Science.gov

Sample records for atmospheric material particles

  1. The atmosphere as particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, Todor

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV gamma-ray detector on the moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the moon.

  2. The atmosphere as particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stanev, T. )

    1990-03-15

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV {gamma}-ray detector on the Moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the Moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the Moon.

  3. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  4. Atmospheric Secondary Particles In Near Earth Space

    E-print Network

    Ming-Huey A. Huang

    2000-09-07

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer detects a large amount of particles below rigidity cutoff. Those high energy particles create questions related to radiation belts and atmospheric neutrinos. To understand the origin of these particles, we use a trajectory tracing program to simulate particle trajectories in realistic geomagnetic field. The complex behaviors and large e^+/e^- are explained here.

  5. Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina A.; Aplin, Karen L.; Arnold, Frank; Bazilevskaya, Galina A.; Harrison, R. Giles; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Turunen, Esa; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth's atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

  6. Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina A.; Aplin, Karen L.; Arnold, Frank; Bazilevskaya, Galina A.; Harrison, R. Giles; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Turunen, Esa; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth's atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

  7. Atmospheric Tar Balls: Particles From Biomass and Biofuel Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posfai, M.; Gelencser, A.; Simonics, R.; Arato, K.; Li, J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Buseck, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    'Tar balls,' amorphous carbonaceous spherules that are locally abundant in the tropospheric aerosol through biomass and biofuel burning, form a distinct group of particles, readily identifiable with electron microscopy. They differ from soot in lacking a turbostratic microstructure, and their morphology and composition (~90 mol% carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. Although the material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic, the particles become largely insoluble through free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When they coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may slightly absorb sunlight. They are a widespread and previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  8. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  9. Alternative pathway for atmospheric particles growth

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Maria Eugenia; Rosenørn, Thomas; Favez, Olivier; Müller, Markus; Adler, Gabriela; Abo Riziq, Ali; Rudich, Yinon; Herrmann, Hartmut; George, Christian; D’Anna, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Credible climate change predictions require reliable fundamental scientific knowledge of the underlying processes. Despite extensive observational data accumulated to date, atmospheric aerosols still pose key uncertainties in the understanding of Earth’s radiative balance due to direct interaction with radiation and because they modify clouds’ properties. Specifically, major gaps exist in the understanding of the physicochemical pathways that lead to aerosol growth in the atmosphere and to changes in their properties while in the atmosphere. Traditionally, the driving forces for particle growth are attributed to condensation of low vapor pressure species following atmospheric oxidation of volatile compounds by gaseous oxidants. The current study presents experimental evidence of an unaccounted-for new photoinduced pathway for particle growth. We show that heterogeneous reactions activated by light can lead to fast uptake of noncondensable Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) at the surface of particles when only traces of a photosensitizer are present in the seed aerosol. Under such conditions, size and mass increase; changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol are also observed upon exposure to volatile organic compounds such as terpenes and near-UV irradiation. Experimentally determined growth rate values match field observations, suggesting that this photochemical process can provide a new, unaccounted-for pathway for atmospheric particle growth and should be considered by models. PMID:22517749

  10. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore W; Ladino, Luis A; Alpert, Peter A; Breckels, Mark N; Brooks, Ian M; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Huffman, J Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P; Mason, Ryan H; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A; Nájera, Juan J; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F; Wong, Jenny P S; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Aller, Josephine Y; Bertram, Allan K; Knopf, Daniel A; Murray, Benjamin J

    2015-09-10

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26354482

  11. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Ladino, Luis A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, Mark N.; Brooks, Ian M.; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Huffman, J. Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Mason, Ryan H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A.; Nájera, Juan J.; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L.; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F.; Wong, Jenny P. S.; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-01

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean.

  12. Nanoporous Materials in Atmosphere Revitalization. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Luna, Bernadette; Junaedi, Christian; Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay L.; Raptis, Raphael G.; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric Revitalization (AR) is the term the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) uses to encompass the engineered systems that maintain a safe, breathable gaseous atmosphere inside a habitable space cabin. An AR subsystem is a key part of the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system for habitable space cabins. The ultimate goal for AR subsystem designers is to 'close the loop', that is, to capture gaseous human metabolic products, specifically water vapor (H2O) and Carbon dioxide (CO2), for maximal Oxygen (o2) recovery and to make other useful resources from these products. The AR subsystem also removes trace chemical contaminants from the cabin atmosphere to preserve cabin atmospheric quality, provides O2 and may include instrumentation to monitor cabin atmospheric quality. Long duration crewed space exploration missions require advancements in AR process technologies in order to reduce power consumption and mass and to increase reliability compared to those used for shorter duration missions that are typically limited to Low Earth Orbit. For example, current AR subsystems include separate processors and process air flow loops for removing metabolic CO2 and volatile organic tract contaminants (TCs). Physical adsorbents contained in fixed, packed beds are employed in these processors. Still, isolated pockets of high carbon dioxide have been suggested as a trigger for crew headaches and concern persists about future cabin ammonia (NH3) levels as compared with historical flights. Developers are already focused on certain potential advancements. ECLS systems engineers envision improving the AR subsystem by combining the functions of TC control and CO2 removal into a single regenerable process and moving toward structured sorbents - monoliths - instead of granular material. Monoliths present a lower pressure drop and eliminate particle attrition problems that result from bed containment. New materials and configurations offer promise for lowering cabin levels of CO2 and NH3 as well as reducing power requirements and increasing reliability. This chapter summarizes the challenges faced by ECLS system engineers in pursuing these goals, and the promising materials developments that may be part of the technical solution for challenges of crewed space exploration beyond LEO.

  13. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  14. Atmospheric tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, MiháLy; GelencséR, AndráS.; Simonics, RenáTa; Arató, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-03-01

    "Tar balls" are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (˜90 mol % carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  15. Atmospheric Tar Balls: Particles from Biomass and Biofuel Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Gelencser, Andras; Simonics, Renata; Arato, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Tar balls are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (approximately 90 mol% carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  16. Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles

    E-print Network

    Shapira, Yoram

    Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy; energy dispersive spectroscopy ABSTRACT Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy

  17. Numerical Investigation of Light Scattering by Atmospheric Particles 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Chao

    2013-07-12

    Atmospheric particles, i.e. ice crystals, dust particles, and black carbon, show significant complexities like irregular geometries, inhomogeneity, small-scale surface structures, and play a significant role in the ...

  18. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney; Shilling, John E.; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2012-07-30

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the uptake of reactive gas species on atmospheric particles will be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of these types of phase transitions within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we observe the coexistence of two non-crystalline phases in particles generated from real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, Georgia, and in particles generated in the laboratory using atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations. Using a box model, we show that liquid-liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO3 and N2O5 in the Atlanta region, due to decreased particle uptake of N2O5.

  19. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid–liquid phase separations

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah J.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney J.; Shilling, John E.; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric aerosol particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere and the water content of the particles correspondingly changes, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid–liquid phase separation. If liquid–liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the reactive uptake of gas species on atmospheric particles may be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of liquid–liquid phase separation within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we present images that show the coexistence of two noncrystalline phases for real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, GA as well as for laboratory-generated samples under simulated atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid–liquid phase separations. To explore the implications of these findings, we carried out simulations of the Atlanta urban environment and found that liquid–liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO3 and N2O5 due to decreased particle uptake of N2O5. PMID:22847443

  20. Wear of hard materials by hard particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-10-01

    Hard materials, such as WC-Co, boron carbide, titanium diboride and composite carbide made up of Mo2C and WC, have been tested in abrasion and erosion conditions. These hard materials showed negligible wear in abrasion against SiC particles and erosion using Al2O3 particles. The WC-Co materials have the highest wear rate of these hard materials and a very different material removal mechanism. Wear mechanisms for these materials were different for each material with the overall wear rate controlled by binder composition and content and material grain size.

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on high energy particles and atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Yair, Yoav

    2015-10-01

    The letters published in the ‘Focus issue on high energy particles and atmospheric processes’ serve to broaden the discussion about the influence of high energy particles on the atmosphere beyond their possible effects on clouds and climate. These letters link climate and meteorological processes with atmospheric electricity, atmospheric chemistry, high energy physics and aerosol science from the smallest molecular cluster ions through to liquid droplets. Progress in such a disparate and complex topic is very likely to benefit from continued interdisciplinary interactions between traditionally distinct science areas.

  2. Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver

    E-print Network

    . Wyslouzilb,c a Department of Materials Science and Engineering, b Department of Chemistry, and c Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USAEffects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion

  3. Atmospheric new particle formation as a source of CCN in the eastern Mediterranean marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Stavroulas, I.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2015-08-01

    While cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production associated with atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is thought to be frequent throughout the continental boundary layers, few studies on this phenomenon in marine air exist. Here, based on simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions, CCN properties and aerosol chemical composition, we present the first direct evidence on CCN production resulting from NPF in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. We show that condensation of both gaseous sulfuric acid and organic compounds from multiple sources leads to the rapid growth of nucleated particles to CCN sizes in this environment during the summertime. Sub-100 nm particles were found to be substantially less hygroscopic than larger particles during the period with active NPF and growth (the value of ? was lower by 0.2-0.4 for 60 nm particles compared with 120 nm particles), probably due to enrichment of organic material in the sub-100 nm size range. The aerosol hygroscopicity tended to be at minimum just before the noon and at maximum in the afternoon, which was very likely due to the higher sulfate-to-organic ratios and higher degree of oxidation of the organic material during the afternoon. Simultaneous with the formation of new particles during daytime, particles formed during the previous day or even earlier were growing into the size range relevant to cloud droplet activation, and the particles formed in the atmosphere were possibly mixed with long-range-transported particles.

  4. INTRODUCTION Atmospheric aerosol particles influence the Earth's

    E-print Network

    Wunderle, Stefan

    - ability means a complex and challenging task in today's atmosphere and climate related science. During to enhance the frequency of aerosol mapping due to their high repetition rate. The objective of this study

  5. Material flammability in space exploration atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Sara Suzanne

    In order to reduce the risk of decompression sickness associated with extravehicular activity, NASA is designing the next generation of exploration vehicles with a different cabin pressure and oxygen concentration than used previously. This work explores how the flammability of solid materials changes in this new environment. One method to evaluate material flammability is by its ease of ignition. To this end, piloted ignition delay tests were conducted in a small-scale wind tunnel subject to this new space exploration atmosphere (SEA -- 58.6 kPa and 32% oxygen) and compared to similar tests in standard atmospheric conditions. In these tests, polymethylmethacylate (PMMA) was exposed to a range of oxidizer flow velocities and externally applied heat fluxes. It was found that the ignition time was reduced by 27% in the intended space exploration atmosphere. It was also noted that the critical heat flux for ignition decreases in exploration atmospheres. These results show that materials are more susceptible to ignition than in current spacecraft atmospheres. To further explore the effect of pressure and oxygen concentration, tests were performed for a wide range of pressures and oxygen concentrations. In all oxygen concentrations tested, the ignition delay time was seen to decrease with pressure, reach a minimum, and then increase with further reduction in pressure creating a classic u-shaped curve. No ignition was seen at sufficiently low pressures. The no ignition pressure depended on the oxygen concentration. Increasing the oxygen concentration uniformly decreases the ignition time; however, no significant differences were seen in oxygen concentrations above 24%. These results indicate there are several competing mechanisms controlling the ignition time. By reducing the pressure, the heat transfer coefficient and the mass flow rate of fuel to reach the lean flammability limit are reduced. Conversely, a reduction in pressure increases the gas-phase chemical induction time. The competition between these three mechanisms is responsible for the u-shaped dependence of ignition time on total pressure. In addition to gaining insight into the effect of pressure on piloted ignition, these results have practical applications including high altitude structures and airplane cabins.

