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Sample records for atmospheric experiment recherche

  1. Experiments on atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab technology is examined as applied to the observation of the earth's weather patterns, composition, thermodynamics, and kinematics. An atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and a geophysical fluid flow cell are individually outlined as planned payload experiment efforts.

  2. Laboratory atmospheric compensation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drutman, C.; Moran, James P.; Faria-e-Maia, Francisco; Hyman, Howard; Russell, Jeffrey A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes an in-house experiment that was performed at the Avco Research Labs/Textron to test a proprietary atmospheric phase compensation algorithm. Since the laser energies of interest were small enough that thermal blooming was not an issue, it was only necessary to simulate the effect of atmospheric turbulence. This was achieved by fabricating phase screens that mimicked Kolmogorov phase statistics. A simulated atmosphere was constructed from these phase screens and the phase at the simulated ground was measured with a digital heterodyne interferometer. The result of this effort was an initial verification of our proprietary algorithm two years before the field experiment.

  3. Lunar atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 17 carried a miniature mass spectrometer, called the Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment (LACE), to the moon as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) to study the composition and variations in the lunar atmosphere. The instrument was successfully deployed in the Taurus-Littrow Valley with its entrance aperture oriented upward to intercept and measure the downward flux of gases at the lunar surface. During the ten lunations that the LACE operated, it produced a large base of data on the lunar atmosphere, mainly collected at night time. It was found that thermal escape is the most rapid loss mechanism for hydrogen and helium. For heavier gases, photoionization followed by acceleration through the solar wind electric field accounted for most of the loss. The dominant gases on the moosn were argon and helium, and models formed for their distribution are described in detail. It is concluded that most of the helium in the lunar atmosphere is of solar wind origin, and that there also exist very small amounts of methane, ammonia, and carbon dioxide.

  4. Atmospheric Climate Experiment Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, K.

    ACE+ is an atmospheric sounding mission using radio occultation techniques and is a combination of the two Earth Explorer missions ACE and WATS earlier proposed to ESA. ACE was highly rated by ESA in the Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 1999 and was prioritised as number three and selected as a "hot-stand-by". A phase A study was carried out during 2000 and 2001. ACE will observe atmospheric parameters using radio occultations from an array of 6 micro-satellites which track the L- band signal of GPS satellites to map the detailed refractivity and thermal structure of the global atmosphere from surface to space. Water vapour and wind in Atmospheric Troposphere and Stratosphere WATS was the response to ESA's Call for Ideas for the next Earth Explorer Core Missions in 2001. WATS combines ACE GPS atmospheric occultations and LEO-LEO cross-link occultations. Cross-links strongly enhance the capability of measuring humidity relative to the ACE mission. The Earth Science Advisory Committée at ESA noted that the LEO-GNSS occultation technique is already well established through several missions in recent years and could not recommend WATS for a Phase A study as an Earth Explorer Core Mission. The ESAC was, however, deeply impressed by the LEO-LEO component of the WATS proposal and would regard it as regrettable if this science would be lost and encourages the ACE/WATS team to explore other means to achieve its scientific goal. ACE+ is therefore the response to ESA's 2nd Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 2001 and will contribute in a significant manner to ESA's Living Planet Programme. ACE+ will considerably advance our knowledge about atmosphere physics and climate change processes. The mission will demonstrate a highly innovative approach using radio occultations for globally measuring profiles of humidity and temperature throughout the atmosphere and stratosphere. A constellation of 4 small satellites, tracking L-band GPS/GALILEO signals and

  5. NASA's atmospheric variability experiments /AVE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    A series of seven mesoscale experiments were conducted under the NASA program, Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE). Rawinsonde, satellite, aircraft, and ground observations were recorded during specially selected meteorological periods lasting from 1 to 3 days. Details are presented for each AVE relative to observation times, experiment size and location, and significant weather. Some research results based on the use of these AVE data are referenced. These include contributions to regional numerical prediction; relations between wind shears, instability, and thunderstorm motion and development; relations between moisture and temperature and the probability of convection; retrieval of tropospheric temperature profiles from cloud-contaminated satellite data; variation of convection intensity as a result of atmospheric variability; and effects of cloud rotation on their trajectories.

  6. Atmospheric variability experiment /AVE II/ pilot experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Scroggins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) was conducted in May 1974. Rawinsonde releases were made at 54 upper-air stations in two thirds of the eastern U.S. at 3-hr intervals for a 24-hr period. Radar data were obtained from 11 stations located near the center of the observational area, and as many data as possible were collected from the Nimbus 5, NOAA 2, ATS-3, and DMSP satellites. The present paper provides an overview of the experiment and describes how the user community can obtain copies of the data.

  7. Laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, M; Tammer, R

    1998-03-20

    Old and new laboratory experiments on atmospheric optics with a focus on mirages, rainbows, and halos are presented. Some qualitative demonstrations serve primarily didactical purposes, e.g., by proving the existence of curved light rays in media with a gradient of the index of refraction, by directly visualizing the minimum-deviation curve for rainbow paths in water droplets, or by helping to elucidate the ray classes in hexagons that contribute to a specific halo. In addition, quantitative experiments allow a direct comparison of angular positions and intensities with analytical computations or Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering from small water droplets or ice hexagons. In particular, the latter can help us to understand complex halo phenomena. PMID:18268748

  8. Laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, M; Tammer, R

    1999-08-16

    Old and new laboratory experiments on atmospheric optics with a focus on mirages, rainbows, and halos are presented. Some qualitative demonstrations serve primarily didactical purposes, e.g., by proving the existence of curved light rays in media with a gradient of the index of refraction, by directly visualizing the minimum-deviation curve for rainbow paths in water droplets, or by helping to elucidate the ray classes in hexagons that contribute to a specific halo. In addition, quantitative experiments allow a direct comparison of angular positions and intensities with analytical computations or Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering from small water droplets or ice hexagons. In particular, the latter can help us to understand complex halo phenomena. PMID:19399049

  9. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  10. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, B.; Bryk, M.; Clark, J.; Donahue, K.; Ellyin, R.; Misra, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Statham, S.; Steinkraus, J.; Lightsey, E. G.; Fear, A.; Francis, P.; Kjellberg, H.; McDonald, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) since 2012, which consists of a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform. RACE will measure 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line, and will be used to validate new low noise amplifier (LNA) technology and a novel amplifier based internal calibration subsystem. The 3U spacecraft is provided by the University of Texas at Austin's Satellite Design Laboratory. RACE will advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and a CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7. Measurements at 183 GHz are used to retrieve integrated products and vertical profiles of water vapor. Current full scale satellite missions that can utilize the technology include AMSU, ATMS, SSMIS and Megha-Tropiques. The LNAs are designed at JPL, based on a 35 nm indium phosphide (InP) high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT) technology developed by Northrop Grumman. The resulting single chip LNAs require only 25 mW of power. Current pre-launch instrument performance specifications include an RF gain of over 30 dB and a room noise figure of < 9.5 dB. The noise figure is dominated by the insertion loss of the Dicke switch which at these frequencies are > 5dB. If a coupler based calibration system is shown to be sufficient, future receiver systems will have noise figures < 4 dB. The gain and noise figure variation over temperature is approximately 0.55 dB/K. The NEDT of the system is < 1K, and on orbit performance is expected to improve due to the thermal environment. The current system is configured for direct detection to reduce power consumption by eliminating the need for a local oscillator. A 2012 NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) selection, RACE is manifested for launch on the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) mission scheduled for October 2014. RACE will be deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) by NanoRacks.

  11. Atmospheric microphysical experiments on an orbital platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory is a Shuttle/Spacelab payload which will be capable of performing a large range of microphysics experiments. This facility will complement terrestrial cloud physics research by allowing many experiments to be performed which cannot be accomplished within the confines of a terrestrial laboratory. This paper reviews the general Cloud Physics Laboratory concept and the experiment scope. The experimental constraints are given along with details of the proposed equipment. Examples of appropriate experiments range from three-dimensional simulation of the earth and planetary atmosphere and of ocean circulation to cloud electrification processes and the effects of atmospheric pollution materials on microphysical processes.

  12. Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Experiment: Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Table-top views of one of the Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Experiments. This view is of the Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment (LACE) (Lunar Mass Spectrometer), Experiment S-205, one of the experiments of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package which will be carried on the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. The LACE will measrue components in the ambient lunar atmosphere in the range of one to 110 atomic mass units (AMU).

  13. Balloon atmospheric propagation experiment measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1973-01-01

    High altitude balloon measurements on laser beam fading during propagation through turbulent atmosphere show that a correlation between fading strength and stellar scintillation magnitudes exists. Graphs for stellar scintillation as a function of receiver aperture are used to predict fading bit error rates for neodymium-yag laser communication system.

  14. Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1988-01-01

    Space plasma physics will be studied on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission during the Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) experiment. The basic scientific objective of the AEPI is the investigation of the upper atmosphere-ionosphere and the space shuttle environment. The experiment areas of the AEPI include: (1) the investigation of ionospheric transport processes by observing Mg(+) ions; (2) studies of optical properties of artificially induced electron beams; (3) measurement of electron cross sections for selected atmospheric species; (4) studies of natural airglow; and (5) studies of natural auroras. On ATLAS 1, optical emissions generated by the shuttle (shuttle ram glow) will also be investigated.

  15. OGO-6 neutral atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The continued analysis of data obtained from the neutral atmospheric composition experiment flown on OGO-V6 is discussed. The effort was directed toward the study of five specific areas of interest for which the OGO-V6 data were especially useful.

  16. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Kurylo, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We seek funding from NASA for the third year (2005) of the four-year period January 1, 2003 - December 31, 2006 for continued support of the MIT contributions to the multi-national global atmospheric trace species measurement program entitled Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE). The case for real-time high-frequency measurement networks like AGAGE is very strong and the observations and their interpretation are widely recognized for their importance to ozone depletion and climate change studies and to verification issues arising from the Montreal Protocol (ozone) and Kyoto Protocol (climate). The proposed AGAGE program is distinguished by its capability to measure over the globe at high frequency almost all of the important species in the Montreal Protocol and almost all of the significant non-CO2 gases in the Kyoto Protocol.

  17. Aeroballistic analyses for the Atmospheric Compensation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (ACE) involved illuminating a sounding rocket payload with a low power laser from the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS), Mt. Haleakala, HI. This experiment, sponsored by DARPA and SDIO, included four launches of Terrier Malemute II rocket vehicles from the Kauai Test Facility during the period July through Dec., 1985. The purpose of ACE was to demonstrate an adaptive optics technology that allowed the efficient transfer of power from the laser to the space target. This paper discusses the rationale used in selecting the launch site and the requirements for the carrier rocket system. Each payload carried a light detector array along its longitudinal axis, and it was necessary that this array be oriented perpendicular to the line of sight from AMOS to the payload. The design requirements for the payload attitude control system to satisfy this requirement are presented. Flight test results from the four tests showing flight performance and payload pointing data are included.

  18. Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkeson, T. D.

    2003-12-01

    The Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) was formed in 1991 to assist in developing a comprehensive plan to restore and protect Tampa Bay in Florida, USA. An ecological indicator of the health of the Bay is the coverage of seagrasses, historically in decline, which are important to the aquatic habitat and food web of the bay. Seagrass decline is linked to excess of plant-stimulating forms of nitrogen to the bay, promoting algae growth, which shades out light needed to sustain seagrasses. One element of the TBEP is a private-local-state, multi-agency Nitrogen Management Consortium that seeks to limit nitrogen loading to the Bay to the 1992-1994 average. Present estimates suggest atmospheric deposition comprises ~ 30% of the nitrogen budget of the Bay. This estimate was based, however, on limited ambient monitoring data and simple models, typical of such national estuary program efforts nationwide. In the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Florida DEP joined with TBEP to increase the intensity, sophistication and spatial scope of monitoring and modeling and provide better information on air quality in the Tampa Bay area. The result will be improved estimates of the effects of local and regional emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) on the Bay and the benefits to be gained from implementation of emissions reduction strategies.

  19. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) is an ongoing research project, for which the work carried out by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Due to the need to complete AGAGE activities specifically funded under NAGW-2034 that had been delayed, a no-cost extension to this grant was obtained, creating an overlap period between the two grants. Because the AGAGE project is continuing, and a Final Project Report is required only because of the change in grant numbers, it is most appropriate to submit for this report the Introduction and Accomplishments sections which appear on pages 1-62 of the October 1998 AGAGE renewal proposal. A copy of the complete proposal is attached.

  20. Atmosphere control for plant growth flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Ferolyn T.; Sudar, Martin; Timm, Marc; Yost, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    An atmosphere exchange system (AES) has been designed to provide a conditioned atmosphere supply to plant specimens in flight without incurring the large weight and volume associated with bottled gases. The paper examines the atmosphere filter cartridge (AFC) designed to remove trace organic atmosphere contaminants from the Space Shuttle cabin and to condition the cabin atmosphere prior to exposure to plant specimens. The AES and AFC are described and illustrated. The AFC design requirements are discussed and results are presented from tests on the performance of the AFC. Also, consideration is given to the potential applications of the AFC and future design concepts for atmosphere control.

  1. A Spectacular Experiment Exhibiting Atmospheric Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Noxaïc, Armand

    2014-01-01

    The experiment described here is fairly easy to reproduce and dramatically shows the magnitude of ambient air pressure. Two circular plates of aluminum are applied one against the other. How do you make their separation very difficult? With only the help of an elastic band! You don't have to use a vacuum pump for this experiment.

  2. The San Marco 3 neutral atmosphere composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelz, D. T.; Newton, G. P.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Clem, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental instrumentation of the San Marco 3 satellite is described along with the calibration and operation. The instrumentation for the following experiments was included: an air density experiment for measuring the instantaneous drag force, and thus the neutral particle total mass density; a neutral atmosphere composition experiment for measuring the densities of helium, atomic and molecular oxygen, molecular nitrogen and argon; and a neutral atmosphere temperature experiment to determine the gas kinetic temperature by measuring molecular nitrogen density variations in an orificed spherical chamber as a function of angle of attack.

  3. Atmospheric Turbulence Statistics from GOLD Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Wilson, Keith; Lesh, Jim

    1996-01-01

    Ground-Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration (GOLD) includes the following: (1) Optical communication experiments between Table Mountain Observatory (TMF) and Japanese Engineering Test Satellite (ETS-VI); (2) International cooperative effort between NASA, NASDA, CRL and JPL; and (3) Phase 1 transmissions from October 1995 to January 1996 and Phase 2 transmissions from March 1996 to May 1996.

  4. Shuttle Coherent Atmospheric Lidar Experiment (SCALE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J.; Beranek, R.; Fitzjarrald, D.; Mabry, J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study to design and accommodate a simplified version of a coherent lidar system capable of performing tropospheric wind measurements are outlined. The following topics are addressed: system sensitivity, orbital analysis, science experiments, preliminary system design, accommodations, and the space qualification of a 2J CO2 laser.

  5. Airborne experiment results for spaceborne atmospheric synchronous correction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wenyu; Yi, Weining; Du, Lili; Liu, Xiao

    2015-10-01

    The image quality of optical remote sensing satellite is affected by the atmosphere, thus the image needs to be corrected. Due to the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric conditions, correction by using synchronous atmospheric parameters can effectively improve the remote sensing image quality. For this reason, a small light spaceborne instrument, the atmospheric synchronous correction device (airborne prototype), is developed by AIOFM of CAS(Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences). With this instrument, of which the detection mode is timing synchronization and spatial coverage, the atmospheric parameters consistent with the images to be corrected in time and space can be obtained, and then the correction is achieved by radiative transfer model. To verify the technical process and treatment effect of spaceborne atmospheric correction system, the first airborne experiment is designed and completed. The experiment is implemented by the "satellite-airborne-ground" synchronous measuring method. A high resolution(0.4 m) camera and the atmospheric correction device are equipped on the aircraft, which photograph the ground with the satellite observation over the top simultaneously. And aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) in the imagery area are also acquired, which are used for the atmospheric correction for satellite and aerial images. Experimental results show that using the AOD and CWV of imagery area retrieved by the data obtained by the device to correct aviation and satellite images, can improve image definition and contrast by more than 30%, and increase MTF by more than 1 time, which means atmospheric correction for satellite images by using the data of spaceborne atmospheric synchronous correction device is accurate and effective.

  6. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  7. An Atmospheric Science Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard; Qu, Zheng; Bowman, Kevin; Eldering, Annmarie

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric sounding mission starts with a wide range of concept designs involving measurement technologies, observing platforms, and observation scenarios. Observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is a technical approach to evaluate the relative merits of mission and instrument concepts. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the OSSE team has developed an OSSE environment that allows atmospheric scientists to systematically explore a wide range of mission and instrument concepts and formulate a science traceability matrix with a quantitative science impact analysis. The OSSE environment virtually creates a multi-platform atmospheric sounding testbed (MAST) by integrating atmospheric phenomena models, forward modeling methods, and inverse modeling methods. The MAST performs OSSEs in four loosely coupled processes, observation scenario exploration, measurement quality exploration, measurement quality evaluation, and science impact analysis.

  8. Atmospheric Absorption of Heat - Skylab Student Experiment ED-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment, Atmospheric Absorption of Heat, proposed by Joe B. Zmolek of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. This experiment utilized Skylab's Earth Resources Experiment spectrometers to determine the attenuation of radiant energy in the visible and near-infrared spectrums for both densely and sparsely populated areas. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  9. Characterization of Settled Atmospheric Dust by the DART Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Baraona, Cosmo

    1999-01-01

    The DART ("Dust Accumulation and Removal Test") package is an experiment which will fly as part of the MIP experiment on the Mars-2001 Surveyor Lander. Dust deposition could be a significant problem for photovoltaic array operation for long duration emissions on the surface of Mars. Measurements made by Pathfinder showed 0.3% loss of solar array performance per day due to dust obscuration. The DART experiment is designed to quantify dust deposition from the Mars atmosphere, measure the properties of settled dust, measure the effect of dust deposition on the array performance, and test several methods of mitigating the effect of settled dust on a solar array. Although the purpose of DART (along with its sister experiment, MATE) is to gather information critical to the design of future power systems on the surface of Mars, the dust characterization instrumentation on DART will also provide significant scientific data on the properties of settled atmospheric dust.

  10. Feasibility study: Atmospheric general circulation experiment, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsey, R. J. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility analysis of the atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) are documented. The analysis performed in each technical area, the rationale and substantiation for the design approaches selected for the hardware, and the design details for the baseline AGCE are presented.

  11. Nuclear effects in atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino (antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei at intermediate energy region. We have applied this study to calculate the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The study of the nuclear effects has been done for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  12. The Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment and the Global Atmospheric Gas Experiment (ALE/GAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. Aslam K.

    1995-01-01

    The ALE/GAGE project was designed to determine the global atmospheric lifetimes of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl3F and CCl2F2 (F-11 and F-12), which had been identified as the main gases that cause stratospheric ozone depletion. The experimental procedures also provided the concentrations of CH3CCl3, CCl4 and N2O. The extended role of the project was to evaluate the mass balances of these gases as well. Methylchloroform (CH3CCl3) serves as a tracer of average atmospheric OH concentrations and hence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and can also deplete the ozone layer. Measurements of these gases were taken with optimized instruments in the field at a frequency of about 1 sample/hr. Toward the end of the present project methane measurements were added to the program. The final report deals with the research of the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) as part of the ALE/GAGE program between 4/1/1988 and 1/31/1991. The report defines the scope of the OGI project, the approach, and the results.

  13. Atmospheric measurements on Mars - The Viking meteorology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, T. E.; Cole, H. L.; Dutton, R. G.; Greene, G. C.; Tillman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking meteorology experiment is one of nine experiments to be carried out on the surface of Mars by each of two Viking Landers positioned at different latitudes and longitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The meteorology experiment will measure pressure, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction at 1.5-hr intervals throughout the Martian day. The duration of each measurement period, the interval between data samples for a measurement period, and the time at which the measurement period is started will be varied throughout the mission. The scientific investigation and the sensors and electronics used for making the atmospheric measurement are discussed.

  14. Molecular line parameters for the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Farmer, C. B.; Toth, R. A.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1987-01-01

    During its first mission in 1985 onboard Spacelab 3, the ATMOS (atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy) instrument, a high speed Fourier transform spectrometer, produced a large number of high resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded in the occultation mode. The analysis and interpretation of these data in terms of composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the earth's upper atmosphere required good knowledge of the molecular line parameters for those species giving rise to the absorptions in the atmospheric spectra. This paper describes the spectroscopic line parameter database compiled for the ATMOS experiment and referenced in other papers describing ATMOS results. With over 400,000 entries, the linelist catalogs parameters of 46 minor and trace species in the 1-10,000/cm region.

  15. VOCAR: An experiment in Variability of Coastal Atmospheric Refractivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulus, Richard A.

    1994-10-01

    A previous radio-meteorological experiment conducted along the coast of southern California showed a high correlation between UHF signals and the base of the elevated temperature inversion. A reanalysis of this experimental data with a recently developed hybrid propagation model confirmed this correlation and a method to remotely sense the refractive structure was proposed. An experiment called Variability of Coastal Atmospheric Refractivity (VOCAR) was designed under a larger program called Coastal Variability Analysis, Measurements, and Prediction. VOCAR is a multi-year experimental effort to investigate the variability of atmospheric refractivity with emphasis on the coastal zone. The experiment is being conducted by the Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Center RDT&E Division jointly with the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, Point Mugu, CA, the Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, DC and Monterey), and the Naval Postgraduate School. In addition, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory, Penn State University Applied Research Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory participated in the intensive measurement phase of VOCAR. The objectives of VOCAR are to provide an assessment capability for horizontally varying refractivity conditions in a coastal environment and to develop a remote sensing capability. The propagation measurements being made during VOCAR consist of monitoring signal strength variations of VHF/UHF transmitters in the southern California coastal region. Corresponding meteorological measurements are made during routine, special, and intensive observation periods. Measurements began in May 1993 and will be conducted periodically through 1994.

  16. Atmospheric guidance concepts for an aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.; Cerimele, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Higgins, J.

    1988-01-01

    Three atmospheric guidance concepts proposed for an aeroassist flight experiment are presented. The flight experiment will simulate a return from geosynchronous orbit by an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle and is proposed to be flown on board the Space Shuttle in 1992. The three guidance concepts include an analytic predictor/corrector, a numeric predictor/corrector, and an energy controller. The algorithms for the three guidance methods are developed and performance results are presented for the nominal case and for several cases dispersed from the nominal conditions.

  17. ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

    1995-09-27

    Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative

  18. Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

    2007-12-21

    This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

  19. Atmospheric science experiments applicable to Space Shuttle Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.; Vaughan, W. W.; Goodman, S. J.; Robertson, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The present lack of a lower atmosphere research satellite program for the 1980s has prompted consideration of the Space Shuttle/Spacelab system as a means of flying sensor complements geared toward specific research problems, as well as continued instrument development. Three specific examples of possible science questions related to precipitation are discussed: (1) spatial structure of mesoscale cloud and precipitation systems, (2) lightning and storm development, and (3) cyclone intensification over oceanic regions. Examples of space sensors availab le to provide measurements needed in addressing these questions are also presented. Distinctive aspects of low-earth orbit experiments would be high resolution, multispectral sensing of atmospheric phenomena by complements of instruments, and more efficient sensor development through reflights of specific hardware packages.

  20. Atmospheric Results from the MGS Horizon Science Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Murphy, J. R.; Hollingsworth, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The Horizon Science Experiment (HORSE) utilizes the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly (MHSA) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter to measure 15-micron band thermal emission from the Martian atmosphere. During the first two phases of aerobraking, from September 1997 to May 1998, and from September 1998 to March 1999, one of the four MGS quadrants was pointed well onto the planet consistently during the near-periapsis aerobraking passes, allowing the device to obtain data on the latitudinal variation of middle atmospheric temperature (0.2 - 2.0 mbar). Of particular interest during the first phase (L(sub s) = 182 - 300 deg) were the effects of a prominent dust storm at L(sub s) =224 deg, and wavelike behavior in the strong temperature gradient near the north polar cap. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. HICO and RAIDS Experiment Payload - Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budzien, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The HICO and RAIDS Experiment Payload - Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (HREP-RAIDS) experiment will provide atmospheric scientists with a complete description of the major constituents of the thermosphere (layer of the Earth's atmosphere) and ionosphere (uppermost layer of the Earth's atmosphere), global electron density profiles at altitudes between 100 - 350 kilometers.

  2. Experiments of reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenshan; Zhu, Yanyu; Deng, Ziwang

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we give some experimental results of our study in reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data. After a great deal of numerical experiments, we found that the logistic map, x n + 1 = 1- μx {2/n}, could be used in monthly mean temperature prediction when it was approaching the chaotic region, and its predictive results were in reverse states to the practical data. This means that the nonlinear developing behavior of the monthly mean temperature system is bifurcating back into the critical chaotic states from the chaotic ones.

  3. Rotating-fluid experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Pitcher, E. J.; Malone, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine features of rotating fluid flow that are dependent on the geometry, rotating annulus-type experiments are carried out with a numerical model in spherical coordinates. Rather than constructing and testing a model expressly for this purpose, it is found expedient to modify an existing general circulation model of the atmosphere by removing the model physics and replacing the lower boundary with a uniform surface. A regime diagram derived from these model experiments is presented; its major features are interpreted and contrasted with the major features of rotating annulus regime diagrams. Within the wave regime, a narrow region is found where one or two zonal wave numbers are dominant. The results reveal no upper symmetric regime; wave activity at low rotation rates is thought to be maintained by barotropic rather than baroclinic processes.

  4. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, B.D.; Church, H.W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R.G.; Tsay, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12--18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP [International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program] Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  5. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, B. D.; Church, H. W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R. G.; Tsay, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12-18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  6. The field experiments on the HTO washout from the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.V.; Mavrin, S.V.; Golubeva, V.N.; Stengach, A.V.; Balashov, Y.S.; Kovalenko, V.P.; Solomatin, I.I.

    2015-03-15

    HTO (tritiated water) wash-out from the atmosphere is one of the key processes governing the HTO transport from the atmosphere into soil and plants. Experimental studies of the HTO interaction with water drops were carried out both in laboratories and in the field. In the course of experiments, the following rain characteristics were recorded: rain intensity, size distribution of drops, and falling velocities and their dependence on drop diameter. A laser optical device was designed and used to measure the distribution of the drop radius and velocities during the period of experiment. The tritium source was placed at a height of 30 m. Rainwater samples were collected in plastic bottles and their HTO activity was determined by liquid scintillation techniques. The data obtained for the experimental values of the scavenging rate are within the range from 4.12*10{sup -5} to 1.57*10{sup -4} s{sup -1} and correspond to the precipitation intensity from 0.3 to 1.26 mm/hour. These results are in sufficiently good agreement with the results of earlier papers.

  7. Experiment for Investigation of Atmosphere-Magnetosphere Relationship at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisberg, O. L.; Koynash, G.; Shestakov, A.; Roman, Z.; Moiseenko, D.; Kirillov, A. S.; Chernouss, S.; Moiseev, P.; Shefov, N.; Semenov, A.; Rodionov, I.; Sosonkin, M.; Ivanov, Y.; Sinyavsky, I.; Sigernes, F.; Berthellier, J.; Leblanc, F.

