solely in terms of two scaling exponents. They turned out to be weakly dependent on the stability properties of the PBL. Its statistics have been investigated by collecting data from a field experiment carried out in the urban area of Turin (Italy) from January 2007 to March 2008. Our results confirm those from a large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis carried out for the convective PBL with different level of convection. We extend the scenario to the stable PBL, a regime much more difficult to simulate when exploiting LES.

  3. The Deep Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Its Significance to the Stratosphere and Troposphere Exchange over the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuelong; Añel, Juan A.; Su, Zhongbo; de la Torre, Laura; Kelder, Hennie; van Peet, Jacob; Ma, Yaoming

    2013-01-01

    In this study the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the Tibetan Plateau was measured during a regional radiosonde observation campaign in 2008 and found to be deeper than indicated by previously measurements. Results indicate that during fair weather conditions on winter days, the top of the mixed layers can be up to 5 km above the ground (9.4 km above sea level). Measurements also show that the depth of the ABL is quite distinct for three different periods (winter, monsoon-onset, and monsoon seasons). Turbulence at the top of a deep mixing layer can rise up to the upper troposphere. As a consequence, as confirmed by trajectory analysis, interaction occurs between deep ABLs and the low tropopause during winter over the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:23451108

  4. Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Evening Transitions: A Comparison Between Two Different Experimental Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    The planetary boundary-layer (PBL) afternoon and evening transition is investigated with measurements from two-month datasets, gathered at two experimental sites significantly different regarding heterogeneity, the degree of terrain wetness, and proximity to mountains. The period of 4 h prior to and after astronomical sunset is extensively analyzed. We show the mean evolution, average, maximum and minimum values of PBL variables, including wind speed, turbulent kinetic energy and potential temperature vertical gradient. Characteristic events, such as the wind minimum around sunset and a common pattern in the evolution of other variables, are identified. Results suggest that, for the establishment of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, moisture plays a more decisive role than turbulence. We also look into the occurrence of katabatic flows, finding more intense but less frequent events at the driest site. In contrast, at that location the crossover of the sensible heat flux takes place later. Time-scale evolution is investigated through case studies, and air humidity and soil moisture are found to have crucial importance explaining most of the site-to-site differences. Therefore, a humidity sensitivity experiment with the Weather Research and Forecasting model is performed, evaluating the role of moisture during the transition by increasing the soil humidity at the driest site and reducing it at the other location. The simulations reveal that humidity effects are more important until 1 h before sunset, both near the surface and at upper levels in the PBL. Furthermore, the moisture change is more relevant at the less humid and more homogeneous site, with intense and long-lasting effects after sunset.

  5. Large-eddy Simulation of Stratocumulus-topped Atmospheric Boundary Layers with Dynamic Subgrid-scale Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senocak, Inane

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the dynamic procedure in LES of stratocumulus topped atmospheric boundary layer and assess the relative importance of subgrid-scale modeling, cloud microphysics and radiation modeling on the predictions. The simulations will also be used to gain insight into the processes leading to cloud top entrainment instability and cloud breakup. In this report we document the governing equations, numerical schemes and physical models that are employed in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCEM3D). We also present the subgrid-scale dynamic procedures that have been implemented in the GCEM3D code for the purpose of the present study.

  6. A bulk similarity approach in the atmospheric boundary layer using radiometric skin temperature to determine regional surface fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried; Sugita, Michiaki

    1991-01-01

    Profiles of wind velocity and temperature in the outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were used together with surface temperature measurements, to determine regional shear stress and sensible heat flux by means of transfer parameterizations on the basis of bulk similarity. The profiles were measured by means of radiosondes and the surface temperatures by infrared radiation thermometry over hilly prairie terrain in northeastern Kansas during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). In the analysis, the needed similarity functions were determined and tested.