  6. Meteoric Material: An Important Component of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Moses, Julianne I.; Pesnell, W. Dean; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) interact with all planetary atmospheres and leave their imprint as perturbations of the background atmospheric chemistry and structure. They lead to layers of metal ions that can become the dominant positively charged species in lower ionospheric regions. Theoretical models and radio occultation measurements provide compelling evidence that such layers exist in all planetary atmospheres. In addition IDP ablation products can affect neutral atmospheric chemistry, particularly at the outer planets where the IDPs supply oxygen compounds like water and carbon dioxide to the upper atmospheres. Aerosol or smoke particles from incomplete ablation or recondensation of ablated IDP vapors may also have a significant impact on atmospheric properties.

  7. Stereochemical transfer to atmospheric aerosol particles accompanying the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebben, Carlena J.; Zorn, Soeren R.; Lee, Seung-Bok; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2011-08-01

    Asymmetric emission profiles of the stereoisomers of plant-derived volatile organic compounds vary with season, geography, plant type, and stress factors. After oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere, the low-vapor pressure products ultimately contribute strongly to the particle-phase material of the atmosphere. In order to explore the possibility of stereochemical transfer to atmospheric aerosol particles during the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds, second-order coherent vibrational spectra were recorded of the particle-phase organic material produced by the oxidation of different stereoisomeric mixes of ?-pinene. The spectra show that the stereochemical configurations are not scrambled but instead are transferred from the gas-phase molecular precursors to the particle-phase molecules. The spectra also show that oligomers formed in the particle phase have a handed superstructure that depends strongly and nonlinearly on the initial stereochemical composition of the precursors. Because the stereochemical mix of the precursors for a material can influence the physical and chemical properties of that material, our findings suggest that chirality is also important for such properties of plant-derived aerosol particles.

  8. Particle Rebound and Phase State of Secondary Organic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Bertram, A. K.; Martin, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic material (SOM) is produced in the atmosphere from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Aerosol particles, composed in part of SOM, play important roles in climate and air quality by scattering/absorbing radiation and serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The magnitude of climate-relevant perturbations depends on particle chemical composition, hygroscopic growth, and phase state, among other factors. Herein, the hygroscopic influence on particle rebound and the phase state of particles composed of isoprene, toluene, and ?-pinene secondary organic material (SOM) was studied. Particle rebound measurements were obtained from 5 to 95% RH using a three-arm impaction apparatus. The experimentally determined rebound fractions were compared with results from a model of the rebound process that took into account the particle kinetic energy, van der Waals forces, and RH-dependent capillary forces. Comparison of the experimental and modeled indicated particles softened due to water uptake. For low RH values, the model explained the rebound behavior for all studied SOMs. At higher RH values specific to each SOM, however, particle rebound was no longer observed, and the model did not capture this behavior. Calibration experiments using sucrose particles of variable known viscosities showed the transition from non-rebounding to rebounding particles occurred for viscosity values from 100 to 1 Pa s, corresponding to a transition from semisolid to liquid material. The implication of the differing RH-dependent behaviors among the SOMs is that each SOM has a specific and quantitatively different interaction with water. A linear correlation between rebound fraction and hygroscopic growth factor was demonstrated, implying that absorbed water volume is the governing factor of viscosity for the studied classes of SOM. The findings of this study suggest that both the chemical composition and the ambient relative humidity influence the phase state of secondary organic material.

  9. AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews Monitoring the Aerosol Phase

    E-print Network

    AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews Monitoring the Aerosol Phase Function University of New Mexico #12;AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews #12;AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews #12;AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews #12

  10. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the atmosphere: Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haszpra, Tímea; Lagzi, István; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of dispersion and deposition of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is an essential issue, because they have an effect on the biosphere and atmosphere. Moreover, aerosol particles have different transport properties and chemical and physical transformations in the atmosphere compared to gas phase air pollutants. The motion of a particle is described by a set of ordinary differential equations. The large-scale dynamics in the horizontal direction can be described by the equations of passive scalar advection, but in the vertical direction a well-defined terminal velocity should be taken into account as a term added to the vertical wind component. In the planetary boundary layer turbulent diffusion has an important role in the particle dispersion, which is taken into account by adding stochastic terms to the deterministic equations above. Wet deposition is also an essential process in the lower levels of the atmosphere, however, its precise parameterization is a challenge. For the simulations the wind field and other necessary data were taken from the ECMWF ERA-Interim database. In the case of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (March-April 2011) radioactive aerosol particles were also released in the planetary boundary layer. Simulations (included the continuous and varying emission from the nuclear power plant) will be presented for the period of 14-23 March. Results show that wet deposition also has to be taken into consideration in the lower levels of the atmosphere. Furthermore, dynamical system characteristics are evaluated for the aerosol particle dynamics. The escape rate of particles was estimated both with and without turbulent diffusion, and in both cases when there was no wet deposition and also when wet deposition was taken into consideration.

  11. Phase Transitions of Aqueous Atmospheric Particles Scot T. Martin*

    E-print Network

    . Polar Stratospheric Clouds 3442 VII. Outlook 3444 VIII. Acknowledgments 3445 IX. Appendix A: Free Energy Transformations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles," in 1995-1996 at MIT in Atmospheric Chemistry. He 3438 iii. Campaigns and Observations of Ambient Aerosol Phase Changes 3439 B. Cirrus Clouds 3441 C

  12. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-11-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  14. Atmospheric science: Sea-spray particles cause freezing in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.

    2015-09-01

    Ice clouds in marine regions at high latitudes might form in warmer and drier air than was previously believed because of freezing induced by airborne particles that contain organic materials from ocean surface waters. See Letter p.234

  15. Atmospheric Condensational Properties of Ultrafine Chain and Fractal Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlow, William H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose for the research sponsored by this grant was to lay the foundations for qualitative understanding and quantitative description of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water vapor over the irregularly shaped, carbonaceous particles that are present in the atmosphere. This work apparently was the first systematic treatment of the subject. Research was conducted in two complementary components: 1. Calculations were performed of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water over particles comprised of aggregates of spheres in the 50-200 nm radius range. The purposes of this work were two-fold. First, since no systematic treatment of this subject had previously been conducted, its availability would be directly useful for quantitative treatment for a limited range of atmospheric aerosols. Second, it would provide qualitative indications of the effects of highly irregular particle shape on equilibrium vapor pressure of aggregates comprised of smaller spheres.

  16. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-25

    Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice nucleation effciencies and can serve as effcient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed phase clouds. This indicates a potential link between human activities and cloud formation, and thus climate.

  17. Materials characterisation with the associated particle technique

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, Bertrand; Carasco, Cedric; Deyglun, Clement; Eleon, Cyrille; Mariani, Alain; Ma, Jean-Luc

    2012-07-01

    Since the last past years, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache, France, together with Partners from European and National projects, has been studying the application of fast neutron interrogation with the Associated Particle Technique for material identification in different areas of homeland and maritime security, and for the characterisation of the materials constituting radioactive waste. Fast 14 MeV neutrons are produced from the H-3(H-2,n)alpha fusion reaction in a sealed tube neutron generator embedding an alpha detector. The alpha particle is used to tag neutron direction and emission time, thus allowing the electronic selection of neutron-induced gamma spectra in the voxels of interest. Gamma rays emitted by tagged neutron interactions on the present nuclei (C, O, N, Fe, Al, Si, Cl, etc.) are recorded with spectroscopic detectors and analysed to determine elemental proportions, thus allowing material identification. Investigations have been conducted for the detection of explosives, illicit drugs and contraband materials in cargo containers, for the inspection of objects lying on the sea floor suspected to contain explosives like mines, bombs, torpedoes, etc., for the recognition of an improvised chemical device, and for material identification in radioactive waste packages. Recently the detection of special nuclear materials is being investigated using time correlation analysis between induced fission particles, instead of gamma-ray spectroscopy. The paper presents an overview of these studies and last results. (authors)

  18. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  19. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  20. Characteristics of individual particles in the atmosphere of Guangzhou by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Han, Bingxue; Bi, Xinhui; Dai, Shouhui; Huang, Wei; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Zhou, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Continuous ambient measurement of atmospheric aerosols was performed with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) in Guangzhou during summer of 2012. The aerosols mainly consisted of carbonaceous particles as major compositions in submicrometer range, including K-rich (29.8%), internally mixed organics and elemental carbon (ECOC, 13.5%), organic carbon-rich (OC, 18.5%), elemental carbon (EC, 12.3%) and high molecular OC (HMOC, 3.2%), and inorganic types (e.g., Na-rich Na-K, Fe-rich, V-rich, and Cu-rich) as major ones in supermicrometer range. Results show that carbonaceous particles were commonly internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate through atmospheric processing, in particular, with sulfate; inorganic types were dominantly internally mixed with nitrate rather than sulfate, indicative of different evolution processes for carbonaceous and inorganic particles in the atmosphere. It was observed that variations of these particle types were significantly influenced by air mass back trajectories (BTs). Under the influence of continental BTs, carbonaceous types were prevalent, while Na-K and Na-rich types considerably increased when the BTs originated from south marine regions. Number fraction of carbonaceous types exhibited obvious diurnal variation throughout the sampling period, which reflects their relatively stable emission and atmospheric processes. Two EC particle types LC-EC and NaK-EC showed different diurnal distributions, suggesting their different origins. The obtained information on the mixing state and the temporal variation of particle types is essential for developing an understanding on the origin and evolution processes of atmospheric aerosols.

  1. Properties of submicron particles in Atmospheric Brown Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Chen, B. B.; Dubovskoi, A. N.; Friedrich, F.; Pernik, L. M.; Popel, S. I.; Weidler, P. G.

    2010-05-01

    The Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC) is an important problem of this century. Investigations of last years and satellite data show that the ABC (or brown gas, smog, fog) cover extensive territories including the whole continents and oceans. The brown gas consists of a mixture of particles of anthropogenic sulfates, nitrates, organic origin, black carbon, dust, ashes, and also natural aerosols such as sea salt and mineral dust. The brown color is a result of absorption and scattering of solar radiation by the anthropogenic black carbon, ashes, the particles of salt dust, and nitrogen dioxide. The investigation of the ABC is a fundamental problem for prevention of degradation of the environment. At present in the CIS in-situ investigations of the ABC are carried out on Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (Kyrgyz Republic). Here, we present the results of experimental investigation of submicron (nanoscale) particles originating from the ABC and the properties of the particles. Samples of dust precipitating from the ABC were obtained at the area of Lidar Station Teplokluchenka as well as scientific station of the Russian Academy of Sciences near Bishkek. The data for determination of the grain composition were obtained with the aid of the scanning electron microscopes JEOL 6460 LV and Philips XL 30 FEG. Analysis of the properties of the particles was performed by means of the X-ray diffraction using diffractometer Siemens D5000. The images of the grains were mapped. The investigation allows us to get (after the image processing) the grain composition within the dust particle size range of 60 nm to 700 ?m. Distributions of nano- and microscale particles in sizes were constructed using Rozin-Rammler coordinates. Analysis of the distributions shows that the ABC contain submicron (nanoscale) particles; 2) at higher altitudes the concentration of the submicron (nanoscale) particles in the ABC is higher than at lower altitudes. The chemical compositions of the particles are shown to be close to those typical for the ABC. We present also the results of the study of morphology and mineralogical composition of the obtained particles as well as their magnetic properties. This study was supported by the Division of Earth Sciences, Russian Academy of Sciences (research program "Nanoscale particles in nature and technogenic products: conditions of existence, physical and chemical properties, and mechanisms of formation") and by ISTC (project No. KR-1522).