    2013-12-01

    We are describing an optical experiment for investigation of nightglow of Mars, aeronomic phenomena, helium fluorescence, magnetospheric tail, and escape of planetary ions. Specifically, proposed experiment aimed to investigation of outer envelope of Mars: upper atmosphere and association of its connections with processes in accretion magnetosphere, including atmospheric losses induced by the solar wind. It includes: 1. Registration of spatial distribution of night-side atmospheric glow on Mars in order to determine spatial and temporal properties of electron precipitation for investigation of source regions of these electrons, 2. Registration of spectra of night-side glow for estimation of the energy of precipitation electrons and for analysis of kinetics of electron-excited molecules at different altitudes at Mars, 3. Registration of helium emission 1083 nm at dusk and down for determination of He number density, its height distribution and its variations, and 4. Measurements of CO+ (O+, O2+, CO2+) emission at night-side for determination of atmospheric losses through magnetospheric tail. To study mentioned phenomena we propose the set of instruments that may be used in mission to Mars. Experiment includes 4 optical sensors: all-sky camera, spectrograph, and two photometers. For investigation of spatial and spectral characteristics of night-side upper atmosphere we have chosen spectral interval 200-230 nm. Observations of Martian night glow will be performed with two instruments: all-sky camera (2π field of view), that measures emission in 200-230 nm band (CO) and narrow-angle spectrograph with 1800 - slit in spectral range 200-230 nm with resolution ~ 0.5 nm. This spectral range almost completely free of absorption by O3 and CO2 Recorded spectrum is attributed to specific emitting regions with help of all-sky camera. He emission at 1083 nm is observed with narrow-angle (~ 50) fast-lens photometer. 1083 nm emission of He depends not only on He number density but

  8. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE): MIT Contribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We describe in detail the instrumentation and calibrations used in the ALE, GAGE and AGAGE experiments and present a history of the majority of the anthropogenic ozone- depleting and climate-forcing gases in air based on these experiments. Beginning in 1978, these three successive automated high frequency in-situ experiments have documented the long-term behavior of the measured concentrations of these gases over the past twenty years, and show both the evolution of latitudinal gradients and the high frequency variability due to sources and circulation. We provide estimates of the long-term trends in total chlorine contained in long- lived halocarbons involved in ozone depletion. We summarize interpretations of these measurements using inverse methods to determine trace gas lifetimes and emissions. Finally, we provide a combined observational and modeled reconstruction of the evolution of chlorocarbons by latitude in the atmosphere over the past sixty years which can be used as boundary conditions for interpreting trapped air in glaciers and oceanic measurements of chlorocarbon tracers of the deep oceanic circulation. Some specific conclusions are: (a) International compliance with the Montreal Protocol is so far resulting in chlorofluorocarbon and chlorocarbon mole fractions comparable to target levels, (b) Mole fractions of total chlorine contained in long-lived halocarbons (CCl2F2, CCl3F, CH3CCl3, CCl4, CHClF2, CCl2FCClF2, CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl2=CCl2) in the lower troposphere reached maximum values of about 3.6 ppb in 1993 and are beginning to slowly decrease in the global lower atmosphere, (c) The chlorofluorocarbons have atmospheric lifetimes consistent with destruction in the stratosphere being their principal removal mechanism, (d) Multi-annual variations in chlorofluorocarbon and chlorocarbon emissions deduced from ALUGAGWAGAGE data are consistent approximately with variations estimated independently from industrial production and sales data where

  9. An overview of the Soviet Vega balloon experiment and studies of the atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the VEGA probe to Venus is given, including a detailed examination of the balloon experiment to study the atmosphere of Venus. The areas of study include the ground network, the global network of radiotelescopes, meteorological measurements, the thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere in the middle cloud layer, atmospheric dynamics, and other results of the VEGA 1 and 2 experiments.

  10. Feasibility study: Atmospheric general circulation experiment, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsey, R. J. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) uses a rotating fluid flow cell assembly. The key technical areas affecting the feasibility of the design and operation of the AGCE are investigated. The areas investigated include materials for the flow cell assembly, thermal design, high voltage power supply design, effective retrieval and handling of experiment data and apparatus configuration. Several materials, DMSO and m-tolunitrile, were selected as candidate fluids for the flow cell principally for their high dielectric constant which permits the high voltage power supply design to be held to 15 kV and still simulate terrestrial gravity. Achievement of a low dissipation factor in the fluid to minimize internal heating from the applied electrical field depends strongly on purification and handling procedures. The use of sapphire as the outer hemisphere for the flow cell provides excellent viewing conditions without a significant impact on attaining the desired thermal gradients. Birefringent effects from sapphire can be held to acceptably low limits. Visualization of flow fluid is achieved through the motion of a dot matrix formed by photochromic dyes. Two dyes found compatible with the candidate fluids are spiropyran and triarylmethane. The observation of the dot motion is accomplished using a flying spot scanner.

  11. Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Estuarine and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Our program in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University is unique in emphasizing the interdisciplinary study of coastal ocean and atmospheric processes. We attract a large number of both male and female undergraduate applicants representing diverse ethnic groups from across the country. Many are multi-discipline majors merging geology, biology, chemistry, or physics with engineering, and/or mathematics and welcome the opportunity to combine their academic training to examine environmental problems. Our goal is a program reflective of today’s world and environmental challenges, one that provides a ‘hands-on’ research experience which illustrates the usefulness of scientific research for understanding real-world problems or phenomena, and one in which students are challenged to apply their academic backgrounds to develop intuition about natural systems and processes. Projects this past summer focused on assessing climate change and its effects on coastal environments and processes. Projects addressed the implications of a changing global climate over the next 50 years on hydrologic cycles and coastal environments like barrier islands and beaches, on seasonal weather conditions and extreme events, on aerosols and the Earth’s radiative balance, and on aquatic habitats and biota. Collaborative field and laboratory or computer-based projects involving two or three REU students, graduate students, and several mentors, enable undergraduate students appreciate the importance of teamwork in addressing specific scientific questions or gaining maximum insight into a particular phenomenon or process. We believe that our approach allows students to understand what their role will be as scientists in the next phase of our earth’s evolution.

  12. Performance Improvements to the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. C.; Petway, L. P.; Antill, C. W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is the first fully-engineered, modular, tunable, autonomous Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for the remote measurement of water vapor, aerosols and clouds across the troposphere. It was designed, built and environmentally tested at LARC. LASE was designed to fly aboard a NASA/Ames ER-2 aircraft (NASA's high altitude aircraft) and operate at altitudes from 58,000 to 70,000 feet. Since its first flight on May 11, 1994, it has flown 28 total missions on board the ER-2. LASE has been validated with results showing an accuracy better than the initial requirement for vertical profiles of water vapor in the troposphere. LASE can also deploy on several other aircraft including the NASA P-3 and will fly aboard the NASA DC-8 during the Convection And Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX) in July-September 1998. The tunable laser system of LASE was designed to operate in a double-pulse mode at 5Hz, with energy outputs of up to 15OmJ per pulse in the 813 to 819nm wavelength region and with 99% of the output energy within a spectral interval of 1.06 pm. Sixteen wavelengths were selected to cover the various water vapor absorption cross sections needed for the DIAL measurement. The Ti:Sapphire laser was constructed using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the pump source and a single mode diode laser as a injection seeder for the Ti:Al2O3 laser. We have improved the LASE instrument in several important ways. Improvements to the seed source have demonstrated that DFB laser diodes can be used as reliable seed sources on airborne DIAL instruments. The DFB diode has enabled LASE to gather more data and significantly reduced the maintenance required to insure that the system performance requirements are met. The multiwavelength sequential seeding technique is the current method of data collection for LASE. It has the advantages of providing an entire atmospheric coverage of H2O(v) from the ground to the aircraft altitude along a single

  13. Infrared experiments for spaceborne planetary atmospheres research. Full report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The role of infrared sensing in atmospheric science is discussed and existing infrared measurement techniques are reviewed. Proposed techniques for measuring planetary atmospheres are criticized and recommended instrument developments for spaceborne investigations are summarized for the following phenomena: global and local radiative budget; radiative flux profiles; winds; temperature; pressure; transient and marginal atmospheres; planetary rotation and global atmospheric activity; abundances of stable constituents; vertical, lateral, and temporal distribution of abundances; composition of clouds and aerosols; radiative properties of clouds and aerosols; cloud microstructure; cloud macrostructure; and non-LTE phenomena.

  14. Infrared experiments for spaceborne planetary atmospheres research. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The role of 0.5 to 300 micron remote sensing in planetary atmospheres exploration was evaluated by examining a broad range of measurement techniques including quantitative intercomparisons of existing and planned instruments by the phenomenological method. Key areas of infrared instrumentation requiring development for the investigations of atmospheres were identified.

  15. SUMS preliminary design and data analysis development. [shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary analysis and data analysis system development for the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS) experiment are discussed. The SUMS experiment is designed to provide free stream atmospheric density, pressure, temperature, and mean molecular weight for the high altitude, high Mach number region.

  16. The ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy) experiment - A tool for global monitoring of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Gunson, M. R.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of the objectives, instrumentation, performance and results of the ATMOS program developed by NASA-JPL as part of the Spacelab 3 shuttle payload. ATMOS was developed to obtain high-resolution spectroscopic information of the middle atmosphere, from which the vertical distribution of the most possible trace and minor molecules could be retrieved. A complete occultation included not only data recorded when the optical path traversed the earth's atmosphere, but also many spectra with tangent heights big enough for no more telluric absorptions to be detected. The averaging of such 'high sun' observations has provided high quality solar spectra totally free of atmospheric absorption features.

  17. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment Post-Launch Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, B.; Misra, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) that was lost during the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) launch anomaly on October 28, 2014. The 3U CubeSat mission would have measured 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line and raised the technology readiness level (TRL) of various subsystems to 6. Despite the launch failure, several hundreds of hours of instrument operation data was taken, including measurements in thermal vacuum of the complete spacecraft system. These data is used to evaluate the 35 nm Indium Phosphide (InP) receivers, and the low noise amplifier (LNA) based internal calibration system. The thermal vacuum measurements included frequent observations of a 'cold' and 'hot' target allowing for various receiver parameters to be calculated. The payload thermal vacuum data show that the receiver front ends performed as expected in terms of the gain (>35 dB) and drift (0.06 dB/K). The data also shows that integration could be performed with decreasing noise up to ~30 seconds, allowing for the system to be calibrated within that time period. The expected spacecraft calibration period would have been every 12 seconds. The injected noise from the load terminated LNA show magnitudes from 50 - 150 K that can be tuned which would meet most requirements. However the temperature coefficient is large at ~3 K/K which is over an order of magnitude larger than typical noise diodes. For nanosatellite class spacecraft, the power required to properly maintain the physical temperature range (±0.1K) would be challenging. On larger spacecraft, this methodology may still be viable, depending on the availability of suitable noise diodes at 183 GHz. While the CubeSat did not take measurements in space, the ground data in the relevant environment and extensive testing allows us to raise the following subsystems to TRL 6: 1) 183 GHz 35 nm InP receiver, 2) 183 GHz direct detect receiver and 3) 183 GHz LNA based calibration system.

  18. Discovery Venera surface: Atmosphere geochemistry experiments mission concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkov, Yuri A.; Head, James W.; Kremnev, Roald; Nock, K. T.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenal increase in our understanding of Venus provided by the Magellan Mission has raised a series of focused, fundamental scientific questions about the geochemistry of the surface of Venus, the nature of the lower atmosphere, and the relationship of the lower atmosphere and surface. First, surface geochemical measurements from the Venera/Vega spacecraft showed that widely spaced regions of the venusian plains are made of basalts; thus basalts are significant and may be the only component of the venusian crust. But we lack information on the composition of several key elements of Venus geology: (1) Tessera terrain (which may be outcrops of continental-like non-basaltic crustal material) and steep-sided domes/festoons are promising candidates for non-basaltic geochemically evolved material. The composition of the lower part of the Venusian crust is unknown: however, ejecta from large venusian craters provides us with the possibility of sampling this material on the surface; (2) bulk chemistry (structure and dynamics) of the venusian atmosphere are known. The altitude profiles of water vapor content and minor admixtures relevant to redox conditions in the lower atmosphere (less than 20 km altitude) remain uncertain. Lack of that knowledge means that we do not understand the fine chemical structure of the main mass of the Venusian atmosphere; and (3) thermodynamic models predict that igneous materials on the surface of Venus should react with gases of the venusian atmosphere. But because the water vapor content and redox conditions in the lower atmosphere are not well known, we do not understand the nature of venusian weathering: oxidation, sulfatization, carbonatization, and hydration. The answers to these questions are critical to the understanding of Venus, the most Earth-like of the terrestrial planets.

  19. X-ray emission of the night terrestrial atmosphere (experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, Galina; Pankov, Vladislav; Prokhin, Vladimir; Gusev, Anatoly; Spjeldvik, Walther; Martin, Inacio; Pugacheva, Galina

    A spectrometer RPS-1 onboard the LEO "CORONAS-F" satellite monitored solar X-rays in the energy range 3-31.5 keV (31.07.2001 - 06.12.2005 years) using CdTe solid state detector with thermoelectric semiconductor micro cooler. The device registered X-ray emission of the upper atmosphere at shadowed branches of the orbit. When touching the inner radiation belt in the South Atlantic anomaly and at high latitudes the device registered signals produced by energetic trapped particles. Among the other factors determining the flux registered by the device there are solar activity, the Earth position relatively the Sun (seasonality), satellite position, the telescope orientation relatively nadir when entering and leaving the Earth's shadow. This paper presents global maps of the atmospheric X-ray emission in four energy intervals 3-5; 5-8, 8-16, and 16-31.5 keV during the total period from 23.03.2002 up to 23.03.2003 and periods of 23.03.2002-23.09.2002 and 23.09.2002-23.03/2003 corresponding "summer" and "winter" seasons in the Northern hemisphere. The energy of the registered emission does not exceed 8 keV out of the radiation belt. Comparison of the seasonal maps reveals a gap between the radiation belts at low altitudes ( 500km) in the summer of 2002 probably due to compression of the magnetosphere and/or the seasonal atmospheric temperature changesin time period close to the maximum of solar activity and the absence of the gap in summer of 2004 year near to solar activity minimum. A weak emission of 3-5 keV x-rays in the gap within radiation belts is produced by interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere.

  20. The martian atmosphere: Mariner 9 television experiment progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leovy, C.B.; Briggs, G.A.; Young, A.T.; Smith, B.A.; Pollack, James B.; Shipley, E.N.; Wildey, R.L.

    1972-01-01

    Atmospheric phenomena appearing in the Mariner 9 television pictures are discussed in detail. The surface of the planet was heavily obscured by a global dust storm during the first month in orbit. Brightness data during this period can be fitted by a semi-infinite scattering and absorbing atmosphere model with a single-scattering albedo in the range 0.70-0.85. This low value suggests that the mean radius of the particles responsible for the obscuration was at least 10 ??m. By the end of the second month, this dust storm had largely dissipated, leaving a residual optical depth ???0.1. Much of the region north of 45??N was covered by variable clouds comprising the north polar hood. The cloud structures revealed extensive systems of lee waves generated by west-to-east flow over irregular terrain. Extensive cloud systems in this region resembled baroclinic wave cyclones. Clouds were also observed over several of the large calderas; these clouds are believed to contain water ice. Several localized dust storms were seen after the global dust storm cleared. These dust clouds appeared to be intensely convective. The convective nature of these storms and the stirring of large dust particles to great heights can be explained by vertical velocities generated by the absorption of solar radiation by the dusty atmosphere. ?? 1972.

  1. Jupiter's atmospheric composition from the Cassini thermal infrared spectroscopy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Flasar, F. M.; Jennings, D. E.; Bezard, B.; Strobel, D. F.; Conrath, B. J.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Romani, P. N.; Achterberg, R. K.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Irwin, P.; Brasunas, J. C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Orton, G. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Spilker, L. J.; Carlson, R. C.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Calcutt, S. B.; Read, P. L.; Taylor, F. W.; Fouchet, T.; Parrish, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer observed Jupiter in the thermal infrared during the swing-by of the Cassini spacecraft. Results include the detection of two new stratospheric species, the methyl radical and diacetylene, gaseous species present in the north and south auroral infrared hot spots; determination of the variations with latitude of acetylene and ethane, the latter a tracer of atmospheric motion; observations of unexpected spatial distributions of carbon dioxide and hydrogen cyanide, both considered to be products of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts; characterization of the morphology of the auroral infrared hot spot acetylene emission; and a new evaluation of the energetics of the northern auroral infrared hot spot.

  2. Experiments on cylindrically converging blast waves in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hideo; Nakamura, Yuichi

    1980-06-01

    Cylindrically converging blast waves have been produced in normal atmospheric conditions by the detonation of the explosives, pentaerythritoltetranitrate, (PETN), over cylindrical surfaces. The shocks generated in this way are so strong that the fronts propagating through the air become luminous of themselves. The production and the propagation of the shocks have been monitored with a framing camera and a streak camera, and the time-space relations of the shock propagations have been determined using an electrical ionization probing system. The results have shown that the trajectory of the shock fronts near the axis of the cylinder can be approximately represented by the Guderley's formula.

  3. OSS-1/STS-3 Shuttle induced atmosphere experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, J. L.; Giovane, F.; Schuerman, D. W.; Hahn, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Direct light form the Sun and the sunlit Earth, and indirect light from these same sources reflected off parts of the orbiter and its payload were the two major sources of light seen in the bay during spacecraft day. Brightness arising from sunlight reflected off particulates originating from the spacecraft (corona or induced atmosphere) were tentatively identified. Sources of light observed during spacecraft night include large scale diffuse glows associated with Vernier thruster firings, surface glows on the orbiter in the direction of orbiter n motion, and periodic sky brightness structures observed primarily at 4200 A and 6300 A. Some information was obtained on the size and trajectories of individual contaminant particulates. Astronomical data were obtained from large regions of the Milky Way and zodiacal light, including large regions to within 35 deg of the Sun and possibly closer. Coordinated and sometimes simultaneous observations were successfully made from Hawaii and from STS-3 to provide unique information on atmospheric sources and sinks of radiation.

  4. Coherent launch-site atmospheric wind sounder: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Hawley, J G; Targ, R; Henderson, S W; Hale, C P; Kavaya, M J; Moerder, D

    1993-08-20

    The coherent launch-site atmospheric wind sounder (CLAWS) is a lidar atmospheric wind sensor designed to measure the winds above space launch facilities to an altitude of 20 km. In our development studies, lidar sensor requirements are defined, a system to meet those requirements is defined and built, and the concept is evaluated, with recommendations for the most feasible and cost-effective lidar system for use as an input to a guidance and control system for missile or spacecraft launches. The ability of CLAWS to meet NASA goals for increased safety and launch/mission flexibility is evaluated in a field test program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in which we investigate maximum detection range, refractive turbulence, and aerosol backscattering efficiency. The Nd:YAG coherent lidar operating at 1.06 µm with 1-J energy per pulse is able to make real-time measurements of the three-dimensional wind field at KSC to an altitude of 26 km, in good agreement with our performance simulations. It also shows the height and thickness of the volcanic layer caused by the volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. PMID:20830118

  5. Analytical study of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The design specifications of the research laboratory as a Spacelab facility are discussed along with the types of planned experiments. These include cloud formation, freezing and scavenging, and electrical phenomena. A summary of the program conferences is included.

  6. Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Measurements of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Chemistry and Long-Term Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris; Nassar, Ray

    2007-01-01

    We highlight chemistry and trend measurement results from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) which is providing precise middle troposphere to the lower thermosphere measurements with a 0.02/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer covering 750-4400/cm

  7. MEEC, a MSP 2001 Rover Experiment to Measure Electrostatic Charging in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Experiment on Electrostatic Charging (MEEC), to be flown on the MSP 2001 Marie Curie Rover, is described. It will measure absolute and relative levels of charging in the Martian atmosphere due to traverses and dust-laden winds.

  8. The manned hydrogen balloon - an appropriate platform for airborne Lagrange experiments in atmospheric research

    SciTech Connect

    Rabl, P.F.H.; Euskirchen, J.

    1996-10-01

    During the last decade hydrogen ballooning provided a reliable basis for special airborne measurements especially for experiments that give evidence about atmospheric chemistry and structure. Although the balloon is not quite a small particle without inertia, Lagrange-like movements of atmospheric mass can be simulated. During two experiments, the vertical gradients of ozone concentration were measured in the downwind area of Munich. The results show remarkable differences in ozone concentration and production, dependent of the daytime. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  9. A compilation of studies from Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Carlson, R. D.; Phelps, R. W.; Bellue, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Five methods for obtaining the sign of vertical motion at various levels in the atmosphere were investigated to determine which gave the best explanation for areas of rain and no-rain in the southeastern United States during the period February 19-22, 1964. The methods used were the terrain-induced vertical motion, the kinematic method including the terrain effect, the adiabatic method, the omega equation, and the vorticity equation combined with Dines' Compensation Principle. Stability and moisture availability were considered but not as extensively as vertical motion. Values of vertical motion obtained by the kinetic method, including orographic lifting produced the best agreement with the observed areas. When terms in the omega equation were added through use of constant multipliers, results comparable to the adiabatic method were obtained. Without this addition large uncertainties occurred. Maps showing areas where terms of the omega equation would indicate positive vertical motion did not correlate well with the observed rainfall patterns.

  10. Planar ion trap (retarding potential analyzer) experiment for atmosphere explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.; Lippincott, C. R.; Zuccaro, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The retarding potential analyzer and drift meter were carried aboard all three Atmosphere Explorer spacecraft. These instruments measure the total thermal ion concentration and temperature, the bulk thermal ion velocity vector and some limited properties of the relative abundance of H(+), He(+), O(+) and molecular ions. These instruments functioned with no internal failures on all the spacecraft. On AE-E there existed some evidence for external surface contamination that damaged the integrity of the RPA sweep grids. This led to some difficulties in data reduction and interpretation that did not prove to be a disastrous problem. The AE-D spacecraft functioned for only a few months before it re-entered. During this time the satellite suffered from a nutation about the spin axis of about + or - 2 deg. This 2 deg modulation was superimposed upon the ion drift meter horizontal ion arrival angle output requiring the employment of filtering techniques to retrieve the real data.

  11. The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, J. T.; Barnes, J. R.; Crisp, D.; Haberle, R. M.; Larsen, S.; Magalhaes, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.; Seiff, A.; Wilson, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment measured the vertical density, pressure, and temperature structure of the martian atmosphere from the surface to 160 km, and monitored surface meteorology and climate for 83 sols (1 sol = 1 martian day = 24.7 hours). The atmospheric structure and the weather record are similar to those observed by the Viking 1 lander (VL-1) at the same latitude, altitude, and season 21 years ago, but there are differences related to diurnal effects and the surface properties of the landing site. These include a cold nighttime upper atmosphere; atmospheric temperatures that are 10 to 12 degrees kelvin warmer near the surface; light slope-controlled winds; and dust devils, identified by their pressure, wind, and temperature signatures. The results are consistent with the warm, moderately dusty atmosphere seen by VL-1.

  12. The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment.

    PubMed

    Schofield, J T; Barnes, J R; Crisp, D; Haberle, R M; Larsen, S; Magalhães, J A; Murphy, J R; Seiff, A; Wilson, G

    1997-12-01

    The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment measured the vertical density, pressure, and temperature structure of the martian atmosphere from the surface to 160 km, and monitored surface meteorology and climate for 83 sols (1 sol = 1 martian day = 24.7 hours). The atmospheric structure and the weather record are similar to those observed by the Viking 1 lander (VL-1) at the same latitude, altitude, and season 21 years ago, but there are differences related to diurnal effects and the surface properties of the landing site. These include a cold nighttime upper atmosphere; atmospheric temperatures that are 10 to 12 degrees kelvin warmer near the surface; light slope-controlled winds; and dust devils, identified by their pressure, wind, and temperature signatures. The results are consistent with the warm, moderately dusty atmosphere seen by VL-1. PMID:9388169

  13. Nucleon decay and atmospheric neutrinos in the Mont Blanc experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, E.; Bologne, G.; Campana, P.; Castagnoli, C.; Chiarella, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cundy, D. C.; Dettorepiazzoli, B.; Fiorini, E.

    1985-01-01

    In the NUSEX experiment, during 2.8 years of operation, 31 fully contained events have been collected; 3 among them are nucleon decay candidates, while the others have been attributed to upsilon interactions. Limits on nucleon lifetime and determinations of upsilon interaction rates are presented.

  14. Atmospheric X-ray emission experiment for shuttle. [earth atmosphere - radiation counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Hallam, K. L.; Emming, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment designed to measure the spatial, temporal, and energy distribution of X-ray aurorae produced by precipitating electrons, is presented. The experiment will provide vital data on solar-terrestrial relationships that may lead to defining the transfer mechanism that causes certain terrestrial weather events and climatological behavior. An instrument concept is discussed, and is based on a spatially sensitive multiwire proportional counter, combined with collimators to produce X-ray images of the aurorae. An instrument pointing system, on which the counter can be mounted, will provide the required altitude control, and can be operated by a Spacelab payload specialist for full control over its observing and data taking modes.

  15. Development of a high-altitude airborne dial system: The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Vaughan, W. R.; Hall, W. M.; Degnan, J. J.; Averill, R. D.; Wells, J. G.; Hinton, D. E.; Goad, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system to measure vertical profiles of H2O in the lower atmosphere was demonstrated both in ground-based and airborne experiments. In these experiments, tunable lasers were used that required real-time experimenter control to locate and lock onto the atmospheric H2O absorption line for the DIAL measurements. The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is the first step in a long-range effort to develop and demonstrate an autonomous DIAL system for airborne and spaceborne flight experiments. The LASE instrument is being developed to measure H2O, aerosol, and cloud profiles from a high-altitude ER-2 (extended range U-2) aircraft. The science of the LASE program, the LASE system design, and the expected measurement capability of the system are discussed.

  16. Atmospheric discharges from nuclear facilities during decommissioning: German experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, H.; Goertz, R.; Weil, L.

    1997-08-01

    In Germany, a substantial amount of experience is available with planning, licensing and realization of decommissioning projects. In total, a number of 18 nuclear power plants including prototype facilities as well as 6 research reactors and 3 fuel cycle facilities have been shut down finally and are at different stages of decommissioning. Only recently the final {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} stage of the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant total dismantlement project has been achieved. From the regulatory point of view, a survey of the decommissioning experience in Germany is presented highlighting the aspects of production and retention of airborne radioactivity. Nuclear air cleaning technology, discharge limits prescribed in licences and actual discharges are presented. As compared to operation, the composition of the discharged radioactivity is different as well as the off-gas discharge rate. In practically all cases, there is no significant amount of short-lived radionuclides. The discussion further includes lessons learned, for example inadvertent discharges of radionuclides expected not to be in the plants inventory. It is demonstrated that, as for operation of nuclear power plants, the limits prescribed in the Ordinance on Radiological Protection can be met using existing air cleaning technology, Optimization of protection results in public exposures substantially below the limits. In the frame of the regulatory investigation programme a study has been conducted to assess the airborne radioactivity created during certain decommissioning activities like decontamination, segmentation and handling of contaminated or activated parts. The essential results of this study are presented, which are supposed to support planning for decommissioning, for LWRs, Co-60 and Cs-137 are expected to be the dominant radionuclides in airborne discharges. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Rainbows, water droplets, and seeing--slow motion analysis of experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-10-01

    Many physics processes underlying phenomena in atmospheric optics happen on a rather short time scale such that neither the human eye nor video cameras are able to analyze the details. We report applications of high-speed imaging of laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics with subsequent slow motion analysis. The potential to study respective transient effects is investigated in general and for a few phenomena in detail, in particular for rainbow scattering due to single oscillating droplets during free fall, and for light propagation effects through atmospheric paths with turbulences, leading, e.g., to scintillation of stars or shimmering of mirage images. PMID:22016242

  18. ACS experiment for atmospheric studies on "ExoMars-2016" Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korablev, O. I.; Montmessin, F.; Fedorova, A. A.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Shakun, A. V.; Trokhimovskiy, A. V.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Anufreichik, K. A.; Kozlova, T. O.

    2015-12-01

    ACS is a set of spectrometers for atmospheric studies (Atmospheric Chemistry Suite). It is one of the Russian instruments for the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) of the Russian-European "ExoMars" program. The purpose of the experiment is to study the Martian atmosphere by means of two observations regimes: sensitive trace gases measurements in solar occultations and by monitoring the atmospheric state during nadir observations. The experiment will allow us to approach global problems of Mars research such as current volcanism, and the modern climate status and its evolution. Also, the experiment is intended to solve the mystery of methane presence in the Martian atmosphere. Spectrometers of the ACS set cover the spectral range from the near IR-range (0.7 μm) to the thermal IR-range (17 μm) with spectral resolution λ/Δλ reaching 50000. The ACS instrument consists of three independent IR spectrometers and an electronics module, all integrated in a single unit with common mechanical, electrical and thermal interfaces. The article gives an overview of scientific tasks and presents the concept of the experiment.

