Science.gov

Sample records for atmospheric interest cavites

  1. Shockwave and cavitation bubble dynamics of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, S.; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2013-11-01

    The generation and evolution of laser induced shock waves (SWs) and the hot core plasma (HCP) created by focusing 7 ns, 532 nm laser pulses in ambient air is studied using time resolved shadowgraphic imaging technique. The dynamics of rapidly expanding plasma releasing SWs into the ambient atmosphere were studied for time delays ranging from nanoseconds to milliseconds with ns temporal resolution. The SW is observed to get detached from expanding HCP at around 3μs. Though the SWs were found to expand spherically following the Sedov-Taylor theory, the rapidly expanding HCP shows asymmetric expansion during both the expansion and cooling phase similar to that of inertial cavitation bubble (CB) dynamics. The asymmetric expansion of HCP leads to oscillation of the plasma boundary, eventually leading to collapse by forming vortices formed by the interaction of ambient air.

  2. Homogeneous processes of atmospheric interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Barker, J. R.; Golden, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Upper atmospheric research programs in the department of chemical kinetics are reported. Topics discussed include: (1) third-order rate constants of atmospheric importance; (2) a computational study of the HO2 + HO2 and DO2 + DO2 reactions; (3) measurement and estimation of rate constants for modeling reactive systems; (4) kinetics and thermodynamics of ion-molecule association reactions; (5) entropy barriers in ion-molecule reactions; (6) reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO2 yields products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K; (7) very low-pressure photolysis of tert-bytyl nitrite at 248 nm; (8) summary of preliminary data for the photolysis of C1ONO2 and N2O5 at 285 nm; and (9) heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 and H2O.

  3. An Optical Parametric Amplifier for Profiling Gases of Atmospheric Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William (Technical Monitor); Burris, John; Richter, Dale

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a lidar transmitter using an optical parametric amplifier. It is designed for profiling gases of atmospheric interest at high spatial and temporal precision in the near-IR. Discussions on desirable characteristics for such a transmitter with specific reference to the case of CO, are made.

  4. Cavitations induced by plasmas, plasmas induced by cavitations, and plasmas produced in cavitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles are not static bubbles but have dynamics of expansion, shrinkage, and collapse. Since the collapse of a cavitation bubble is roughly an adiabatic process, the inside of the bubble at the collapse has a high temperature and a high pressure, resulting in the production of a plasma. This talk will be focused on cavitation-related plasma phenomena and the role of the cavitation bubble in the synthesis of nanoparticles. A method for inducing a cavitation bubble is laser ablation in liquid. After the disappearance of laser-produced plasma with optical emission, we have observed the formation of a cavitation bubble. We have found that the inside of the cavitation bubble is the reaction field for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The atomic and molecular species ejected from the ablation target toward the liquid are transported into the cavitation bubble, and they condense into nanoparticles inside it. It is important to note that nanoparticles are stored inside the cavitation bubble until its collapse. We have shown that the size and the structure of nanoparticles are controlled by controlling the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles. Another method for inducing cavitation bubbles is to use ultrasonic power. We have found a simple method for the efficient production of standing cavitation bubbles. The method is just inserting a punching metal plate into water irradiated by ultrasonic wave. The depth of water and the position of the punching plate should be tuned precisely. We have proposed the mechanism of the efficient production of cavitation bubbles by this method. Currently, we try to have electric discharges in cavitation bubbles with the intention of realizing nonequilibrium sonochemistry. In particular, the electric discharge in a laser-induced cavitation bubble shows interesting distortion of the bubble shape, which suggests the electrostatic characteristics of the cavitation bubble.

  5. Cavitation pressure in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Eric; Balibar, Sébastien; Caupin, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the limiting mechanical tension (negative pressure) that liquid water can sustain before cavitation occurs. The temperature dependence of this quantity is of special interest for water, where it can be used as a probe of a postulated anomaly of its equation of state. After a brief review of previous experiments on cavitation, we describe our method which consists in focusing a high amplitude sound wave in the bulk liquid, away from any walls. We obtain highly reproducible results, allowing us to study in detail the statistics of cavitation, and to give an accurate definition of the cavitation threshold. Two independent pressure calibrations are performed. The cavitation pressure is found to increase monotonically from -26MPa at 0°C to -17MPa at 80°C . While these values lie among the most negative pressures reported in water, they are still far away from the cavitation pressure expected theoretically and reached in the experiment by Angell and his group [Zheng , Science 254, 829 (1991)] (around -120MPa at 40°C ). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are considered.

  6. Promoting Interests in Atmospheric Science at a Liberal Arts Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, S.; Sherengos, P. M.; Limpasuvan, V.; Xue, M.

    2007-12-01

    Coastal Carolina University (CCU) students in Computer Science participated in a project to set up an operational weather forecast for the local community. The project involved the construction of two computing clusters and the automation of daily forecasting. Funded by NSF-MRI, two high-performance clusters were successfully established to run the University of Oklahoma's Advance Regional Prediction System (ARPS). Daily weather predictions are made over South Carolina and North Carolina at 3-km horizontal resolution (roughly 1.9 miles) using initial and boundary condition data provided by UNIDATA. At this high resolution, the model is cloud- resolving, thus providing detailed picture of heavy thunderstorms and precipitation. Forecast results are displayed on CCU's website (https://marc.coastal.edu/HPC) to complement observations at the National Weather Service in Wilmington N.C. Present efforts include providing forecasts at 1-km resolution (or finer), comparisons with other models like Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and the examination of local phenomena (like water spouts and tornadoes). Through these activities the students learn about shell scripting, cluster operating systems, and web design. More importantly, students are introduced to Atmospheric Science, the processes involved in making weather forecasts, and the interpretation of their forecasts. Simulations generated by the forecasts will be integrated into the contents of CCU's course like Fluid Dynamics, Atmospheric Sciences, Atmospheric Physics, and Remote Sensing. Operated jointly between the departments of Applied Physics and Computer Science, the clusters are expected to be used by CCU faculty and students for future research and inquiry-based projects in Computer Science, Applied Physics, and Marine Science.

  7. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Real-time two-dimensional imaging of microbubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, W. T.; Powers, J. E.; Liu, J.; Drvol, L.; Lof, J.; Everbach, C.; Gao, S.; Xie, F.; Porter, T.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications, including sonothrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (e.g. stable versus inertial forms of cavitation) and intensity in and around a treatment area. Acoustic Passive Cavitation Detectors (PCDs) have been used but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and intensity in a region of interest at a frame rate of 0.6Hz. The system is based on a modified ultrasound scanner (iE33, Philips) with a sector imaging probe (S5-1). Cavitation imaging is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, while noise bands indicate inertial cavitation. The system demonstrates the capability to robustly identify stable and inertial cavitation thresholds of Definity microbubbles (Lantheus) in a vessel phantom through 3 ex-vivo human temporal bones, as well as to spatially map cavitation activities.

  9. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion

  10. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity. PMID:25682465

  11. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation.

  12. The MPI-Mainz UV/VIS Spectral Atlas of Gaseous Molecules of Atmospheric Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Rolf; Keller-Rudek, Hannelore; Moortgat, Geert; Sörensen, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Measurements from satellites can be used to obtain global concentration maps of atmospheric trace constituents. Critical parameters needed in the analysis of the satellite data are the absorption cross sections of the observed molecules. Here, we present the MPI-Mainz UV/VIS Spectral Atlas, which is a large collection of more than 5000 absorption cross section and quantum yield data files in the ultraviolet and visible (UV/VIS) wavelength region for gaseous molecules and radicals primarily of atmospheric interest. The data files contain results of individual measurements, covering research of almost a whole century. To compare and visualize the data sets, multicoloured graphical representations have been created. The Spectral Atlas is available on the internet at http://www.uv-vis-spectral-atlas-mainz.org. It has been completely overhauled and now appears with improved browse and search options, based on PostgreSQL, Django and Python database software. The web pages are continuously updated.

  13. Cavitation milling of natural cellulose to nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Dipak Vitthal; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2010-06-01

    Cavitation holds the promise of a new and exciting approach to fabricate both top down and bottom up nanostructures. Cavitation bubbles are created when a liquid boils under less than atmospheric pressure. The collapse process occurs supersonically and generates a host of physical and chemical effects. We have made an attempt to fabricate natural cellulose material using hydrodynamic as well as acoustic cavitation. The cellulose material having initial size of 63 micron was used for the experiments. 1% (w/v) slurry of cellulose sample was circulated through the hydrodynamic cavitation device or devices (orifice) for 6h. The average velocity of the fluid through the device was 10.81m/s while average pressure applied was 7.8 kg/cm(2). Cavitation number was found to be 2.61. The average particle size obtained after treatment was 1.36 micron. This hydrodynamically processed sample was sonicated for 1h 50 min. The average size of ultrasonically processed particles was found to be 301 nm. Further, the cellulose particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to see the effect of cavitation on crystallinity (X(c)) as well as on melting temperature (T(m)). Cellulose structures consist of amorphous as well as crystalline regions. The initial raw sample was 86.56% crystalline but due to the effect of cavitation, the crystallinity reduced to 37.76%. Also the melting temperature (T(m)) was found to be reduced from 101.78 degrees C of the original to 60.13 degrees C of the processed sample. SEM images for the cellulose (processed and unprocessed) shows the status and fiber-fiber alignment and its orientation with each other. Finally cavitation has proved to be very efficient tool for reduction in size from millimeter to nano scale for highly crystalline materials. PMID:20362487

  14. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  15. Drop fragmentation by laser-induced cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-A, S. Roberto; Kerssens, Pjotr; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    The fragmentation of water droplets by a short laser pulse has received significant attention since the 70's. The fundamental understanding of droplet vaporization/fragmentation is of interest in laser beam propagation in the atmosphere, in situ analysis of combustion products -a great concern due to its ecological implications- and more recently driven by a better understanding of the drop shaping by a laser pulse which is of interest in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) machines. In this presentation we discuss about the incipient events that lead to the fragmentation of a drop produced by a cavitation bubble. When the bubble expands, it stretches the drop into a thin liquid film; this liquid film is eventually ruptured and a shockwave and small droplets are ejected as fast as 4 times the speed of sound in air. Interestingly, we also observe bubbles on the surface of the stretched film. Numerical simulations of a shock wave propagating inside a droplet show that cavitation bubbles appear when counter propagating shock waves that rebound from the walls of the drop meet. We also show different fragmentation scenarios recorded with high-speed video, one of them being a jelly fish like liquid film that eventually fragments into smaller drops.

  16. Experiments in thermosensitive cavitation of a cryogenic rocket propellant surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean Benjamin

    Cavitation is a phase-change phenomenon that may appear in practical devices, often leading to loss of performance and possible physical damage. Of particular interest is the presence of cavitation in rocket engine pumps as the cryogenic fluids cavitate in impellers and inducers. Unlike water, which has been studied exhaustively, cryogenic fluids undergo cavitation with significant thermal effect. Past attempts at analyzing this behavior in water have led to poor predictive capability due to the lack of data in the regime defined as thermosensitive cavitation. Fluids flowing near their thermodynamic critical point have a liquid-vapor density ratio that is orders of magnitude less than typical experimental fluids, so that the traditional equation-of-state and cavitation models do not apply. Thermal effects in cavitation have not been fully investigated due to experimental difficulties handling cryogenics. This work investigates the physical effects of thermosensitive cavitation in a model representative of a turbopump inducer in a modern rocket engine. This is achieved by utilizing a room-temperature testing fluid that exhibits a thermal effect equivalent to that experienced by cryogenic propellants. Unsteady surface pressures and high speed imaging collected over the span of thermophysical regimes ranging from thermosensitive to isothermal cavitation offer both quantitative and qualitative insight into the physical process of thermal cavitation. Physical and thermodynamic effects are isolated to identify the source of cavity conditions, oscillations and growth/collapse behavior. Planar laser imaging offers an instantaneous look inside the vapor cavity and at the behavior of the boundary between the two-phase region and freestream liquid. Nondimensional parameters are explored, with cavitation numbers, Reynolds Numbers, coefficient of pressure and nondimensional temperature in a broad range. Results in the form of cavitation regime maps, Strouhal Number of cavity

  17. Fundamental studies on cavitation melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Hodnett, M.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to industry has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments and acoustic pressures were successfully measured using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. Results showed that highest cavitation intensity in the liquid bulk is achieved at lower amplitudes of the sonotrode tip than the maximum available, suggesting nonlinearity in energy transfer to the liquid, while the location of the sonotrode is seen to substantially affect cavitation activity within the liquid. Estimation of real-time acoustic pressures distributed inside a crucible with liquid Al was performed for the first time.

  18. Detection, tracking and event localization of interesting features in 4-D atmospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, S.; Schömer, E.; Wernli, H.

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for the efficient detection and tracking of interesting features in spatial-temporal atmospheric data, as well as for the precise localization of the occurring genesis, lysis, merging and splitting events. The algorithm is based on the well-known region growing segmentation method. We extended the basic idea towards the analysis of the complete 4-D dataset, identifying segments representing the spatial features and their development over time. Each segment consists of one set of distinct 3-D features per time step. The algorithm keeps track of the successors of each 3-D feature, constructing the so-called event graph of each segment. The precise localization of the splitting events is based on a search for all grid points inside the initial 3-D feature which have a similar distance to all successive 3-D features of the next time step. The merging event is localized analogously considering inverted direction of time. We tested the implementation on a four-dimensional field of wind speed data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses and computed a climatology of upper-tropospheric jet streams and their events. We compare our results with a previous climatology, investigate the statistical distribution of the merging and splitting events, and illustrate the meteorological significance of the jet splitting events with a case study. A brief outlook is given on additional potential applications of the 4-D data segmentation technique.

  19. The MPI-Mainz UV/VIS Spectral Atlas of Gaseous Molecules of Atmospheric Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller-Rudek, H.; Moortgat, G. K.; Sander, R.; Sörensen, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present the MPI-Mainz UV/VIS Spectral Atlas of Gaseous Molecules, which is a large collection of absorption cross sections and quantum yields in the ultraviolet and visible (UV/VIS) wavelength region for gaseous molecules and radicals primarily of atmospheric interest. The data files contain results of individual measurements, covering research of almost a whole century. To compare and visualize the data sets, multicoloured graphical representations have been created. The MPI-Mainz UV/VIS Spectral Atlas is available on the Internet at http://www.uv-vis-spectral-atlas-mainz.org. It now appears with improved browse and search options, based on new database software. In addition to the Web pages, which are continuously updated, a frozen version of the data is available under the doi:10.5281/zenodo.6951.

  20. Cavitation guide for control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  1. Cavitation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  2. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-07-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  3. Harness cavitation to improve processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, A.G.; Moholkar, V.S.

    1996-07-01

    Mention cavitation to most chemical engineers, and they undoubtedly think of it as an operational problem. Indeed, the rapid creation and then collapse of bubbles, which is after all what cavitation involves, can destroy pumps and erode other equipment. Cavitation, however, also can have a positive side--presuming it is designed for and not unplanned. In this article, the authors look at how cavitation can be harnessed to improve processes, and the mechanisms for inducing cavitation--ultrasonics and hydrodynamics--and their likely roles. Sonication, that is, the use of ultrasound, is the conventional approach for creating cavitation, and so they turn to it first. Over the past few years, a number of groups have attempted to solve the problem of scale-up and design of ultrasonic reactors. The authors review the systems that already exist and also explore a simpler and efficient alternative to the ultrasonic reactor, the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor.

  4. Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maines, Brant H.; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2000-11-01

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a problem of practical importance, that is relatively unexplored. Vortical structures of importance range from the eddies occurring randomly in space and time in turbulent flows to the developed vortices that occur at the tips of lifting surfaces and at the hubs of propellers and hydraulic turbines. A variety of secondary flow phenomena such as the horse shoe vortices that form around bridge piers, chute blocks and struts, and the secondary vortices found in the clearance passages of turbomachinery are also important cavitation sites. Tip vortex cavitation can be viewed as a canonical problem that captures many of the essential physics associated with vortex cavitation in general. This paper describes the inception process and focuses on the high levels of tension that can be sustained in the flow, which appears to scale with the blade loading. High speed video visualization indicates that the details of how free stream nuclei are ingested plays a major role in the nucleation and inception process. A new photographic technique was used to obtain high quality images of the bubble growth process at framing rates as high as 40,000 fps. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research

  5. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chuanhua; Karnik, Rohit; Lu, Ming-Chang; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. Although widely studied in bulk and microscale-confined liquids, cavitation in the nanoscale is generally believed to be energetically unfavorable and has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here we report evaporation-induced cavitation in water-filled hydrophilic nanochannels under enormous negative pressures up to -7 MPa. As opposed to receding menisci observed in microchannel evaporation, the menisci in nanochannels are pinned at the entrance while vapor bubbles form and expand inside. Evaporation in the channels is found to be aided by advective liquid transport, which leads to an evaporation rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that governed by Fickian vapor diffusion in macro- and microscale evaporation. The vapor bubbles also exhibit unusual motion as well as translational stability and symmetry, which occur because of a balance between two competing mass fluxes driven by thermocapillarity and evaporation. Our studies expand our understanding of cavitation and provide new insights for phase-change phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:22343530

  6. Microwave Spectroscopy of Monoterpenes of Atmospheric Interest: α-PINENE, β-PINENE, and Nopinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Neeman, Elias; Huet, T. R.

    2014-06-01

    Several monoterpenes and terpenoids are biogenic volatile organic compounds which are emitted in the atmosphere, and react with OH, O_3, NO_x, etc. to give rise to several oxydation and degradation products. Spectroscopic information on these atmospheric species are still very scarse. Meanwhile we have demonstrated that combining quantum calculations to microwave spectroscopy led to the unambiguous characterization of the most stable conformers for perillaldehyde, limonene and carvone. This information can be used to subsequently model accurately the vibrational signature for atmospheric purposes. We have recorded the pure rotational spectra of α-pinene and β-pinene (C10H_{16}), and of nopinone (C9H_{14O}), using the MB-FTMW spectrometer of Lille, in the 2-20 GHz range at temperatures varying between 340 and 380 K. For these three bicyclic molecules only one conformer can be observed, and the rotational structure was observed up to J, K_a = 8, 3 ; 8, 4 ; 8, 5, respectively. All the spectra were modeled with a semi-rigid rotor Hamiltonian and fitted to obtain a rms value better than 5 kHz using a-, b- and c- type transitions. All the experimental results were supported by several quantum calculations performed at different levels of theory (DFT and ab initio). In particular no experimental evidence of internal rotation motion was found (methyl groups), in good agreement with the calculated barriers. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. J.-R. Aviles Moreno, F. Partal Urena, J.-J. Lopez Gonzalez and T. R. Huet, Chem. Phys. Lett. 473 (2009) 17 J.-R. Aviles Moreno, T. R. Huet, F. Partal Urena, J.-J. Lopez Gonzalez, Struct. Chem. 24 (2013) 1163 T. R. Huet, J.-R. Aviles Moreno, O. Pirali, M. Tudorie, F. Partal Urena, J.-J. Lopez Gonzalez, JQSRT. 113 (2012) 1261

  7. Rate constants for reactions of ClO/x/ of atmospheric interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical kinetics measurements on 82 gas phase reactions of chlorine containing species are reviewed. Recommended rate constants are given. The principal species of interest are Cl, Cl2, ClO, Cl2O, ClOO, OClO, CINO, HCl and halo derivatives of methane and ethane. Absorption spectra are given for 21 species. In addition the chemical kinetics methods used to obtain these data are discussed with regard to their applicability and reliability.

  8. Cold atmospheric air plasma sterilization against spores and other microorganisms of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Klämpfl, Tobias G; Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log(10) CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D(23)(°)(C) values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  9. Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma Sterilization against Spores and Other Microorganisms of Clinical Interest

    PubMed Central

    Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E.; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log10 CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D23°C values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  10. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. O.

    1983-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation. Previously announced in STAR as N82-20543

  11. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  12. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  14. Numerical analysis for cavitation flow of marine propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Muchammad, Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2015-12-01

    Concerning the environmental issue and the increase of fuel price, optimizing the fuel consumption has been recently an important subject in all industries. In marine industries one of the ways to decrease the energy consumption was by reducing the presence of cavitation on marine propeller blades. This will give a higher propulsive efficiency. This paper provides an investigation into the influence of the cavitation on a hydrodynamic performance around the propeller based on numerical method. Hydrofoil representing the blade form of propeller was of particular of interest. Two types of cavitation model were investigated with respect to the accuracy of the result and the effectiveness of the method. The results include the hydrodynamic characteristics of cavitation phenomenon like lift/drag variation with respect to the cavity extent. It was found that a high accuracy and low computational time is achieved when the cavitation model of Zwart-Gerber-Belamri is used. The interesting outcome of this study is that the results can be used as a good evaluation tool for high marine propeller performance.

  15. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  16. Interaction of Trace gas Species of Atmospheric Interest With ice: Measurement of the Adsorption Enthalpy of Acetone on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, T.; Guimbaud, C.; Gaggeler, H.; Ammann, M.

    2002-12-01

    Ice provides an important substrate for heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere, the upper troposphere, but also in the cold regions of the planetary boundary layer. Thus, we started to investigate the interaction of trace gases of atmospheric interest (acetone) with ice. In the upper troposphere, the photolysis of acetone is the main source of HOX, dominating the one from the reaction of O(1D) + H2O (Jaegle et al., 2001). Source and sinks of acetone need to be quantified to simulate the concentration of the main atmospheric oxidant (HOX). Ice cirrus clouds are suggested to be one of the acetone sinks. Thus, the adsorption enthalpy of acetone on ice needs to be investigated because it determines the mixing ratio of acetone between the gas and the particulate phase and the chemistry of the upper troposphere. In this paper, the chromatographic method applied for the measurement of the adsorption enthalpy of acetone on ice is described. This method uses a chromatographic ice-packed column similar to the one described by Bartels et al. (2002) and is combined with Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) for the monitoring of the acetone concentration in the gas phase. Preliminary results show that the measured standard adsorption enthalpy obtained with a column packed with ice spheres, i.e. (-54+/-8) kJ mol-1, and with a column packed with a snow sample, i.e. (-56+/-3) kJ mol-1, are similar and in agreement with the ones derived by Winkler et al. (2002) and from Domine and Hanot (2002), using a low pressure ice coated wall flow tube reactor and a volumetric method, respectively. More investigations are scheduled in the near future using different ice surfaces (ice crystals, fresh snow). We briefly address the atmospheric implication of this study as well as the perspective of the chromatographic & APCI-MS system to investigate other processes of atmospheric interest. References Bartels, T., B. Eichler, P. Zimmermann, H. W. Gäggeler, and M. Ammann, The

  17. Dynamic response of cavitating turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Stimulated by the pogo instability encountered in many liquid propellant rockets, the dynamic behavior of cavitating inducers is discussed. An experimental facility where the upstream and downstream flows of a cavitating inducer could be perturbed was constructed and tested. The upstream and downstream pressure and mass flow fluctuations were measured. Matrices representing the transfer functions across the inducer pump were calculated from these measurements and from the hydraulic system characteristics for two impellers in various states of cavitation. The transfer matrices when plotted against the perturbing frequency showed significant departure from steady state or quasi-steady predictions especially at higher frequencies.

  18. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage. PMID:25890856

  19. Current research in cavitating fluid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E. (Editor); Ball, J. H. (Editor); Khonsari, M. M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    A review of the current research of cavitation in fluid films is presented. Phenomena and experimental observations include gaseous cavitation, vapor cavitation, and gas entrainment. Cavitation in flooded, starved, and dynamically loaded journal bearings, as well as squeeze films are reviewed. Observations of cavitation damage in bearings and the possibility of cavitation between parallel plates with microasperities were discussed. The transcavity fluid transport process, meniscus motion and geometry or form of the film during rupture, and reformation were summarized. Performance effects were related to heat transfer models in the cavitated region and hysteresis influence on rotor dynamics coefficients. A number of cavitation algorithms was presented together with solution procedures using the finite difference and finite element methods. Although Newtonian fluids were assumed in most of the discussions, the effect of non-Newtonian fluids on cavitation was also discussed.

  20. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  1. Thresholds of Transient Cavitation Produced by Pulsed Ultrasound in a Controlled Nuclei Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy Katherine Smith

    The possibility of hazardous bioeffects from medical ultrasound examinations and therapy, although not demonstrated in current epidemiologic data, is still of interest to the medical community. In particular, concern persists over the potential of damage at the cellular level due to transient cavitation produced by diagnostic and high intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Transient cavitation is a discrete phenomenon which relies on the existence of stabilized nuclei, or pockets of gas within a host fluid, for its genesis. A convenient descriptor for assessing the likelihood of transient cavitation is the threshold pressure, or the minimum acoustic pressure necessary to initiate bubble growth and subsequent collapse. Experimental measurements of cavitation thresholds are presented here which elucidate the importance of ultrasound host fluid and nuclei parameters in determining these thresholds. These results are interpreted in the context of an approximate theory, included as an appendix, describing the relationship between these parameters and cavitation threshold pressures. An automated experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thresholds for cavitation produced in a fluid by short tone bursts of ultrasound at 0.76, 0.99, and 2.30 MHz. A fluid jet was used to convect potential cavitation nuclei through the focal region of the insonifying transducer. Potential nuclei tested include 1mum polystyrene spheres, microbubbles in the 1-10 μm range that are stabilized with human serum albumin, and whole blood constituents. Cavitation was detected by a passive acoustical technique which is sensitive to sound scattered from cavitation bubbles. Measurements of the transient cavitation threshold in water, in a fluid of higher viscosity, and in diluted whole blood are presented. Results from these experiments which permit the control of nuclei and host fluid properties are compared to the approximate analytical theory for the prediction of the onset of cavitation.

  2. Computation of Cavitating Flow in a Francis Hydroturbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Lindau, Jay

    2013-11-01

    In an effort to improve cavitation characteristics at off-design conditions, a steady, periodic, multiphase, RANS CFD study of an actual Francis hydroturbine was conducted and compared to experimental results. It is well-known that operating hydroturbines at off-design conditions usually results in the formation of large-scale vaporous cavities. These cavities, and their subsequent collapse, reduce efficiency and cause damage and wear to surfaces. The conventional hydro community has expressed interest in increasing their turbine's operating ranges, improving their efficiencies, and reducing damage and wear to critical turbine components. In this work, mixing planes were used to couple rotating and stationary stages of the turbine which have non-multiple periodicity, and provide a coupled solution for the stay vanes, wicket gates, runner blades, and draft tube. The mixture approach is used to simulate the multiphase flow dynamics, and cavitation models were employed to govern the mass transfer between liquid and gas phases. The solution is compared with experimental results across a range of cavitation numbers which display all the major cavitation features in the machine. Unsteady computations are necessary to capture inherently unsteady cavitation phenomena, such as the precessing vortex rope, and the shedding of bubbles from the wicket gates and their subsequent impingement upon the leading edge of the runner blades. To display these features, preliminary unsteady simulations of the full machine are also presented.

  3. Numerical estimation of cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumenacker, L.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Archer, A.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation may appear in turbomachinery and in hydraulic orifices, venturis or valves, leading to performance losses, vibrations and material erosion. This study propose a new method to predict the cavitation intensity of the flow, based on a post-processing of unsteady CFD calculations. The paper presents the analyses of cavitating structures' evolution at two different scales: • A macroscopic one in which the growth of cavitating structures is calculated using an URANS software based on a homogeneous model. Simulations of cavitating flows are computed using a barotropic law considering presence of air and interfacial tension, and Reboud's correction on the turbulence model. • Then a small one where a Rayleigh-Plesset software calculates the acoustic energy generated by the implosion of the vapor/gas bubbles with input parameters from macroscopic scale. The volume damage rate of the material during incubation time is supposed to be a part of the cumulated acoustic energy received by the solid wall. The proposed analysis method is applied to calculations on hydrofoil and orifice geometries. Comparisons between model results and experimental works concerning flow characteristic (size of cavity, pressure,velocity) as well as pitting (erosion area, relative cavitation intensity) are presented.

  4. Bacterial Sterilization Using Cavitating Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Yohei; Kato, Hiroharu; Usami, Ron; Fukushima, Tadamasa

    In this paper, a new sterilization method using cavitating flow is presented. Water with bacteria was pressurized up to 105 MPa and flushed out through two very small nozzles 0.1-0.31 mm in diameter, where a cavitating jet was generated containing bubbles that collapsed downstream. First, the effects of jet velocity and cavitation number on the sterilization rate of Escherichia coli JCM1649T (E. coli) were examined. The sterilization rate increased with jet velocity. The rate was proportional to the 3rd power of the velocity. All the E. coli cells were killed by three successive treatments at V=355.7 m/s and cavitation number σ=0.154. The sterilization rate has a peak depending on cavitation number at the low-jet-velocity region of less than 300 m/s. An experiment was also performed to compare two types of bacteria, E. coli, as typical Gram-negative bacteria and Bacillus subtilis JCM1465T (B. subtilis), as typical Gram-positive bacteria. Additional tests were performed using Pseudomonas putida JCM13063T, Gram-negative bacteria and Bacillus halodurans JCTM9153, Gram-positive bacteria. The sterilization rate of the Gram-positive bacteria was much lower than that of the Gram-negative bacteria under the same experimental conditions. Gram-positive bacteria have a thicker peptidoglycan layer than Gram-negative bacteria. This may be the reason why B. subtilis is more resistant to the mechanical stress caused by cavitating flow.

  5. Numerical simulation of cavitation bubble dynamics induced by ultrasound waves in a high frequency reactor.

    PubMed

    Servant, G; Caltagirone, J P; Gérard, A; Laborde, J L; Hita, A

    2000-10-01

    The use of high frequency ultrasound in chemical systems is of major interest to optimize chemical procedures. Characterization of an open air 477 kHz ultrasound reactor shows that, because of the collapse of transient cavitation bubbles and pulsation of stable cavitation bubbles, chemical reactions are enhanced. Numerical modelling is undertaken to determine the spatio-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles. The calculus of the emergence of cavitation bubbles due to the acoustic driving (by taking into account interactions between the sound field and bubbles' distribution) gives a cartography of bubbles' emergence within the reactor. Computation of their motion induced by the pressure gradients occurring in the reactor show that they migrate to the pressure nodes. Computed bubbles levitation sites gives a cartography of the chemical activity of ultrasound. Modelling of stable cavitation bubbles' motion induced by the motion of the liquid gives some insight on degassing phenomena. PMID:11062879

  6. Kinetics studies of aqueous phase reactions of Cl atoms and Cl2(-) radicals with organic sulfur compounds of atmospheric interest.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Nicovich, J Michael; Wine, Paul H

    2005-05-01

    A laser flash photolysis-long path UV-visible absorption technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of aqueous phase reactions of chlorine atoms (Cl) and dichloride radicals (Cl2(-)) with four organic sulfur compounds of atmospheric interest, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; CH3S(O)CH3), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2; CH3(O)S(O)CH3), methanesulfinate (MSI; CH3S(O)O-), and methanesulfonate (MS; CH3(O)S(O)O-). Measured rate coefficients at T = 295 +/- 1 K (in units of M(-1) s(-1)) are as follows: Cl + DMSO, (6.3 +/- 0.6) x 10(9); Cl2(-) + DMSO, (1.6 +/- 0.8) x 10(7); Cl + DMSO2, (8.2 +/- 1.6) x 10(5); Cl2(-) + DMSO2, (8.2 +/- 5.5) x 10(3); Cl2(-) + MSI, (8.0 +/- 1.0) x 10(8); Cl + MS, (4.9 +/- 0.6) x 10(5); Cl2(-) + MS, (3.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(3). Reported uncertainties are estimates of accuracy at the 95% confidence level and the rate coefficients for MSI and MS reactions with Cl2(-) are corrected to the zero ionic strength limit. The absorption spectrum of the DMSO-Cl adduct is reported; peak absorbance is observed at 390 nm and the peak extinction coefficient is found to be 5760 M(-1) cm(-1) with a 2sigma uncertainty of +/-30%. Some implications of the new kinetics results for understanding the atmospheric sulfur cycle are discussed. PMID:16833708

  7. Relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified by spectral Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability in the United States and worldwide. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are theragonistic ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) being developed for the early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Stability of the echogenicity of ELIP in physiologic conditions is crucial to their successful translation to clinical use. The stability of ELIP echogenicity was determined in vitro under physiologic conditions of total dissolved gas concentration, temperature, and hydrodynamic pressure in porcine plasma and whole blood. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Previous studies have also demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the on-screen echogenicity in clinical applications. ELIP were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations and four PRFs in a static fluid and in a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) system and a passive cavitation imaging (PCI) system. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. Stable cavitation thresholds were found to be lower than inertial

  8. Cavitation erosion: Using the target material as a pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samir Chandra; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Fivel, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Numerical prediction of mass loss due to cavitation erosion requires the knowledge of the hydrodynamic impact loads generated by cavitation bubble collapses. Experimental measurements of such impact loads using conventional pressure sensors are not reliable (if not impossible) due to the micron size and the very small duration of the loading. In this paper, a new method to estimate these loading conditions is proposed based on cavitation pitting tests and an iterative inverse finite element modeling. The principle of the method is as follows. First, numerous pits corresponding to localized plastically deformed regions are identified from a cavitation test performed in a dedicated tunnel. Then each pit is numerically reproduced by finite element simulations of the material response to a representative Gaussian pressure field supposed to mimic a single bubble collapse. This gives the size and pressure distribution of the bubble impacts. The prime objective of this study is to find out if the target material itself could be used as a pressure sensor or not, i.e., if the cavitation pits left on the surface of the tested specimen could provide the characteristics of the cavitating flow in terms of pressure fields independently of the target material. Pitting tests were done on three materials, namely, 7075 Aluminum alloy (Al-7075), 2205 duplex stainless steel (A-2205), and Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) at three different flow conditions and the impact loads have been estimated for each identified pit. Very interestingly, a statistical analysis shows that the estimated impact loads are material independent at all flow conditions, provided the material properties are characterized properly. It is also shown that for some materials, the constitutive parameters obtained from compression tests are not satisfactory.

  9. Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation require consideration of multiple models for both water flows and cavities. In particular, distinction of laminar and turbulent boundary layers is very important. A qualitative impact of selection of models is manifested for blade sheet cavitation. Its quantitative impact is shown for vortex cavitation inception.

  10. Preventing cavitation in butterfly valves

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.D.

    1985-03-18

    Some of the mechanical problems that plagued butterfly valves in the past are discussed. The authors suggest integrated packages to alleviate these problems. These packages include such innovations as backlash-free stem connections, allenclosed actuator packages, and torque-compensated vanes. Some disadvantages to these packages are outlined and examined, including: high noise levels with compressible fluids, and an increased tendency to cavitate with liquids. A discussion follows on cavitation--how it is caused, just how much of it can be tolerated, and how it can be avoided or reduced.

  11. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  12. A study of pump cavitation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-11-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  13. Cavitation in an orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, S.; Sirignano, W. A.; Joseph, D. D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the potential locations for cavitation induced by total stress on the flow of a liquid through an orifice of an atomizer. A numerical simulation of two-phase incompressible flow is conducted in an axisymmetric geometry of the orifice for Reynolds numbers between 100 and 2000. The orifice has a rounded upstream corner and a sharp downstream corner with length-to-diameter ratio between 0.1 and 5. The total stress including viscous stress and pressure has been calculated in the flow field and, from there, the maximum principal stress is found. The total-stress criterion for cavitation is applied to find the regions where cavitation is likely to occur and compared with those of the traditional pressure criterion. Results show that the viscous stress has significant effects on cavitation. The effect of geometry and occurrence of hydraulic flip in the orifice on the total stress are studied. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically using a finite-volume method and a boundary-fitted orthogonal grid that comes from the streamlines and potential lines of an axisymmetric equipotential flow in the same geometry. A level-set formulation is used to track the interface and model the surface tension.

  14. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mørch, K A

    2015-10-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  15. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    SciTech Connect

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-07-15

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian “particles” or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations.

  16. Hysteresis of inertial cavitation activity induced by fluctuating bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Desjouy, Cyril; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the variety of complex phenomena encountered in nonlinear physics, a hysteretic effect can be expected on ultrasound cavitation due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of bubble dynamics. When applying successive ultrasound shots for increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, a hysteretic behaviour is experimentally observed on inertial cavitation activity, with a loop area sensitive to the inertial cavitation threshold. To get a better insight of the phenomena underlying this hysteretic effect, the evolution of the bubble size distribution is studied numerically by implementing rectified diffusion, fragmentation process, rising and dissolution of bubbles from an initial bubble size distribution. When applying increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, the numerical distribution exhibits asymmetry in bubble number and distribution. The resulting inertial cavitation activity is assessed through the numerical broadband noise of the emitted acoustic radiation of the bubble cloud dynamics. This approach allows obtaining qualitatively the observed hysteretic effect and its interest in terms of control is discussed. PMID:26186844

  17. Prediction of cryogenic cavitation around hydrofoil by an extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T. Z.; Wei, Y. J.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Developing a robust computational strategy to address the rich physics characteristic involved in the thermodynamic effects on the cryogenic cavitation remains a challenging problem. The objective of this present study is to model the numerical methodology to simulate the cryogenic cavitation by implanting the thermodynamic effects to the Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model, and coupling the energy equation considered the latent heat. For this purpose, cavitating flows are investigated over a three dimensional hydrofoil in liquid hydrogen and nitrogen. Experimental measurements of pressure and temperature are utilized to validate the extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model. Specifically, the further analysis of the cavitation solution with respect to the thermodynamic term is conducted. The results show that the extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model predicts better accuracy to the quasi-steady cavitation over hydrofoil in the two cryogenic fluids.

  18. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2016-04-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  19. Cavitation erosion - scale effect and model investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Rutschmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental works presented in here contribute to the clarification of erosive effects of hydrodynamic cavitation. Comprehensive cavitation erosion test series were conducted for transient cloud cavitation in the shear layer of prismatic bodies. The erosion pattern and erosion rates were determined with a mineral based volume loss technique and with a metal based pit count system competitively. The results clarified the underlying scale effects and revealed a strong non-linear material dependency, which indicated significantly different damage processes for both material types. Furthermore, the size and dynamics of the cavitation clouds have been assessed by optical detection. The fluctuations of the cloud sizes showed a maximum value for those cavitation numbers related to maximum erosive aggressiveness. The finding suggests the suitability of a model approach which relates the erosion process to cavitation cloud dynamics. An enhanced experimental setup is projected to further clarify these issues.

  20. Cavitation study of a pump-turbine at turbine mode with critical cavitation coefficient condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Yang, D.; Xu, J. W.; Liu, J. T.; Jiao, L.

    2016-05-01

    To study the cavitation phenomenon of a pump-turbine at turbine mode when it ran at the critical cavitation coefficient condition, a high-head model pump-turbine was disperse using hexahedron grid. Three dimensional, steady cavitating flow was numerically studied using SST k-ω model. It is confirmed that ZGB cavitation model and SST k-ω model are useful ways to study the two-phase cavitation flow in pump-turbine. Mass flow inlet and pressure outlet were specified at the casing inlet and draft tube outlet, respectively. The static pressure was set according to the cavitation coefficient. The steady cavitating flows at critical cavitation coefficient condition were analysed. The cavitation area in the runner was investigated. It was found that the pressure of the suction on the blade surface was decreasing gradually with the decrease of the cavitation coefficient. In addition, the vortex flow in the draft tube was observed at the critical cavitation coefficient. It was found that the vortex flow appeared at the center of the draft tube inlet with the decreasing of the cavitation coefficient. Compared with the experimental data, the simulation results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  2. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  3. Dependence of the drag of a conical axisymmetric cavitation body on the cone angle and the cavitation number

    SciTech Connect

    Khomyakov, A.N.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical investigations of flow past axisymmetric conical cavitation bodies have shown that the drag coefficient of the cavitation body, calculated from the maximum cross-sectional area of the cavity (midsection), depends on the cavitation number and the cone angle.

  4. Cavitating Langmuir turbulence in the terrestrial aurora.

    PubMed

    Isham, B; Rietveld, M T; Guio, P; Forme, F R E; Grydeland, T; Mjølhus, E

    2012-03-01

    Langmuir cavitons have been artificially produced in Earth's ionosphere, but evidence of naturally occurring cavitation has been elusive. By measuring and modeling the spectra of electrostatic plasma modes, we show that natural cavitating, or strong, Langmuir turbulence does occur in the ionosphere, via a process in which a beam of auroral electrons drives Langmuir waves, which in turn produce cascading Langmuir and ion-acoustic excitations and cavitating Langmuir turbulence. The data presented here are the first direct evidence of cavitating Langmuir turbulence occurring naturally in any space or astrophysical plasma. PMID:22463417

  5. Cavitation on hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation characteristics of hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge were examined experimentally at a Reynolds number of 7.2 × 105. The hydrofoils had an underlying NACA 634-021 profile and an aspect ratio of 4.3. The sinusoidal leading edge geometries included three amplitudes of 2.5%, 5%, and 12% and two wavelengths of 25% and 50% of the mean chord length. Results revealed that cavitation on the leading edge-modified hydrofoils existed in pockets behind the troughs whereas the baseline hydrofoil produced cavitation along its entire span. Moreover, cavitation on the modified hydrofoils appeared at consistently lower angles of attack than on the baseline hydrofoil.

  6. RECENT APPLICATIONS OF THE GREENSPAN AND TSCHIEGG DATA ON NEUTRON INDUCED CAVITATION THRESHOLDS

    SciTech Connect

    West, Colin D

    2007-03-01

    In 1967 Greenspan and Tschiegg published a paper on radiation induced acoustic cavitation. They researched the thresholds for cavitation induced in various liquids by fast neutrons, {alpha}-decay recoils and fission fragments. It turns out that these data can be used to verify predictions of a more recent theory of radiation induced cavitation nucleation. In 1979, in a report to their sponsor (The Office of Naval Research) they published new details of their results on neutron induced cavitation thresholds, including tables of the thresholds at different temperatures for various liquids. They were also some fission fragment results, but none of the {alpha}-decay recoil data. By that time Greenspan had evidently retired while I had left the field of cavitation research and did not know of the existence of their report [which also contains the only published record of some cavitation threshold measurements made by West and Howlett at Harwell, England]. Later still, in 1982, Greenspan and Tschiegg published the graphical data--but not the tables--in a more easily accessible form. In the late 1990s I revisited the problem of calculating radiation induced cavitation thresholds. There was interest in this because the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, then just beginning, planned to use a liquid mercury target to produce intense bursts of neutrons when irradiated by a pulsed, high energy proton beam. It was known that the pressure waves produced by local heating when the proton pulse struck the target could, upon reflection at the walls of the mercury container, give rise to very high, although brief, negative pressure waves in the mercury. There was concern that cavitation might result and, if it did, might lead to undesirable effects. With the encouragement of the SNS target team this author managed further to develop an earlier method of calculating the threshold for such cavitation, and the SNS project kindly provided funding to publish the work in two ORNL

  7. Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1

    PubMed Central

    Hacke, Uwe G.; Stiller, Volker; Sperry, John S.; Pittermann, Jarmila; McCulloh, Katherine A.