  2. Phase transitions of aqueous atmospheric particles: Crystallization of ammonium salts promoted by oxide mineral constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong-Ho

    2001-09-01

    Knowledge of the hygroscopic response of aerosols is a fundamental factor necessary for the accurate quantitative modeling of visibility degradation, global warming, PM-10 health issues, cloud microphysics, and the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. At the present time, however, our current understanding of phase transitions is insufficient to develop accurate quantitative models. The discrepancy between current atmospheric models and field measurements originates mainly from a lack of understanding of the efflorescence of real atmospheric particles. While there have been many studies on the homogeneous nucleation of the soluble organic, inorganic, or multi-component materials, many recent in situ field measurements with single-particle mass spectrometry reveal that the individual particles in the troposphere are primarily composed of more than one component. One of the common mixed component particle types contains both water- soluble and insoluble components. Through atmospheric processes, the soluble component can be expected to form a coating around the insoluble constituents. This type of atmospheric particles is very important because the insoluble constituent can play a role as a template for the crystallization of the soluble components by heterogeneous nucleation. In the atmosphere, the most prevalent insoluble constituents are mineral dusts, which have their origin from Saharan and Gobbi deserts. The existence of these coated particles has been supported by several field measurements as well as model studies. Therefore, it becomes imperative to simulate more realistic atmospheric particles for more exact (or realistic) understanding the phase transition of the ambient aerosol particles in the real world. In this context, a series of studies has been completed to solve the aforementioned problems in the phase transition study and to better understand the heterogeneous nucleation of these internally mixed particles. An in-line tube furnace has been developed and characterized to generate the internally mixed particles consisting of the soluble and insoluble components. Spray pyrolysis was employed in order to have the control of the size and crystalline phase of the insoluble constituents and combined with the in-line tube furnace to manipulate the coated particles (i.e., internally mixed particles). Employing the stable and well- characterized generation source for the coated particles, the roles of the insoluble constituents (i.e., metal oxides) in heterogeneous nucleation were investigated extensively in terms of their size (i.e., surface area) and crystalline structure as nucleation templates. Ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate were selected as the soluble components because they are the most common atmospheric aerosol particles from anthropogenic activities. As for insoluble components, corundum (?-Al2O3), hematite (?- Al2O3), mullite (Al6Si 2O13), silica (am-SiO2), rutile (TiO2), ZrO2, and ?-Al2O3 were selected with the reasoning that some of them represent the abundant crustal components in the atmosphere and that others have interesting chemical compositions and/or crystalline structures.

  3. Particle impact damping: influence of material and size 

    E-print Network

    Marhadi, Kun Saptohartyadi

    2005-02-17

    In this study, particle impact damping is measured for a cantilever beam with a particle-filled enclosure attached to its free end. Many particle materials are tested: lead spheres, steel spheres, glass spheres, tungsten carbide pellets, lead dust...

  4. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  5. Determination of atmospheric particle size distribution from forward scattering data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an analytic method of reconstructing the particle size distribution of atmospheric aerosols when no a priori information is available regarding the refractive index of the particles, the analytic form of the distribution, the size range, and the size extremal values. The method applies in principle to angle-dependent scattering data at a fixed wave number, or to wave-number-dependent scattering data at a fixed angle, or to a combination of the two. Some results of an angular scan study of the aureole are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. In conclusion, an analysis is made of the efficiency and accuracy of the method, the uniqueness of the inverse solutions, and the stability of the method relative to experimental noise.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Hydrocarbon Nucleation on Tholin Particles and Thin Organic Films: Application to Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Daniel B.; Glandorf, David L.; Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; McKay, Christopher P.; Khare, Bishun N.

    2001-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has a thick nitrogen/methane atmosphere. In Titan's lower atmosphere, methane is saturated or supersaturated with respect to nucleation and may form clouds. To better characterize the properties of Titan's methane clouds we have measured the saturation ratio required to obtain butane nucleation, S (sub crit), on Titan tholin material and organic films. We find a critical saturation ratio for butane on tholin particles of S (sub crit) = 1.40, suggesting high supersaturations are required for nucleation. If methane is similar to butane, we expect high supersaturations of methane as well. This could favor the formation of a small number of large particles, consistent with recent measurements of methane rain on Titan.

  7. Small particle cirrus observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fishbein, E. F.

    2003-04-01

    The high-resolution spectra of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) have provided an opportunity to globally observe small particle-dominated cirrus clouds. The shape of the radiance spectra in the atmospheric windows is uniquely influenced by small ice crystals with an effective radius (reff) of a few 10s of microns and smaller. In some rare instances, minima in the AIRS brightness temperature (BT) spectra between 800 to 850 cm-1 are seen, consistent with the existence of ice particles with an reff smaller than 3 microns. Much more frequent occurences of small ice particle clouds with reff larger than 3 microns are observed through the large 998 to 811 cm-1 BT differences without minima. The small particle events are occasionally found in orographic cirrus clouds, in and around cumulonimbus towers, and in cirrus bands far removed from convection and orography. Several cases spanning the variety of small particle-dominated cirrus events will be presented. AIRS, located on the EOS-Aqua platform, is a high-resolution grating spectrometer that scans at angles 49.5 degrees on either side of nadir view, at both visible and infrared wavelengths. The surface footprint is 13.5 km at the nadir view, and coverage in the infrared is in three bandpasses (649-1136, 1265-1629, and 2169-2674 cm-1). Comparisons of observed spectra are made with simulated spectra generated by a plane-parallel scattering radiative transfer model using ice particle shapes and sizes calculated by the T-matrix method. These comparisons yield information on small particle cirrus cloud reff and optical depth. Aumann, H.H., and R.J. Pagano, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System. Opt. Eng. 33, 776-784, 1994. Mishchenko, M.I., and L.D. Travis, Capabilities and limitations of a current Fortran implementation of the T-matrix method for randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric scatterers. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 60, 309-324, 1998. Moncet, J.L., and S.A. Clough, Accelerated monochromatic radiative transfer for scattering atmospheres: Application of a new model to spectral radiance observations. J. Geophys. Res., 102, 21,853-21,866, 1997. Rathke, C., and J. Fischer, Retrieval of cloud microphysical properties from thermal infrared observations by a fast iterative radiance fitting method, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 17, 1509-1524, 2000. Smith, W.L., S. Ackerman, H. Revercomb, H. Huang, D.H. DeSlover, W. Feltz, L. Gumley, and A. Collard, Infrared spectral absorption of nearly invisible cirrus clouds. Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 1137-1140, 1998. Strabala, K.I., S.A. Ackerman, and W.P. Menzel, Cloud properties inferred from 8-12 micron data. J. Appl. Meteor., 33, 212-229, 1994.

  8. Energetic particle energy deposition in Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlake, J. H.; Smith, H. T.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C. P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mandt, K. E.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s upper atmosphere has been observed to be variable on a pass-by-pass basis. During the nominal mission where the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) only sampled the northern hemisphere this variability was initially believed to be tied to solar drivers manifest in latitudinal variations in the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere. However, when Cassini delved into the southern hemisphere the latitudinal dependence was not present in the data. Recently, Westlake et al. (2011) showed that the pass-by-pass variability is correlated with the deviations in the plasma environment as identified by Rymer et al. (2009) and Simon et al. (2010). Furthermore, the studies of Westlake et al. (2011) and Bell et al. (2011) showed that Titan’s upper atmosphere responds to changes in the ambient magnetospheric plasma on timescales of roughly one Titan day (16 Earth days). We report on recent studies of energy deposition in Titan’s upper atmosphere. Previous studies by Smith et al. (2009), Cravens et al. (2008), Tseng et al. (2008), and Shah et al. (2009) reported on energetic proton and oxygen ion precipitation. Back of the envelope calculations by Sittler et al. (2009) showed that magnetospheric energy inputs are expected to be of the order of or greater than the solar processes. We report on further analysis of the plasma environment around Titan during the flybys that the INMS has good data. We utilize data from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument to determine how the magnetospheric particle population varies from pass to pass and how this influences the net magnetospheric energy input prior to the flyby. We also report on enhanced energetic neutral atom emissions during select highly energetic passes. References: Bell, J., et al.: “Simulating the time-dependent response of Titan's upper atmosphere to periods of magnetospheric forcing”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06202, 2011. Rymer, A. M., et al.: “Discrete classification and electron energy spectra of Titan’s varied magnetospheric environment”. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 36, L15109, 2009. Simon, S., et al.: “Titan’s highly dynamic magnetic environment: A systematic survey of Cassini magnetometer observations from flybys TA-T62”. Planet. Space. Sci., Vol 58, pp. 1230-1251, 2010. Sittler, E., et al.: “Energy deposition processes in Titan’s upper atmosphere and its induced magnetosphere”. In Titan from Cassini-Huygens. 2009. Tseng, W.-L, et al.: “Exospheric heating by pickup ions at Titan”. Adv. Space Res. Vol 42. Pp 54-60, 2008. Westlake, J. H., et al.: “Titan’s thermospheric response to various plasma environments”. J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 116, A03

  9. A test-particle model of the atmosphere/ionosphere system of Saturn's main rings

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Robert E.

    A test-particle model of the atmosphere/ionosphere system of Saturn's main rings M. Bouhram,1 R. E pass of the Cassini orbiter near the A and B rings of Saturn, formed mainly by H2O ice particles. Crary (2006), A test-particle model of the atmosphere/ionosphere system of Saturn's main rings, Geophys

  10. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  11. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  12. Particle beams in the solar atmosphere - General overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.

    1990-12-01

    An overview of particle beams in the solar atmosphere is separated into discussions of (1) current-carrying beams, (2) current-neutralized electron beams, and (3) ion beams. The Alfven-Lawson limit on an electric current implies some severe limitations. Considerable progress has been made in understanding how electron beams in type III solar radio events propagate in a way that is consistent with the generation of Langmuir waves, but a completely consistent picture has not yet emerged. Such beams, and more importantly the electron beams that generate hard X-ray bursts require current neutralization; how the required return current is set up is still not entirely clear. There is direct evidence for ion beams with energies above about 10 MeV per nucleon from gamma-ray line emission; there is no unambiguous evidence for ion beams of lower energy. A mechanism is suggested for bulk energization of electrons due to dissipation of a parallel current in solar flares. Some outstanding problems concerning particle beams are identified.

  13. Material shields against neutral atomic particle beams. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kash, S.W.

    1985-07-12

    A material shield designed to protect a spacecraft against an atomic particle beam will, of necessity, be quite massive; consequently, even modest fractional-weight savings would be significant. With this goal in mind, the particle stopping power and range in various materials were investigated. The lightest shield materials are compounds composed of hydrogen and other light elements.

  14. Carbohydrate-like composition of submicron atmospheric particles and their production

    E-print Network

    Carbohydrate-like composition of submicron atmospheric particles and their production from ocean polyol and other alcohol) groups characteristic of saccharides, similar to biogenic carbohydrates found aerosol marine carbohydrates organic aerosols sea salt particles The scattering of light by salt

  15. Spatially resolved chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles using nanoscale imaging mass spectrometry: Insighs into particle origin and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Weber, Peter K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-04-21

    Knowledge of the spatially-resolved composition of atmospheric particles is essential for differentiating between their surface versus bulk chemistry, understanding particle reactivity and the potential environmental impact. We demonstrate the application of nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion probe) for 3D chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles without any sample pre-treatment, such as the sectioning of particles. Use of NanoSIMS depth profile analysis enables elemental mapping of particles with nanometer spatial resolution over a broad of range of particle sizes. We have used this technique to probe spatially resolved composition of ambient particles collected during a field campaign in Mexico City. Particles collected during this campaign have been extensively characterized in the past using other particle analysis techniques and hence offer a unique opportunity for exploring the utility of depth resolved chemical imaging in ambient particle research. 1 Particles examined in this study include those collected during a pollution episode related to urban waste incineration as well as background particles from the same location prior to the episode. Particles from the pollution episode show substantial intra-particle compositional variability typical of particles resulting from multiple emission sources. In contrast, the background particles have relatively homogeneous compositions with enhanced presence of nitrogen, oxygen and chlorine at the particle surface. The observed surface enhancement of nitrogen and oxygen species is consistent with the presence of surface nitrates resulting from gas-particle heterogeneous interactions and is indicative of atmospheric ageing of the particles. The results presented here illustrate 3D characterization of ambient particles for insights into their chemical history.