  19. The Numerical Studies Program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) for Spacelab Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W. (Editor); Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) numerical design for Spacelab flights was studied. A spherical baroclinic flow experiment which models the large scale circulations of the Earth's atmosphere was proposed. Gravity is simulated by a radial dielectric body force. The major objective of the AGCE is to study nonlinear baroclinic wave flows in spherical geometry. Numerical models must be developed which accurately predict the basic axisymmetric states and the stability of nonlinear baroclinic wave flows. A three dimensional, fully nonlinear, numerical model and the AGCE based on the complete set of equations is required. Progress in the AGCE numerical design studies program is reported.

  20. Seasonal-scale Observational Data Analysis and Atmospheric Phenomenology for the Cold Land Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Gregory S.; Stamus, Peter A.; Snook, John S.

    2005-01-01

    The Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) experiment emphasized the development of a strong synergism between process-oriented understanding, land surface models and microwave remote sensing. Our work sought to investigate which topographically- generated atmospheric phenomena are most relevant to the CLPX MSA's for the purpose of evaluating their climatic importance to net local moisture fluxes and snow transport through the use of high-resolution data assimilation/atmospheric numerical modeling techniques. Our task was to create three long-term, scientific quality atmospheric datasets for quantitative analysis (for all CLPX researchers) and provide a summary of the meteorologically-relevant phenomena of the three MSAs (see Figure) over northern Colorado. Our efforts required the ingest of a variety of CLPX datasets and the execution an atmospheric and land surface data assimilation system based on the Navier-Stokes equations (the Local Analysis and Prediction System, LAPS, and an atmospheric numerical weather prediction model, as required) at topographically- relevant grid spacing (approx. 500 m). The resulting dataset will be analyzed by the CLPX community as a part of their larger research goals to determine the relative influence of various atmospheric phenomena on processes relevant to CLPX scientific goals.

  1. Climate and atmosphere simulator for experiments on ecological systems in changing environments.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Bruno; Jouanneau, Isabelle; Simonnet, Benoit; Rabin, Christian; Van Dooren, Tom J M; Delpierre, Nicolas; Clobert, Jean; Abbadie, Luc; Ferrière, Régis; Le Galliard, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Grand challenges in global change research and environmental science raise the need for replicated experiments on ecosystems subjected to controlled changes in multiple environmental factors. We designed and developed the Ecolab as a variable climate and atmosphere simulator for multifactor experimentation on natural or artificial ecosystems. The Ecolab integrates atmosphere conditioning technology optimized for accuracy and reliability. The centerpiece is a highly contained, 13-m(3) chamber to host communities of aquatic and terrestrial species and control climate (temperature, humidity, rainfall, irradiance) and atmosphere conditions (O2 and CO2 concentrations). Temperature in the atmosphere and in the water or soil column can be controlled independently of each other. All climatic and atmospheric variables can be programmed to follow dynamical trajectories and simulate gradual as well as step changes. We demonstrate the Ecolab's capacity to simulate a broad range of atmospheric and climatic conditions, their diurnal and seasonal variations, and to support the growth of a model terrestrial plant in two contrasting climate scenarios. The adaptability of the Ecolab design makes it possible to study interactions between variable climate-atmosphere factors and biotic disturbances. Developed as an open-access, multichamber platform, this equipment is available to the international scientific community for exploring interactions and feedbacks between ecological and climate systems. PMID:24955649

  2. Experiment on the Vernov satellite: Transient energetic processes in the Earth's atmosphere and magnetosphere. Part I: Description of the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Svertilov, S. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Garipov, G. K.; Barinova, V. O.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Veden'kin, N. N.; Golovanov, I. A.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Klimov, P. A.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Morozenko, V. S.; Morozov, O. V.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. L.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Rozhkov, G. V.; Sigaeva, E. A.; Khrenov, B. A.; Yashin, I. V.; Klimov, S. I.; Vavilov, D. I.; Grushin, V. A.; Grechko, T. V.; Khartov, V. V.; Kudryashov, V. A.; Bortnikov, S. V.; Mzhel'skiy, P. V.; Papkov, A. P.; Krasnopeev, S. V.; Krug, V. V.; Korepanov, V. E.; Belyaev, S.; Demidov, A.; Ferenz, Ch.; Bodnar, L.; Szegedi, P.; Rotkel, H.; Moravskiy, M.; Park, Il; Jeon, Jin-A.; Kim, Ji-In; Lee, Jik

    2016-07-01

    The program of physical studies on the Vernov satellite launched on July 8, 2014 into a polar (640 × 830 km) solar-synchronous orbit with an inclination of 98.4° is presented. We described the complex of scientific equipment on this satellite in detail, including multidirectional gamma-ray detectors, electron spectrometers, red and ultra-violet detectors, and wave probes. The experiment on the Vernov satellite is mainly aimed at a comprehensive study of the processes of generation of transient phenomena in the optical and gamma-ray ranges in the Earth's atmosphere (such as high-altitude breakdown on runaway relativistic electrons), the study of the action on the atmosphere of electrons precipitated from the radiation belts, and low- and high-frequency electromagnetic waves of both space and atmospheric origin.

  3. MIR station atmospheric chemistry investigations: numerical simulation of the future space experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy M.

    1995-12-01

    Regular, long-term, g1obalscale measurements of atmospheric minor gaseous and aerosol composition (MGAC) by means ofdifferent instruments (PHOENIX, OZONE-MIR, ISTOK-1, DOPI) are planned on board the SPECTR and PRIRODA modules of the Space Station MIR during 1995-1998. The main characteristics of these devices are given. The principal goals of the space experiments are: investigations of the spatial and temporal MGAC variations, comparisons of different space-borne atmospheric chemistry sensors and their intercalibration, validation of the space MGAC measurements using different ground-based station and aircraft data, and studies of the molecular absorption in the atmosphere aimed to enhance an accuracy of radiative transfer atmospheric models. Special attention is . devoted to radiative transfer model (line-mixing, line-shift, line-narrowing, Non-LTE effects). The numerical estimations of the errors of the MGAC vertical profile retrievals using different device data are carried out.

  4. From image quality to atmosphere experience: how evolutions in technology impact experience assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heynderickx, Ingrid; de Ridder, Huib

    2013-03-01

    Image quality is a concept that for long very well served to optimize display performance and signal quality. New technological developments, however, forced the community to look into higher-level concepts to capture the full experience. Terms as naturalness and viewing experience were used to optimize the full experience of 3D-displays and Ambilight TV. These higher-level concepts capture differences in image quality and differences in perceived depth or perceived viewing field. With the introduction of solid-state lighting, further enhancing the multimedia experience, yet more advanced quality evaluation concepts to optimize the overall experience will be needed in the future.

  5. Studying Venus' atmosphere and ionosphere with Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra-Bahamon, T. M.; Cimo, G.; Duev, D. A.; Gurvits, L. I.; Marty, J. Ch.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Rosenblatt, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that can provide a multi-disciplinary enhancement of the science return of planetary missions. By performing precise Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, at Earth-based radio telescopes, and VLBI-style processing of these signals in phase-referencing mode, the technique allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of the spacecraft with very high accuracy[1]. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research. The application of this technique for atmospheric studies has been assessed by observing ESA's Venus Express (VEX) during Venus occultation events in 2012 and 2014, and by participating in one of the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE) campaigns in 2012. Both studies are contributing to the characterization efforts of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Venus. During the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE) campaigns VEX's orbit pericenter was lowered into an altitude range of approximately 165 to 175 km in order to probe Venus upper atmosphere above its north pole. The first VExADE campaigns were carried out between 2009-2010 using Doppler tracking data acquired by the VEX radio science experiment (VeRa), which provided the first in situ measurements of the density of Venus' polar thermosphere at solar minimum conditions [2]. In the December 2012 campaign the PRIDE-team participated by tracking VEX with several radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network (EVN) during pericenter passage. A Doppler frequency drop of ∼40 mHz was detected as VEX reached the lowest altitudes at around 170 km. The tracking data for each pericenter pass is fitted for precise orbit determination, from which drag acceleration estimates and the

  6. Definition of Atmospheric Science Experiments and Techniques: Wake Zone Mapping Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a subsatellite system has been proposed for the shuttle program which would provide to the scientific community a platform for experiments which would be tethered to the shuttle spacecraft orbiting at about 200 km altitude. Experiments which can perform measurements of aeronomic interest onboard or utilizing the tethered satellite concept are described and recommended.

  7. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Mishra, S.; Carney, M.; Jacobsen, E. P.; Wharton, Sonia; Newsom, Rob K.

    2015-10-23

    This paper presents an overview of the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE), which included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was conducted as a collaborative effort between the University of Oklahoma (OU), the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the ARM program. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. The main objective of LABLE was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrain using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques. Several instruments from OU and LLNL were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper provides an overview of the experiment including i) instruments deployed, ii) sampling strategies, iii) parameters observed, and iv) student involvement. To illustrate these components, the presented results focus on one particular aspect of LABLE, namely the study of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation and structure of nocturnal low-level jets. During LABLE, low-level jets were frequently observed and they often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages.

  8. WUSAT-SOLSPEC REXUS 17 Experiment: Measuring Atmospheric Quantities of Oxygen and Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofts, W.; Austin, F.; Burr, D.; Eckersley-Carr, F.; Ferguson, I.; Gold, R.; Harvard, M.; Tucker Harvey, S.; Beard, O.; Hanbury-Williams, C. J.; Iddles, S.; Kodners, L.; Konsala, M.; Lomath, J.; Vavasour, O.

    2015-09-01

    The WUSAT—SOLSPEC experiment was a proof of concept of a novel approach for analysing the characteristics of an atmosphere with regard to its habitability. Once validated the system could be used in the search for extra-terrestrial life by providing details of the compositions of exoplanet atmospheres. The experiment comprised a free falling unit based on CubeSat specifications that measured the wavelengths of light absorbed by Na and 02 in the atmosphere via solar spectroscopy. Using a wireless communication system, this data was sent to a ground station for analysis. As the free falling unit was unrecoverable, all of the data was transferred through the communication link. The wireless communication link was successfully established and this was the first time such a link has been demonstrated on a REXUS mission. Data was received for 71 seconds after ejection. The solar spectroscopy instrument was unable to clearly distinguish the subtle trends in Na and 02 with altitude due to light intensity variation. Light leakage within the optical system is the probable cause of the significant influence of light intensity variation in the results. Hence, further development is required to fully demonstrate the capabilities of solar spectroscopy for the analysis of an atmosphere from a free falling unit, however the experiment successfully illustrated the operation of all required subsystems and the principle of the optical measurement system.

  9. Global tropospheric experiment at the Hong Kong Atmosphere Chemistry Measurement Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Mary Ann; Wang, Tao

    1995-01-01

    The major activities of the Global Tropospheric Experiment at the Hong Kong Atmospheric Chemistry Measurement Station are presented for the period 1 January - 31 December 1995. Activities included data analysis, reduction, and archiving of atmospheric measurements and sampling. Sampling included O3, CO, SO2, NO, TSP, RSP, and ozone column density. A data archive was created for the surface meteorological data. Exploratory data analysis was performed, including examination of time series, frequency distributions, diurnal variations and correlation. The major results have been or will be published in scientific journals as well as presented at conferences/workshops. Abstracts are attached.

  10. Atlas of the global distribution of atmospheric heating during the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric heating for the annual cycle of the Global Weather Experiment are estimated from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Level 3b data set. Distributions of monthly, seasonally, and annually averaged heating are presented for isentropic and isobaric layers within the troposphere and for the troposphere as a whole. The distributions depict a large-scale structure of atmospheric heating that appears spatially and temporally consistent with known features of the global circulation and the seasonal evolution.

  11. Atmosphere explorer missions C, D, and E. Spacecraft experiment interface definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer Missions C, D, & E Spacecraft/Experiment Interface Definition Study is discussed. The objectives of the study included an analysis of the accommodation requirements of the experiments for the three missions, an assessment of the overall effect of these requirements on the spacecraft system design and performance, and the detailed definition of all experiment/spacecraft electrical, mechanical, and environmental interfaces. In addition, the study included the identification and definition of system characteristics required to ensure compatibility with the consolidated STADAN and MSFN communications networks.

  12. EM Propagation in Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Analysis of RED Experiment Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, T.; Friehe, C. A.

    2002-05-01

    The pattern of propagation for EM signals over the ocean is a combined result of the atmospheric refraction and scattering from the rough ocean surface. Here we study experimentally the structure of the atmospheric refractive index and the ocean surface statistics, pertinent to scattering. We are also interested in fluctuations of the refractive index induced by the ocean surface waves, which along with the turbulence contribute to the random refraction. However, these fluctuations exhibit behavior different from turbulence (e.g. their structure function does not follow the 2/3 scaling valid for the turbulent fluctuations) and require to be studied separately. We analyze data of atmospheric turbulence, humidity, temperature, and sea surface temperature and waves from the Rough Evaporation Duct experiment, conducted in part from the instrument platform FLIP in the open ocean north of Oahu, Hawaii.

  13. International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

    2009-03-11

    The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth’s radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show

  14. Feasibility study of a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiments laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinden, A. B.; Eaton, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    A feasibility and concepts study for a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiment laboratory is discussed. The primary objective was to define a set of cloud physics experiments which will benefit from the near zero-gravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft, identify merits of this environment relative to those of groundbased laboratory facilities, and identify conceptual approaches for the accomplishment of the experiments in an orbiting spacecraft. Solicitation, classification and review of cloud physics experiments for which the advantages of a near zero-gravity environment are evident are described. Identification of experiments for potential early flight opportunities is provided. Several significant accomplishments achieved during the course of this study are presented.

  15. Composition of the earth's atmosphere by shock-layer radiometry during the PAET entry probe experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, E. E.; Arnold, J. O.; Page, W. A.; Reynolds, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination of the composition of the earth's atmosphere obtained from onboard radiometer measurements of the spectra emitted from the bow shock layer of a high-speed entry probe is reported. The N2, O2, CO2, and noble gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere were determined to good accuracy by this technique. The results demonstrate unequivocally the feasibility of determining the composition of an unknown planetary atmosphere by means of a multichannel radiometer viewing optical emission from the heated atmospheric gases in the region between the bow shock wave and the vehicle surface. The spectral locations in this experiment were preselected to enable the observation of CN violet, N2(+) first negative and atomic oxygen emission at 3870, 3910, and 7775 A, respectively. The atmospheric gases were heated and compressed by the shock wave to a peak temperature of about 6100 K and a corresponding pressure of 0.4 atm. Complete descriptions of the data analysis technique and the onboard radiometer and its calibration are given.

  16. The large-scale biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia: Analyzing regional land use change effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Michael; Silva-Dias, Maria Assunção; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Silva-Andreae, Meinrat O.

    The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multi-disciplinary, multinational scientific project led by Brazil. LBA researchers seek to understand Amazonia in its global context especially with regard to regional and global climate. Current development activities in Amazonia including deforestation, logging, cattle ranching, and agriculture significantly perturb regional and global carbon budgets and the atmospheric radiation budget through both greenhouse gas inputs and the increase in atmospheric particulates generated by fires. The Brazilian Amazon currently releases about 0.2 Pg-C to the atmosphere each year as a result of net deforestation. Logging and forest fire activity are poorly quantified but certainly increase this amount by more than 10%. Fires associated with land management activities generate smoke that leads to heating of the lower atmosphere, decreases in overall cloudiness, increases in cloud lifetimes, and the suppression of rainfall. There are considerable uncertainties associated with our understanding of smoke effects. Present development trends point to agricultural intensification in the Brazilian Amazon. This intensification and the associated generation of wealth present an opportunity to enhance governance on the frontier and to minimize the damaging effects of fires.

  17. An overview of the spectroscopy of the atmosphere using far infrared emission experiment (SAFIRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James M., III

    1991-01-01

    The SAFIRE experiment was conceived to satisfy a long-standing need for simultaneous middle atmosphere observations of ozone and important O(y), HO(y), NO(y), ClO(y), and BrO(y) gases, coupled with dynamics data. This will be accomplished using interferometry and broadband radiometry to sound the Earth limb in the far IR and mid IR, respectively. The experiment will employ the latest developments in detector and cryogenic cooling technology in order to achieve the measurement objectives. Detailed instrument and simulated atmospheric retrieval studies show that important gases such as OH, HO2, H2O2, HDO, N2O5, and HOCl can be observed with good accuracy.

  18. Apollo experience report: Processing of lunar samples in a sterile nitrogen atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, T. M.

    1972-01-01

    A sterile nitrogen atmosphere processing cabinet line was installed in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory to process returned lunar samples with minimum organic contamination. Design and operation of the cabinet line were complicated by the requirement for biological sterilization and isolation, which necessitated extensive filtration, leak-checking, and system sterilization before use. Industrial techniques were applied to lunar sample processing to meet requirements for time-critical experiments while handling a large flow of samples.

  19. A three-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. B.; Petley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional thermal analysis model of the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is the subject of this paper. The use of an interactive computer graphics and finite element generation program to define the geometry information for the thermal model is discussed. The methods used in calculating the heat transfer parameters are explained. The results of the thermal analysis are given, and these results are compared with actual flight data.

  20. Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

  1. Rocket experiment in a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Liu, H.; Abe, T.; Ono, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Saito, A.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, M. Y.

    Rocket experiment is carried out to investigate a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma of thermosphere and ionosphere at Kagoshima Space Center KSC of JAXA The rocket launch window is in the evening of July 31 - August 15 2007 Momentum transfer through collisional process of the neutral atmosphere and the plasma is a basic problem of atmospheric circulation and super rotation in the low latitude thermosphere and a medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbance MS-TID occurring in the mid-latitude ionosphere but the direct observation is not yet performed In the rocket experiment we observe plasma drift velocity plasma density and temperature and its fluctuations electric field magnetic field and neutral wind The neutral winds are estimated from the movements of Lithium clouds which are released at altitudes between 150km and 300km and scatter sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670 nm The Lithium clouds are observed by CCD imagers on ground The plan of rocket experiment ground observation system and science objectives are presented

  2. Observations of Mars Neutral Atmosphere during the Polar Night by the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Pätzold, M.; Tellmann, S.; Häusler, B.; Hinson, D. P.

    2006-09-01

    The Radio Science Experiment on Mars Express (MaRS) sounds the Martian atmophere and ionosphere making use of spacecraft radio signals at 3.6 and 13 cm-wavelength and an Earth-Mars occultation geometry. Vertical profiles of pressure, temperature, and density in the neutral atmosphere are obtained with an altitude resolution of only a few hundred meters. The elliptical orbit of Mars Express permits examination of a large range of local times and locations and therefore can be used to investigate latitudinal, diurnal, and seasonal variations of Mars atmosphere. Daytime atmospheric profiles collected from both hemispheres since March 2004 allow us to study the development of the atmosphere in the early morning and the polar night. The second occultation season, December 2004, produced 32 profiles located in the southern polar latitudes at an average solar longitude of about 130°. Approximately 30 profiles obtained during the fourth occultation season, July 2005-April 2006, provide data on the north polar region at latitudes above 70° and a solar longitude of about 271°. The polar night at 75° north shows a 142-145 K isothermal atmosphere up to an altitude of 40 km, which is at or close to the condensation line of CO2. A similar behavior is observed during the southern polar night at 80° south, but with a significant warming at longitudes passing through Hellas. Model calculations of a Martian General Circulation Model (GCM) developed by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique de C.N.R.S. (LMD) support the interpretation of the observed atmospheric phenomena. The MaRS investigation is funded by the DLR Grant 50QP9909 and by the NASA Mars Program.

  3. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for Planetary Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamon, Tatiana; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Gurvits, Leonid; Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of planetary spacecraft with very high accuracy (Duev, 2012). The setup of the experiment consists of several ground stations from the European VLBI Network (EVN) located around the globe, which simultaneously perform Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, and are subsequently processed in a VLBI-style in phase referencing mode. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research, among which planetary atmospheric studies, gravimetry and ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems. In the study at hand the application of this technique for planetary atmospheric investigations is demonstrated. As a test case, radio occultation experiments were conducted with PRIDE having as target ESA's Venus Express, during different observing sessions with multiple ground stations in April 2012 and March 2014. Once each of the stations conducts the observation, the raw data is delivered to the correlation center at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE) located in the Netherlands. The signals are processed with a high spectral resolution and phase detection software package from which Doppler observables of each station are derived. Subsequently the Doppler corrected signals are correlated to derive the VLBI observables. These two sets of observables are used for precise orbit determination. The reconstructed orbit along with the Doppler observables are used as input for the radio occultation processing software, which consists of mainly two modules, the geometrical optics module and the ray tracing inversion module, from which vertical density profiles, and subsequently, temperature and pressure profiles of Venus

  4. Mass spectrometer-pyrolysis experiment for atmospheric and soil sample analysis on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, Konrad; Mahaffy, Paul; Niemann, Hasso

    1992-01-01

    Results from the Viking mission will form the foundation for future in-depth investigations of atmosphere-surface interactions on Mars. The two Viking landers carried impressive instrumentation to obtain and analyze soil samples: the sites were observed by cameras, and the collector head was located on a long boom and allowed the collection of large samples at various depths. A selection of grain sizes was possible and a distribution system supplied a number of experiments with soil material. Despite stationary vehicles, a wide sampling field was reachable. The GCMS system, responsible for atmospheric as well as surface soil analysis, worked well on both landers. Atmospheric measurements resulted in the determination of the abundance of noble gases as well as of other molecular species. Isotopic composition measurements included the important ratios of C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, and Ar-36/Ar-40. To verify these past results and to advance detailed studies of noble gas isotope ratios and minor constituents, better instrument sensitivities, higher precision, and lower background contributions are required in future Mars missions. Soil analysis during the Viking mission concentrated on organic material. Heating cycles were performed to 500 C and only water and carbon dioxide were identified. Higher pyrolysis temperatures are of primary importance to advance our understanding of the mineralogy and gas loading of surface material and atmospheric exchange.

  5. Global stratospheric measurements of the isotopologues of methane from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, Eric M.; Beale, Chris A.; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of observations of methane and its two major isotopologues, CH3D and 13CH4, from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite between 2004 and 2013. Additionally, atmospheric methane chemistry is modeled using the Whole Atmospheric Community Climate Model (WACCM). ACE retrievals of methane extend from 6 km for all isotopologues to 75 km for 12CH4, 35 km for CH3D, and 50 km for 13CH4. While total methane concentrations retrieved from ACE agree well with the model, values of δD-CH4 and δ13C-CH4 show a bias toward higher δ compared to the model and balloon-based measurements. Errors in spectroscopic constants used during the retrieval process are the primary source of this disagreement. Calibrating δD and δ13C from ACE using WACCM in the troposphere gives improved agreement in δD in the stratosphere with the balloon measurements, but values of δ13C still disagree. A model analysis of methane's atmospheric sinks is also performed.

  6. Global stratospheric measurements of the isotopologues of methane from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, E. M.; Beale, C. A.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of observations of methane and its two major isotopologues, CH3D and 13CH4 from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite between 2004 and 2013. Additionally, atmospheric methane chemistry is modeled using the Whole Atmospheric Community Climate Model (WACCM). ACE retrievals of methane extend from 6 km for all isotopologues to 75 km for 12CH4, 35 km for CH3D, and 50 km for 13CH4. While total methane concentrations retrieved from ACE agree well with the model, values of δD-CH4 and δ13C-CH4 show a bias toward higher δ compared to the model and balloon-based measurements. Calibrating δD and δ13C from ACE using WACCM in the troposphere gives improved agreement in δD in the stratosphere with the balloon measurements, but values of δ13C still disagree. A model analysis of methane's atmospheric sinks is also performed.

  7. 11th Annual LVMH Recherche Symposium: skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Bonté, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The 11(th) Annual LVMH Recherche Scientific Symposium was held in London on October 27(th), into the warmth of the distinguished British Library, with nearly 150 industry and research attendees. The meeting organized by LVMH Recherche was centered on the theme of skin rejuvenation. The current state of play for rejuvenation research was summarized, and then advances in the science of skin aging and rejuvenation therapies were discussed in detail. Personalized genomics and current and prospective translational therapies were presented, followed by a clever linking of multiple global theories towards a cohesive plan for future goals in rejuvenation research. PMID:22615002

  8. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature with the Titan Haze Simulation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E. M.; Salama, F.

    2012-12-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, possesses a dense atmosphere (1.5 bar at the surface) composed mainly of N2 and CH4. The solar radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere induces a complex organic chemistry between these two constituents leading to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid aerosols. These aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere form the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. Since 2004, the instruments onboard the Cassini orbiter have produced large amounts of observational data, unraveling a chemistry much more complex than what was first expected, particularly in Titan's upper atmosphere. Neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules have been detected in the ionosphere of Titan, including benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3). The presence of these critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan's aerosols. The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility, is to study the chemical pathways that link the simple molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, the THS experiment can be used to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's chemistry by injecting different gas mixtures in the plasma. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Thin tholin deposits are also produced

  9. Liquid and atmospheric ammonia concentrations from a dairy lagoon during an aeration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumburg, Brian; Neger, Manjit; Mount, George H.; Yonge, David; Filipy, Jenny; Swain, John; Kincaid, Ron; Johnson, Kristen

    Ammonia emissions from agriculture are an environmental and human health concern, and there is increasing pressure to reduce emissions. Animal agriculture is the largest global source of ammonia emissions and on a per cow basis dairy operations are the largest emitters. The storage and disposal of the dairy waste is one area where emissions can be reduced, aerobic biological treatment of wastewater being a common and effective way of reducing ammonia emissions. An aeration experiment in a dairy lagoon with two commercial aerators was performed for 1 month. Liquid concentrations of ammonia, total nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate were monitored before, during and after the experiment and atmospheric ammonia was measured downwind of the lagoon using a short-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument with 1 ppbv sensitivity. No changes in either liquid or atmospheric ammonia concentrations were detected throughout the experiment, and neither dissolved oxygen, nitrite nor nitrate could be detected in the lagoon at any time. The average ammonia concentration at 10 sampling sites in the lagoon at a depth of 0.15 m was 650 mg l -1 and at 0.90 m it was 700 mg l -1 NH 3-N. The average atmospheric ammonia concentration 50 m downwind was about 300 ppbv. The 0.90 m depth total nitrogen concentrations and total and volatile solids concentrations decreased during the experiment due to some mixing of the lagoon but the 0.15 m depth concentrations did not decrease indicating that the aerators were not strong enough to mix the sludge off the bottom into the whole water column.

  10. GLACE: The Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment Part 2: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Zhichang; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Koster, Randal D.; Bonan, Gordon; Chan, Edmond; Cox, Peter; Gordon, C. T.; Kanae, Shinjiro; Kowalczyk, Eva; Lawrence, David

    2005-01-01

    The twelve weather and climate models participating in the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) show both a wide variation in the strength of land-atmosphere coupling and some intriguing commonalities. In this paper, we address the causes of variations in coupling strength - both the geographic variations within a given model and the model-to-model differences. The ability of soil moisture to affect precipitation is examined in two stages, namely, the ability of the soil moisture to affect evaporation, and the ability of evaporation to affect precipitation. Most of the differences between the models and within a given model are found to be associated with the first stage - an evaporation rate that varies strongly and consistently with soil moisture tends to lead to a higher coupling strength. The first stage differences reflect identifiable differences in model parameterization and model climate. Intermodel differences in the evaporation-precipitation connection, however, also play a key role.

  11. Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

  12. Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 2). [rawinsondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 54 stations participating in the AVE 2 pilot experiment. Soundings were taken at three-hour intervals from stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data reduction and estimates of data accuracy are discussed. Examples of the data records produced are shown. The AVE 2 pilot experiment was conducted as part of NASA's program to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales-of-motion interrelationships.