  7. Lagrangian stochastic modeling of pollutant dispersion in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer - application to an urban area over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattal, Eyal; Gavze, Ehud

    2014-05-01

    The modeling of pollutant dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer depends on an adequate description of the turbulent processes. Since turbulence is a multi-scale phenomenon characterized by a high degree of disorder, a statistical approach is needed. Among the statistical approaches, Lagrangian stochastic particle models provide a well established theoretical framework for the description of pollutant dispersion in different atmospheric boundary layer scenarios. Usually turbulent structure in the surface layer is described in terms of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) using universal relationships between scaling parameters. These relationships have been shown to be valid in the case of horizontal homogeneity for stationary turbulence. The description of the turbulent processes above rough surfaces, such as over canopies, is a more complex case. For the urban canopy it was found that under developed stationary turbulence conditions MOST relations are approximately valid (in some cases, with extensions). An even more complex case is that of rough surfaces over topography, as no similarity theory has been established to properly describe the turbulence exchange over heterogeneous surfaces in complex terrain. We show Lagrangian stochastic model simulations based on MOST against measurements in urban canopy over complex terrain. Comparison gives good agreement with direct tracer measurements, in cases of neutral and convective stratifications. It is shown that in conditions of developed stationary turbulence, at most areas, there is in an agreement with MOST predictions. However, in very low wind conditions the turbulent nocturnal boundary layer is not necessarily stationary and is spatially non-homogeneous. This results in larger horizontal velocity standard deviation than expected in regular stable regime, as manifested in the pollutant pattern.

  8. The thermal structure of the atmospheric surface boundary layer on Mars as modified by the radiative effect of aeolian dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallmann, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A computational simulation, based on Mariner 9 data, was performed for the thermal characteristics of the Martian atmospheric surface boundary layer in clear and dust-filled conditions. A radiative transfer model consisting of the atmospheric enthalpy rate equation, the radiative flux integrated over the 0.2-50 microns, the solid angle interval, and 0.50 km altitudes, broken into 52 levels. Mariner 9 IR data for CO2 absorption lines were included in the form of a temperture-dependent equation, while the line-widths were interpreted in terms of the pressure dependene as well as temperature. The lines covered the regions from 1-50 microns and varying conditions of dust content in the atmosphere. Attention was given to the thermal coupling between the ground and the atmosphere. It was found that convective heat exchange develops quickly due to radiative heating of the Martian desert surface, but does not cool the surface because of the attenuated atmosphere. The model predictd the 100 K temperature variations in the dusty atmosphere, as observed by the Viking thermal mapper. It is suggested that radiative flux convergence is as important as convection at equivalent efficiencies.

  9. On determination of formaldehyde content in atmospheric boundary layer for overcast using DOAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postylyakov, Oleg; Borovski, Alexander; Ivanov, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is involved in a lot of chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Taking into account that HCHO basically undergo by photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radical within a few hours, short-lived VOCs and direct HCHO emissions can cause local HCHO enhancement over certain areas, and, hence, exceeding background level of HCHO can be examined as a local pollution of the atmosphere by VOCs or existence of a local HCHO source. Several retrieval algorithms applicable for DOAS measurements in cloudless were previously developed. A new algorithm applicable for overcast and cloudless sky and its error analysis is briefly introduced by this paper. Analysis of our HCHO VCD retrieval for overcast shows that when one know the cloud base height, but doesn't know cloud optical depth, the typical errors of HCHO total content retrieval are less than 10% for snow season, less than 5% for snow-free seasons, and reaches 40-45% for season with non-stable snow cover. In case one knows both the cloud base height and the cloud optical depth, the typical errors are about 5% for snow season, less than 2.5% for snow-free seasons, and are within about 10-30% for season with non-stable snow cover. Given above error estimations are valid if the HCHO layer is below the cloud base. The errors dramatically increase when HCHO layer penetrates into clouds in both cases. The first preliminary results of HCHO VCD retrieval for overcast are shown. The average difference of the HCHO VCDs for wind from Moscow megapolis and wind from few urbanized areas is about 0.8×1016 mol×cm-2 and approximately corresponds to estimates of influence of Moscow megapolis observed in clear-sky conditions.

  10. The influence of the atmospheric boundary layer on nocturnal layers of noctuids and other moths migrating over southern Britain.