    2001-01-01

    Although cavitation and refilling cycles could be common in plants, it is unknown whether these cycles weaken the cavitation resistance of xylem. Stem or petiole segments were tested for cavitation resistance before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling cycle. Cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air drying of shoots, or soil drought. Except for droughted plants, material was not significantly water stressed prior to collection. Cavitation resistance was determined from “vulnerability curves” showing the percentage loss of conductivity versus xylem pressure. Two responses were observed. “Resilient” xylem (Acer negundo and Alnus incana stems) showed no change in cavitation resistance after a cavitation-refilling cycle. In contrast, “weakened” xylem (Populus angustifolia, P. tremuloides, Helianthus annuus stems, and Aesculus hippocastanum petioles) showed considerable reduction in cavitation resistance. Weakening was observed whether cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air dehydration, or soil drought. Observations from H. annuus showed that weakening was proportional to the embolism induced by stress. Air injection experiments indicated that the weakened response was a result of an increase in the leakiness of the vascular system to air seeding. The increased air permeability in weakened xylem could result from rupture or loosening of the cellulosic mesh of interconduit pit membranes during the water stress and cavitation treatment. PMID:11161035

  8. A numerical and experimental study on the drag of a cavitating underwater vehicle in cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Kyu; Ahn, Byoung-Kwon; Kim, Hyoung-Tae

    2015-09-01

    For Super-Cavitating Underwater Vehicles (SCUV), the numerical analyses and experiments in a large cavitation tunnel are carried out at relatively large Reynolds numbers. The numerical results agree well with experiments and the drag coefficient of SCUV is rarely changed by the Reynolds number. As the cavitation number is decreased, the cavity occurs and grows, the cavitator drag decreases and the body drag is affected by the degree of covering the body with the cavity. The tunnel effects, i.e. the blockage and the friction pressure drop of the tunnel, on the drag and the cavitation of SCUV are examined from the numerical results in between the tunnel and unbounded flows. In the tunnel, a minimum cavitation number exists and the drag of SCUV appears larger than that in unbounded flow. When the super-cavity covers the entire body, the friction drag almost disappears and the total drag of SCUV can be regarded as the pressure drag of cavitator.

  9. Matrix isolation model studies on the radiation-induced transformations of small molecules of astrochemical and atmospheric interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Vladimir I.; Ryazantsev, Sergey V.; Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Kameneva, Svetlana V.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.

    2016-07-01

    The radiation-induced transformations of small molecules at low temperatures play an important role in the interstellar, planetary and atmospheric chemistry. This work presents a review of our recent model studies on the radiation chemistry of relevant molecules in solid noble gas (Ng) matrices, including some preliminary new results. Among the triatomic molecules, water and carbon dioxide were studied in detail. The radiation-induced degradation of isolated H2O yields hydrogen atoms and OH radicals, while oxygen atoms are produced at higher doses. Isolated CO2 molecules are decomposed to yield CO and trapped oxygen atoms. Upon annealing the trapped O and H atoms are mobilized selectively at different temperatures and react with other trapped species. The formation of HCO and HOCO radicals was observed in the mixed H2O/CO2/Ng systems. Other studies were concerned with the radiation-induced degradation of simple organic molecules (methanol, formic acid) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCl3, CF2Cl2). Preliminary results for methanol revealed deep dehydrogenation yielding HCO and CO, whereas CO2, CO and HOCO were detected as primary products for formic acid. In the case of chlorofluorocarbons, significance of ionic channels was demonstrated. The implications of the results for modeling the processes in astrochemical ices and atmosphere are discussed.

  10. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 1: Venturi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.; Anderson, L. M.; Hall, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The results of continuing cavitation studies are reported. The cavitation characteristics of liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen flowing in a transparent plastic Venturi are discussed. Thermodynamic data, consisting of pressure and temperature measurements within fully developed hydrogen cavities, are reported. Details concerning test apparatus, test procedure, and data correlation techniques are given.

  11. Periodicity of Sheet/Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Damien T.; Qin, Qiao; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2004-11-01

    Cloud cavitation is the rapid formation and shedding of vaporous clouds from a cavitating hydrofoil. This type of cavitation occurs under certain conditions that are characterized by the cavitation number and the angle of attack. Associated with cloud cavitation are large, abrupt changes in surface pressure caused by the shedding of the attached cavity. Comparison between experimental data and the linearized flat plate theory of Acosta and Tulin have agreed surprisingly well. Near values of cavitation number divided by twice of the angle of attack equal to 4, a singularity exists in the flat plate theory. Experimental results and numerical simulations indicate that in this region a transition between competing mechanisms of cavity shedding occurs. Recent investigation made possible by high-speed video reveals that the cloud shedding is periodic and that, for each cycle, the cavitating surface becomes fully wetted. In certain cases, the surface can be fully wetted for over 20% of the shedding cycle. Using piezoelectric pressure transducers as a trigger, phase-locked photography is used to investigate the physical processes behind cloud cavitation in this transition region. This technique also enabled a visual comparison between numerical and experimental data. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  13. J-2X Turbopump Cavitation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, I. Michael; Butas, John P.; Tyler, Thomas R., Jr.; Aguilar, Robert; Sowers, T. Shane

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X is the upper stage engine currently being designed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). Propellant supply requirements for the J-2X are defined by the Ares Upper Stage to J-2X Interface Control Document (ICD). Supply conditions outside ICD defined start or run boxes can induce turbopump cavitation leading to interruption of J-2X propellant flow during hot fire operation. In severe cases, cavitation can lead to uncontained engine failure with the potential to cause a vehicle catastrophic event. Turbopump and engine system performance models supported by system design information and test data are required to predict existence, severity, and consequences of a cavitation event. A cavitation model for each of the J-2X fuel and oxidizer turbopumps was developed using data from pump water flow test facilities at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) together with data from Powerpack 1A testing at Stennis Space Center (SSC) and from heritage systems. These component models were implemented within the PWR J-2X Real Time Model (RTM) to provide a foundation for predicting system level effects following turbopump cavitation. The RTM serves as a general failure simulation platform supporting estimation of J-2X redline system effectiveness. A study to compare cavitation induced conditions with component level structural limit thresholds throughout the engine was performed using the RTM. Results provided insight into system level turbopump cavitation effects and redline system effectiveness in preventing structural limit violations. A need to better understand structural limits and redline system failure mitigation potential in the event of fuel side cavitation was indicated. This paper examines study results, efforts to mature J-2X turbopump cavitation models and structural limits, and issues with engine redline detection of cavitation and the use of vehicle-side abort triggers to augment the

  14. Detection of cavitation in hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, Xavier; Egusquiza, Eduard; Farhat, Mohamed; Avellan, François; Coussirat, Miguel

    2006-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in order to evaluate the detection of cavitation in actual hydraulic turbines. The methodology is based on the analysis of structural vibrations, acoustic emissions and hydrodynamic pressures measured in the machine. The proposed techniques have been checked in real prototypes suffering from different types of cavitation. In particular, one Kaplan, two Francis and one Pump-Turbine have been investigated in the field. Additionally, one Francis located in a laboratory has also been tested. First, a brief description of the general features of cavitation phenomenon is given as well as of the main types of cavitation occurring in hydraulic turbines. The work presented here is focused on the most important ones which are the leading edge cavitation due to its erosive power, the bubble cavitation because it affects the machine performance and the draft tube swirl that limits the operation stability. Cavitation detection is based on the previous understanding of the cavity dynamics and its location inside the machine. This knowledge has been gained from flow visualisations and measurements in laboratory devices such as a high-speed cavitation tunnel and a reduced scale turbine test rig. The main techniques are the study of the high frequency spectral content of the signals and of their amplitude demodulation for a given frequency band. Moreover, low frequency spectral content can also be used in certain cases. The results obtained for the various types of cavitation found in the selected machines are presented and discussed in detail in the paper. Conclusions are drawn about the best sensor, measuring location, signal processing and analysis for each type of cavitation, which serve to validate and to improve the detection techniques.

  15. Physical effects in cavitating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesset, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the physical effects of cavitating flows are discussed. The microscopic features are related to the properties of nuclei in liquids and to the moderate tensile strengths which are usually encountered in flows. The macroscopic features are concerned with the growth of vapor or gaseous cavities from a small initial size and with their eventual collapse. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the characteristics of: (1) tensile strength in liquids, (2) growth of vapor bubbles, and (3) collapse of vapor bubbles.

  16. Cavitation Inside High-Pressure Optically Transparent Fuel Injector Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgout, Z.; Linne, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nozzle-orifice flow and cavitation have an important effect on primary breakup of sprays. For this reason, a number of studies in recent years have used injectors with optically transparent nozzles so that orifice flow cavitation can be examined directly. Many of these studies use injection pressures scaled down from realistic injection pressures used in modern fuel injectors, and so the geometry must be scaled up so that the Reynolds number can be matched with the industrial applications of interest. A relatively small number of studies have shown results at or near the injection pressures used in real systems. Unfortunately, neither the specifics of the design of the optical nozzle nor the design methodology used is explained in detail in these papers. Here, a methodology demonstrating how to prevent failure of a finished design made from commonly used optically transparent materials will be explained in detail, and a description of a new design for transparent nozzles which minimizes size and cost will be shown. The design methodology combines Finite Element Analysis with relevant materials science to evaluate the potential for failure of the finished assembly. Finally, test results imaging a cavitating flow at elevated pressures are presented.

  17. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  18. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, P.R.; Miller, W.J.

    1981-02-11

    A method is disclosed of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension.

  19. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Paul R.; Miller, Wayne J.

    1982-01-01

    A method of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension.

  20. An Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B., Jr.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-05

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  1. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  2. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, Jana; Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-01

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ɛ model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  3. Periodic cavitation shedding in a cylindrical orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, C.; Barber, T.; Milton, B.; Rosengarten, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation structures in a large-scale ( D = 8.25 mm), plain orifice style nozzle within a unique experimental rig are investigated using high-speed visualisation and digital image processing techniques. Refractive index matching with an acrylic nozzle is achieved using aqueous sodium iodide for the test fluid. Cavitation collapse length, unsteady shedding frequency and spray angles are measured for cavitation conditions from incipient to supercavitation for a range of Reynolds numbers, for a fixed L/ D ratio of 4.85. Periodic cavitation shedding was shown to occur with frequencies between 500 and 2,000 Hz for conditions in which cavitation occupied less than 30% of the nozzle length. A discontinuity in collapse length was shown to occur once the cavitation exceeded this length, coinciding with a loss of periodic shedding. A mechanism for this behaviour is discussed. Peak spray angles of approximately θ ≈ 14° were recorded for supercavitation conditions indicating the positive influence of cavitation bubble collapse on the jet atomisation process.

  4. RANS computations of tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, Jean; Balarac, Guillaume; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed; Münch, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    The present study is related to the development of the tip vortex cavitation in Kaplan turbines. The investigation is carried out on a simplified test case consisting of a NACA0009 blade with a gap between the blade tip and the side wall. Computations with and without cavitation are performed using a R ANS modelling and a transport equation for the liquid volume fraction. Compared with experimental data, the R ANS computations turn out to be able to capture accurately the development of the tip vortex. The simulations have also highlighted the influence of cavitation on the tip vortex trajectory.

  5. Research on the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation condition in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Yuan, J. P.; Ren, X. D.; Pei, J.; Si, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to research the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation (AC) condition in a centrifugal pump. The acoustic pressure signals at the pump inlet and outlet were measured respectively during the development of cavitation in a closed hydraulic test rig. It could be found that both the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressures changed obviously with the development of cavitation. The time domain and the power spectrum density of the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressure pulsations were analyzed. The broadband pulses of the acoustic pressure pulsations were found and the reasons for the phenomenon were given.

  6. Cavitation studies on axi-symmetric underwater body with pumpjet propulsor in cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, Ch.; Satyanarayana, B.; Ramji, K.; Rao, M. Nageswara

    2010-12-01

    A pumpjet propulsor (PJP) was designed for an underwater body (UWB) with axi-symmetric configuration. Its performance was predicted through CFD study and models were manufactured. The propulsor design was evaluated for its propulsion characteristics through model tests conducted in a Wind Tunnel (WT). In the concluding part of the study, evaluation of the cavitation performance of the pumpjet was undertaken in a cavitation tunnel (CT). In order to assess the cavitation free operation speeds and depths of the body, cavitation tests of the PJP were carried out in behind condition to determine the inception cavitation numbers for rotor, stator and cowl. The model test results obtained were corrected for full scale Reynolds number and subsequently analyzed for cavitation inception speeds at different operating depths. From model tests it was also found that the cavitation inception of the rotor takes place on the tip face side at higher advance ratios and cavitation shifts towards the suction side as the RPS increases whereas the stator and cowl are free from cavitation.

  7. Observations on Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge from the Development of the Fastrac Engine Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2000-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations acquired from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered in this paper. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  8. Overview of Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge in the Fastrac Engine LOX Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac 60 Klbf engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a simple lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  9. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization. PMID:27312576

  10. Thermodynamic effects on developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, J. W.; Billet, M. L.; Weir, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an investigation of thermodynamic effects are presented. Distributions of temperature and pressure in a developed cavity were measured for zero- and quarter-caliber ogives. A semiempirical entrainment theory was developed to correlate the measured temperature depression in the cavity. This theory correlates the maximum temperature depression expressed in dimensionless form as the Jakob number in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length, L/D. The results show that in general, the temperature depression increases with L/D and temperature and the cavitation number based on measured cavity pressure is a function of L/D for a given model contour, independent of the thermodynamic effect.

  11. CAVITATIONAL HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION: A NEW REMEDIATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will explore the emerging science of sonochemistry and its technological applications for organic waste remediation, particularly for water and soil purification. Ultrasound can induce unusual high-energy chemistry through the process of acoustic cavitation: the for...

  12. Numerical calculation for cavitation flow of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.; Zhao, L. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    Inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of centrifugal pump. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and then was imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. Effects of the blade number on the performance of an inducer are investigated in the present paper. The inducers were designed on the basis of identical design flow rate and identical pressure elevation at nominal flow rate. The study focuses on the steady behavior of the inducers in cavitating conditions. Evolutions of performance, torque, mass flow rate, and amplitude of radial forces on the shaft according to the inlet pressure are considered. Furthermore, cavitation instabilities are analyzed in the study. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the pressure distribution and vapour volume fraction distribution through numerical simulations using the Navier-stokes solver with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  13. Cavitation for improved sludge conversion into biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, A. H.; Bakker, T. W.; Kramer, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In several studies the beneficial influence of pre-treatment of waste activated sludge with cavitation on the biogas production was demonstrated. It is however, still not fully certain whether this effect should be mainly contributed to an increase in conversion rate of organics into biogas by anaerobic bacteria, and how much cavitation increases the total biogas yield. An increase in yield is only the case if cavitation can further disrupt otherwise inaccessible cell membrane structures and long chain organic molecules. In this study the influence of hydrodynamic cavitation on sludge that was already digested for 30 days was investigated. The total biogas yield could indeed be increased. The effect of the backpressure behind the venturi tube on the yield could not yet be established.

  14. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2013-08-14

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation. PMID:23947875

  15. Experimental investigation of cavitation in pump inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Roman; Bureček, Adam; Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The article deals with experimental research of cavitation development in inlet tube of hydraulic pump. The pressures in inlet and outlet tube of the pump and flow rate were measured. Mineral oil was used as working fluid. The cavitation was visually evaluated in transparent inlet tube. The inlet tube underpressure was achieved by throttle valve. The relationship between the generation of bubbles and the inlet pressure is evaluated.

  16. Inducer Design to Avoid Cavitation Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghyuk; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Yonezawa, Koichi; Horiguchi, Hironori; Kawata, Yutaka; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    2010-06-01

    Three inducers were designed to avoid cavitation instabilities. This was accomplished by avoiding the interaction of tip cavity with the leading edge of the opposing blade. The first one applied extremely larger leading edge sweep, the second and third ones applied smaller incidence angle by reducing the inlet blade angle or increasing the design flow rate, respectively. The inducer with larger design flow rate has larger outlet blade angle to obtain sufficient pressure rise. The inducer with larger sweep could suppress the cavitation instabilities in wide ranges of cavitation number and flow rate, owing to weaker tip leakage vortex cavity with stronger disturbance by backflow vortices. The inducer with larger outlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at higher flow rates owing to the extension of the tip cavity along the suction surface of the blade. The inducer with smaller inlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at the flow rates larger than the design flow coefficient, owing to the occurrence of the cavity first in the blade passage and its extension upstream. The cavity shape and suction performance were reasonably simulated by three dimensional CFD computations under the steady cavitating condition, except for the backflow vortex cavity. The difference in the growth of cavity for each inducer is explained from the difference of the pressure distribution on the suction side of the blades.

  17. Research on cavitation characteristic of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Wang, L. Q.; Y Kong, F.; Wu, D. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of a centrifugal pump. The fact which can not be neglected is that the inducer itself is a kind of axial pump. Research on inducer's cavitation characteristic is very important. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. The relationship between cavity length and head breakdown was discussed. With the decrease of NPSH, there is a slight increase in the head just prior to the decrease associated with head breakdown. This conclusion coincides with experimental results. The influence of backflow eddy on the inducer's cavitation characteristic was analyzed, and the change of backflow eddy in the process of cavitation was illustrated. It can be concluded that the correlation between the inducer head breakdown and the relative cavity length is very close which agrees well with the theoretical and experimental results. As the inlet pressure is decreased, inception almost always occurs in the tip vortex generated by the corner where the leading edge meets the tip. And backflow vortex gradually disappears in the process of cavitation.

  18. Large eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, A.; Mahesh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Large Eddy Simulation is employed to study two turbulent cavitating flows: over a cylinder and a wedge. A homogeneous mixture model is used to treat the mixture of water and water vapor as a compressible fluid. The governing equations are solved using a novel predictor- corrector method. The subgrid terms are modeled using the Dynamic Smagorinsky model. Cavitating flow over a cylinder at Reynolds number (Re) = 3900 and cavitation number (σ) = 1.0 is simulated and the wake characteristics are compared to the single phase results at the same Reynolds number. It is observed that cavitation suppresses turbulence in the near wake and delays three dimensional breakdown of the vortices. Next, cavitating flow over a wedge at Re = 200, 000 and σ = 2.0 is presented. The mean void fraction profiles obtained are compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Cavity auto-oscillation is observed, where the sheet cavity breaks up into a cloud cavity periodically. The results suggest LES as an attractive approach for predicting turbulent cavitating flows.

  19. Cavitation on Hydrofoils with Leading Edge Protuberances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid; Office of Naval Research Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The effects of spanwise-uniform sinusoidal leading edge protuberances on the flow characteristics and forces of finite-span hydrofoils under vaporous cavitation conditions were examined experimentally over angles of attack ranging from -9° α <= 27°. Two planforms were studied, rectangular and swept, at a Reynolds number of ~ 720,000. Two protuberance wavelengths, λ = 0.25 c and 0.50 c, and three amplitudes, A = 0.025 c, 0.05 c, and 0.12 c, were examined as they resemble the humpback whale flipper morphology. All hydrofoils retain a mean NACA 634-021 profile. The forces and moments were measured at a freestream velocity of 7.2 m/s, and high-speed digital photography was used to capture flow field images at several angles of attack. The cavitation number corresponding to incipient leading edge cavitation was also calculated. As far as forces and cavitation number are concerned, results show that the baseline hydrofoil tends to have nearly equal or improved performance over the modified hydrofoils at most angles of attack tested. Flow images reveal that it is possible that the extent of sheet and tip vortex cavitation can be reduced with the introduction of leading edge protuberances. The forces and cavitation characteristics will be presented. Sponsored by the ONR-ULI program.

  20. Measuring Cavitation with Synchrotron X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel; Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Chris; X-Ray Fuel Spray Group, Energy Systems Division Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation plays an important role in the formation of sprays from small nozzles such as those found in fuel injection systems. A sharp-edged inlet from the sac into the nozzle of a diesel fuel injector is shown to inititate a strong sheet-like cavitation along the boundary layer of the nozzle throat, which is difficult to measure and can lead to acoustic damage. To investigate this phenomenon, a diagnostic technique capable of mapping the density field of the nozzle through regions of intense cavitation is required. Available visible-light techniques are limited to qualitative observations of the outer extent of cavitation zones. However, brilliant X-rays from a synchrotron source have negligible refraction and are capable of penetrating the full extent of cavitation zones. We present the early results of a novel application of line-of-sight, time-resolved X-ray radiography on a cavitating model nozzle. Experiments were conducted at Sector 7-BM of the Advanced Photon Source. Density and vapor distribution are measured from the quantitative absorption of monochromatic X-rays. The density field can then be tomographically reconstructed from the projections. The density is then validated against a range of compressible and incompressible numerical simulations. This research was performed at the 7-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (DOE-EERE).

  1. Particle motion induced by bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  2. Comparison of cavitation intensity in water and in molten aluminium using a high-temperature cavitometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2015-12-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to the industry have been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study, experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. In water, the highest cavitation activity is obtained for the lowest sonotrode tip amplitudes. Below the sonotrode, the cavitation intensity in liquid aluminium is found to be four times higher than in water.

  3. Application of Coupled-Cluster Methods to the Prediction and Interpretation of the Spectra of Molecules of Interest in Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The quality of fundamental vibrational frequencies determined using the CCSD(T) method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations) is shown to be very good, usually predicting band centers to within +/-8/cm. This approach is applied to several molecules of interest in atmospheric chemistry, including HNO, NO2(+), H2CO, and HOCl. The HNO molecule displays a large and unusual anharmonicity in the H-N stretch. For the calculation of ultraviolet (UV) spectra, the linear response CCSD (LRCCSD) approach (which is equivalent to EOM-CCSD) has been shown to yield vertical excitation energies that are accurate to approximately 0.1 eV for singly excited electronic states. This method together with more approximate methods is used to examine the UV spectra of several molecules important in stratospheric chemistry, including HOCl, Cl2O, ClOOCl, ClOOH, and HOOH.

  4. Experimental measurements of low temperature rate coefficients for neutral-neutral reactions of interest for atmospheric chemistry of Titan, Pluto and Triton: reactions of the CN radical.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sébastien B; Le Picard, Sébastien D; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of cyano radical, CN (X2sigma+) with three hydrocarbons, propane (CH3CH2CH3), propene (CH3CH=CH2) and 1-butyne (CH[triple band]CCH2CH3) have been studied over the temperature range of 23-298 K using a CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) apparatus combined with the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. These reactions are of interest for the cold atmospheres of Titan, Pluto and Triton, as they might participate in the formation of nitrogen and carbon bearing molecules, including nitriles, that are thought to play an important role in the formation of hazes and biological molecules. All three reactions are rapid with rate coefficients in excess of 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at the lowest temperatures of this study and show behaviour characteristic of barrierless reactions. Temperature dependences, different for each reaction, are compared to those used in the most recent photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere. PMID:21302546

  5. The effect of regime and structural parameters of an inclined Archimedean screw forepump on the volume of cavitation cavities, their elasticity, and cavitation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorev, Iu. E.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    Improved empiricotheoretical dependences of the volume of cavitation cavities and cavitation resistance on the cavitation number and liquid flowrate at the inlet to an inclined Archimedean centrifugal screw pump are derived. An analysis is presented of the influence of cavitation number, flowrate, and structural parameters of the forepump on the volume and elasticity of cavities, and on cavitation resistance.

  6. Cavitational Hydrothermal Oxidation: A New Remediation Process - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K. S.

    2001-07-05

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions.

  7. Sound signature of propeller tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Westerweel, Jerry; van Terwisga, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The design of an efficient propeller is limited by the harmful effects of cavitation. The insufficient understanding of the role of vortex cavitation in noise and vibration reduces the maximum efficiency by a necessary safety margin. The aim in the present study is to directly relate propeller cavitation sound to tip vortex cavity dynamics. This is achieved by a dedicated experiment in a cavitation tunnel on a specially designed two-bladed propeller using a high-speed video camera and a hydrophone. The sound signature of a tip vortex cavity is not evidently present in the sound spectrum above the tunnel background. The addition of a simulated wake inflow results in a high amplitude broadband sound. With a decrease in the free-stream pressure the centre frequency of this sound decreases as a result of a larger vortex cavity diameter. In the near future each blade passage in the high-speed video will be analyzed in detail. The frequency content of the cavity dynamics can then be directly related to the measured sound. An analytic model for vortex cavity dynamics resulting in a cavity eigenfrequency using a vortex velocity model can finally be evaluated as a design instrument for estimation of broadband sound from propeller cavitation.

  8. Suitability research on the cavitation model and numerical simulation of the unsteady pulsed cavitation jet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Yu, X. F.; Luan, D. Y.; Qu, Y. P.; Zhou, C.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the cavitation jet mechanism, it can first study its critical state of single-phase flow before cavity occurrence to explore the trend of pulsed cavitation jet. Then select the cavitation model to simulate the complex multiphase flow state. Such a step-by-step approach is beneficial to advance research reliably and steady, relying on the foundation for further solving the problem. Three turbulence models such as Euler Hybrid Model, Euler Two Phase Model and Euler Lagrange Model are discussed on their suitability. In this paper, it states only RNG k- ε turbulent model can simulate small scale vortex of jet in the transient simulation. Grid independent verification and the effect of time step is presented. The simulation results show that a large scale vortex ring surrounding jet flow in the nozzle, the pressure of vortex core is slightly lower than the upstream nozzle pressure. Considering the capture ability of small scale eddies, an equivalent pressure is established. The single-phase flow turbulence model is modified to simulate the turbulence flow in the self-excited pulsed cavitation after the cavitation occurs. Through different results comparison of not modified cavitation model and the modified cavitation model to the experimental results, it proves that the latter simulation results are relatively accurate.

  9. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Characteristics for Pump-jet Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yao; Pan, Guang; Huang, Qiaogao; Du, Xiaoxu

    2015-09-01

    With k — ε turbulent model, non-cavitating performance of a pump-jet propeller was obtained by calculating RANS equations. The comparison between calculation results and experiment data shown that the numerical model and method was reliable. The cavitating hydrodynamic performance of it was calculated and analyzed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations and sliding mesh. The effects of different inlet velocity ratio, cavitation number and flow velocity on cavitation characteristics of pump-jet were studied. When the cavitation occurred on the blades, the propeller thrust and torque decreased significantly, thereby causing open water efficiency reduced 15%. For the same cavitation number, as the inlet velocity ratio decreased, the pump-jet propeller blade cavitation phenomenon was more obvious. While for the same ratio, the smaller the number of cavitation, cavitation phenomenon was more remarkable. The more significant was that while the cavitation number was greater than a certain value, the blade cavitation phenomenon disappeared.

  11. On instationary mechanisms in cavitating micro throttles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beban, B.; Legat, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    The current investigation presents numerical simulations of cavitating flows in a simplified model of a mushroom valve chamber of a piezo common rail injection system. Two discharge throttles with different step diameters are investigated. The developed models are able to predict relevant features of cavitating flow in fuel injectors. Special attention is put on the investigation of wave dynamics and related instationary mechanisms in the discharge throttle and the valve chamber. To this respect, a compressible flow solver with a homogeneous mixture model and barotropic description of the diesel-like-fluid is utilized. Highly unsteady phenomena are observed in both investigated designs. The structure of the cavitating flow is further analyzed with an emphasis on the interaction between collapsing vapor clouds in the throttle step and reentrant motion in the discharge throttle. Furthermore, numerical simulations reveal significant influence of the throttle step diameter on the cavity dynamics.

  12. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  13. Inducer Hydrodynamic Forces in a Cavitating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a measurement device for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The device - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The rotating balance was calibrated statically using a dead-weight load system in order to generate the 6 x 12 calibration matrix later used to convert measured voltages to engineering units. Structural modeling suggested that the rotating assembly first bending mode would be significantly reduced with the balance s inclusion. This reduction in structural stiffness was later confirmed experimentally with a hammer-impact test. This effect, coupled with the relatively large damping associated with the rotating balance waterproofing material, limited the device s bandwidth to approximately 50 Hertz Other pre-test validations included sensing the test article rotating assembly built-in imbalance for two configurations and directly measuring the assembly mass and buoyancy while submerged under water. Both tests matched predictions and confirmed the device s sensitivity while stationary and rotating. The rotating balance was then demonstrated in a water test of a full-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure liquid oxygen pump inducer. Experimental data was collected a scaled operating conditions at three flow coefficients across a range of cavitation numbers for the single inducer geometry and radial clearance. Two distinct cavitation modes were observed symmetric tip vortex cavitation and alternate-blade cavitation. Although previous experimental tests on the same inducer demonstrated two additional

  14. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  15. Prediction of cavitation erosion for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquil, T.; Yakubov, S.; Rung, T.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the development of a cavitation erosion prediction method. The approach is tailored to marine applications and embedded into a VoF-based procedure for the simulation of turbulent flows. Supplementary to the frequently employed Euler-Euler models, Euler-Lagrange approaches are employed to simulate cavitation. The study aims to convey the merits of an Euler-Lagrange approach for erosion simulations. Accordingly, the erosion model is able to separate different damage mechanisms, e.g. micro-jets, single and collective bubble collapse, and also quantifies their contribution to the total damage. Emphasis is devoted to the prediction of the cavitation extend, the influence of compressible effects and the performance of the material damage model in practical applications. Examples included refer to 2D validation test cases and reveal a fair predictive accuracy.

  16. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  17. Correlations of thermodynamic effects for developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billet, M. L.; Holl, J. W.; Weir, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    The net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements for a pump are determined by the combined effects of cavitation, fluid properties, pump geometry, and pump operating point. An important part of this determination is the temperature depression (Delta T). Correlations are presented of the temperature depression for various degrees of developed cavitation on venturis and ogives. These correlations, based on a semi-empirical entrainment theory, express Delta T in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, Weber, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length (L/D). The Delta T data were obtained in Freon 114, hydrogen and nitrogen for the venturis and in Freon 113 and water for the ogives.

  18. Animal models of cavitation in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Helke, Kris L; Mankowski, Joseph L; Manabe, Yukari C

    2006-09-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis occurs with the highest frequency from patients with extensive, cavitary, pulmonary disease and positive sputum smear microscopy. In animal models of tuberculosis, the development of caseous necrosis is an important prerequisite for the formation of cavities although the immunological triggers for liquefaction are unknown. We review the relative merits and the information gleaned from the available animal models of pulmonary cavitation. Understanding the host-pathogen interaction important to the formation of cavities may lead to new strategies to prevent cavitation and thereby, block transmission. PMID:16359922

  19. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  20. Ideas in action: Solving a cavitation mystery

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Cavitation caused significant erosion from 1985 through 1990 on turbine runners at the 970-MW Murray 1 Power Station operated by Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Authority (SMHEA) in Australia. The problem was perplexing because no obvious cause could be found. Investigation eventually showed the problems stemmed form the runners sagging slightly from the correct height. Corrective measures, which included adjustment of runners and new control settings for the units, appear to have relieved the cavitation. The adjustments also reduced stress on the unit thrust-bearings, eliminating a future maintenance headache.

  1. POD study of aerated cavitation in a venturi nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, P.; Danlos, A.; Khelladi, S.; Ravelet, F.; Sarraf, C.; Bakir, F.

    2015-12-01

    The fact of injecting bubbles into a cavitating flow influences typical cavitating behavior. Cavitation and aerated cavitation experiments has been carried out on a symmetrical venturi nozzle with convergent/divergent angles of 18° and 8°, respectively. A snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique is used to identify different modes in terms of discharge flow velocity, pressure and injected quantity of air. The energy spectrum per given mode is also presented. The first four modes are outlined in the present paper for an aerated and non-aerated cavitating flows.

  2. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  3. Analytical Study of Cavitation Surge in a Hydraulic System.

    PubMed

    Kang, Donghyuk; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    In order to clarify effects of an accumulator, pipe lengths and gradients of pressure and suction performances on cavitation surge, one-dimensional stability analyses of cavitation surge were performed in hydraulic systems consisting of an upstream tank, an inlet pipe, a cavitating pump, a downstream pipe, and a downstream tank. An accumulator located upstream or downstream of the cavitating pump was included in the analysis. Increasing the distance between the upstream accumulator and the cavitating pump enlarged the stable region. On the other hand, decreasing the distance between the downstream accumulator and the cavitating pump enlarged the stable region. Furthermore, the negative gradient of a suction performance curve and the positive gradient of a pressure performance curve cause cavitation surge. PMID:25278638

  4. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  5. Cavitation of a Physically Associating Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Satish; Kundu, Santanu

    Self-assembly of block copolymers in selective solvents form ordered structures such as micelles, vesicles, and physically crosslinked gels due to difference in their interaction with solvents. These gels have wide range of applications in tissue engineering, food science and biomedical field due to their tunable properties and responsiveness with changing environmental conditions. Pressurization of a defect inside a physically associating gel can lead to elastic instability (cavitation) leading to failure of the gel. The failure behavior involves dissociation of physical networks. A thermoreversible, physically associating gel with different volume fractions of a triblock copolymer, poly (methyl methacrylate)-poly (n-butyl acrylate)-poly (methyl methacrylate) [PMMA-PnBA-PMMA] in 2-ethyl 1-hexanol, a midblock selective solvent, is considered here. Mechanical properties were investigated using shear rheology and cavitation experiments. The experimental data is fitted with a constitutive model that captures the stiffening behavior followed by softening behavior of a physical gel. Finite element analysis has been performed on cavitation rheology geometry to capture the failure behavior and to calculate energy release rate during cavitation experiments.

  6. Scale effect on unsteady cloud cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dular, M.; Khlifa, I.; Fuzier, S.; Adama Maiga, M.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.

    2012-11-01

    No experiment was conducted, yet, to investigate the scale effects on the dynamics of developed cavitating flow with periodical cloud shedding. The present study was motivated by the unclear results obtained from the experiments in a Venturi-type section that was scaled down 10 times for the purpose of measurements by ultra-fast X-ray imaging (Coutier-Delgosha et al. 2009). Cavitation in the original size scale section (Stutz and Reboud in Exp Fluids 23:191-198, 1997, Exp Fluids 29:545-552 2000) always displays unsteady cloud separation. However, when the geometry was scaled down, the cavitation became quasi steady although some oscillations still existed. To investigate this phenomenon more in detail, experiments were conducted in six geometrically similar Venturi test sections where either width or height or both were scaled. Various types of instabilities are obtained, from simple oscillations of the sheet cavity length to large vapor cloud shedding when the size of the test section is increased. It confirms that small scale has a significant influence on cavitation. Especially the height of the test section plays a major role in the dynamics of the re-entrant jet that drives the periodical shedding observed at large scale. Results suggest that the sheet cavity becomes stabile when the section is scaled down to a certain point because re-entrant jet cannot fully develop.

  7. Optical Measurements of Cavitation in Tribological Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tian; Morris, Nick; Coupland, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the use of a white light interformeter to measure the cavitation bubble and oil film thickness in a tribological contact and compares the results to theory. It is found that oil film thickness is best predicted by the theory proposed by Coyne and Elrod.

  8. Size scale effect in cavitation erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    An overview and data analyses pertaining to cavitation erosion size scale effects are presented. The exponents n in the power law relationship are found to vary from 1.7 to 4.9 for venturi and rotating disk devices supporting the values reported in the literature. Suggestions for future studies were made to arrive at further true scale effects.

  9. Relating xylem cavitation to transpiration in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic emmisions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Even though a body of work employing AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. A few s...

  10. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Saurel, Richard; Ahn, Byoung-Kwon; Ko, Sungho

    2011-12-01

    The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008) is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009) is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile). Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  11. Mechanisms of thrombolysis acceleration by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Selvaraj, Prashanth; Ahadi, Golnaz; Voie, Arne; Hoelscher, Thilo; Okita, Kohei; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Szeri, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies, in vitro and in vivo, have shown that High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) accelerates thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, for ischemic stroke. Although the mechanisms are not fully understood, cavitation is thought to play an important role in sonothrombolysis. The damage to a blood clot's fibrin fiber network from cavitation in a HIFU field is studied using two independent approaches for an embedded bubble. One method is extended to the more important scenario of a bubble outside a blood clot that collapses asymmetrically creating a jet towards the clot. There is significantly more damage potential from a bubble undergoing cavitation collapse outside the clot compared to a rapidly expanding bubble embedded within the clot structure. Also, the effects of the physical properties of skull bone when a HIFU wave propagates through it are examined by use of computer simulation. The dynamics of a test bubble placed at the focus is used in understanding of the pressure field. All other things being equal, the analysis suggests that skull thickness can alter the wave at the focus, which in turn can change the nature of cavitation bubble dynamics and the amount of energy available for clot damage. Now at MSOE.

  12. The detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Odermatt, P.; Etterlin, M.; Lerch, T.; Frei, M.; Farhat, M.

    2014-03-01

    This presentation describes an experimental approach for the detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis. Instead of using the high frequency pulses (typically 1MHz) only for transit time measurement different other signal characteristics are extracted from the individual signals and its correlation function with reference signals in order to gain knowledge of the water conditions. As the pulse repetition rate is high (typically 100Hz), statistical parameters can be extracted of the signals. The idea is to find patterns in the parameters by a classifier that can distinguish between the different water states. This classification scheme has been applied to different cavitation sections: a sphere in a water flow in circular tube at the HSLU in Lucerne, a NACA profile in a cavitation tunnel and a Francis model test turbine both at LMH in Lausanne. From the signal raw data several statistical parameters in the time and frequency domain as well as from the correlation function with reference signals have been determined. As classifiers two methods were used: neural feed forward networks and decision trees. For both classification methods realizations with lowest complexity as possible are of special interest. It is shown that three signal characteristics, two from the signal itself and one from the correlation function are in many cases sufficient for the detection capability. The final goal is to combine these results with operating point, vibration, acoustic emission and dynamic pressure information such that a distinction between dangerous and not dangerous cavitation is possible.

  13. Numerical analysis on cavitation inception in the rotary valve of the power steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeon Ryu, Gwang; Park, Sun Hong; Cho, Myung Hwan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2009-11-01

    The power steering valve directs the power steering oil to either side of a power piston and relieves the driver of the effort to turn the wheel, when a driver begins to operate the vehicle. It is well known that hiss noise occurring at that moment is caused mainly by cavitation of the oil inside the rotary valve. However, it is very difficult to check the flow pattern and the cavitation inception experimentally because of the complex geometry and high pressure in the interior of the rotary valve. In spite of the increasing interest in this flow phenomenon inside the rotary valve, only few studies have been reported. In the present study, this complex oil flow inside the rotary valve has been analyzed numerically using three-dimensional cavitation model provided by the commercial code, FLUENT 6.2. It is confirmed that the location of cavitation inception is similar to that obtained by the existing two-dimensional numerical analysis. Then, the volume fraction of oil vapor has been compared with the hiss noise level measured experimentally in a semi-anechoic room.

  14. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  15. Cavitation in hydraulic fluids. I - Inception in shear flow. II - Delay time for stepwise reduction in pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.

    1980-09-01

    A novel concentric-cylinder test apparatus was used to study the onset of cavitation in hydraulic fluids with allowance for the effects of shear. The fluids tested were base oils and include four types of paraffinic mineral oils and two types of naphthenic oils. In addition, the delay time of gaseous cavitation in seven types of hydraulic fluids and tap water was measured for a stepwise reduction in pressure from atmospheric pressure to given pressure. The longest delay time for the incipient cavitation is obtained for water-glycol fluids, and the second longest for tap water. Petroleum-based hydraulic fluids and the phosphate ester have almost the same delay times, which are slightly longer than for the base oil.

  16. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Background on thermal effects in cavitation. Physical properties of hydrogen. Multi-phase cavitation with thermal effect. Solution procedure. Cavitation model overview. Cavitation source terms. New cavitation model. Source term for bubble growth. One equation les model. Unsteady ogive simulations: liquid nitrogen. Unsteady incompressible flow in a pipe. Time averaged cavity length for NACA15 flowfield.

  17. Cellular High-Energy Cavitation Trauma – Description of a Novel In Vitro Trauma Model in Three Different Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuli; Risling, Mårten; Malm, Elisabeth; Sondén, Anders; Bolling, Magnus Frödin; Sköld, Mattias K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high-energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation, and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer-plate model is an in vitro high-energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation, and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer-plate model to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to control. In this study, we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose-dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray, a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 h post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies. PMID:26869990

  18. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  19. Appearance of Density Cavitations in the Laser Wake in Simulations of High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-L.

    2009-01-22

    Nonlinear interactions of high intensity, ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas produce many interesting features that may appear in computer simulations. One of these features commonly observed in Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations is the spontaneous appearance of long-lived density cavitations in the plasma wake region behind the laser pulse. To study these cavitations, several small 2D PIC simulations are run in which plasma density, density ramps, total simulation time, laser pulsewidth, laser intensity, and laser polarization parameters have been varied. Based on the simulation results, some possible aspects of an experiment designed to directly detect these structures are discussed.

  20. Quantification of optison bubble size and lifetime during sonication dominant role of secondary cavitation bubbles causing acoustic bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Kamaev, Pavel P; Hutcheson, Joshua D; Wilson, Michelle L; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation has been shown to deliver molecules into viable cells, which is of interest for drug and gene delivery applications. To address mechanisms of these acoustic bioeffects, this work measured the lifetime of albumin-stabilized cavitation bubbles (Optison) and correlated it with desirable (intracellular uptake of molecules) and undesirable (loss of cell viability) bioeffects. Optison was exposed to 500 kHz ultrasound (acoustic pressures of 0.6-3.0 MPa and energy exposures of 0.2-200 J/cm2) either with or without the presence of DU145 prostate cancer cells (10(6) cells/ml) bathed in calcein, a cell-impermeant tracer molecule. Bubble lifetime was determined using a Coulter counter and flow cytometer, while bioeffects were evaluated by flow cytometry. The lifetime of Optison cavitation nuclei was found to decrease and bioeffects (molecular uptake and loss of cell viability) were found to increase with increasing acoustic energy exposure. These bioeffects correlated well with the disappearance of bubbles, suggesting that contrast agent destruction either directly or indirectly affected cells, probably involving unstabilized cavitation nuclei created upon the destruction of Optison. Because Optison solutions presonicated to destroy all detectable bubbles also caused significant bioeffects, the indirect mechanism involving secondary cavitation bubbles is more likely. PMID:15101659

  1. Cavitation luminescence from flow over a hydrofoil in a cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, T. G.; Farhat, M.; Field, J. E.; Avellan, F.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes a photon-counting study of the cavitation luminescence produced by flow over a hydrofoil. This has previously been identified in water saturated with xenon. The four objectives of this study are: to determine whether luminescence can be obtained using air-saturated water; to quantify this emission, if it is present, as a function of flow parameters; to determine whether the photon arrivals occur with random timing, or in ‘bursts’; to put limits on the rates associated with any bursts. The flow experiments were performed in a cavitation tunnel capable of achieving flow velocities of up to about 50 m s(-1) in the test section. The experimental hydrofoil was a NACA 009 blade. Parameters varied were the flow velocity, the incident angle of the hydrofoil and the cavitation index. The results show that significant photon counts are recorded when leading-edge cavitation takes place and U-shaped vortices (cavities) are shed from the main cavity. The photon count increases dramatically as the flow velocity increases or the cavitation index is reduced. Departures from a Poisson distribution in the arrival times of photons at the detector suggest the presence of ‘bursts’. These may be related to the way vortices are shed from the main cavity. Limits are inferred on the detection rates associated with bursts.