  13. An alpha particle experiment for chemical analysis of the Martian surface and atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Patterson, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An alpha particle experiment similar to the one performed successfully on the Surveyor lunar missions is described. It is designed to provide a chemical analysis of the Martian surface and atmosphere. Analyses of rocks of known and unknown compositions have been made under simulated Martian conditions. The accuracies attained are generally comparable to those of the Surveyor lunar analyses. Improvements have been achieved in determining carbon and oxygen, so that a few per cent of water or carbonates in rocks can be detected. Some aspects of the integration of such an experiment with the spacecraft, a possible mission profile, and some other problems associated with a soft-landing mission to Mars are discussed. The importance of such a chemical analysis experiment in answering current questions about the nature and history of Martian surface material and its suitability for life processes is presented.

  14. Inferring the unobserved chemical state of the atmosphere: idealized data assimilation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C. J.; Barré, J.; Eckl, M.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Emmons, L. K.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Arellano, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical data assimilation in numerical models of the atmosphere is a venture into uncharted territory, into a world populated by a vast zoo of chemical compounds with strongly non-linear interactions. Commonly assimilated observations exist for only a selected few of those key gas phase compounds (CO, O3, NO2), and assimilating those in models assuming linearity begs the question of: To what extent we can infer the remainder to create a new state of the atmosphere that is chemically sound and optimal? In our work we present the first systematic investigation of sensitivities that exist between chemical compounds under varying ambient conditions in order to inform scientists on the potential pitfalls when assimilating single/few chemical compounds into complex 3D chemistry transport models. In order to do this, we developed a box-modeling tool (BOXMOX) based on the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP, http://people.cs.vt.edu/~asandu/Software/Kpp/) in which we can conduct simulations with a suite of 'mechanisms', sets of differential equations describing atmospheric photochemistry. The box modeling approach allows us to sample a large variety of atmospheric conditions (urban, rural, biogenically dominated, biomass burning plumes) to capture the range of chemical conditions that typically exist in the atmosphere. Included in our suite are 'lumped' mechanisms typically used in regional and global chemistry transport models (MOZART, RACM, RADM2, SAPRC99, CB05, CBMZ) as well as the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, U. Leeds). We will use an Observing System Simulation Experiment approach with the MCM prediction as 'nature' or 'true' state, assimilating idealized synthetic observations (from MCM) into the different ‚lumped' mechanisms under various environments. Two approaches to estimate the sensitivity of the chemical system will be compared: 1) adjoint: using Jacobians computed by KPP and 2) ensemble: by perturbing emissions, temperature, photolysis rates, entrainment, etc., in

  15. Scaling water and energy fluxes in climate system: Three land-atmospheric modeling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.F.; Lakshmi, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The effects of small-scale heterogeneity in land-surface characteristics on the large-scale fluxes of water and energy in the land-atmosphere system have become a central focus of many of the climatology research experiments. The acquisition of high-resolution land-surface data through remote sensing and intensive land-climatology field experiments (like HAPEX and FIFE) has provided data to investigate the interactions between microscale land-atmosphere interactions and macroscale models. One essential research question is how to account for the small-scale heterogeneities and whether [open quotes]effective[close quotes] parameters can be used in the macroscale models. To address this question of scaling, three modeling experiments were performed and are reviewed in the paper. The first is concerned with the land-surface hydrology during rain events and between rain events. The second experiment applies the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) to a heterogeneous domain and the spatial and temporal latent heat flux is analyzed. The third experiment uses thermatic mapper (TM) data to look at the scaling of the normalized vegetation index (NDVI), latent heat flux, and sensible heat flux through either scaling of the TM-derived fields using the TM data or the fields derived from aggregated TM data. In all three experiments it was found that the surface fluxes and land characteristics can be scaled, and that macroscale models based on effective parameters are sufficient to account for the small-scale heterogeneities investigated. The paper also suggests that the scale at which a macroscale model becomes valid, the representative elementary scale (REA), is on the order 1.5-3 correlation lengths, which for land processes investigated appears to be about 1000-1500 m. At scales less than the REA scale, exact patterns of subgrid heterogeneities are needed for accurate small-scale modeling. 31 refs., 19 figs.

  16. Control Experiment of Positively Charged Fine Particles at the Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Toshiaki; Ando, Ayumi; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    It is already reported that the negatively charged fine particle flow was controlled by application of external electric field. The control of positively charged fine particles was examined in this experiment.The fine particles are able to take charges in the air under the atmospheric pressure by irradiation of UV light. The control of the positively charged fine particles has been attempted by the external electric field applied the negative potential. The fine particles for experiments are volcanic ashes, nylon 16, glass, and ice. Experiment was performed in the T-shaped glass chamber under the atmospheric pressure. The halogen lamp (500 W) was used to exit the electrons from particles by photo-emission. The ring and disk electrodes to control the positively charged particles were set at the bottom of chamber. The parallel electrodes were set at the middle of chamber and horizontal static electric fields (E = 0 {approx} 210 V/cm) were created in order to estimate the charge of fine particles. The charges of particle were estimated by the deflection of particle trajectory in the static electric fields and particle velocity. The estimated charges were 104e {approx} 5x106e and 103e {approx} 105e for volcanic ashes and nylon 16, respectively. When positively charged particles were introduced into collecting electrodes, the fine particles are collected in the electrodes. The result of control of positively charged fine particles is shown in this conference.

  17. Lessons Learned from the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) and Implications for Nitrogen Management of Tampa Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from air quality modeling and field measurements made as part of the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) along with related scientific literature were reviewed to provide an improved estimate of atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) deposition to Tampa Bay, to...

  18. Mass storage system experiences and future needs at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olear, Bernard T.

    1991-01-01

    A summary and viewgraphs of a discussion presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Mass Storage Workshop is included. Some of the experiences of the Scientific Computing Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) dealing the the 'data problem' are discussed. A brief history and a development of some basic mass storage system (MSS) principles are given. An attempt is made to show how these principles apply to the integration of various components into NCAR's MSS. Future MSS needs for future computing environments is discussed.

  19. From Clusters to Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Nucleation in the CLOUD Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    Globally, a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei for cloud formation is thought to originate from new particle formation (aerosol nucleation). Despite extensive research, many questions remain about the dominant nucleation mechanisms. Specifically, a quantitative understanding of the dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of the nucleating substances such as gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, water vapor and others has not been reached. This is of relevance for climate as the atmospheric concentrations of sulfuric acid, ammonia and other nucleating agents are strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. By providing extremely well controlled and essentially contaminant free conditions in the CLOUD chamber, we were able to show that indeed sulfuric acid is an important component for such new particle formation, however, for the typical temperatures encountered in the planetary boundary layer the concentrations of sulfuric acid are not high enough to explain the atmospheric observations. Moreover, the effect of ammonia, amines and oxidized organic molecules on the nucleation rate of sulfuric acid has been investigated in CLOUD so far. Recent developments in instrument technology such as the Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer have allowed us to investigate the chemical composition of charged as well as neutral clusters during such nucleation experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) collaboration consists of 20 institutions from Europe and the United States and is funded by national funding institutions as well as the EU training network CLOUD-TRAIN (http://www.cloud-train.eu/).

  20. Experiments using atmospheric forcing from a FGGE analysis to drive an upper ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camerlengo, A.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of numerical experiments in which an upper ocean model is driven by surface heat fluxes and stress fields derived from the FGGE SOP-1 GLAS analysis/forecast system (Halem, et al., 1982). The model results show that most changes in the mixed layer height and horizontal velocity occurs in the first days. On the other hand, changes in the temperature field take a longer time to develop. In the most realistic case (real initial conditions, instantaneous forcing fields from the atmospheric analysis), the resulting changes in temperature were larger than observed and the correlation between observed and predicted changes was poor. The deficiency in the forecast of SST changes may be due to several factors: lack of sufficient ocean resolution, improper initialization, lack of feedback between the ocean and the atmosphere and the absence of transports by the strong boundary currents, and perhaps unrealistic surface fluxes of heat and momentum. Unless these problems are alleviated it is not reasonable to perform coupled atmospheric ocean forecasts.

  1. GLACE: The Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment. Part 1; Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Guo, Zhi-Chang; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Bonan, Gordon; Chan, Edmond; Cox, Peter; Davies, Harvey; Gordon, C. T.; Kanae, Shinjiro; Kowalczyk, Eva

    2005-01-01

    GLACE is a model intercomparison study focusing on a typically neglected yet critical element of numerical weather and climate modeling: land-atmosphere coupling strength, or the degree to which anomalies in land surface state (e.g., soil moisture) can affect rainfall generation and other atmospheric processes. The twelve AGCM groups participating in GLACE performed a series of simple numerical experiments that allow the objective quantification of this element. The derived coupling strengths vary widely. Some similarity, however, is found in the spatial patterns generated by the models, enough similarity to pinpoint multi-model "hot spots" of land-atmosphere coupling. For boreal summer, such hot spots for precipitation and temperature are found over large regions of Africa, central North America and India; a hot spot for temperature is also found over eastern China. The design of the GLACE simulations are described in full detail so that any interested modeling group can repeat them easily and thereby place their model s coupling strength within the broad range of those documented here.

  2. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  3. Experiments with the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) using the synthetic relative humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chia-Bo

    1994-01-01

    This study is intended to examine the impact of the synthetic relative humidity on the model simulation of mesoscale convective storm environment. The synthetic relative humidity is derived from the National Weather Services surface observations, and non-conventional sources including aircraft, radar, and satellite observations. The latter sources provide the mesoscale data of very high spatial and temporal resolution. The synthetic humidity data is used to complement the National Weather Services rawinsonde observations. It is believed that a realistic representation of initial moisture field in a mesoscale model is critical for the model simulation of thunderstorm development, and the formation of non-convective clouds as well as their effects on the surface energy budget. The impact will be investigated based on a real-data case study using the mesoscale atmospheric simulation system developed by Mesoscale Environmental Simulations Operations, Inc. The mesoscale atmospheric simulation system consists of objective analysis and initialization codes, and the coarse-mesh and fine-mesh dynamic prediction models. Both models are a three dimensional, primitive equation model containing the essential moist physics for simulating and forecasting mesoscale convective processes in the atmosphere. The modeling system is currently implemented at the Applied Meteorology Unit, Kennedy Space Center. Two procedures involving the synthetic relative humidity to define the model initial moisture fields are considered. It is proposed to perform several short-range (approximately 6 hours) comparative coarse-mesh simulation experiments with and without the synthetic data. They are aimed at revealing the model sensitivities should allow us both to refine the specification of the observational requirements, and to develop more accurate and efficient objective analysis schemes. The goal is to advance the MASS (Mesoscal Atmospheric Simulation System) modeling expertise so that the model

  4. On the use of plant emitted volatile organic compounds for atmospheric chemistry simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hohaus, T.; Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Wegener, R.; Novelli, A.; Fuchs, H.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) contribute to about 90% of the emitted VOC globally with isoprene being one of the most abundant BVOC (Guenther 2002). Intensive efforts in studying and understanding the impact of BVOC on atmospheric chemistry were undertaken in the recent years. However many uncertainties remain, e.g. field studies have shown that in wooded areas measured OH reactivity can often not be explained by measured BVOC and their oxidation products (e.g. Noelscher et al. 2012). This discrepancy may be explained by either a lack of understanding of BVOC sources or insufficient understanding of BVOC oxidation mechanisms. Plants emit a complex VOC mixture containing likely many compounds which have not yet been measured or identified (Goldstein and Galbally 2007). A lack of understanding BVOC sources limits bottom-up estimates of secondary products of BVOC oxidation such as SOA. Similarly, the widespread oversimplification of atmospheric chemistry in simulation experiments, using single compound or simple BVOC mixtures to study atmospheric chemistry processes limit our ability to assess air quality and climate impacts of BVOC. We will present applications of the new extension PLUS (PLant chamber Unit for Simulation) to our atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. PLUS is used to produce representative BVOC mixtures from direct plant emissions. We will report on the performance and characterization of the newly developed chamber. As an exemplary application, trees typical of a Boreal forest environment were used to compare OH reactivity as directly measured by LIF to the OH reactivity calculated from BVOC measured by GC-MS and PTRMS. The comparison was performed for both, primary emissions of trees without any influence of oxidizing agents and using different oxidation schemes. For the monoterpene emitters investigated here, we show that discrepancies between measured and calculated total OH reactivity increase with increasing degree of oxidation

  5. Formation of Amino Acids and Nucleotide Bases in a Titan Atmosphere Simulation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Yelle, R.V.; Buch, A.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Dutuit, O.; Quirico, E.; Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Smith, M.A.; Somogyi, Á.; Szopa, C.; Thissen, R.; Vuitton, V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N2/CH4/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C4H5N3O, C4H4N2O2, C5H6N2O2, C5H5N5, and C6H9N3O2 are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C4H5N3O), uracil (C5H4N2O2), thymine (C5H6N2O2), guanine (C5H5N5O), glycine (C2H5NO2), and alanine (C3H7NO2). Adenine (C5H5N5) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin. Key Words: Astrochemistry—Planetary atmospheres—Titan—Astrobiology. Astrobiology 12, 809–817. PMID:22917035

  6. Springtime Arctic Trace Gas Measurements and Comparisons With the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment on SCISAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, R.; Batchelor, R.; Strong, K.; Walker, K.; Manney, G.; Daffer, W.

    2009-05-01

    The process of rapid stratospheric ozone loss in the polar regions begins during the polar winter, when dynamical and chemical conditions lead to the formation of reactive chlorine and bromine radicals. Arctic ozone loss varies significantly from year to year because of changing dynamical conditions. Therefore, long-term data sets of Arctic chemical composition measurements are needed to better understand the process of ozone loss, the links between ozone depletion and climate change, and the future evolution of ozone. Solar absorption spectra have been recorded at Eureka, Nunavut in the sunlit part of each year since July 2006, when a Bruker 125HR high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL). Applying the optimal estimation technique, total columns and some vertical profile information are retrieved for a suite of trace gases that are involved in stratospheric ozone depletion. Total columns of O3, HCl, ClONO2, HNO3, and HF will be presented, with a focus on three Canadian Arctic ACE Validation spring campaigns that took place in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Very different dynamical situations were observed over Eureka during these three spring periods: the impact of these conditions on the trace gas measurements will be shown. SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian satellite mission for remote sounding of the Earth's atmosphere and was launched on August 12, 2003. Its primary instrument is a high spectral resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) measuring sequences of atmospheric absorption spectra in solar occultation. From these spectra the vertical distribution of trace gases can be determined. Results of the Bruker 125HR comparisons with the ACE-FTS, made with the purpose of validating the satellite measurements, will be also shown.

  7. Do meteoroids of sedimentary origin survive terrestrial atmospheric entry? The ESA artificial meteorite experiment STONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, A.; Baglioni, P.; Borruat, G.; Brandstätter, F.; Demets, R.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Genge, M.; Kurat, G.; Miller, M. F.; Newton, E. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Roten, C.-A.; Wäsch, E.

    2002-06-01

    The 18 SNC meteorites identified to date are all igneous rocks, being basalts or basaltic cumulates. The lack of sedimentary rocks in this inventory is therefore surprising, in view of the collisional history of Mars and the likelihood that Mars experienced warmer conditions, possibly with a significant hydrosphere, earlier in its history. To address the possibility that sedimentary rocks ejected by impact from the surface of Mars may have reached the Earth, but did not survive terrestrial atmospheric entry, an experiment was performed in which samples of dolomite, a simulated Martian regolith (consisting of basalt fragments in a gypsum matrix) and a basalt were fixed to the heat shield of a recoverable capsule and flown in low Earth orbit. Temperatures attained during re-entry were high enough to melt basalt and the silica fibres of the heat shield and were therefore comparable to those experienced by meteorites. The dolomite sample survived space flight and atmospheric re-entry, in part, as did fragments of the simulated Martian regolith, allowing detailed examinations of these 'artificial meteorites' to be conducted for chemical, mineralogical and isotopic modifications associated with atmospheric re-entry. Oxygen three-isotope measurements of the silica 'fusion crust' formed on the sample holder during atmospheric re-entry fit on a mixing line, with tropospheric O 2 and the interior of the sample holder as end members. Because much of the surface of Mars is covered by clastic sediments, meteorites of Martian provenance might be expected to be mostly sedimentary rocks rather than igneous ones. However, in the absence of a readily identifiable fusion crust, the extraterrestrial origin of such sedimentary rocks on Earth would most probably not be recognised without detailed petrological-geochemical examination and, ultimately, isotope measurements.

  8. The Nimbus-4 backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) atmospheric ozone experiment two years operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Mateer, C. L.; Krueger, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) experiment aboard the Nimbus-4 satellite is discussed. This double monochromator experiment measures ultraviolet terrestrial radiance at 12 discrete wavelengths between 2550 A and 3400 A. Approximately 100 scans covering a 230 kilometer square are made between terminator crossings on the daylight side of the earth. A colinear photometer channel with the same field of view is used to derive the Lambert reflectivity of the lower boundary of the scattering atmosphere. The extraterrestrial solar irradiance is measured at the northern terminator. The instrument has currently produced almost three years of nearly continuous data which are being used to infer the high-level ozone distribution and total ozone on a global basis. The high-level ozone data have been verified by independent coincident rocket ozone soundings, and the total ozone values show good agreement with Dobson spectrophotometer determinations as well as those made with the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer also on Nimbus-4.

  9. Formation of highly oxygenated organic aerosol in the atmosphere: Insights from the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Lea; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Donahue, Neil M.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2010-12-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiments (FAME-08 and FAME-09), which were part of the EUCAARI intensive campaigns. Quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMSs) were employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the OA. The experiments provide unique insights into ambient oxidation of aerosol by measuring at the same site but under different photochemical conditions. NR-PM1 concentrations were about a factor of three lower during FAME-09 (winter) than during FAME-08 (summer). The OA sampled was significantly less oxidized and more variable in composition during the winter than during the early summer. Lower OH concentrations in the winter were the main difference between the two campaigns, suggesting that atmospheric formation of highly oxygenated OA is associated with homogeneous photochemical aging.

  10. Interactions between spacecraft motions and the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    In evaluating the effects of spacecraft motions on atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) experimentation, the motions of concern are those which will result in the movement of the fluid or cloud particles within the experiment chambers. Of the various vehicle motions and residual forces which can and will occur, three types appear most likely to damage the experimental results: non-steady rotations through a large angle, long-duration accelerations in a constant direction, and vibrations. During the ACPL ice crystal growth experiments, the crystals are suspended near the end of a long fiber (20 cm long by 200 micron diameter) of glass or similar material. Small vibrations of the supported end of the fiber could cause extensive motions of the ice crystal, if care is not taken to avoid this problem.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  12. Observing system simulation experiments for the laser atmospheric wind sounder using global spectral model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohaly, Gregg; Krishnamurti, T. N.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental to improving the understanding of the total Earth system are increased and improved observations. In the coming decade several spaceborne instrumented platforms will be constructed and implemented. These platforms will, in large, be housing the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument suite. One of the proposed instruments is a wind profiling system which is currently referred to as the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). This instrument will use a CO2 Doppler lidar wind profiler to give wind measurements with a vertical and horizontal resolution which has yet to be seen globally. The LAWS instrument is now a candidate for launch on a NASA EOS-B platform and is fundamental to increasing our understanding of Earth system science. The LAWS data sets will form an integral component of the temporally continuous data base needed for research of the coupled climate systems. This instrument's observations will aid in giving an improved description of the atmospheric circulation, including the transports of energy, momentum, moisture, trace gases, and aerosols. Also, the wind data will be assimilated and used as the initial state for many global forecast models at various operational centers. Results of system simulation experiments are discussed, and future experiments are described.

  13. The effect of the atmospheric condition on the extensive air shower analysis at the Telescope Array experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Kakimoto, F.; Tomida, T.

    2011-09-22

    The accuracies in determination of air shower parameters such as longitudinal profiles or primary energies with the fluorescence detection technique are strongly dependent on atmospheric conditions of the molecular and aerosol components. Moreover, air fluorescence photon yield depends on the atmospheric density, and the transparency of the air for fluorescence photons depends on the atmospheric conditions from EAS to FDs. In this paper, we describe the atmospheric monitoring system in the Telescope Array (TA experiment), and the impact of the atmospheric conditions in air shower reconstructions. The systematic uncertainties of the determination of the primary cosmic ray energies and of the measurement of depth of maximum development (X{sub max}) of EASs due to atmospheric variance are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. The spectroscopy of the atmosphere using far-infrared emission experiment (SAFIRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the SAFIRE experiment is to improve understanding of the middle-atmospher ozone distribution by conducting and analyzing global-scale measurements of important chemical, radiative and dynamical processes, including coupling among these processes and atmospheric regions. This will be accomplished by observing vertical profiles of temperature and key gases in the main chemical families. A detailed listing of SAFIRE measurements, including sepctral ranges, altitude ranges, IFOV, spatial and temporal resolution, latitude coverage and estimated precision is provided. The temperature, O3, CH4, and H2O observations will be useful for deriving and studying dynamical quantities such as geopotential height, potential vorticity, balanced winds and Eliassen-Palm fluxes. The SAFIRE observations will provide important data for study of chemistry, dynamics and transport processes. This experiment was conceived in response to a need for simultaneous measurements of odd hydrogen gases. These include gases such as OH, HO2, and atomic oxygen, which have not been observed by past satellite experiments and which will not be measured by any of teh Upper Atmosophere Reserach Satellite (UARS) experiments to be launched in 1991.

  15. Atmospheric PCDD/F measurement in Taiwan and Southeast Asia during Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuan, Ngo Thi; Chi, Kai Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Chang, Moo Been; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Peng, Chi-Ming

    2013-10-01

    The international campaign of Dongsha Experiment was conducted in the northern Southeast Asian region during March-May 2010. To address the effects of long-range transport on the persistent organic pollutants and further understand the PCDD/F contamination in Vietnam, atmospheric PCDD/Fs were evaluated at a coastal station (Pingtung County, Sites A) in southern Taiwan, remote island station in South China Sea (Dongsha Island, Site B) and coastal station (Da Nang City, Site C) in central Vietnam during different sampling periods in this study. The measurements indicated that the atmospheric PCDD/F concentrations were 1.01-27.4 fg I-TEQ/m3 (n = 22), 1.52-10.8 fg I-TEQ/m3 (n = 17) and 23.4-146 fg I-TEQ/m3 (n = 16) at Sites A, B and C, respectively, during different periods in 2010. In March 2010, an Asian dust storm (ADS) that originated in Gobi deserts eventually reached populated areas of East Asia, including Taiwan and the island in northern South China Sea. During the ADS episode, measurements made in southern Taiwan and South China Sea on 16 and 21 March 2010 indicate that the atmospheric PCDD/F concentration increased 6.5 and 6.9 times at Sites A and B, respectively. Furthermore, the significantly higher PCDD/F concentrations and contents in suspended particles (134-546 pg I-TEQ/g-TSP) were measured at Site C in the central Vietnam. In addition, the distribution of PCDD/F congeners measured in Central Vietnam was quite different from those measured at other stations with high PCDD distribution (>80%) especially in OCDD (>70%). During the Vietnam conflict, United States (US) forces had sprayed a greater volume of defoliant with higher PCDD/F contents than originally estimated. We consider that the high fraction of PCDDs observed in Vietnam probably originated as anthropogenic emission from specific source in Vietnam.

  16. Low-cost and easy experiments about water in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; Mazon, J.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric water represents only the 0,001% of the total water in the hydrosphere. Despite this tiny percentage, the physical changes water experiences in the atmosphere are essential for the conservation of this substance in our planet. Often, the understanding of the presence of water in the Earth's atmosphere and its physical changes inside this gas layer are difficult for most secondary and primary school students. We present 5 examples of simple practical activities that will facilitate students to think about and understand some important concepts about atmospheric water. Two of the basic principles to bear in mind when designing these activities are the use of cheap and easy to find materials and the simplicity of the construction and development of each activity. This simplicity makes it possible for the students to easily carry the experiments in the classroom or in the laboratory, using only a part of a class session. We think that the use of these kinds of activities enables us to work some basic concepts about atmospheric water with the students which lead to a more meaningful understanding, not only of these concepts but also of many other processes related to this part of the hydrosphere, such as meteorological phenomena, erosion, floods, etc. Here we present a brief description of the five experiments we suggest: 1- a crazy thermometer? Using water at the same temperature of the air, a piece of paper and two thermometers, we can easily "build" a dry and a wet bulb thermometer. Making questions about the differences between the temperatures of both thermometers we can understand what the air's humidity is and how we can calculate it. 2- what are clouds made of? Most of people think that clouds are made of water vapour. Observing what happens with the air above a small container filled with warm water when we approach a tray containing ice, we can conduct a Socratic dialogue that allows us to understand that clouds are made of ice or liquid water

  17. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G.; Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K.

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock & Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  18. Radiometric correction of atmospheric path length fluctuations in interferometric experiments. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Hogg, D. E.; Napier, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    To support very long baseline interferometric experiments, a system has been developed for estimating atmospheric water vapor path delay. The system consists of dual microwave radiometers, one operating at 20.7 GHz and the other at 31.4 GHz. The measured atmospheric brightness temperatures at these two frequencies yield the estimate of the precipitable water present in both vapor and droplets. To determine the accuracy of the system, a series of observations were undertaken, comparing the outputs of two water vapor radiometers with the phase variation observed with two connected elements of the very large array (VLA). The results show that: (1) water vapor fluctuations dominate the residual VLA phase and (2) the microwave radiometers can measure and correct these effects. The rms phase error after correction is typically 15 deg at a wavelength of 6 cm, corresponding to an uncertainty in the path delay of 0.25 cm. The residual uncertainty is consistent with the stability of the microwave radiometer but is still considerably larger than the stability of the VLA. The technique is less successful under conditions of heavy cloud.

  19. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G. ); Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K. )

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  20. Improved VAS regression soundings of mesoscale temperature structure observed during the 1982 atmospheric variability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Keyser, Dennis A.; Larko, David E.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1987-01-01

    An Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE) was conducted over the central U.S. in the spring of 1982, collecting radiosonde date to verify mesoscale soundings from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the GOES satellite. Previously published VAS/AVE comparisons for the 6 March 1982 case found that the satellite retrievals scarcely detected a low level temperature inversion or a mid-tropospheric cold pool over a special mesoscale radiosonde verification network in north central Texas. The previously published regression and physical retrieval algorithms did not fully utilize VAS' sensitivity to important subsynoptic thermal features. Therefore, the 6 March 1982 case was reprocessed adding two enhancements to the VAS regression retrieval algorithm: (1) the regression matrix was determined using AVE profile data obtained in the region at asynoptic times, and (2) more optimistic signal-to-noise statistical conditioning factors were applied to the VAS temperature sounding channels. The new VAS soundings resolve more of the low level temperature inversion and mid-level cold pool. Most of the improvements stems from the utilization of asynoptic radiosonde observations at NWS sites. This case suggests that VAS regression soundings may require a ground-based asynoptic profiler network to bridge the gap between the synoptic radiosonde network and the high resolution geosynchronous satellite observations during the day.

  1. The Second Phase of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Yamada, T.; Mahanama, S.; Guo, Z.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; VandenHurk, B. J. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    A major motivation for the study of the coupled land-atmosphere system is the idea that soil moisture anomalies may affect future meteorological variables through their effects on future surface energy and water budgets. If true, the accurate initialization of soil moisture in a subseasonal or seasonal forecast system may improve forecast skill, making the forecast products more valuable to society. The GLACE-2 project is examining, through a coordinated experiment using a wide variety of models, the degree to which subseasonal (out to two months) precipitation and air temperature forecasts improve through the realistic initialization of soil moisture. For the first time ever, a global consensus should emerge regarding the value of land initialization for forecasts, perhaps motivating national forecast centers to make full use of land moisture initialization in their operations

  2. Solar/Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; London, Julius; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    A final report on the operational activities related to the UARS Solar Stellar irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is presented. Scientific activities of SOLSTICE has also been supported. The UARS SOLSTICE originated at the University of Colorado in 1981. One year after the UARS launch in 1991, the operations and research support activities for SOLSTICE were moved to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The SOLSTICE program continued at HAO with the National Science Foundation, and after four years, it was moved once again back to the University of Colorado. At the University after 1997 this subject grant was issued to further extend the operations activities from July 2001 through September 2002. Although this is a final report for one particular activity, in fact the SOLSTICE operations activity -first at the University, then at HAO, and now again at the University -has continued in a seamless fashion.