    PubMed

    Wood, Curtis R; Chapman, Jason W; Reynolds, Donald R; Barlow, Janet F; Smith, Alan D; Woiwod, Ian P

    2006-03-01

    Insects migrating at high altitude over southern Britain have been continuously monitored by automatically operating, vertical-looking radars over a period of several years. During some occasions in the summer months, the migrants were observed to form well-defined layer concentrations, typically at heights of 200-400 m, in the stable night-time atmosphere. Under these conditions, insects are likely to have control over their vertical movements and are selecting flight heights that are favourable for long-range migration. We therefore investigated the factors influencing the formation of these insect layers by comparing radar measurements of the vertical distribution of insect density with meteorological profiles generated by the UK Meteorological Office's (UKMO) Unified Model (UM). Radar-derived measurements of mass and displacement speed, along with data from Rothamsted Insect Survey light traps, provided information on the identity of the migrants. We present here three case studies where noctuid and pyralid moths contributed substantially to the observed layers. The major meteorological factors influencing the layer concentrations appeared to be: (a) the altitude of the warmest air, (b) heights corresponding to temperature preferences or thresholds for sustained migration and (c) on nights when air temperatures are relatively high, wind-speed maxima associated with the nocturnal jet. Back-trajectories indicated that layer duration may have been determined by the distance to the coast. Overall, the unique combination of meteorological data from the UM and insect data from entomological radar described here show considerable promise for systematic studies of high-altitude insect layering. PMID:16432728

  11. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (ΔN). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the

  12. Atmospheric conditions associated with high and low summertime ozone levels in the boundary layer over some eastern Mediterranean airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalabokas, Pavlos D.; Thouret, Valerie; Cammas, Jean-Pierre; Volz-Thomas, Andreas; Boulanger, Damien; Repapis, Christos C.

    2013-04-01

    Thanks to the vertical atmospheric measurements of the MOZAIC program, enhanced ozone mixing ratios in the lower troposphere over the Eastern Mediterranean have been found, frequently exceeding the 60 ppb, 8-h EU air quality standard, whereas ozone between 700 hPa and 400 hPa was only slightly (3-5 ppb, 5-10%) higher than over Central Europe. Also, the examination of the highest and lowest ozone levels in the lower troposphere (1.5-5 km) over some airports in the Eastern Mediterranean area showed the lower-tropospheric ozone variability over there is controlled mainly by the synoptic meteorological conditions, combined with local topographical and meteorological features. In particular, the highest ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere and subsequently in the boundary layer in the area are associated with large scale subsidence of ozone rich air masses from the upper troposphere under anticyclonic conditions while the lowest ozone concentrations are associated with low pressure conditions inducing uplifting of boundary layer air, poor in ozone and rich in relative humidity, to the lower troposphere. In order to further evaluate the observed high rural ozone levels during summertime, vertical summer ozone profiles measured by MOZAIC in the period 1994-2008 over the Eastern Mediterranean basin (Cairo, Tel-Aviv, Heraklion, Rhodes, Antalya) are analyzed, focusing in the boundary layer (0-1.5 km). First, vertical profiles collected during extreme days with very high or very low tropospheric ozone mixing ratios are examined. Also, the average profiles of ozone, relative humidity, carbon monoxide, vertical temperature gradient and wind speed corresponding to the 7% highest and the 7% lowest ozone mixing ratios for the height layers of 0-500m, 500-1000m and 1000-1500m for Cairo and Tel-Aviv are examined along with the corresponding composite maps of geopotential heights at 850 hPa and 925 hPa. In addition, analyses of backward trajectories, using the FLEXPART model

  13. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. Structure of the Entrainment Zone Capping the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Peter P.; Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Stevens, Bjorn; Lenschow, Donald H.; Mayor, Shane D.