  2. Cavitation you can hold in your hand... for a moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse; Pendlebury, Jonathon; Langley, Kenneth; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    In a popular party trick a glass bottle is filled with water and firmly struck at the top, breaking the bottle with nothing but bare hands. We present evidence that this trick is caused by cavitation formed by the acceleration of the fluid. Traditional velocity based methods for determining cavity formation do not successfully predict cavitation onset, however, a dimensionless cavitation equation derived from the Navier-Stokes equation predicts cavitation as a function of pressure head and acceleration. Our experiments utilized accelerometers and high-speed photography to observe cavitation with good agreement between experiments and predictions. Elucidating the onset of cavitation based on these simple parameters will help those who attempt this trick appreciate the physical complexity of this phenomenon and improve their bottle breaking skills.

  3. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  4. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  5. L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.C.

    2001-06-26

    The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

  6. High-harmonic generation in cavitated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Comier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-05-15

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using ultraintense lasers interacting with highly stripped ions in cavitated plasmas. This method relies on plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense drive beam (laser or electron beam) to produce an ion cavity. An ultrashort pulse laser propagating in the plasma-electron-free ion cavity generates laser harmonics. The longitudinal electron motion, which inhibits high-harmonic generation at high laser intensities, can be suppressed by the space-charge field in the ion cavity or by using a counterpropagating laser pulse. Periodic suppression of the longitudinal electron motion may also be used to quasi-phase-match. This method enables harmonic generation to be extended to the sub-A regime.

  7. Preventing cavitation in high energy centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Garbers, A.W.F.; Wasfi, A.K. Ltd. )

    1990-07-01

    Large-eye impellers for high energy centrifugal pumps were developed to meet the specification of reduced NPSH{sub r} at rated flow conditions. Unfortunately, this improved NPSH performance was not without adverse tradeoffs because an abnormal increase in noise, vibration and cavitation erosion were experienced at low flows. Centrifugal pumps are often used under widely varying and adverse conditions, and in the case of high energy and large-eye impeller pumps, these conditions should be evaluated very carefully. At petrochemical complexes in Secunda in the Republic of South Africa, a centrifugal pump application for lean carbonate solution experienced frequent failures. An investigation and literature survey indicated the cause was low flow cavitation. The purpose of this article is but to give design guidelines as obtained from literature and experience.

  8. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 3: Ogives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results for three, scaled, quarter-caliber ogives are given. Both desinent and developed cavity data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The desinent data do not exhibit a consistent ogive size effect, but the developed cavity data were consistently influenced by ogive size; B-factor increases with increasing ogive diameter. The developed cavity data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cavities. These data were correlated by using the extended theory derived in NASA-CR-2156 (volume II of this report series). The new correlating parameter MTWO, improves data correlation for the ogives, hydrofoil, and venturi and appears attractive for future predictive applications. The cavitation coefficient and equipment size effects are shown to vary with specific equipment-fluid combinations. A method of estimating cavitation coefficient from knowledge of the noncavitating pressure coefficient is suggested.

  9. Enhancing the aggressive intensity of hydrodynamic cavitation through a Venturi tube by increasing the pressure in the region where the bubbles collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyama, H.; Hoshino, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we used a Venturi tube for generating hydrodynamic cavitation, and in order to obtain the optimum conditions for this to be used in chemical processes, the relationship between the aggressive intensity of the cavitation and the downstream pressure where the cavitation bubbles collapse was investigated. The acoustic power and the luminescence induced by the bubbles collapsing were investigated under various cavitating conditions, and the relationships between these and the cavitation number, which depends on the upstream pressure, the downstream pressure at the throat of the tube and the vapor pressure of the test water, was found. It was shown that the optimum downstream pressure, i.e., the pressure in the region where the bubbles collapse, increased the aggressive intensity by a factor of about 100 compared to atmospheric pressure without the need to increase the input power. Although the optimum downstream pressure varied with the upstream pressure, the cavitation number giving the optimum conditions was constant for all upstream pressures.

  10. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  11. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  12. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L.; Wang, Qianxi X.; Leppinen, David M.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  13. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L; Wang, Qianxi X; Leppinen, David M; Walmsley, A Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  14. Numerical simulation on the cavitation of waterjet propulsion pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C. Z.; Cheng, L.; Shang, Y. N.; Zhou, J. R.; Yang, F.; Jin, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Waterjet propulsion system is widely used in high speed vessels with advantages of simple transmission mechanism, low noise underwater and good manoeuvrability. Compared with the propeller, waterjet propulsion can be used flow stamping to increasing cavitation resistance at high speed. But under certain conditions, such as low ship speed or high ship speed, cavitation problem still exists. If water-jet propulsion pump is run in cavitation condition for a long time, then the cavitation will cause a great deal of noise CFD is applied to analysis and predict the process of production and development of cavitation in waterjet propulsion pump. Based on the cavitation model of Zwart-Gerber-Belamri and a mixture of homogeneous flow model, commercial CFD software CFX was taken for characteristics of cavitation under the three operating conditions. Commercial software ANSYS 14.0 is used to build entity model, mesh and numerical simulation. The grid independence analysis determine the grid number of mixed flow pump model is about 1.6 million and the grid number of water-jet pump system unit is about 2.7 million. The cavitation characteristics of waterjet pump under three operating conditions are studied. The results show that the cavitation development trend is similar design and small rate of flow condition .Under the design conditions Cavitation bubbles are mainly gathered in suction surface of blade near the inlet side of the hub under the primary stage, and gradually extended to the water side in the direction of the rim with the loss of the inlet total pressure. Cavitation appears in hub before the blade rim, but the maximum value of gas content in blade rim is bigger than that in hub. Under large flow conditions, bubble along the direction of wheel hub extends to the rim gradually. Cavitation is found in the pressure surface of blade near the hub region under the critical point of cavitation nearby. When NPSHa is lower than critical point, the area covering by bubbles

  15. Calcium Is a Major Determinant of Xylem Vulnerability to Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Herbette, Stephane; Cochard, Herve

    2010-01-01

    Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a key parameter in the drought tolerance of trees, but little is known about the control mechanisms involved. Cavitation is thought to occur when an air bubble penetrates through a pit wall, and would hence be influenced by the wall's porosity. We first tested the role of wall-bound calcium in vulnerability to cavitation in Fagus sylvatica. Stems perfused with solutions of oxalic acid, EGTA, or sodium phosphate (NaPO4) were found to be more vulnerable to cavitation. The NaPO4-induced increase in vulnerability to cavitation was linked to calcium removal from the wall. In contrast, xylem hydraulic conductance was unaffected by the chemical treatments, demonstrating that the mechanisms controlling vulnerability to cavitation and hydraulic resistance are uncoupled. The NaPO4 solution was then perfused into stems from 13 tree species possessing highly contrasted vulnerability to cavitation. Calcium was found to be a major determinant of between-species differences in vulnerability to cavitation. This was evidenced in angiosperms as well as conifer species, thus supporting the hypothesis of a common mechanism in drought-induced cavitation. PMID:20547703

  16. Propeller sheet cavitation noise source modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunhwa; Lee, Jaehyuk; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Kyungseop; Seong, Woojae

    2014-02-01

    Propeller sheet cavitation is the main contributor to high level of noise and vibration in the after body of a ship. Full measurement of the cavitation-induced hull pressure over the entire surface of the affected area is desired but not practical. Therefore, using a few measurements on the outer hull above the propeller in a cavitation tunnel, empirical or semi-empirical techniques based on physical model have been used to predict the hull-induced pressure (or hull-induced force). In this paper, with the analytic source model for sheet cavitation, a multi-parameter inversion scheme to find the positions of noise sources and their strengths is suggested. The inversion is posed as a nonlinear optimization problem, which is solved by the optimization algorithm based on the adaptive simplex simulated annealing algorithm. Then, the resulting hull pressure can be modeled with boundary element method from the inverted cavitation noise sources. The suggested approach is applied to the hull pressure data measured in a cavitation tunnel of the Samsung Heavy Industry. Two monopole sources are adequate to model the propeller sheet cavitation noise. The inverted source information is reasonable with the cavitation dynamics of the propeller and the modeled hull pressure shows good agreement with cavitation tunnel experimental data.

  17. Alternative approach for cavitation damage study utilizing repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation is a common phenomenon in fluid systems that can lead to dramatic degradation of solid materials surface in contact with the cavitating media. Study of cavitation damage has great significance in many engineering fields. Current techniques for cavitation damage study either require large scale equipments or tend to introduce damages from other mechanisms. In this project, we utilized the cavitation phenomenon induced by laser optical breakdown and developed a prototype apparatus for cavitation damage study. In our approach, cavitation was generated by the repetitive pressure waves induced by high-power laser pulses. As proof of principal study, stainless steel and aluminum samples were tested using the novel apparatus. Surface characterization via scanning electron microscopy revealed damages such as indentation and surface pitting, which were similar to those reported in literature using other state-of-the-art techniques. These preliminary results demonstrated the new device was capable of generating cavitation damages and could be used as an alternative method for cavitation damage study.

  18. Photoacoustic cavitation for theranostics: mechanism, current progress and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Qin, D.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging cavitation technology, photoacoustic cavitation (PAC) means the formation of bubbles in liquids using focused laser and pre-established ultrasound synchronously. Its significant advantages include the decreased threshold of each modality and the precise location of cavitation determined by the focused laser. In this paper, a brief review of PAC is presented, including the physical mechanism description, the classic experimental technology, the representative results in variety of media, and its applications in biomedical imaging and therapy. Moreover, some preliminary results of PAC in perfluoropentane (PFP) liquid and PFP droplets investigated by passive cavitation detection (PCD) in our group are also presented.

  19. Acoustic methods for cavitation mapping in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Xu, S.; Ding, T.; Hu, H.; Liu, R.; Bai, C.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, cavitation is increasingly utilized in a wide range of applications in biomedical field. Monitoring the spatial-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles is of great significance for efficiency and safety in biomedical applications. In this paper, several acoustic methods for cavitation mapping proposed or modified on the basis of existing work will be presented. The proposed novel ultrasound line-by-line/plane-by-plane method can depict cavitation bubbles distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution and may be developed as a potential standard 2D/3D cavitation field mapping method. The modified ultrafast active cavitation mapping based upon plane wave transmission and reception as well as bubble wavelet and pulse inversion technique can apparently enhance the cavitation to tissue ratio in tissue and further assist in monitoring the cavitation mediated therapy with good spatial and temporal resolution. The methods presented in this paper will be a foundation to promote the research and development of cavitation imaging in non-transparent medium.

  20. Numerical investigation of cavitation performance on bulb tubular turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. G.; Guo, P. C.; Zheng, X. B.; Luo, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    The cavitation flow phenomena may occur in the bulb tubular turbine at some certain operation conditions, which even decrease the performance of units and causes insatiably noise and vibration when it goes worse. A steady cavitating flow numerical simulations study is carried out on the bulb tubular unit with the same blade pitch angle and different guide vane openings by using the commercial code ANSYS CFX in this paper. The phenomena of cavitation induction areas and development process are obtained and draws cavitation performance curves. The numerical results show that the travelling bubble cavity is the main types of cavitation development over a wide operating range of discharge and this type of cavitation begins to sensitive to the value of cavitation number when the discharge exceeding a certain valve, in this condition, it can lead to a severe free bubble formation with the gradually decrement of cavitation number. The reported cavitation performance curves results indicate that the flow blockage incident would happen because of a mount of free bubble formation in the flow passage when the cavity developed to certain extend, which caused head drop behavior and power broken dramatically and influenced the output power.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Cavitating Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Hsiao, C.-T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. DOE-SBIR, ONR (monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim)

  2. Dynamics of Isolated Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Bosschers, Johan; van Terwisga, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Performance of ship propellers and comfort levels in the surroundings are limited by various forms of cavitation. Amongst these forms tip vortex cavitation is one of the first appearing forms and is expected to be mainly responsible for the emission of broadband pressure fluctuations typically occurring between the 4th to the 7th blade passing frequency (approx. 40--70 Hz). These radiated pressure pulses are likely to excite parts of the hull structure resulting in a design compromise between efficiency and comfort. Insight is needed in the mechanism of acoustic emission from the oscillations by a tip vortex cavity. In the current experimental study the tip vortex cavity from a blade with an elliptic planform and sections based on NACA 662 - 415 with meanline a = 0 . 8 is observed using high speed shadowgraphy in combination with blade force and acoustic measurements. An analytic model describing three main cavity deformation modes is verified and used to explain the origin of a cavity eigenfrequency or ``vortex singing'' phenomenon observed by Maines and Arndt (1997) on the tip vortex cavity originating from the same blade. As no hydrodynamic sound originating from the tip vortex cavity was observed it is posed that a tip flow instability is essential for ``vortex singing.'' This research was funded by the Lloyd's Register Foundation as part of the International Institute for Cavitation Research.

  3. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  4. Cavitation effects in ultrasonic cleaning baths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasscock, Barbara H.

    1995-01-01

    In this project, the effect of cavitation from aqueous ultrasonic cleaning on the surfaces of metal and non-metal sample coupons was studied. After twenty cleaning cycles, the mass loss from the aluminum coupons averaged 0.22 mg/sq cm surface area and 0.014 mg/sq cm for both stainless steel and titanium. The aluminum coupons showed visual evidence of minor cavitation erosion in regions of previously existing surface irregularities. The non-metal samples showed some periods of mass gain. These effects are believed to have minor impact on hardware being cleaned, but should be evaluated in the context of specific hardware requirements. Also the ultrasonic activity in the large cleaning baths was found to be unevenly distributed as measured by damage to sheets of aluminum foil. It is therefore recommended that items being cleaned in an ultrasonic bath be moved or conveyed during the cleaning to more evenly distribute the cavitation action provide more uniform cleaning.

  5. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  6. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  7. Non-Newtonian effects on flow-generated cavitation and on cavitation in a pressure field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, A. T.; Ting, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Observations are presented which show that the stresses in a flow field of very dilute polymer are not well enough described by the Navier-Stokes equations to accurately predict cavitation. The contitutive equation for the particular polymer and concentration used is needed. The second-order fluid form in which accelerations are relatively important appears capable of explaining observed cavitation suppression by changing the pressure field due to flow. Bubble dynamics in stationary dilute polymer solutions are also examined and found to be little different from those in water.

  8. Titan Ice and Dust Experiment (TIDE): Detection and Analysis of Compounds of Interest to Astrobiology in the Lower Atmosphere and Surface of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Holland Paul M.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Takeruchi, Noreshige

    2004-01-01

    The Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission (TOAM) is a proposed concept for the Solar System Exploration Visions Mission, Titan Explorer, a follow-on to the Cassini-Huygens mission. TOAM would use a Titan polar orbiter and a lighter-than-air aerorover to investigate the surface and atmosphere of Titan. Astrobiology issues will be addressed though TOAM investigations including, for example: Distribution and composition of organics (atmospheric, aerosol, surface); Organic chemical processes, their chemical context and energy sources; and Seasonal variations and interactions of the atmosphere and surface. The TIDE instrument will perform in-situ analyses to obtain comprehensive and sensitive molecular and elemental assays of volatile organics in the atmosphere, oceans and surface. TIDE chemical analyses are conducted by a Gas Chromatograph-Ion Mobility Spectrometer (GC-IMS). This TIDE GC-IMS was a component of the mini-Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (mini-CIDEX) developed for the chemical analysis of a cometary environment. Both the GC and helium IMS of mini-CIDEX have been further developed to better meet the analytical and operational requirements of the TOAM. application. A Micro-ElectroMechanical System (MEMS) GC and Mini-Cell helium IMS are under development to replace their respective mini-CIDEX components, providing similar or advanced analytical capabilities.

  9. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  10. Examples of oil cavitation erosion in positive displacement pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halat, J. A.; Ellis, G. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of cavitation flow on piston type, positive displacement, hydraulic pumps are discussed. The operating principles of the pump and the components which are most subject to erosion effects are described. The mechanisms of cavitation phenomena are identified from photographic records. Curves are developed to show the solubility of air in water, oil-water emulsion, and industrial hydraulic oil.

  11. A comprehensive analysis of cavitation and liquid impingement erosion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation-erosion experimental data previously covering several materials tested in a rotating disk device and a magnetostriction apparatus were analyzed using new normalization and curve-fitting techniques. From this process a universal approach is derived which can include data from cavitation and liquid impingement studies for specific materials from different test devices.

  12. A continuum damage relation for hydrogen attack cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, M.W.D. van der; Giessen, E. van der

    1997-07-01

    A continuum damage relation (CDR) is proposed to describe the failure process of hydrogen attack, i.e., grain boundary cavitation of steels under conditions of high temperature and high hydrogen pressure. The cavitation is caused by the chemical reaction of hydrogen with grain boundary carbides forming cavities filled with high pressure methane. The micromechanisms described are the grain boundary cavitation and the dislocation creep of the grains. The CDR is based on two extreme cavitation rate distribution modes. In the first mode, the cavitation rate along the facets is uniform, resulting in a hydrostatic dilatation while the creep deformations remain relatively small. In the second mode, cavitation proceeds predominantly on grain boundary facets transverse to the principal macroscopic stress. This part of the CDR builds on Tvergaard`s constitutive relation for intergranular creep rupture [Tvergaard, V., Acta Metallurgica, 1984, 32, 1977] where the facet cavitation is constrained by creep of the surrounding grains. The mode corresponding to the highest cavitation rate is the active mode. The two-dimensional version of the CDR is verified against detailed finite element analyses of hydrogen attack in planar polycrystalline aggregates. Finally, the generalization to a three-dimensional CDR is discussed.

  13. FINAL REPORT. CAVITATIONAL HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION: A NEW REMEDIATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of ...

  14. Cavitation measurements on a pump-turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2015-12-01

    When a hydraulic turbine is operated at off-design conditions, cavitation on the runner and other machine parts can occur. Vibration, noise and erosion caused by cavitation can damage the turbine and lead to a limitation of the operational range. To avoid damage of the turbine, it is fundamental to get knowledge of the presence of cavitation. In this paper, the acoustic emissions at a pump-turbine model at different operating conditions with and without the presence of cavitation were recorded and analysed. High speed video recordings were carried out simultaneously to validate the acoustic measurements. The main goal of the investigation was to compare the acoustic emissions with the visual observations at operating conditions with cavitation on the leading edge of the turbine runner. The analysis of the recorded signals and the visual observations are in good accordance for the investigated operating points.

  15. Importance of the implosion of ESWL-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Delacrétaz, G; Rink, K; Pittomvils, G; Lafaut, J P; Vandeursen, H; Boving, R

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter is observed with a fiber optic stress sensing technique. When a stone is placed in the focus, besides the expected stress induced by the incoming shock wave emitted by the ESWL apparatus, a second delayed stress is observed some hundreds of microseconds later. The second stress is induced by a shock wave generated at the collapse of a cavitation bubble. Partial reflection of the incoming shock wave at the stone boundary is at the origin of the large cavitation bubble formation. Sensing fiber fracture results always from the second shock wave due to the collapse of the cavitation bubble. Thus the largest stress is generated at the collapse. When no target is placed in the focus of the lithotripter, no large cavitation bubble is formed and no delayed shock wave is observed. Our results demonstrate unambiguously the decisive role of cavitation in ESWL procedures. PMID:7754583

  16. Researches upon cavitation erosion behavior of some duplex steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, C.; Ghera, C.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels having a duplex structure formed by austenite and ferrite. The conclusions were obtained by using both the cavitation erosion characteristic curves and the pictures of the eroded surfaces obtained with performing optic microscopes. The researches were focused upon the optimal correlation between the cavitation erosion resistance and the rate of the two structural constituents. The tests were done with T2 facility, with ceramic crystals, which integrally respects the ASTM G32-2010 Standard. The obtained results present the cumulative effect upon cavitation erosion of the chemical composition, mechanical properties and the structural constituents. The results of the researches are of importance for the specialists which establishes the composition of the stainless steels used for manufacturing hydraulic machineries or other devices subjected to cavitation erosion.

  17. Application of Hydrodynamic Cavitation for Food and Bioprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogate, Parag R.

    Hydrodynamic cavitation can be simply generated by the alterations in the flow field in high speed/high pressure devices and also by passage of the liquid through a constriction such as orifice plate, venturi, or throttling valve. Hydrodynamic cavitation results in the formation of local hot spots, release of highly reactive free radicals, and enhanced mass transfer rates due to turbulence generated as a result of liquid circulation currents. These conditions can be suitably applied for intensification of different bioprocessing applications in an energy-efficient manner as compared to conventionally used ultrasound-based reactors. The current chapter aims at highlighting different aspects related to hydrodynamic cavitation, including the theoretical aspects for optimization of operating parameters, reactor designs, and overview of applications relevant to food and bioprocessing. Some case studies highlighting the comparison of hydrodynamic cavitation and acoustic cavitation reactors will also be discussed.

  18. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  19. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L. H.; Huang, X.; Ling, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones) mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale.

  20. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, Δt, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P−/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as Δt increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer Δts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for Δt ≥ 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  1. Effect of cavitation on spherical blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.

    1984-09-01

    For spherical blast waves propagating through a self-gravitating gas with an energy input Eα = E0tβ, where Eα is the energy released up to time t, E0 is a functional constant, and β is a constant, kinetic, internal heat, and gravitational potential energies have been computed. Taking the parameter A2, which characterises the gravitational field, equal to 2, variations of the percentages of these energies for β = 0, 1/2, 4/3, and 3 with shock strength have been presented. For β = 3, the effect of cavitation on the percentages of kinetic energy and internal heat energies has been explored.

  2. Clustering reveals cavitation-related acoustic emission signals from dehydrating branches.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Lidewei L; Sause, Markus G R; De Baerdemaeker, Niels J F; De Roo, Linus; Steppe, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    The formation of air emboli in the xylem during drought is one of the key processes leading to plant mortality due to loss in hydraulic conductivity, and strongly fuels the interest in quantifying vulnerability to cavitation. The acoustic emission (AE) technique can be used to measure hydraulic conductivity losses and construct vulnerability curves. For years, it has been believed that all the AE signals are produced by the formation of gas emboli in the xylem sap under tension. More recent experiments, however, demonstrate that gas emboli formation cannot explain all the signals detected during drought, suggesting that different sources of AE exist. This complicates the use of the AE technique to measure emboli formation in plants. We therefore analysed AE waveforms measured on branches of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. 'Chardonnay') during bench dehydration with broadband sensors, and applied an automated clustering algorithm in order to find natural clusters of AE signals. We used AE features and AE activity patterns during consecutive dehydration phases to identify the different AE sources. Based on the frequency spectrum of the signals, we distinguished three different types of AE signals, of which the frequency cluster with high 100-200 kHz frequency content was strongly correlated with cavitation. Our results indicate that cavitation-related AE signals can be filtered from other AE sources, which presents a promising avenue into quantifying xylem embolism in plants in laboratory and field conditions. PMID:27095256

  3. Influence of superoleophobic layer on the lubrication performance of partially textured bearing including cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauviqirrahman, M.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muchammad, Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    Surfaces with high superoleophobicity have attracted important attention because of their potential applications in scientific and industrial field. Especially classical metal bearing are faced with lubrication problem, because metal surface shows typically oleophilicity. The development of superolephobic metal surfaces which repel oil liquid droplet have significant applications in preventing the stiction. In addition, for classical bearing with texturing, the cavitation occurence is often considered as the main cause of the deterioration of the lubrication performance and thus shorten the lifetime of the bearing. In the present study, the exploration of the influence of adding the superoleophobic layer on the improvement of the performance of partially textured bearing in preventing the cavitation was performed. Navier slip model was used to model the behavior of the superoleophobic layer. A formulation of the modified Reynolds equation with mass-conserving boundary conditions was derived and the pressure distribution was of particular interest. The equations of lubrication were discretized using a finite volume method and solved using a tri-diagonal-matrix-algortihm. In this calculation, it was shown that after introducing the superoleophobic layer at the leading edge of the contact, the cavitation occurence can be prevented and thus the increased hydrodynamic pressure is found. However, the results showed that for deeper texture, the deterioration of the load support is noted. This findings may have useful implications to extend the life time of textured bearing.

  4. Wetting and cavitation pathways on nanodecorated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Amabili, Matteo; Lisi, Emanuele; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-03-28

    In this contribution we study the wetting and nucleation of vapor bubbles on nanodecorated surfaces via free energy molecular dynamics simulations. The results shed light on the stability of superhydrophobicity in submerged surfaces with nanoscale corrugations. The re-entrant geometry of the cavities under investigation is capable of sustaining a confined vapor phase within the surface roughness (Cassie state) both for hydrophobic and hydrophilic combinations of liquid and solid. The atomistic system is of nanometric size; on this scale thermally activated events can play an important role ultimately determining the lifetime of the Cassie state. Such a superhydrophobic state can break down by full wetting of the texture at large pressures (Cassie-Wenzel transition) or by nucleating a vapor bubble at negative pressures (cavitation). Specialized rare event techniques show that several pathways for wetting and cavitation are possible, due to the complex surface geometry. The related free energy barriers are of the order of 100kBT and vary with pressure. The atomistic results are found to be in semi-quantitative accord with macroscopic capillarity theory. However, the latter is not capable of capturing the density fluctuations, which determine the destabilization of the confined liquid phase at negative pressures (liquid spinodal). PMID:26905783

  5. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh–Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed. PMID:20000921

  6. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-04-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. The in vivo measurements were made under different combinations of HIFU treatment depths, laser wavelengths, and HIFU durations. The results demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to enhance cavitation effect by reducing cavitation threshold in vivo.

  7. Use of hydrodynamic cavitation in (waste)water treatment.

    PubMed

    Dular, Matevž; Griessler-Bulc, Tjaša; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; Heath, Ester; Kosjek, Tina; Krivograd Klemenčič, Aleksandra; Oder, Martina; Petkovšek, Martin; Rački, Nejc; Ravnikar, Maja; Šarc, Andrej; Širok, Brane; Zupanc, Mojca; Žitnik, Miha; Kompare, Boris

    2016-03-01

    The use of acoustic cavitation for water and wastewater treatment (cleaning) is a well known procedure. Yet, the use of hydrodynamic cavitation as a sole technique or in combination with other techniques such as ultrasound has only recently been suggested and employed. In the first part of this paper a general overview of techniques that employ hydrodynamic cavitation for cleaning of water and wastewater is presented. In the second part of the paper the focus is on our own most recent work using hydrodynamic cavitation for removal of pharmaceuticals (clofibric acid, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, carbamazepine), toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), green microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), bacteria (Legionella pneumophila) and viruses (Rotavirus) from water and wastewater. As will be shown, hydrodynamic cavitation, like acoustic, can manifest itself in many different forms each having its own distinctive properties and mechanisms. This was until now neglected, which eventually led to poor performance of the technique. We will show that a different type of hydrodynamic cavitation (different removal mechanism) is required for successful removal of different pollutants. The path to use hydrodynamic cavitation as a routine water cleaning method is still long, but recent results have already shown great potential for optimisation, which could lead to a low energy tool for water and wastewater cleaning. PMID:26515938

  8. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested. PMID:25571278

  9. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  10. Influence of cathodic and anodic currents on cavitation erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Auret, J.G.; Damm, O.F.R.A.; Wright, G.J. . Div. of Materials Science and Technology); Robinson, F.P.A. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A vibratory-type cavitation test rig was constructed to study the effect of polarizing currents applied to a cavitating body. The generation of gas by electrolysis reduced mechanical damage suffered by a cavitating body because of bubble collapse cushioning. However, the net effect on overall damage depended on several factors, including the intensity of mechanical attack, corrosion rate, and surface geometrical effects. A cathodic current was shown to always decrease the total volume loss rate, but the volume loss rate sometimes was increased and sometimes was reduced in the anodic current range.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  12. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, J. J.; Graham, S.; Myers, R.; Carlisle, R.; Stride, E.; Coussios, C. C.

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning.

  13. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J J; Graham, S; Myers, R; Carlisle, R; Stride, E; Coussios, C C

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning. PMID:26382515

  14. Effect of cavitation in high-pressure direct injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    As we move toward higher pressures for Gasoline Direct Injection and Diesel Direct Injection, cavitation has become an important issue. To better understand the effect of cavitation on the nozzle flow and primary atomization, we use a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin approach using multi-GPU parallelism to simulate the compressible flow inside and outside the nozzle. Phase change is included using the six-equations model. We investigate the effect of nozzle geometry on cavitation inside the injector and on primary atomization outside the nozzle.

  15. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  16. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale cavitation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the cavitation dynamics around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. Specifically, we study the temporal evolution of vapor nanobubbles that form around the solid nanoparticles heated over ps time scale and provide a detail description of the following vapor formation and collapse. For 8 nm diameter nanoparticles we observe the formation of vapor bubbles when the liquid temperature 0.5-1 nm away from the nanoparticle surface reaches ˜90% of the critical temperature, which is consistent with the onset of spinodal decomposition. The peak heat flux from the hot solid to the surrounding liquid at the bubble formation threshold is ˜20 times higher than the corresponding steady state critical heat flux. Detailed analysis of the bubble dynamics indicates adiabatic formation followed by an isothermal final stage of growth and isothermal collapse.

  17. Cavitation microstreaming and material transport around microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasseh, Richard; Tho, Paul; Ooi, Andrew; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Zhu, Yonggang

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that cavitation microstreaming plays a role in the therapeutic action of microbubbles driven by ultrasound, such as the sonothrombolytic and sonoporative phenomena. Microscopic particle-image velocimetry experiments are presented, showing that many different microstreaming patterns are possible around a microbubble when it is on a surface. Each pattern is associated with a particular oscillation mode of the bubble and generates a different shear stress distribution. It was found that it is possible to change the flow pattern by changing the sound frequency. Microstreaming flows around bubbles could be responsible for mixing therapeutic agents into the surrounding blood, as well as assisting sonoporative delivery of molecules across cell membranes. Appropriate tuning of the driving frequency may benefit therapies.

  18. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 2: Hydrofoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Boundary layer principles, along with two-phase concepts, are used to improve existing correlative theory for developed cavity data. Details concerning cavity instrumentation, data analysis, correlative techniques, and experimental and theoretical aspects of a cavitating hydrofoil are given. Both desinent and thermodynamic data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The thermodynamic data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cryogen cavities. The improved correlative formulas were used to evaluate these data. A new correlating parameter based on consideration of mass limiting two-phase flow flux across the cavity interface, is proposed. This correlating parameter appears attractive for future correlative and predictive applications. Agreement between theory and experiment is discussed, and directions for future analysis are suggested. The front half of the cavities, developed on the hydrofoil, may be considered as parabolically shaped.

  19. Wear, corrosion, and cavitation erosion characteristics of laser-surface-alloyed gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bransden, Antony S.; Tomlinson, W. J.

    1990-10-01

    There is significant industrial interest in methods to improve the surface properties of cast iron. This paper describes investigations of laser treatments to enhance cast iron surfaces by alloying with the elements chromium, nickel or cobalt, or a cobalt/chromium mixture. The coatings achieved are of high integrity, low porosity and uniform in composition, microstructure and hardness. Alloyed surfaces have been subjected to corrosion testing in a range of acids and to wear and cavitation erosion in distilled and salt waters. The data show substantial improvements over those obtained from unalloyed material. Results are presented and discussed including the response of the microstructure to the testing environments.

  20. Hign-speed penetration of projectile with cavitator into sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurskikh, Anna; Veldanov, Vladislav

    2011-06-01

    Cavitators are used in underwater projectiles design to form a cavern in which projectile could move with no or significantly reduced drag. An investigation of possible application of this structural element for penetration into porous media was conducted. High-speed impact of a conical-shaped head projectile with cavitator was studied in terms of its influence on penetration capacity and projectile stability in sand for impact velocity about 1500 m/s. Cavitators were manufactured of steel with different strength moduli, and thus two penetration regimes (with eroding/non-eroding cavitator) were compared. Numerical simulations showing wave propagation in target and projectile were performed in AUTODYN with Johnson-Cook model for projectile and granular model for sand.

  1. Cavitation Performance of a Centrifugal Pump with Water and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.; Barton, R. K.; Cramer, V. F.; Robinson, M. J.

    1961-01-01

    The cavitation performance of a given centrifugal pump with water (hot and cold) and mercury is compared. It is found that there are significant scale effects with all fluids tested, with the Thoma cavitation parameter decreasing in all cases for increased pump speed or fluid Reynolds' number. The data for a fixed flow coefficient fall into a single curve when plotted against pump speed (or fluid velocity), rather than against Reynolds' number. Conversely, the Thoma parameter for a given Reynolds' number is approximately twice as large for mercury as for water. The direction of this variation is as predicted from consideration of the cavitation thermodynamic parameters which vary by a factor of 10(exp 7) between these fluids. No difference in cavitation performance between hot and cold water (approximately 160 F and 80 F) was observed, However, the thermodynamic parameters vary only by a factor of 5.

  2. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  3. Influence of cavitation on near nozzle exit spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshahi, M.; Yan, Y.; Nouri, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of cavitation inside multi-hole injectors for direct injection internal combustion (IC) engineshas been addressed in many previous investigations. Still, the effect of cavitation on jet spray, its stability and liquid breakup and atomisation is not yet fully understood. The current experimental work aims to address some of these issues. It focuses on the initiation and development of cavitation inside a 7× enlarged transparent model of a symmetric 6-hole spark ignition direct injection (SIDI) injector and quantifies the effect of cavitation on near-nozzle spray cone angle and stability utilising high speed Mie scattering visualisation. The regions studied include the full length of the nozzle and its exitjet spray wherethe primary breakup takes place.

  4. Design method of water jet pump towards high cavitation performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L. L.; Che, B. X.; Hu, L. J.; Wu, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    As one of the crucial components for power supply, the propulsion system is of great significance to the advance speed, noise performances, stabilities and other associated critical performances of underwater vehicles. Developing towards much higher advance speed, the underwater vehicles make more critical demands on the performances of the propulsion system. Basically, the increased advance speed requires the significantly raised rotation speed of the propulsion system, which would result in the deteriorated cavitation performances and consequently limit the thrust and efficiency of the whole system. Compared with the traditional propeller, the water jet pump offers more favourite cavitation, propulsion efficiency and other associated performances. The present research focuses on the cavitation performances of the waterjet pump blade profile in expectation of enlarging its advantages in high-speed vehicle propulsion. Based on the specifications of a certain underwater vehicle, the design method of the waterjet blade with high cavitation performances was investigated in terms of numerical simulation.

  5. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  6. Freezing of Xylem Sap Without Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, H. T.

    1967-01-01

    Freezing of stem sections and entire twigs of hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) has been demonstrated to occur without increasing the resistance to the movement of water through the frozen part after rewarming. This was interpreted to mean that freezing did not produce cavitation in the xylem sap even though A) the sap was unquestionably frozen; B) it contained dissolved gases; and C) it was under tension before freezing and after. Freezing stem sections of some other evergreen gymnosperms during the summer again produced no evidence for cavitation of the xylem sap. On the other hand, freezing stem sections of some angiosperms invariably increased the resistance to sap flow leading to wilting and death in a few hours when the sap tension was at normal daytime values at the time of freezing. These results were interpreted to mean that the bordered pits on the tracheids of gymnosperms function to isolate the freezing sap in each tracheid so that the expansion of water upon freezing not only eliminates any existing tension but also develops positive pressure in the sap. Dissolved gases frozen out of solution may then be redissolved under this positive pressure as melting occurs. As the bubbles are reduced in size by this ice pressure developed in an isolated tracheid, further pressure is applied by the surface tension of the water against air. If the bubbles are redissolved or are reduced to sufficient small size by the time the tension returns to the sap as the last ice crystals melt, then the internal pressure from surface tension in any existing small bubbles may exceed the hydrostatic tension of the melted sap and the bubbles cannot expand and will continue to dissolve. PMID:16656485

  7. Modelling on cavitation in a diffuser with vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, J.

    2013-04-01

    Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience, problem with the diffuser with vortex generator was defined. The problem describes unsteady multiphase flow of water. Different cavitation models were used when modelling in Fluent, flow condition is inlet and pressure condition is outlet. Boundary conditions were specified by Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan's Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. Numerical modelling is compared with experiment.

  8. Causes and formation of cavitation in mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Graf, T; Reul, H; Detlefs, C; Wilmes, R; Rau, G

    1994-04-01

    Cavitation may develop on mechanical valvular prostheses in the mitral position; it causes blood damage and, under particularly adverse conditions, it may result in sudden failure of the prosthesis. Therefore, with regard to future development of mechanical heart valves, the pattern of cavitation and its predisposing factors in different types of prostheses were investigated in in vitro studies, which focused on the analysis of valve closure dynamics and the influence of design parameters on the cavitation-inducing pressure drop at the artificial valve. It was found that cavitation is produced primarily by the deceleration of the closing body of the valve. At 900g, the measured deceleration of the closing bodies falls in the range of the decelerations determined in oscillation experiments for investigating cavitation-induced material erosion. The pressure drop produced thereby is overlapped by the pressure drop in accelerated or turbulent flow regions produced by design characteristics at outlet struts, stop faces or sealing lips during backflow through the closing disc. These phenomena exist particularly in regions of high flow velocity, i.e. at the instant of closure at the maximum distance from the bearing axis of the closing body (12 o'clock position). The onset of cavitation is additionally promoted in this position by a tight joint between the closing body and the ring. Oscillations of the closing body generally have a negligible effect on the cavitation behavior. From these relationships one can infer that cavitation can be avoided in future in mechanical heart valves by locally limited design measures. Especially, unsteadiness in the backflow through the closing valve is to be avoided. PMID:8061870

  9. Research on the characteristics of quasi-steady cavitation in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Li, X. J.; Si, Q. R.; Luo, Y.

    2015-01-01

    With the pressure decreasing, the process of cavitation in a centrifugal pump could be summarized as incipient cavitation, quasi-steady cavitation and unsteady cavitation. Quasi-steady cavitation is the condition that is between the incipient cavitation and unsteady cavitation in a centrifugal pump. Under this condition, the intensity of cavitation is relatively weak, and the head of the pump almost remains unchanged, but the cavitation exists, causing damage to the impeller by pitting and erosion. So it is important to investigate the quasi-steady cavitation. In this paper, both the numerical and experimental methods had been carried out to investigate the characteristics of quasi-steady cavitation. The internal flow in the pump, the performance of cavitation and the inlet and outlet pressure pulsation of the pump measured through experimental method have been studied under different NPSHa conditions. It was found that the head decreases about 0.77%-1.38% from non-cavitation condition and it could be regarded as the quasi-steady cavitation. Little change has been found from the internal flow between non-cavitation condition and quasi-steady cavitation condition. The period of inlet pressure pulsation changes from the time that the blade passes by to the period of shaft rotating with the development of cavitation. The dominant frequency of the inlet pressure pulsation is two times of shaft frequency whose amplitudes decrease firstly and then increase to a peak value, followed by a decrease to a low value in quasi-steady cavitation conditions. The dominant frequency of the outlet pressure pulsation is blade passing frequency whose amplitudes increase firstly and then decrease gradually with the decrease of NPSHa.

  10. Effect of cavitation on flow structure of a tip vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthieu, Dreyer; Reclari, Martino; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices, which may develop in axial turbines and marine propellers, are often associated with the occurrence of cavitation because of the low pressure in their core. Although this issue has received a great deal of attention, it is still unclear how the phase transition affects the flow structure of such a vortex. In the present work, we investigate the change of the vortex structure due to cavitation incipience. The measurement of the velocity field is performed in the case of a tip vortex generated by an elliptical hydrofoil placed in the test section of EPFL high speed cavitation tunnel. To this end, a 3D stereo PIV is used with fluorescent seeding particles. A cost effective method is developed to produce in-house fluorescent seeding material, based on polyamide particles and Rhodamine-B dye. The amount of cavitation in the vortex core is controlled by the inlet pressure in the test section, starting with the non-cavitating case. We present an extensive analysis of the vorticity distribution, the vortex intensity and core size for various cavitation developments. This research is supported by CCEM and swisselectric research.

  11. Researches upon the cavitation erosion behaviour of austenite steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Salcianu, L. C.; Bordeasu, D.; Duma, S. T.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paper analyzes the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels with 100% austenitic structure but differing by the chemical composition and the values of mechanical properties. The research is based on the MDE(t) and MDER(t) characteristic curves. We studied supplementary the aspect of the eroded areas by other to different means: observations with performing optical microscopes and roughness measurements. The tests were done in the T2 vibratory facility in the Cavitation Laboratory of the Timisoara Polytechnic University. The principal purpose of the study is the identification of the elements influencing significantly the cavitation erosion resistance. It was established the effect of the principal chemical components (determining the proportion of the structural components in conformity the Schaffler diagram) upon the cavitation erosion resistance. The results of the researches present the influence of the proportion of unstable austenite upon cavitation erosion resistance. The stainless steel with the great proportion of unstable austenite has the best behavior. The obtained conclusion are important for the metallurgists which realizes the stainless steels used for manufacturing the runners of hydraulic machineries (turbines and pumps) with increased resistance to cavitation attack.

  12. Computing Thermal Effects of Cavitation in Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Dash, Sanford M.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program implements a numerical model of thermal effects of cavitation in cryogenic fluids. The model and program were developed for use in designing and predicting the performances of turbopumps for cryogenic fluids. Prior numerical models used for this purpose do not account for either the variability of properties of cryogenic fluids or the thermal effects (especially, evaporative cooling) involved in cavitation. It is important to account for both because in a cryogenic fluid, the thermal effects of cavitation are substantial, and the cavitation characteristics are altered by coupling between the variable fluid properties and the phase changes involved in cavitation. The present model accounts for both thermal effects and variability of properties by incorporating a generalized representation of the properties of cryogenic fluids into a generalized compressible-fluid formulation for a cavitating pump. The model has been extensively validated for liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Using the available data on the properties of these fluids, the model has been shown to predict accurate temperature-depression values.

  13. Cavitation damage prediction for the JSNS mercury target vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The liquid mercury target system for the Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) at the Materials and Life science experimental Facility (MLF) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is designed to produce pulsed neutrons. The mercury target vessel in this system, which is made of type 316L stainless steel, is damaged by pressure wave-induced cavitation due to proton beam bombardment. Currently, cavitation damage is considered to be the dominant factor influencing the service life of the target vessel rather than radiation damage. In this study, cavitation damage to the interior surface of the target vessel was predicted on the basis of accumulated damage data from off-beam and on-beam experiments. The predicted damage was compared with the damage observed in a used target vessel. Furthermore, the effect of injecting gas microbubbles on cavitation damage was predicted through the measurement of the acoustic vibration of the target vessel. It was shown that the predicted depth of cavitation damage is reasonably coincident with the observed results. Moreover, it was confirmed that the injection of gas microbubbles had an effect on cavitation damage.