  3. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  4. Spacelab 2 Upper Atmospheric Modification Experiment over Arecibo. II - Plasma dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Swartz, W. E.; Kelly, M. C.; Sulzer, M. P.; Noble, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experiment performed on Spacelab 2 over Arecibo to study the neutral gas dynamics of supersonic flows in a rarefield atmosphere and to modify the plasma density by releasing chemically reactive vapors. Exhaust vapor was released at an altitude of 317 km, where the plasma density was 300,000/cu cm. Observations were made with high resolution incoherent scatter radar. A localized depletion formed in the ionosphere. The depletion fell and eventually disappeared within the bottomside F-region ionosphere. The dynamics of the evolution of the depletion are discussed. Optical and radar data are compared, setting an upper limit of 3 percent for the branching ratio to produce O(D-1) from dissociative recombination of CO(2+) and electrons.

  5. Theoretical and experimental design studies for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W.; Hathaway, D. H.; Miller, T. L.; Roberts, G. O.; Kopecky, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The major criterion for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) design is that it be possible to realize strong baroclinic instability in the spherical configuration chosen. A configuration was selected in which a hemispherical shell of fluid is subjected to latitudinal temperature gradients on its spherical boundaries and the latitudinal boundaries are insulators. Work in the laboratory with a cylindrical version of this configuration revealed more instabilities than baroclinic instability. Since researchers fully expect these additional instabilities to appear in the spherical configuration also, they decided to continue the laboratory cylindrical annulus studies. Four flow regimes were identified: an axisymmetric Hadley circulation, boundary layer convection, baroclinic waves and deep thermal convection. Regime diagrams were prepared.

  6. Low-energy electron experiment for Atmosphere Explorer-C and -D.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.; Janetzke, R. W.; Mcchesney, J. F.; Way, S. H.; Evans, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    The low-energy electron experiment will provide differential measurements of the energy influx and angular distributions of electrons and protons on the Atmosphere Explorer-C and -D missions. The detectors consist of cylindrical electrostatic analyzers for species and energy selection and Spiraltron electron multipliers as particle sensors. The C version will contain three detectors, two measuring electrons and protons from 0.2 to 25 keV in 16 logarithmically spaced steps and one measuring 5 keV electrons continuously. Angular distributions will be acquired utilizing the spin of the spacecraft. The D version will contain 19 detectors, one proton-stepped energy analyzer, and two electron-stepped energy analyzers at two different angles, again over the energy range 0.2 to 25 keV.

  7. Chamber experiments to investigate the release of fungal IN into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Krüger, Mira; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Several types of microorganisms like bacteria, fungi and lichen have been identified as sources of biological ice nuclei (IN). They are a potentially strong source of atmospheric IN, as some of them are able to catalyze ice formation at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures. Common plant-associated bacteria are the best-known biological IN but recently ice nucleation activity in a variety of fungal species such as Mortierella alpina, Isaria farinosa, Acremonium implicatum was found. These fungal species are widely spread throughout the world and are present in soil and air. Their IN seem to be proteins, which are not anchored in the fungal cell wall. To which extent these small, cell-free IN are emitted directly into the atmosphere remains unexplored just as other processes, which probably indirectly release fungal IN e.g. absorbed onto soil dust particles. To analyze the release of fungal IN into the air, we designed a chamber, whose main principle is based on the emission of particles into a closed gas compartment and the subsequent collection of these particles in water. The concentration of the collected IN in the water is determined by droplet freezing assays. For a proof of principles, fungal washing water containing cell-free IN was atomized by an aerosol generator and the produced gas stream was lead through a water trap filled with pure water. Preliminary results show a successful proof of principles. The chamber design is capable of collecting aerosolic IN produced by an aerosol generator with fungal washing water. In ongoing experiments, alive or dead fungal cultures are placed into the chamber and a gentle, particle free air stream is directed over the fungi surface. This gas stream is also lead through water to collect particles, which might be emitted either actively or passively by the fungi. Further experiments will be e.g. conducted under different relative humidities. Results

  8. Mineralogical alteration of artificial meteorites during atmospheric entry. The STONE-5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Franz; Brack, André; Baglioni, Pietro; Cockell, Charles S.; Demets, René; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Kurat, Gero; Osinski, Gordon R.; Pillinger, Judith M.; Roten, Claude-Alain; Sancisi-Frey, Suzy

    2008-05-01

    The generic concept of the artificial meteorite experiment STONE is to fix rock samples bearing microorganisms on the heat shield of a recoverable space capsule and to study their modifications during atmospheric re-entry. The STONE-5 experiment was performed mainly to answer astrobiological questions. The rock samples mounted on the heat shield were used (i) as a carrier for microorganisms and (ii) as internal control to verify whether physical conditions during atmospheric re-entry were comparable to those experienced by "real" meteorites. Samples of dolerite (an igneous rock), sandstone (a sedimentary rock), and gneiss impactite from Haughton Crater carrying endolithic cyanobacteria were fixed to the heat shield of the unmanned recoverable capsule FOTON-M2. Holes drilled on the back side of each rock sample were loaded with bacterial and fungal spores and with dried vegetative cryptoendoliths. The front of the gneissic sample was also soaked with cryptoendoliths. The mineralogical differences between pre- and post-flight samples are detailed. Despite intense ablation resulting in deeply eroded samples, all rocks in part survived atmospheric re-entry. Temperatures attained during re-entry were high enough to melt dolerite, silica, and the gneiss impactite sample. The formation of fusion crusts in STONE-5 was a real novelty and strengthens the link with real meteorites. The exposed part of the dolerite is covered by a fusion crust consisting of silicate glass formed from the rock sample with an admixture of holder material (silica). Compositionally, the fusion crust varies from silica-rich areas (undissolved silica fibres of the holder material) to areas whose composition is "basaltic". Likewise, the fusion crust on the exposed gneiss surface was formed from gneiss with an admixture of holder material. The corresponding composition of the fusion crust varies from silica-rich areas to areas with "gneiss" composition (main component potassium-rich feldspar). The

  9. Experimental investigation of atmospheric dispersion over the Swiss Plain — Experiment ``SIESTA''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, F.; Bürki, D.

    1987-12-01

    Between November 15 and 30, 1985, an international mesoscale transport experiment was performed on the Swiss Plain. Seven meteorological groups from Denmark, Germany, Italy and Switzerland measured diffusion properties of near neutral planetary boundary layers during six completely overcast days: four “Bise” (north-east wind) situations, one transitional situation and one west-wind situation. Diffusion was measured using SF6 as tracer, which was released at the meteotower of the Gösgen nuclear power plant at 6 m above ground level. One hundred automatic samplers plus a mobile gas chromatograph were used to measure the concentration fields at distances up to 90 km downwind. Meteorological parameters were observed using radar-tracked constant-level balloons, tethered balloon soundings, sonic anemometers, an acoustic sounder and several meteorological ground stations, including a 110 m mast. All data were collected on a magnetic tape with free access to interested persons. The aim of the experiments was to obtain knowledge about the general nature of the turbulence, advection and atmospheric dispersion during neutral weak-wind situations over complex terrain. The collected data set will be useful for testing mesoscale transport and diffusion models. The results clearly show the channelling effect of the Jura mountains and the hilly prealpine region. An interesting result is that the SF6 plumes showed intensive horizontal spread but only limited diffusion in the vertical direction.

  10. Design of experiments on a DC Steady State Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeff, Igor; Balasundaram, Arun; Sawheny, Rapinder

    2009-11-01

    Our Resistive Barrier Discharge has been demonstrated to be successful on E. coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens (5RL), spores and bacteriophages. It has been tested successfully in sterilizing pagers at the St. Jude Research Hospital in Memphis, TN. In this recent work, we evaluate three primary factors in the atmospheric pressure resistive barrier discharge, hydrogen peroxide, charged ions and air (oxygen). The experiment used was Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. The tests used 144 Petri Dishes and the bacteria used were E. coli. The hydrogen peroxide was used as a replacement for the water conductor on the resistive barrier discharge electrode. The charged ions were removed by a double charged wire mesh between the discharge and the Petri Dish. The air was displaced by a slow flow of nitrogen into the experimental area. The basic conclusions are that air, and charged ions are both extremely effective in killing bacteria. In addition, air and charged ions together strongly enhance each other. Hydrogen peroxide in our experiments did not enhance the kill rate.

  11. Evolution of Black Carbon Optical Properties during Atmospheric Aging: Comparison Between Theoretical Calculations and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Li, Q.; Yang, P.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    The optical properties of black carbon (BC) are significantly affected by its aging process in the atmosphere. We have built a conceptual model defining three BC aging stages, including freshly emitted BC aggregates, coating by soluble material and hygroscopic growth. We apply an improved geometric-optics surface-wave approach (Liou et al., 2011; Takano et al., 2013) to calculate the absorption and scattering properties of BC at each stage and compare the theoretical results with those obtained from laboratory experiments (Zhang et al., 2008; Khalizov et al., 2009). Preliminary results show a general agreement between calculated and measured BC absorption cross sections (bias < 10%) and scattering cross sections (bias < 30%) for BC aerosols with mobility diameters of 155, 245 and 320 nm at Stages 1 and 2, where BC is coated by sulfuric acid and its water solution, respectively. We find that the calculated scattering and absorption cross sections for fresh BC aggregates (Stage 0) with different sizes are invariably larger than experimental results partly because of the uncertainty in theoretical calculations for BC with size parameters less than 1. It appears that the uncertainty in the experiment could also contribute to the discrepancy, considering that the measuring instrument missed some scattering in certain angles (0-7° and 170-180°). Finally, we will apply the conceptual model and the single-scattering results to assess the effects of BC aging processes on direct radiative forcing using observed BC vertical profiles.

  12. Metadata Standards for Atmospheric Science Virtual Observatories Based on Experiences with the Madrigal/Cedar Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rideout, W. C.; Holt, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    The concept of Virtual Observatories as distributed islands of measured data, accessed so that they appear to the user as a single instrument, is a compelling one for Atmospheric Science. Given the coupled nature of the various regions of the solar system, the ability to query data in a simple way from numerous instruments to study a single event would greatly enhance our understanding of these couplings. One key tool in such a Virtual Observatory is a well-defined metadata standard, which defines as precisely and succinctly as possible what data is available. Our experience with the Madrigal and Cedar databases, which also depend on a metadata standard, has taught us a number of important lessons. These include the need for well-defined measured parameters, and a method for easily adding new parameters. Since a number of different frames of reference are used for different regions of the solar system, well-defined standards for position and time are also required. Standards are also needed for describing regions of space, since the metadata cannot contain too much detail about the exact position of the measurements. These and other lessons learned from our database experience will be discussed.

  13. Use of halophytes to remove carbon from the atmosphere: Results of a demonstration experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, E.; Olsen, M.; Frye, R.; Moore, D.

    1994-01-01

    The project examined the feasibility of using salt-tolerant plants, halophytes, to sequester large quantities of C from the atmosphere and enhance food production in desert regions of the world by using seawater and other saline water sources for irrigation. Field experiments using 40 ppt seawater in a coastal desert site in Mexico recorded biomass yields of 16.7--34.0 t ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} and C yields of 5.4--10.1 t ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1}for the best candidate species in the genera Atriplex, Batis, Salicornia, Suaeda and Sesuvium. These yields are comparable to high-yielding forestry and agricultural biomass crops. Irrigation requirements and other costs of production were within the range of conventional crops as well. Laboratory and field experiments showed that seawater had an inhibitory effect on the decomposition of halophyte biomass in soil; hence, a strategy for C sequestration in desert soil was proposed, in which halophyte crop by-products would be returned to the soil to store C while the harvested portions would be used for oilseeds and animal feed.

  14. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment: laboratory simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Contreras, C. S.; Ricketts, C. L.; Salama, F.

    2012-04-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry between its two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. Several instruments onboard Cassini have detected neutral, positively and negatively charged particles and heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan[1,2]. In particular, the presence of benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3)[3], which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan’s aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at NASA Ames’ Cosmic Simulation facility (COSmIC) to study the chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN…) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan’s atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic jet expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing the first products of Titan’s N2-CH4 chemistry but also much heavier molecules like PAHs or PANHs can be injected to study specific chemical reactions. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy[4] and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry[5]. Thin tholin deposits are also produced in the THS experiment and can be analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We will present the results of ongoing mass spectrometry studies on the THS experiment using different gas mixtures: N2-CH4, N2-C2H2, N2-C2H4, N2-C2H6, N2-C6H6, and similar mixtures with an N2-CH4 (90:10) mixture instead of pure N2, to study specific pathways

  15. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes the science objectives and strategies to address gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In January-February 2015, a field campaign has been planned consisting of a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific. In close coordination with NOAA, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is also contributing air and shipborne facilities for ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment), a DOE-sponsored study complementing CalWater 2. Ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network in California and aerosol chemical instrumentation at Bodega Bay, California have been designed to add important near surface-level context for the

  16. Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank: Atmospheric Refraction at Low Elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Jeff; Maddalena, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    During the summer, 2008 Research Experience for Teachers, J. Paradis worked at the NRAO in Green Bank to collect and reduce data taken on the 43-m radio telescope to compare models of atmospheric refraction at elevations below 10º. Unlike optical telescopes, radio telescopes cannot use guide stars to overcome deficiencies in refraction models but, instead, need accurate refraction predictions. The GBT, for example, has a large aperture, observes at high frequencies and to low elevations, and requires a model that is accurate to a few arc seconds. Unfortunately, there is no radio refraction model that has been universally accepted, with some of the most common models differing by up to an arc minute at the horizon. There are a number of advantages in using the 43-m telescope at 1 GHz to measure refraction using the Moon as a source. The telescope can observe to the horizon, the Moon's size closely matches the beam width of the telescope, and the Moon is bright enough to have its position measured accurately in under 30 sec. Most importantly, the equatorial mount of the telescope, when combined with the monthly changing azimuth of Moon rises and sets, makes it possible to disentangle telescope pointing errors from refraction. So far we have not collected sufficient data for a complete analysis, but lessons for high school students have been developed that embrace the core concepts of the summers’ efforts. Using BUFKIT, a weather forecast program developed by the National Weather Service, students in physics classes determine the atmospheric refraction at different elevations for fictional radio and optical telescopes in upstate New York. Students are given a pre and post test assessment to measure understanding for a topic students traditionally find difficult. This work was supported in part by the NSF-RET program

  17. CO2 Dissociation using the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Experiment (VADER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindon, Michael Allen

    As of 2013, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) estimates that the world emits approximately 36 trillion metric tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere every year. These large emissions have been correlated to global warming trends that have many consequences across the globe, including glacial retraction, ocean acidification and increased severity of weather events. With green technologies still in the infancy stage, it can be expected that CO2 emissions will stay this way for along time to come. Approximately 41% of the emissions are due to electricity production, which pump out condensed forms of CO2. This danger to our world is why research towards new and innovative ways of controlling CO2 emissions from these large sources is necessary. As of now, research is focused on two primary methods of CO2 reduction from condensed CO2 emission sources (like fossil fuel power plants): Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and Carbon Capture and Utilization (CCU). CCS is the process of collecting CO2 using absorbers or chemicals, extracting the gas from those absorbers and finally pumping the gas into reservoirs. CCU on the other hand, is the process of reacting CO2 to form value added chemicals, which can then be recycled or stored chemically. A Dielectric Barrier discharge (DBD) is a pulsed, low temperature, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma which creates high energy electrons suitable for dissociating CO2 into its components (CO and O) as one step in the CCU process. Here I discuss the viability of using a DBD for CO2 dissociation on an industrial scale as well as the fundamental physics and chemistry of a DBD for CO2 dissociation. This work involved modeling the DBD discharge and chemistry, which showed that there are specific chemical pathways and plasma parameters that can be adjusted to improve the CO2 reaction efficiencies and rates. Experimental studies using the Versatile Atmospheric dielectric barrier Discharge ExpeRiment

  18. Atmospheric transport simulations in support of the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. M.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Mountain, M. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Karion, A.; Miller, J. B.; Sweeney, C.; Steiner, N.; Wofsy, S. C.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the atmospheric modeling that underlies the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) science analysis, including its meteorological and atmospheric transport components (polar variant of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models), and provides WRF validation for May-October 2012 and March-November 2013 - the first 2 years of the aircraft field campaign. A triply nested computational domain for WRF was chosen so that the innermost domain with 3.3 km grid spacing encompasses the entire mainland of Alaska and enables the substantial orography of the state to be represented by the underlying high-resolution topographic input field. Summary statistics of the WRF model performance on the 3.3 km grid indicate good overall agreement with quality-controlled surface and radiosonde observations. Two-meter temperatures are generally too cold by approximately 1.4 K in 2012 and 1.1 K in 2013, while 2 m dewpoint temperatures are too low (dry) by 0.2 K in 2012 and too high (moist) by 0.6 K in 2013. Wind speeds are biased too low by 0.2 m s-1 in 2012 and 0.3 m s-1 in 2013. Model representation of upper level variables is very good. These measures are comparable to model performance metrics of similar model configurations found in the literature. The high quality of these fine-resolution WRF meteorological fields inspires confidence in their use to drive STILT for the purpose of computing surface influences ("footprints") at commensurably increased resolution. Indeed, footprints generated on a 0.1° grid show increased spatial detail compared with those on the more common 0.5° grid, better allowing for convolution with flux models for carbon dioxide and methane across the heterogeneous Alaskan landscape. Ozone deposition rates computed using STILT footprints indicate good agreement with observations and exhibit realistic seasonal variability, further indicating that WRF

  19. Atmospheric monitoring of a perfluorocarbon tracer at the 2009 ZERT Center experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekney, Natalie; Wells, Arthur; Rodney Diehl, J.; McNeil, Matthew; Lesko, Natalie; Armstrong, James; Ference, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Field experiments at Montana State University are conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Zero Emissions Research and Technology Center (ZERT) to test and verify monitoring techniques for carbon capture and storage (CCS). A controlled release of CO 2 with an added perfluorocarbon tracer was conducted in July 2009 in a multi-laboratory study of atmospheric transport and detection technologies. Tracer plume dispersion was measured with various meteorological conditions using a tethered balloon system with Multi-Tube Remote Samplers (MTRS) at elevations of 10 m, 20 m, and 40 m above ground level (AGL), as well as a ground-based portable tower with monitors containing sorbent material to collect the tracer at 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, and 4 m AGL. Researchers designed a horizontal grid of sampling locations centered at the tracer plume source, with the tower positioned at 10 m and 30 m in both upwind and downwind directions, and the MTRS spaced at 50 m and 90 m downwind and 90 m upwind. Tracer was consistently detected at elevated concentrations at downwind sampling locations. With very few exceptions, higher tracer concentrations correlated with lower elevations. Researchers observed no statistical difference between sampling at 50 m and 90 m downwind at the same elevation. The US EPA AERMOD model applied using site-specific information predicted transport and dispersion of the tracer. Model results are compared to experimental data from the 2009 ZERT experiment. Successful characterization of the tracer plume simulated by the ZERT experiment is considered a step toward demonstrating the feasibility of remote sampling with unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) at future sequestration sites.

  20. Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Experiment Laboratory engineering concepts/design tradeoffs. Volume 1: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greco, R. V.; Eaton, L. R.; Wilkinson, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The work is summarized which was accomplished from January 1974 to October 1974 for the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineation of candidate experiments that require the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity are reported. The experiment program and the laboratory concept for a Spacelab payload to perform cloud microphysics research are defined. This multimission laboratory is planned to be available to the entire scientific community to utilize in furthering the basic understanding of cloud microphysical processes and phenomenon, thereby contributing to improved weather prediction and ultimately to provide beneficial weather control and modification.

  1. New experience in atmospheric monitoring in Moscow city on the base of WSN technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavin, Alex; Litvinov, Artur; Baskakov, Sergey; Chesalova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    for each sensors. We use triggers to modify data, for example, to modify signal from gas sensors to gas concentration, in depend of unique sensor name. Additional table gives geographical coordinates of each node. We use GIS project for visualization and data analysis. Experiences revealed the inverse relationship between H2 concentration and temperature and pressure. Also we revealed periodicity of gas concentration with different harmonics. We could not find in literatures the similar works of H2 monitoring in cites. Exclusion is the work of (Necki et al., 2014) to organize continue monitoring in Krakow and it neighborhood. Authors also note periodicity in gas concentration affected by the seasons (increase in wintertime), day time (auto traffic). The received data we consider as first experiments in organization of long time monitoring of cites atmosphere, using new technologies (WSN). This results we consider to be the first methodological experiments in the field of monitoring the atmosphere of the city by WSN technic. It is planned to update the correctness of the analysis based on a comparison with other gas analysis methods. Acknowledgements This study was supported by the program 44 presidium RAS "Search basic research for the development of the Russian Arctic" Reference Necki, Jaroslaw M.; Chmura, Lukasz; Bielewski, Jaroslaw; et al. Variability of Molecular Hydrogen in the Urban Atmosphere Based on Continuous Measurements in Krakow //Polish Journal of Environmental Studies 2014, V.23, Iss. 2, P. 427-434.

  2. First results from the GPS atmospheric remote sensing experiment TOR aboard TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, G.; Grunwaldt, L.; Heise, S.; Köhler, W.; Schmidt, T.; Choi, K.-R.; Michalak, G.; König, R.; Rothacher, M.; Wickert, J.

    2009-04-01

    The TerraSAR-X satellite was launched on 15 June 2007 into a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of about 514 km and about 98 ° orbit inclination. In addition to synthetic aperture radar and laser communication payloads, TerraSAR-X accommodates the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) experiment. TOR's hardware consists of the Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) and a laser retro-reflector for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). IGOR, a dual frequency, geodetic-grade GPS receiver instrument, provides signal-to-noise ratios, pseudorange and carrier phase observations of an occulting and a reference satellite at sampling rates of up to 50 Hz for remote sensing of atmospheric refractivity using the radio occultation (RO) technique. For precise orbit determination pseudorange and carrier phase data from all satellites in view are sampled at 0.1 Hz. Three brief RO tests were conducted with TOR in 2007; a 32-day campaign was performed in January/February 2008 and from 25 July to 17 November 2008 occultation events were recorded continuously for 117 days. We describe first results from an analysis of about 19.000 setting radio occultation events observed during that last campaign. Atmospheric refractivity profiles derived from TOR data are intercompared with ECMWF analyses; ECMWF analysis data are interpolated to the time and location of the RO measurement. At altitudes of about 2-25 km the mean fractional refractivity bias with respect to ECMWF is less than ±0.5%, its standard deviation varies between 0.5% and 1% in the altitude range 5-20 km increasing to about 2% at altitudes below 5 km and above 20 km. Unlike the RO receivers aboard the CHAMP and GRACE satellites the IGOR aboard TerraSAR-X employs an open-loop tracking technique to improve L1 carrier phase tracking at altitudes below 5 to 6 km. Consistent with earlier findings from the COSMIC constellation, open-loop tracking significantly reduces the 50%-altitude, the tangent point altitude which is

  3. [The deposition of tritium in form of HTO from atmosphere moisture to Hypogymnia physodes lichens during chamber experiments].

    PubMed

    Golubeva, V N; Golubev, A V; Kosheleva, T A; Kuznetsova, V F; Mavrin, S V

    2008-01-01

    The results of the deposition of tritium oxide (HTO) from atmosphere to Hypogymnia physodes lichens during chamber experiments are presented. For lichens the content of tissue water tritium (TWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) were measuremed. Were shown that lichens mainly absorb HTO from atmosphere during first 24 hours. The ratio TWT/HTO of chamber and the velocity of TWT to OBT conversion in lichens were determined. Was noted that the TWT to OBT conversion velocity for lichens is ten times greater than that for deposition of HTO by vascular plant leafs. There was supposed that TWT to OCT conversion in lichens is occurred through alga as well as fungus component of lichens. The intensive deposition HTO from chamber atmosphere by lichens and high velocity of HTO to OBT conversion show the availability to use lichens for determination of atmosphere pollution by HTO. PMID:19004335

  4. Improved VAS regression soundings of mesoscale temperature features observed during the atmospheric variability experiment on 6 March 1982. [VISSR Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Keyser, Dennis A.; Larko, David E.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1988-01-01

    In 1982, the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the GOES satellite performed the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE) to verify VAS's mesoscale-sounding capabilities. Attention is given to the AVE network in the late afternoon of March 6, 1982, after a winter storm had passed over Texas, in order to ascertain whether such temperature profile deviations from the average lapse rate as a midlevel cold pool (which should decrease the brightness of several IR channels) can be retrieved from VAS radiances. Two simple enhancements are introduced: the regression matrix is calculated using the AVE asynoptic radiosondes launched from NWS sites in the region, and a change of the statistical conditioning factor from the conservative 10/1 SNR to a more optimistic 100/1 for those VAS channels that are more sensitive to tropospheric temperature.

  5. Analysis of a laboratory experiment on neutron generation by discharges in the open atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.

    2015-10-01

    A recently reported laboratory experiment with a high-voltage long discharge in the open atmosphere producing neutrons "…up to energies above 10 MeV…" [Agafonov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 115003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.115003] is critically analyzed. Known elementary processes, namely, nuclear synthesis 2H(2H,n )3He and 2H(14N,n )15O , photonuclear, electrodisintegration Anm(e-,n )mprescripts>m n -1 and opposite to the β-decay e-(p+,n ) νe reactions, as well as unconventional mechanisms and the hypothetical increase in the nuclear synthesis cross sections are not capable of accounting for the neutron generation under conditions of the experiment analyzed. In particular, total energy yields of reactions 2H(2H,n )3He and 2H(14N,n )15O are less than the claimed neutron energy above 10 MeV. Trustworthiness of the neutron measurements on the basis of the available study of the C-39 track detectors behavior carried out by Faccini et al. [Eur. Phys. J. C 74, 2894 (2014), 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-2894-3] in connection with claimed observations of neutron emission in electrolytic cells is discussed. Real-time measurements of x-ray and neutron pulses by Agafonov et al. are commented on using the thorough study of the x-ray emissions by discharges under similar conditions [Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45, 425202 (2012), 10.1088/0022-3727/45/42/425202].

  6. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments (Mohave, Mohave II): Results Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Iain S.; McGee, Thomas G.; Twigg, Laurence W.; Sumnicht, Grant K.; Whiteman, David N.; Rush, Kurt D.; Cadirola, Martin P.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Connell, R.; Demoz, Belay B.; Vomel, Holger; Miloshevich, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments (MOHAVE, MOHAVE-II) inter-comparison campaigns took place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.5(sup o)N) in October 2006 and 2007 respectively. Both campaigns aimed at evaluating the capability of three Raman lidars for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). During each campaign, more than 200 hours of lidar measurements were compared to balloon borne measurements obtained from 10 Cryogenic Frost-point Hygrometer (CFH) flights and over 50 Vaisala RS92 radiosonde flights. During MOHAVE, fluorescence in all three lidar receivers was identified, causing a significant wet bias above 10-12 km in the lidar profiles as compared to the CFH. All three lidars were reconfigured after MOHAVE, and no such bias was observed during the MOHAVE-II campaign. The lidar profiles agreed very well with the CFH up to 13-17 km altitude, where the lidar measurements become noise limited. The results from MOHAVE-II have shown that the water vapor Raman lidar will be an appropriate technique for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS given a slight increase in its power-aperture, as well as careful calibration.