  16. Spatially resolved chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles using nanoscale imaging mass spectrometry: Insights into particle origin and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, S.; Weber, P. K.; Laskin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the spatially-resolved composition of atmospheric particles is essential for differentiating between their surface versus bulk chemistry, understanding particle reactivity and the potential environmental impact. We demonstrate the application of nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion probe) for 3D chemical imaging of individual atmospheric particles without any sample pre-treatment, such as the sectioning of particles. Use of NanoSIMS depth profile analysis enables elemental mapping of particles with nanometer spatial resolution over a broad of range of particle sizes. We have used this technique to probe spatially resolved composition of ambient particles collected during a field campaign in Mexico City. Particles collected during this campaign have been extensively characterized in the past using other particle analysis techniques and hence offer a unique opportunity for exploring the utility of depth resolved chemical imaging in ambient particle research. Particles examined in this study include those collected during a pollution episode related to urban waste incineration as well as background particles from the same location prior to the episode. Particles from the pollution episode show substantial intra-particle compositional variability typical of particles resulting from multiple emission sources. In contrast, the background particles have relatively homogeneous compositions with enhanced presence of nitrogen, oxygen and chlorine at the particle surface. The observed surface enhancement of nitrogen and oxygen species is consistent with the presence of surface nitrates resulting from gas-particle heterogeneous interactions and is indicative of atmospheric ageing of the particles. The results presented here illustrate 3D characterization of ambient particles for insights into their chemical history.

  17. Graphene: from materials science to particle physics

    E-print Network

    Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde; Eero Tölö

    2010-11-02

    Since its discovery in 2004, graphene, a two-dimensional hexagonal carbon allotrope, has generated great interest and spurred research activity from materials science to particle physics and vice versa. In particular, graphene has been found to exhibit outstanding electronic and mechanical properties, as well as an unusual low-energy spectrum of Dirac quasiparticles giving rise to a fractional quantum Hall effect when freely suspended and immersed in a magnetic field. One of the most intriguing puzzles of graphene involves the low-temperature conductivity at zero density, a central issue in the design of graphene-based nanoelectronic components. While suspended graphene experiments have shown a trend reminiscent of semiconductors, with rising resistivity at low temperatures, most theories predict a constant or even decreasing resistivity. However, lattice field theory calculations have revealed that suspended graphene is at or near the critical coupling for excitonic gap formation due to strong Coulomb interactions, which suggests a simple and straightforward explanation for the experimental data. In this contribution we review the current status of the field with emphasis on the issue of gap formation, and outline recent progress and future points of contact between condensed matter physics and Lattice QCD.

  18. Recreational atmospheric pollution episodes: Inhalable metalliferous particles from firework displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Cruz Minguillón, Mari; Pey, Jorge; Rodriguez, Sergio; Vicente Miró, José; Felis, Carles; Gibbons, Wes

    The use of fireworks creates an unusual and distinctive anthropogenic atmospheric pollution event. We report on aerosol samples collected during Las Fallas in Valencia, a 6-day celebration famous for its firework displays, and add comparative data on firework- and bonfire-contaminated atmospheric aerosol samples collected from elsewhere in Spain (Barcelona, L'Alcora, and Borriana) and during the Guy Fawkes celebrations in London. Specific high-profile official firework events during Las Fallas included the afternoon Mascletà and the nightly aerial displays (especially in the climactic final 2 days of the fiesta) and were accompanied by pollution spikes in suspended particles, NO, SO 2, and the creation and dispersal of an aerosol cloud enriched in a range of metallic elements. Notable metal aerosol concentration increases recorded during Las Fallas were potassium (from 500 to 5900 ng m -3), aluminium (as Al 2O 3 from around 600 to 2200 ng m -3), titanium (from 200 to 700 ng m -3), magnesium (from 100 to 500 ng m -3), lead (from 17 to 379 ng m -3), barium (from 39 to 322 ng m -3), strontium (from 3 to 112 ng m -3), copper (from 12 to 71 ng m -3), and antimony (from 1 to 52 ng m -3). Firework-contaminated aerosols of similarly metalliferous composition were also identified at the other monitoring sites, although different sites show variations attributable to other sources such as bonfires and local industry. Unusual levels of the trace elements Ba, Sr and (to a lesser extent) Cu, always in proportions with Ba dominant, along with strongly enhanced K, Pb, and Sb, are identified as being particularly characteristic of firework aerosols. Although firework-related recreational pollution episodes are transient in nature, they are highly concentrated, contribute significantly to total annual metal emissions, and are on average fine enough to be easily inhaled and a health risk to susceptible individuals.

  19. Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Depalma, Joseph W.; Ridge, Douglas P.; Laskin, Julia; Johnston, Murray V.

    2013-02-27

    The exact mechanisms by which small clusters form and grow in the atmosphere are poorly understood, but this process may significantly impact cloud condensation nuclei number concentrations and global climate. Sulfuric acid is the key chemical component to new particle formation, but basic species such as ammonia are also important. However, few laboratory experiments address the kinetics or thermodynamics of acid and base incorporation into small clusters. This work utilizes a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped with surface-induced dissociation (FTICR-SID) to investigate time- and collision energy-resolved fragmentation of positively charged ammonium bisulfate clusters. Critical energies for dissociation are obtained from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/Quasi-Equilibrium Theory (RRKM/QET) modeling of the experimental data and are compared to quantum chemical calculations of the thermodynamics of cluster dissociation. Fragmentation of ammonium bisulfate clusters occurs by two pathways: 1) a two-step pathway whereby the cluster sequentially loses ammonia followed by sulfuric acid and 2) a one-step pathway whereby the cluster loses an ammonium bisulfate molecule. Experimental critical energies for loss of an ammonia molecule and loss of an ammonium bisulfate molecule are higher than the thermodynamic values. If cluster growth is considered the reverse of cluster fragmentation, these results require the presence of an activation barrier to describe the incorporation of ammonia into small acidic clusters and suggest that kinetically (i.e. diffusion) limited growth should not be assumed. An important corollary is that models of atmospheric NPF should be revised to consider activation barriers to individual chemical steps along the growth pathway.

  20. Status and potential of atmospheric plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Daphne

    2011-03-15

    This paper is a review of the current status and potential of atmospheric plasma technology for materials processing. The main focus is the recent developments in the area of dielectric barrier discharges with emphasis in the functionalization of polymers, deposition of organic and inorganic coatings, and plasma processing of biomaterials. A brief overview of both the equipment being used and the physicochemical reactions occurring in the gas phase is also presented. Atmospheric plasma technology offers major industrial, economic, and environmental advantages over other conventional processing methods. At the same time there is also tremendous potential for future research and applications involving both the industrial and academic world.

  1. Quantifying the kinetic limitations of atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, A.; Murphy, B.; Riipinen, I.; Percival, C.; Topping, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, from anthropogenic and biogenic sources, remain a major uncertainty in the Earth system: they impact the climate by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation, as well as regulating the properties of clouds. On regional scales, aerosols are among the main pollutants deteriorating air quality, their impacts on both poorly quantified. Reducing these uncertainties requires accurate knowledge on the composition, concentrations and size distributions of these particles as they reside in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, there are currently huge uncertainties in many fundamental parameters that are required to predict their environmental impacts. This is largely down to the fact that a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles are comprised of organic material (20-90% of particle mass), containing potentially thousands of compounds with largely uncertain properties It is becoming increasingly evident that aerosols exist as metastable amorphous states, rather than simple liquid/solid mixtures. Empirical evidence suggests that particles can form glass like substances. As the glass transition temperature is approached, an increase in viscosity leads to a reduced rate of molecular diffusion and an arrested non-equilibrium structure. Partitioning between the gas and condensed phase is kinetically limited in such amorphous states. Traditional organic aerosol models do not account for this, they assume that 1) the aerosol phase is a well-mixed non-viscous liquid; 2) the aerosol phase instantaneously equilibrates with the gas phase constituents. This adds significant uncertainty to predictions of gas/particle mass transfer as mixing timescales are ultimately governed by the diffusion coefficients of the aerosol constituents in the aerosol, which, on the other hand, are connected to the viscosity of the particulate matter. For typical aerosol sizes, the characteristic time for mixing could increase from a few milliseconds to hours or even days. In this study, we present direct laboratory determination of viscosity/diffusing of atmospherically relevant species along with an evaluation of composition dependent predictive techniques. Output from highly detailed chemical mechanisms are used to probe potential sensitivities of these kinetic limitations and sensitivities to our predictive capability.

  2. Liquidliquid phase separation in atmospherically relevant particles consisting of organic species and inorganic salts

    E-print Network

    Liquid­liquid phase separation in atmospherically relevant particles consisting of organic species received 31 January 2014) Laboratory studies of liquid­liquid phase separation in particles containing organic species and inorganic salts of atmospheric relevance are reviewed. The oxygen- to-carbon elemental

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Metallic Materials Containing Embedded Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Iesulauro, Erin; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2004-01-01

    Multiscale modeling at small length scales (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -3) m) is discussed for aluminum matrices with embedded particles. A configuration containing one particle surrounded by about 50 grains and subjected to uniform tension and lateral constraint is considered. The analyses are performed to better understand the effects of material configuration on the initiation and progression of debonding of the particles from the surrounding aluminum matrix. Configurational parameters considered include particle aspect ratio and orientation within the surrounding matrix. Both configurational parameters are shown to have a significant effect on the behavior of the materials as a whole. For elliptical particles with the major axis perpendicular to the direction of loading, a particle with a 1:1 aspect ratio completely debonds from the surrounding matrix at higher loads than particles with higher aspect ratios. As the particle major axis is aligned with the direction of the applied load, increasing amounts of load are required to completely debond the particles.

  4. Particle emission from artificial cometary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelzer, Gabriele; Kochan, Hermann; Thiel, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    During KOSI (comet simulation) experiments, mineral-ice mixtures are observed in simulated space conditions. Emission of ice-/dust particles from the sample surface is observed by means of different devices. The particle trajectories are recorded with a video system. In the following analysis we extracted the parameters: particle count rate, spatial distribution of starting points on the sample surface, and elevation angle and particle velocity at distances up to 5 cm from the sample surface. Different kinds of detectors are mounted on a frame in front of the sample to register the emitted particles and to collect their dust residues. By means of these instruments the particle count rates, the particle sizes and the composition of the particles can be correlated. The results are related to the gas flux density and the temperature on the sample surface during the insolation period. The particle emission is interpreted in terms of phenomena on the sample surface, e.g., formation of a dust mantle.

  5. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, A.; Smolander, S.; Vuollekoski, H.; Sihto, S.-L.; Mammarella, I.; Laakso, L.; Rannik, Ü.; Boy, M.