  14. Experimental investigation of a cavitating backward-facing step flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, G.; Djeridi, H.; Barre, S.

    2014-03-01

    The present study is the first part of global experimental work which is intended to produce a refined database of liquid and vapor phases and to improve CFD modeling of turbulent cavitating flows which can occur in rocket engine turbo-pump inducers. The purpose of the present experimental study is to get a better understanding of the dynamics of the liquid phase in a cavitating backward facing step flow and provide a refined database for the physical analysis of interaction between turbulence and cavitation. The backward facing step flow provides us a well-known test case to compare vortex dynamics and a realistic industrial configuration such as backflow in turbo machinery. Experiments were conducted in the hydrodynamic tunnel of CREMHyG at Grenoble,which was especially designed to study cavitating shear flows at high Reynolds numbers. To highlight the liquid phase topology and dynamics such as large vortex structures, free shear layer instability, reattachment wall interaction and reverse flow, the flow is characterized by Laser Induced Fluoresence Particles Image Velocimetry (PIV-LIF) measurements techniques and by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) techniques using spectral analysis to characterize the vortex shedding dynamics. The liquid phase was analyzed at different cavitation levels corresponding to 1% to 45% of void ratio range inside the shear layer, recirculation area and reattachment zone. The mean and fluctuating liquid velocities are clearly modified by the vapor phase and the scale of the vortical structures tends to be smaller inducing a destructuration of turbulence by cavitation.

  15. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow in journal bearing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M.; Schmidt, M.; Stücke, P.

    2013-04-01

    The appearance of cavitation is still a problem in technical and industrial applications. Especially in automotive internal combustion engines, hydrodynamic journal bearings are used due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Cavitation flows inside the bearings reduces the load capacity and leads to a risk of material damages. Therefore an understanding of the complex flow phenomena inside the bearing is necessary for the design development of hydrodynamic journal bearings. Experimental investigations in the fluid domain of the journal bearing are difficult to realize founded by the small dimensions of the bearing. In the recent years more and more the advantages of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to investigate the detail of the cavitation flows. The analysis in the paper is carried out in a two-step approach. At first an experimental investigation of journal bearing including cavitation is selected from the literature. The complex numerical model validated with the experimental measured data. In a second step, typically design parameters, such as a groove and feed hole, which are necessary to distribute the oil supply across the gap were added into the model. The paper reflects on the influence of the used design parameters and the variation of the additional supply flow rate through the feed hole regarding to cavitation effects in the bearing. Detailed pictures of the three-dimensional flow structures and the cavitation regions inside the flow film of the bearing are presented.

  16. Evaluation of the Destruction of the Harmful Cyanobacteria, Microcystis aeruginosa, with a Cavitation and Superoxide Generating Water Treatment Reactor.

    PubMed

    Medina, Victor F; Griggs, Chris S; Thomas, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Cyanobacterial/Harmful Algal Blooms are a major issue for lakes and reservoirs throughout the U.S.A. An effective destructive technology could be useful to protect sensitive areas, such as areas near water intakes. The study presented in this article explored the use of a reactor called the KRIA Water Treatment System. The reactor focuses on the injection of superoxide (O2 (-)), which is generated electrochemically from the atmosphere, into the water body. In addition, the injection process generates a significant amount of cavitation. The treatment process was tested in 190-L reactors spiked with water from cyanobacterial contaminated lakes. The treatment was very effective at destroying the predominant species of cyanobacteria, Microcystis aeruginosa, organic matter, and decreasing chlorophyll concentration. Microcystin toxin concentrations were also reduced. Data suggest that cavitation alone was an effective treatment, but the addition of superoxide improved performance, particularly regarding removal of cyanobacteria and reduction of microcystin concentration. PMID:26846314

  17. A piezoelectric polymer cavitation sensor installed in an emulsion generation microchannel device and an evaluation of cavitation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Takefumi; Yabumoto, Masaki; Suzumori, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    In previous works, ultrasonic emulsification was realized using small microchannel devices oscillated by piezoelectric transducers. By using the devices, the emulsification in the flow process was also realized. In these devices, the driving frequency was higher than 2 MHz. This value is higher than the maximum audible field. On the other hand, the frequency is too high to utilize the cavitation effect. This is because the cavitation threshold depends on the frequency. The aim of this study is to confirm the cavitation state in the microchannel device using a piezoelectric polymer sensor. A micropatterned cavitation detection sensor has been fabricated by a photolithography technique and evaluated in a high-intensity ultrasound field. The emulsification state in the microchannel device has been evaluated using the fabricated sensor.

  18. Predicting the Inception Cavitation of a Reversible Pump- Turbine in Pump Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Xiao, Ruofu; Zhu, Di; Liu, Weichao

    2015-12-01

    Inception cavitation is a crucial indicator for reversible pump-turbines especially in pump mode. In actual applications, it is difficult to use CFD for the inception cavitation character. In this study, CFD simulation is conducted to find a proper way to evaluate the inception cavitation, different levels of vapor volume fraction in the impeller is predicted based on the tested results. Results show that the prediction of the location and scale of cavitation is accurate. The predicted cavitation number also matches the experimental data well. The vapor volume fraction levels from 0.0001% to 0.001% are recommended as the criterion of inception cavitation.

  19. Evaluation of Turbulence Models Performance in Predicting Incipient Cavitation in an Enlarged Step-Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, H.; Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.

    2015-12-01

    Predictive capability of RANS and LES models to calculate incipient cavitation of water in a step nozzle is assessed. The RANS models namely, Realizable k-ε, SST k-ω and Reynolds Stress Model did not predict any cavitation, due to the limitation of RANS models to predict the low pressure vortex cores. LES WALE model was able to predict the cavitation by capturing the shear layer instability and vortex shedding. The performance of a barotropic cavitation model and Rayleigh-Plesset-based cavitation models was compared using WALE model. Although the phase change formulation is different in these models, the predicted cavitation and flow field were not significantly different.

  20. Experimental investigation on noise of cavitation nozzle and its chaotic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Haifeng; Xu, Junchao; Tang, Chuanlin

    2013-07-01

    The researches of cavitation noise mainly focus on the incipiency and developing of cavitation to prevent the cavititation erosion in the hydraulic machinery, while there is few report about the collapse strength of cavitation bubbles produced by water jet through the cavitation nozzle to utilize efficiently the collapse energy of cavitation bubbles. The cavitation noise signals are collected with hydrophones for the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position and the nozzle exit separately in the conditions of different standoff distance. The features of signal's frequency spectrum and power spectrum are analyzed for various nozzles by way of classical methods. Meanwhile, based on chaotic theory, phase space reconstruction is processed and the maximum Lyapunov index is calculated separately for each cavitation signal's time series. The results of chaotic analysis are compared with the one of conventional analysis. The analyzed data show that there are the marked differences at the spectrum between the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position while the standoff distance is 35 mm, which mainly displays at the high frequency segment (60-120 kHz). The maximum Lyapunov index calculated appear at standoff distance 35 mm, which is an optimum standoff distance for the most bubbles to collapse at the target. At the nozzle exit, the noise signal of cavitation nozzle is different from the general nozzle, which also displays at the high frequency segment. The results demonstrate that the water jet modulated by the cavitation nozzle can produce effectually cavitation, and at the target position the amplitude and energy of noise spectrum in high frequency segment for cavitation nozzle are higher than conventional nozzle and the Lyapunov index of cavitation nozzle is larger than conventional nozzle as the standoff distance is less than 55 mm. The proposed research reveals that the cavitation noise produced by collapse of cavitation bubbles

  1. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is

  2. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  3. Numerical calculation of thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Suguo; Wang, Guoyu

    2012-11-01

    A key design issue related to the turbopump of the rocket engine is that cavitation occurs in cryogenic fluids when the fluid pressure is lower than the vapor pressure at a local thermodynamic state. Cavitation in cryogenic fluids generates substantial thermal effects and strong variations in fluid properties, which in turn alter the cavity characteristics. To date, fewer investigate the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids clearly by the numerical methods due to the difficulty of the heat transfer in the phase change process. In order to study the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluid, computations are conducted around a 2D quarter caliber hydrofoil in liquid nitrogen and hydrogen respectively by implementing modified Merkle cavitation model, which accounts for the energy balance and variable thermodynamic properties of the fluid. The numerical results show that with the thermal effect, the vapour content in constant location decreases, the cavity becomes more porous and the interface becomes less distinct which shows increased spreading while getting shorter in length. In the cavity region, the temperature around the cavity depresses due to absorb the evaporation latent heat and the saturation pressure drops. When the vapour volume fraction is higher, the temperature depression and pressure depression becomes larger. It is also observed that a slight temperature rise is found above the reference fluid temperature at the cavity rear end attributed to the release of latent heat during the condensation process. When the fluid is operating close to its critical temperature, thermal effects on cavitation are more obviously in both the liquid nitrogen and hydrogen. The thermal effect on cavitation in liquid hydrogen is more distinctly compared with that in liquid nitrogen due to the density ratio, vapour pressure and other variable properties of the fluid. The investigation provides aid for the design of the cryogenic pump of the liquid rocket.

  4. Cavitation modeling and diesel engine cylinder liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Gautam; Pardue, Sally

    2003-10-01

    A common occurrence of cavitation damage is the waterside pitting of a wet sleeve liner in a diesel engine. The automotive industry utilizes an ultrasonic test of 20 kHz according to ASTM standards to quantify the effectiveness of engine coolant additives to prevent damage. However, recent tests indicate a mismatch between the ultrasonic test results and actual engine test runs. The focus of this study is to generate numerical models of bubble dynamics using already published literature. In most of the published papers higher-range frequencies (ultrasonic >15 kHz) are used. It is useful to explore the results of lower excitation frequencies as the vibrating frequencies of a diesel engine liner are between 500-9000 Hz. A Rayleigh-Plesset equation, nonlinear in nature, is used to plot the relation between bubble radius and time. Plots of the numerical solution from MATLAB are compared with plots published in the literature. Results from when the frequency of excitation is changed to the liner wall frequency and the fluid properties are changed to approximate engine conditions will be presented. Future work will examine the energy released by the bubble collapse and its correlation with erosion measured as mass change in a standard test button.

  5. Attached cavitation at a small diameter ultrasonic horn tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Dular, Matevž

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids, for instance, for cell disruption or sonochemical reactions. They are operated typically in the frequency range up to about 50 kHz and have tip diameters from some mm to several cm. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e., below the acoustic driving frequency. Here, we present a systematic study of the cavitation dynamics in water at a 20 kHz horn tip of 3 mm diameter. The system was investigated by high-speed imaging with simultaneous recording of the acoustic emissions. Measurements were performed under variation of acoustic power, air saturation, viscosity, surface tension, and temperature of the liquid. Our findings show that the liquid properties play no significant role in the dynamics of the attached cavitation at the small ultrasonic horn. Also the variation of the experimental geometry, within a certain range, did not change the dynamics. We believe that the main two reasons for the peculiar dynamics of cavitation on a small ultrasonic horn are the higher energy density on a small tip and the inability of the big tip to "wash" away the gaseous bubbles. Calculation of the somewhat adapted Strouhal number revealed that, similar to the hydrodynamic cavitation, values which are relatively low characterize slow cavitation structure dynamics. In cases where the cavitation follows the driving frequency this value lies much higher - probably at Str > 20. In the spirit to distinguish the observed phenomenon with other cavitation dynamics at ultrasonic transducer surfaces, we suggest to term the observed phenomenon of attached cavities partly covering the full horn

  6. Cavitating flow during water hammer using a generalized interface vaporous cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadafi, Mohamadhosein; Riasi, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    In a transient flow simulation, column separation may occur when the calculated pressure head decreases to the saturated vapor pressure head in a computational grid. Abrupt valve closure or pump failure can result in a fast transient flow with column separation, potentially causing problems such as pipe failure, hydraulic equipment damage, cavitation or corrosion. This paper reports a numerical study of water hammer with column separation in a simple reservoir-pipeline-valve system and pumping station. The governing equations for two-phase transient flow in pipes are solved based on the method of characteristics (MOC) using a generalized interface vaporous cavitating model (GIVCM). The numerical results were compared with the experimental data for validation purposes, and the comparison indicated that the GIVCM describes the experimental results more accurately than the discrete vapor cavity model (DVCM). In particular, the GIVCM correlated better with the experimental data than the DVCM in terms of timing and pressure magnitude. The effects of geometric and hydraulic parameters on flow behavior in a pumping station with column separation were also investigated in this study.

  7. Observation of pressure variation in the cavitation region of submerged journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Visual observations and pressure measurements in the cavitation zone of a submerged journal bearing are described. Tests were performed at various shaft speeds and ambient pressure levels. Some photographs of the cavitation region are presented showing strong reverse flow at the downstream end of the region. Pressure profiles are presented showing significant pressure variations inside the cavitation zone, contrary to common assumptions of constant cavitation pressure.

  8. Cavitation assisted delignification of wheat straw: a review.

    PubMed

    Iskalieva, Asylzat; Yimmou, Bob Mbouyem; Gogate, Parag R; Horvath, Miklos; Horvath, Peter G; Csoka, Levente

    2012-09-01

    Wheat is grown in most of the Indian and Chinese regions and after harvesting, the remaining straw offers considerable promise as a renewable source most suitable for papermaking and as a pulping resource. Delignification of wheat straw offers ample scope for energy conservation by way of the application of the process intensification principles. The present work reviews the pretreatment techniques available for improving the effectiveness of the conventional approach for polysaccharide component separation, softening and delignification. A detailed overview of the cavitation assisted delignification process has been presented based on the earlier literature illustrations and important operational guidelines have been presented for overall low-cost and amenable energy utilization in the processes. The effectiveness of the methods has been evaluated according to yield and properties of the isolated fibers in comparison to the conventional treatment. Also the experimental results of one such non-conventional treatment scheme based on the use of hydrodynamic cavitation have been presented for the pulping of wheat straw. The effect of hydrodynamically induced cavitation on cell wall matrix and its components have been characterized using FT-IR analysis with an objective of understanding the cavitation assisted digestion mechanism on straws. It has been observed that the use of hydrodynamic cavitation does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes relocalisation and partial removal of lignin. Overall it appears that considerable improvement can be obtained due to the use of pretreatment or alternate techniques for delignification, which is an energy intensive step in the paper making industries. PMID:22410399

  9. Hydrodynamic cavitation in microsystems. II. Simulations and optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, M.; Pellone, C.; Zermatten, P. J.; Ayela, F.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical calculations in the single liquid phase and optical observations in the two-phase cavitating flow regime have been performed on microdiaphragms and microventuris fed with deionized water. Simulations have confirmed the influence of the shape of the shrinkage upon the contraction of the jet, and so on the localisation of possible cavitating area downstream. Observations of cavitating flow patterns through hybrid silicon-pyrex microdevices have been performed either via a laser excitation with a pulse duration of 6 ns, or with the help of a high-speed camera. Recorded snapshots and movies are presented. Concerning microdiaphragms, it is confirmed that very high shear rates downstream the diaphragms are the cause of bubbly flows. Concerning microventuris, a gaseous cavity forms on a boundary downstream the throat. As a consequence of a microsystem instability, the cavity displays a high frequency pulsation. Low values Strouhal numbers are associated to such a sheet cavitation. Moreover, when the intensity of the cavitating flow is reduced, there is a mismatch between the frequency of the pulsation of the cavity and the frequency of shedded clouds downstream the channel. That may be the consequence of viscous effects limiting the impingement of a re-entrant liquid jet on the attached cavity.

  10. Research of the cavitation performance of the condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Pan, Z. B.; He, M. H.; Ji, K.; Zhou, W. C.; Min, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Condensate pump is an important part of power plant circulation systems, which is used to pump condensate water. Because the condensate water pressure is very low, the first impeller of the condensate pump must have a good cavitation performance. Numerical simulation was employed to study the first impeller cavitation performance. The first impeller was set in the condensate pump barrel, and the double suction casing was kept, the parts after the double suction casing was simplified as tube. The simplicity can guarantee the inlet and outlet conditions of the impeller. Based on the RANS and SST k - ω turbulence model, CFD software was used to simulate the condensate pump at different working conditions. The numerical simulation shows that cavitation occurred at the suction side of the blades closing to the leading edge. The cavitation performance of the impeller was predicted based on the numerical calculation. Comparing with the experimental results, the numerical simulation result is smaller than that of the experiment in small flux, and the cavitation performance trend is agreed with that of the experiments.

  11. Quantitative observations of cavitation activity in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jamie R T; Coussios, Constantin C

    2011-11-01

    Quantitative experimental observations of single-bubble cavitation in viscoelastic media that would enable validation of existing models are presently lacking. In the present work, single bubble cavitation is induced in an agar gel using a 1.15 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound transducer, and observed using a focused single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) transducer. To enable quantitative observations, a full receive calibration is carried out of a spherically focused PCD system by a bistatic scattering substitution technique that uses an embedded spherical scatterer and a hydrophone. Adjusting the simulated pressure received by the PCD by the transfer function on receive and the frequency-dependent attenuation of agar gel enables direct comparison of the measured acoustic emissions with those predicted by numerical modeling of single-bubble cavitation using a modified Keller-Miksis approach that accounts for viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium. At an incident peak rarefactional pressure near the cavitation threshold, period multiplying is observed in both experiment and numerical model. By comparing the two sets of results, an estimate of the equilibrium bubble radius in the experimental observations can be made, with potential for extension to material parameter estimation. Use of these estimates yields good agreement between model and experiment. PMID:22088001

  12. Cavitation improvement of double suction centrifugal pump HPP Fuhren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Titzschkau, M.; Pavlin, R.; Vehar, F.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    A double suction storage pump has been refurbished because of the strong cavitation which resulted in cavitation damage on blade and consequently in frequent repairs of the impeller. The analyses of the old and the new impeller were done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), performing transient simulations with the commercial solver Ansys CFX. In the simulations, the scale-adaptive-simulation with the curvature correction (SAS-CC) turbulence model was used. No model tests were carried out. Additionally, observations with the digital camera were made through the specially designed plexi-glass window, mounted at the lid at the suction side. The predicted pump head at the operating point agrees well with the pump characteristics measurements, performed with the direct thermodynamic method. The extent of the cavitation predicted by CFD is smaller than the observed one because the cloud cavitation was not predicted. The observations of the cavitation extent show that the impeller design is better than the old one, which was also possible to anticipate based on the CFD results.

  13. Role of vortices in cavitation formation in the flow at the closure of a bileaflet mitral mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Pei; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Lo, Chi-Wen; Lu, Po-Chien

    2012-03-01

    Bubble cavitation occurs in the flow field when local pressure drops below vapor pressure. One hypothesis states that low-pressure regions in vortices created by instantaneous valve closure and occluder rebound promote bubble formation. To quantitatively analyze the role of vortices in cavitation, we applied particle image velocimetry (PIV) to reduce the instantaneous fields into plane flow that contains information about vortex core radius, maximum tangential velocity, circulation strength, and pressure drop. Assuming symmetrical flow along the center of the St. Jude Medical 25-mm valve, flow fields downstream of the closing valve were measured using PIV in the mitral position of a circulatory mock loop. Flow measurements were made during successive time phases immediately following the impact of the occluder with the housing (O/H impact) at valve closing. The velocity profile near the vortex core clearly shows a typical Rankine vortex. The vortex strength reaches maximum immediately after closure and rapidly decreases at about 10 ms, indicating viscous dissipation; vortex strength also intensifies with rising pulse rate. The maximum pressure drop at the vortex center is approximately 20 mmHg, an insignificant drop relative to atmospheric vapor pressures, which implies vortices play a minor role in cavitation formation. PMID:22015913

  14. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  15. Cavitation performance simulation of turbine meter under different temperature water condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Z.; Zhang, B. S.; Chen, G.; Zhu, B. L.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation thermodynamics model based on phase change, which is suitable for prediction of cavitation with thermal effects is developed. The cavitation characteristic at different temperature and cavitation number is investigated and analyzed. The initial cavitation of turbine flow meter generally occurs in the blade suction side. With the development of cavitation, the cavitation zone will appear on the front and the back end of the conditioner. In order to avoid the gather of cavitation, the design of the optimizing the blade structure should be adapted, and at the same time, the back pressure should be limited on the installation requirements. Expanding the measurement range and preventing cavitation occurs are the goal of the design and installation. The temperature effects on the cavitation of turbine flow meter is quite obvious and the increase of the temperature will delay the occurrence of cavitation. Pressure difference and the impeller torque will change obviously with the decrease of the cavitation number, which will cause the measurement error of the turbine meter.

  16. An algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations using homogeneous mixture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, A.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Marquillie, M.; Dular, M.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations is developed. The algorithm is based on Kim and Moin projection method form. Homogeneous mixture approach with transport equation for vapour volume fraction is used to model cavitation and various cavitation models can be used. Influence matrix and matrix diagonalisation technique enable fast parallel computations.

  17. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  18. Evaluation of friction heating in cavitating high pressure Diesel injector nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, R.; Koukouvinis, P.; Strotos, G.; McDavid, R.; Wang, Lifeng; Li, Jason; Marengo, M.; Gavaises, M.

    2015-12-01

    Variation of fuel properties occurring during extreme fuel pressurisation in Diesel fuel injectors relative to those under atmospheric pressure and room temperature conditions may affect significantly fuel delivery, fuel injection temperature, injector durability and thus engine performance. Indicative results of flow simulations during the full injection event of a Diesel injector are presented. In addition to the Navier-Stokes equations, the enthalpy conservation equation is considered for predicting the fuel temperature. Cavitation is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagrangian cavitation model fully coupled with the flow equations. Compressible bubble dynamics based on the R-P equation also consider thermal effects. Variable fuel properties function of the local pressure and temperature are taken from literature and correspond to a reference so-called summer Diesel fuel. Fuel pressurisation up to 3000bar pressure is considered while various wall temperature boundary conditions are tested in order to compare their effect relative to those of the fuel heating caused during the depressurisation of the fuel as it passes through the injection orifices. The results indicate formation of strong temperature gradients inside the fuel injector while heating resulting from the extreme friction may result to local temperatures above the fuel's boiling point. Predictions indicate bulk fuel temperature increase of more than 100°C during the opening phase of the needle valve. Overall, it is concluded that such effects are significant for the injector performance and should be considered in relevant simulation tools.

  19. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  20. Investigation of noninertial cavitation produced by an ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Birkin, Peter R; Offin, Douglas G; Vian, Christopher J B; Leighton, Timothy G; Maksimov, Alexey O

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on noninertial cavitation that occurs beyond the zone close to the horn tip to which the inertial cavitation is confined. The noninertial cavitation is characterized by collating the data from a range of measurements of bubbles trapped on a solid surface in this noninertial zone. Specifically, the electrochemical measurement of mass transfer to an electrode is compared with high-speed video of the bubble oscillation. This gas bubble is shown to be a "noninertial" event by electrochemical surface erosion measurements and "ring-down" experiments showing the activity and motion of the bubble as the sound excitation was terminated. These measurements enable characterization of the complex environment produced below an operating ultrasonic horn outside of the region where inertial collapse can be detected. The extent to which solid boundaries in the liquid cause the frequencies and shapes of oscillatory modes on the bubble wall to differ from their free field values is discussed. PMID:22088002

  1. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-04-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  2. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle and jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, F.; Trummler, T.; Hickel, S.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present implicit large-eddy simulations (LES) to study the primary breakup of cavitating liquid jets. The considered configuration, which consists of a rectangular nozzle geometry, adopts the setup of a reference experiment for validation. The setup is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up automotive fuel injector. Modelling of all components (i.e. gas, liquid, and vapor) is based on a barotropic two-fluid two-phase model and employs a homogenous mixture approach. The cavitating liquid model assumes thermodynamic- equilibrium. Compressibility of all phases is considered in order to capture pressure wave dynamics of collapse events. Since development of cavitation significantly affects jet break-up characteristics, we study three different operating points. We identify three main mechanisms which induce primary jet break-up: amplification of turbulent fluctuations, gas entrainment, and collapse events near the liquid-gas interface.

  3. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  4. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  5. Multiple pulmonary metastases with cavitation from gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, K; Ishii, Y; Hironaka, M; Kitamura, S

    1998-03-01

    We report a rare case of multiple pulmonary metastases with cavitation from gallbladder cancer. A 77-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of productive cough and exertional dyspnea. Chest X-ray film showed multiple nodular shadows with some cavitation. Computed tomography showed multiple cavities, up to 2 cm in diameter, as well as nodules, in bilateral lung fields. Under a survey of primary focus, the ultrasonographic test of the abdomen revealed a hypoechoic mass in the hepatic hilum. The patient died of respiratory failure. Autopsy findings revealed that that multiple lung tumors had metastasized from papillary adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder and that cavitation of the lung was formed by bronchioloectasis. PMID:9617865

  6. Nonlinear Elasticity and Cavitation of a Triblock Copolymer Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Santanu; Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Zabet, Mahla; Mishra, Satish

    2015-03-01

    Polymer gels are subjected to large-strain deformation during their applications. The gel deformation at large-strain is non-linear and can often lead to failure of the material. Here, we report the large-strain deformation behavior of a physically cross-linked, swollen polymer gel, which displays unique strain-stiffening response at large-strain. Investigations were performed using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) and custom developed cavitation rheology techniques. Gent constitutive model, which considers finite extensibility of midblock, was fitted with the LAOS data, therefore, linking the estimated parameters from LAOS analysis to the structure of the gel. Cavitation experiments were conducted as a function of temperature. Both analytical method and finite-element based modeling have been implemented to capture the pressure response in cavitation experiments. Our results provide a critical understanding of gel failure mechanism at large-strain.

  7. Analysis of cavitation inception and desinence behind surface irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Cavities behind a surface irregularity appear in vortices drifting downstream of it. Cavitation can occur there substantially earlier than over smooth surfaces of the same bodies. Cavitation inception and desinence behind surface irregularities have been intensively studied in the course of water tunnel experiments several decades ago, but no corresponding quantitative theoretical (numerical) analysis was reported. This numerical study is aimed at elaboration of a general approach to the prediction of cavitation desinence numbers for various irregularities over various surfaces and on determination of the major factors influencing these numbers in both computations and experiments. The developed multi-level computational method employs diverse models for flow zones of diverse scale. The viscous-inviscid interaction approach is used for the flow around irregularities submerged (or partially submerged) in the turbulent boundary layer. Combinations of the semi-empirical and asymptotic analyses are used for vortices and cavities in their cores. The computational method is validated with various known experimental data.

  8. Drying-induced cavitation in a constrained hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiming; Cai, Shengqiang

    2015-02-14

    Cavitation can be often observed in soft materials. Most previous studies were focused on cavitation in an elastomer, which is under different mechanical loadings. In this paper, we investigate cavitation in a constrained hydrogel induced by drying. Taking account of surface tension and chemo-mechanics of gels, we calculate the free energy of the system as a function of cavity size. The free energy landscape shows a double-well structure, analogous to first-order phase transition. Above the critical humidity, a cavity inside the gel is tiny. Below the critical humidity, the size of the cavity is large. At the critical humidity, the cavity size grows suddenly and discontinuously. We further show that local large stretches can be induced in the gel during the drying process, which may result in fractures. PMID:25592184

  9. The recreation of a unique shrimp's mechanically induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ryan; Dougherty, Christopher; Eliasson, Veronica; Khanolkar, Gauri

    2014-11-01

    The Alpheus heterochaelis, appropriately nicknamed the ``pistol shrimp,'' possesses an oversized claw that creates a cavitation bubble upon rapid closure. The implosion of this bubble results in a shock wave that can stun or even kill the shrimp's prey (Versluis et al., 2000). Additionally, the implosion is so violent that sonoluminescence may occur. This light implies extreme temperatures, which have been recorded to reach as high as 10,000 K (Roach, 2001). By developing an analogous mechanism to the oversized claw, the goal of this experiment is to verify that cavitation can be produced similar to that of the pistol shrimp in nature as well as to analyze the resulting shock wave and sonoluminescence. High-speed schlieren imaging was used to observe the shock dynamics. Furthermore, results on cavitation collapse and light emission will be presented. USC Provost Undergraduate Research Fellowship/Rose Hills Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

  10. Numerical simulation of cavitating turbulent flow through a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady cavitating turbulent flow in a Francis turbine is simulated based on governing equations of the mixture model for cavity-liquid two-phase flows with the RNG k-epsilon turbulence model in the present paper. An improved mass transfer expression in the mixture model is obtained based on evaporation and condensation mechanics with considering the effects of the non-dissolved gas, the turbulence, the tension of interface at cavity and the effect of phase change rate and so on. The governing equations of the mixture model for the unsteady cavitating-liquid flow is solved by a direct coupling method numerically with the finite volume method (FVM) using the unstructured tetrahedron grid and the structured hexahedral grid system. This direct coupling simulation was successfully applied to simulate the cavitating two-phase turbulent flow through a Francis turbine. The simulated external results agreed well with the experimental results.

  11. The dynamic transfer function for a cavitating inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.; Acosta, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the dynamic performance of pumps is essential for the prediction of transient behavior and instabilities in hydraulic systems; the necessary information is in the form of a transfer function which relates the instantaneous or fluctuating pressure and mass flow rate at inlet to the same quantities in the discharge from the pump. The presence of cavitation within the pump can have a major effect on this transfer function since dynamical changes in the volume of cavitation contribute to the difference in the instantaneous inlet and discharge mass flow rates. The present paper utilizes results from free streamline cascade theory to evaluate the elements in the transfer function for a cavitating inducer and shows that the numerical results are consistent with the characteristics observed in some dynamic tests on rocket engine turbopumps.

  12. Influence of ultrasonic cavitation on passive film of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Cheng; Zhu, Jin-hua

    2008-03-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of passive film of stainless steel 0Cr13Ni5Mo under the condition of static state (quiescence) and ultrasonic cavitation in the HCl solution have been studied by means of polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and capacitance potential measurement. The results indicate that the passive film shows a multi layer structure distribution, and presents a p-type semiconductor property under the condition of quiescence. The stability of passive film decreases, the semiconducting property changes to an n-type semiconductor in the presence of cavitation. The amount of transition electrons from valence band because of cavitation is related to the height of Fermi level of passive film semiconductor. PMID:17584517

  13. Possibility of Metal Processing Using Ultrasonic Cavitation Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Ryoji; Fujiwara, Ryuichi; Niita, Tokuo

    2001-05-01

    Utilizing a high-intensity ultrasonic cavitation, a processing experiment was conducted with the aim of performing volumetric flow adjustment of a fuel jet nozzle to be used for a small engine, which cannot be carried out by a method such as machining. At the bottom of the nozzle used for the experiment, which is in the shape of a cup, a nozzle hole with a diameter of 0.15 mm is drilled. In this experiment, we make adjustments in the volumetric flow by grinding and removing the machining burr with the aid of the processing power of ultrasonic cavitation. The processing effect is highly dependent on the ultrasonic cavitation intensity. In the experiment, the processing reservoir was filled with pressurized highly deaerated water to increase the processing force by allowing cavitation with high intensity to be generated. The processing principle is to utilize the effect of a cavitation jet flow passing through the nozzle hole. To restrain the intake of the bubbles into the flow circuits during the pressure reduction cycle of the vibrator, the water flow was discharged into a pressure reduction reservoir. By allowing the horn tip with a diameter of 6 mm at a frequency of 28 kHz to approach the sample, followed by high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation, powerful cavitation was generated. As a result of the evaluation of the processing efficiency made based on the volumetric flow increase and microscopic observation of the nozzle, burrs smaller than 10 μm were almost entirely removed within 15 min of initial irradiation, resulting in a volumetric flow increase of more than 0.4%/min. However, in the case of burrs of more than 10 μm, no force that could remove the burrs was found. It was surprising for the burrs to generate deformation rather than to be removed.

  14. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  15. Cavitation in ultrasound and shockwave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic waves, especially high-intensity ultrasound and shock waves, are used for medical imaging and intra- and extra-corporeal manipulation of cells, tissue, and urinary calculi. Waves are currently used to treat kidney stone disease, plantar fasciitis, and bone nonunion, and they are being investigated as a technique to ablate cancer tumors and mediate drug delivery. In many applications, acoustic waves induce the expansion and collapse of preexisting or newly cavitating bubbles whose presence can either mediate the generation of localized stresses or lead to collateral damage, depending on how effectively they can be controlled. We describe efforts aimed at simulating the collapse of bubbles, both individually and in clusters, with the aim to characterize the induced mechanical stresses and strains. To simulate collapse of one or a few bubbles, compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations of multi-component materials are performed with WENO-based shock and interface capturing schemes. Repetitive insonification generates numerous bubbles that are difficult to resolve numerically. Such clouds are also important in traditional engineering applications such as caveating hydrofoils. Models that incorporate the dynamics of an unresolved dispersed phase consisting of the bubble cloud are also developed. The results of several model problems including bubble collapse near rigid surfaces, bubble collapse near compliant surfaces and in small capillaries are analyzed. The results are processed to determine the potential for micron-sized preexisting gas bubbles to damage capillaries. The translation of the fundamental fluid dynamics into improvements in the design and clinical application of shockwave lithotripters will be discussed. NIH Grant PO1-DK043881.

  16. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  17. Characterization of Axial Inducer Cavitation Instabilities via High Speed Video Recordings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arellano, Patrick; Peneda, Marinelle; Ferguson, Thomas; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sub-scale water tests were undertaken to assess the viability of utilizing high resolution, high frame-rate digital video recordings of a liquid rocket engine turbopump axial inducer to characterize cavitation instabilities. These high speed video (HSV) images of various cavitation phenomena, including higher order cavitation, rotating cavitation, alternating blade cavitation, and asymmetric cavitation, as well as non-cavitating flows for comparison, were recorded from various orientations through an acrylic tunnel using one and two cameras at digital recording rates ranging from 6,000 to 15,700 frames per second. The physical characteristics of these cavitation forms, including the mechanisms that define the cavitation frequency, were identified. Additionally, these images showed how the cavitation forms changed and transitioned from one type (tip vortex) to another (sheet cavitation) as the inducer boundary conditions (inlet pressures) were changed. Image processing techniques were developed which tracked the formation and collapse of cavitating fluid in a specified target area, both in the temporal and frequency domains, in order to characterize the cavitation instability frequency. The accuracy of the analysis techniques was found to be very dependent on target size for higher order cavitation, but much less so for the other phenomena. Tunnel-mounted piezoelectric, dynamic pressure transducers were present throughout these tests and were used as references in correlating the results obtained by image processing. Results showed good agreement between image processing and dynamic pressure spectral data. The test set-up, test program, and test results including H-Q and suction performance, dynamic environment and cavitation characterization, and image processing techniques and results will be discussed.

  18. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  19. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  20. The cavitation induced by a rapid change of velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olšiak, Róbert; Csuka, Zoltán; Fuszko, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the theory of cavitation flow near the high-speed rotary surface. For this purpose, a spatial model of two cylindrical surfaces imposed concentrically was designed. In the narrow gap between two cylindrical surfaces the temperature, density and viscosity of liquid are constant. Shear stress is induced by the high-speed rotary motion of the inner cylinder. In this case: velocity and pressure fields are changed. Due to the pressure drop between the cylinders there is a precondition to the formation of cavitation zones at the point of the lowest static pressure. This phenomenon is simulated via CFD methods.

  1. Experimental studies on thermodynamic effects of developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    A method for predicting thermodynamic effects of cavitation (changes in cavity pressure relative to stream vapor pressure) is presented. The prediction method accounts for changes in liquid, liquid temperature, flow velocity, and body scale. Both theoretical and experimental studies used in formulating the method are discussed. The prediction method provided good agreement between predicted and experimental results for geometrically scaled venturis handling four different liquids of widely diverse physical properties. Use of the method requires geometric similarity of the body and cavitated region and a known reference cavity-pressure depression at one operating condition.

  2. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  3. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yang, K; Cui, J; Ye, J Y; Deng, C X

    2012-01-10

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustical, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency ultrasound (7.44MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40μs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d=0.75. The maximum mean

  4. Prediction of Performance of a Cavitating Propeller in Oblique Inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Kinnas, Spyros A.

    2015-12-01

    A cavitating propeller subject to an oblique inflow in a cavitating tunnel is simulated using potential flow methods coupled with a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver. The propeller is mainly modelled using a panel method, while the inflow to the propeller is evaluated by coupling a Vortex-Lattice Method (VLM) with the RANS solver. The effects of the tunnel wall are incorporated into the calculated effective inflow to the propeller. The predicted propeller forces and cavity pattern are correlated with experiment. The fully wetted open water characteristics of the propeller predicted by the panel method are presented as well.

  5. Mapping of cavitational activity in a pilot plant dyeing equipment.

    PubMed

    Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Pezzin, A; Rovero, G; Sicardi, S

    2015-11-01

    A large number of papers of the literature quote dyeing intensification based on the application of ultrasound (US) in the dyeing liquor. Mass transfer mechanisms are described and quantified, nevertheless these experimental results in general refer to small laboratory apparatuses with a capacity of a few hundred millilitres and extremely high volumetric energy intensity. With the strategy of overcoming the scale-up inaccuracy consequent to the technological application of ultrasounds, a dyeing pilot-plant prototype of suitable liquor capacity (about 40 L) and properly simulating several liquor to textile hydraulic relationships was designed by including US transducers with different geometries. Optimal dyeing may be obtained by optimising the distance between transducer and textile material, the liquid height being a non-negligible operating parameter. Hence, mapping the cavitation energy in the machinery is expected to provide basic data on the intensity and distribution of the ultrasonic field in the aqueous liquor. A flat ultrasonic transducer (absorbed electrical power of 600 W), equipped with eight devices emitting at 25 kHz, was mounted horizontally at the equipment bottom. Considering industrial scale dyeing, liquor and textile substrate are reciprocally displaced to achieve a uniform colouration. In this technology a non uniform US field could affect the dyeing evenness to a large extent; hence, mapping the cavitation energy distribution in the machinery is expected to provide fundamental data and define optimal operating conditions. Local values of the cavitation intensity were recorded by using a carefully calibrated Ultrasonic Energy Meter, which is able to measure the power per unit surface generated by the cavitation implosion of bubbles. More than 200 measurements were recorded to define the map at each horizontal plane positioned at a different distance from the US transducer; tap water was heated at the same temperature used for dyeing tests (60

  6. Controlling cavitation in the 1990s: Contours, materials, monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, E.

    1996-10-01

    Case studies of cavitation control methods at hydroelectric power plants are presented in the article. The control methods described include contouring of turbine blades, stainless steel runners and overlays (including 309L) and super-resistant alloys (Hydroloy 914), and cavitation monitoring equipment. Hydroelectric plants highlighted in the article include Central Maine Power Company`s Hiram Unit 2, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers` Dworshak Dam, Transalta Utilities` Spray Station, and Tennessee Valley Authority`s Raccoon Mountain. The development and testing of new materials is also highlighted.

  7. Multidetector CT of pulmonary cavitation: filling in the holes.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, K H; Babar, J L; Balan, A

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary cavitation causes significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of the presence and aetiology of a cavity is therefore crucial in order to avoid further demise in both the localized pulmonary and systemic disorders that may manifest with pulmonary cavity formation. Multidetector CT has become the principal diagnostic technique for detecting pulmonary cavitation and its complications. This review provides an overview of the aetiologies and their imaging findings using this technique. Combining a literature review with case illustration, a synopsis of the different imaging features and constellations is provided, which may suggest a particular cause and aid the differentiation from diseases with similar findings. PMID:25623513

  8. Mechanism of noise generation by cavitation in hydraulic relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Kataoka, T.; Takagi, S.; Kato, H.

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of noise generation in a hydraulic relief valve, oil cavitating flows in a half cut model of the valve were observed by means of a high-speed camera and were simulated numerically. As the result of image analysis, the fluctuation of cavitation volume is corresponding to the pressure fluctuation of downstream, and the both fluctuations take peaks at frequencies from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz depending on the back pressure. In addition, as the back pressure increases, the frequency of the pressure fluctuation increases and the peak value decreases. These phenomena were also qualitatively reproduced in the numerical simulation.

  9. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen species generation by cavitation incepted efficiently using nonlinear propagation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a treatment method that uses chemical bio-effect of cavitation bubbles. Reactive oxygen species that can kill cancerous tissue is induced by such chemical effect of cavitation bubbles and it is important to generate them efficiently for effective sonodynamic treatment. Cavitation cloud can be formed by an effect of nonlinear propagation and focus and in this study, it was experimentally investigated if cavitation cloud was useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, it was demonstrated that cavitation cloud would be useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump with inlet guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Zha, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Gui, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of prewhirl regulation by inlet guide vanes (IGVs) on cavitation performance and flow characteristic in a centrifugal pump is investigated. At the impeller inlet, the streamlines are regulated by the IGVs, and the axial velocity distribution is also influenced by the IGVs. Due to the total pressure loss on the IGVs, the cavitation performance of the centrifugal pump degrades. The cavitation area in impeller with IGVs is larger than one without IGVs. The specify values of total pressure loss between the suction pipe inlet and impeller inlet for three cavitation conditions show that the IGVs will generate additional pressure loss, which is related to the IGVs angles and cavitation conditions.

  11. Research on axial thrust of the waterjet pump based on CFD under cavitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. H.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on RANS equations, performance of a contra-rotating axial-flow waterjet pump without hydrodynamic cavitation state had been obtained combined with shear stress transport turbulence model. Its cavitation hydrodynamic performance was calculated and analysed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations. The results shows that the cavitation causes axial thrust of waterjet pump to drop. Furthermore, axial thrust and head cavitation characteristic curve is similar. However, the drop point of the axial thrust is postponed by 5.1% comparing with one of head, and the critical point of the axial thrust is postponed by 2.6%.