  7. Experiences of sexual relationships of young black women in an atmosphere of coercion.

    PubMed

    Clüver, Frances; Elkonin, Diane; Young, Charles

    2013-03-01

    Negotiations surrounding sexual activity are characterised by multiple power disparities that include race, social status and age, with gender being the most dominant differential in heterosexual interactions. Research has shown that women are physiologically more at risk of contracting HIV than men, as indicated by the higher infection rates of the former. Many African societies operate via a hegemonic masculinity, with patriarchal governance and female subordination being the norm, placing women at even greater risk of HIV infection. In this qualitative phenomenological study, four black school-going adolescent women living in Grahamstown were interviewed using a semi-structured interview to gather data. An interpretative phenomenological analysis was conducted on the data to provide subjective insights of the experiences of the participants with regard to their interactions with men. From the findings, it became apparent that the participants felt pressured, coerced or manipulated by male counterparts. This pressure and coercion was not just felt in their interactions with older men, but also in their romantic partnerships. Three of the participants experienced pressure to engage in sexual intercourse with their boyfriends when they were unwilling or unready, and they reported being faced with additional pressure to engage in unprotected sex. Furthermore, it became apparent that each participant had an underlying fear of being raped and considered this as a genuine threat to her safety and sexual health. The atmosphere within which these participants negotiate their sexual agency is thus heavily informed by male control, coercion and the threat of violence or rape. PMID:23777540

  8. Iterative ensemble Kalman filter for atmospheric dispersion in nuclear accidents: An application to Kincaid tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Su, G F; Chen, J G; Raskob, W; Yuan, H Y; Huang, Q Y

    2015-10-30

    Information about atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides is vitally important for planning effective countermeasures during nuclear accidents. Results of dispersion models have high spatial and temporal resolutions, but they are not accurate enough due to the uncertain source term and the errors in meteorological data. Environmental measurements are more reliable, but they are scarce and unable to give forecasts. In this study, our newly proposed iterative ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation scheme is used to combine model results and environmental measurements. The system is thoroughly validated against the observations in the Kincaid tracer experiment. The initial first-guess emissions are assumed to be six magnitudes underestimated. The iterative EnKF system rapidly corrects the errors in the emission rate and wind data, thereby significantly improving the model results (>80% reduction of the normalized mean square error, r=0.71). Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the influence of meteorological parameters. The results indicate that the system is sensitive to boundary layer height. When the heights from the numerical weather prediction model are used, only 62.5% of reconstructed emission rates are within a factor two of the actual emissions. This increases to 87.5% when the heights derived from the on-site observations are used. PMID:26026852

  9. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  10. Experiences of sexual relationships of young black women in an atmosphere of coercion

    PubMed Central

    Clüver, Frances; Elkonin, Diane; Young, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Negotiations surrounding sexual activity are characterised by multiple power disparities that include race, social status and age, with gender being the most dominant differential in heterosexual interactions. Research has shown that women are physiologically more at risk of contracting HIV than men, as indicated by the higher infection rates of the former. Many African societies operate via a hegemonic masculinity, with patriarchal governance and female subordination being the norm, placing women at even greater risk of HIV infection. In this qualitative phenomenological study, four black school-going adolescent women living in Grahamstown were interviewed using a semi-structured interview to gather data. An interpretative phenomenological analysis was conducted on the data to provide subjective insights of the experiences of the participants with regard to their interactions with men. From the findings, it became apparent that the participants felt pressured, coerced or manipulated by male counterparts. This pressure and coercion was not just felt in their interactions with older men, but also in their romantic partnerships. Three of the participants experienced pressure to engage in sexual intercourse with their boyfriends when they were unwilling or unready, and they reported being faced with additional pressure to engage in unprotected sex. Furthermore, it became apparent that each participant had an underlying fear of being raped and considered this as a genuine threat to her safety and sexual health. The atmosphere within which these participants negotiate their sexual agency is thus heavily informed by male control, coercion and the threat of violence or rape. PMID:23777540

  11. Development of the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE): An Advanced Airborne DIAL Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Brown, Kevin E.; Hall, William M.; Barnes, James C.; Edwards, William C.; Petway, Larry B.; Little, Alan D.; Luck, William S., Jr.; Jones, Irby W.; Antill, Charles W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) Instrument is the first fully-engineered, autonomous Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) System for the measurement of water vapor in the troposphere (aerosol and cloud measurements are included). LASE uses a double-pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser for the transmitter with a 30 ns pulse length and 150 mJ/pulse. The laser beam is "seeded" to operate on a selected water vapor absorption line in the 815-nm region using a laser diode and an onboard absorption reference cell. A 40 cm diameter telescope collects the backscattered signals and directs them onto two detectors. LASE collects DIAL data at 5 Hz while onboard a NASA/Ames ER-2 aircraft flying at altitudes from 16-21 km. LASE was designed to operate autonomously within the environment and physical constraints of the ER-2 aircraft and to make water vapor profile measurements across the troposphere to better than 10% accuracy. LASE has flown 19 times during the development of the instrument and the validation of the science data. This paper describes the design, operation, and reliability of the LASE Instrument.

  12. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no

  13. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  14. The Passy-2015 field experiment: wintertime atmospheric dynamics and air quality in a narrow alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paci, Alexandre; Staquet, Chantal

    2016-04-01

    Wintertime anticyclonic conditions lead to the formation of persistent stable boundary layers which may induce severe air pollution episodes in urban or industrialized area, particularly in mountain regions. The Arve river valley in the Northern Alps is very sensitive to this phenomenon, in particular close to the city of Passy (Haute-Savoie), 20 km down valley past Chamonix. This place is indeed one of the worst place in France regarding air quality, the concentration of fine particles and Benzo(a)pyrene (a carcinogenic organic compound) regularly exceeding the EU legal admissible level during winter. Besides air quality measurements, such as the ones presently carried in the area by the local air quality agency Air Rhône-Alpes or in the DECOMBIO project led by LGGE, it is crucial to improve our knowledge of the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and processes at the valley scale under these persistent stable conditions in order to improve our understanding on how it drives pollutant dispersion. These issues motivated the Passy-2015 field experiment which took place during the winter 2014-2015. A relatively large set-up of instruments was deployed on a main measurement site in the valley center and on four other satellite sites. It includes several remote sensing instruments, a surface flux station, a 10 m instrumented tower, a large aperture scintillometer, a fog monitoring station among others. Most of the instruments were present from early January to the end of February. During two intensive observation periods, 6-14 February and 17-20 February, the instrumental set-up was completed on the main site with high frequency radio-soundings (up to one per 1h30), a tethered balloon, a remote controlled drone quadcopter and a sodar. The field campaign, the instruments, the meteorological situations observed and preliminary results will be presented. This field experiment is part of the Passy project funded by ADEME through the French national programme LEFE/INSU and

  15. A model for eastward and westward jets in laboratory experiments and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, P. S.; Lee, C.

    1998-06-01

    Flows in a rotating annular tank [J. Sommeria, S. D. Meyers, and H. L. Swinney, Nonlinear Topics in Ocean Physics, edited by A. Osborne (North Holland, Amsterdam, 1991); Nature (London) 337, 58 (1989); T. H. Solomon, W. J. Holloway, and H. L. Swinney, Phys. Fluids A 5, 1971 (1993); J. Sommeria, S. D. Meyers, and H. L. Swinney, Nature (London) 331, 689 (1989)] with a sloping bottom (that simulates a barotropic atmosphere's Coriolis force with a topographic β-effect [J. Pedlosky, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, 2nd ed. (Springer, Berlin, 1986)]) produce eastward and westward jets, i.e., azimuthal flows moving in the same or opposite direction as the annulus' rotation. Flows are forced by pumping fluid in and out of two concentric slits in the bottom boundary, and the direction of the jets depends on the direction of the pumping. The eastward and westward jets differ, with the former narrow, strong, and wavy. The jets of Jupiter and Saturn have the same east-west asymmetry [P. S. Marcus, Ann. Rev. Astron. Astro. 431, 523 (1993)]. Numerical simulations show that the azimuthally-averaged flow differs substantially from the non-averaged flow which has sharp gradients in the potential vorticity q. They also show that the maxima of the eastward jets and Rossby waves are located where the gradients of q are large, and the maxima of the westward jets and vortex chains are located where they are weak. As the forcing is increased the drift velocities of the two chains of vortices of the eastward jet lock together; whereas the two chains of the westward jet do not. Inspired by a previously published, [P. S. Marcus, Ann. Rev. Astron. Astro. 431, 523 (1993)] piece-wise constant-q model of the Jovian jets and based on numerical simulations, a new model of the experimental flow that is characterized by regions of undisturbed flow and bands of nearly uniform q separated by sharp gradients is presented. It explains the asymmetry of the laboratory jets and quantitatively describes all of

  16. Photochemistry of iron(III)-carboxylato complexes in aqueous atmospheric particles - Laboratory experiments and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, C.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Iron is always present in the atmosphere in concentrations from ~10-9 M (clouds, rain) up to ~10-3 M (fog, particles). Sources are mainly mineral dust emissions. Iron complexes are very good absorbers in the UV-VIS actinic region and therefore photo-chemically reactive. Iron complex photolysis leads to radical production and can initiate radical chain reactions, which is related to the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. These radical chain reactions are involved in the decomposition and transformation of a variety of chemical compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles. Additionally, the photochemical reaction itself can be a degradation pathway for organic compounds with the ability to bind iron. Iron-complexes of atmospherically relevant coordination compounds like oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, tartronate, gluconate, pyruvate and glyoxalate have been investigated in laboratory experiments. Iron speciation depends on the iron-ligand ratio and the pH. The most suitable experimental conditions were calculated with a speciation program (Visual Minteq). The solutions were prepared accordingly and transferred to a 1 cm quartz cuvette and flash-photolyzed with an excimer laser at wavelengths 308 or 351 nm. Photochemically produced Fe2+ has been measured by spectrometry at 510 nm as Fe(phenantroline)32+. Fe2+ overall effective quantum yields have been calculated with the concentration of photochemically produced Fe2+ and the measured energy of the excimer laser pulse. The laser pulse energy was measured with a pyroelectric sensor. For some iron-carboxylate systems the experimental parameters like the oxygen content of the solution, the initial Iron concentration and the incident laser energy were systematically altered to observe an effect on the overall quantum yield. The dependence of some quantum yields on these parameters allows in some cases an interpretation of the underlying photochemical reaction mechanism. Quantum yields of malonate

  17. Atmospheric Science Experiment for Mars: ATMIS for the Netlander 2005 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harri, A.-M.; Siili, T.; Angrilli, A.; Calcutt, S.; Crisp, D.; Larsen, S.; Polkko, J.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Malique, C.; Tillman, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    ATMIS (Atmospheric and Meteorological Instrumentation System) is a versatile suite of atmospheric instrumentation to be accommodated onboard the Netlander Mission slated for launch in 2005. Four Netlanders are planned to form a geophysical measurement network on the surface of Mars. The atmospheric sciences are among the scientific disciplines benefiting most of the network concept. The goal of the ATMIS instrument is to provide new data on the atmospheric vertical structure, regional and global circulation phenomena, the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and atmosphere-surface interactions, dust storm triggering mechanisms, as well as the climatological cycles of H2O, dust and CO2. To reach the goal of characterization of a number of phenomena exhibiting both spatial and temporal variations, simultaneous observations of multiple variables at spatially displaced sites Deforming a network D are required. The in situ observations made by the ATMIS sensors will be supported by extensive modeling efforts. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments - Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Larsen, J. C.; Rind, D.; Oltmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite sensors of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus-7 LIMS, and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. It was found that, despite differences in the measurement techniques, sampling bias, and observational periods, the three experiments have disclosed a generally consistent pattern of stratospheric water vapor distribution. The only significant difference occurs at high southern altitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements were 2-3 ppmv greater than those of SAGE II and ATMOS.

  19. Atmospheric Transport During the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific TRACE-P Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Kiley, C. M.; Hannan, J. R.; Westberg, D. J.; Avery, M. A.; Newell, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric transport over the Pacific Basin is described during NASA's Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific Experiment (TRACE-P) that was conducted between February - April 2001. The mission included extensive chemical sampling from two aircraft based primarily in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Base, Japan. Meteorological conditions during TRACE-P changed rapidly due to the seasonal winter/spring transition and the decay of prolonged ENSO cold phase (La Nina) conditions. To document these changes, TRACE-P was divided into two halves, and mean flow patterns during each half are presented and discussed. Important circulation features are the semi-permanent Siberian anticyclone and transient middle latitude cyclones that form near eastern Asia and then move eastward over the northern Pacific. Five-day backward trajectories from the various flight tracks show that air sampled by the aircraft had been transported from a variety of locations. Some parcels remained over the tropical western North Pacific during the entire period, while other important origins were Southeast Asia, Africa, and central Asia. Patterns of satellite-derived precipitation and lightning are described. TRACE-P occurs during a neutral to weak La Nina period of relatively cold sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific. Compared to climatology, the TRACE-P period exhibits deep convection located west of its typical position; however, tropospheric flow patterns do not exhibit a strong La Nina signal. Circulation patterns during TRACE-P are found to be generally similar to those during NASA's PEM WEST-B mission that occurred in the same region during February - March 1994.

  20. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Retrievals from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Solar Occultation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE satellite (SCISAT-1) was launched into an inclined orbit on 12 August 2003 and is now recording high signal-to-noise 0.02 per centimeter resolution solar absorption spectra covering 750-4400 per centimeter (2.3-13 micrometers). A procedure has been developed for retrieving average dry air CO2 mole fractions (X(sub CO2)) in the altitude range 7-10 kilometers from the SCISAT-1 spectra. Using the N2 continuum absorption in a window region near 2500 per centimeter, altitude shifts are applied to the tangent heights retrieved in version 2.2 SCISAT-1 processing, while cloudy or aerosol-impacted measurements are eliminated. Monthly-mean XCO2 covering 60 S to 60 N latitude for February 2004 to March 2008 has been analyzed with consistent trends inferred in both hemispheres. The ACE XCO2 time series have been compared with previously-reported surface network measurements, predictions based on upper tropospheric aircraft measurements, and space-based measurements. The retrieved X(sub CO2) from the ACE-FTS spectra are higher on average by a factor of 1.07 plus or minus 0.025 in the northern hemisphere and by a factor of 1.09 plus or minus 0.019 on average in the southern hemisphere compared to surface station measurements covering the same time span. The ACE derived trend is approximately 0.2% per year higher than measured at surface stations during the same observation period.

  1. A Sounding Rocket experiment to Validate Ultraviolet Remote Sensing of the Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Erickson, P. J.; Cook, T.; Mende, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Despite decades of observations and interpretations of ultraviolet airglow, advancing the derivation of physical parameters of the ionosphere and atmosphere beyond the current successes presents difficult challenges due to the lack of comprehensive understanding of the fundamental detailed physics that surrounds the associated airglow emission process. The daytime thermosphere, while better characterized than the ionosphere, is still subject to uncertainties caused by the need for somewhat ad-hoc modeling using a multi-step process that creates the UV airglow emissions. The state of the field for the daytime ionosphere is currently based on only a few dozen profiles obtained from sounding rocket and satellite missions, none of which were designed to obtain the necessary comprehensive set of measurements. We have designed a sounding rocket experiment that will validate extreme and far ultraviolet (EUV/FUV) remote sensing of the ionosphere and thermosphere during day time. The sounding rocket data will be coordinated with simultaneous observations by an Incoherent Scatter Radar which will provide altitude profiles of daytime electron density, ion composition, electron and ion temperatures, and ion drifts due to winds and electric fields as well as neutral temperature profiles. The instruments aboard the sounding rocket will observe full-disk solar EUV and FUV irradiance measurements in the 2 - 131 nm band along with a high speed multi-wavelength photometer package that will provide altitude profiles of thermospheric neutral species along the rocket track. The dayglow instrument will cover 60 - 140 nm spectral range and observe the emissions in a direction perpendicular to the rocket axis, which will point towards the Sun. With these measurements, we hope to answer how well the EUV and FUV dayglow measurements can be used to provide a self-consistent measure of the day time ionosphere-thermosphere space environment.

  2. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Algorithm for Infrasound Atmospheric Sounding: Application to the Humming Roadrunner experiment in New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalande, Jean-Marie; Waxler, Roger; Velea, Doru

    2016-04-01

    As infrasonic waves propagate at long ranges through atmospheric ducts it has been suggested that observations of such waves can be used as a remote sensing techniques in order to update properties such as temperature and wind speed. In this study we investigate a new inverse approach based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. This approach as the advantage of searching for the full Probability Density Function in the parameter space at a lower computational cost than extensive parameters search performed by the standard Monte Carlo approach. We apply this inverse methods to observations from the Humming Roadrunner experiment (New Mexico) and discuss implications for atmospheric updates, explosion characterization, localization and yield estimation.

  3. An evaluation of atmospheric path delay correction in differential VLBI experiments for spacecraft tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, R.; Sekido, M.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2005-12-01

    We performed differential VLBI (Δ VLBI) experiments for tracking of the interplanetary spacecraft. Our main goal is to obtain the precise and quasi-realtime navigation technique of the spacecraft using Δ VLBI technique. With VLBI time delay measurements, differenced between the spacecraft and angularly nearby quasars to cancel common measurement errors such as the propagation delays due to the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere. However, we can't always observe desirable quasars. Unfortunately, sometimes we have no choice but to use quasars which are angularly far from the spacecraft. Then, we tried to evaluate the reduction effect by subtracting the group delays of the reference radio source from those of the spacecraft. Two HAYABUSA Δ VLBI experiments were carried out in order to evaluate reducing propagation delays on October, 2004. The spacecraft HAYABUSA has been flying steadily towards an asteroid named ``Itokawa'' and it will orbit the asteroid as of September 2005, land on it, and bring back a sample from its surface. The HAYABUSA spacecraft and an angularly nearby quasar ``2126-158'' were observed sequentially, not simultaneously, during each period with various time intervals of data acquisition. The maximum angular separations of the spacecraft from the quasar are less than 3 degrees. We estimated the zenith path delay due to the water vapor (ZWD: Zenith Wet Delay) using the data sets of the GPS stations which are adjacent to each VLBI antenna. A principle observable feature of VLBI is the difference in arrival times of radio signals between two stations. Then, we calculated difference between the slant path delays which are values as a ZWDs at each station multiplied by a mapping function. We defined this ``differential wet delay''. If the angular separation is sufficiently small, the differential wet delays for both radio sources are almost equal. Then, these are canceled out by the difference procedure. However, if these are different, the

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions derived from regional measurement networks and atmospheric inversions: Results from the MCI and INFLUX experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Cambaliza, M.; Denning, A.; Gurney, K. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Ogle, S. M.; Possolo, A.; Richardson, S.; Schuh, A. E.; Shepson, P. B.; Sweeney, C.; Turnbull, J. C.; West, T. O.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric evaluation of emissions inventories is increasingly envisioned as a critical element of greenhouse gas emissions regulation. Atmospheric inversions utilizing dense regional networks of greenhouse gas measurements, however, are scarce. Discussions of the measurements and methods required to infer fluxes at spatial and temporal resolutions sufficient to meet the needs of policy makers, therefore, remain largely hypothetical. We present results from one past field experiment, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Midcontinent Intensive (MCI) regional study, and preliminary results from a new experiment, the Indianapolis Flux project (INFLUX), both of which include high density regional greenhouse gas measurement networks. Both studies also include detailed regional inventory assessments of greenhouse gas sources and sinks. The MCI results show large amplitude, spatially coherent synoptic and seasonal patterns in boundary layer CO2 mixing ratios correlated with cropping patterns. Regional atmospheric inversions utilizing these data show corrections that tend towards the inventory estimates regardless of the prior flux estimates utilized in the inversion, and the region appears to have been slightly oversampled by the instrument density deployed. The uncertainty bounds associated with the inverted fluxes, however, remain fairly large despite the high density of atmospheric data, and the true uncertainty is difficult to assess. The INFLUX experiment will utilize a similar number of sensors deployed over a spatial domain two to three orders of magnitude smaller in area than the MCI domain, and will attempt to utilize similar techniques to infer anthropogenic emissions at high spatial resolution. We will present the experimental design for this project including the unique challenges of multi-species inversions and the need to deconvolve biological and fossil fuel fluxes. We anticipate that this experiment will serve as a benchmark regarding the accuracy and

  5. Education Relative a l'Environnement: Regards, Recherches, Reflexions. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document reports the work of an inter-university colloquium in Montreal in November, 1997 on research on the evaluation of education relative to the environment. Papers include: (1) "Un "patrimoine" de recherche en construction" (Lucie Sauve); (2) "Pour une recherche en education relative l'environnement "centree sur l'objet partage"" (Louis…

  6. Retrieval and molecule sensitivity studies for the global ozone monitoring experiment and the scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly V.; Burrows, John P.; Schneider, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) are diode based spectrometers that will make atmospheric constituent and aerosol measurements from European satellite platforms beginning in the mid 1990's. GOME measures the atmosphere in the UV and visible in nadir scanning, while SCIAMACHY performs a combination of nadir, limb, and occultation measurements in the UV, visible, and infrared. A summary is presented of the sensitivity studies that were performed for SCIAMACHY measurements. As the GOME measurement capability is a subset of the SCIAMACHY measurement capability, the nadir, UV, and visible portion of the studies is shown to apply to GOME as well.

  7. Deuterium to Hydrogen Ratios in Solid and Atmospheric Samples from the SAM Experiment in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Brunner, A.; Atreya, S. K.; McAdam, A.; Stern, J.; Kashyap, S.

    2014-07-01

    Low D/H ratios in the smectite clay hydroxyl water relative to the current atmospheric values suggest that substantial early escape must have fractionated martian water prior to the formation of the Yellowknife Bay mudstones.

  8. Reproducing Experiment in the Shock-Induced Removal of CO2 From the Atmosphere on the Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.; Isobe, H.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of the Mars is one of the most important problems on the environmental issues of terrestrial planets. The early Martian atmosphere was formed by degassing and it consisted thick CO2. Most of the CO2 must have been removed from the early Martian atmosphere in order to change to the present thin atmosphere. Heavy bombardment of planetesimals had been one of the important high energy processes on the primitive Mars. In this study, we experiment to reproduce the reaction between the early Martian atmosphere and the minerals in the high temperature condition caused by the shock-induced heating and discuss its effect of CO2 removal from the atmosphere. Reaction experiments were carried out with CO2 or CO2- H2O fluid at the pressure of 100MPa or 50MPa. A range of the temperature is 200-650°C and run duration is 7 days. Starting materials was the mixture of olivine, orthopyroxene, diopside, and plagioclase represented the main mineral phases of the early Mars. After the experiment, the reacted CO2 was weighed by CO2 mass remained in the experimental capsule. CO2 reactivity increased with decreasing temperature. If removed CO2 fixed as carbonate minerals in the run products, abundance of the carbonate minerals may be as much as 10% of the run products. Presence of H2O has no remarkable effect on CO2 reactivity. A Martian meteorite, ALH84001 includes approximately 1% of carbonate. Large-scale impact on the Martian surface brought shock-induced heating up to several hundred degrees C at several kilometers in depth. Accessory carbonate minerals in Martian rocks may be formed by reactions of CO2 atmosphere and brecciated rocks under craters. A layer of 1% carbonate-bearing rocks with 5km in thickness at Martian surface can settle 0.5MPa of CO2 (1MPa equivalent at the terrestrial gravity) from the Martian atmosphere. Carbonate formation by the shock-induced heating may have played a significant role in the evolution of the primitive Martian atmosphere.

  9. Simultaneous atmospheric measurements using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometers at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory during spring 2006, and comparisons with the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Walker, K. A.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Strong, K.; Sung, K.; Fast, H.; Daffner, W. H.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Fogal, P.; Kolonjari, F.; Loewen, P.; Manney, G. L.; Mikhailov, O.

    2008-03-01

    The 2006 Canadian Arctic ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) Validation Campaign collected measurements at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, 80.05° N, 86.42° W, 610 m above sea level) at Eureka, Canada from 17 February to 31 March 2006. Two of the ten instruments involved in the campaign, both Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs), were operated simultaneously, recording atmospheric solar absorption spectra. The first instrument was an ABB Bomem DA8 high-resolution infrared FTS. The second instrument was the Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer for the Infrared (PARIS-IR), the ground-based version of the satellite-borne FTS on the ACE satellite (ACE-FTS). From the measurements collected by these two ground-based instruments, total column densities of seven stratospheric trace gases (O3, HNO3, NO2, HCl, HF, NO, and ClONO2 were retrieved using the optimal estimation method and these results were compared. Since the two instruments sampled the same portions of atmosphere by synchronizing observations during the campaign, the biases in retrieved columns from the two spectrometers represent the instrumental differences. These differences were consistent with those seen in previous FTS intercomparison studies. Partial column results from the ground-based spectrometers were also compared with partial columns derived from ACE-FTS version 2.2 (including updates for O3, HDO and N2O5 profiles and the differences found were consistent with the other validation comparison studies for the ACE-FTS version 2.2 data products. Column densities of O3, HCl, ClONO2, and HNO3 from the three FTSs were normalized with respect to HF and used to probe the time evolution of the chemical constituents in the atmosphere over Eureka during spring 2006.

  10. Results of the Balloon Atmospheric Propagation Experiment flights of 1970 (BAPE 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1972-01-01

    Two laser beams, one argon (5145 A) and one CO2 (10.6 microns), were propagated over vertical path from the ground to receivers located above the atmosphere, and the scintillation of the beams was measured. Simulataneous measurement of the state of turbulence along the path permitted the comparison of scintillation statistics with theory. The effects of atmospheric turbulence over a vertical or near-vertical path are discussed.

  11. The Greatest Legacy of the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA): A Bibliometric Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international continental scale effort led by Brazil to understand how land use change and climate change affects the role of Amazonia in the Earth system. During the first decade of studies (1998-2007), LBA researchers generated new understanding of Amazonia and published over 1000 papers. However, most LBA participants agree that training and education of a large cohort of scientists, especially students from Brazil, was the greatest contribution of LBA. I analyzed bibliographic data from the NASA supported component project known as LBA-ECO. This component covered a large cross-section of the LBA subject areas highlighting land use and land cover change, carbon cycling, nutrient cycling and other aspects of terrestrial and aquatic ecology. I reviewed the complete bibliography of peer-reviewed papers reported by LBA-ECO researchers (http://www.lbaeco.org/cgi-bin/web/investigations/lbaeco_refs.pl). The researchers reported 691 contributions from 1996 through 2013 of which 24 were theses that were removed them from further analysis. Of 667 papers and book chapters, I tallied the first authors separating categories for Brazilians, all students, and Brazilian students. Numerically, LBA-ECO production of papers peaked in 2004. Publication by Brazilians, students, and Brazilian students generally followed the same pattern as publication in general. However, student and Brazilian student contributions as first authors showed clearly increasing proportions of the papers from project initiation through peak publication. Brazilian student participation as first authors averaged more than 20% of all publications from 2003 to 2010 and more than half of all student publications had Brazilians as first authors. Foreign researchers, some initially reluctant to invest in Brazilian students, almost universally adapted the belief that the greatest legacy of LBA would be the contribution to building a cadre of

  12. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Möhler, O.

    2012-10-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation). While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation "onset" conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulfate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the "onset" of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density is discussed as a simple and empirical normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that INAS densities of some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains, fungal spores and diatoms

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Möhler, O.

    2012-05-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation). While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation onset conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulphate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the onset of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density is discussed as a normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains and fungal spores, are not intrinsically better ice nuclei than dust

  14. Wind tunnel experiments: cold-air pooling and atmospheric decoupling above a melting snow patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, Rebecca; Paterna, Enrico; Horender, Stefan; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The longevity of perennial snowfields is not fully understood, but it is known that strong atmospheric stability and thus boundary-layer decoupling limit the amount of (sensible and latent) heat that can be transmitted from the atmosphere to the snow surface. The strong stability is typically caused by two factors, (i) the temperature difference between the (melting) snow surface and the near-surface atmosphere and (ii) cold-air pooling in topographic depressions. These factors are almost always a prerequisite for perennial snowfields to exist. For the first time, this contribution investigates the relative importance of the two factors in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Vertical profiles of sensible heat and momentum fluxes are measured using two-component hot-wire and one-component cold-wire anemometry directly over the melting snow patch. The comparison between a flat snow surface and one that has a depression shows that atmospheric decoupling is strongly increased in the case of topographic sheltering but only for low to moderate wind speeds. For those conditions, the near-surface suppression of turbulent mixing was observed to be strongest, and the ambient flow was decoupled from the surface, enhancing near-surface atmospheric stability over the single snow patch.