    2010-08-01

    We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere. Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Statistical Analysis of Particle Distributions in Composite Materials

    E-print Network

    Wichert, Sofia

    Statistical Analysis of Particle Distributions in Composite Materials by Sofia Mucharreira de Distributions in Composite Materials Sofia Mucharreira de Azeredo Lopes Summary Particulate composite materials distributions is of prime importance for a better control of the production of particulate composite materials

  7. Atmospheric giant particles (iberulites) from African desert soils and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Párraga, Jesús; Delgado, Gabriel; Bech, Jaume; Martín-García, Juan Manuel; Delgado, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    Earth is twice as dusty as in 19th century. The amount of soil dust in the Earth's atmosphere has doubled over the last century. The circum-Mediterranean area has one of the highest dust accretion rates in the world. The larger deserts (Sahara, Gobi, Badai Jaran, etc.) are the primary sources of mobilized desert-dust top soil that move great distances through the troposphere each year. Erosion, atmospheric transport, and dust-sized soil particles deposition to earth's surface are important process in aeolian environments. Atmospheric dust is associated to global climate change. Iberulites are giant microspherulitic particles (87.9 × 27.6 µm) rounded and reddish, generated in the atmosphere (troposphere) by coalescence of smaller particles, finally falling to the earth's surface. The name comes from the Iberian Peninsula where they were discovered. An iberulite is a co-association with axial geometry, consisting of well-defined mineral grains, together with non-crystalline compounds, structured around a coarse-grained core with a smectite rind, only one vortex and pinkish color formed in the troposphere by complex aerosol-water-gas interactions. Sedimentable dust ("dry deposition") in the city of Granada (Spain) for 17 African dust intrusion events occurring in the summer months of 2010 has been studied. In all samples were detected (SEM, stereomicroscope) iberulites. Total dust and the iberulites are composed mainly by mineral particles of different nature (XRD and SEM-EDX) and size less than 10µm (laser technique), implying dangerousness by inhalation. In the total dust the dominant mineral is dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2], abundant in the surroundings of the city; in the iberulites dominates the quartz (SiO2), which indicates Saharan origin. The iberulites and the total dust are associated with metals (ICP-MS) that have a capacity to transport electrons with a high toxic potential in the body. The concentration of Cu and Pb in total dust were 5 and 2.5 times higher than the soil background values of Granada province. In the iberulites we have detected (SEM-EDX) biological material (bacteria, diatoms, nanoplankton, etc.) which allows to emit a hypothesis about their role as vectors (atmospherical "shuttles") for alloctonous diseases. Recently has been observed the role of Saharan dust in the relationship between particulate matter and short-term daily mortality among the elderly in Madrid (Spain).

  8. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 ?m sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  9. On the formation of sulphuric acid - amine clusters in varying atmospheric conditions and its influence on atmospheric new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paasonen, P.; Olenius, T.; Kupiainen, O.; Kurtén, T.; Petäjä, T.; Birmili, W.; Hamed, A.; Hu, M.; Huey, L. G.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Smith, J. N.; Wiedensohler, A.; Loukonen, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Ortega, I. K.; Laaksonen, A.; Vehkamäki, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.

    2012-10-01

    Sulphuric acid is a key component in atmospheric new particle formation. However, sulphuric acid alone does not form stable enough clusters to initiate particle formation in atmospheric conditions. Strong bases, such as amines, have been suggested to stabilize sulphuric acid clusters and thus participate in particle formation. We modelled the formation rate of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules (JA2B2) at varying atmospherically relevant conditions with respect to concentrations of sulphuric acid ([H2SO4]), dimethylamine ([DMA]) and trimethylamine ([TMA]), temperature and relative humidity (RH). We also tested how the model results change if we assume that the clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules would act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of organic vapours (other than amines) with higher atmospheric concentrations than sulphuric acid. The modelled formation rates JA2B2 were functions of sulphuric acid concentration with close to quadratic dependence, which is in good agreement with atmospheric observations of the connection between the particle formation rate and sulphuric acid concentration. The coefficients KA2B2 connecting the cluster formation rate and sulphuric acid concentrations as JA2B2=KA2B2[H2SO4]2 turned out to depend also on amine concentrations, temperature and relative humidity. We compared the modelled coefficients KA2B2 with the corresponding coefficients calculated from the atmospheric observations (Kobs) from environments with varying temperatures and levels of anthropogenic influence. By taking into account the modelled behaviour of JA2B2 as a function of [H2SO4], temperature and RH, the atmospheric particle formation rate was reproduced more closely than with the traditional semi-empirical formulae based on sulphuric acid concentration only. The formation rates of clusters with two sulphuric acid and two amine molecules with different amine compositions (DMA or TMA or one of both) had different responses to varying meteorological conditions and concentrations of vapours participating in particle formation. The observed inverse proportionality of the coefficient Kobs with RH and temperature agreed best with the modelled coefficient KA2B2 related to formation of a cluster with two H2SO4 and one or two TMA molecules, assuming that these clusters can grow in collisions with abundant organic vapour molecules. In case this assumption is valid, our results suggest that the formation rate of clusters with at least two of both sulphuric acid and amine molecules might be the rate-limiting step for atmospheric particle formation. More generally, our analysis elucidates the sensitivity of the atmospheric particle formation rate to meteorological variables and concentrations of vapours participating in particle formation (also other than H2SO4).

  10. Use of Atmospheric Glow Discharge Plasma to Modify Spaceport Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, S.; Shuerger, A. C.; Buhler, C. R.; Calle, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous materials used in spaceport operations require stringent evaluation before they can be utilized. It is critical for insulative polymeric materials that any surface charge be dissipated as rapidly as possible to avoid Electrostatic Discharges (ESD) that could present a danger. All materials must pass the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) standard electrostatic test [1]; however several materials that are considered favorable for Space Shuttle and International Space Station use have failed. Moreover, to minimize contamination of Mars spacecraft, spacecraft are assembled under cleanroom conditions and specific cleaning and sterilizing procedures are required for all materials. However, surface characteristics of these materials may allow microbes to survive by protecting them from sterilization and cleaning techniques. In this study, an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Plasma (APGD) [2] was used to modify the surface of several materials. This allowed the materials surface to be modified in terms of hydrophilicity, roughness, and conductivity without affecting the bulk properties. The objectives of this study were to alter the surface properties of polymers for improved electrostatic dissipation characteristics, and to determine whether the consequent surface modification on spaceport materials enhanced or diminished microbial survival.

  11. Comparing the Treatment of Spherical and Fractal Particles in Titan’s Atmosphere using CARMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzano, Alexander; Barth, Erika

    2015-11-01

    The nature of Titan’s optically thick haze is of great interest in the study of its atmosphere. In an attempt to further understand the particle distribution and radiative properties of this haze we applied the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA), originally designed for Earth, to simulate the microphysical and radiative transfer properties of Titan’s atmosphere. In the past, the model treated the haze particles as spheres, however, it is more accurate to treat the haze particles as fractals (Lavvas et al. 2010). We first simulated spherical particles to verify the model’s consistency with past studies (i.e. Toon et al. 1992). We then ran simulations considering fractal haze particles. In both instances we considered a 600km atmosphere with a production zone centered at 300km from the surface. These particles, initially 0.0013 µm in radius, are then subject to vertical transport and coagulation processes affecting the size, number, and distribution of the particles. Our results for both cases show that for wavelengths of 550nm the optical depth and extinction of the atmosphere rapidly decreases above 400km, however, there is a greater concentration of fractal particles at altitudes above 400km than spherical particles by at least two orders of magnitude. Initial results indicate that above 400km there were approximately 2x105 fractal particles/cm3 whereas there were only at most 1x103 spherical particles/cm3 corresponding with a greater cumulative optical depth of Titan’s atmosphere for fractal particles than spherical particles. The full effects of these results on the cumulative optical depth of the atmosphere are still being explored.This work was funded by the NASA Outer Planets research program.

  12. Oxidation products of biogenic emissions contribute to nucleation of atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, Francesco; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Dommen, Josef; Ortega, Ismael K; Rondo, Linda; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hansel, Armin; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Spracklen, Dominick V; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjö; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Wimmer, Daniela; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-16

    Atmospheric new-particle formation affects climate and is one of the least understood atmospheric aerosol processes. The complexity and variability of the atmosphere has hindered elucidation of the fundamental mechanism of new-particle formation from gaseous precursors. We show, in experiments performed with the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN, that sulfuric acid and oxidized organic vapors at atmospheric concentrations reproduce particle nucleation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. The experiments reveal a nucleation mechanism involving the formation of clusters containing sulfuric acid and oxidized organic molecules from the very first step. Inclusion of this mechanism in a global aerosol model yields a photochemically and biologically driven seasonal cycle of particle concentrations in the continental boundary layer, in good agreement with observations. PMID:24833386

  13. Direct night-time ejection of particle-phase reduced biogenic sulfur compounds from the ocean to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Cassandra J; Furutani, Hiroshi; Guazzotti, Sergio A; Coffee, Keith R; Jung, Jinyoung; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Prather, Kimberly A

    2015-04-21

    The influence of oceanic biological activity on sea spray aerosol composition, clouds, and climate remains poorly understood. The emission of organic material and gaseous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) from the ocean represents well-documented biogenic processes that influence particle chemistry in marine environments. However, the direct emission of particle-phase biogenic sulfur from the ocean remains largely unexplored. Here we present measurements of ocean-derived particles containing reduced sulfur, detected as elemental sulfur ions (e.g., (32)S(+), (64)S2(+)), in seven different marine environments using real-time, single particle mass spectrometry; these particles have not been detected outside of the marine environment. These reduced sulfur compounds were associated with primary marine particle types and wind speeds typically between 5 and 10 m/s suggesting that these particles themselves are a primary emission. In studies with measurements of seawater properties, chlorophyll-a and atmospheric DMS concentrations were typically elevated in these same locations suggesting a biogenic source for these sulfur-containing particles. Interestingly, these sulfur-containing particles only appeared at night, likely due to rapid photochemical destruction during the daytime, and comprised up to ?67% of the aerosol number fraction, particularly in the supermicrometer size range. These sulfur-containing particles were detected along the California coast, across the Pacific Ocean, and in the southern Indian Ocean suggesting that these particles represent a globally significant biogenic contribution to the marine aerosol burden. PMID:25835033

  14. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-H.; Yiacoumi, S.; Nenes, A.; Tsouris, C.

    2015-09-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 40 nm and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and a radioactive plume. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  15. Particle sizes and composition of Mars atmospheric dust based upon Viking and Mariner 9 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    Mars atmospheric dust can play an important role in the thermal structure of the Mars atmosphere during periods of high dust loading. However, the radiative properties of Mars atmospheric dust remain uncertain due to uncertain definitions of the dust composition and size distribution. The analysis by Toon et al., of Mariner 9 IRIS spectra during the 1971-1972 global dust storm indicated a reasonable match between the modeled 9-micron absorption of montmorillinite and the observed 9-micron absorption. Toon et al. also determined that an effective (cross-section weighted) mean radius of 2.5 microns (Rmode = 0.4 microns) provided a consistent fit of montmorillinite to the IRIS dust spectra at 9 microns. Pollack et al. analyzed Viking lander observations of atmospheric extinction and scattering at visible-near IR wavelengths (0.5-1.0 microns), and obtained consistency with the Toon et al. dust size distribution when the effects of nonspherical particle shapes were included. An additional, minor (1 percent) component of visible-ultraviolet absorbing material was required to model the derived visible (0.86) and ultraviolet (0.4-0.6) single-scattering albedos of the dust, since montmorillinite does not absorb sufficiently in this wavelength region. A combined analysis of the Viking IRTM and Mariner 9 observations was conducted to reassess the model of Mars atmospheric ultraviolet-to-infrared measurements of dust absorption and scattering. The optical constants for palagonite are incorporated in a doubling-adding radiative transfer model of the Mars atmosphere to simulate Mariner 9 IRIS spectra as well as the Viking IRTM IR band observations. Visible and ultraviolet single-scattering albedos based on the Hansen and Travis Mie scattering code were also derived. A tentative conclusion is that smaller dust particles (Rmode = 0.15 microns, cross-section weighted mean R = 1.2 microns) composed of palagonite provide a much improved fit to the Mariner 9 IRIS spectra; agreement with the observed ratio of visible-to-infrared extinction opacities; and ultraviolet and visible single-scattering albedos comparable to their observed values.