    1998-10-01

    The authors use large-eddy simulation (LES) to investigate entrainment and structure of the inversion layer of a clear convectively driven planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a range of bulk Richardson numbers, Ri. The LES code uses a nested grid technique to achieve fine resolution in all three directions in the inversion layer.Extensive flow visualization is used to examine the structure of the inversion layer and to illustrate the temporal and spatial interaction of a thermal plume and the overlying inversion. It is found that coherent structures in the convective PBL, that is, thermal plumes, are primary instigators of entrainment in the Ri range 13.6 Ri 43.8. At Ri = 13.6, strong horizontal and downward velocities are generated near the inversion layer because of the plume-interface interaction. This leads to folding of the interface and hence entrainment of warm inversion air at the plume's edge. At Ri = 34.5, the inversion's strong stability prevents folding of the interface but strong horizontal and downward motions near the plume's edge pull down pockets of warm air below the nominal inversion height. These pockets of warm air are then scoured off by turbulent motions and entrained into the PBL. The structure of the inversion interface from LES is in good visual agreement with lidar measurements in the PBL obtained during the Lidars in Flat Terrain field experiment.A quadrant analysis of the buoyancy flux shows that net entrainment flux (or average minimum buoyancy flux min) is identified with quadrant IV + < 0 motions, that is, warm air moving downward. Plumes generate both large negative quadrant II + < 0 and positive quadrant III > 0 buoyancy fluxes that tend to cancel.The maximum vertical gradient in potential temperature at every (x, y) grid point is used to define a local PBL height, zi(x, y). A statistical analysis of zi shows that skewness of zi depends on the inversion strength. Spectra of zi exhibit a sensitivity to grid resolution. The

  15. A Large-eddy Simulation Study of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) offer some advantages over their horizontal axis counterparts, and are being considered as a viable alternative to conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Nevertheless, a relative shortage of scientific, academic and technical investigations of VAWTs is observed in the wind energy community with respect to HAWTs. Having this in mind, in this work, we aim to study the wake of a single VAWT, placed in the atmospheric boundary layer, using large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled with actuator line model (ALM). It is noteworthy that this is the first time that such a study is being performed. To do this, for a typical 1 MW VAWT design, first, the variation of power coefficient with both the chord length of the blades and the tip-speed ratio is analyzed using LES-ALM, and an optimum combination of chord length and tip-speed ratio is obtained. Subsequently, the wake of a VAWT with these optimum specifications is thoroughly examined by showing different relevant mean and turbulent wake flow statistics. Keywords: vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT); VAWT wake; Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL); large eddy simulation (LES); actuator line model (ALM); turbulence.

  16. An Experimental Investigation on the Interference of the Multiple Wind Turbines with Different Layout Patterns in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet

    2012-11-01

    We report an experimental study to investigate the wake interferences of multiple wind turbines in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) winds. The experimental study is conducted by taking advantages of the large-scale Aerodynamic/Atmospheric Boundary Layer (AABL) Wind Tunnel available at Iowa State University to quantify the performances of an array of wind turbine models with aligned and staggered arrangement patterns. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loads (both forces and moments) and the power outputs of the wind turbine models, advanced flow diagnostic techniques such as digital Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to quantify the flow characteristics of the surface winds and wake interferences among the multiple wind turbines with different layout patterns. The detailed flow field measurements are correlated with the dynamic wind loads and power output measurements to elucidate underlying physics for the optimal design of the wind turbine array layout with the ultimate goal of higher total power yield and better durability of the wind turbines operating in more realistic environments. The reserach work is funded by IAWIND and NSF with Award # CBET-1133751.

  17. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height under marine upstream flow conditions at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PeñA, A.; Gryning, S.-E.; Hahmann, A. N.