  15. Baroclinic instability with variable static stability - A design study for a spherical atmospheric model experiment. [for Spacelab flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giere, A. C.; Fowlis, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a radially-variable, dielectric body force, analogous to gravity on baroclinic instability for the design of a spherical, synoptic-scale, atmospheric model experiment in a Spacelab flight is investigated. Exact solutions are examined for quasi-geostrophic baroclinic instability in which the rotational Froude number is a linear function of the height. Flow in a rotating rectilinear channel with a vertically variable body force without horizontal shear of the basic state is also discussed.

  16. Radio occultation studies of the Venus atmosphere with the Magellan spacecraft. 2: Results from the October 1991 experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jon M.; Steffes, Paul G.; Hinson, David P.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Tyler, G. Leonard

    1994-01-01

    On October 5 and 6, 1991, three dual-frequency ingress radio occultation experiments were conducted at Venus during consecutive orbits of the Magellan spacecraft. The radio signals probed a region of the atmosphere near 65 deg N, with a solar zenith angle of 108 deg, reaching below 35 km at 3.6 cm, and below 34 km at 13 cm (above a mean radius of 6052 km). The high effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of the Magellan spacecraft and highly successful attitude maneuvers allowed these signals to probe deeper than any previous radio occultation experiment and also resulted in the most accurate thermal and sulfuric acid vapor abundance profiles ever obtained at Venus through radio occultation techniques. The performance of the spacecraft and the experiment design are discussed in an accompanying paper. Average electron density profiles retrieved from the data possess peaks between 2600 and 6000/cu cm, well below typical values of 10,000/cu cm retrieved in 1979 by Pioneer Venus at similar solar zenith angles. Other basic results include vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, and density in the neutral atmosphere, 13- and 3.6-cm absorpttivity, and H2SO4 (g) abundance below the main cloud layer. H2SO4 (g) becomes significant below 50 km, reaching peaks between 18 and 24 ppm near 39 km before dropping precipitously below 38 km. These sharp decreases confirm the thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid vapor below 39 km. Since the Venus atmosphere rotated approximately 10 deg between experiments, the data contain information about the horizontal variability of the atmosphere. All derived profiles exhibit significant variations from orbit to orbit, indicating the presence of dynamical processes between 33 and 200 km. In particular, the orbit-to-orbit variations in temperature and in H2SO4 (g) abundance appear to be correlated, suggesting that a common mechanism may be responsible for the observed spatial variations.

  17. The Siding Spring cometary encounter with Mars: A natural experiment for the Martian atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, John E.; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Ming, Douglas W.; Archer, Paul Douglas; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2014-06-01

    On 19 October 2014 comet C/2013 A1 will encounter Mars. The planet is anticipated to pass through the coma resulting in a greater than four order-of-magnitude increase in the accretion of dust with 430 tonnes of dust with diameters between 1 µm and 12.4 mm surviving atmospheric passage. At high altitude, the dust would impact temperature and may affect limb dust extinction and cloud formation. The UV photolysis of the organic carbon content of the dust, 1.9 to 4.6 tonnes, would have a negligible effect on atmospheric methane. Should C/2013 A1 brighten, increases in upper atmospheric accretion of coma particles will exceed the background dust and the population of small coma particles may be constrained from orbital measurements. For M1 < -1.3, methane produced might be measurable by the Sample Analysis at Mars Tunable Laser Spectrometer instrument onboard Curiosity.

  18. Data for NASA's AVSSE 1 Experiment: 25 Mb Sounding Data and Synoptic Charts. [atmospheric variability and severe storm experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucik, N. F.; Turner, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The AVSSE 1 Experiment is described and tabulated rawinsonde data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb are presented for the 24 stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken between 1,200 GMT, April 27, and 1,200 GMT, April 28, 1975. The methods of data processing and accuracy are briefly discussed. Synoptic charts prepared from the data are presented, as well as an example of contact data.

  19. Sulfur in the early martian atmosphere revisited: Experiments with a 3-D Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Laura; Forget, François; Wordsworth, Robin

    2015-11-01

    Volcanic SO2 in the martian atmosphere has been invoked as a way to create a sustained or transient greenhouse during early martian history. Many modeling studies have been performed to test the feasibility of this hypothesis, resulting in a range of conclusions, from highly feasible to highly improbable. In this study we perform a wide range of simulations using the 3-D Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Generic Global Climate Model (GCM) in order to place earlier results into context and to explore the sensitivity of model outcomes to parameters such as SO2 mixing ratio, atmospheric H2O content, background atmospheric pressure, and aerosol size, abundance, and composition. We conclude that SO2 is incapable of creating a sustained greenhouse on early Mars, and that even in the absence of aerosols, local and daily temperatures rise above 273 K for only for limited periods with favorable background CO2 pressures. In the presence of even small amounts of aerosols, the surface is dramatically cooled for realistic aerosol sizes. Brief, mildly warm conditions require the co-occurrence of many improbable factors, while cooling is achieved for a wide range of model parameters. Instead of causing warming, sulfur in the martian atmosphere may have caused substantial cooling, leading to the end of clement climate conditions on early Mars.

  20. Wind tunnel experiments: cold-air pooling and atmospheric decoupling above a melting snow patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, R.; Paterna, E.; Horender, S.; Crivelli, P.; Lehning, M.

    2015-10-01

    The longevity of perennial snow fields is not fully understood but it is known that strong atmospheric stability and thus boundary layer decoupling limits the amount of (sensible and latent) heat that can be transmitted to the snow surface. The strong stability is typically caused by two factors, (i) the temperature difference between the (melting) snow surface and the near-surface atmosphere and (ii) cold-air pooling in topographic depressions. These factors are almost always a prerequisite for perennial snow fields to exist. For the first time, this contribution investigates the relative importance of the two factors in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Vertical profiles of sensible heat fluxes are measured using two-component hot wire and one-component cold-wire anemometry directly over the melting snow patch. The comparison between a flat snow surface and one that has a depression shows that atmospheric decoupling is strongly increased in the case of topographic sheltering but only for low to moderate wind speeds. For those conditions, the near-surface suppression of turbulent mixing was observed to be strongest and drainage flows were decoupled from the surface enhancing atmospheric stability and promoting the cold-air pooling over the single snow patch. Further work is required to systematically and quantitatively describe the flux distribution for varying terrain geometry, wind speeds and air temperatures.

  1. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) CubeSat Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, C.; Scherliess, L.; Christensen, A. B.; Fish, C. S.; Marchant, A.; McCarthy, D. D.; Sullivan, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) is a recently selected mission in the NSF CubeSat-based Science Missions for Geospace and Atmospheric Research program. The objective of the proposed mission is to understand the thermospheric temperature signatures of the dynamic solar, geomagnetic and internal atmospheric forcing. A student team, supported by professional scientists and engineers will design, build and execute the OPAL Instrument and mission. OPAL will measure lower thermospheric temperatures from 90-140 km altitude by observing the daytime O2 A-band (near 762nm) emission with a high-sensitivity, hyper-spectral limb imager. The instrument will be incorporated into a 3U Colony 2 CubeSat bus provided by the National Reconnaissance Office for launch in late 2015 with mission duration > 8 months. Two critical science questions will be answered: 1. How much do geomagnetic storms alter the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at low- and mid-latitudes? 2. What are the temperature signatures of internal atmospheric waves in the lower thermosphere? The high-latitude region of the thermosphere responds promptly to energy inputs, relatively little is known about the global/regional response to these energy inputs. Global temperatures are predicted to respond within 3-6 hours, but the details of the thermal response of the atmosphere as energy transports away from their high-latitude source region is not well understood. This is the motivation of the OPAL mission to observe the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at low- and mid-latitudes. Wave coupling from lower to higher altitudes in the neutral atmosphere represents key additional pathways for the flow of energy and momentum into the thermosphere. A diverse spectrum of neutral atmospheric waves exists in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region, excited mainly by solar inputs at lower altitudes, and manifest as solar tides, planetary waves and gravity waves. Together

  2. New experience in atmospheric monitoring in Moscow city on the base of WSN technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavin, Alex; Litvinov, Artur; Baskakov, Sergey; Chesalova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this report is to present the gas emission of H2 in the general composition of atmospheric pollution of Moscow city. We start the project at the beginning of 2015 year in two Moscow academicals organization -Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry and Moscow Geological State Museum. One place is in the center of Moscow, near the Kremlin and other one is in the most clear zone of Moscow - Moscow State University place, Vorobyevy Mountains (high point of Moscow). We plan to compare these regions by the concentration of H2 and other gases (CH4, SO2) for green gas pollution. Application network of monitoring is composed of gas sensors (H2, CH4), complex autonomous equipment for measurement temperature, pressure, humidity and network of telecommunications (used ZigBee protocol). Our project offer the technical solutions for monitoring network on the base of WSN (wireless sensor network) technology and the high-sensitive sensors of hydrogen and methane, software and electronic equipment with a transmitter network. This work is the first project in Russia. Gas sensors for monitoring system were developed on the base of MIS-structures (metal-insulator-semiconductor). MIS-sensors are suitable for measuring the concentrations of the following gases: hydrogen, hydrogen sulphide, nitrogen dioxide, ethylmercaptan, chlorine and ammonia. The basis of the sensor is MIS - structure Pd-Ta2O5-SiO2-Si,), which capacitance changes when reaction with gases occurs. The sensor fabrication technology is based on the microelectronics device fabrication technologies and the thin film laser deposition technique. Sensor can be used for measuring the concentration of any gas among noted before, in ambient temperature range -30..+40°C and RH 30-90% (30°C).Three gas sensors with analog interface were made for our experimental monitoring system. Original calibration was made using calibration by special standard mixture of H2 and atmosphere. There are 10-15 points

  3. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment: quantification of the near-infrared water vapor continuum from atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Andreas; Sussmann, Ralf; Rettinger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Inaccuracies in the description of atmospheric radiative processes are among the major shortcomings of current climate models. Especially the contribution by water vapor, the primary greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere, currently still lacks sufficiently accurate quantification. The main focus of our study is on the so-called water vapor continuum absorption in the near-infrared spectral range, which is of crucial importance for atmospheric radiative processes. To date, the quantification of this contribution originates exclusively from laboratory experiments which show contradictory results and whose findings are not unambiguously transferable to atmospheric conditions. The aim of the Zugspitze radiative closure study is therefore to obtain, to our knowledge for the first time, an exact characterization of the near-infrared water vapor continuum absorption using atmospheric measurements. This enables validation and, if necessary, improvements of the radiative transfer codes used in current climate models. The closure experiment comprises near-infrared spectral radiance measurements using a solar absorption FTIR spectrometer. These measurements are then compared to synthetic radiance spectra computed by means of a high-resolution radiative transfer model. The spectral residuals, i.e. the difference between measured and calculated spectral radiances can then be used to quantify errors in the description of water vapor absorption. Due to the extensive permanent instrumentation available at the Zugspitze observatory, the atmospheric state used as an input to the model calculations can be constrained with high accuracy. Additionally, we employ a novel radiometric calibration strategy for the solar FTIR spectral radiance measurements based on a combination of the Langley method and measurements of a medium-temperature blackbody source. These prerequisites enable accurate quantification of the water vapor continuum in the near-infrared spectral region, where

  4. Snow Study at Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments: Variability of snow fall velocity, density and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil

    In this work, snow data, collected at the Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE) site during the winter of 2005/06 as part of the Canadian CALIPSO/CloudSat Validation Project (C3VP) were analyzed with various goals in mind: 1) investigate the effects of surface temperature and system depth on the snow fall velocity and particle size . . distribution, 2) find the variables that control the relationships between snow fall velocity and size (control variables), 3) retrieve the coefficient and the exponent in the power-law mass-size relations used in snow reflectivity, 4) estimate vertical air motion and 5) describe the shape of snowflakes that can be used in polarimetric studies of snow. It also includes considerable calibration work on the Hydrometeor Velocity and Shape Detector (HVSD); as well as sensitivity testing for radar calibration and Mie-scattering effect on snow density. Snow events were classified into several categories according to the radar echo vertical extent (H), surface and echo top temperatures (T s, Tt), to find their effects on snow fall velocity and particle size distribution. Several case studies, including situations of strong turbulence, were also examined. Simple and multiple correlation analyses between control variables and parameters of the power-law size-velocity relationship were carried out for 13 snow cases having a high R2 between their mean snowflakes fall velocity and the v-D fitted curve, in order to find the control variables of power-law v-D relations. Those cases were all characterized by single layered precipitation with different echo depth, surface and echo top temperatures. Results show that the exponent "b" in v-D power-law relationship has little effect on the variability of snow fall velocity; all control variables (T s, Tt, H) correlate much better to the coefficient "a" than to the exponent "b", leading to a snow fall velocity that can be simulated with a varying coefficient "a" and a fixed exponent "b" (v

  5. Studies of the differential absorption rocket experiment. [to measure atmospheric electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginther, J. C.; Smith, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations of the ionosphere, in the rocket program of the Aeronomy Laboratory, include a propagation experiment, the data from which may be analyzed in several modes. This report considers in detail the differential absorption experiment. The sources of error and limitations of sensitivity are discussed. Methods of enhancing the performance of the experiment are described. Some changes have been made in the system and the improvement demonstrated. Suggestions are made for further development of the experiment.

  6. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  7. Preliminary experiment requirements document for Solar and Terrestrial Atmospheres Spectrometer (STAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The principal scientific objective of the Solar and Terrestrial Atmospheres Spectrometer (STAS) project is the measurement of the absolute ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance with: (1) resolution of better than 15 mA, and (2) absolute irradiance uncertainty at the state of the art (less than or equal to 3%). High measurement accuracy coupled with high spectral resolution are necessary to identify the nature of the radiation, its variability, and to identify solar processes which may cause the changes. Solar radiation between 1200 and 3600 A dominates the photochemistry of the mesosphere and stratosphere. Some important minor species, such as NO, show very complex and fundamentally narrow structure in their photodestruction cross sections, especially in the region of the Schumann-Runge bands of O2. Understanding the photochemical processes in the terrestrial atmosphere requires knowledge of both the cross sections and of the solar spectrum with the highest possible resolution and accuracy.

  8. VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) simulation experiment for a severe storm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L. W.; Mostek, A.

    1981-01-01

    Radiance fields were simulated for prethunderstorm environments in Oklahoma to demonstrate three points: (1) significant moisture gradients can be seen directly in images of the VISSIR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) channels; (2) temperature and moisture profiles can be retrieved from VAS radiances with sufficient accuracy to be useful for mesoscale analysis of a severe storm environment; and (3) the quality of VAS mesoscale soundings improves with conditioning by local weather statistics. The results represent the optimum retrievability of mesoscale information from VAS radiance without the use of ancillary data. The simulations suggest that VAS data will yield the best soundings when a human being classifies the scene, picks relatively clear areas for retrieval, and applies a "local" statistical data base to resolve the ambiguities of satellite observations in favor of the most probable atmospheric structure.

  9. Detonation propulsion experiments and theory. [for spacecraft in high pressure planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Dowler, W. L.; Varsi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Test data are presented for the use of a single detonation of explosives in long-cone, short-cone, straight, and firing-plug nozzles to provide propulsion in a simulated Jupiter atmosphere, as well as the ambient gases N, CO2 and He. The long-cone nozzle yielded a progressive increase with ambient pressure for the higher molecular weight gases CO2 and N, while the lower molecular weight He and simulated Jupiter atmosphere showed a specific pulse decrease with increasing ambient pressure. The short-plug nozzle yielded a small specific impulse reduction with increasing ambient pressure, and its results were found to be nearly independent of ambient gas molecular weight. All data gathered are analyzed by using first principles, approximate blast wave theory predictions, and two-dimensional numerical calculations. Rarefaction and oscillatory wave phenomena are found to significantly influence specific impulse.

  10. An overview of the regional experiments for land-atmosphere exchanges 2012 (REFLEX 2012) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Wim; Van der Tol, Christiaan; Timmermans, Joris; Ucer, Murat; Chen, Xuelong; Alonso, Luis; Moreno, Jose; Carrara, Arnaud; Lopez, Ramon; de la Cruz Tercero, Fernando; Corcoles, Horacio L.; de Miguel, Eduardo; Sanchez, Jose A. G.; Pérez, Irene; Franch, Belen; Munoz, Juan-Carlos J.; Skokovic, Drazen; Sobrino, Jose; Soria, Guillem; MacArthur, Alasdair; Vescovo, Loris; Reusen, Ils; Andreu, Ana; Burkart, Andreas; Cilia, Chiara; Contreras, Sergio; Corbari, Chiara; Calleja, Javier F.; Guzinski, Radoslaw; Hellmann, Christine; Herrmann, Ittai; Kerr, Gregoire; Lazar, Adina-Laura; Leutner, Benjamin; Mendiguren, Gorka; Nasilowska, Sylwia; Nieto, Hector; Pachego-Labrador, Javier; Pulanekar, Survana; Raj, Rahul; Schikling, Anke; Siegmann, Bastian; von Bueren, Stefanie; Su, Zhongbo (Bob)

    2014-12-01

    The REFLEX 2012 campaign was initiated as part of a training course on the organization of an airborne campaign to support advancement of the understanding of land-atmosphere interaction processes. This article describes the campaign, its objectives and observations, remote as well as in situ. The observations took place at the experimental Las Tiesas farm in an agricultural area in the south of Spain. During the period of ten days, measurements were made to capture the main processes controlling the local and regional land-atmosphere exchanges. Apart from multi-temporal, multi-directional and multi-spatial space-borne and airborne observations, measurements of the local meteorology, energy fluxes, soil temperature profiles, soil moisture profiles, surface temperature, canopy structure as well as leaf-level measurements were carried out. Additional thermo-dynamical monitoring took place at selected sites. After presenting the different types of measurements, some examples are given to illustrate the potential of the observations made.

  11. An Overview of the Regional Experiments for Land-Atmosphere Exchanges 2012 (Reflex 2012) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Wim J.; Tol, Christiaan van der; Timmermans, Joris; Ucer, Murat; Chen, Xuelong; Alonso, Luis; Moreno, Jose; Carrara, Arnaud; Lopez, Ramon; de la Cruz Tercero, Fernando; Corcoles, Horacio L.; De Miguel, Eduardo; Sanchez, Jose A. G.; Pérez, Irene; Franch, Belen; Munoz, Juan-Carlos J.; Skokovic, Drazen; Sobrino, Jose; Soria, Guillem; MacArthur, Alasdair; Vescovo, Loris; Reusen, Ils; Andreu, Ana; Burkart, Andreas; Cilia, Chiara; Contreras, Sergio; Corbari, Chiara; Calleja, Javier F.; Guzinski, Radoslaw; Hellmann, Christine; Herrmann, Ittai; Kerr, Gregoire; Lazar, Adina-Laura; Leutner, Benjamin; Mendiguren, Gorka; Nasilowska, Sylwia; Nieto, Hector; Pachego-Labrador, Javier; Pulanekar, Survana; Raj, Rahul; Schikling, Anke; Siegmann, Bastian; von Bueren, Stefanie; Su, Zhongbo

    2015-12-01

    The REFLEX 2012 campaign was initiated as part of a training course on the organization of an airborne campaign to support advancement of the understanding of land-atmosphere interaction processes. This article describes the campaign, its objectives and observations, remote as well as in situ. The observations took place at the experimental Las Tiesas farm in an agricultural area in the south of Spain. During the period of ten days, measurements were made to capture the main processes controlling the local and regional land-atmosphere exchanges. Apart from multi-temporal, multi-directional and multi-spatial space-borne and airborne observations, measurements of the local meteorology, energy fluxes, soil temperature profiles, soil moisture profiles, surface temperature, canopy structure as well as leaf-level measurements were carried out. Additional thermo-dynamical monitoring took place at selected sites. After presenting the different types of measurements, some examples are given to illustrate the potential of the observations made.

  12. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) CubeSat Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppesen, M.; Miller, J.; Cox, W.; Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, C.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Scherliess, L.; Christensen, A. B.; Cleave, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's lower thermosphere is an important interface region between the neutral atmosphere and the "space weather" environment. While the high-latitude region of the thermosphere responds promptly to energy inputs, relatively little is known about the global/regional response to these energy inputs. Global temperatures are predicted to respond within 3-6 hours, but the details of the thermal response of the atmosphere as energy transports away from high-latitude source regions is not well understood. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) mission aims to characterize this thermal response through observation of the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at mid- and low-latitudes. The OPAL instrument is designed to map global thermospheric temperature variability over the critical "thermospheric gap" region (~100-140 km altitude) by spectroscopic analysis of molecular oxygen A-band emission (758 - 768 nm). The OPAL instrument is a grating-based imaging spectrometer with refractive optics and a high-efficiency volume holographic grating (VHG). The scene is sampled by 7 parallel slits that form non-overlapping spectral profiles at the focal plane with resolution of 0.5 nm (spectral), 1.5 km (limb profiling), and 60 km (horizontal sampling). A CCD camera at the instrument focal plane delivers low noise and high sensitivity. The instrument is designed to strongly reject stray light from daylight regions of the earth. The OPAL mission is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) CubeSat-based Science Missions for Geospace and Atmospheric Research program. The OPAL instrument, CubeSat bus and mission are being designed, built and executed by a team comprised of students and professors from Utah State University, Dixie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, with support from professional scientists and engineers from the Space Dynamics Laboratory and Hawk Institute for Space Science.

  13. Astronomical and Atmospheric Spectroscopy in the SMM/THz: Experiments, Analysis, and Catalogs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    For many years the needs of the astronomical and atmospheric science communities have directly or indirectly motivated much of the work at this symposium. Interestingly, the power and sophistication of the field instruments have grown at such a rate that the needs for laboratory data seem to be diverging rather than converging. The central role played by catalogs will be discussed, as well as their impact on the spectroscopic community.

  14. Minor constituents in the Martian atmosphere from the ISM/Phobos experiment.

    PubMed

    Rosenqvist, J; Drossart, P; Combes, M; Encrenaz, T; Lellouch, E; Bibring, J P; Erard, S; Langevin, Y; Chassefiere, E

    1992-08-01

    Global Martian atmospheric results derived from the infrared imaging spectrometer ISM flown aboard the Phobos 2 Soviet spacecraft are presented. Over low altitude regions the expected CO mixing ratio of (8 +/- 3) x 10(-4) is measured. Variations of the 2.35-micrometers feature are inconsistent with this value over the Great Martian Volcanoes. If the 2.35-micrometers band is entirely attributable to carbon monoxide, the CO mixing ratio is typically depleted by a factor of 3 over these high altitude areas. Orography should play a major role in the existence of this CO "hole." If, however, these spectral variations at 2.35 micrometers are due to the surface composition, the fraction of the surface covered by the responsible mineral must smoothly decrease as the surface elevation decreases. This phenomenon implies a strong interaction between the surface and the atmosphere for the Great Martian Volcanoes. Diurnal behavior and latitudinal variations of water vapor are globally consistent with Viking measurements. During the Phobos observations, the water vapor amounts over the bright equatorial regions range around 11 pr-micrometers during the day. These amounts are slightly larger than those inferred from 1976 to 1979. The lack of global dust storms during 1988-1989 could explain the enhancement of H2O in the atmosphere. PMID:11539361

  15. Sampling of ions at atmospheric pressure: ion transmission and ion energy studied by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, Simon; Hübner, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry of ions from atmospheric pressure plasmas is a challenging diagnostic method that has been applied to a large variety of cold plasma sources in the past. However, absolute densities can usually not be obtained, moreover, the process of sampling of ions and neutrals from such a plasma inherently influences the measured composition. These issues are studied in this contribution by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Different numerical domains are sequentially coupled to calculate the ion transmission from the source to the mass analyzer. It is found that the energy of the sampled ions created by a radio-frequency microplasma operated in a He-N2 mixture at atmospheric pressure is of the order of 0.1 eV and that it depends linearly on the ion mass in good agreement with the expectation for seeded particles accelerated in a supersonic expansion. Moreover, the measured ion energy distribution from an afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma can be reproduced on basis of the particle trajectories in the sampling system. Eventually, an estimation of the absolute flux of ions to the detector is deduced.

  16. Early Dust Storm Season Thermal State of the Martian Atmosphere - Latest Results from the Horizon Science Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Murphy, J. R.

    1999-09-01

    The Horizon Science Experiment (HORSE) uses the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly on the MGS orbiter to measure 15 micrometer band thermal emission from the middle Martian atmosphere. Since mapping began in March 1999, data acquisition has been continuous, with 12 orbits/day providing rapid longitudinal coverage. The instrument's four quadrants aligned orthogonally on the Martian limb provide important coverage in local time; two quadrants fore and aft give redundant sampling of the ground track, while the other two sample +/- 1.4 hrs in local time at the equator. Equator crossing is nominally at 3 AM and 3 PM. This coverage of six local times per day for most of the planet means that the MHSA is well suited to detect diurnal temperature variations, including the semidiurnal tidal mode, which is particularly sensitive to the presence of atmospheric dust. We report recent results on the global thermal state; specific dust events; diurnal behavior; and other wavelike phenomena.

  17. Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft, and surface data during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Minnis, Patrick; Pope, Shelly K.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bush, Brett C.; Doelling, David R.; Smith, William L. Jr.; Dong, Xiquan

    2000-02-27

    Data sets acquired during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) using simultaneous measurements from five independent platforms (GOES 8 geostationary satellite, ER-2, Egrett and Twin Otter aircraft, and surface) are analyzed and compared. A consistent data set can be built for selected days during ARESE on the basis of the observations from these platforms. The GOES 8 albedos agree with the ER 2, Egrett, and Twin Otter measured instantaneous albedos within 0.013{+-}0.016, 0.018{+-}0.032, and 0.006{+-}0.011, respectively. It is found that for heavy overcast conditions the aircraft measurements yield an absorptance of 0.32{+-}0.03 for the layer between the aircraft (0.5-13 km), while the GOES 8 albedo versus surface transmittance analysis gives an absorptance of 0.33{+-}0.04 for the total atmosphere (surface to top). The absorptance of solar radiation estimated by model calculations for overcast conditions varies between 0.16 and 0.24, depending on the model used and on cloud and aerosol implementation. These results are in general agreement with recent findings for cloudy skies, but here a data set that brings together independent simultaneous observations (satellite, surface, and aircraft) is used. Previous ARESE results are reexamined in light of the new findings, and it is concluded that the overcast absorptance in the 0.224-0.68 {mu}m spectral region ranges between 0.04{+-}0.06 and 0.08{+-}0.06, depending on the particular case analyzed. No evidence of excess clear-sky absorption beyond model and experimental errors is found. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  18. Atmospheric response in aurora experiment: Observations of E and F region neutral winds in a region of postmidnight diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.; Marshall, T. R.; Mikkelsen, I. S.; Emery, B. A.; Christensen, A.; Kayser, D.; Hecht, J.; Lyons, L.; Walterscheid, R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Atmospheric Response in Aurora (ARIA) experiment carried out at Poker Flat, Alaska, on March 3, 1992, was to determine the response of the neutral atmosphere to the long-lived, large-scale forcing that is characteristic of the diffuse aurora in the post midnight sector. A combination of chemical release rocket wind measurements, instrumented rocket composition measurements, and ground-based optical measurements were used to characterize the response of the neutral atmosphere. The rocket measurements were made at the end of a 90-min period of strong Joule heating. We focus on the neutral wind measurements made with the rocket. The forcing was determined by running the assimilated mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) analysis procedure developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The winds expected at the latitude and longitude of the experiment were calculated using the spectral thermospheric general circulation model developed at the Danish Meteorological Institute. Comparisons of the observations and the model suggest that the neutral winds responded strongly in two height ranges. An eastward wind perturbation of approximately 100 m/s developed between 140 and 200 km altitude with a peak near 160 km. A southwestward wind with peak magnitude of approximately 150 m/s developed near 115 km altitude. The large amplitude winds at the lower altitude are particularly surprising. They appear to be associated with the upward propagating semidiurnal tide. However, the amplitude is much larger than predicted by any of the tidal models, and the shear found just below the peak in the winds was nominally unstable with a Richardson number of approximately 0.08.

  19. Initial Mars Upper Atmospheric Structure Results from the Accelerometer Science Experiment aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bougher, S. W.; Theriot, M. E.; Tolson, R. H.; Blanchard, R. C.; Zurek, R. W.; Forbes, J. M.; Murphy, J.