  12. Nobody’s perfect: can irregularities in pit structure influence vulnerability to cavitation?

    PubMed Central

    Plavcová, Lenka; Jansen, Steven; Klepsch, Matthias; Hacke, Uwe G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that species-specific pit properties such as pit membrane thickness, pit membrane porosity, torus-to-aperture diameter ratio and pit chamber depth influence xylem vulnerability to cavitation. Despite the indisputable importance of using mean pit characteristics, considerable variability in pit structure within a single species or even within a single pit field should be acknowledged. According to the rare pit hypothesis, a single pit that is more air-permeable than many neighboring pits is sufficient to allow air-seeding. Therefore, any irregularities or morphological abnormalities in pit structure allowing air-seeding should be associated with increased vulnerability to cavitation. Considering the currently proposed models of air-seeding, pit features such as rare, large pores in the pit membrane, torus extensions, and plasmodesmatal pores in a torus can represent potential glitches. These aberrations in pit structure could either result from inherent developmental flaws, or from damage caused to the pit membrane by chemical and physical agents. This suggests the existence of interesting feedbacks between abiotic and biotic stresses in xylem physiology. PMID:24273549

  13. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  14. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  15. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  16. Effect of austempering temperature on cavitation behaviour of unalloyed ADI material

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcinovic, Marina; Eric, Olivera; Rajnovic, Dragan; Sidjanin, Leposava; Balos, Sebastian

    2013-08-15

    This paper provides an in-depth study and description of cavitation damage and microstructural changes in two types of unalloyed austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADI materials used were austempered at 300 and 400 °C having ausferrite microstructure with 16 and 31.4% of retained austenite, respectively. Metallographic examination was carried out to study the morphology of their cavitation-damaged surfaces. Cavitation damage was initiated at graphite nodules as well as in the interface between a graphite nodule and an ausferrite matrix. Furthermore, microcracking and ferrite/retained austenite morphology were proved to be of great importance for cavitation resistance. Mass loss rate revealed that ADI austempered at 400 °C has a higher cavitation resistance in water than ADI austempered at 300 °C. A higher amount of retained austenite in ADI austempered at 400 °C played an important role in increasing cavitation resistance. The good cavitation behaviour of ADI austempered at 400 °C was due to the matrix hardening by stress assisted phase transformation of retained austenite into martensite (SATRAM) phenomenon, as shown by X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • Cavitation rate of two ADI materials was tested. • ADI material with a lower hardness has had a lower cavitation rate. • The main reason is microstructural transformations during cavitation. • SATRAM phenomenon increases cavitation resistance.

  17. Precise spatial control of cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom by using an ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiwei; Huang, Peixuan; Guo, Shifang; Zhao, Lu; Jia, Yingjie; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic inducement in animal models, the conventionally used balloon injury is invasive, produces excessive vessel injuries at unpredictable locations and is inconvenient in arterioles. Fortunately, cavitation erosion, which plays an important role in therapeutic ultrasound in blood vessels, has the potential to induce atherosclerosis noninvasively at predictable sites. In this study, precise spatial control of cavitation erosion for superficial lesions in a vessel phantom was realised by using an ultrasonic standing wave (USW) with the participation of cavitation nuclei and medium-intensity ultrasound pulses. The superficial vessel erosions were restricted between adjacent pressure nodes, which were 0.87 mm apart in the USW field of 1 MHz. The erosion positions could be shifted along the vessel by nodal modulation under a submillimetre-scale accuracy without moving the ultrasound transducers. Moreover, the cavitation erosion of the proximal or distal wall could be determined by the types of cavitation nuclei and their corresponding cavitation pulses, i.e., phase-change microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 5 MHz and SonoVue microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 1 MHz. Effects of acoustic parameters of the cavitation pulses on the cavitation erosions were investigated. The flow conditions in the experiments were considered and discussed. Compared to only using travelling waves, the proposed method in this paper improves the controllability of the cavitation erosion and reduces the erosion depth, providing a more suitable approach for vessel endothelial injury while avoiding haemorrhage. PMID:26964937

  18. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p−) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p− = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p− = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p− = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  19. Numerical simulation and experimental visualization of the separated cavitating boundary layer over NACA2412

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Jiří; Rudolf, Pavel; Sedlář, Milan; Habán, Vladimír; Hudec, Martin; Huzlík, Rostislav

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is physical phenomenon of crucial impact on the operation range and service lifetime of the hydraulic machines (pumps, turbines, valves etc.). Experimental measurement of cavitation is expensive and time consuming process, while some important characteristic of the flow are difficult to measure due to the nature of the phenomenon. Current possibilities of computational fluid dynamics provide a way for deeper understanding of cavitation which is important for many applications in the hydraulic machines industry such as expanding operation range or extending lifetime of the hydraulic machines. Simplified model consists of NACA 2412 hydrofoil with 8 degrees angle of attack fixed in between the walls of cavitation tunnel. Present investigation focuses on comparison of vapor volume fractions obtained by 3D CFD simulations and high speed visualization of the real cavitation phenomena. Several operating regimes corresponding to different cavitation numbers are studied with aim to assess the dynamics of the separated cavitating sheets/clouds

  20. Numerical simulation of high-speed cavitating flows in submerged water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Shimizu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Properties of existing cavitation models are discussed and a compressible mixture flow method based a simplified estimation of bubble cavitation is then presented for numerical simulation of high-speed water jets accompanied by intensive cavitation. Two-phase fluid media of cavitating flow are treated as a mixture of liquid and bubbles, and the mean flow is computed by solving RANS equations for compressible fluids considering the effect of bubble expansion a/o contraction. The intensity of cavitation is evaluated by the gas volume fraction, which is governed by the compressibility of bubble-liquid mixture corresponding to the status of mean flow field. Numerical results of cavitating water jet issuing from a submerged nozzle are presented and its applicability to intensively cavitating jets is demonstrated.

  1. A numerical model for the evolution of internal structure of cavitation cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tezhuan; Wang, Yiwei; Liao, Lijuan; Huang, Chenguang

    2016-07-01

    Bubble size distributions in cloud cavitation are important in cavitating flows. In this study, a numerical model was developed to study the evolution of the internal structure of cloud cavitation. The model includes (1) an evolution equation of bubble number density, which considers the bubble breakup effect and (2) the multiphase Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a modified cavitation model for background cavitating flows. The proposed model was validated with a flow over a projectile. Results show that the numerical model can predict the evolution of the internal structure of cloud cavitation. Comparisons of the proposed model and Singhal model were discussed. The effects of re-entrant jet and bubble number density on cavitating flows were also investigated.

  2. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloys.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, I; Dimian, E; Bordeaşu, I; Crăciunescu, C

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments were performed on Ti-6Al-4V alloys samples in annealed, nitrided and nitrided and subsequently heat treated state. The protective oxide layer formed as a result of annealing and heat treatment after nitriding is eliminated after less than 30 min cavitation time, while the nitride layer lasts up to 90 min cavitation time. Once the protective layer is removed, the cavitation process develops by grain boundary erosion, leading to the expulsion of grains from the surface. The gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy, forming a TixN surface layer, proved to be a better solution to improve the cavitation erosion resistance, compared to the annealed and nitrided and heat treated state, respectively. The analysis of the mean depth of erosion rate at 165 min cavitation time showed an improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance of the nitrided samples of up to 77% higher compared to the one of the annealed samples. PMID:24500067

  3. A study of pump cavitation damage. [space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  4. Numerical investigation of the cavitational behaviour into a storage pump at off design operating points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuparu, A.; Susan-Resiga, R.; Anton, L. E.; Muntean, S.

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents a new method for the analysis of the cavitational behaviour of hydraulic turbomachines. This new method allows determining the coefficient of the cavitation inception and the cavitation sensitivity of the turbomachines. We apply this method to study the cavitational behaviour of a large storage pump. By plotting in semi-logarithmic coordinates the vapour volume versus the cavitation coefficient, we show that all numerical data collapse in an exponential manner. This storage pump is located in a power plant and operating without the presence of the developed cavitation is vital. We investigate the behaviour of the pump from the cavitational point of view while the pump is operating for variable discharge. A distribution of the vapour volume upon the blade of the impeller is presented for all the four operating points. It can be seen how the volume of vapour evolves from one operating point to another. In order to study the influence of the cavitation phenomena upon the pump, the evolution of the pumping head against the cavitation coefficient is presented. That will show how the pumping head drops while the cavitation coefficient decreases. From analysing the data obtained from the numerical simulation it results that the cavitation phenomena is present for all the investigated operating points. By analysis of the slope of the curve describing the evolution of the vapour volume against the cavitation coefficient we determine the cavitation sensitivity of the pump for each operating point. It is showed that the cavitation sensitivity of the investigated storage pump increases while the flow rate decreases.

  5. Untreated cavitated dentine lesions: impact on children's quality of life.

    PubMed

    Leal, S C; Bronkhorst, E M; Fan, M; Frencken, J E

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess the impact of dental caries prevalence and the consequences of untreated cavitated dentine lesions on quality of life of 6- and 7-year-old Brazilian children. A total of 826 schoolchildren were assessed using ICDAS and pufa (to score consequences of dental caries on soft tissues) indices. History of extraction and toothache was recorded. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed using the Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS). A multiple logistic regression model was used to analyze the relationship between the prevalence of dentine carious lesions, pufa, history of extraction and toothache with the B-ECOHIS scores. A total of 587 questionnaires were analyzed. The prevalence of cavitated dentine lesions and pufa was 74.8 and 26.2%, respectively. Some 21.8% of children reported toothache and 9.2% had had at least one tooth extraction. The chance (OR) for children with cavitated dentine lesions, pufa ≥1, history of extraction and toothache of having higher B-ECOHIS scores than those not affected was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.18-3.06), 6.26 (95% CI: 3.63-10.83), 6.87 (95% CI: 2.75-17.16) and 3.68 (95% CI: 2.12-6.39), respectively. Children's quality of life was negatively influenced by untreated cavitated dentine lesions and their consequences. PMID:22398411

  6. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  7. Relating xylem cavitation to gas exchange in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic emissions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Though a body of work using AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. The objective of...

  8. Analysis of cavitation effect for water purifier using electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-11-01

    Water is a limited and vital resource, so it should not be wasted by pollution. A development of new water purification technology is urgent nowadays since the original and biological treatments are not sufficient. The microbubble-aided method was investigated for removal of algal in this study since it overcomes demerits of the existing purification technologies. Thus, the cavitation effect in a venturi-type tube using the electrolysis was analyzed. Ruthenium-coated titanium plates were used as electrodes. Optimum electrode interval and applied power were determined for the electrolysis. Then, the optimized electrodes were installed in the venturi-type tube for generating cavitation. The cavitation effect could be enhanced without any byproduct by the bubbly flow induced by the electrolysis. The optimum mass flow rate and current were determined for the cavitation with the electrolysis. Finally, the visualization techniques were used to count the cell number of algal and microbubbles for the confirmation of the performance. As a result, the energy saving and high efficient water purifier was fabricated in this study. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. 2013R1A2A2A01068653).

  9. Numerical Investigation of Cavitation Improvement for a Francis Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhifeng; Xiao, Ruofu; Wang, Fujun; Yang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic machine is undesired due to its negative effects on performances. To improve cavitation performance of a Francis turbine without the change of the best efficiency point, a model runner geometry optimization was carried out. Firstly, the runner outlet diameter was appropriately increased to reduce the flow velocity at runner outlet region. Then, to avoid the change of the flow rate at the best efficiency point, the blade shapes were carefully adjusted by decreasing the blade outlet angles and increasing the blade wrap angles. A large number of the modified runners were tested by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. Finally the most appropriate one was selected, which has the runner outlet diameter 10% larger, the blade outlet angles 3 degrees smaller and the blade wrap angles 5 degrees larger. The results showed that the critical cavitation coefficient of the model runner decreased at every unit rotational speed after the optimization, and the effect was much remarkable at relative high flow rate. Besides, by analysing the internal flow field, it was found that the zone of the low pressure on pressure surface of the optimized turbine blades was reduced, the backflow and vortex rope in draft tube were reduced, and the cavitation zone was reduced obviously.

  10. Experimental research of multiphase flow with cavitation in the nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubkova, Milada; Bojko, Marian; Jablonska, Jana; Homa, Dorota; Tůma, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with the problems of cavitation in water flow in the nozzle. The area of research is divided into two directions (experimental and numerical research). During the experimental research the equipment with the nozzle is under the measurement and basic physical quantities such as pressure and volume flow rate are recorded. In the following phase measuring of noise which is generated during flow through the nozzle in the area of cavitation is measured at various operating conditions of the pump. In the second part the appropriate multiphase mathematical model including the consideration of cavitation is defined. Boundary conditions for numerical simulation are defined on the basis of experimental measurements. Undissolved air in the flow is taken into account to obtain pressure distribution in accordance to measured one. Results of the numerical simulation are presented by means of basic current quantities such as pressure, velocity and volume fractions of each phase. The conclusions obtained from experimental research of cavitation were applied to modify the multiphase mathematical model.

  11. Bilateral and multiple cavitation sounds during upper cervical thrust manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The popping produced during high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation is a common sound; however to our knowledge, no study has previously investigated the location of cavitation sounds during manipulation of the upper cervical spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of pops, the duration of upper cervical thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Methods Nineteen asymptomatic participants received two upper cervical thrust manipulations targeting the right and left C1-2 articulation, respectively. Skin mounted microphones were secured bilaterally over the transverse process of C1, and sound wave signals were recorded. Identification of the side, duration, and number of popping sounds were determined by simultaneous analysis of spectrograms with audio feedback using custom software developed in Matlab. Results Bilateral popping sounds were detected in 34 (91.9%) of 37 manipulations while unilateral popping sounds were detected in just 3 (8.1%) manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (P < 0.001) more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally. Of the 132 total cavitations, 72 occurred ipsilateral and 60 occurred contralateral to the targeted C1-2 articulation. In other words, cavitation was no more likely to occur on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side (P = 0.294). The mean number of pops per C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation was 3.57 (95% CI: 3.19, 3.94) and the mean number of pops per subject following both right and left C1-2 thrust manipulations was 6.95 (95% CI: 6.11, 7.79). The mean duration of a single audible pop was 5.66 ms (95% CI: 5.36, 5.96) and the mean duration of a single manipulation was 96.95 ms (95% CI: 57.20, 136.71). Conclusions Cavitation was significantly more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally during upper cervical HVLA

  12. Modeling Unsteady Cavitation and Dynamic Loads in Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald; Dash, Sanford M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that includes representations of effects of unsteady cavitation and associated dynamic loads has been developed to increase the accuracy of simulations of the performances of turbopumps. Although the model was originally intended to serve as a means of analyzing preliminary designs of turbopumps that supply cryogenic propellant liquids to rocket engines, the model could also be applied to turbopumping of other liquids: this can be considered to have been already demonstrated, in that the validation of the model was performed by comparing results of simulations performed by use of the model with results of sub-scale experiments in water. The need for this or a similar model arises as follows: Cavitation instabilities in a turbopump are generated as inlet pressure drops and vapor cavities grow on inducer blades, eventually becoming unsteady. The unsteady vapor cavities lead to rotation cavitation, in which the cavities detach from the blades and become part of a fluid mass that rotates relative to the inducer, thereby generating a fluctuating load. Other instabilities (e.g., surge instabilities) can couple with cavitation instabilities, thereby compounding the deleterious effects of unsteadiness on other components of the fluid-handling system of which the turbopump is a part and thereby, further, adversely affecting the mechanical integrity and safety of the system. Therefore, an ability to predict cavitation- instability-induced dynamic pressure loads on the blades, the shaft, and other pump parts would be valuable in helping to quantify safe margins of inducer operation and in contributing to understanding of design compromises. Prior CFD models do not afford this ability. Heretofore, the primary parameter used in quantifying cavitation performance of a turbopump inducer has been the critical suction specific speed at which head breakdown occurs. This parameter is a mean quantity calculated on the basis of assumed steady

  13. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications. PMID:27150739

  14. Comparative CFD Investigation on the Performance of a New Family of Super-Cavitating Hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzolara, S.; Bonfiglio, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a CFD characterization of a new type of super-cavitating hydrofoil section designed to have optimal performance both in super-cavitating conditions and in sub-cavitating conditions (including transitional regime). The basic concepts of the new profile family are first introduced. Lift, drag and cavity shapes at different cavitation numbers are calculated for a new foil and compared with those of conventional sub-cavitating and super-cavitating profiles. Numerical calculations confirm the superior characteristics of the new hydrofoil family, which is able to attain high lift and efficiency both in sub-cavitating and super-cavitating conditions. Numerical calculations are based on a multi-phase fully turbulent URANSE solver with a bubble dynamic cavitation model to follow the generation and evaporation of the vapor phase. The new profile family, initially devised for ultra-high speed hydrofoil crafts, may result useful for diverse applications such as super-cavitating or surface-piercing propellers or high-speed sailing boats.

  15. Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Monitoring – National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) developed and operates a collaborative network of atmospheric mercury monitoring sites based in North America – the Atmospheric Mercury Network (AMNet). The justification for the network was growing interest and demand from many ...

  16. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time

  17. Determination of sulfuric acid concentration for anti-cavitation characteristics of Al alloy by two step anodizing process to forming nano porous.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Seong-Kweon; Jeong, Jae-Yong; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2014-12-01

    Al alloy is a highly active metal but forms a protective oxide film having high corrosion resistance in atmosphere environment. However, the oxide film is not suitable for practical use, since the thickness of the film is not uniform and it is severly altered with formation conditions. This study focused on developing an aluminum anodizing layer having hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance equivalent to a commercial grade protective layer. Aluminum anodizing layer was produced by two-step aluminum anodizing oxide (AAO) process with different sulfuric acid concentrations, and the cavitation characteristics of the anodized coating layer was investigated. In hardness measurement, the anodized coating layer produced with 15 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition had the highest value of hardness but exhibited poor cavitation resistance due to being more brittle than those with other conditions. The 10 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition was thus considered to be the optimum condition as it had the lowest weight loss and damage depth. PMID:25971100

  18. Laser beam treatment effect on AMPCO M4 bronze cavitation erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Micu, L. M.; Oanca, O. V.; Bordeasu, D.; Pugna, A.; Bordeasu, C.

    2015-06-01

    Ship propellers must resist simultaneously to ocean water corrosion and cavitation erosion. Until now, the best material used is the bronze with great copper content. These materials are expensive and there is the tendency to reduce the copper content while maintaining good properties. Such a material is AMPCO M4 used for manufacturing details for aircraft retractable landing assemblies. As a consequence we undertake cavitation erosion tests upon this bronze. In natural state (cast or even extruded) the cavitation resistance is not acceptable so, we improved the specimens by treating them with laser beams at three different impulse powers (160, 180 and 220 W). The cavitation erosion resistance was tested in the Cavitation Laboratory of Timisoara “Politehnica” University using a vibratory device respecting the conditions imposed by ASTM G32-2010 Standard. The comparisons with the genuine material (without any treatments) show that the applied procedure increased the hardness of the melted layer as well as the cavitation erosion behavior.

  19. DNA acts as a nucleation site for transient cavitation in the ultrasonic nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Y K; Anchordoquy, T J; Lengsfeld, C S

    2006-03-01

    Several new technologies based upon ultrasound technology have been proposed as a method to enhance the delivery of genetic therapeutics. Using ultrasonic nebulization and a well-established method to quantitatively monitor transient cavitation, this study investigates the extent and factors influencing the degradation of DNA. Results from our studies show that the presence of DNA greatly enhances cavitation, and that the number of transient cavitation events also increases with the hydrodynamic diameter and number of DNA molecules in solution. More importantly, removing saturated gases from the plasmid DNA solutions resulted in a decrease in transient cavitation events but not degradation rate, suggesting that the cavitation event responsible for degradation occurs locally at the DNA molecule. Finally, complexing plasmid DNA with the cationic polymer polyethylenimine protected the native structure by reducing the molecule's potential to act as a heterogeneous nucleation site for transient cavitation. PMID:16432878

  20. Unraveling the Geometry Dependence of In-Nozzle Cavitation in High-Pressure Injectors

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyoung-Su; Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Powell, Christopher F.; Lai, Ming-chia D.; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cavitation is an intricate multiphase phenomenon that interplays with turbulence in fluid flows. It exhibits clear duality in characteristics, being both destructive and beneficial in our daily lives and industrial processes. Despite the multitude of occurrences of this phenomenon, highly dynamic and multiphase cavitating flows have not been fundamentally well understood in guiding the effort to harness the transient and localized power generated by this process. In a microscale, multiphase flow liquid injection system, we synergistically combined experiments using time-resolved x-radiography and a novel simulation method to reveal the relationship between the injector geometry and the in-nozzle cavitation quantitatively. We demonstrate that a slight alteration of the geometry on the micrometer scale can induce distinct laminar-like or cavitating flows, validating the multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the simulation identifies a critical geometric parameter with which the high-speed flow undergoes an intriguing transition from non-cavitating to cavitating. PMID:23797665

  1. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W. PMID:16571378

  2. Unraveling the Geometry Dependence of In-Nozzle Cavitation in High-Pressure Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kyoung-Su; Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Powell, Christopher F.; Lai, Ming-Chia D.; Wang, Jin

    2013-06-01

    Cavitation is an intricate multiphase phenomenon that interplays with turbulence in fluid flows. It exhibits clear duality in characteristics, being both destructive and beneficial in our daily lives and industrial processes. Despite the multitude of occurrences of this phenomenon, highly dynamic and multiphase cavitating flows have not been fundamentally well understood in guiding the effort to harness the transient and localized power generated by this process. In a microscale, multiphase flow liquid injection system, we synergistically combined experiments using time-resolved x-radiography and a novel simulation method to reveal the relationship between the injector geometry and the in-nozzle cavitation quantitatively. We demonstrate that a slight alteration of the geometry on the micrometer scale can induce distinct laminar-like or cavitating flows, validating the multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the simulation identifies a critical geometric parameter with which the high-speed flow undergoes an intriguing transition from non-cavitating to cavitating.

  3. Localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using ray based matched field inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Seong, Woojae; Choo, Youngmin; Lee, Jeunghoon

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation of marine propeller is one of the main contributing factors of broadband radiated ship noise. In this research, an algorithm for the source localization of incipient vortex cavitation is suggested. Incipient cavitation is modeled as monopole type source and matched-field inversion method is applied to find the source position by comparing the spatial correlation between measured and replicated pressure fields at the receiver array. The accuracy of source localization is improved by broadband matched-field inversion technique that enhances correlation by incoherently averaging correlations of individual frequencies. Suggested localization algorithm is verified through known virtual source and model test conducted in Samsung ship model basin cavitation tunnel. It is found that suggested localization algorithm enables efficient localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using a few pressure data measured on the outer hull above the propeller and practically applicable to the typically performed model scale experiment in a cavitation tunnel at the early design stage.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Phenomena for Hybrid Contra-Rotating Shaft Propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Choo, Sung-Han; Park, Jeong-Yong; Choi, Gil-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with a numerical simulation of cavitation flow around a hybrid contra-rotating shaft propeller operating in wake field. The simulation for the cavitating flow is performed for straight operating and turning condition of podded propeller located behind the main propeller using unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes. The behavior of the main propeller is almost similar regardless of the turning angle. In contrast, the cavitation behavior of the podded propeller depending on the turning angle appears to be entirely different due to the change of the load distribution on the podded propeller. At the large angle of the turning condition, the unstable cavity flow due to the large amount of cavitation and the hub vortex separated from the forward propeller as well as face cavitation is observed. Thus, a great caution on the cavitation phenomena is needed when designing and operating the HCRSP.

  5. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized. PMID:26168172

  6. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 4: Combined correlations for venturi, hydrofoil, ogives, and pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a series of experimental and analytical cavitation studies are presented. Cross-correlation is performed of the developed cavity data for a venturi, a hydrofoil and three scaled ogives. The new correlating parameter, MTWO, improves data correlation for these stationary bodies and for pumping equipment. Existing techniques for predicting the cavitating performance of pumping machinery were extended to include variations in flow coefficient, cavitation parameter, and equipment geometry. The new predictive formulations hold promise as a design tool and universal method for correlating pumping machinery performance. Application of these predictive formulas requires prescribed cavitation test data or an independent method of estimating the cavitation parameter for each pump. The latter would permit prediction of performance without testing; potential methods for evaluating the cavitation parameter prior to testing are suggested.

  7. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  8. Optimization in design of scientific products for purposes of cavitation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modorskii, V. Ya.; Gaynutdinova, D. F.; Gergel, V. P.; Barkalov, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an optimized computer simulation of cavitation phenomena that occurs when a piston moves in a closed liquid-filled pipe. We have developed physical and mathematical models in a three-dimensional dynamic setting, found out a dependence of cavitation parameters on vibration parameters and constructed a domain of vibration influence on concentration of air cavitation bubbles. We also detected a maximum that corresponds to a certain combination of vibration kinematic parameters.

  9. Development of a Pulsed Pressure-Based Technique for Cavitation Damage Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in many fluid systems and can lead to severe material damage. To assist the study of cavitation damage, a novel testing method utilizing pulsed pressure was developed. In this talk, the scientific background and the technical approach of this development are present and preliminary testing results are discussed. It is expected that this technique can be used to evaluate cavitation damage under various testing conditions including harsh environments such as those relevant to geothermal power generation.

  10. Memory effect and redistribution of cavitation nuclei in a thin liquid layer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Lin, Weijun; Wu, Pengfei; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Wang, Dong; Chen, Lishuo

    2016-09-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of acoustic cavitation structures in a thin liquid layer were investigated experimentally with high-speed photography. The inception and disappearance processes of cavitation bubble cloud revealed that the metastable cavitaton structures formed in the thin liquid layer caused a long-term "memory effect". A factor which weakens the memory effect was identified. The distribution of cavitation nuclei was investigated by changing the temporal decay of the memory effect. PMID:27150763

  11. On the creep constrained diffusive cavitation of grain boundary facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    CREEP rupture in a polycrystalline metal at a high temperature, by cavity growth on a number of grain boundary facets, is studied numerically. An axisymmetric model problem is analysed, in which a cavitating facet is represented as disk-shaped, and the model dimensions are taken to represent spacings between neighbouring cavitating facets. For the grains both power law creep and elastic deformations are taken into account, and the description of cavity growth is based on an approximate expression that incorporates the coupled influence of grain boundary diffusion and power law creep. The cases considered include creep-constrained cavity growth at low stresses, where the voids link up to form grain boundary cracks at relatively small overall strains, as well as the power law creep dominated behaviour at higher stress levels, where rupture occurs at large overall strains. The numerical results are compared with results based on various simplified analyses.

  12. [A Patient with Cavitated Pulmonary Metastases Treated with Regorafenib].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masatake; Mori, Misuzu; Sata, Naohiro; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman underwent surgical resection of rectal cancer(SI, N3, Stage IIIb)and received 12 courses of adjuvant mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy. Six months after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, she was found to have pulmonarymetastases, and was treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. After 6 courses of chemotherapy, the pulmonarynodules showed central cavitation without anychange in size. After 6 additional courses of chemotherapy, pulmonarylesions increased in and had consolidated. She was treated with regorafenib as second-line chemotherapyfor recurrent disease. After 6 courses of regorafenib, the pulmonarynodules became cavitated. According to the RECIST criteria, the tumor response was stable disease. However, the morphologywas significantlychanged and tumor growth had been controlled for a long time. Assessment of tumor response depends not onlyon size according to the RECIST criteria, but also on the morphologic response when we assess tumor response to molecular targeted drugs. PMID:27306815

  13. Microscopic investigation of cavitation erosion damage in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackworh, J. V.; Adler, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The results of research to identify the cavitation erosion damage mechanisms at the microscopic level for three metals (aluminum, stainless steel, and titanium) representing a range of properties and microstructure are presented. The metals were exposed to cavitation generated in distilled water by a 20-kHz ultrasonic facility operating at a vibration amplitude of 2 mils. Representative properties of the metals and experimental details are summarized. Replicas of the eroded surfaces of the specimens obtained periodically during exposure were examined with a transmission electron microscope to follow progression of the erosion damage and identify dominant erosion mechanisms as a function of exposure time. Eroded surfaces of selected specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope to assist in the interpretation.

  14. Partial Averaged Navier-Stokes approach for cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y. N.

    2015-01-01

    Partial Averaged Navier Stokes (PANS) is a numerical approach developed for studying practical engineering problems (e.g. cavitating flow inside hydroturbines) with a resonance cost and accuracy. One of the advantages of PANS is that it is suitable for any filter width, leading a bridging method from traditional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) to direct numerical simulations by choosing appropriate parameters. Comparing with RANS, the PANS model will inherit many physical nature from parent RANS but further resolve more scales of motion in great details, leading to PANS superior to RANS. As an important step for PANS approach, one need to identify appropriate physical filter-width control parameters e.g. ratios of unresolved-to-total kinetic energy and dissipation. In present paper, recent studies of cavitating flow based on PANS approach are introduced with a focus on the influences of filter-width control parameters on the simulation results.

  15. An efficient numerical procedure for thermohydrodynamic analysis of cavitating bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, D.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient and accurate numerical procedure to determine the thermo-hydrodynamic performance of cavitating bearings is described. This procedure is based on the earlier development of Elrod for lubricating films, in which the properties across the film thickness are determined at Lobatto points and their distributions are expressed by collocated polynomials. The cavitated regions and their boundaries are rigorously treated. Thermal boundary conditions at the surfaces, including heat dissipation through the metal to the ambient, are incorporated. Numerical examples are presented comparing the predictions using this procedure with earlier theoretical predictions and experimental data. With a few points across the film thickness and across the journal and the bearing in the radial direction, the temperature profile is very well predicted.

  16. Cavitation bubble dynamics in microfluidic gaps of variable height.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Lim, Kang Y; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2009-10-01

    We study experimentally the dynamics of laser-induced cavitation bubbles created inside a narrow gap. The gap height, h , is varied from 15 to 400 microm and the resulting bubble dynamics is compared to a semiunbounded fluid. The cavitation bubbles are created with pulsed laser light at constant laser energy and are imaged with a high-speed camera. The bubble lifetime increases with decreasing gap height by up to 50% whereas the maximum projected bubble radius remains constant. Comparing the radial dynamics to potential flow models, we find that with smaller gaps, the bubble-induced flow becomes essentially planar, thus slower flows with reduced shear. These findings might have important consequences for microfluidic applications where it is desirable to tune the strength and range of the interactions such as in the case of cell lysis and cell membrane poration. PMID:19905487

  17. Superplasticity and cavitation in an aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Donghyun

    2000-10-01

    Fundamental issues related to the forming performance of superplastic metals include the mechanisms of flow and cavitation occurring during the forming process. Cavitation beyond a critical amount is damaging to the mechanical behavior of fabricated parts. Therefore, the role of process parameters which influence cavitation must be precisely documented and understood. In this study, (1) the mechanism of deformation, (2) cavity formation and growth, and (3) the effect of forming parameters on cavitation are systematically investigated in a fine grain Al-4.7%Mg-0.8%Mn-0.4%Cu alloy. The mechanical flow response of the alloy is characterized by a new type of step strain-rate test which preserves the initial microstructure of the alloy. Under isostructural condition, sigmoidal log s vs. log 3˙ relationship is determined and then analyzed by using a grain-mantle based quantitative model1 for superplastic flow. The activation energies in both grain-mantle creep and core creep are analyzed, and the overall controlling mechanism is found to be dislocation glide and climb. Grain-mantle creep rate in the low strain-rate region is found to be enhanced many times due to a high concentration of vacancies near grain boundaries. Cavitation caused by superplastic straining under uniaxial tension is evaluated by the SEM (for < 0.5mum size) and the number and size of cavities are monitored by image analysis through optical microscopy. Growth of pre-existing cavities and nucleation and growth of new cavities at grain boundary particles are monitored with increasing strain. Cavity nucleation and growth occur in two stages: crack-like growth along the particle-matrix interface by a constrained growth process, and beyond complete debonding growth via plastic deformation of the matrix which is modeled here. Stresses and strain-rates near the void are intensified due to the perturbed flow field near the void, and not relaxed during the time frame associated with superplastic deformation

  18. Empirical relations for cavitation and liquid impingement erosion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A unified power-law relationship between average erosion rate and cumulative erosion is presented. Extensive data analyses from venturi, magnetostriction (stationary and oscillating specimens), liquid drop, and jet impact devices appear to conform to this relation. A normalization technique using cavitation and liquid impingement erosion data is also presented to facilitate prediction. Attempts are made to understand the relationship between the coefficients in the power-law relationships and the material properties.

  19. The fern cavitation catapult: mechanism and design principles.

    PubMed

    Llorens, C; Argentina, M; Rojas, N; Westbrook, J; Dumais, J; Noblin, X

    2016-01-01

    Leptosporangiate ferns have evolved an ingenious cavitation catapult to disperse their spores. The mechanism relies almost entirely on the annulus, a row of 12-25 cells, which successively: (i) stores energy by evaporation of the cells' content, (ii) triggers the catapult by internal cavitation, and (iii) controls the time scales of energy release to ensure efficient spore ejection. The confluence of these three biomechanical functions within the confines of a single structure suggests a level of sophistication that goes beyond most man-made devices where specific structures or parts rarely serve more than one function. Here, we study in detail the three phases of spore ejection in the sporangia of the fern Polypodium aureum. For each of these phases, we have written the governing equations and measured the key parameters. For the opening of the sporangium, we show that the structural design of the annulus is particularly well suited to inducing bending deformations in response to osmotic volume changes. Moreover, the measured parameters for the osmoelastic design lead to a near-optimal speed of spore ejection (approx. 10 m s(-1)). Our analysis of the trigger mechanism by cavitation points to a critical cavitation pressure of approximately -100 ± 14 bar, a value that matches the most negative pressures recorded in the xylem of plants. Finally, using high-speed imaging, we elucidated the physics leading to the sharp separation of time scales (30 versus 5000 µs) in the closing dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of the precise tuning of the parameters without which the function of the leptosporangium as a catapult would be severely compromised. PMID:26763327

  20. Numerical Optimization of converging diverging miniature cavitating nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Kanchan; Bhingole, B.; Raut, J.; Pandit, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The work focuses on the numerical optimization of converging diverging cavitating nozzles through nozzle dimensions and wall shape. The objective is to develop design rules for the geometry of cavitating nozzles for desired end-use. Two main aspects of nozzle design which affects the cavitation have been studied i.e. end dimensions of the geometry (i.e. angle and/or curvature of the inlet, outlet and the throat and the lengths of the converging and diverging sections) and wall curvatures(concave or convex). Angle of convergence at the inlet was found to control the cavity growth whereas angle of divergence of the exit controls the collapse of cavity. CFD simulations were carried out for the straight line converging and diverging sections by varying converging and diverging angles to study its effect on the collapse pressure generated by the cavity. Optimized geometry configurations were obtained on the basis of maximum Cavitational Efficacy Ratio (CER)i.e. cavity collapse pressure generated for a given permanent pressure drop across the system. With increasing capabilities in machining and fabrication, it is possible to exploit the effect of wall curvature to create nozzles with further increase in the CER. Effect of wall curvature has been studied for the straight, concave and convex shapes. Curvature has been varied and effect of concave and convex wall curvatures vis-à-vis straight walls studied for fixed converging and diverging angles.It is concluded that concave converging-diverging nozzles with converging angle of 20° and diverging angle of 5° with the radius of curvature 0.03 m and 0.1530 m respectively gives maximum CER. Preliminary experiments using optimized geometry are indicating similar trends and are currently being carried out. Refinements of the CFD technique using two phase flow simulations are planned.

  1. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock

  2. Aspergillus infection in pulmonary cavitating lesions with right atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divyesh; Dorgan, Eileen; Douglas, Hannah; Trouton, Tom; McMullan, Ronan; Parissis, Haralabos

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare primary tumors with varied clinical presentations that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old man with multiple cavitating lung lesions with aspergillosis and underlying right atrial myxoma, who presented with hemoptysis and weight loss. He was successfully treated with right atrial myxoma resection and antifungal agents, with no recurrence or complications after one year of follow-up. PMID:24887845

  3. Grain boundary structure effects on creep cavitation susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Adams, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    Grain boundary structure plays an important role in creep cavitation. A function called the misorientation distribution function (MDF) defined in Euler space has been used to statistically characterize the boundary structure of polycrystalline materials. The theoretical developmet of the MDF is presented here. Experimental results showed that ..sigma..3 and ..sigma..9 special boundaries occur with high frequency in 304 stainless steel and the data also suggested a possible directional dependence of the grain boundary structure.

  4. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet. PMID:26442141

  5. Study about the influence of cavitation on the dynamic characteristics for the sliding bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. M.; Luo, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sliding bearings are employed to support the rotor system and limit the vibration amplitude. In high speed rotor system, cavitation often occurs in the oil film and affects the dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing greatly. In this paper, numerical method is adopted to simulate the cavitation in the oil film with homogeneous two-phase mixture flow using Singhal-et-al cavitation model in the commercial code FLUENT-solver. Cases without cavitation model were also calculated at the same time. Many computations with different frequency ratios were conducted. Then the rotor dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing were retrieved. The results show that the cavitation has great influences on the pressure distribution in the oil film. As the rotational speed or whirling speed of the journal increases, the cavitation will become prominent. The dynamic coefficients of the bearing such as stiffness and damping with cavitation model considered are quite different from that without cavitation. So it is worth to pay attention to and do further study about the cavitation in the sliding bearing in the high speed rotor system.

  6. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin). PMID:7869722

  7. Effect of dilute polymer additives on the acoustic cavitation threshold of water

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, L.A.; Brosey, J.E.

    1984-02-01

    Measurements are presented of the variation of the acoustic cavitation threshold of water with concentration of the polymer additives polyethylene oxide and guar gum. It was found that small amounts of these additives could significantly increase the cavitation threshold. A theoretical model, based upon nucleation of a gas bubble from a Harvey-type crevice in a mote or solid particle, is developed that gives good agreement with the measurements. The applicability of this approach to an explanation of cavitation index reduction in flow-generated or confined jet cavitation, when polymer additives are introduced, is discussed.

  8. Study on cavitation influence for pump head in an axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, K.; Kajie, Y.; Saito, S.; Miyagawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    The size of axial flow pumps used in drainage pump stations has recently decreased, and their rotation speeds have increased, causing an increase in the risk of cavitation. Therefore, to provide highly reliable pumps, it is important to understand the internal flow of pumps under cavitating conditions. In this study, high-speed camera measurements and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed to understand the cavitation performance of an axial flow pump. The mechanism that causes the head to change as a result of cavitation under low net positive suction head values is shown to be the balance between the increasing angular momentum and the loss indicated by the changing streamlines.

  9. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, R Glynn; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 muC will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 muC by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 mus after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 muC and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber ( approximately 300 mus), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles. PMID:20370004

  10. Cavitation Erosion in Hydraulic Turbine Components and Mitigation by Coatings: Current Status and Future Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Tiwari, S. K.; Mishra, Suman K.

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation erosion is a frequently observed phenomenon in underwater engineering materials and is the primary reason for component failure. The damage due to cavitation erosion is not yet fully understood, as it is influenced by several parameters, such as hydrodynamics, component design, environment, and material chemistry. This article gives an overview of the current state of understanding of cavitation erosion of materials used in hydroturbines, coatings and coating methodologies for combating cavitation erosion, and methods to characterize cavitation erosion. No single material property fully characterizes the resistance to cavitation erosion. The combination of ultimate resilience, hardness, and toughness rather may be useful to estimate the cavitation erosion resistance of material. Improved hydrodynamic design and appropriate surface engineering practices reduce damage due to cavitation erosion. The coatings suggested for combating the cavitation erosion encompasses carbides (WC Cr2C3, Cr3C2, 20CrC-80WC), cermets of different compositions (e.g., 56W2C/Ni/Cr, 41WC/Ni/Cr/Co), intermetallic composites, intermetallic matrix composites with TiC reinforcement, composite nitrides such as TiAlN and elastomers. A few of them have also been used commercially. Thermal spraying, arc plasma spraying, and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) processes have been used commercially to apply the coatings. Boronizing, laser surface hardening and cladding, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and plasma nitriding have been tried for surface treatments at laboratory levels and have shown promise to be used on actual components.

  11. A numerical study on the effects of cavitation on orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, S.; Sirignano, W. A.; Joseph, D. D.

    2010-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown better atomization of sprays generated by high-pressure liquid injectors when cavitation occurs inside the nozzle. It has been proposed that the collapse of traveling cavitation bubbles increases the disturbances inside the liquid flow. These disturbances will later trigger the instabilities in the emerged jet and cause a shorter breakup distance. In this paper, effects of cavitation on increasing the disturbances in the flow through the orifice of an atomizer are studied. In previous cavitation models, spherical cavitation bubbles are considered. Here, the cavitation bubbles are allowed to deform as they travel through the orifice. Dynamics of the cavitation bubble, traveling in the separated shear layer in the orifice, is analyzed through a one-way coupling between the orifice flow and bubble dynamics. Effects of shear strain, normal strain, and pressure variation are examined. Three mechanisms are suggested that could be responsible for the increase in disturbances in the flow due to cavitation. These mechanisms are monopole, quadrupole, and vorticities generated during growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles. The effects of these mechanisms are estimated by postprocessing of the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations to identify monopole and quadrupole behaviors.

  12. Temperature and Pressure Measurements and Visualization of He II Cavitation Flow through Venturi Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.; Harada, K.

    2004-06-23

    He II cavitation flow through a Venturi channel was experimentally investigated through temperature and pressure measurements and optical visualization. So far some distinctive features of cavitation between He II and He I flows were clarified. Then, detailed measurements were added for further investigation, such as the measurements of the temperature drop distribution throughout the flow channel and the void fraction. Further considerations were given on the cavitation inception with emphasis on the superheating of liquid helium, and the effect of the flow separation on cavitation.

  13. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of erosive cavitation pressure field from pits in material: fact or myth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Material pitting in a cavitating flow has been used for a long time as an indicator of the vague ‘cavitation intensity’ concept. Periodically, some researchers suggest pitting tests as a “simple” means to provide quantitative measurements of the amplitude of the impulsive pressures in the cavitation field, especially when combined with Tabor's formula or with simple finite element computations with static loads. This paper examines the viability of such a method using fully coupled bubble dynamics and material response, and strongly concludes that the commonly accepted idea is a myth, as different loading scenarios with the same amplitude of the cavitation impulsive pressure result in different pit aspect ratios.

  15. The Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Cavitation Evolution Induced by Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, B. C.; Zheng, J. G.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is focused on the numerical simulation of pressure wave propagation through the cavitating compressible liquid flow, its interaction with cavitation bubble and the resulting unsteady cavitation evolution. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account and the cavitating flow is governed by one-fluid cavitation model which is based on the compressible Euler equations with the assumption that the cavitation is the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Several aspects of the method employed to solve the governing equations are outlined. The unsteady features of cavitating flow due to the external perturbation, such as the cavitation deformation and collapse and consequent pressure increase are resolved numerically and discussed in detail. It is observed that the cavitation bubble collapse is accompanied by the huge pressure surge of order of 100 bar, which is thought to be responsible for the material erosion, noise, vibration and loss of efficiency of operating underwater devices.

  16. Photodistruptive laser nucleation of ultrasonic cavitation for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Doug L.; Spooner, Greg J.; Williams, Alun R.

    2001-07-01

    Pulses of high intensity laser light, when focused into transparent materials, may produce localized electron-ion plasmas through optical breakdown. By simultaneously incorporating the resulting volume of vaporized material within the focal volume of a high intensity ultrasound source, the photodisruption (1.05 micrometers wavelength) void served as a nucleation site for ultrasonic cavitation. Dilute suspensions of canine erythrocytes in phosphate buffered saline were exposed in a flow-through exposure chamber and the percentage of lysed cells was used as a measure of the biologically effective cavitation activity produced in the chamber. Brief (about 30 microsecond(s) ) acoustic emissions were detected from the photodisruption alone (indicating laser nucleation of bubbles), but the cell lysis produced was undetectable against the background. However, combined exposure greatly increased both the duration of the acoustic emissions (up to 1.5 ms) and the amount of cell lysis above an ultrasonic pressure amplitude threshold of about 4.3 MPa at 2.5 MHz. The amount of cell lysis (sometimes approaching 100%) increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity, laser pulse energy and laser PRF. Addition of 5% serum albumin enhanced the effect, apparently by stabilizing bubbles and nuclei. Photodisruptive laser nucleation of ultrasonic cavitation can provide controlled and synergistic enhancement of bioeffects.