    2013-02-01

    AbstractWe investigate several lidar-type instruments and methodologies for <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> height (BLH) estimation during 2 days at a coastal site for winds that experience marine upstream flow conditions. Wavelet and profile fitting procedures on the aerosol backscatter signals from a ceilometer and an aerosol lidar reveal similar BLHs, but their agreement depends on the presence of clouds and the instrument signal, among others. BLHs derived by a threshold on the carrier-to-noise profiles of a wind lidar agree well with those derived by using a threshold on the backscatter profile of the ceilometer and are used as reference for a 10 day BLH intercomparison. Furthermore, the BLHs from the aerosol analysis are comparable to those derived from wind speed and direction profiles from combined mast/wind lidar measurements. The BLH derived from simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model shows similar behavior compared to the lidar observations. The seasonal diurnal variation of the BLH for 2010, derived from the wind lidar and ceilometer thresholds, shows similar BLHs but generally higher values compared to that from WRF. No clear BLH diurnal variation is observed neither from the observations nor from the WRF model outputs, except in summer for the latter. Both observations and WRF model simulations reveal higher BLHs during autumn compared to spring time. These BLHs are used to evaluate the intra-annual variation and show high peaks in September, November, and February.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AeoRe..20..147K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AeoRe..20..147K"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of particulate matter transport in <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> following dust emission from source areas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Katra, Itzhak; Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris; Yizhaq, Hezi</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>A two-dimensional model for particulate matter (PM) dispersion due to dust emission from soils is presented. Field experiments were performed at a dust source site (Negev loess soil) with a portable <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> wind tunnel to determine the emitted PM fluxes for different wind speeds and varying soil conditions. The numerical model is formulated using parameterizations based on the aeolian experiments. The wind velocity profiles used in the simulations were fitted from data obtained in field measurements. Size distribution of the emitted dust particles in the numerical simulations was taken into account using a Monte Carlo method. The PM concentration distributions at a distance of several kilometers from the dust source under specific shear velocities and PM fluxes from the soil were determined numerically by solving advection-diffusion equation. The obtained PM10 concentrations under typical wind and soil conditions are supported by PM data recorded over time in a standard environmental monitoring station. The model enhances our capacity of quantification of dust processes to support climate models as well as health risk assessment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713717C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713717C"><span id="translatedtitle">Large-eddy simulation of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> flow and passive scalar dispersion over idealized urban surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cheng, Wai Chi; Porté-Agel, Fernando</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Accurate prediction of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> (ABL) flow and its interaction with urban surfaces is critical for understanding the transport of momentum and scalars within and above cities. This, in turn, is essential for predicting the local climate and pollutant dispersion patterns in urban areas. Large-eddy simulation (LES) explicitly resolves the large-scale turbulent eddy motions and, therefore, can potentially provide improved understanding and prediction of flows and scalar transport inside and above urban canopies. In this study, LES is used to simulate the dispersion of passive scalar over idealized urban surfaces represented by uniform arrays of cubes. A modulated gradient subgird-scale (SGS) model is used to parametrize the SGS fluxes of momentum and scalar, and an immersed <span class="hlt">boundary</span> method is used to model the presence of cubes. A similar LES framework for flow was validated in our previous studies in simulations of turbulent <span class="hlt">boundary-layer</span> flow past a 2D block and a uniform array of cubes. Here, the LES framework is further validated with wind tunnel experimental data of passive scalar dispersion within and above a staggered array of cubes with a localized scalar source at ground level. Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental data are found in the vertical and horizontal profiles of scalar concentration in different streamwise locations. After the validation, the LES framework is used to simulate the scalar transport at rural-to-urban flow transition region and the results obtained are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JESS..123.1233C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JESS..123.1233C"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> from radiosonde observations along eastern end of monsoon trough of India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chandra, Sagarika; Dwivedi, Arun K.; Kumar, Manoj</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>In this paper, a comparison of two methods for the calculation of the height of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> (ABL), using balloon-borne GPS radiosonde data is presented. ABL has been characterized using vertical profiles of meteorological parameter. The gradient of virtual potential temperature ( 𝜃 v ) profile for the determination of mixed <span class="hlt">layer</span> heights (MLH) and the mean value of turbulent flow depth (TFD) obtained from the vertical profile of Bulk Richardson Number ( R i B ) have been used in this study. One-year data have been used for the study. There is large seasonal variability in MLH with a peak in the summer and winter whereas the TFD remained steady throughout the year. Results from the present study indicate that the magnitudes of TFD are often larger than the MLH.