  16. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  17. Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black CarbonReference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous AtmosphericAerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2007-04-25

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratios and graphitic nature of a rangeof black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecularmass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric particles are examinedusing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with nearedge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. UsingSTXM/NEXAFS, individual particles with diameter>100 nm are studied,thus the diversity of atmospheric particles collected during a variety offield missions is assessed. Applying a semi-quantitative peak fittingmethod to the NEXAFS spectra enables a comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS toparticles originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burns,thus allowing determination of the suitability of these materials forrepresenting atmospheric particles. Anthropogenic combustion and biomassburn particles can be distinguished from one another using both chemicalbonding and structural ordering information. While anthropogeniccombustion particles are characterized by a high proportion ofaromatic-C, the presence of benzoquinone and are highly structurallyordered, biomass burn particles exhibit lower structural ordering, asmaller proportion of aromatic-C and contain a much higher proportion ofoxygenated functional groups.

  18. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this SBIR Phase 1 feasibility effort was to demonstrate the usefulness of Quantex electron-trapping (ET) materials for spatial detection of nuclear particles over large areas. This demonstration entailed evaluating the prompt visible scintillation as nuclear particles impinged on films of ET materials, and subsequently detecting the nuclear particle impingement information pattern stored in the ET material, by means of the visible-wavelength luminescence produced by near-infrared interrogation. Readily useful levels of scintillation and luminescence outputs are demonstrated.

  19. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, A.; Smolander, S.; Vuollekoski, H.; Sihto, S.-L.; Mammarella, I.; Laakso, L.; Rannik, Ü.; Boy, M.

    2011-06-01

    We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the simulated vertical profile of particle number concentration does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by the biosphere. The simulation of aerosol concentration within the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation event days shows a highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated the suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing the most important characteristics of particle dynamics within the boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles in the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  20. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Almeida, João; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Vehkamaki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates ...

  1. Secondary Cosmic Ray Particles Due to GCR Interactions in the Earth's Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Muraro, S. Pinsky, L.S.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; ,

    2009-06-16

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  2. Secondary Cosmic Ray particles due to GCR interactions in the Earth's atmosphere

    E-print Network

    G. Battistoni; F. Cerutti; A. Fassò; A. Ferrari; M. V. Garzelli; M. Lantz; S. Muraro; L. S. Pinsky; J. Ranft; S. Roesler; P. R. Sala

    2007-11-13

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  3. A Plasma Window for Transmission of Radiation and Particle Beams from Vacuum to Atmosphere for Various Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1997-11-01

    Many industrial and scientific processes like electron beam melting and welding, material modification by ion implantation, dry etching, and micro-fabrication, as well as generation of synchrotron radiation are performed almost exclusively in vacuum nowadays, since the electron and ion guns and their extractors must be kept at a reasonably high vacuum. Consequently, there are numerous drawbacks, among which are low production rates due to required pumping time, limits the vacuum volume sets on the size of target objects. In a small number of applications like non-vacuum electron beam welding, and various processes involving UV and x-ray radiation, thin vacuum walls or long stages of differential pumping are used. But, the resultant degradations of particle and radiation beams severely limit those applications. A novel apparatus, which utilized a short plasma arc, was successfully used to maintain a pressure of 7.6 x exp(-6) Torr in a vacuum chamber with a 2.36mm aperture to atmosphere, i.e., a plasma was successfully used to "plug" a hole to atmosphere while maintaining a reasonably high vacuum in the chamber. Successful transmission of charged particle beams from a vacuum through the plasma to atmosphere was accomplished. More details can be found in A. Hershcovitch, J. Appl. Physics 78, p. 5283 (1995). In addition to sustaining a vacuum atmosphere interface, the plasma has very strong lensing effect on charged particles. The plasma current generates an azimuthal magnetic field which exerts a radial Lorentz on charged particles moving parallel to the current channel. With proper orientation of the current direction, the Lorentz force is radially inward. This feature can be used to focus in beams to a very small spot size, and to overcome beam dispersion due to scattering by atmospheric atoms and molecules. Relatively hot plasma at the atmosphere boundary rarefies the atmospheric gases to further enhance particle beam propagation to the materials to target. Recent experimental results, with a plasma window coupled to a venturi, show a factor of three further enhancement in vacuum-atmosphere separation.

  4. Process for application of powder particles to filamentary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M. (inventor); Snoha, John J. (inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is a process for the uniform application of polymer powder particles to a filamentary material in a continuous manner to form a uniform composite prepreg material. A tow of the filamentary material is fed under carefully controlled tension into a spreading unit, where it is spread pneumatically into an even band. The spread filamentary tow is then coated with polymer particles from a fluidized bed, after which the coated filamentary tow is fused before take-up on a package for subsequent utilization. This process produces a composite prepreg uniformly without imposing severe stress on the filamentary material, and without requiring long, high temperature residence times for the polymer.

  5. Modeling of the optical properties of nonspherical particles in the atmosphere 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Guang

    2009-05-15

    The single scattering properties of atmospheric particles are fundamental to radiative simulations and remote sensing applications. In this study, an efficient technique, namely, the pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) ...

  6. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 particles formed by oxidation of pyrite heated in an anoxic atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Talley, R.; Hetherington, S.; Dulong, F.

    1990-01-01

    As a follow-up to previous gas analysis experiments in which pyrite was heated to 681 K in an anoxic (oxygen starved) atmosphere, the first oxidation product, FeSO4, was studied as a bulk material. No decomposition of FeSO4 to Fe3O4 was observed in the temperature range studied. The lack of decomposition of bulk FeSO4 to Fe3O4 suggests that FeS2 oxidizes directly to Fe3O4, or that FeSO4, FeS2 and O2 react together to form Fe3O4. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements, along with magnetic hysteresis curves, show that small particles of Fe3O4 form on the pyrite surface, rather than a continuous layer of bulk Fe3O4. A working model describing the oxidation steps is presented. ?? 1990.

  7. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  8. The Shock Compaction of Brittle Granular Materials: Particle Size Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, William; Chapman, David; Proud, William

    2011-06-01

    Several continuum models can represent the shock compaction of brittle granular materials. Their success is limited by their insensitivity to mesoscopic features. There is therefore a need to quantify the effects of these mesoscopic features on the material's bulk shock response. impact experiments have been conducted on mono and bi-disperse glass microspheres with differing particle size distributions. Hugoniot relationships and shock-wave profile features are discussed with regard to the differences in particle size.

  9. Additional flux of particles and albedo-electrons in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitbaev, F. B.; Dyuisembaev, B. M.; Kolomeets, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    The results are presented of the Monte Carlo simulation of albedo flux from the dense layers of the Earth's atmosphere and the dependence of angular distribution on the rigidity of geomagnetic cut off and additional flux of particles at the depth in the atmosphere 15-20 g/sq sm. Influence of geomagnetic field on the propagation of charged particles was not taken into account.

  10. Control Experiment of Positively Charged Fine Particles at the Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Toshiaki; Ando, Ayumi; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    It is already reported that the negatively charged fine particle flow was controlled by application of external electric field. The control of positively charged fine particles was examined in this experiment.The fine particles are able to take charges in the air under the atmospheric pressure by irradiation of UV light. The control of the positively charged fine particles has been attempted by the external electric field applied the negative potential. The fine particles for experiments are volcanic ashes, nylon 16, glass, and ice. Experiment was performed in the T-shaped glass chamber under the atmospheric pressure. The halogen lamp (500 W) was used to exit the electrons from particles by photo-emission. The ring and disk electrodes to control the positively charged particles were set at the bottom of chamber. The parallel electrodes were set at the middle of chamber and horizontal static electric fields (E = 0 {approx} 210 V/cm) were created in order to estimate the charge of fine particles. The charges of particle were estimated by the deflection of particle trajectory in the static electric fields and particle velocity. The estimated charges were 104e {approx} 5x106e and 103e {approx} 105e for volcanic ashes and nylon 16, respectively. When positively charged particles were introduced into collecting electrodes, the fine particles are collected in the electrodes. The result of control of positively charged fine particles is shown in this conference.

  11. Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.; Sluss, F.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

  12. Measurements of hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles during ultrafine particle formation events at urban, industrial, and coastal sites.

    PubMed

    Park, Kihong; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Seung Ho

    2009-09-01

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique was applied to determine the hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles in three sites of urban Gwangju, industrial Yeosu, and coastal Taean in South Korea. A database for the hygroscopicity and volatility of the known compositions and sizes of the laboratory-generated particles wasfirst constructed for comparison with the measured properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles. Distinct differences in hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles werefound between a "photochemical event" and a "combustion event" as well as among different sites. At the Gwangju site, ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" were determined to be more hygroscopic (growth factor (GF) = 1.05-1.33) than those in the "combustion event" (GF = 1.02-1.12), but their hygroscopicity was not as high as pure ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the laboratory-generated database, suggesting they were internally mixed with less soluble species. Ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" at the Yeosu site, having a variety of SO2, CO, and VOC emission sources, were more hygroscopic (GF = 1.34-1.60) and had a higher amount of volatile species (47-75%)than those observed at the Gwangju site. Ultrafine particle concentration at the Taean site increased during daylight hours with low tide, having a higher GF (1.34-1.80) than the Gwangju site and a lower amount of volatile species (17-34%) than the Yeosu site. Occasionally ultrafine particles were externally mixed according to their hygroscopicity and volatility, and TEM/EDS data showed that each type of particle had a distinct morphology and elemental composition. PMID:19764239

  13. UNDERSTANDING AND REDUCING THE UNCERTAINTY ASSOCIATED WITH THE EFFECT OF ATMOSPHERIC PARTICLES ON CLOUDS AND CLIMATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    I predict that human-generated particles have modified clouds and cooled climate, somewhat masking the effect of greenhouse gases and that these particles have also modified the amount of sunlight reaching the ground, changing the thermodynamic cycles in the atmosphere. Wi...

  14. Scanning Electron Microanalysis and Analytical Challenges of Mapping Elements in Urban Atmospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental mapping with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) associated with scanning electron microscopy is highly useful for studying internally mixed atmospheric particles. Presented is a study of individual particles from urban airsheds and the analytical challenges in q...

  15. A plasma window for transmission of particle beams and radiation from vacuum to atmosphere for various applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1998-05-01

    Many industrial and scientific processes like ion material modification, electron beam melting, and welding, as well as generation of synchrotron radiation are performed exclusively in vacuum nowadays, since electron guns, ion guns, their extractors, and accelerators must be kept at a reasonably high vacuum. Consequently, there are numerous limitations, among which are low production rates due to required pumping time, limits on the size of target objects, and degradation of particle beams and radiation through foils or differentially pumped sections. A novel apparatus, which utilized a short plasma arc, was successfully used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface as an alternative to differential pumping. Successful transmission of charged particle beams from a vacuum through the plasma to atmosphere was accomplished. Included in the article are a theoretical framework, experimental results, and possible applications for this novel interface.

  16. Atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds: Gas-phase reactivity, gas-to-particle conversion, and particle aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Amy M.