  17. Prediction of Shock-Induced Cavitation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading has wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over pre-existing CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy/NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Prediction of shock-induced cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, A.

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading have wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over preexisting CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation.

  19. Secondary shock wave emissions from cavitation in lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the role of secondary shock waves (SSWs) generated by cavitation in lithotripsy. Acoustic pressure was measured with a fiber optic probe hydrophone and cavitation using a dual passive cavitation detector (PCD) consisting of two confocal transducers. An artificial stone (~7 mm diameter and ~9 mm length) was placed at the focus of an electrohydraulic lithotripter. The fiber was inserted through a hole drilled through the stone so that the tip was at the proximal surface. SSWs were identified by matching the time of arrival to that of the inertial collapse signature acquired by the PCD. Measurements of SSWs were obtained for 50% of SWs fired at 20 kV and 1 Hz. The peak positive pressure for the SSW was p+=33.7+/-14.8 MPa, which was comparable to the pressure induced by the incident SW (p+=42.6+/-6 MPa). The peak pressure in water was p+=23.2+/-4.4 MPa. The PCD also recorded acoustic emissions from forced collapse of pre-existing bubbles caused by the incident SW. We propose that both the reflection from the semi-rigid stone boundary and SSW from the forced collapse contribute to the observed increase in the peak pressure of the incident SW in presence of a stone. [Work supported by NIH.

  20. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect). PMID:9726407

  1. X-ray Diagnostics for Cavitating Nozzle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation plays a critical role in the internal flow of nozzles such as those used in direct fuel injection systems. However, quantifying the vapor fraction in the nozzle is difficult. The gas-liquid interfaces refract and multiply scatter visible light, making quantitative extinction measurements difficult. X-rays offer a solution to this problem, as they refract and scatter only weakly. In this paper, we report on current progress in the development of several x-ray diagnostics for cavitating nozzle flows. X-ray radiography experiments undertaken at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory have provided measurements of total projected void fraction in a 500 μm submerged nozzle, which have been directly compared with numerical simulations. From this work, it has been shown that dissolved gases in the liquid also result in the formation of vapor regions, and it is difficult to separate these multiple phenomena. To address this problem, the liquid was doped with an x-ray fluorescent bromine tracer, and the dissolved air substituted with krypton. The fluorescent emission of Br and Kr at x-ray wavelengths provide a novel measurement of both the total void fraction and the dissolved gas component, allowing both cavitation and dissolved gas contributions to be measured independently. [199/200 words

  2. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 µm) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  3. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  4. Performance and cavitation characteristics of bi-directional hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Tidal turbines extract energy from flows which reverse direction. One way to address this bi-directionality in horizontal axis turbines that avoid the use of complex and maintenance-intensive yaw or blade pitch mechanisms, is to design bi-directional blades which perform (equally) well in either flow direction. A large number of proposed hydrofoil designs were investigated using numerical simulations. Selected candidate foils were also tested (at various speeds and angles of attack) in the High-Speed Cavitation Tunnel (HICaT) at the University of New Hampshire. Lift and drag were measured using a force balance, and cavitation inception and desinence were recorded. Experimental and numerical results were compared, and the foils were compared to each other and to reference foils. Bi-directional hydrofoils may provide a feasible solution to the problem of reversing flow direction, when their performance and cavitation characteristics are comparable to those for unidirectional foils, and the penalty in decreased energy production is outweighed by the cost reduction due to lower complexity and respectively lower installation and maintenance costs.

  5. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  6. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  7. Analysis of turbulent cavitating flow in a micro channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Christian; Hickel, Stefan; Schmidt, Steffen; Adams, Nikolaus

    2013-11-01

    Associated with the collapse of vapor cavities is the formation of shock waves and liquid micro-jets, which can lead to the damage of material (cavitation erosion) or even failure of engineering devices, e.g. fuel injectors. We performed Large-Eddy Simulations of the turbulent cavitating flow through a micro channel, resembling a throttle valve commonly found in fuel injectors, at two different operating points with the aim of indentifying such erosion sensitive areas. The underlying numerical method of our flow solver INCA solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on a Cartesian adaptive grid for a homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapor in order to account for all relevent physical effects, i.e., compressibility of the liquid-vapor mixture as well as transitional flow and turbulence. The effect of non-represented scales on the represented ones is accounted for by the Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method, a non-linear finite volume scheme for the convective fluxes. We will present a comparison of numerical results with experiments as well as a detailed analysis of the interplay between vortical and cavitation structures. Furthermore, tools enabling the automatic detection of erosion sensitive areas will be discussed and applied.

  8. A Non-catalytic Deep Desulphurization Process using Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Nalinee B.; Bhandari, Vinay M.; Sorokhaibam, Laxmi Gayatri; Ranade, Vivek V.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for desulphurization of fuels or organics without use of catalyst. In this process, organic and aqueous phases are mixed in a predefined manner under ambient conditions and passed through a cavitating device. Vapor cavities formed in the cavitating device are then collapsed which generate (in-situ) oxidizing species which react with the sulphur moiety resulting in the removal of sulphur from the organic phase. In this work, vortex diode was used as a cavitating device. Three organic solvents (n-octane, toluene and n-octanol) containing known amount of a model sulphur compound (thiophene) up to initial concentrations of 500 ppm were used to verify the proposed method. A very high removal of sulphur content to the extent of 100% was demonstrated. The nature of organic phase and the ratio of aqueous to organic phase were found to be the most important process parameters. The results were also verified and substantiated using commercial diesel as a solvent. The developed process has great potential for deep of various organics, in general, and for transportation fuels, in particular. PMID:27605492

  9. Tandem shock wave cavitation enhancement for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M; Prieto, Fernando E; Fernandez, Francisco; van Cauwelaert, Javier

    2002-11-21

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been successful for more than twenty years in treating patients with kidney stones. Hundreds of underwater shock waves are generated outside the patient's body and focused on the kidney stone. Stones fracture mainly due to spalling, cavitation and layer separation. Cavitation bubbles are produced in the vicinity of the stone by the tensile phase of each shock wave. Bubbles expand, stabilize and finally collapse violently, creating stone-damaging secondary shock waves and microjets. Bubble collapse can be intensified by sending a second shock wave a few hundred microseconds after the first. A novel method of generating two piezoelectrically generated shock waves with an adjustable time delay between 50 and 950 micros is described and tested. The objective is to enhance cavitation-induced damage to kidney stones during ESWL in order to reduce treatment time. In vitro kidney stone model fragmentation efficiency and pressure measurements were compared with those for a standard ESWL system. Results indicate that fragmentation efficiency was significantly enhanced at a shock wave delay of about 400 and 250 micros using rectangular and spherical stone phantoms, respectively. The system presented here could be installed in clinical devices at relatively low cost, without the need for a second shock wave generator. PMID:12476975

  10. A Non-catalytic Deep Desulphurization Process using Hydrodynamic Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Nalinee B; Bhandari, Vinay M; Sorokhaibam, Laxmi Gayatri; Ranade, Vivek V

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for desulphurization of fuels or organics without use of catalyst. In this process, organic and aqueous phases are mixed in a predefined manner under ambient conditions and passed through a cavitating device. Vapor cavities formed in the cavitating device are then collapsed which generate (in-situ) oxidizing species which react with the sulphur moiety resulting in the removal of sulphur from the organic phase. In this work, vortex diode was used as a cavitating device. Three organic solvents (n-octane, toluene and n-octanol) containing known amount of a model sulphur compound (thiophene) up to initial concentrations of 500 ppm were used to verify the proposed method. A very high removal of sulphur content to the extent of 100% was demonstrated. The nature of organic phase and the ratio of aqueous to organic phase were found to be the most important process parameters. The results were also verified and substantiated using commercial diesel as a solvent. The developed process has great potential for deep of various organics, in general, and for transportation fuels, in particular. PMID:27605492

  11. Visualization of cavitating and flashing flows within a high aspect ratio injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew S.

    Thermal management issues necessitate the use of fuel as a heat sink for gas turbine and liquid rocket engines. There are certain benefits to using heated fuels, namely, increased sensible enthalpy, increased combustion efficiency, a decrease in certain emissions, and enhanced vaporization characteristics. However, the thermal and pressure enviornment inside an injector can result in the fuel flashing to vapor. Depending on the injector design, this can have deleterious effects on engine performance. As interest in heated fuels inreases, it is important to understand what occurs in the flow path of an injector under flashing conditions. At the High Pressure Laboratory at Purdue University's Maurice J. Zucrow Laboritories, a test rig was designed and built to give visual access into the flow path of a 2-D slot injector. The rig is capable of pressurizing and heating a liquid to superheated conditions and utilizes a pneumatically actuated piston to pusth the liquid through the slot injector. Methanol was chosen as a surrogate fuel to allow for high levels of superheat at relatively low temperatures. Testing was completed with acrylic and quartz injectors of varying L/DH. Flashing conditions inside the injector flow path were induced via a combination of heating and back pressure adjustments. Volume flow rate, pressure measurements, and temperature measurements were made which allowed the discharge characteristics, the level of superheat, and other parameters to be calculated and compared. To give a basis for comparison the flashing results are compared to the flow through the injector under cavitating conditions. Cavitation and flashing appear to be related phenomena and this relationship is shown. Bubble formation under cavitating or flashing conditions is observed to attenuate the injector's discharge characteristics. High speed videos of the flow field were also collected. Several flow regimes and flow structures, unique to these regimes, were observed. A

  12. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  13. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  14. Fundamental studies on ultrasonic cavitation-assisted molten metal processing of A356-nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoda

    The usage of lightweight high-performance components is expected to increase significantly as automotive, military and aerospace industries are required to improve the energy efficiency and the performance of their products. A356, which is much lighter than steel, is an attractive replacement material. Therefore, it is of great interest to enhance its properties. There is strong evidence that the microstructure and mechanical properties can be considerably improved if nanoparticles are used as reinforcement to form metal-matrix-nano-composite (MMNC). Several recent studies revealed that ultrasonic vibration is highly efficient in dispersing nanoparticles into the melt and producing MMNC. In this thesis, a detailed analysis of the microstructure and mechanical properties is provided for an A356 alloy enhanced with Al2O 3 and SiC nanoparticles via ultrasonic processing. Each type of the nanoparticles was inserted into the A356 molten metal and dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming technology (UST) to avoid agglomeration or coalescence. The results showed that microstructures were greatly refined and with the addition of nanoparticles, tensile strength, yield strength and elongation increased significantly. SEM and EDS analyses were also performed to analyze the dispersion of nanoparticles in the A356 matrix. Since the ultrasonic energy is concentrated in a small region under the ultrasonic probe, it is difficult to ensure proper cavitation and acoustic streaming for efficient dispersion of the nanoparticles (especially in larger UST systems) without to determine the suitable ultrasonic parameters via modeling and simulation. Accordingly, another goal of this thesis was to develop well-controlled UST experiments that can be used in the development and validation of a recently developed UST modeling and simulation tool.

  15. Investigation of nozzle flow and cavitation characteristics in a diesel injector.

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Ramirez, A.; Aggarwal, S.; El-Hannouny, E.; Longman, D.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-04-01

    Cavitation and turbulence inside a diesel injector play a critical role in primary spray breakup and development processes. The study of cavitation in realistic injectors is challenging, both theoretically and experimentally, since the associated two-phase flow field is turbulent and highly complex, characterized by large pressure gradients and small orifice geometries. We report herein a computational investigation of the internal nozzle flow and cavitation characteristics in a diesel injector. A mixture based model in FLUENT V6.2 software is employed for simulations. In addition, a new criterion for cavitation inception based on the total stress is implemented, and its effectiveness in predicting cavitation is evaluated. Results indicate that under realistic diesel engine conditions, cavitation patterns inside the orifice are influenced by the new cavitation criterion. Simulations are validated using the available two-phase nozzle flow data and the rate of injection measurements at various injection pressures (800-1600 bar) from the present study. The computational model is then used to characterize the effects of important injector parameters on the internal nozzle flow and cavitation behavior, as well as on flow properties at the nozzle exit. The parameters include injection pressure, needle lift position, and fuel type. The propensity of cavitation for different on-fleet diesel fuels is compared with that for n-dodecane, a diesel fuel surrogate. Results indicate that the cavitation characteristics of n-dodecane are significantly different from those of the other three fuels investigated. The effect of needle movement on cavitation is investigated by performing simulations at different needle lift positions. Cavitation patterns are seen to shift dramatically as the needle lift position is changed during an injection event. The region of significant cavitation shifts from top of the orifice to bottom of the orifice as the needle position is changed from fully

  16. Effect of geometrical parameters on submerged cavitation jet discharged from profiled central-body nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minguan; Xiao, Shengnan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2013-05-01

    The flow characteristics of cavitation jets are essential issues among relevant studies. The physical properties of the jet are largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the nozzle. The structure and cavitation jets characteristics of the angular-nozzle and the self-resonating cavitation nozzle have been extensively studied, but little research is conducted in the central-body cavitation nozzle mainly because of its hard processing and the cavitation jet effect not satisfactory. In this paper, a novel central-body nozzle (a non-plunger central-body nozzle with square outlet) is studied to solve above problems. Submerged jets discharged from the novel central-body nozzle are simulated, employing the full cavitation model. The impact of nozzle configuration on jet properties is analyzed. The analysis results indicate that when central-body relative diameter keeps constant, there is an optimal contraction degree of nozzle's outlet, which can induce intense cavitation in the jet. The central-body relative diameter also affects jet profiles. In the case of large central-body relative diameter, most of the bubbles settle in the jet core. On the contrary, a smaller relative diameter makes bubbles concentrate in the interface between the jet and its surrounding fluid. Moreover, the shorter outlet part allows the cavitation zone further extend in both the axial and racial directions. The research results further consummate the study on the central-body nozzles and the correlation between cavitation jet and the structure, and elementarily reveal the mechanism of cavitation jet produced in a non-plunger novel central-body nozzle and the effect of the structure parameters on the cavitation jet, moreover, provide the theoretical basis for the optimal design of the nozzle.

  17. Modeling cavitation in a rapidly changing pressure field - application to a small ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e. below the acoustic driving frequency. The term "acoustic supercavitation" was proposed for this type of cavitation Žnidarčič et al. (2014) [1]. We tested several established hydrodynamic cavitation models on this problem, but none of them was able to correctly predict the flow features. As a specific characteristic of such acoustic cavitation problems lies in the rapidly changing driving pressures, we present an improved approach to cavitation modeling, which does not neglect the second derivatives in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Comparison with measurements of acoustic supercavitation at an ultrasonic horn of 20kHz frequency revealed a good agreement in terms of cavity dynamics, cavity volume and emitted pressure pulsations. The newly developed cavitation model is particularly suited for simulation of cavitating flow in highly fluctuating driving pressure fields. PMID:24889548

  18. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  19. Application of cavitational reactors for water disinfection: current status and path forward.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R

    2007-12-01

    Cavitational reactors are a novel and promising form of multiphase reactors, based on the principle of release of large magnitude of energy due to the violent collapse of the cavities. An overview of cavitational reactors in the specific area of water disinfection, in terms of the basic mechanism, different reactor designs including recommendations for optimum operating parameters and applicability of the cavitation phenomena for disinfection of different micro-organisms have been presented. A design of a pilot scale sonochemical reactor has been presented, which forms the basis for development of industrial scale reactors. Economic analysis for comparison of cavitation phenomena with other conventional techniques of disinfection has been discussed. It appears that though cavitation is quite successful in treatment of water at laboratory scale operations, comparatively higher cost of treatment as compared to the conventional chemical methods is a hindrance in its industrial scale application. Intensification of cavitational activity and efficient design of industrial scale hydrodynamic cavitation reactors is required for ensuring successful application of cavitational reactors at industrial scale operation. PMID:17714855

  20. Effect of a cavitation treatment of coals on their physicochemical properties and ability for thermal dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yu. F. Patrakov; N.I. Fedorova; S.A. Semenova

    2007-08-15

    It was found that the cavitation treatment of low-metamorphized coals from the Kuznetsk Basin resulted in not only their mechanical degradation but also changes in the chemical composition of the surface layers of coal particles due to the occurrence of oxidation-hydrolysis reactions with water in a supercritical state under cavitation conditions.

  1. Using acoustic cavitation to enhance chemotherapy of DOX liposomes: experiment in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Dai, Dan-Dan; Lu, Cui-Tao; Lv, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xing; Li, Wen-Feng; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Kun; Huang, Pin-Tong; Chen, Li-Juan; Lin, Min

    2012-09-01

    Experiments in vitro and in vivo were designed to investigate tumor growth inhibition of chemotherapeutics-loaded liposomes enhanced by acoustic cavitation. Doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (DOX liposomes) were used in experiments to investigate acoustic cavitation mediated effects on cell viability and chemotherapeutic function. The influence of lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation on tumor inhibition was also investigated. Animal experiment was carried out to verify the practicability of this technique in vivo. From experiment results, blank phospholipid-based microbubbles (PBM) combined with ultrasound (US) at intensity below 0.3 W/cm² could produce acoustic cavitation which maintained cell viability at high level. Compared with DOX solution, DOX liposomes combined with acoustic cavitation exerted effective tumor inhibition in vitro and in vivo. The lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation could also enhance the susceptibility of tumor to chemotherapeutic drugs. DOX liposomes could also exert certain tumor inhibition under preliminary acoustic cavitation. Acoustic cavitation could enhance the absorption efficiency of DOX liposomes, which could be used to reduce DOX adverse effect on normal organs in clinical chemotherapy. PMID:22188116

  2. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  3. Plastic deformation of a magnesium oxide 001-plane surface produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, S.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine plastic deformation of a cleaved single-crystal magnesium oxide 001-plane surface exposed to cavitation. Cavitation damage experiments were carried out in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (2 mm) to the surface of the cleaved specimen. The dislocation-etch-pit patterns induced by cavitation were examined and compared with that of microhardness indentations. The results revealed that dislocation-etch-pit patterns around hardness indentations contain both screw and edge dislocations, while the etch-pit patterns on the surface exposed to cavitation contain only screw dislocations. During cavitation, deformation occurred in a thin surface layer, accompanied by work-hardening of the ceramic. The row of screw dislocations underwent a stable growth, which was analyzed crystallographically.

  4. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ε and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ε model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump.

  5. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  6. DES Prediction of Cavitation Erosion and Its Validation for a Ship Scale Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponkratov, Dmitriy, Dr

    2015-12-01

    Lloyd's Register Technical Investigation Department (LR TID) have developed numerical functions for the prediction of cavitation erosion aggressiveness within Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These functions were previously validated for a model scale hydrofoil and ship scale rudder [1]. For the current study the functions were applied to a cargo ship's full scale propeller, on which the severe cavitation erosion was reported. The performed Detach Eddy Simulation (DES) required a fine computational mesh (approximately 22 million cells), together with a very small time step (2.0E-4 s). As the cavitation for this type of vessel is primarily caused by a highly non-uniform wake, the hull was also included in the simulation. The applied method under predicted the cavitation extent and did not fully resolve the tip vortex; however, the areas of cavitation collapse were captured successfully. Consequently, the developed functions showed a very good prediction of erosion areas, as confirmed by comparison with underwater propeller inspection results.

  7. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of nodular cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, Ion; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Pelle, Marius; Crăciunescu, Corneliu

    2015-03-01

    The cavitation erosion of ductile cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure was analyzed based on ultrasonic experiments performed according to ASTM G32-2010 and the resistance was compared to the C45 steel with similar hardness. The microstructural observation of the surface for different exposure times to the ultrasonic cavitation reveals the fact that the process initiates at the nodular graphite-ferrite interface and is controlled by micro-galvanic activities and mechanical factors. The cavitation erosion resistance was evaluated based on the evolution of the mean depth erosion and the mean depth erosion rate as a function of the cavitation time. The cavitation erosion rate of the cast iron is up to 1.32 times higher than the one of the C 45 steel with similar hardness. This is explained by the occurrence of stress concentrators due to the expulsion of the graphite from the metallic matrix. PMID:25465881

  8. The inception of cavitation bubble clouds induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-12-22

    In many therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) the appearance of cavitation bubbles is unavoidable, whereas the dynamics of the bubbles induced by HIFU have not been clarified. The objective of the present work is to observe the inception process of cavitation bubble clouds generated by HIFU transducer in water using high-speed photography. Sequential images captured within 600 micros after the onset of ultrasound transmission show the dynamics of cavitation bubbles' generation, growth, deformation, expansion and collapse in the focal region. However, when the observation time is narrowed to the initial 145 micros, both the still and streak images reveal that the cavitation bubbles astonishingly stay stable in the focal region for at least 60 micros. The results imply that through adjusting the HIFU exposure time while other physical parameters are appropriately chosen, it might be possible to control the generation of stable cavitation bubbles locally in the focal region. PMID:16782158

  9. Cavitation and two-phase flow characteristics of SRPR (Savannah River Plant Reactor) pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The possible head degradation of the SRPR pumps may be attributable to two independent phenomena, one due to the inception of cavitation and the other due to the two-phase flow phenomena. The head degradation due to the appearance of cavitation on the pump blade is hardly likely in the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) since the coolant circulating line is highly pressurized so that the cavitation is difficult to occur even at LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. On the other hand, the suction pressure of SRPR pump is order-of-magnitude smaller than that of PWR so that the cavitation phenomena, may prevail, should LOCA occur, depending on the extent of LOCA condition. In this study, therefore, both cavitation phenomena and two-phase flow phenomena were investigated for the SRPR pump by using various analytical tools and the numerical results are presented herein.

  10. Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration Technique in Cavitation Research and Comparison to Phase-Doppler Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Eric; Kröger, Willfried; Damaschke, Nils

    2015-12-01

    Small particles, especially bubbles in the micro-meter range, influence the cavitation of the propellers. The prediction of cavitation inception and water quality measurements are important in cavitation research. The Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration (HDNC) technique can be used for reliable bubble concentration measurements in fluid flows. The HDNC technique bases on the analysis of scattered light from the cavitation nuclei in the water. The HDNC technique can distinguish between bubbles and solid particles. The particle type classification is important, because the number concentration of solid particles is often much higher than the nuclei concentration in cavitation tunnels and in seawater. Verification experiments show, that the HDNC technique reaches similar capabilities in number concentration estimation as Phase Doppler (PD) technique in much shorter acquisition time.

  11. Experiment and numerical simulation of cavitation performance on a pressure-regulating valve with different openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. S.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Xu, Y.; Huang, J.; Xu, Q. H.

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of widely used device in pipe system for pressure and flow rate regulating, the valve would experience cavitation in the case when a sharp pressure drop occurs, which will induce the energy loss, noise and vibration of pipeline system, and even operational accidents. The experiment on flow resistance coefficient of a DN600 pressure-regulating valve under operation conditions from 0% to 100% openings is conducted. Based on the RNG k-e turbulence model and the Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation equation, a set of computational model is developed to simulate the turbulent flow in the valve under operational conditions from 0% to 100% openings. The computational results of flow resistance coefficient are compared to the experimental data. And the numerical simulation is employed to predict the cavitation performance of the valve at different inlet flow conditions. The transient cavitating flow is calculated to reveal the time evolution of cavitation in the valve.

  12. Cavitation-free buckets of YS-920 and NACA 66 (MOD) foil sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. T.

    1982-07-01

    Based on a wing section design theory and boundary layer calculations, a new series of hydrofoil sections with improved cavitation inception characteristics were theoretically developed and presented in previous papers. To verify these theoretical results experimentally, two hydrofoil models, one a newly developed profile designated YS-920 and the other an NACA-66 (MOD) wing section, were tested in high-speed water tunnel. The measurements included force and moment data, flow visualization, cavitation characteristics, and surface roughness effect on cavitation. In this report, the measured cavitation-free buckets of YS-920 and NACA-66 (MOD) foil sections are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. The ability to achieve a significant delay in cavitation inception with a newly designed profile is clearly demonstrated experimentally.

  13. Cavitation and primary atomization in real injectors at low injection pressure condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumouchel, Christophe; Leboucher, Nicolas; Lisiecki, Denis

    2013-06-01

    This experimental work investigates the influence of the geometry of GDI devices on primary atomization processes under low injection pressure and reduced back pressure. These pressure conditions ensure cavitating flows and observable atomization processes. Measurements include mass flux, structure velocity from high-speed visualizations and spray characterization with a laser diffraction technique. Super-cavitation regime and cavitation string, which have their own influence on the mass flux, develop independently in different injector regions. These regimes impact the flow pattern in the orifice and the subsequent atomization process. A possible interaction between cavitation string and super-cavitation is found to promote a hydraulic-flip-like regime and to deteriorate atomization quality. As far as the geometry of the injector is concerned, the profile of the orifice inlet and the roughness of the sac volume region are found to be important geometrical characteristics.

  14. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP). PMID:27150764

  15. Comparative cavitation erosion test on steels produced by ESR and AOD refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojčinović, M.

    2011-09-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of steels produced by Electroslag Refining (ESR) and Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD refining) have been carried out. The experiments were conducted using the modified ultrasonically induced cavitation test method. Erosion rates were measured and the morphology of damages under cavitation action was studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy techniques. The present work is aimed at understanding the cavitation erosion behaviour of electroslag refined steel (ESR) compared with the steel produced by Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD refining), commonly used in the production of hydraulic machinery parts (Pelton blades). The results exhibited lower cavitation rate of ESR steel compared with AOD steel, as a consequence of its better mechanical properties and homogeneous and fine-grained microstructure.

  16. Relationship between thrombolysis efficiency induced by pulsed focused ultrasound and cavitation bubble size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, X.; Wang, S.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles has been studied. Firstly, the thrombolysis efficiency, evaluated by degree of mechanical fragmentation was investigated with varying duty cycle. Secondly, the size distribution of cavitation bubbles after the 1st, 103th and 105th pulse during experiments for various duty cycles was studied. It was revealed that the thrombolysis efficiency was highest when the cavitation bubble size distribution was centred around linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. Therefore, in cavitation enhanced therapeutic applications, the essential of using a pulsed FUS may be controlling the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range so as to increase the treatment efficiency.

  17. Positron annihilation study of the micro-defects induced by cavitation in mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Baoyi

    2008-08-01

    Cavitation-induced micro-defects in mild steel after cavitation experiment in the fluid field have been studied by positron Doppler broadening measurement and positron annihilation lifetime spectra (PALS). Depth-resolved positron Doppler S-parameter (DPDS) results showed that S-parameter increased and micro-defects between the surface and the bulk has obvious variation with depth during the cavitation process. From the positron lifetime results, it was found that the size and number of micro-defects increase with the development of cavitation. These results suggest that more micro-defects are generated in mild steel bulk during the cavitation process than those in the mild steel surface layer region, although more mico-defects seen in the mild steel surface layer. Moreover, the size of micro-defects in mild steel bulk increases remarkably owing to their transfer and aggregation.

  18. On Rayleigh-Plesset based cavitation modelling of fluid film bearings using the Reynolds equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Troy A.; Braun, Minel J.; Pierson, Kristopher

    2015-12-01

    In the ‘universe’ of the general cavitation phenomena the issue of cavitation in bearings, due to its particular application and the mostly non-homogeneous working fluids associated with it, has presented a rather specialized challenge. The present paper models the phenomenon of pseudo-cavitation in fluid film bearings and offers a physics-based approach that conserves mass while solving the Reynolds (RE) and Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equations in a coupled, fully transient environment. The RP solution calculates a time dependent void fraction synchronized with the RE transient solution, where density and viscosity are (re)calculated at every grid point of this homogeneous two-phase fluid. The growth and evolution of the cavitation zone expanse is physics-based and thus can accommodate evaporation, diffusion, or pseudocavitation as separate processes. This is a step beyond the present available cavitation models both for the RE and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  20. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  1. Trans-Stent B-Mode Ultrasound and Passive Cavitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Raymond, Jason L; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Moody, Melanie R; Huang, Shao-Ling; Peng, Tao; Shekhar, Himanshu; Klegerman, Melvin E; Kim, Hyunggun; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-02-01

    Angioplasty and stenting of a stenosed artery enable acute restoration of blood flow. However, restenosis or a lack of re-endothelization can subsequently occur depending on the stent type. Cavitation-mediated drug delivery is a potential therapy for these conditions, but requires that particular types of cavitation be induced by ultrasound insonation. Because of the heterogeneity of tissue and stochastic nature of cavitation, feedback mechanisms are needed to determine whether the sustained bubble activity is induced. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging through a metal stent in a flow phantom and an animal model. In this study, an endovascular stent was deployed in a flow phantom and in porcine femoral arteries. Fluorophore-labeled echogenic liposomes, a theragnostic ultrasound contrast agent, were injected proximal to the stent. Cavitation images were obtained by passively recording and beamforming the acoustic emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified with a low-frequency (500 kHz) transducer. In vitro experiments revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio for detecting stable cavitation activity through the stent was greater than 8 dB. The stent did not significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio. Trans-stent cavitation activity was also detected in vivo via passive cavitation imaging when echogenic liposomes were insonified by the 500-kHz transducer. When stable cavitation was detected, delivery of the fluorophore into the arterial wall was observed. Increased echogenicity within the stent was also observed when echogenic liposomes were administered. Thus, both B-mode ultrasound imaging and cavitation imaging are feasible in the presence of an endovascular stent in vivo. Demonstration of this capability supports future studies to monitor restenosis with contrast-enhanced ultrasound and pursue image-guided ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to inhibit restenosis. PMID:26547633

  2. Decolourization of Rhodamine B: A swirling jet-induced cavitation combined with NaOCl.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Giuseppe; Langone, Michela; Laezza, Marco; Andreottola, Gianni

    2016-09-01

    A hydrodynamic cavitation reactor (Ecowirl) based on swirling jet-induced cavitation has been used in order to allow the degradation of a waste dye aqueous solution (Rhodamine B, RhB). Cavitation generated by Ecowirl reactor was directly compared with cavitation generated by using multiple hole orifice plates. The effects of operating conditions and parameters such as pressure, pH of dye solution, initial concentration of RhB and geometry of the cavitating devices on the degradation rate of RhB were discussed. In similar operative conditions, higher extents of degradation (ED) were obtained using Ecowirl reactor rather than orifice plate. An increase in the ED from 8.6% to 14.7% was observed moving from hole orifice plates to Ecowirl reactor. Intensification in ED of RhB by using hydrodynamic cavitation in presence of NaOCl as additive has been studied. It was found that the decolourization was most efficient for the combination of hydrodynamic cavitation and chemical oxidation as compared to chemical oxidation and hydrodynamic cavitation alone. The value of ED of 83.4% was reached in 37min using Ecowirl combined with NaOCl (4.0mgL(-1)) as compared to the 100min needed by only mixing NaOCl at the same concentration. At last, the energetic consumptions of the cavitation devices have been evaluated. Increasing the ED and reducing the treatment time, Ecowirl reactor resulted to be more energy efficient as compared to hole orifice plates, Venturi and other swirling jet-induced cavitation devices, as reported in literature. PMID:27150741

  3. Investigation of acoustic cavitation energy in a large-scale sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation energy distributions were investigated for various frequencies such as 35, 72, 110 and 170 kHz in a large-scale sonoreactor. The energy analyses were conducted in three-dimensions and the highest and most stable cavitation energy distribution was obtained not in 35 kHz but in 72 kHz. However, the half-cavitation-energy distance was larger in the case of 35 kHz ultrasound than in the case of 72 kHz, demonstrating that cavitation energy for one cycle was higher for a lower frequency. This discrepancy was due to the large surface area of the cavitation-energy-meter probe. In addition, 110 and 170 kHz ultrasound showed a very low and poor cavitation energy distribution. Therefore larger input power was required to optimize the use of higher frequency ultrasound in the sonoreactor with long-irradiation distance. The relationship between cavitation energy and sonochemical efficiency using potassium iodide (KI) dosimetry was best fitted quadratically. From 7.77 x 10(-10) to 4.42 x 10(-9)mol/J of sonochemical efficiency was evaluated for the cavitation energy from 31.76 to 103. 67 W. In addition, the cavitation energy attenuation was estimated under the assumption that cavitation energy measured in this study would be equivalent to sound intensity, resulting in 0.10, 0.18 and 2.44 m(-1) of the attenuation coefficient (alpha) for 35, 72 and 110 kHz, respectively. Furthermore, alpha/(frequency)(2) was not constant, as some previous studies have suggested. PMID:19144557

  4. Loss of echogenicity and onset of cavitation from echogenic liposomes: pulse repetition frequency independence

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are being developed for the early detection and treatment of atherosclerotic lesions. An 80% loss of echogenicity of ELIP (Radhakrishnan et al. 2013) has been shown to be concomitant with the onset of stable and inertial cavitation. The ultrasound pressure amplitude at which this occurs is weakly dependent on pulse duration. Smith et al. (2007) have reported that the rapid fragmentation threshold of ELIP (based on changes in echogenicity) is dependent on the insonation pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The current study evaluates the relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from ELIP insonified by duplex Doppler pulses at four PRFs (1.25 kHz, 2.5 kHz, 5 kHz, and 8.33 kHz). Loss of echogenicity was evaluated on B-mode images of ELIP. Cavitation emissions from ELIP were recorded passively on a focused single-element transducer and a linear array. Emissions recorded by the linear array were beamformed and the spatial widths of stable and inertial cavitation emissions were compared to the calibrated azimuthal beamwidth of the Doppler pulse exceeding the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds. The inertial cavitation thresholds had a very weak dependence on PRF and stable cavitation thresholds were independent of PRF. The spatial widths of the cavitation emissions recorded by the passive cavitation imaging system agreed with the calibrated Doppler beamwidths. The results also show that 64%–79% loss of echogenicity can be used to classify the presence or absence of cavitation emissions with greater than 80% accuracy. PMID:25438849

  5. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-02-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  6. [Paroxysmal melanoptysis secondary to the cavitation of pulmonary pneumoconiosis conglomerate].

    PubMed

    Haro, M; Vizcaya, M; Sánchez, E; Coloma, R; Loeches, N; Arévalo, M

    1996-04-01

    Progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) secondary to pneumoconiosis involves the formation of fibrotic masses that eventually cause death from multiple complications. We present a rare but potentially serious complication in a patient with coal pneumoconiosis with PMF, in whom the appearance of paroxysmal melanoptysis was attributed to the cavitation of one of the pneumoconiotic masses. We emphasize the need for differential diagnosis to exclude other more common causes, as well as the use of bronchoscopy for diagnosis and confirmation. Strict control is needed to prevent possible respiratory failure when melanoptysis is massive. PMID:8689018

  7. Drag of bodies of revolution in cavitating flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper describes work in progress concerning fluid dynamics of cavitating flow. The flow field and drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack is predicted for cavity coefficients from fully-wetted flow to sigma = 0. Excellent agreement for drag coefficient is demonstrated between theory and a water tunnel experiment. It is shown that skin friction drag is the dominant drag component for zero cavity coefficient. Excellent agreement is also demonstrated between theory and a high-speed water entry experiment. This agreement corroborates the experimental measurement that the cavity pressure is equal to the water vapor pressure, contrary to low-speed water entry. 14 refs.

  8. Cavitation in water under tension near the freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Sosikov, V. A. Utkin, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-05-15

    Experiments are reported on cavitation in water at an initial temperature of 0.7 deg. C under the dynamic tension created when a compression wave interacts with a free liquid surface. It is found that the tensile strength of water increases from 20 to 50 MPa as the strain rate is varied from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 5.2 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. It is shown that the phase state of water obtained in experiments is in a double metastable region.

  9. Cavitation-Induced Fracture Causes Nanocorrugations in Brittle Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Narasimhan, R; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-22

    Brittle metallic glasses exhibit a unique and intriguing fracture morphology of periodic nanocorrugations whose spacing and amplitude are of the order of tens of nanometers. We show through continuum simulations that they fail by spontaneous and simultaneous cavitation within multiple weak zones arising due to intrinsic atomic density fluctuations ahead of a notch tip. Dynamic crack growth would then occur along curved but narrowly confined shear bands that link the growing cavities. This mechanism involves little dissipation and also explains the formation of nanocorrugations. PMID:27494475

  10. Laser-induced cavitation as a tool for detecting microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimpiev, Sergey S.; Simanovsky, Yaroslav O.; Egerev, Sergey V.; Pashin, A. E.

    1993-11-01

    The optoacoustic device consisting of a XeCl excimer laser and a measurement cell with an attached piezotransducer was used for detecting microparticles suspended in liquid probes. The potential of optoacoustic diagnostics of microinhomogeneous liquids was enhanced by applying information parameters of optoacoustic response. Probes of distilled water and Dow Chemical latex suspension were used in experiments. It was shown that the optimal laser energy deposit for individual particle detection corresponds to the coexistence of the thermal expansion mechanism of optoacoustic conversion and the cavitation mechanism.

  11. Cavitation induced by CW lasers in absorbing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Rodriguez-Aboytes, E.; Martínez-Canton, A. E.; Baldovino-Pantaleon, O.; Torres-Hurtado, S.; Robledo-Martinez, A.; Korneev, N.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2010-02-01

    Novel results are presented on thermocavitation in highly absorbing solutions using CW low power laser (λ=975 nm). Due to the large absorption coefficient (135 cm-1) at the laser wavelength, penetration length is only ~74μm inside the liquid and asymmetric bubbles are generated near the beam's entrance wall. We report the temporal dynamic of the cavitation bubble, which is much shorter than previously reported. We found that the amplitude of the shock wave decreases exponentially with the beam power. As shown in this work, thermocavitation is a phenomenon that has a great application potential in areas such as ultrasonic waves generation and controlled tissue ablation for use in lithotripsy.

  12. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  13. A Matter of Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In these days of financial turmoil, there is greater interest in depositing one's money in the bank--at least one might hope for greater interest. Banks and various trusts pay compound interest at regular intervals: this means that interest is paid not only on the original sum deposited, but also on previous interest payments. This article…

  14. Numerical Analysis of Tip Cavitation on Marine Propeller with Wake Alignment Using a Simple Surface Panel Method “SQCM”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemaru, T.; Ando, J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the calculation method of tip cavitation with wake alignment. Tip cavitation consists of tip vortex cavitation and tip super cavitation which means the undeveloped and local super cavitation around blade tip. The feature of this study is that the method applies the wake alignment model in order to express the realistic phenomena of tip cavitation and predict the pressure fluctuation more accurately. In the present method, the wake sheet is deformed according to the induced velocity vector on the vortex lines. The singularity of the potential vortex can be removed by using the Rankine Vortex model. This paper shows the calculated results regarding cavitation pattern, pressure fluctuation etc. comparing with published experimental data and calculated results without wake alignment.

  15. Simulation and experimental study of cavitation region caused by longitudinal and transverse vibration of casting ultrasonic radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Q.; Li, R. Q.; Dong, F.; Chen, P. H.; Jiang, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic simulation of casting ultrasonic vibration system were studied based on dynamic characteristics of the system and numerical simulation of ultrasonic sound pressure field under different vibration depths in water was performed. According to the simulation results, the cavitation region was estimated, and the experiment of cavitation erosion of aluminum foil in water and amplitude test were done to verify simulation results. The results showed that the longitudinal vibration at the end of face was the major vibration of ultrasonic radiation, while there was a strong vibration on cylindrical surface. Results of amplitude test are consistent with simulation results. Cavitation region caused by ultrasonic vibration mainly below the end face of radiation. The scope and intensity of cavitation were inversely related to the distance from the end face of radiation. With the vibrating depth increased, some small cavitation regions were found at the side of radiation, cavitation region distributed uncontinuously below radiation. Cavitation field measurement and simulation results were basically consistent.

  16. Cavitation bubble dynamics during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored for lithotripsy. TFL parameters differ from standard Holmium:YAG laser in several ways, including smaller fiber delivery, more strongly absorbed wavelength, low pulse energy/high pulse rate operation, and more uniform temporal pulse structure. High speed imaging of cavitation bubbles was performed at 105,000 fps and 10 μm spatial resolution to determine influence of these laser parameters on bubble formation. TFL was operated at 1908 nm with pulse energies of 5-75 mJ, and pulse durations of 200-1000 μs, delivered through 100-μm-core fiber. Cavitation bubble dynamics using Holmium laser at 2100 nm with pulse energies of 200-1000 mJ and pulse duration of 350 μs was studied, for comparison. A single, 500 μs TFL pulse produced a bubble stream extending 1090 +/- 110 μm from fiber tip, and maximum bubble diameters averaged 590 +/- 20 μm (n=4). These observations are consistent with previous studies which reported TFL ablation stallout at working distances < 1.0 mm. TFL bubble dimensions were five times smaller than for Holmium laser due to lower pulse energy, higher water absorption coefficient, and smaller fiber diameter used.

  17. Ultrasonic cavitation for obtainment of nanometric sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A.; Guzmán, R.; Espinosa, J.; Estrada, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to determine the possibility of obtaining nanometric size particles of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) from commercial micron-sized powders, through the physical principle of ultrasonic cavitation, in order to be used as supply material in coatings made through a process of thermal spray by flame. The tests are performed on a Hielscher UIP 1000hd Ultrasonics equipment, in a 20 micron wave amplitude and in times of 6, 8, 12, 18 and 24 hours. The determination of the particle size is done through image processing using ImageJ software, obtained by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM); while the elemental composition of the processed samples is analyzed through the technique of energy dispersing spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that Al2O3 and TiO2 have a reduction behaviour of the particles size after being subjected to ultrasonic cavitation, however is only reached the nanometric size in the TiO2 samples.

  18. The mechanism of erosion of metallic materials under cavitation attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The mean depth of penetration rates (MDPRs) of eight polycrystalline metallic materials, Al 6061-T6, Cu, brass, phosphor bronze, Ni, Fe, Mo, and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn exposed to cavitation attack in a viscous mineral oil with a 20 kHz ultrasonic oscillator vibrating at 50 micron amplitude are reported. The titanium alloy followed by molybdenum have large incubation periods and small MDPRs. The incubation periods correlate linearly with the inverse of hardness and the average MDPRs correlate linearly with the inverse of tensile strength of materials. The linear relationships yield better statistical parameters than geometric and exponential relationships. The surface roughness and the ratio of pit depth to pit width (h/a) increase with the duration of cavitation attack. The ratio h/a varies from 0.1 to 0.8 for different materials. Recent investigations (20) using scanning electron microscopy to study deformation and pit formation features are briefly reviewed. Investigations with single crystals indicate that the geometry of pits and erosion are dependent on their orientation.