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JESS..tmp...86C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JESS..tmp...86C"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> from radiosonde observations along eastern end of monsoon trough of India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chandra, Sagarika; Dwivedi, Arun K.; Kumar, Manoj</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>In this paper, a comparison of two methods for the calculation of the height of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> (ABL), using balloon-borne GPS radiosonde data is presented. ABL has been characterized using vertical profiles of meteorological parameter. The gradient of virtual potential temperature (𝜃 v ) profile for the determination of mixed <span class="hlt">layer</span> heights (MLH) and the mean value of turbulent flow depth (TFD) obtained from the vertical profile of Bulk Richardson Number (R i B ) have been used in this study. One-year data have been used for the study. There is large seasonal variability in MLH with a peak in the summer and winter whereas the TFD remained steady throughout the year. Results from the present study indicate that the magnitudes of TFD are often larger than the MLH.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AMTD....712283A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AMTD....712283A"><span id="translatedtitle">ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Lampert, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Bange, J.; Baars, H.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturized by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time. Each system was characterized in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 6 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs. Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global <span class="hlt">Atmosphere</span> Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on two days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span>, derived from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC31B1180R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC31B1180R"><span id="translatedtitle">The Tturbulent Structure of the <span class="hlt">Atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">Boundary</span> <span class="hlt">Layer</span> over Small Northern Lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Repina, I.; Stepanenko, V.; Artamonov, A.; Barskov, K.; Polukhov, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Wetland and freshwater ecosystems of the Northern Europe are an important natural source of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> methane. Adequate calculation of gas emission from the northern territories requires calculation of balances of heat, moisture, and gases at the surface of water bodies on the sub-grid scale in the climate models. We carried out measurements in North Karelia on the lake Verkhneye (White Sea Biological Station of Moscow State University). The purpose of the study is evaluation of turbulent transport in the system "lake water- near-surface air - surrounding forest" in the winter season. We used an array of acoustic anemometers mounted at different distances from the lake shore. Measurements were taken at two heights in the center of the lake. It was revealed that the intensity of the turbulent transfer essentially depends on the height and location of sensors, and the wind direction. Stratification in the near-to-surface air probably does not play significant role. Besides, there is no constant-flux <span class="hlt">layer</span>. The later makes Monin and Obukhov similarity theory (which is used in most of the parameterizations for calculating turbulent flows) inapplicable in this case. The work was sponsored by RFBR 14-05-91752, 14-05-91764, 15-35-20958.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.3884S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.3884S"><span id="translatedtitle">Turbulence Generation in the <span class="hlt">Atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">Boundary</span> <span class="hlt">Layer</span> and Limitations of the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald; LeMone, Margaret; Mahrt, Larry</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Turbulent fluxes from the Cooperative <span class="hlt">Atmosphere</span>-Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment are further analyzed for both day- and nighttime as a follow-on to the investigation of the nighttime turbulence in Sun et al. (2012). The behavior of momentum and heat fluxes is investigated as functions of wind speed and the bulk temperature difference between observation heights and the surface. Vertical variations of momentum and heat flux at a given height z are correlated and are explained in terms of the energy and heat balance in a <span class="hlt">layer</span> above the ground surface in which the surface heating/cooling and momentum sink need to be included. In addition, the surface also plays an important role in constraining the size of the dominant turbulent eddies, which is directly related to turbulence strength and the length scale of turbulence generation. The turbulence generation is not related to local vertical gradients especially under neutral condition as assumed in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on the observed relationships between momentum and heat fluxes, a new bulk formula for turbulence parameterization is developed to mainly examine the above-mentioned surface effects on vertical variation of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. The new understanding of the observed relationships between these turbulent variables and mean variables explains the observed nighttime turbulence regime change observed in Sun et al. (2012) as well as the daytime momentum and heat flux variations with height up to the maximum observation height of 55 m.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ACPD...1527539R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ACPD...1527539R"><span id="translatedtitle">Controlled meteorological (CMET) balloon profiling of the Arctic <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> around Spitsbergen compared to a mesoscale model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roberts, T. J.; Dütsch, M.; Hole, L. R.; Voss, P. B.