    2006-12-01

    Designed for aerobraking, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006, and successfully completed aerobraking on August 30, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude was fine tuned to the density surface that safely used the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 445 orbits, providing 890 vertical structures. MRO periapsis precesses from near the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis is brought dramatically from 40,000km at MOI to 480 km at aerobraking completion (ABX). Without aerobraking this would have required an additional 400kg of fuel. After ABX, two small propulsive orbital adjustment maneuvers September 5, 2006 and September 11, 2006 established the final Primary Science Orbit (PSO). Each of the 445 aerobraking orbits provides, a pair of vertical structures inbound toward periapsis and outbound from periapsis, with a distribution of density, scale heights, temperatures, and pressures along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (> 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: Where did the water go? Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extends vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both the lower atmosphere and the upper atmosphere, thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from

  20. La Section 17 du Comité National de la Recherche Scientifique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelin, M.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution presents the section 17 of the ``Comité National de la Recherche Scientifique" and its activity. Since it concerns mostly French researchers and researchers from French institutes, the rest of the contribution is provided in French language.

  1. Three atmospheric dispersion experiments involving oil fog plumes measured by lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, W. L.; Mcnice, G. T.; Troxel, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Lab. participated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in a series of experiments with the goal of developing and validating dispersion models that perform substantially better that models currently available. The lidar systems deployed and the data processing procedures used in these experiments are briefly described. Highlights are presented of conclusions drawn thus far from the lidar data.

  2. Experiments in monthly mean simulation of the atmosphere with a coarse-mesh general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, R. J.; Spar, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Hansen atmospheric model was used to compute five monthly forecasts (October 1976 through February 1977). The comparison is based on an energetics analysis, meridional and vertical profiles, error statistics, and prognostic and observed mean maps. The monthly mean model simulations suffer from several defects. There is, in general, no skill in the simulation of the monthly mean sea-level pressure field, and only marginal skill is indicated for the 850 mb temperatures and 500 mb heights. The coarse-mesh model appears to generate a less satisfactory monthly mean simulation than the finer mesh GISS model.

  3. Natural variability of tropical upper stratospheric ozone inferred from the Atmosphere Explorer backscatter ultraviolet experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Abrams, R. B.; Dasgupta, R.; Guenther, B.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of backscattered ultraviolet radiances observed at tropical latitudes by the Atmosphere Explorer-E satellite reveals both annual and semiannual cycles in upper stratospheric ozone. The annual variation dominates the signal at wavelengths which sense ozone primarily above 45 km while below this, to the lowest altitude sensed, 35 km, the semiannual component has comparable amplitude. Comparison of radiance measurements taken with the same instrument at solar minimum during 1976 and solar maximum in 1979 show no significant differences. This suggests that variations in upper stratospheric ozone over the solar cycle are small, although the data presently available do not allow a definite conclusion.

  4. The atmospheric inventory of Xenon and noble cases in shales The plastic bag experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Honda, M.; Kramer, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    A novel trapped gas analysis protocol is applied to five shales in which the samples are sealed in air to eliminate the possibility of gas loss in the preanalysis laboratory vacuum exposure of a conventional protocol. The test is aimed at a determination concerning the hypothesis that atmospheric noble gases occur in the same proportion as planetary gases in meteorites, and that the factor-of-23 deficiency of air Xe relative to planetary Xe is made up by Xe stored in shales or other sedimentary rocks. The results obtained do not support the shale hypothesis.

  5. The Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Experiment: Deployment on the ATLAS Space Shuttle Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunson, M. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Allen, M.; Brown, L. R.; Brown, T. L.; Chang, A. Y.; Goldman, A.; Irion, F. W.; Lowes, L. L..; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Stiller, G. P.; Toon, G. C.; Yung, Y. L.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    The ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer was flown for a fourth time on the Space Shuttle as part of the ATLAS-3 instrument payload in November 1994. More than 190 sunrise and sunset occultation events provided measurements of more than 30 atmospheric trace gases at latitudes 3 - 49 deg N and 65 - 72 deg S, including observations both inside and outside the Antarctic polar vortex. The instrument configuration, data retrieval methodology, and mission background are described to place in context analyses of ATMOS data presented in this issue.

  6. Numerical experiments on short-term meteorological effects of solar variability. [earth atmosphere model considering solar luminosity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Hansen, J. E.; Stone, P. H.; Quirk, W. J.; Lacis, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Set of numerical experiments has been carried out to test the short range sensitivity of a large atmospheric general circulation model to changes in solar constant and ozone amount. On the basis of the results of 12-day integrations with very large variations in these parameters, it is concluded that realistic variations would produce insignificant meteorological effects. Thus any causal relationships between solar variability and weather, for time scales of two weeks or less, will have to rely upon changes in parameters other than solar constant or ozone amounts, or upon mechanisms not yet incorporated in the model.

  7. Investigation of the external flow analysis for density measurements at high altitude. [shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienkowski, G. K.

    1983-01-01

    A Monte Carlo program was developed for modeling the flow field around the space shuttle in the vicinity of the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer experiment. The operation of the EXTERNAL code is summarized. Issues associated with geometric modeling of the shuttle nose region and the modeling of intermolecular collisions including rotational energy exchange are discussed as well as a preliminary analysis of vibrational excitation and dissociation effects. The selection of trial runs is described and the parameters used for them is justified. The original version and the modified INTERNAL code for the entrance problem are reviewed. The code listing is included.

  8. COOP 3D ARPA Experiment 109 National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Coupled atmospheric and hydrodynamic forecast models were executed on the supercomputing resources of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado and the Ohio Supercomputing Center (OSC)in Columbus, Ohio. respectively. The interoperation of the forecast models on these geographically diverse, high performance Cray platforms required the transfer of large three dimensional data sets at very high information rates. High capacity, terrestrial fiber optic transmission system technologies were integrated with those of an experimental high speed communications satellite in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) to test the integration of the two systems. Operation over a spacecraft in GEO orbit required modification of the standard configuration of legacy data communications protocols to facilitate their ability to perform efficiently in the changing environment characteristic of a hybrid network. The success of this performance tuning enabled the use of such an architecture to facilitate high data rate, fiber optic quality data communications between high performance systems not accessible to standard terrestrial fiber transmission systems. Thus obviating the performance degradation often found in contemporary earth/satellite hybrids.

  9. Geographical, biological and remote sensing aspects of the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel (HAPEX-Sahel)

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, S.D.; Kerr, Y.H.; Goutorbe, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    HAPEX Sahel (Hydrological Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel) was an international program focused on the soil-plant-atmosphere energy, water and carbon balance in the west African Sahel. It was intended to improve their understanding of the interaction between the Sahel and the general atmospheric circulation, both at present and in the future, providing a base line for studies of climate change. It was carried out in a 1{degree} x 1{degree} area of west Niger over a 3--4 year period with an 8-week intensive observation period from August to October 1992. HAPEX-Sahel was funded by a wise range of agencies in seven participating countries. Over 170 scientists visited and worked in the field. An interdisciplinary approach was adopted with contributed studies in hydrology and soil moisture, surface fluxes and vegetation, remote sensing science, and meteorology and mesoscale modeling. Detailed field measurements were concentrated at 3 ``supersites`` and 3 ancillary sites. Four aircraft were used for remote sensing and flux measurement. Observations from space were acquired from nine sensors on seven different satellite platforms. Conditions in 1992 turned out to be average for the last decade with good gradients of precipitation and a variety of vegetation productivities between the study sites. An information system has been established to provide a data base to disseminate the measurements. An active program of meetings, workshops, and interdisciplinary studies is now in progress.

  10. Sulfur in the Early Martian Atmosphere Revisited: Experiments with a 3-D Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L.; Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.

    2013-09-01

    Data returned from the surface of Mars during the 1970s revealed intriguing geological evidence for a warmer and wetter early martian climate. Dendritic valley networks were discovered by Mariner 9 on ancient Noachian terrain [1], indicating that liquid water had flowed across the surface in the distant past. Since this time, geological investigations into early Martian history have attempted to ascertain the nature and level of activity of the early Martian hydrological cycle [e.g. 2-5] while atmospheric modeling efforts have focused on how the atmosphere could be warmed to temperatures great enough to sustain such activity [see 6-7 for reviews]. Geological and spectroscopic investigations have refined the history and chronology of Noachian Mars over time, and circulation of liquid water has been invoked to explain several spatially and temporally distinct morphological and chemical signatures found in the geological record. Detections of iron and magnesium-rich clays are widespread in the oldest Martian terrains, suggesting a period of pH-neutral aqueous alteration [e.g., 8]. Valley network incision also took place during the Noachian period [9]. Some chains of river valleys and craters lakes extend for thousands of kilometers, suggesting temperatures at least clement enough for sustained ice-covered flow [3,10]. The commencement of valley network incision is not well constrained, but the period of Mg/Fe clay formation appears to have ended before the termination of valley network formation, as the visible fluvial systems appear to have remobilized existing clays rather than forming them [5,8]. There is also evidence that the cessation of valley network formation was abrupt [11]. Towards the end of the Noachian, erosion rates appear to have been significantly higher than during subsequent periods, a process that has also been attributed to aqueous processes [12]. A period of sulfate formation followed, likely characterized by acidic, evaporitic playa environments

  11. Atmospheric turbulence in urban environments: large-eddy simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertwig, D.; Nguyen van yen, R.; Patnaik, G.; Leitl, B.

    2012-04-01

    The description of atmospheric turbulence in densely built urban environments is a major theoretical challenge, which has wide-ranging practical implications - regarding for example pollutant dispersion, wind comfort, and many other micro-climatic issues. The traditional approach to adopt obstacle-resolving micro-scale meteorological models based on Reynolds-averaged equations is strongly limited by its inherent inability to provide spatio-temporal data. Although more advanced models, such as large-eddy simulation (LES), are now technically applicable to this problem, the precise validation of their output is still a matter of ongoing investigation, which is particularly challenging due to the time-dependent nature of the problem. In this work, we undertake a systematic comparison between results of urban LES computations and boundary-layer wind-tunnel measurements of turbulent flow in the inner city of Hamburg, Germany. The experimental data were acquired for neutral atmospheric stratification within an urban model on a scale of 1:350, under well-defined and documented boundary constraints. Background information about the atmospheric inflow conditions for both the physical and numerical model was deduced from suburban field site measurements. LES computations were conducted by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory using the code FAST3D-CT that is based on the monotone integrated LES methodology (MILES). The validation focuses on the comparison of time-series information and the characterization of turbulent flow structures within and above the urban canopy. Densely spaced measurements in vertical profiles and horizontal flow layers allow for the investigation of the urban boundary-layer development across the city. Typical obstacle-induced urban flow scenarios provide further test cases for detailed analyses. Besides mean flow and turbulence statistics, velocity histograms, fluctuation time scales, spectral information and statistics of the Reynolds stress

  12. The seasonal and global behavior of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere - Complete global results of the Viking atmospheric water detector experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A key question regarding the evolution of Mars is related to the behavior of its volatiles. The present investigation is concerned with the global and seasonal abundances of water vapor in the Mars atmosphere as mapped by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector (MAWD) instrument for almost 1-1/2 Martian years from June 1976 to April 1979. Attention is given to the implications of the observed variations for determining the relative importance of those processes which may be controlling the vapor cycle on a seasonal basis. The processes considered include buffering of the atmosphere water by a surface or subsurface reservior of ground ice, physically adsorbed water, or chemically bound water. Other processes are related to the supply of water from the residual or seasonal north polar ice cap, the redistribution of the vapor resulting from atmospheric circulation, and control of the vapor holding capacity of the atmosphere by the local atmospheric temperatures.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

  14. Data for first NASA Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 1). Part 1: Data tabulation. [rawindsonde data for eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.; Smith, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    A tablulation is given of rawinsonde data for NASA's first Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 1) conducted during the period February 19-22, 1964. Methods of data handling and processing, and estimates of error magnitudes are also given. Data taken on the AVE 1 project in 1964 enabled an analysis of a large sector of the eastern United States on a fine resolution time scale. This experiment was run in February 1964, and data were collected as a wave developed in the East Gulf on a frontal system which extended through the eastern part of the United States. The primary objective of AVE 1 was to investigate the variability of parameters in space and over time intervals of three hours, and to integrate the results into NASA programs which require this type of information. The results presented are those from one approach, and represent only a portion of the total research effort that can be accomplished.

  15. Effects of a Total Solar Eclipse on the Mesoscale Atmospheric Circulation over Europe - A Model Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, P.; Hense, A.

    On August the 11th, 1999 Central Europe saw a spectacular astronomical event, a total solar eclipse. We present a model study concerning the meteorological effects of this eclipse in central Europe using the state-of-the-art limited area forecast model Deutschland-Modell DM from the German Weather Service DWD. Under typical summer radiation conditions very strong anomalies in the surface energy flux and temperature in screen height are simulated. The main temperature signal in the lower troposphere is delayed by about one hour with respect to the surface. Furthermore it is connected with a well defined dynamical signal which is reminiscent to a large scale land - sea circulation. The event could be used as a test case for mesoscale atmospheric models.

  16. The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) experiment on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Edlow, K. L.; Floyd, L. E., IV; Lean, J. L.; Vanhoosier, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements in 1978, when NASA requested proposals for a new generation of solar ultraviolet monitors to be flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), is described. To overcome the radiometric uncertainties that plagued the measurements at this time, the solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) instrument design included in-flight calibration light sources and multichannel photometers. Both are aimed at achieving a maximum precision of the SUSIM measurements over a long period of time, e.g., one solar cycle. The design of the SUSIM-UARS instrument is compared with the original design specifications for the UARS instruments. Details including optical train, filters, detectors, and contamination precautions are described. Also discussed are the SUSIM-UARS preflight calibration and characterization, as well as the results of the inflight performance of the instrument during the first 3 months of operation. Finally, flight operations, observation strategy, and data reduction schemes are outlined.

  17. Assumption Centred Modelling of Ecosystem Responses to CO2 at Six US Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. P.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Medlyn, B. E.; Zaehle, S.; Luus, K. A.; Ryan, E.; Xia, J.; Norby, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Plant photosynthetic rates increase and stomatal apertures decrease in response to elevated atmospheric CO[2] (eCO2), increasing both plant carbon (C) availability and water use efficiency. These physiological responses to eCO2 are well characterised and understood, however the ecological effects of these responses as they cascade through a suite of plant and ecosystem processes are complex and subject to multiple interactions and feedbacks. Therefore the response of the terrestrial carbon sink to increasing atmospheric CO[2] remains the largest uncertainty in global C cycle modelling to date, and is a huge contributor to uncertainty in climate change projections. Phase 2 of the FACE Model-Data Synthesis (FACE-MDS) project synthesises ecosystem observations from five long-term Free-Air CO[2] Enrichment (FACE) experiments and one open top chamber (OTC) experiment to evaluate the assumptions of a suite of terrestrial ecosystem models. The experiments are: The evergreen needleleaf Duke Forest FACE (NC), the deciduous broadleaf Oak Ridge FACE (TN), the prairie heating and FACE (WY), and the Nevada desert FACE, and the evergreen scrub oak OTC (FL). An assumption centered approach is being used to analyse: the interaction between eCO2 and water limitation on plant productivity; the interaction between eCO2 and temperature on plant productivity; whether increased rates of soil decomposition observed in many eCO2 experiments can account for model deficiencies in N uptake shown during Phase 1 of the FACE-MDS; and tracing carbon through the ecosystem to identify the exact cause of changes in ecosystem C storage.

  18. Moisture dynamics in the cloudy and polluted tropical atmosphere: The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Dynamics Experiment (CARDEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Thomas, R. M.; Praveen, P. S.; Pistone, K.; Bender, F.; Feng, Y.; Ramanathan, V.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols are well known to modify the microphysical properties of clouds. This modification is expected to yield brighter clouds that cover a greater area. However, observations from satellites show little inter-hemispheric difference in cloud optical thickness and liquid water path in spite of the clear inter-hemispheric difference in aerosol optical thickness. Furthermore, comparisons of observations with global atmospheric models suggest that models that parameterize the mechanisms of aerosol nucleation of cloud drops but do not resolve cloud-scale dynamics may be overestimating the magnitude of aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. Resolving these discrepancies requires a deeper understanding of the factors determining the transport of moisture to the cloud layer and the effects of aerosols on that transport. Towards this goal, we have conducted a new field experiment to study the moisture dynamics in the boundary layer and lower troposphere of the polluted and cloudy tropical atmosphere. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Dynamics Experiment (CARDEX) was conducted during the winter of 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory - Hanimaadhoo in the tropical northern Indian Ocean during the period of extensive outflow of the South Asian pollution. Pollution in the CARDEX region has been well documented to both modify the microphysical properties of low clouds and strongly absorb solar radiation with significant consequences for the lower atmosphere and surface radiative energy budgets. Three unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) flew nearly 60 research flights instrumented to measure turbulent latent and sensible heat fluxes, aerosol concentrations, and cloud microphysical properties. Airborne measurements were enhanced with continuous surface monitoring of surface turbulent heat fluxes, aerosol concentrations and physical properties, surface remote sensing of cloud water amount and aerosol profiles, and model analyses of aerosols and dynamics with WRFchem. This

  19. Scaling water and energy fluxes in climate systems - Three land-atmospheric modeling experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Lakshmi, Venkataraman

    1993-01-01

    Three numerical experiments that investigate the scaling of land-surface processes - either of the inputs or parameters - are reported, and the aggregated processes are compared to the spatially variable case. The first is the aggregation of the hydrologic response in a catchment due to rainfall during a storm event and due to evaporative demands during interstorm periods. The second is the spatial and temporal aggregation of latent heat fluxes, as calculated from SiB. The third is the aggregation of remotely sensed land vegetation and latent and sensible heat fluxes using TM data from the FIFE experiment of 1987 in Kansas. In all three experiments it was found that the surface fluxes and land characteristics can be scaled, and that macroscale models based on effective parameters are sufficient to account for the small-scale heterogeneities investigated.

  20. AMPS data management concepts. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasma in Space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzelaar, P. N.

    1975-01-01

    Five typical AMPS experiments were formulated to allow simulation studies to verify data management concepts. Design studies were conducted to analyze these experiments in terms of the applicable procedures, data processing and displaying functions. Design concepts for AMPS data management system are presented which permit both automatic repetitive measurement sequences and experimenter-controlled step-by-step procedures. Extensive use is made of a cathode ray tube display, the experimenters' alphanumeric keyboard, and the computer. The types of computer software required by the system and the possible choices of control and display procedures available to the experimenter are described for several examples. An electromagnetic wave transmission experiment illustrates the methods used to analyze data processing requirements.

  1. High energy gamma-ray observations of the Crab Nebula and pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oser, Scott Michael

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~1200 m2 has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma- like events from the Crab, with a significance of +6.75σ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was < 5.5% at the 90% confidence level. A subset of the data was used to determine the integral flux of gamma rays from the Crab. We report an energy threshold of Eth = 190 +/- 60 GeV, and a measured integral flux of I(E > Eth) = (2.2 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.2) × 10-10 photons cm-2 s-1. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies.

  2. Feasibility of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) in atmospheric source-receptor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    1984-03-01

    A brief description of the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) system, which includes the tracers and the release equipment, the air samplers and the analyzers, is presented along with details on the research needs to provide a viable system for MATEX-scenario experiments. The present family of 2 viable PFTs needs to be increased to 5 to 6. Given the present precision of the analysis system, a one year long tracer experiment consisting of 4 hour releases every 60 hours from 5 different sites would require nearly 150 metric tons of PFTs at a cost of $15,000,000. Shortcomings in the programmable sampler include the pump, the sampling sequence control flexibility, data storage and retrieval, and the lack of remote communication capability; sampler adsorbent studies are also needed. The analytical system, including the catalyst processing bed, the chromatography column resolution, and the linearity of the detector, is in need of significant improvement. A higher resolution analysis system could significantly reduce analysis time but, more importantly, reduce tracer requirements more than 10-fold, for a cost savings potential of more than $13,000,000. A model is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of tracer material balances. Assessment of earlier long-range tracer experiments indicates the need for possibly 400 ground sampling sites requiring $8 to $14 million worth of samplers for a one-year tracer experiment. As many as six aircraft would be needed to conduct airborne model validation and material balance studies for each tracer plume.

  3. Science objectives and performance of a radiometer and window design for atmospheric entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.; Davy, William C.; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the techniques developed for measuring stagnation-point radiation in NASA's cancelled Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). It specifies the need for such a measurement; the types and requirements for the needed instruments; the Radiative Heating Experiment (RHE) developed for the AFE; the requirements, design parameters, and performance of the window developed for the RHE; the procedures and summary of the technique; and results of the arc-jet wind tunnel experiment conducted to demonstrate the overall concept. Subjects emphasized are the commercial implications of the knowledge to be gained by this experiment in connection with the Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV), the nonequilibrium nature of the radiation, concerns over the contribution of vacuum-ultraviolet radiation to the overall radiation, and the limit on the flight environment of the vehicle imposed by the limitations on the window material. Results show that a technique exists with which the stagnation-point radiation can be measured in flight in an environment of interest to commercial ASTV applications.

  4. Impact of Precession On Monsoon Characteristics From Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braconnot, Pascale; Marti, Olivier

    Precession cycle modulates the seasonal distribution of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere with a periodicity of about 23 kyr. Summer insolation is the largest for periods during which the Earth is near the perihelion of its orbit dur- ing summer. The associated continental warming favours the deepening of the sum- mer thermal low over the Northern Hemisphere continents and the inland advection of moist air from the tropical oceans, strengthening the monsoon activity. Different orbital configurations (precession) can lead to large June-July-August (summer) inso- lation forcing. Amongst these, the maximum insolation can occur between the vernal equinox and the summer solstice or between the summer solstice and the autumnal equinox. Using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model we investigate the response of the Indian and southeast monsoons to changes in precession and we explore the differences between periods where the monsoon activity is strong compared to the period of reference but the seasonal timing of the insolation forcing is different. Our aim is to determine if extreme phases in the seasonal forcing can lead to different signatures in the monsoon response. We focus on the Asian monsoon and on the at- mospheric and oceanic circulation in the Indian Ocean. Our results show that, even though the changes in the land-sea contrast that drives the monsoon flow follows quite well the differences in the insolation forcing, the regional distribution over the con- tinental regions affected by the monsoon and the ocean substantially varies from one simulation to the other. Large differences are found in the simulated surface temper- ature and salinity in the Indian Ocean. They are related to various feedbacks, where the changes in the hydrological cycle over the basin through precipitation, evapora- tion and river runoff play and important role. Our results strongly emphasize that the timing of the seasonal cycle need to be considered in

  5. Shortwave feedbacks and El Nino-Southern Oscillation: Forced ocean coupled ocean-atmosphere experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waliser, Duane E.; Blanke, Bruno; Neelin, J. David; Gautier, C.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in tropical sea surface temperature (SST) can produce changes in cloudiness that modify incoming solar shortwave (SW) radiation, which in turn affects SST. The effects of this negative feedback on Pacific interannual variability are examined in forced ocean model and hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model simulations. Two empirical schemes are used to model the large-scale, low-frequency response of surface SW to SST anomalies. The first scheme attempts to account for the nonlocal nature of the atmospheric response to SST based patterns of covariability analyzed through singular value decomposition. In the observations the primary coupled mode of variability is composed of a SW anomaly in the central Pacific that covaries with anomalous SST in the eastern Pacific. This is applied in the model as a nonlocal feedback. The second scheme examines the effects of a purely local feedback with a spatially varying coefficient of magnitude chosen similar to the first scheme. In almost all cases the second scheme behaved similarly to the first, presumably because the correlation scale of SST is large enough for El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics that there is little sensitivity to the local approximation in the SW feedback. In simulations forced by time series of observed wind stress the SW feedback induced very minor SST damping. Results for a simpified heat budget analysis showed that while the SW feedback increased the local heat flux damping on SST, it also induced a mean shallowing of the mixed layer. The resulting changes in both the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the zonal velocity response to the wind stress acted to oppose the local heat flux damping effects. When the observed SW anomalies were applied to forced simulations, the simulated SST anomalies were modified as expected, and agreement with observed SST improved. In coupled simulations the SW feedbacks had greater impact than in the case of specified stress. The main effects were

  6. Exobiological implications of dust aggregation in planetary atmospheres: An experiment for the gas-grain simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, J. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) will provide a microgravity environment where undesirable environmental effects are reduced, and thus, experiments involving interactions between small particles and grains can be more suitably performed. Slated for flight aboard the Shuttle in 1992, the ESA glovebox will serve as a scientific and technological testbed for GGSF exobiology experiments as well as generating some basic scientific data. Initial glovebox experiments will test a method of generating a stable, mono-dispersed cloud of fine particles using a vibrating sprinkler system. In the absence of gravity and atmospheric turbulence, it will be possible to determine the influence of interparticle forces in controlling the rate and mode of aggregation. The experimental chamber can be purged of suspended matter to enable multiple repetitions of the experiments. Of particular interest will be the number of particles per unit volume of the chamber, because it is suspected that aggregation will occur extremely rapidly if the number exceeds a critical value. All aggregation events will be recorded on high-resolution video film. Changes in the experimental procedure as a result of surprise events will be accompanied by real-time interaction with the mission specialist during the Shuttle flight.

  7. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY-LED VOLUNTEER ATMOSPHERIC HAZE CLINIC IN SINGAPORE.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Benson; Liew, Choon Fong; Oon, Hazel H

    2014-11-01

    The Pollutant Standards Index reached a life-threatening level of 401 in Singapore on 21 June 2013. Grassroot leaders in Ulu Pandan Constituency conducted the first community-led free atmospheric Haze Clinic from 25 June 2013 to 11 July 2013 to provide accessible medical assessment for affected community members. This provided insight into the common conditions afflicting that community during the haze period while allaying public anxiety. Seventy-two consultations were conducted over the 3 week period, of which 26 (36.1%) were haze related, 18 (25%) were possibly haze related and 28 (38.9%) were non-haze related. The majority of haze-related complaints were respiratory, eye and skin-related. During a haze crisis, such adhoc community-led clinics may help alleviate the surge in patients seen at emergency departments and public primary health clinics. Many of the patients seen were from low income families and a significant number (38.9%) sought help for non-haze related medical conditions. PMID:26466431

  8. Transient desorption of water vapor - A potential source of error in upper atmosphere rocket experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.; Weeks, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Results of measurements of the outgassing rates of samples of materials and surface finishes used on the outer skins of rocket-borne experiment packages in simulated rocket ascents. The results showed outgassing rates for anodized aluminum in the second minute of flight which are two to three orders of magnitude higher than those given in typical tables of outgassing rates. The measured rates for aluminum with chromate conversion surface coatings were also abnormally high. These abnormally high initial rates fell quickly after about five to ten minutes to values comparable with those in the published literature. It is concluded that anodized and chromate conversion coatings on the aluminum outer surfaces of a sounding rocket experiment package will cause gross distortion of the true water vapor environment.

  9. Science objectives and performance of a radiometer and window design for atmospheric entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.; Davy, William C.; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiative Heating Experiment, RHE, aboard the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, AFE, (now cancelled) was to make in-situ measurements of the stagnation region shock layer radiation during an aerobraking maneuver from geosynchronous to low earth orbit. The measurements were to provide a data base to help develop and validate aerothermodynamic computational models. Although cancelled, much work was done to develop the science requirements and to successfully meet RHE technical challenges. This paper discusses the RHE scientific objectives and expected science performance of a small sapphire window for the RHE radiometers. The spectral range required was from 170 to 900 nm. The window size was based on radiometer sensitivity requirements including capability of on-orbit solar calibration.

  10. The analysis of the characteristics of the dishpan experiment and the revolving motion of atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gangyi; Xie, Lihui

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we summarize the characteristics of the dishpan experiment, the principle of substance revolving, and the scientific basis of the “retrograde wave in only one direction” with respect to weather data and S. C. OuYang’s articles in which the fundamental questions in the meteorological theory were pointed out. Furthermore, we discuss the systematic changes involving the concept, theory, and method that substance evolves.