  19. THE ROLE OF INERTIAL CAVITATION IN ACOUSTIC DROPLET VAPORIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Fakhri, Nasir H.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2011-01-01

    The vaporization of a superheated droplet emulsion into gas bubbles using ultrasound – termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) – has potential therapeutic applications in embolotherapy and drug delivery. The optimization of ADV for therapeutic applications can be enhanced by understanding the physical mechanisms underlying ADV, which are currently not clearly elucidated. Acoustic cavitation is one possible mechanism. This paper investigates the relationship between the ADV and inertial cavitation (IC) thresholds (measured as peak rarefactional pressures) by studying parameters that are known to influence the IC threshold. These parameters include bulk fluid properties such as gas saturation, temperature, viscosity, and surface tension; droplet parameters such as degree of superheat, surfactant type, and size; and acoustic properties such as pulse repetition frequency and pulse width. In all cases the ADV threshold occurred at a lower rarefactional pressure than the IC threshold indicating that the phase-transition occurs before IC events. The viscosity and temperature of the bulk fluid are shown to influence both thresholds directly and inversely, respectively. An inverse trend is observed between threshold and diameter for droplets in the 1 to 2.5 μ range. Based on a choice of experimental parameters, it is possible to achieve ADV with or without IC. PMID:19473917

  20. Effect of morphology of hydrophobic surfaces on cavitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    LUZAR,ALENKA; LEUNG,KEVIN

    2000-04-24

    Cavitation has been suggested to be a possible source of long range interactions between mesoscopic hydrophobic surfaces. While evaporation is predicted by thermodynamics, little is known about its kinetics. Glauber dynamics Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice gas close to liquid-gas coexistence and confined between partially drying surfaces are used to model the effect of water confinement on the dynamics of surface-induced phase transition. Specifically, they examine how kinetics of induced evaporation change as the texture of hydrophobic surfaces is varied. Evaporation rates are considerably slowed with relatively small amount of hydrophilic coverage. However, the distribution of hydrophilic patches is found to be crucial, with the homogeneous one being much more effective in slowing the formation of vapor tubes which triggers the evaporation process. They estimate the free energy barrier of vapor tube formation via transition state theory, using a constrained forward-backward umbrella sampling technique applied to the metastable, confined liquid. Furthermore, to relate simulation rates to experimental ones, they perform simulations using the mass-conserving Kawasaki algorithm. They predict evaporation time scales that range from hundreds of picoseconds in the case of mesoscopic surfaces {approximately} 10{sup 4} nm{sup 2} to tens of nanoseconds for smaller surfaces {approximately} 40 nm{sup 2}, when the two surfaces are {approximately} 10 solvent layers apart. The present study demonstrates that cavitation is kinetically viable in real systems and should be considered in studies of processes at confined geometry.

  1. Intensification of biogas production using pretreatment based on hydrodynamic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pankaj N; Gogate, Parag R; Csoka, Levente; Dregelyi-Kiss, Agota; Horvath, Miklos

    2016-05-01

    The present work investigates the application of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) for the pretreatment of wheat straw with an objective of enhancing the biogas production. The hydrodynamic cavitation reactor is based on a stator and rotor assembly. The effect of three different speeds of rotor (2300, 2500, 2700 rpm), wheat straw to water ratios (0.5%, 1% and 1.5% wt/wt) and also treatment times as 2, 4 and 6 min have been investigated in the work using the design of experiments (DOE) approach. It was observed that the methane yield of 31.8 ml was obtained with untreated wheat straw whereas 77.9 ml was obtained with HC pre-treated wheat straw confirming the favourable changes during the pre-treatment. The combined pre-treatment using KOH and HC gave maximum yield of biogas as 172.3 ml. Overall, it has been established that significant enhancement in the biogas production can be obtained due to the pretreatment using HC which can also be further intensified by combination with chemical treatment. PMID:26639635

  2. An experimental investigation of acoustic cavitation in gaseous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Dario F.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    1990-11-01

    High amplitude radial pulsations of a single bubble in several glycerine and water mixtures were observed in an acoustic stationary wave system at acoustic pressure amplitudes on the order of 150 kPa at 21 to 25 kHz. Sonoluminescence, a phenomenon generally attributed to the high temperatures generated during the collapse of cavitation bubbles, was observed as short light pulses occurring once every acoustic period. These emissions could be seen to originate at the geometric center of the bubble when observed through a microscope. It was observed that the light emissions occurred simultaneously with the bubble collapse. Using a laser scattering technique, experimental radius-time curves were obtained which confirmed the absence of surface waves which are expected at pressure amplitudes above 100 kPa. From these radius-time curves, measurements of the pulsation amplitude, the timing of the major bubble collapse, and the number of rebounds were made and compared with several theories. The implications of this research on the current understanding of cavitation were discussed.

  3. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  4. Computation and analysis of cavitating flow in Francis-class hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel J.

    Hydropower is the most proven renewable energy technology, supplying the world with 16% of its electricity. Conventional hydropower generates a vast majority of that percentage. Although a mature technology, hydroelectric generation shows great promise for expansion through new dams and plants in developing hydro countries. Moreover, in developed hydro countries, such as the United States, installing generating units in existing dams and the modern refurbishment of existing plants can greatly expand generating capabilities with little to no further impact on the environment. In addition, modern computational technology and fluid dynamics expertise has led to substantial improvements in modern turbine design and performance. Cavitation has always presented a problem in hydroturbines, causing performance breakdown, erosion, damage, vibration, and noise. While modern turbines are usually designed to be cavitation-free at their best efficiency point, due to the variable demand of the energy market it is fairly common to operate at off-design conditions. Here, cavitation and its deleterious effects are unavoidable, and hence, cavitation is a limiting factor on the design and operation of these turbines. Multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used in recent years to model cavitating flow for a large range of problems, including turbomachinery. However, CFD of cavitating flow in hydroturbines is still in its infancy. This dissertation presents steady-periodic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a cavitating Francis-class hydroturbine at model and prototype scales. Computational results of the reduced-scale model and full-scale prototype, undergoing performance breakdown, are compared with empirical model data and prototype performance estimations based on standard industry scalings from the model data. Mesh convergence of the simulations is also displayed. Comparisons are made between the scales to display that cavitation performance breakdown

  5. Numerical Study of the Effect of the Leading Edge Shape on Cavitation Around Inducer Blade Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier; Reboud, Jean-Luc; Fortes-Patella, Regiane

    A numerical study of the cavitation behaviour of two-dimensional hydrofoils simulating a section of an inducer blade is presented. Two leading edge shapes were chosen to approach rocket engine inducer designs. They were tested with respect to the development of sheet cavitation. The numerical model of cavitating flows is based on the 3D code FINE/TURBOTM, developed by NUMECA International. The cavitation process is taken into account by using a single fluid model, which considers the liquid vapour mixture as a homogeneous fluid whose density varies with respect to the static pressure. Numerical results are compared with experimental ones, obtained in the CREMHyG large cavitation tunnel(1). Pressure distributions along the foil suction side and the tunnel walls were measured for different cavity lengths. Total pressure measurements along the foil suction side allow characterizing the effects of cavitation on the liquid flow. Influence of the leading edge shape on the cavitation behaviour and comparison between experiments and numerical predictions are discussed.

  6. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-01

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  7. Prediction and analysis of jet pump cavitation using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi, Hai; Zhou, Lingjiu; Meng, Long

    2015-12-01

    3D LES numerical simulations were performed to investigate cavitation performance inside a jet pump. The results were found to match the test data most closely. The cavitation characteristics of the jet pump were then analyzed using changes in the inlet and outlet pressure to isolate its effect on cavitation. Both results shows that the increase of the inlet pressure generally increases the Renolds number but decrease the cavitation number, thus aggravate cavitation. The closing of the outlet valve increase the outlet pressure but decrease the flowrate ratio, resulting in the increase of velocity difference and vorticity in the mixing layer. So the cavitation first declines and then grows. The cavities appear slender and extended longer in the throat with high flowrate ratio. Conversely, the cavities look short and located in the front part of the throat with low flowrate ratio. Flow analysis indicated that the turbulence behavior in the shear layer and the overall mean pressure has great influence on the local pressure in jet pump, which reveal the reason of different cavitation shape observed in experiment.

  8. Numerical studies in a centrifugal pump with the improved blade considering cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P. F.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhou, X.; Zhang, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a centrifugal pump with the improved blade for cavitation is studied numerically. A 3D impeller with logarithmic spiral blade profile was designed by the in-house hydraulic design code using a centrifugal pump geometric parameters, and the blade profile curve of suction side on the designed impeller is replaced by a combination of tangent line and circle arc line. The cavitation flows in the centrifugal pump with designed impeller, modified impeller and centrifugal pump spectrum impeller are respectively calculated by two-phase CFD simulation at three flow rates. The tests of the centrifugal pump have been conducted to verify numerical simulation. The effects of designed impeller and modified impeller on hydraulic efficiency, critical cavitation number, cavitation length, head drop performance and vapor cavity distribution in impeller are investigated. The results show that the modification of blade profile curve of suction side can improve the cavitation performance of an impeller and hydraulic efficiency of centrifugal pump. Compared with designed impeller, the critical cavitation number of centrifugal pump with modified impeller decrease by 26.5% under the same flow rate coefficient, and the cavitation intensity in the modified impeller is weakened effectively. The hydraulic efficiency of modified impeller also increases by 4.9%.

  9. Numerical simulation of cavitation effects influenced by centrifugal pump inlet parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. F.; Wang, Y.; Ning, C.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation has great influence on performance of the centrifugal pump. However, there is still no effective design to overcome this problem. Blade leading edge of centrifugal pump impeller is the initial position of cavitation. The leading edge geometry shape not only has a great influence on the cavitation inception and its development, but also a great influence on the flow state near the impeller inlet. In this paper, the numerical simulation method is adopted. Cavitation of four different models (including rectangular-shape blade model, circular-arc-shape blade model, elliptical-shape blade model and cusp-shape blade model) are simulated under the same condition by changing the NPSHA value. The influence of different blade models on cavitation performance is analyzed. The results show that the deviation between the simulated data and experimental data is within the deviation range. The head of rectangular-shape blade model and circular-arc-shape blade model are higher than those of elliptical-shape blade model and cusp-shape blade model. However, the head of rectangular-shape blade model and circular-arc-shape blade model is smaller than the latter under the low effective cavitation margin. What's more, the head of the models with trimmed blade are higher than the head of the models with untrimmed blade under the working condition but are smaller under the low effective cavitation margin.

  10. The cavitation induced Becquerel effect and the hot spot theory of sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Prevenslik, T V

    2003-06-01

    Over 150 years ago, Becquerel discovered the ultraviolet illumination of one of a pair of identical electrodes in liquid water produced an electric current, the phenomenon called the Becquerel effect. Recently, a similar effect was observed if the water surrounding one electrode is made to cavitate by focused acoustic radiation, which by similarity is referred to as the cavitation induced Becquerel effect. The current in the cavitation induced Becquerel effect was found to be semi-logarithmic with the standard electrode potential that is consistent with the oxidation of the electrode surface by the photo-decomposition theory of photoelectrochemistry. But oxidation of the electrode surface usually requires high temperatures, say as in cavitation. Absent high bubble temperatures, cavitation may produce vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light that excites water molecules in the electrode film to higher H(2)O(*) energy states, the excited states oxidizing the electrode surface by chemical reaction. Solutions of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation during bubble collapse that include the condensation of water vapor show any increase in temperature or pressure of the water vapor by compression heating is compensated by the condensation of vapor to the bubble wall, the bubbles collapsing almost isothermally. Hence, the cavitation induced Becquerel effect is likely caused by cavitation induced VUV light at ambient temperature. PMID:12782265

  11. Optimal design of solenoid valve to minimize cavitation by numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seungbin; Jang, Ilhoon; Song, Simon

    2012-11-01

    Keeping pace with the development of clean energy, hybrid cars and electric vehicles are getting extensive attention recently. In an electronic-control brake system which is essential to those vehicles, a solenoid valve is used to control external hydraulic pressure that boosts up the driver's braking force. However, strong cavitation occurs at the narrow passage between the ball and seat of a solenoid valve due to sudden decrease in pressure, leading to severe damage to the valve. In this study, we investigate the cavitation numerically to discover geometric parameters to affect the cavitation, and an optimal design to minimize the cavitation using optimization technique. As a result, we found four parameters: seat inner radius, seat angle, seat length, and ball radius. Among them, the seat inner radius affects the cavitation most. Also, we found that preventing a sudden reduction in a flow passage is important to reduce cavitation. Finally using an evolutionary algorithm for optimization we minimized cavitation. The optimal design resulted in the maximum vapor volume of fraction of 0.04 while it was 0.7 for reference geometry.

  12. Influence of the vibro-acoustic sensor position on cavitation detection in a Kaplan turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.; Necker, J.; Kopf, E.; Rieg, M.; Arantes, G.; Wessiak, M.; Mayrhuber, J.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic turbines can be operated close to the limits of the operating range to meet the demand of the grid. When operated close to the limits, the risk increases that cavitation phenomena may occur at the runner and / or at the guide vanes of the turbine. Cavitation in a hydraulic turbine can cause material erosion on the runner and other turbine parts and reduce the durability of the machine leading to required outage time and related repair costs. Therefore it is important to get reliable information about the appearance of cavitation during prototype operation. In this experimental investigation the high frequency acoustic emissions and vibrations were measured at 20 operating points with different cavitation behaviour at different positions in a large prototype Kaplan turbine. The main goal was a comparison of the measured signals at different sensor positions to identify the sensitivity of the location for cavitation detection. The measured signals were analysed statistically and specific values were derived. Based on the measured signals, it is possible to confirm the cavitation limit of the examined turbine. The result of the investigation shows that the position of the sensors has a significant influence on the detection of cavitation.

  13. Air emission into a water shear layer through porous media. Part 2: Cavitation induced pressure attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, E.C.; Marboe, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation near the casing of a hydroturbine can lead to damage through both cavitation erosion and mechanical vibration of the casing and the associated piping. Cavitation erosion results from the collapse of cavitation bubbles on or near a surface such as the casing wall. Mechanical vibrations transmitted to the casing directly through the collapse of bubbles on the casing wall indirectly through a coupling of the acoustic pressure pulse due to a nearby collapse on the turbine blade. Air emission along the casing can reduce the intensity of the tip vortex and the gap cavitation through ventilation of the cavity. Reduction in the machinery vibration is obtained by reduction of the intensity of cavitation bubble collapse and attenuation and scattering of the radiated acoustic pressure. This requires a bubble layer which may be introduced in the vicinity of the turbine blade tips. This layer remains for some distance downstream of the blades and is effective for attenuation of tip vortex induced noise and blade surface cavitation noise. For the purpose of characterizing this bubble layer within a water pipe, the authors spanned a pipe with a two dimensional hydrofoil and emitted air through porous media (20 and 100 micron porosity sintered stainless steel) into the shear flow over the hydrofoil. This paper is limited to an investigation of the attenuation of acoustic pressure propagating to the casing rather than the reduction in acoustic source level due to collapse cushioning effects.

  14. Numerical simulation of cavitation for a horizontal axis marine current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    Marine current turbines, compared with the analogous wind turbines, have the potential to suffer cavitation. This paper focuses on the effect of cavitation on a marine current turbine and implements the two-phase flow simulations based on the Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation model. It can be found that under the influence of cavitation, the power and thrust coefficients of turbine decrease and especially near the blade tips. Due to the non-uniform hydrostatic pressure along the depth of water, the present work takes this effect into account and finds a larger cavitation area appears on the blade tips at a shallow submergence. Meanwhile the power and thrust performance of one blade change during its rotating period. In order to analyze the cavitation performance of turbine locates at a certain water depth, the variations of inflow velocity and rotor rotating speed are implemented. It indicates that, with the inflow velocity increasing, the CP and CT of turbine with higher rotation speed will significantly reduce due to the occurrence of cavitation, and the influence on the turbine with lower speed is small. These predicting results can provide implications for the safe and stable operation of marine current turbines.

  15. Characterizing cryogenic propellant flow behavior through a cavitating venturi in comparison to alternative flow control mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, Marjorie Adele

    The work detailed is an investigation of the use of a cavitating venturi as both a flow control and metering device. This was achieved through the combination of actual experimentation and numerical modeling of the fluid behavior of both liquid water and liquid methane as it passes through the test article designed, developed, and validated here within this study. The discharge coefficient of the cavitating venturi was determined through weigh flow calibration testing to determine an average mass flow rate. Turbine flow meter flow rate readings were used as a point of comparison and the discharge coefficient was computed. The discharge coefficient was then implemented into the Bernoulli Equation along with experimental pressure and temperature data to again calculate mass flow rate through the cavitating venturi. The agreement of the venturi flow rate data to that of the turbine flow meter effectively established its applicability as a passive flow control and metering feature. A preliminary CFD cavitation model was developed and validated for cavitating water flow regimes using ANSYS FLUENT. Agreement between mass flow rates obtained from the model to experimental data for cavitating water flow indicates that deviations in results for liquid methane analysis from experimental results could simply be the result of insufficiently defined fluid characteristics in the ANSYS FLUENT materials database. SEM surface roughness analysis of a secondary test article indicated that the default average surface roughness for steel in ANSYS FLUENT was reasonable. In addition, the methodology could be further applied to future duty life studies for the cavitating venturi flow meter.

  16. The Influence of Dissolved Carbon Dioxide on Cavitation Intensity in Ultrasound Cleaning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brems, Steven; Hauptmann, Marc; Camerotto, Elisabeth; Pacco, Antoine; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul; Gottschalk, Christiane; De Gendt, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    A study is made of the effect of dissolved CO2 on cavitation inception and activity in an ultrasound system with a sound frequency of 928 kHz. It is shown that measurable cavitation activity is completely absent at moderate acoustic power densities (≤1.7 W cm-2) when only CO2 is dissolved in ultra pure water. It is suggested that the enhanced stability of CO2 bubbles against coalescence might be the origin of the delayed cavitation inception when compared to other dissolved gases. A combination of dissolved O2 and CO2 can lead to a measurable cavitation activity at an acoustic power of 420 mW cm-2, but an increase of the dissolved CO2 level reduces, in general, the observed cavitation activity. In order to compare results with different dissolved gas concentrations, measurements are performed with acoustic pulses and the pulse off time is varied. An optimal pulse-off time exists, where a maximum of cavitation activity is observed. However, the pulse-off time interval with enhanced cavitation activity is narrowed with increasing dissolved CO2 concentrations. Again, a decrease in bubble coalescence might explain the narrowing of the “enhancement peak”.

  17. Probing and characterizing the early stages of cavitation in glassy polymers in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, R.; Long, D.

    2011-06-01

    This work focuses on a specific aspect of polymer fracture: the onset of cavitation during deformation. Failure in polymers involves plastic deformation by shear yielding and crazing. The competition between these two mechanisms is thought to govern the ductile versus brittle response of the material. The present molecular dynamics (MD) analysis shows that at a small scale, cavitation results from a transition between a homogeneous to a highly heterogeneous deformation field during loading. We characterize here these two regimes thanks to a scalar non-affine displacement probe, which displays a sharp transition at the onset of cavitation. Close scrutiny of cavitation allows for defining a stress-based cavitation criterion, the validity of which is checked for two temperatures in the glassy state. A mapping between the MD results and the corresponding estimates at the continuum scale indicates that the onset of cavitation at high deformation rates corresponds to a noticeably larger stress level as compared with that at low and intermediate loading rates. Since cavitation precedes failure in glassy polymers, this effect could be responsible for the marked increase in toughness reported experimentally under impact conditions.

  18. The influence of octyl β-D-glucopyranoside on cell lysis induced by ultrasonic cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan

    2011-01-01

    Octyl β-D-glucopyranoside (OGP) has been reported to completely inhibit cavitation-induced cell lysis in vitro, possibly by quenching critical free-radical effects. In this study, the influence of OGP on cell lysis in a 60 rpm rotating-tube exposure apparatus was assessed. HL-60 cell lysis was estimated with a Coulter Multisizer counter. Cavitation activity from the 2.3 MHz, 30 s duration exposures were monitored at the 1.15 MHz subharmonic. Cavitation nucleation was accomplished by addition of an ultrasound contrast agent, or by using freshly dissolved culture media. For both nucleation methods, exposures were conducted for 0–0.7 MPa peak rarefactional pressure-amplitudes with and without 5 mM OGP, and for 0.5 MPa with 0-5 mM OGP. The addition of OGP to the cell suspension medium generally had little influence on cavitation-induced cell lysis. Exposures with no rotation had reduced subharmonic and lysis for added contrast agent, but essentially no cavitation for the fresh medium. Since the decreases or increases in cell lysis found for added OGP generally were accounted for by concomitant decreases or increases in cavitation activity, the changes in cell lysis could be explained by variation of the mechanical effects of cavitation without invoking a critical role for free-radical effects. PMID:22088023

  19. Application of hydrodynamic cavitation to improve the biodegradability of mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Bis, M; Montusiewicz, A; Ozonek, J; Pasieczna-Patkowska, S

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the application of hydrodynamic cavitation to improve the biodegradability of mature landfill leachate was investigated. Three configurations of cavitation device were examined and operational parameters of the process were selected. The study indicated that the orifice plate with a 3/10mm diameter conical concentric hole, characterized by the cavitation number of 0.033, is a reasonable choice to ensure the enhanced biodegradability of mature leachate. Using such a configuration and maintaining 30 recirculation passes through the cavitation zone at inlet pressure of 7 bar, the highest increase of biodegradability index (BI) of approximately 22% occurred, i.e., from the value of 0.046 to 0.056. The FT-IR/PAS analysis confirmed a degradation of refractory compounds that typically prevail in mature leachate. An evaluation of energy efficiency was made in terms of the actual consumed energy measured by using the Kyoritsu KEW6310 Power Quality Tester. A cavitational yield of 9.8 mg COD kJ(-1) was obtained for the optimum configuration and 30 recirculation passes. Regarding energy efficiency, the application of 10 cavitation cycles appeared to be the most profitable. This was due to an almost threefold higher cavitational yield of 27.5 mg COD kJ(-1). However, the preferable option should be selected by considering a satisfactory effect in the biodegradability enhancement. PMID:25771333

  20. Time-frequency analysis of transient pressure signals for a mechanical heart valve cavitation study.

    PubMed

    Yu, A A; White, J A; Hwang, N H

    1998-01-01

    A series of transient pressure signals (TPSs) can be measured using a miniature pressure transducer mounted near the tip of the inflow side of a mechanical heart valve (MHV) occluder during closure. A relationship appears to exist between the intensity and pattern of the TPS and the cavitation potential of a MHV. To study the relationship between MHV cavitation and the TPSs, we installed an MHV in a valve testing chamber of a digitally controlled burst test loop. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera and a personal computer based image grabbing program was used to visualize cavitation bubbles appearing on or near the occluder surface. One bileaflet MHV was used as the model for this study. Cavitation bubbles were observed within 300 microsec of the leaflet/housing impact. The valve was tested at various driving pressures between 100 and 1,300 mmHg. MHV cavitation bubble intensities were qualitatively classified into three categories: 1) strong, 2) weak, and 3) none. Digital images of the MHV occluder inflow surface were recorded simultaneously with the TPSs. TPSs were studied by the time-frequency analysis method (spectrogram) and correlated to MHV cavitation potential. The intensity of the cavitation bubbles was found to be associated with burst test loop driving pressures during leaflet closure. PMID:9804476

  1. Numerical investigation on cavitation in pressure relief valve for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, G. F.; Li, W. Z.; Xiao, D. H.; Zheng, Z. J.; Dou, H. S.; Wang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The pressure relief valve for regulating the level of the high-pressure separator works under a pressure difference up to 15 MPa in the temperature of 415 °C. Severe cavitation erosion and particle impact lead to the valve disc's mass loss. In this paper, three-dimensional turbulent cavitating flows in the pressure relief valve are numerically simulated to reveal the mechanism of mass loss at valve disc. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the mixture model with a mass transfer for cavitation are employed to simulate the cavitating flow in the pressure relief valve. The result shows that there is phase change in the pressure relief process and cavitation bubbles would be transported by high-velocity backflow to the head of valve disc. For the local pressure higher than the saturated vapor pressure, the bubbles collapse at the head of disc and cavitation erosion is formed at the head of the disc. By comparing the cases of opening of 40%, 50%, and 60%, backflow velocity and cavitation region in front of the disc decrease with the opening increase. Therefore, during the actual operation, the pressure relief valve should be kept to a relatively large opening.

  2. A Tissue Phantom for Evaluation of Mechanical Damage Caused by Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alex; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a phantom which acts as an indicator of mechanical tissue damage caused by cavitation in therapeutic ultrasound such as histotripsy. The phantom is an optically-transparent gel, allowing real-time visualization of cavitation. Lesions are visible as a change in transparency, giving immediate feedback of the damage. The phantom was formed in 3 layers of agarose gel, with the center layer containing 5% porcine red blood cells. It was found that the acoustic and mechanical properties are similar to tissue. To compare lesions induced in the phantom and tissue, phantoms and ex-vivo kidney were treated using a focused 1-MHz transducer applying 15 cycle pulses at a rate of 100 Hz and peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Cavitation caused lysis of red blood cells, which changed the affected area from translucent red to transparent. Lesion morphology of the phantom was similar to tissue, with no cellular structures remaining inside the lesion and sharp boundaries between the transparent and translucent zones. Lesions in the phantom produced a hypoechoic appearance in the phantom on a B-Mode ultrasound image, as previously observed with histotripsy lesions generated in tissue. High-speed imaging was used to correlate cavitation activity with the formation of lesions spatially. During ultrasound exposure, cavitation clouds were observed in the phantom by high-speed optical imaging. Lesions in the gel only formed when and where cavitation was observed. The tissue phantom allows immediate visualization of cavitation and cavitational tissue damage providing a useful research tool for cavitational ultrasound therapy studies such as testing acoustic parameters or scanning algorithms.

  3. Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170 kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study. PMID:22489674

  4. Cavitation phenomena in mechanical heart valves: studied by using a physical impinging rod system.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-10-01

    When studying mechanical heart valve cavitation, a physical model allows direct flow field and pressure measurements that are difficult to perform with actual valves, as well as separate testing of water hammer and squeeze flow effects. Movable rods of 5 and 10 mm diameter impinged same-sized stationary rods to simulate squeeze flow. A 24 mm piston within a tube simulated water hammer. Adding a 5 mm stationary rod within the tube generated both effects simultaneously. Charged-coupled device (CCD) laser displacement sensors, strobe lighting technique, laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high fidelity piezoelectric pressure transducers measured impact velocities, cavitation images, squeeze flow velocities, vortices, and pressure changes at impact, respectively. The movable rods created cavitation at critical impact velocities of 1.6 and 1.2 m/s; squeeze flow velocities were 2.8 and 4.64 m/s. The isolated water hammer created cavitation at 1.3 m/s piston speed. The combined piston and stationary rod created cavitation at an impact speed of 0.9 m/s and squeeze flow of 3.2 m/s. These results show squeeze flow alone caused cavitation, notably at lower impact velocity as contact area increased. Water hammer alone also caused cavitation with faster displacement. Both effects together were additive. The pressure change at the vortex center was only 150 mmHg, which cannot generate the magnitude of pressure drop required for cavitation bubble formation. Cavitation occurred at 3-5 m/s squeeze flow, significantly different from the 14 m/s derived by Bernoulli's equation; the temporal acceleration of unsteady flow requires further study. PMID:20490686

  5. Interest Assessment. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.

    The assessment of interests through the use of interest inventories is big business in the field of testing today. The assessment of interests originally developed as an outgrowth of efforts in education and in industry to supplement special and general abilities information about individuals. Interest inventories used today differ from early…

  6. Whose interests count?

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Lantos, John D

    2014-10-01

    Whose interests should count and how should various interests be balanced at the pediatric patient's bedside? The interests of the child patient clearly count. Recently, however, many authors have argued that the family's interests also count. But how should we think about the interests of others? What does it mean to talk about "the family" in this context? Does it really just mean the interests of each individual family member? Or is the family itself a moral entity that has interests of its own independent of the interests of each of its members? Are such interests important only as they affect the patient's interest or also for their own sake? In this special supplement to Pediatrics, a group of pediatricians, philosophers, and lawyers grapple with these questions. They examine these issues from different angles and reach different conclusions. Jointly, they demonstrate the ethical importance and, above all, the ethical complexity of the family's role at the bedside. PMID:25274878

  7. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kazuki; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation bubbles initiated by focused ultrasound waves are investigated through experiments and modeling. Pulses of focused ultrasound with a frequency of 335 kHz and a peak negative pressure of 8 MPa is generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The pressure field is modeled by solving the Euler equations and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by highspeed photography qualitatively agree with the simulation results. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works synchronized with high-speed photography.

  8. Adaptation of the Advanced Spray Combustion Code to Cavitating Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1993-01-01

    A very important consideration in turbopump design is the prediction and prevention of cavitation. Thus far conventional CFD codes have not been generally applicable to the treatment of cavitating flows. Taking advantage of its two-phase capability, the Advanced Spray Combustion Code is being modified to handle flows with transient as well as steady-state cavitation bubbles. The volume-of-fluid approach incorporated into the code is extended and augmented with a liquid phase energy equation and a simple evaporation model. The strategy adopted also successfully deals with the cavity closure issue. Simple test cases will be presented and remaining technical challenges will be discussed.

  9. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  10. The rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller in the presence of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid-induced rotordynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller whirling along a trajectory eccentric to its undeflected position in the presence of cavitation were measured using the experimental facility described by Jery (1987). The force measured is a combination of a steady radial force due to the volute asymmetries and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the rotor. It was found that, compared to the noncavitation condition, a cavitation corresponding to a head loss of 3 percent had little effect upon the unsteady force. However, a lesser degree of cavitation at the design point, was found to increase the destabilizing force for a particular set of whirl ratios.

  11. Erosion of phosphor bronze under cavitation attack in a mineral oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental investigations on erosion of a copper alloy, phosphor bronze, under cavitation attack in a viscous mineral oil are presented. The details of pit formation and erosion were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The mean depth of penetration, the variations in surface roughness, and the changes in erosion pit size were studied. Cavitation pits formed initially over the grain boundaries while the surface grains were plastically deformed. Erosion of surface grains occurred largely by ductile fracture involving microcracking and removal in layers. The ratio h/a of the depth h to half width a of cavitation pits increased with test duration from 0.047 to 0.55.

  12. Elasticity effects on cavitation in a squeeze film damper undergoing noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Elasticity of the liner and its effects on cavitation were numerically determined for a squeeze film damper subjected to dynamic loading. The loading was manifested as a prescribed motion of the rotor undergoing noncentered circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm which conserves lineal mass flux through the moving cavitation bubble as well as the oil film region of the damper. Computational movies were used to analyze the rapidly changing pressures and vapor bubble dynamics throughout the dynamic cycle for various flexibilities in the damper liner. The effects of liner elasticity on cavitation were only noticeable for the intermediate and high values of viscosity used in this study.

  13. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  14. Evaluation of a Filter-Based Model for Computations of Cavitating Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biao; Wang, Guo-Yu

    2011-02-01

    To identify ways to improve the predictive capability of the current RANS-based cavitating turbulent closure, a filter-based model (FBM) is introduced by considering sub-filter stresses. The sub-filter stress is constructed directly by using the filter size and the conventional turbulence closure. The model is evaluated in steady cavitating flow over a blunt body revolution and unsteady cavitating flow around a Clark-Y hydrofoil respectively. Compared with the experimental data, those results indicate that FBM can be used to improve the predictive capability considerably.

  15. Study on Prediction of Underwater Radiated Noise from Propeller Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takuyoshi; Sato, Kei; Kawakita, Chiharu; Oshima, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The method to predict underwater radiated noise from tip vortex cavitation was studied. The growth of a single cavitation bubble in tip vortex was estimated by substituting the tip vortex to Rankine combined vortex. The ideal spectrum function for the sound pressure generated by a single cavitation bubble was used, also the empirical factor for the number of collapsed bubbles per unit time was introduced. The estimated noise data were compared with measured ship's ones and it was found out that this method can estimate noise data within 3dB difference.

  16. Spatio-temporal description of the cavitating flow behavior around NACA 2412 hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.; Štefan, D.; Sedlář, M.; Kozák, J.; Habán, V.; Huzlík, R.

    2015-12-01

    Spatio-temporal description of the cavitating flow around hydrofoil with 8 degrees incidence using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is presented. POD is a suitable tool, which provides information not only about the flow dynamics, but also about relevance of different flow structures. POD also enables to track energy transport within the domain and energy transfer among the eigenmodes of the flow field. Analysis documents change of the flow structure for decreasing cavitation number, which can be most likely attributed to sheet/cloud cavitation transition.

  17. Scale effects on propeller cavitating hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic performances with non-uniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiongfang; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Zhihong

    2013-03-01

    Considering the lack of theoretical models and ingredients necessary to explain the scaling of the results of propeller cavitation inception and cavitating hydroacoustics from model tests to full scale currently, and the insufficient reflection of the nuclei effects on cavitation in the numerical methods, the cavitating hydrodynamics and cavitation low frequency noise spectrum of three geometrically similar 7-bladed highly skewed propellers with non-uniform inflow are addressed. In this process, a numerical bridge from the multiphase viscous simulation of propeller cavitation hydrodynamics to its hydro-acoustics is built, and the scale effects on performances and the applicability of exist scaling law are analyzed. The effects of non-condensable gas(NCG) on cavitation inception are involved explicitly in the improved Sauer's cavitation model, and the cavity volume acceleration related to its characteristic length is used to produce the noise spectrum. Results show that, with the same cavitation number, the cavity extension on propeller blades increases with diameter associated with an earlier shift of the beginning point of thrust decline induced by cavitation, while the three decline slopes of thrust breakdown curves are found to be nearly the same. The power of the scaling law based on local Reynolds number around 0.9 R section is determined as 0.11. As for the smallest propeller, the predominant tonal noise is located at blade passing frequency(BPF), whereas 2BPF for the middle and both 2BPF and 3BPF for the largest, which shows the cavitating line spectrum is fully related to the interaction between non-uniform inflow and fluctuated cavity volume. The predicted spectrum level exceedance from the middle to the large propeller is 6.65 dB at BPF and 5.94 dB at 2BPF. Since it just differs less than 2 dB to the increment obtained by empirical scaling law, it is inferred that the scale effects on them are acceptable with a sufficient model scale, and so do the

  18. Cavitation performance tests on the primary pump model of a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, A.S.L.K.; Kale, R.D.; Chougule, R.J.; Joshi, S.G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses in detail cavitation performance tests on a 1/3 model of the primary sodium pump for the proposed Prototype fast Breeder Reactor. The prototype pump has a rated capacity of 2.09 m{sup 3}/s at a delivery head of 80 mlc when operating at the rated speed of 700 rpm. The available NPSH is a modest 14 mlc and it is required that the hydraulic design of the pump be such as to have zero cavitation at the normal operating speed. The details of cavitational study of the model pump and comparison of experimental observations with model predictions is discussed.

  19. Transient cavitation produced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioanta, Iulian

    1998-12-01

    Two decades ago, a new medical procedure was introduced, allowing the fragmentation of kidney stones from outside the human body (noninvasively) using a shock wave device termed lithotripter ('stone crusher'). Considered as one of the most important medical inventions of this century, lithotripsy is currently used in more than 80% of urolithiasis cases. Experimental studies have shown that transient or inertial cavitation is generated by this procedure near the stones and in renal tissue. To find a correlation between the number of shocks delivered and the treatment efficiency, the acoustic emission (AE) generated by the oscillation of cavitation bubbles, and its relation with stone fragmentation and tissue damage during shock wave lithotripsy were studied. In vitro experiments were carried out to identify the correlation between the AE signals and the expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles, which were captured by high-speed photography (20,000 frames per second). This correlation has been verified on four different electrohydraulic lithotripters, under multiple experimental conditions. The effects of tissue attenuation on AE and stone fragmentation were also studied. The in vitro results have further allowed the interpretation of AE signals from in vivo experiments with pigs. Although similar in general trend, in vivo AE signals are found to be shorter in expansion and longer in the total ringing times (including the rebound phenomenon) than for in vitro AE signals, indicating a tissue constraining effect on bubble oscillation. Based on this observation a new mechanism for renal vascular and tubular injury is proposed. In addition, changes in AE signals have been observed as the total number of shocks increases, and this dose dependence feature has allowed the determination of a threshold value for extended tissue injury at 20 kV. This result has been confirmed by histological analysis and by results of a theoretical model study of bubble oscillation in a

  20. Points of Interest: What Determines Interest Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tim

    Interest rates can significantly influence people's behavior. When rates decline, homeowners rush to buy new homes and refinance old mortgages; automobile buyers scramble to buy new cars; the stock market soars, and people tend to feel more optimistic about the future. But even though individuals respond to changes in rates, they may not fully…

  1. Hydrodynamics of an endothermic gas with application to bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2006-10-01

    The hydrodynamics for a gas of hard spheres which sometimes experience inelastic collisions resulting in the loss of a fixed, velocity-independent, amount of energy Δ is investigated with the goal of understanding the coupling between hydrodynamics and endothermic chemistry. The homogeneous cooling state of a uniform system and the modified Navier-Stokes equations are discussed and explicit expressions given for the pressure, cooling rates, and all transport coefficients for D dimensions. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for the case of a two-dimensional gas subject to a circular piston so as to illustrate the effects of the enegy loss on the structure of shocks found in cavitating bubbles. It is found that the maximal temperature achieved is a sensitive function of Δ with a minimum occurring near the physically important value of Δ ˜12000K˜1eV.

  2. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  3. Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Suslick, Kenneth S; Eddingsaas, Nathan C; Flannigan, David J; Hopkins, Stephen D; Xu, Hangxun

    2011-07-01

    We review recent work on the use of sonoluminescence (SL) to probe spectroscopically the conditions created during cavitation, both in clouds of collapsing bubbles (multibubble sonoluminescence, (MBSL)) and in single bubble events. The effective MBSL temperature can be controlled by the vapor pressure of the liquid or the thermal conductivity of the dissolved gas over a range from ∼1600 to ∼9000K. The effective pressure during MBSL is ∼300bar, based on atomic line shifts. Given nanosecond emission times, this means that cooling rates are >10(12)K/s. In sulfuric and phosphoric acid, the low volatility and high solubility of any sonolysis products make bubble collapse more efficient and evidence for an optically opaque plasma core is found. PMID:21247788

  4. Investigation of aluminum surface cleaning using cavitating fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralys, Aurimas; Striška, Vytautas; Mokšin, Vadim

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates efficiency of specially designed atomizer used to spray water and cavitate microbubbles in water flow. Surface cleaning system was used to clean machined (grinded) aluminum surface from abrasive particles. It is established that cleaning efficiency depends on diameter of the diffuser, water pressure and distance between nozzle and metal surface. It is obtained that the best cleaning efficiency (100%) is achieved at pressure 36 bar, when diameter of diffuser is 0.4 mm and distance between nozzle and surface is 1 mm. It is also established that satisfactory cleaning efficiency (80%) is achieved not only when atomizer is placed closer to metal surface, but also at larger (120 mm) distances.

  5. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  6. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  7. Amyloid fibril disruption by ultrasonic cavitation: nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G

    2014-07-30

    We describe the disruption of amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptides by ultrasonic cavitation. For this purpose, we performed nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with sinusoidal pressure and visualized the process with movies. When the pressure is negative, a bubble is formed, usually at hydrophobic residues in the transmembrane region. Most β-strands maintain their secondary structures in the bubble. When the pressure becomes positive, the bubble collapses, and water molecules crash against the hydrophilic residues in the nontransmembrane region to disrupt the amyloid. Shorter amyloids require longer sonication times for disruption because they do not have enough hydrophobic residues to serve as a nucleus to form a bubble. These results agree with experiments in which monodispersed amyloid fibrils were obtained by ultrasonication. PMID:24987794

  8. Investigation of crazing and cavitation in polymer nanocomposites via simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepperwein, Gregory; de Pablo, Juan

    2010-03-01

    Crazing is a unique mode of failure by which polymer strands are stretched into a periodic array of columns. It has been shown that these crazes follow cavitation under deformation. Molecular simulation studies of crazing in nanocomposites have been limited. To explore the connection between nanocomposite structure and some of the local dynamic mechanical effects that are difficult to probe experimentally, we have performed extensive Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of highly entangled polymer nanocomposites with nanoparticles whose size, shape, and concentration have been varied systematically. We investigate the nucleation and growth of voids that precede craze formation to elucidate the role those inclusions play in failure. Calculation of local densities, local stresses and local elastic moduli are used to explain the molecular origins of void formation. The main outcome of our study is a better understanding of how inclusions alter local mechanical properties and how those properties influence failure.

  9. Additional evidence of nuclear emissions during acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Taleyarkhan, R P; Cho, J S; West, C D; Lahey, R T; Nigmatulin, R I; Block, R C

    2004-03-01

    Time spectra of neutron and sonoluminescence emissions were measured in cavitation experiments with chilled deuterated acetone. Statistically significant neutron and gamma ray emissions were measured with a calibrated liquid-scintillation detector, and sonoluminescence emissions were measured with a photomultiplier tube. The neutron and sonoluminescence emissions were found to be time correlated over the time of significant bubble cluster dynamics. The neutron emission energy was less than 2.5 MeV and the neutron emission rate was up to approximately 4 x 10(5) n/s. Measurements of tritium production were also performed and these data implied a neutron emission rate due to D-D fusion which agreed with what was measured. In contrast, control experiments using normal acetone did not result in statistically significant tritium activity, or neutron or gamma ray emissions. PMID:15089363

  10. Cavitation-induced fragmentation of an acoustically-levitated droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the initial sequence of events that lead to the fragmentation of a millimetre sized water droplets when interacting with a focused ns-laser pulse. The experimental results show complex processes that result from the reflection of an initial shock wave from plasma generation with the soft boundary of the levitating droplet; furthermore, when the reflected waves from the walls of the droplet refocus they leave behind a trail of microbubbles that later act as cavitation inception regions. Numerical simulations of a shock wave impacting and reflecting from a soft boundary are also reported; the simulated results show that the lowest pressure inside the droplet occurs at the equatorial plane. The results of the numerical model display good agreement with the experimental results both in time and in space.

  11. Effect of picosecond laser induced cavitation bubbles generated on Au targets in a nanoparticle production set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, M.; Simonelli, A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Marsili, P.; Giammanco, F.; Giorgetti, E.

    2013-03-01

    This work is aimed at an analysis of the influence on the efficiency of nanoparticle production of a cavitation bubble (CB), which forms during the laser ablation process in high-fluence regime. The CB is produced on an Au metal target immersed in water by 1064 nm ps Nd:YAG laser pulses at different fluences. Its time-space evolution is monitored by a shadowgraphic set-up, while the Au nanoparticles production rate is tagged by the growth of the plasmon resonance, which is detected by measuring shot-by-shot the UV-Vis absorbance. We analyze the dependence of bubble size on the experimental parameters. Our results appear of interest to enhance the nanoparticle production efficiency in a liquid medium.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Cavitating Characteristics in Centrifugal Pump with Gap Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing; Chen, Hongxun; Wei, Qun

    2014-06-01

    This paper is to study the cavitating characteristics in a low specific speed centrifugal pump with gap structure impeller experimentally and numerically. A scalable DES numerical method is proposed and developed by introducing the von Karman scale instead of the local grid scale, which can switch at the RANS and LES region interface smoothly and reasonably. The SDES method can detect and grasp unsteady scale flow structures, which were proved by the flow around a triangular prism and the cavitation flow in a centrifugal pump. Through numerical and experimental research, it's shown that the simulated results match qualitatively with tested cavitation performances and visualization patterns, and we can conclude that the gap structure impeller has a superior feature of cavitation suppression. Its mechanism may be the guiding flow feature of the small vice blade and the pressure auto-balance effect of the gap tunnel.