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Observations from CMET (Controlled Meteorological) balloons are analyzed in combination with mesoscale model simulations to provide insights into tropospheric meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity, wind-speed) around Svalbard, European High Arctic. Five Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons were launched from Ny-Ålesund in Svalbard over 5-12 May 2011, and measured vertical <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> profiles above Spitsbergen Island and over coastal areas to both the east and west. One notable CMET flight achieved a suite of 18 continuous soundings that probed the Arctic marine <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> over a period of more than 10 h. The CMET profiles are compared to simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using nested grids and three different <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> schemes. Variability between the three model schemes was typically smaller than the discrepancies between the model runs and the observations. Over Spitsbergen, the CMET flights identified temperature inversions and low-level jets (LLJ) that were not captured by the model. Nevertheless, the model largely reproduced time-series obtained from the Ny-Ålesund meteorological station, with exception of surface winds during the LLJ. Over sea-ice east of Svalbard the model underestimated potential temperature and overestimated wind-speed compared to the CMET observations. This is most likely due to the full sea-ice coverage assumed by the model, and consequent underestimation of ocean-<span class="hlt">atmosphere</span> exchange in the presence of leads or fractional coverage. The suite of continuous CMET soundings over a sea-ice free region to the northwest of Svalbard are analysed spatially and temporally, and compared to the model. The observed along-flight daytime increase in relative humidity is interpreted in terms of the diurnal cycle, and in the context of marine and terrestrial air-mass influences. Analysis of the balloon trajectory during the CMET soundings identifies strong wind-shear, with a low-level channeled</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9299E..0LL','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9299E..0LL"><span id="translatedtitle">Observations of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> trace gases by MAX-DOAS in the coastal <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> over Jiaozhou Bay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Xianxin; Wang, Zhangjun; Meng, Xiangqian; Zhou, Haijin; Du, Libin; Qu, Junle; Chen, Chao; An, Quan; Wu, Chengxuan; Wang, Xiufen</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Atmospheric</span> trace gases exist in the <span class="hlt">atmosphere</span> of the earth rarely. But the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> trace gases play an important role in the global <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> environment and ecological balance by participating in the global <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> cycle. And many environmental problems are caused by the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> trace gases such as photochemical smog, acid rain, greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, etc. So observations of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> trace gases become very important. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) developed recently is a kind of promising passive remote sensing technology which can utilize scattered sunlight received from multiple viewing directions to derive vertical column density of lower tropospheric trace gases like ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. It has advantages of simple structure, stable running, passive remote sensing and real-time online monitoring automatically. A MAX-DOAS has been developed at Shandong Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation (SDIOI) for remote measurements of lower tropospheric trace gases (NO2, SO2, and O3). In this paper, we mainly introduce the stucture of the instrument, calibration and results. Detailed performance analysis and calibration of the instrument were made at Qingdao. We present the results of NO2, SO2 and O3 vertical column density measured in the coastal <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> over Jiaozhou Bay. The diurnal variation and the daily average value comparison of vertical column density during a long-trem observation are presented. The vertical column density of NO2 and SO2 measured during Qingdao oil pipeline explosion on November 22, 2013 by MAX-DOAS is also presented. The vertical column density of NO2 reached to a high value after the explosion. Finally, the following job and the outlook for future possible improvements are given. Experimental calibration and results show that the developed MAX-DOAS system is reliable and credible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3700011','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3700011"><span id="translatedtitle">Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the <span class="hlt">Atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">Boundary</span> <span class="hlt">Layer</span> at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu; Challa, Venkata Srinivas; Indracanti, Jayakumar; Dasari, Hariprasad; Baham, Julius; Patrick, Chuck; Young, John; Hughes, Robert; White, Lorren D.; Hardy, Mark G.; Swanier, Shelton</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Coastal <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> during the period 25–29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT) during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF) meso-scale <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT) are used to simulate the lower <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28–30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region. PMID:19151446</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFM.A23F0392J&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFM.A23F0392J&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Massive-scale aircraft observations of giant sea-salt aerosol particle size distributions in <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> marine <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layers</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jensen, J. B.