    The atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds has implications for both health and climate policy, In order to quantify these impacts, we must know the reactivity of organic pollutants throughout their atmospheric residence times. This reactivity encompasses both gas-phase and heterogeneous processes, carried out via complex radical reaction mechanisms, and involves more than 10,000 organic species. Creatively reducing the complexity of this system is a first-order priority in atmospheric chemistry. The work discussed here does that in the process of addressing three questions. In response to the need for large amounts of gas-phase kinetics data, a method is demonstrated that permits the extraction of the physical properties that control reactivity from experimental kinetics datasets. We demonstrate the strength of this method in extrapolating beyond measured temperature ranges and species. In response to observations that condensed-phase organic mass in the atmosphere dramatically exceeds expected values, we show that the consideration of a single additional molecular property can have profound influences on those expectations. By considering species volatility in addition to atmospheric abundance we can improve the agreement between models and measurements and chemical analysis verifies that this improvement is correct. In response to the need to study atmospheric particle chemistry in the laboratory, we have developed methods to examine long timescale chemistry in complex mixtures. These methods show that the reactivity of compounds in atmospheric particles is a strong function of the composition of those particles. Taken together, the work described here advances both the methods used in and our understanding of atmospheric chemistry.

  17. Investigation of the Importance of Atmospheric Dust Content on Particle Spectra on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, J.; Lohf, H.; Guo, J.; Kohler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Rafkin, S. C.; Matthiae, D.; Hassler, D.; Burmeister, S.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Brinza, D.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission successfully landed the Curiosity Rover inside Gale Crater on the surface of Mars on August 6, 2012. The mission's science goals are to determine the past and present habitability of Mars, to search for the building blocks of life, to investigate the surface composition and long-term surface and atmospheric processes and to analyze the Martian radiation environment. For analyzing the radiation environment, Curiosity carries the Radiation Assessment Detector. Its goals are to measure the energetic particle spectra on the surface of Mars, to determine dose and dose equivalent rate, to determine radiation hazard and mutagenic influence, to determine chemical and isotopic effects of energetic particles and to enable validation of atmospheric transmission models. In order to fully understand the influence of the highly variable Martian climate, we simulate the process of particle transportation through the Martian atmosphere. We have applied different atmospheric models available through a climate database which include a widely varying range of conditions. This enables us to study the the effect of atmospheric variables such as air density and dust content on the particle spectra at the surface of Mars. We present a comparison of particle spectra resulting from different atmospheric conditions. The results are discussed and the implications in the context of the MSL mission and possible future missions are presented.

  18. Evidence for the role of organics in aerosol particle formation under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Axel; Verheggen, Bart; Dommen, Josef; Duplissy, Jonathan; Prevot, Andre S H; Weingartner, Ernest; Riipinen, Ilona; Kulmala, Markku; Spracklen, Dominick V; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs

    2010-04-13

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is an important parameter in governing the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. However, detailed nucleation mechanisms remain ambiguous, as laboratory data have so far not been successful in explaining atmospheric nucleation. We investigated the formation of new particles in a smog chamber simulating the photochemical formation of H(2)SO(4) and organic condensable species. Nucleation occurs at H(2)SO(4) concentrations similar to those found in the ambient atmosphere during nucleation events. The measured particle formation rates are proportional to the product of the concentrations of H(2)SO(4) and an organic molecule. This suggests that only one H(2)SO(4) molecule and one organic molecule are involved in the rate-limiting step of the observed nucleation process. Parameterizing this process in a global aerosol model results in substantially better agreement with ambient observations compared to control runs. PMID:20133603

  19. On the emission of amines from terrestrial vegetation in the context of atmospheric new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Sintermann, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Airborne amines, specifically methylamines (MAs), play a key role in atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) by stabilising small molecule clusters. Agricultural emissions are assumed to constitute the most important MA source, but given the short atmospheric residence time of MAs, they can hardly have a direct impact on NFP events observed in remote regions. High MA contents as well as emissions by plants have already been described in the 19th century. Strong MA emissions predominantly occur during flowering as part of a pollination strategy. The behaviour is species specific, but examples of such species are common and widespread. In addition, vegetative plant tissue exhibiting high amounts of MAs might potentially lead to significant emissions, and the decomposition of organic material could constitute another source for airborne MAs. These mechanisms would provide sources, which could be crucial for the amine's role in NPF, especially in remote regions. Knowledge about vegetation-related amine emissions is, however, very limited and thus it is also an open question how Global Change and the intensified cycling of reactive nitrogen over the last 200 years have altered amine emissions from vegetation with a corresponding effect on NPF.

  20. Shear-induced segregation of particles by material density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi; Hill, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    Recently, shear rate gradients and associated gradients in velocity fluctuations (e.g., granular temperatures or kinetic stresses) have been shown to drive segregation of different-sized particles in a manner that reverses at relatively high solids fractions (>0.50 ). Here we investigate these effects in mixtures of particles differing in material density through computational and theoretical studies of particles sheared in a vertical chute where we vary the solids fraction from =0.2 to 0.6. We find that in sparse flows, =0.2 to 0.4, the heavier (denser) particles segregate to lower shear rates similarly to the heavier (larger) particles in mixtures of particles differing only in size. However, there is no segregation reversal at high f in mixtures of particles differing in density. At all solids fractions, heavier (denser) particles segregate to regions of lower shear rates and lower granular temperatures, in contrast with segregation of different-sized particles at high f , where the heavier (larger) particles segregate to the region of higher shear rates. Kinetic theory predicts well the segregation for both types of systems at low f but breaks down at higher f 's. Our recently proposed mixture theory for high f granular mixtures captures the segregation trends well via the independent partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses between the two species. In light of these results, we discuss possible directions forward for a model framework that encompasses segregation effects more broadly in these systems.

  1. Chemical characterization of atmospheric particles and source apportionment in the vicinity of a steelmaking industry.

    PubMed

    Almeida, S M; Lage, J; Fernández, B; Garcia, S; Reis, M A; Chaves, P C

    2015-07-15

    The objective of this work was to provide a chemical characterization of atmospheric particles collected in the vicinity of a steelmaking industry and to identify the sources that affect PM10 levels. A total of 94 PM samples were collected in two sampling campaigns that occurred in February and June/July of 2011. PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 were analyzed for a total of 22 elements by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Particle Induced X-ray Emission. The concentrations of water soluble ions in PM10 were measured by Ion Chromatography and Indophenol-Blue Spectrophotometry. Positive Matrix Factorization receptor model was used to identify sources of particulate matter and to determine their mass contribution to PM10. Seven main groups of sources were identified: marine aerosol identified by Na and Cl (22%), steelmaking and sinter plant represented by As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mn, Pb, Sb and Zn (11%), sinter plant stack identified by NH4(+), K and Pb (12%), an unidentified Br source (1.8%), secondary aerosol from coke making and blast furnace (19%), fugitive emissions from the handling of raw material, sinter plant and vehicles dust resuspension identified by Al, Ca, La, Si, Ti and V (14%) and sinter plant and blast furnace associated essentially with Fe and Mn (21%). PMID:25864153

  2. [Characterization of ultrafine particle size distribution in the urban atmosphere of Hangzhou in spring].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Continuous measurement and analysis of the atmospheric ultrafine particle number concentration were performed in Hangzhou from March to May, 2012 by using the fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The result showed that daily number concentration of nucleation mode (5.6-20 nm), Aitken mode (20-100 nm), and accumulation mode (100-560 nm) particles, and total particles were 0.84 x 10(4), 1.08 x 10(4), 0.47 x 10(4) and 2.38 x 10(4) cm(-3) respectively. The concentration of Aitken mode particles was higher than that of other mode particles in sunny day. The nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles usually started to increase around 10:00-11:00 and ended up after 3-4 h. This indicated the solar radiation promoted the formation of new particles. Human activities caused the concentration distribution of each mode particles having an obvious difference between workdays and weekends. Combined with the meteorological factors, analysis showed that the wind speed and wind direction also directly influenced particulate concentration. The analysis of particulate concentration and visibility showed that the concentration of accumulation mode particles had a negative relationship with the atmospheric visibility, while those of nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles had a slight influence on it. PMID:24812930

  3. A dynamical perspective on the energetic particles precipitation-middle atmosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Khalil; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Versick, Stefan; Braesicke, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Energetic particles including protons, electrons and heavier ions, enter the Earth's atmosphere over polar region of both hemispheres, where the geomagnetic lines are considered to be open and connected to the interplanetary medium. This condition allows direct access for energetic particles of solar or galactic origin to directly deposit their own energy into the middle and upper atmosphere. Such particle precipitations can greatly disturb the chemical composition of the upper and middle atmosphere. At polar latitudes, these particles have the potential to penetrate from thermosphere deep into the mesosphere and in rare occasions into the stratosphere. The most important are changes to the budget of atmospheric nitric oxides, NOy, and to atmospheric reactive hydrogen oxides, HOx, which both contribute to ozone loss in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The chemistry-climate general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy is used to investigate the impact of changed ozone concentration due to energetic particles precipitation on temperatures and wind fields. The simulated anomalies of both zonal mean temperature and zonal wind suggest that these changes are very unlikely to be caused in situ by ozone depletion and indirect dynamical condition is important. The results of our simulations suggests that ozone perturbation is a starting point for a chain of processes resulting in temperature and circulation changes in many areas of the atmosphere. Different dynamical analysis (e.g., frequency of sudden stratospheric warming, dates of stratospheric final warming, divergence of Eliassen-Palm flux and refractive index of planetary waves) are performed to investigate the impact of ozone anomaly originated from high energetic particle precipitation on middle atmospheric temperature and circulation.

  4. A new method for assessing the contribution of Primary Biological Atmospheric Particles to the mass concentration of the atmospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Cinzia; Marcovecchio, Francesca

    2016-02-01

    Primary Biologic Atmospheric Particles (PBAPs) constitute an interesting and poorly investigated component of the atmospheric aerosol. We have developed and validated a method for evaluating the contribution of overall PBAPs to the mass concentration of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). The method is based on PM sampling on polycarbonate filters, staining of the collected particles with propidium iodide, observation at epifluorescence microscope and calculation of the bioaerosol mass using a digital image analysis software. The method has been also adapted to the observation and quantification of size-segregated aerosol samples collected by multi-stage impactors. Each step of the procedure has been individually validated. The relative repeatability of the method, calculated on 10 pairs of atmospheric PM samples collected side-by-side, was 16%. The method has been applied to real atmospheric samples collected in the vicinity of Rome, Italy. Size distribution measurements revealed that PBAPs was mainly in the coarse fraction of PM, with maxima in the range 5.6-10?m. 24-h samples collected during different period of the year have shown that the concentration of bioaerosol was in the range 0.18-5.3?gm(-3) (N=20), with a contribution to the organic matter in PM10 in the range 0.5-31% and to the total mass concentration of PM10 in the range 0.3-18%. The possibility to determine the concentration of total PBAPs in PM opens up interesting perspectives in terms of studying the health effects of these components and of increasing our knowledge about the composition of the organic fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. PMID:26680730

  5. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L. M.; Zhang, G. L.; Lei, Q. T.; Li, Y.; Li, X. L.; Hwu, Y. K.; Yi, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained.

  6. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...must be suitable for the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except...

  7. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...must be suitable for the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except...

  8. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...must be suitable for the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except...

  9. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...must be suitable for the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except...

  10. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material...must be suitable for the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except...

  11. Phase considerations in the gas/particle partitioning of organic amines in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, James F.