  13. Numerical investigation of unsteady cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V. H.; Luo, X. W.; Escaler, X.; Ji, J.; Aguinaga, A.

    2014-03-01

    The prediction and control of cavitation damage in pumps, propellers, hydro turbines and fluid machinery in general is necessary during the design stage. The present paper deals with a numerical investigation of unsteady cloud cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil. The current study is focused on understanding the dynamic pressures generated during the cavity collapses as a fundamental characteristic in cavitation erosion. A 2D and 3D unsteady flow simulation has been carried out using OpenFOAM. Then, Paraview and Python programming language have been used to characterize dynamic pressure field. Adapted Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Zwart cavitation model have been implemented to improve the analysis of cloud motion and to visualize the bubble expansions. Additional results also confirm the correlation between cavity formation and generated pressures.

  14. 76 FR 55954 - Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker Products... accurate information concerning the securities of Crystal International Travel Group, Inc. because it...

  15. Computation of forces acting on bodies in plane and axisymmetric cavitation flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. G.; Potapov, I. I.

    2016-02-01

    Plane and axisymmetric cavitation flow problems are considered using Riabouchinsky's scheme. The incoming flow is assumed to be irrotational and steady, and the fluid is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible. The flow problems are solved by applying the boundary element method with quadrature formulas without saturation. The free boundary is determined using a gradient descent technique based on Riabouchinsky's principle. The drag force acting on the cavitator is expressed in terms of the Riabouchinsky functional. As a result, for small cavitation numbers, the force is calculated with a fairly high accuracy. Dependences of the drag coefficient are investigated for variously shaped cavitators: a wedge, a cone, a circular arc, and a spherical segment.

  16. The acoustic signatures of cavitation erosion on grade DH36 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armakolas, I.; Carlton, J.; Vidakovic, M.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation can cause considerable erosion to adjacent materials. Erosion is accompanied by acoustic emissions, related to crack formation and propagation inside the material. In this study a piezoelectric acoustic sensor mounted on the back of a grade DH36 steel plate is used to identify the acoustic signatures of cavitation. Cavitation is induced near the plate by means of an ultrasonic transducer (sonotrode). Various ‘non-erosive’ and erosive test rig configurations are examined and an acoustic threshold value for the onset of cavitation erosion is identified and presented. The use of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based acoustic sensor developed at City University London for acoustic monitoring purposes is also examined. Acoustic signals from both sensors are analysed, by means of a fast Fourier transform, showing a very good agreement in terms of captured frequencies.

  17. Cavitation Erosion Characteristics of Nitrocarburized and HPDL-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, B. K.; Arya, Vivek; Mann, B. S.

    2012-06-01

    This article deals with plasma ion-nitrocarburising and high power diode laser (HPDL) surface treatment of 13Cr4Ni and X10CrNiMoV1222 martensitic stainless steels to enhance their cavitation erosion resistance. These steels are commonly used in hydro turbines and boiler feed pumps. These treated steels have been evaluated for cavitation erosion resistance and it has been observed that the plasma ion-nitrocarburising process has significantly enhanced the cavitation erosion resistance as compared to untreated steel whereas HPDL-treated steels have shown marginal improvement. This is due to formation of high hardness nitrides during nitrocarburising and formation of moderate hardness martensitic phase due to rapid heating and cooling rates involved in HPDL treatment. The cavitation erosion and micro-hardness data of plasma ion-nitrocarburized as well as HPDL-treated steel samples and their comparison with hard deposits such as stellite and HVOF coating form the main part of the article.

  18. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Kwang-Jun; Park, Hyung-Gil; Seo, Jongsoo

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT). The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  19. Enhancement and quenching of high-intensity focused ultrasound cavitation activity via short frequency sweep gaps.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Loïc; Lee, Judy; Touyeras, Francis; Nevers, Aymeric; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-01

    This letter reports on the use of frequency sweeps to probe acoustic cavitation activity generated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Unprecedented enhancement and quenching of HIFU cavitation activity were observed when short frequency sweep gaps were applied in negative and positive directions, respectively. It was revealed that irrespective of the frequency gap, it is the direction and frequency sweep rate that govern the cavitation activity. These effects are related to the response of bubbles generated by the starting frequency to the direction of the frequency sweep, and the influence of the sweep rate on growth and coalescence of bubbles, which in turn affects the active bubble population. These findings are relevant for the use of HIFU in chemical and therapeutic applications, where greater control of cavitation bubble population is critical. PMID:26584998

  20. LES of cavitating flow inside a Diesel injector including dynamic needle movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, F.; Hickel, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the turbulent, cavitating flow inside a 9-hole solenoid common-rail injector including jet injection into gas during a full injection cycle. The liquid fuel, vapor, and gas phases are modelled by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitation model is based on a thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The geometry of the injector is represented on a Cartesian grid by a conservative cut-element immersed boundary method. The strategy allows for the simulation of complex, moving geometries with sub-cell resolution. We evaluate the effects of needle movement on the cavitation characteristics in the needle seat and tip region during opening and closing of the injector. Moreover, we study the effect of cavitation inside the injector nozzles on primary jet break-up.

  1. Research and development of improved cavitating jets for deep-hole drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Lindenmuth, W.T.; Chahine, G.L.; Conn, A.F.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    Improved cavitating nozzles have been developed as part of an on-going program to increase the rate of penetration of deep-hole drill bits. Based on the four criteria of: incipient cavitation number, amplitude of pressure fluctuation (and hence enhanced structuring of the jet flow), rock cutting, and cleaning chips from the hole bottom - these new, STRATOJET (STRuctured Acoustically Tuned Oscillating JET) cavitating nozzle systems have out-performed both conventional drill bit nozzles and the basic CAVIJET cavitating jets. Although nozzle designs which provide large amplitude pressure modulations are now available for the operation in water, additional research is needed to optimize self-resonating jets for use: (a) in mud, (b) in specific drill bit designs, and (c) at higher system pressures than now currently used for deep-hole drilling.

  2. Cavitation as a Mechanism to Enhance Wetting in a Mercury Thermal Convection Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2001-07-17

    Type 316L stainless steel was statically tested under cavitation conditions via an ultrasonic transducer externally mounted on a tube filled with ambient mercury. During the preliminary exposure (24 h, 20 kHz, 1.5 MPa), cavitation resulted in apparent wetting of the specimens by mercury as well as general surface roughening and wastage similar to erosion damage. Subsequently, a thermal convection loop identical to those used previously to study thermal gradient mass transfer was modified to include an externally-mounted donut-shaped transducer in order to similarly produce cavitation and wetting at temperatures prototypic of those expected in the SNS target. However, a series of attempts to develop cavitation and wetting on 316L specimens in the thermal convection loop was unsuccessful.

  3. Applications of Acoustics and Cavitation to Noninvasive Therapy and Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussios, Constantin C.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical acoustics is rapidly evolving from a diagnostic modality into a therapeutic tool, and acoustic cavitation is often the common denominator in a wide range of new therapeutic applications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) waves generated outside the body can be used to deposit heat deep within the body. Through a quantitative analysis of heat deposition by ultrasound, it is shown that inertial cavitation can help address some of the major challenges of HIFU therapy by providing a means of enhancing and monitoring treatment noninvasively. In the context of drug delivery, both inertial and stable cavitation play roles in enhancing drug activity and uptake. In particular, shape oscillations arising during stable cavitation provide an effective micropumping mechanism for enhanced mass transport across inaccessible interfaces.

  4. Mechanistic analysis of cavitation assisted transesterification on biodiesel characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Abdul Aziz, A R; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sonoluminescence transesterification on biodiesel physicochemical properties was investigated and the results were compared to those of traditional mechanical stirring. This study was conducted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasonication by coupling statistical analysis of the experiments into the simulation of cavitation bubble. Different combinations of operational variables were employed for alkali-catalysis transesterification of palm oil. The experimental results showed that transesterification with ultrasound irradiation could change the biodiesel density by about 0.3kg/m(3); the viscosity by 0.12mm(2)/s; the pour point by about 1-2°C and the flash point by 5°C compared to the traditional method. Furthermore, 93.84% of yield with alcohol to oil molar ratio of 6:1 could be achieved through ultrasound assisted transesterification within only 20min. However, only 89.09% of reaction yield was obtained by traditional macro mixing/heating under the same condition. Based on the simulated oscillation velocity value, the cavitation phenomenon significantly contributed to generation of fine micro emulsion and was able to overcome mass transfer restriction. It was found that the sonoluminescence bubbles reached the temperature of 758-713K, pressure of 235.5-159.55bar, oscillation velocity of 3.5-6.5cm/s, and equilibrium radius of 17.9-13.7 times greater than its initial size under the ambient temperature of 50-64°C at the moment of collapse. This showed that the sonoluminescence bubbles were in the condition in which the decomposition phenomena were activated and the reaction rate was accelerated together with a change in the biodiesel properties. PMID:24981808

  5. Cavitation bubble generation and control for HIFU transcranial adaptive focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gâteau, J.; Marsac, L.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-04-01

    Brain treatment with High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be achieved by multichannel arrays through the skull using time-reversal focusing. Such a method requires a reference signal either sent by a real source embedded in brain tissues or computed from a virtual source, using the acoustic properties of the skull deduced from CT images. This noninvasive computational method allows precise focusing, but is time consuming and suffers from unavoidable modeling errors which reduce the accessible acoustic pressure at the focus in comparison with real experimental time-reversal using an implanted hydrophone. Ex vivo simulations with a half skull immersed in a water tank allow us to reach at low amplitude levels a pressure ratio of 83% of the reference pressure (real time reversal) at 1MHz. Using this method to transcranially focus a pulse signal in an agar gel (model for in vivo bubble formation), we induced a cavitation bubble that generated an ultrasonic wave received by the array. Selecting the 1MHz component, the signal was time reversed and re-emitted, allowing 97%±1.1% of pressure ratio to be restored. To target points in the vicinity of the geometrical focus, electronic steering from the reference signal has been achieved. Skull aberrations severely degrade the accessible pressure while moving away from the focus ( ˜90% at 10mm in the focal plane). Nevertheless, inducing cavitation bubbles close to the limit of the primary accessible zone allowed us to acquire multiple references signal to increase the electronic steering area by 50%.

  6. Twin pregnancy in an accessory cavitated non-communicating uterus

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Yaseen, Enas M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A uterine malformation is a type of female genital malformation resulting from abnormal development of the Mullerian duct(s) during embryogenesis. The type and degree of uterine malformation depends on the level at which the fusion process of the two Mullerian ducts stops; thus, there is a wide variety of malformations. A newly described deformity called accessory cavitated uterine mass (ACUM) has been increasingly reported. The case We report this deformity (in a 20-year-old married woman) which appears to be an additional incompletely developed, cavitated and presumably non-communicating uterus in addition to a normally shaped and developed uterus. The former uterus became impregnated with twins that died in a missed abortion at 13 weeks of gestation. Before discovering the presence of the deformity, three attempts were made to evacuate the dead fetuses by cervical dilatation and curettage of the normal empty uterus. These attempts resulted in perforation of its fundus, a laparotomy was performed to repair the uterus. During the laparotomy, the pregnant accessory uterus was discovered and was excised with the dead twins. Discussion The lack of good medical history was a cause of the mismanagement of this patient. Most probably, the origin of ACUM is a growth from the right Mullerian duct. The ovum has entered the ACUM through the rudimentary tube and has been fertilized by a sperm travelled either through the normal vaginal and uterine cavities or through the lymphatics. Conclusions (1) A detailed case history is important. (2) An ACUM can be impregnated. PMID:25813124

  7. A Experimental Investigation of Acoustic Cavitation in Gaseous Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Dario Felipe

    1990-01-01

    High amplitude radial pulsations of a single gas bubble in several glycerine and water mixtures have been observed in an acoustic stationary wave system at acoustic pressure amplitudes as high as 1.5 bars. Using a laser scattering technique, radius-time curves have been obtained experimentally which confirm the absence of surface waves. Measurements of the pulsation amplitude, the timing of the major bubble collapse, and the number of rebounds have been made and compared with the theory. From these data, calculations of the internal gas temperature and pressure during the collapse have been performed. Values of at least 2,000 K and 2,000 bars have been obtained using a sophisticated model of spherically symmetric bubble dynamics. Simultaneously, sonoluminescence (SL), a phenomenon discovered in 1933 and attributed today to the high temperatures and pressures generated during the collapse of the bubbles, were observed as short light pulses occurring once every acoustic period. The light emissions can be seen to originate at the geometric center of the bubble when observed through a microscope. Also, the simultaneity of the light emissions and the collapse of the bubble has been confirmed with the aid of a photomultiplier tube. This is the first recorded observation of SL generated by a single bubble. Comparisons of the measured quantities have been made to those predicted by several models. In addition, the implications of this research on the current understanding of cavitation related phenomena such as rectified diffusion, surface wave excitation and sonoluminescence will be discussed. Some possible future experiments are suggested which could further increase our understanding of cavitation bubble dynamics.

  8. Characterization of macrolesions induced by myocardial cavitation-enabled therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yiying I; Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Kripfgans, Oliver D

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent high intensity ultrasound pulses with circulating contrast agent microbubbles can induce scattered cavitation caused myocardial microlesions of potential value for tissue reduction therapy. Here, computer-aided histological evaluation of the effective treated volume was implemented to optimize ultrasound pulse parameters, exposure duration, and contrast agent dose. Rats were treated with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound bursts and Evans blue staining indicates lethal cardiomyocytic injury. Each heart was sectioned to provide samples covering the entire exposed myocardial volume. Both brightfield and fluorescence images were taken for up to 40 tissue sections. Tissue identification and microlesion detection were first done based on 2-D images to form microlesion masks containing the outline of the heart and the stained cell regions. Image registration was then performed on the microlesion masks to reconstruct a volume-based model according to the morphology of the heart. The therapeutic beam path was estimated from the 3-D stacked microlesions, and finally the total microlesion volume, here termed macrolesion, was characterized along the therapeutic beam axis. Radially symmetric fractional macrolesions were characterized via stepping disks of variable radius determined by the local distribution of microlesions. Treated groups showed significant macrolesions of a median volume of 87.3 μL, 2.7 mm radius, 4.8 mm length, and 14.0% lesion density compared to zero radius, length, and lesion density for sham. The proposed radially symmetric lesion model is a robust evaluation for myocardial cavitation-enabled therapy. Future work will include validating the proposed method with varying acoustic exposures and optimizing involved parameters to provide macrolesion characterization. PMID:25347871

  9. Physical and numerical investigation of cavitating flows around a pitching hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biao; Ducoin, Antoine; Young, Yin Lu

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate cavitating flows around a pitching hydrofoil via combined physical and numerical studies. The aims are to (1) improve the understanding of the interplay between unsteady cavitating flow, hydrofoil motion, and hydrodynamic performance, (2) quantify the influence of pitching rate on subcavitating and cavitating responses, and (3) quantify the influence of cavitation on the hydrodynamic load coefficients and surrounding flow structures. Results are presented for a NACA66 hydrofoil undergoing controlled, slow (dot α = 6^circ /s) and fast (dot α = 63^circ /s) pitching motions from α = 0° to α = 15° and back to α = 0° for both subcavitating and cavitating conditions at a moderate Reynolds number of Re = 750 000. The experimental studies were conducted in a cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy, France. The numerical simulations are performed by solving the incompressible, multiphase Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations via the commercial code CFX using a transport equation-based cavitation model; a modified k-ω SST turbulence model is used to account for the effect of local compressibility on the turbulent eddy viscosity. The results showed that increases in the pitching rate suppressed laminar to turbulent transition, delayed stall, and significantly modified post-stall behavior. Cavitation inception at the leading edge modified the pressure distribution, which in turn significantly changed the interaction between leading edge and trailing edge vortices, and hence the magnitude as well as the frequency of the load fluctuations. For a fixed cavitation number, increases in pitching rate lead to increase in cavitation volume, which in turn changed the cavity shedding frequencies and significantly modified the hydrodynamic loads. Inversely, the leading edge cavitation observed for the low pitching velocity case tends to stabilize the stall because of the decrease of the pressure gradient due to the

  10. Inertial cavitation in theranostic nanoemulsions with simultaneous pulsed laser and low frequency ultrasound excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation is a mechanical process used for site-localized therapies such as non-invasive surgery. Initiating cavitation in tissue requires very high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-frequencies. Hence, some applications like thrombolysis require targeted contrast agents to reduce peak intensities and the potential for secondary effects. A new type of theranostic nanoemulsion has been developed as a combined ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic(PA) agent for molecular imaging and therapy. It includes a nanoscale emulsion core encapsulated with a layer of gold nanospheres at the water/ oil interface. Its optical absorption exhibits a spectrum broadened up to 1100 nm, opening the possibility that 1064 nm light can excite cavitation nuclei. If optically-excited nuclei are produced at the same time that a low-frequency US wave is at peak negative pressure, then highly localized therapies based on acoustic cavitation may be enabled at very low US pressures. We have demonstrated this concept using a low-cost, low energy, portable 1064 nm fiber laser in conjunction with a 1.24 MHz US transducer for simultaneous laser/US excitation of nanoemulsions. Active cavitation detection from backscattered signals indicated that cavitation can be initiated at very low acoustic pressures (less than 1 MPa) when laser excitation coincides with the rarefaction phase of the acoustic wave, and that no cavitation is produced when light is delivered during the compressive phase. US can sustain cavitation activity during long acoustic bursts and stimulate diffusion of the emulsion, thus increasing treatment speed. An in vitro clot model has been used to demonstrate combined US and laser excitation of the nanoemulsion for efficient thrombolysis.

  11. One-way-coupling simulation of cavitation accompanied by high-speed droplet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2016-03-01

    Erosion due to high-speed droplet impact is a crucial issue in industrial applications. The erosion is caused by the water-hammer loading on material surfaces and possibly by the reloading from collapsing cavitation bubbles that appear within the droplet. Here, we simulate the dynamics of cavitation bubbles accompanied by high-speed droplet impact against a deformable wall in order to see whether the bubble collapse is violent enough to give rise to cavitation erosion on the wall. The evolution of pressure waves in a single water (or gelatin) droplet to collide with a deformable wall at speed up to 110 m/s is inferred from simulations of multicomponent Euler flow where phase changes are not permitted. Then, we examine the dynamics of cavitation bubbles nucleated from micron/submicron-sized gas bubble nuclei that are supposed to exist inside the droplet. For simplicity, we perform Rayleigh-Plesset-type calculations in a one-way-coupling manner, namely, the bubble dynamics are determined according to the pressure variation obtained from the Euler flow simulation. In the simulation, the preexisting bubble nuclei whose size is either micron or submicron show large growth to submillimeters because tension inside the droplet is obtained through interaction of the pressure waves and the droplet interface; this supports the possibility of having cavitation due to the droplet impact. It is also found, in particular, for the case of cavitation arising from very small nuclei such as nanobubbles, that radiated pressure from the cavitation bubble collapse can overwhelm the water-hammer pressure directly created by the impact. Hence, cavitation may need to be accounted for when it comes to discussing erosion in the droplet impact problem.

  12. Dynamic cavitation inside a high performance diesel injector - an experimental and CFD investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Daniel; Soteriou, Celia; Winterbourn, Mark; Daveau, Christian

    2015-12-01

    A combination of simulation and special experimental techniques has been used to investigate the transient flow and cavitation phenomena of a control device inside a high performance diesel injector. Dynamic cavitation behaviour was captured on a large scale transparent model, which was then used to develop and validate an advanced turbulence CFD model with Large Eddy Simulation. These techniques are used within Delphi to gain insight and optimise injector performance at real-size.

  13. Universal approach to analysis of cavitation and liquid-impingement erosion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.

    1982-01-01

    Cavitation erosion experimental data was analyzed by using normalization and curve-fitting techniques. Data were taken from experiments on several materials tested in both a rotating disk device and a magnetostriction apparatus. Cumulative average volume loss rate and time data were normalized relative to the peak erosion rate and the time to peak erosion rate, respectively. From this process a universal approach was derived that can include data on specific materials from different test devices for liquid impingement and cavitation erosion studies.

  14. Hydrodynamic cavitation in microsystems. I. Experiments with deionized water and nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, M.; Zermatten, P. J.; Pellone, C.; Franc, J. P.; Ayela, F.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental study of hydrodynamic cavitation downstream microdiaphragms and microventuris is presented. Deionized water and nanofluids have been characterized within silicon-Pyrex micromachined devices with hydraulic diameters ranging from 51 μm to 104 μm. The input pressure could reach up to 10 bars, and the flow rate was below 1 liter per hour. The output pressure of the devices was fixed at values ranging from 0.3 bar to 2 bars, so that it was possible to study the evolution of the cavitation number as a function of the Reynolds number in the orifice of the diaphragms or in the throat of the venturis. A delay on the onset of cavitation has been recorded for all the devices when they are fed with deionized water, because of the metastability of the liquid and because of the lack of roughness of the walls. For the first time, hydrodynamic cavitation of nanofluids (nanoparticles dispersed into the liquid) has been considered. The presence of nano-aggregates in the liquid does not exhibit any noticeable effect on the cavitation threshold through the venturis. However, such a presence has a strong influence on the cavitation onset in microdiaphragms: above a critical volume solid concentration of ≈10-5, the metastability is broken and the nanofluids behave as tap water filled up with large nuclei. These microdevices, where a low amount of fluid is required to reach cavitating flows, appear to be useful tools in order to study cavitating phenomena in localized area with specific fluids.

  15. Numerical simulation of steady cavitating flow of viscous fluid in a Francis hydroturbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, L. V.; Chirkov, D. V.; Cherny, S. G.; Pylev, I. M.; Sotnikov, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    Numerical technique was developed for simulation of cavitating flows through the flow passage of a hydraulic turbine. The technique is based on solution of steady 3D Navier—Stokes equations with a liquid phase transfer equation. The approch for setting boundary conditions meeting the requirements of cavitation testing standard was suggested. Four different models of evaporation and condensation were compared. Numerical simulations for turbines of different specific speed were compared with experiment.

  16. Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Miorini, R.; Soranna, F.; Katz, J.; Michael, T.; Jessup, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Measure the flow structure and turbulence within a Naval, axial waterjet pump. Create a database for benchmarking and validation of parallel computational efforts. Address flow and turbulence modeling issues that are unique to this complex environment. Measure and model flow phenomena affecting cavitation within the pump and its effect on pump performance. This presentation focuses on cavitation phenomena and associated flow structure in the tip region of a rotor blade.

  17. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-02-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (-200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and -100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  18. Degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 2 through photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoning; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yalin

    2011-01-15

    The decolorization of an azo dye, C.I. Reactive Red 2 was investigated using TiO(2) photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation. Experiments were performed in a 4.0 L solution under ultraviolet power of 9 W. The effects of TiO(2) loading, initial dye concentration, solution pH, geometry of cavitation tube, and the addition of anions on the degradation of the dye were evaluated. Degradation of the dye followed a pseudo-first order reaction. The photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation elevated degradation of the dye by about 136%, showing a synergistic effect compared to the individual photocatalysis and water jet cavitation. The enhancement of photocatalysis by water jet cavitation could be due to the deagglomeration of catalyst particles as well as the better contact between the catalyst surfaces and the reactants. Venturi tube with smaller diameter and shorter length of throat tube favored the dye decolorization. The degradation efficiency was found to increase with decreasing initial concentration and pH. The presence of NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-) enhanced the degradation of RR2, while Cl(-), and especially HCO(3)(-) significantly reduced dye decolorization. The results of this study indicated that the coupled photocatalysis and water jet cavitation is effective in degrading dye in wastewater and provides a promising alternative for treatment of dye wastewater at a large scale. PMID:20940086

  19. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20 MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected. PMID:24953962

  20. Formation of Zones with Maximum Supersonic Cavitation Intensity in Single-Component and Multicomponent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtin, B. I.; Ivashov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Skorokhodov, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the formation of highly active cavitation zones in fluid media at high pressures (up to 6.5 MPa) and temperatures (up to 150°C) with the use of a high-power ultrasonic installation. It has been shown that attempts to increase the cavitation intensity in single-component and multicomponent media by increasing the power of the ultrasonic installation to above a certain limit lead to a strong degradation of the cavitation processes. This is due to the appearance of hydrodynamical flows generated by longitudinal vibrations of the installation radiator waveguide. Eliminating or weakening such flows makes it possible to increase markedly the efficiency of cavitation treatment by increasing the medium pressure (in the range of 0.5-1.5 MPa) and choosing the optimum ratio between the temperature of the medium and the power of the ultrasonic installation (specific acoustic power of the radiator). We recommend to use for the cavitation intensity index the acoustic activity of the cavitation zone (acoustic noise amplitude in the frequency range of 200 kHz-10 MHz), as well as its physical activity determined by the destruction rate of thin-layer indicators.

  1. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (leq 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  2. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajian, M.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Rezaei-Nejad, S. S.; Assadi, H.; Hadavi, S. M. M.; Chung, K.; Shokouhimehr, M.

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3-6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  3. Formation of Zones with Maximum Supersonic Cavitation Intensity in Single-Component and Multicomponent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtin, B. I.; Ivashov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Skorokhodov, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the formation of highly active cavitation zones in fluid media at high pressures (up to 6.5 MPa) and temperatures (up to 150°C) with the use of a high-power ultrasonic installation. It has been shown that attempts to increase the cavitation intensity in single-component and multicomponent media by increasing the power of the ultrasonic installation to above a certain limit lead to a strong degradation of the cavitation processes. This is due to the appearance of hydrodynamical flows generated by longitudinal vibrations of the installation radiator waveguide. Eliminating or weakening such flows makes it possible to increase markedly the efficiency of cavitation treatment by increasing the medium pressure (in the range of 0.5-1.5 MPa) and choosing the optimum ratio between the temperature of the medium and the power of the ultrasonic installation (specific acoustic power of the radiator). We recommend to use for the cavitation intensity index the acoustic activity of the cavitation zone (acoustic noise amplitude in the frequency range of 200 kHz-10 MHz), as well as its physical activity determined by the destruction rate of thin-layer indicators.

  4. Effect of Tensile Stress on Cavitation Erosion and Damage of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, M.; Inaba, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Hayabusa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation erosion tests for epoxy, unsaturated polyester, polycarbonate, and acrylic resin were conducted under various tensile stress conditions (Tensile-Cavitation test). A new testing device was designed to conduct the Tensile-Cavitation test and observe specimen surface during the experiment based on ASTM G32. When tensile stress of 1.31 MPa was loaded on epoxy resin, cracks occurred on the specimen after 0.5 hours during cavitation erosion. When no tensile stress was loaded on the epoxy resin, the damage was general cavitation erosion only. As well as the epoxy resin, unsaturated polyester resin applied tensile stress of 1.31 MPa and polycarbonate resin of 6.54 MPa indicated erosion damages and cracks. When tensile stress of 6.54 MPa was loaded on acrylic resin, the erosion damage was almost the same as the results without tensile stress. We confirmed that anti-cavitation property of epoxy resin was higher than those of acrylic and polycarbonate without tensile stress while the damage of epoxy resin was much serious than that of acrylic resins under tensile stress loadings.

  5. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  6. Degradation of diclofenac sodium using combined processes based on hydrodynamic cavitation and heterogeneous photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Manisha V; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-05-01

    Diclofenac sodium, a widely detected pharmaceutical drug in wastewater samples, has been selected as a model pollutant for degradation using novel combined approach of hydrodynamic cavitation and heterogeneous photocatalysis. A slit venturi has been used as cavitating device in the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor. The effect of various operating parameters such as inlet fluid pressure (2-4 bar) and initial pH of the solution (4-7.5) on the extent of degradation have been studied. The maximum extent of degradation of diclofenac sodium was obtained at inlet fluid pressure of 3 bar and initial pH as 4 using hydrodynamic cavitation alone. The loadings of TiO2 and H2O2 have been optimised to maximise the extent of degradation of diclofenac sodium. Kinetic study revealed that the degradation of diclofenac sodium fitted first order kinetics over the selected range of operating protocols. It has been observed that combination of hydrodynamic cavitation with UV, UV/TiO2 and UV/TiO2/H2O2 results in enhanced extents of degradation as compared to the individual schemes. The maximum extent of degradation as 95% with 76% reduction in TOC has been observed using hydrodynamic cavitation in conjunction with UV/TiO2/H2O2 under the optimised operating conditions. The diclofenac sodium degradation byproducts have been identified using LC/MS analysis. PMID:24262760

  7. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flow in a micro channel

    SciTech Connect

    Egerer, Christian P. Hickel, Stefan; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2014-08-15

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of cavitating flow of a Diesel-fuel-like fluid in a generic throttle geometry are presented. Two-phase regions are modeled by a parameter-free thermodynamic equilibrium mixture model, and compressibility of the liquid and the liquid-vapor mixture is taken into account. The Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method (ALDM), adapted for cavitating flows, is employed for discretizing the convective terms of the Navier-Stokes equations for the homogeneous mixture. ALDM is a finite-volume-based implicit LES approach that merges physically motivated turbulence modeling and numerical discretization. Validation of the numerical method is performed for a cavitating turbulent mixing layer. Comparisons with experimental data of the throttle flow at two different operating conditions are presented. The LES with the employed cavitation modeling predicts relevant flow and cavitation features accurately within the uncertainty range of the experiment. The turbulence structure of the flow is further analyzed with an emphasis on the interaction between cavitation and coherent motion, and on the statistically averaged-flow evolution.

  8. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in-vitro and predict in-vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom’s response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue, at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-Mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High speed imaging of the optically-transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. PMID:21030142

  9. Cavitation resistance and seasonal hydraulics differ among three arid Californian plant communities.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Anna L; Pratt, R Brandon; Davis, Stephen D; Ewers, Frank W

    2007-12-01

    Vulnerability to water stress-induced cavitation was measured on 27 woody shrub species from three arid plant communities including chaparral, coastal sage and Mojave Desert scrub. Dry season native embolism and pre-dawn water potential, and both wet and dry season xylem specific hydraulic conductivity (Ks) were measured. Cavitation resistance, estimated as water potential at 50% loss in conductivity (Psi50), was measured on all species during the wet season and on a subset of species during the dry season. Cavitation resistance varied with sampling season, with 8 of 13 sampled species displaying significant seasonal shifts. Native embolism and water potential were useful in identification of species displaying seasonal shifts. The Ks was not different among sites or seasons. The Psi50 varied among species and communities. Within communities, interspecific variation may be partially explained by differences in rooting depth or leaf habit (evergreen, semi-deciduous, deciduous). Communities diverged in their Psi50 with chaparral species displaying the greatest cavitation resistance regardless of sampling season. The greater cavitation resistance of chaparral species is surprising, considering the greater aridity of the Mojave Desert site. Adaptation to arid environments is due to many plant traits, and aridity does not necessarily lead to convergence in cavitation resistance. PMID:17927695

  10. Initiate and Maintain Cavitation by Combining High Amplitude Bursts and Continuous Ultrasound Exposure in Culture Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; Chesnais, S.; Lafon, C.; Blay, J.-Y.; Cathignol, D.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound can produce a variety of nonthermal bioeffects via acoustic cavitation. Most studies on cavitation effects pointed on the difficulty of initiating and controlling the cavitation phenomenon. Our objective is to obtain reproducible viability and transfection rate in the case of the application of a continuous low intensity ultrasound exposure. We propose to initiate and maintain cavitation in the medium by combining a continuous ultrasound exposure with periodical high amplitude bursts. Cells were exposed to ultrasound (444.5 kHz) transmitted through the bottom of twelve-well culture plates containing prostatic cells (AT2, 2.5 106 cells/mL), the plasmid DsRed in transfection case (200 μg/mL) and culture media. The cavitation effects were evaluated on the cell viability and transfection, determined 0 to 3 days after exposure by a flow cytometer (FACScan; total counted events: 10 000). Bursts of 1.73 W/cm2 intensity level had no effect on cells when their duration was lower than 100 ms and their frequency lower than 4 bursts/min. When combined with continuous exposure, only one burst of 1.73 W/cm2 intensity level and 50 ms duration was sufficient to activate the cavitation phenomenon in the medium.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Cavitating Venturi: A Flow Control Element of Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a propulsion system, the propellant flow and mixture ratio could be controlled either by variable area flow control valves or by passive flow control elements such as cavitating venturies. Cavitating venturies maintain constant propellant flowrate for fixed inlet conditions (pressure and temperature) and wide range of outlet pressures, thereby maintain constant, engine thrust and mixture ratio. The flowrate through the venturi reaches a constant value and becomes independent of outlet pressure when the pressure at throat becomes equal to vapor pressure. In order to develop a numerical model of propulsion system, it is necessary to model cavitating venturies in propellant feed systems. This paper presents a finite volume model of flow network of a cavitating venturi. The venturi was discretized into a number of control volumes and mass, momentum and energy conservation equations in each control volume are simultaneously solved to calculate one-dimensional pressure, density, and flowrate and temperature distribution. The numerical model predicts cavitations at the throat when outlet pressure was gradually reduced. Once cavitation starts, with further reduction of downstream pressure, no change in flowrate is found. The numerical predictions have been compared with test data and empirical equation based on Bernoulli's equation.

  12. Use of magnetic resonance microscopy for the nondestructive observation of xylem cavitation caused by pine wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Utsuzawa, Shin; Fukuda, Kenji; Sakaue, Daisuke

    2005-07-01

    ABSTRACT The development of xylem cavitation caused by pine wilt disease was visualized nondestructively with a compact magnetic resonance (MR) microscope system. A T(1)-weighted spin-echo sequence clearly visualized the water-filled xylem of Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii) as white zones, whereas cavitated xylem was represented as dark areas. Cavitated areas in the xylem were first observed 6 to 9 days after inoculation with the pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus), and enlarged gradually over several days. After 11 to 18 days, cavitated areas rapidly increased in size, fused, and reached the cambium. This drastic expansion in cavitation coincided with and appeared to explain the sudden wilting of the seedlings. The development of cavitation observed through MR microscopy corresponded well with previous descriptions of disease progression. PMID:18943004

  13. Fundamental Study of Cavitation Sensors Fabricated with Lead Zirconate Titanate Film Deposited by Hydrothermal Method: Analysis and Consideration of Output Signal from the Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Yuki; Kawashima, Norimichi; Kuribayashi Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2008-05-01

    Small cavitation sensors were developed with hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) on the outer surface of the Ti cylinder. Output signals from the fabricated cavitation sensor were analyzed in frequency domain with changing applied voltage to the Langevin transducer of the ultrasound exposure system. Frequency components from 1 to 5 MHz included in the output signal from the cavitation sensor were measured as the cavitation signal in order to distinguish the harmonic components from acoustic cavitation from those by nonlinear propagation in water. Broadband integrated voltage can be calculated by integrating harmonic components from 1 to 5 MHz included in the output signal from the cavitation sensor.

  14. Effect of cavitation on the properties of coal-tar pitch as studied by gas-liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    M.I. Baikenov; T.B. Omarbekov; S.K. Amerkhanova

    2008-02-15

    The applicability of the cavitation-wave effect to coal-tar pitch processing is considered. The results of the GLC analysis of the test material before and after rotor-pulsation cavitation treatment are given. The organic matter of coal-tar pitch was found to degrade upon cavitation; as a result of this, the yields of light and medium fractions considerably increased. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Dual pulses for cavitation control in lithotripsy: Shock wave-bubble interactions and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Dahlia L.

    2002-08-01

    Cavitation, the growth and collapse of gas/vapor bubbles, appears to play an important role in both stone comminution and tissue injury during shock wave lithotripsy, the clinical treatment in which focused, high amplitude shock pulses are used to comminute kidney stones. The goal of this research was to characterize in vitro cavitation activity and stone and cell damage in a novel system that uses converging dual pulses, produced by two identical, confocal lithotripters, to modify the cavitation field. The cavitation bubble dynamics were numerically calculated, and experiments were performed in a research electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter to determine bubble size, lifetime, and pit depth created in aluminum foils by cavitation collapse. Furthermore, damage to model stones and to red blood cells was measured for both single and dual-pulses. A single shock pulse creates a ˜15 x 100 mm cloud of bubbles in water. The greatest cavitation activity and stone damage from single-pulses was found to occur 2 cm proximal to the geometric focus, F2, where the stone is normally aligned. Therefore, a 2 cm shift in stone alignment may potentially improve stone comminution and reduce tissue injury in clinical treatment. The dual-pulse lithotripter, on the other hand, generates a localized and intensified cavitation field that increased stone comminution efficiency at F2 by at least three times the maximum values achieved by single-pulses. At F2, acoustic pressure approximately doubled, as did bubble size, collapse time, and pit depth on foils. A significant reduction in comminution of stones suspended in glycerol indicates that cavitation activity, not the doubling of acoustic pressure, explains the increased comminution. On either side of F2, the second delayed pulse mitigated bubble collapse, resulting in little or no pitting on foils and reduced hemolysis, even when compared with single pulses. Numerical calculations of radial dynamics agreed with experimental findings

  16. The role of positive and negative pressure on cavitation nucleation in nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Aydin, Omer; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Yuksel Durmaz, Yasemin; Fowlkes, Brian; ElSayed, Mohamed; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy (NMH) is an ultrasound ablation technique combining histotripsy with acoustically sensitive perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets that can be selectively delivered to tumor cells for targeted tumor ablation. NMH takes advantage of the significantly reduced cavitation threshold of the nanodroplets, allowing for cavitation to be selectively generated only in regions containing nanodroplets. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the nanodroplet cavitation process is essential to the development of NMH. In this study, we hypothesize that cavitation nucleation is caused by the negative pressure (p-) exposed to the PFC, and the NMH cavitation threshold is therefore determined by the incident p-  of the single-cycle pulses commonly used in NMH. This paper reports the first study that separately investigates the effects of negative and positive pressure on the NMH cavitation threshold using near half-cycle ultrasound pulses with dominant negative (negative-polarity pulses) or positive (positive-polarity pulses) pressure phases. Tissue phantoms containing perfluorohexane (PFH) nanodroplets were exposed to negative-polarity and positive-polarity pulses generated by a frequency compounding transducer recently developed in our lab, and the probability of generating cavitation was measured as a function of peak negative (p-) and peak positive (p+) pressure. The results showed close agreement in the p-  cavitation threshold for PFH phantoms exposed to negative-polarity (11.4  ±  0.1 MPa) and positive-polarity (11.7  ±  0.2 MPa) pulses. The p+ at the cavitation threshold, in contrast, was measured to be significantly different for the negative-polarity (4.0  ±  0.1 MPa) and positive-polarity (42.6  ±  0.2 MPa) pulses. In the final part of this study, the experimental results were compared to the cavitation threshold predicted by classical nucleation theory (CNT), with results showing

  17. Extracting a Whisper from the DIN: A Bayesian-Inductive Approach to Learning an Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1999-11-07

    For several reasons, Bayesian parameter estimation is superior to other methods for inductively learning a model for an anticipatory system. Since it exploits prior knowledge, the analysis begins from a more advantageous starting point than other methods. Also, since "nuisance parameters" can be removed from the Bayesian analysis, the description of the model need not be as complete as is necessary for such methods as matched filtering. In the limit of perfectly random noise and a perfect description of the model, the signal-to-noise ratio improves as the square root of the number of samples in the data. Even with the imperfections of real-world data, Bayesian methods approach this ideal limit of performance more closely than other methods. These capabilities provide a strategy for addressing a major unsolved problem in pump operation: the identification of precursors of cavitation. Cavitation causes immediate degradation of pump performance and ultimate destruction of the pump. However, the most efficient point to operate a pump is just below the threshold of cavitation. It might be hoped that a straightforward method to minimize pump cavitation damage would be to simply adjust the operating point until the inception of cavitation is detected and then to slightly readjust the operating point to let the cavitation vanish. However, due to the continuously evolving state of the fluid moving through the pump, the threshold of cavitation tends to wander. What is needed is to anticipate cavitation, and this requires the detection and identification of precursor features that occur just before cavitation starts.

  18. Interests and Stimulus Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kish, George B.; Donnenwerth, Gregory V.

    1969-01-01

    Examines relationships between Sensation-Seeking Scale (SSS) and vocational interests measured by the Kuder and Strong Vocational Interest Blank, among alcoholics and undergraduates. Results support construct validity of the SSS and provide further evidence of modes of expression of stimulus-seeking needs in personality. (Author/CJ)

  19. Prediction of rotating stall and cavitation inception in pump turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anciger, D.; Jung, A.; Aschenbrenner, T.

    2010-08-01

    The current development of modern pump storage plants aims towards a higher flexibility in operation, an extended operation range of the hydraulic machine, especially in the pumping mode, and a higher reliability. A major design target for state-of-the-art reversible Francis-type pump turbines is to find an optimal balance between pumping and generating performance. The pumping requirements are the crucial design drivers, since, even if the turbine mode performance is world class, the success of a project depends on the pump turbine delivering the required maximum pump head and starting reliably in pump mode. The proposed paper describes how advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can help the designer to evaluate his design with respect to hydraulic performance and dynamic phenomena occurring in pump turbines. A standard procedure today is to compute the flow by applying the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) on the steady-state flow in individual components or in multiple components which are coupled by mixing-plane interfaces (sometimes also called stage-interface). This standard approach gives fast turnaround times and is a good engineering tool. However, accuracy is limited due to necessary simplifications. Therefore methods are developed and evaluated which allow a more reliable prediction of the onset of rotating stall which is the operation limit of the pump under high heads and low flow rates. The behaviour a modern pump turbine design in this instability region is investigated in detail. Another important task in the design process is the proper prediction of cavitation phenomena in the runner. Predicting cavitating flows with multi-phase CFD computations is still a very challenging task. Some results of ongoing work in this field are presented and compared to single phase computations and results from model tests. The relevance and applicability of such computations is discussed. All the information gained from these kinds of

  20. Interest rates mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, M.; Maignan, M.; Pozdnoukhov, A.; Timonin, V.

    2008-06-01

    The present study deals with the analysis and mapping of Swiss franc interest rates. Interest rates depend on time and maturity, defining term structure of the interest rate curves (IRC). In the present study IRC are considered in a two-dimensional feature space-time and maturity. Exploratory data analysis includes a variety of tools widely used in econophysics and geostatistics. Geostatistical models and machine learning algorithms (multilayer perceptron and Support Vector Machines) were applied to produce interest rate maps. IR maps can be used for the visualisation and pattern perception purposes, to develop and to explore economical hypotheses, to produce dynamic asset-liability simulations and for financial risk assessments. The feasibility of an application of interest rates mapping approach for the IRC forecasting is considered as well.