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>iant sea-salt aerosol particles (dry radius, rd > 0.5 μm) occur nearly everywhere in the marine <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> and frequently above. This study presents observations of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> sea-salt size distributions in the range 0.7 < rd < 14 μm based on external impaction of sea-spray aerosol particles onto microscope polycarbonate microscope slides. The slides have very large sample volumes, typically about 250 L over a 10-second sampling period. This provides unprecedented sampling of giant sea-salt particles for flights in marine <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> air. The slides were subsequently analyzed in a humidified chamber using dual optical digital microscopy. At a relative humidity of 90% the sea-salt aerosol particles form spherical cap drops. Based on measurement the volume of the spherical cap drop and assuming NaCl composition, the Kohler equation is used to derive the dry salt mass of tens of thousands of individual aerosol particles on each slide. Size distributions are given with a 0.2 μm resolution. The slides were exposed from the NSF/NCAR C-130 research aircraft during the 2008 VOCALS project off the coast of northern Chile and the 2011 ICE-T in the Caribbean. In each deployment, size distributions using hundreds of slides are used to relate fitted log-normal size distributions parameters to wind speed, altitude and other <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> conditions. The size distributions provide a unique observational set for initializing cloud models with coarse-mode aerosol particle observations for marine <span class="hlt">atmospheres</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A43A0206V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A43A0206V"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the intermittency of turbulence in the stable <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> - a field data and stochastic modeling approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vercauteren, N.; Von Larcher, T. G.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Klein, R.; Parlange, M. B.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Intermittent turbulence is a common feature of stably stratified <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> flows, yet its modeling is still problematic. Mesoscale motions such as gravity waves, Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities or density currents may trigger intermittent turbulence and greatly complicate the modeling and measurements of the stable <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> (SBL). In this study we investigate the intermittency of turbulence in very stable conditions by applying new statistical analysis tools to the existing SnoHATS dataset, collected in Switzerland over the Glacier de la Plaine Morte in 2006. These tools could then be used to develop stochastic parameterization for the SBL for use in weather or climate models. The SnoHATS dataset includes measurements of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> turbulence collected by horizontal arrays of sonic anemometers. This study applies timeseries analysis tools developed for meteorological data to analyze the SnoHATS dataset with a new perspective. Turbulence in very stable conditions exhibits intermittency, and there is interplay between larger scale <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> flow features (at the so-called submesoscales) and onset of turbulence. We investigate the use of statistical tools such as hidden Markov models (HMM) and nonstationary multivariate autoregressive factor models (VARX) as a way to define the interactions between lower frequency modes and turbulence modes. The statistical techniques allow for separation of the data according to metastable states, such as quiet and turbulent periods in the stratified <span class="hlt">atmosphere</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1810802P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016EGUGA..1810802P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Description of the <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> circulation in the <span class="hlt">boundary</span> <span class="hlt">layer</span> over a tropical island: Case study of Guadeloupe Archipelago</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Plocoste, Thomas; Dorville, Jean-François; Jacoby-Koaly, Sandra; Roussas, André</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Over past two decades the use of <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> sounding methods as Sodars, Lidar equipped drones increased sharply. Compare to weather balloon, these modern methods allow measure of profile at constant heights during long period. There are few studies using this type of equipment in tropical climates and lesser on small island. Wind regime on island of diameter less than 50 km are mostly considered as oceanic. Many author consider that thermal effect are negligible in land. But recent observations and simulations show importance of the thermal circulation at small- and meso- scales particularly in <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> pollution process. Up to 2009 no wind profile data were available continuously to study <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> circulation in Guadeloupe Archipelago (GA) which is one of the islands of the Lesser Antilles Arc. In first approximation wind was evaluated based on measures done at the most upwind island of the GA for many application as wind power and <span class="hlt">atmospheric</span> pollution. From 2009 to 2012 a measurement campaign of the <span class="hlt">Atmospheric</span> <span class="hlt">Boundary</span> <span class="hlt">Layer</span> (ABL) have been performed by the University of Antilles (UA) in GA. To assess effects of dynamic of ABL on air quality in sub urban area, particularly during the sunset and sunrise, UA monitored two sites with a weather station and a doppler sodar (REMTECH PAO). Both sites are close to the sea with one in a coastal area and the other in an open landfill surrounded by densely populated building and a mangrove swamp. Thermal and chemical measurements with a portable mass spectrometer were made in the vicinity of the landfill and showed the existence of urban heat islands. This study presents the first Doppler Sodar long measurements campaign in GA. Statistical analysis of the three year of doppler sodar data (i.e. wind components and its fluctuations) allow to identified and characterized the complex circulations on the two sites in the ABL between 25 and 500m above the sea level. Orographic and thermal effects due to urban area were</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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