    2015-12-01

    Amines in the atmosphere are of interest because of their likely role in new particle formation, and because of anthropogenic emissions of amines at post-combustion carbon capture (PCCC) facilities. A conceptual framework for considering the partitioning of a monobasic amine (Am = unprotonated, "free-base form") from the gas phase to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is presented for cases when the PM may be composed of multiple liquid phases. Three types of liquid phases are considered as being individually or simultaneously possible for absorptive uptake of atmospheric amines: w) a mostly water phase; ?) a mostly (by mass) organic phase that has at least some polarity (e.g., predominantly secondary organic aerosol (SOA), may contain significant water on a mole fraction basis); and ?) a mostly organic phase that is less polar than an ? phase (e.g., predominantly primary organic aerosol (POA), containing little water). That one or more salts may contain the aminium ion AmH+ (formed by protonation of Am) is subject to the fact that the trace levels of individual amines in the atmosphere make formation of a pure solid such as AmHHSO4(s) exceedingly unlikely: when solid salts of AmH+ are indeed present, by far the most likely form is as a solid solution, e.g., (NH4+)1-y(AmH+)yHSO4(s)- where y << 1. Neglecting dissolution in solid salts, and considering only partitioning to liquid phases, the overall gas/particle partitioning constant is Kp,tot(m3?g-1) = cp,tot /cg = ??f?Kp,fb?/?fb?. The quantity cp,tot (?g ?g-1) is the total Am concentration (Am + AmH+) in the PM as summed over all phases using the index ? (= w, ?, ?); cg is the gas-phase concentration of Am; f? is the mass fraction of the total PM that is the ? phase; Kp,fb? is the gas/particle partitioning constant for the free-base (Am) form to the ? phase; and 0 < ?fb? < 1 is the fraction of the amine in the ? phase that is in the free-base form. To date, most treatments of the partitioning of amines to PM have only considered contributions to Kp,tot from absorption into a mostly water phase, according to the term fw Kp,fbw/?fbw. However, unless the PM contains little or no organic-phase material, the ? and/or ? terms are likely to also be relevant. The Am form of a low MW amine will in general have reasonable affinities for both ? and ? type phases, so in general Kp,fbw, Kp,fb?, and Kp,fb? will all be roughly similar in magnitude. And, with significant water uptake into an ? phase certain to occur at moderate to high RH values, solvation of ions will often be possible in an ? phase. This will assist protonation of Am to AmH+ (as is known to occur for nicotine in tobacco smoke PM). The overall result is that to a first approximation, ?fbw and ?fb? can be similar in magnitude, making Kp,fb?/?fb? likely to be generally comparable to Kp,fbw/?fbw. In a ? phase, ion solvation will not be as good, so that for acidic aerosol ?fb? will generally be closer to one than the other two ?fb values, making Kp,fb?/?fb? smaller than both Kp,fbw/?fbw and Kp,fb?/?fb?. Overall, modeling of amine behavior in the atmosphere should include consideration of partitioning into organic PM. Unfortunately, this will be more difficult than water-phase only modeling because prediction of ?fb values in multiphase PM will be greatly complicated by the needs to: 1) have estimated values of acidity constants in mostly organic phases of variable composition; and 2) allow distribution of chemicals over multiple liquid phases.

  12. Origin of nitrocatechols and alkylated-nitrocatechols in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Sylvestre, Alexandre; Ravier, Sylvain; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Slowik, Jay; El Haddad, Imad; Prevot, Andre

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning constitutes one of the major sources of aerosol particles in most of the environments during winter. If a lot of information is available in the literature on the primary fraction of biomass burning aerosol particles, almost nothing is known regarding the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) from the chemical mixture emitted by this source. Recently methylated nitrocatechol have been identified in atmospheric particles collected in winter. These compounds are strongly associated with biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan and are suspected to be of secondary origin since they can be formed through the oxidation of cresol significantly emitted by biomass burning. However, nitrocatechols are particularly difficult to analyze using classical techniques like HPLC-MS or GC-MS. In the present study, we adopt a new analytical approach. Direct analysis in real time (DART), introduced by Cody et al. (2005), allows direct analysis of gases, liquids, solids and materials on surfaces. Thus, for particles collected onto filters, the sample preparation step is simplified as much as possible, avoiding losses and reducing to the minimum the analytical procedure time. Two analytic modes can be used. In positive mode, [MH]+ ions are formed by proton transfer reaction ; whereas in negative ionization mode, [MH]-, M- and [MO2]- ions are formed. DART source enables soft ionization and produces simple mass spectra suitable for analysis of complex matrices, like organic aerosol, in only a few seconds. For this study, the DART source was coupled to a Q-ToF mass spectrometer (Synapt G2 HDMS, Waters), with a mass resolution up to 40 000. The analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples, collected in Marseille during winter 2011 (APICE project), with the DART/Q-ToF approach highlighted the abundance of nitrocatechols and alkylated nitrocatechols. Their temporal trends were also very similar to those of levoglucosan or dihydroabietic acid well known tracers of biomass burning aerosol. If their biomass burning origin's is clearly established, their secondary origin remains still not totally clear. Smog chamber experiments were then conducted in the PSI facilities to investigate the aging of biomass burning emissions. The analysis of samples collected during these experiments using the DART/Q-ToF approach, confirmed that nitrocatechols and methylated nitrocatechols originate from biomass burning processes. More importantly our results confirm that nitrocatechols and their methylated derivatives are quasi exclusively from secondary origin. Considering the abundance of biomass burning primary aerosol, and the large fraction of unexplained SOA, this result is of prime importance. Cody. R., Laramée J. Nilles J. and Durst H. : Direct Analysis in Real Time (DARTtm) Mass Spectrometry, JOEL news, 2005, 40, 1, 8-12. Kitanovski Z., Grgic I., Yasmeen F., Claeys M. and Cusak A.: Development of a liquid chromatographic method based on ultraviolet-visible and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection for the identification of nitrocatechols and related tracers ion biomass burning atmospheric organic aerosol, Rapid Communication in Mass Spectrometry, 2012, 26, 793-804. Iinuma Y., Boge O., Grafe R. and Herrmann H.: Methyl-nitrocatechols : Atmospheric tracer coumpounds for biomass burnig secondary organic aerosols, Environmental Science and Technology, 2010, 44, 8453-8459.

  13. Genesis Concentrator Target Particle Contamination Mapping and Material Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of surface particles were found to be < 5 microns in diameter with increasing numbers close to the optical resolution limit of 0.3 microns. Acceleration grid EDS results show that the majority of materials appear to be from the SRC shell and SLA materials which include carbon-carbon fibers and Si-rich microspheres in a possible silicone binder. Other major debris material from the SRC included white paint, kapton, collector array fragments, and Al. Image analysis also revealed that SRC materials were also found mixed with the Utah mud and salt deposits. The EDS analysis of the acceleration grid showed that particles < 1 m where generally carbon based particles. Chemical cleaning techniques with Xylene and HF in an ultrasonic bath are currently being investigated for removal of small particles by the Genesis science team as well as ultra-pure water megasonic cleaning by the JSC team [4]. Removal of organic contamination from target materials is also being investigated by the science team with the use of UV-ozone cleaning devices at JSC and Open University [5]. In preparation for solar wind oxygen analyses at UCLA and Open University [1, 2], surface particle contamination on three Genesis concentrator targets was closely examined to evaluate cleaning strategies. Two silicon carbide (Genesis sample # 60001 and 60003) and one chemical vapor deposited (CVD) 13C concentrator target (60002) were imaged and mosaic mapped with optical microscopes. The resulting full target mosaic images and particle feature maps were subsequently compared with non-flight, but flight-like, concentrator targets and sample return capsule (SRC) materials. Contamination found on the flown concentrator acceleration grid was further examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle identification was subsequently compared with the optical images from the flown targets. Figure 1 show that all three targets imaged in this report are fully intact and do not show any signs of material fractures. However, previous ellipsometry results and overview imaging of both flown SiC targets show a solar wind irradiation gradient from the center focal point to the outer edge [3]. In addition, due to the hard landing, each target has experienced varying degrees of impacts, scratches, and particle debris from the spacecraft and Utah impact site.

  14. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Almeida, João; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-10-17

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates more than 1,000-fold compared with ammonia, sufficient to account for the particle formation rates observed in the atmosphere. Molecular analysis of the clusters reveals that the faster nucleation is explained by a base-stabilization mechanism involving acid-amine pairs, which strongly decrease evaporation. The ion-induced contribution is generally small, reflecting the high stability of sulphuric acid-dimethylamine clusters and indicating that galactic cosmic rays exert only a small influence on their formation, except at low overall formation rates. Our experimental measurements are well reproduced by a dynamical model based on quantum chemical calculations of binding energies of molecular clusters, without any fitted parameters. These results show that, in regions of the atmosphere near amine sources, both amines and sulphur dioxide should be considered when assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on particle formation. PMID:24097350

  15. Topical Issue on Optical Particle Characterization and Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere: Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Videen, Gorden; Kocifaj, Miroslav; Sun, Wenbo; Kai, Kenji; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Horvath, Helmuth; Mishchenko, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Increasing our understanding of the Earth-atmosphere system has been a scientific and political priority for the last few decades. This system not only touches on environmental science, but it has applicability to our broader understanding of planetary atmospheres in general. While this issue focuses primarily on electromagnetics, other fundamental fields of science, including fluid and thermodynamics play major roles. In recent years, significant research efforts have led to advances in the fields of radiative transfer and electromagnetic scattering from irregularly shaped particles. Recently, several workshops and small conferences have taken place to promote the fusion of these efforts. Late in 2013, for instance, two such meetings took place. The Optical Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols (OCAA) meeting took place in Smolenice, Slovakia to promote a better understanding of microphysical properties of aerosol particles, and the characterization of such atmospheric particles using optical techniques. A complementary conference was organized in Nagoya, Japan, the 3rd International Symposium on Atmospheric Light Scattering and Remote Sensing (ISALSaRS), whose goal is to fuse the advances achieved in particle characterization with remote-sensing techniques. While the focus of these meetings is slightly different, they represent the same aspects of this rapidly growing field. This Topical Issue is the first of two parts. Within this issue we analyze different aspects of the problem of atmospheric characterization and present a broad overview of the topical area. Research includes theory and experiment, ranging from fundamental microphysical properties of individual aerosol particles to broad characterizations of atmospheric properties. Since this is an active field, we also have encouraged the submission of ideas for new methodologies that may represent the future of the field.

  16. Molecular understanding of sulphuric acid-amine particle nucleation in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, João; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K.; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Henschel, Henning; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kurtén, Theo; Kvashin, Alexander N.; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Leppä, Johannes; Loukonen, Ville; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; McGrath, Matthew J.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Olenius, Tinja; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti; Rondo, Linda; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Sarnela, Nina; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H.; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjo; Virtanen, Annele; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kirkby, Jasper

    2013-10-01

    Nucleation of aerosol particles from trace atmospheric vapours is thought to provide up to half of global cloud condensation nuclei. Aerosols can cause a net cooling of climate by scattering sunlight and by leading to smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which makes clouds brighter and extends their lifetimes. Atmospheric aerosols derived from human activities are thought to have compensated for a large fraction of the warming caused by greenhouse gases. However, despite its importance for climate, atmospheric nucleation is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that sulphuric acid and ammonia cannot explain particle formation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. It is thought that amines may enhance nucleation, but until now there has been no direct evidence for amine ternary nucleation under atmospheric conditions. Here we use the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN and find that dimethylamine above three parts per trillion by volume can enhance particle formation rates more than 1,000-fold compared with ammonia, sufficient to account for the particle formation rates observed in the atmosphere. Molecular analysis of the clusters reveals that the faster nucleation is explained by a base-stabilization mechanism involving acid-amine pairs, which strongly decrease evaporation. The ion-induced contribution is generally small, reflecting the high stability of sulphuric acid-dimethylamine clusters and indicating that galactic cosmic rays exert only a small influence on their formation, except at low overall formation rates. Our experimental measurements are well reproduced by a dynamical model based on quantum chemical calculations of binding energies of molecular clusters, without any fitted parameters. These results show that, in regions of the atmosphere near amine sources, both amines and sulphur dioxide should be considered when assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on particle formation.

  17. Particles, environments, and possible ecologies in the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    The possible existence of indigenous Jovian organisms is investigated by characterizing the relevant physical environment of Jupiter, discussing the chromophores responsible for the observed coloration of the planet, and analyzing some permissible ecological niches of hypothetical organisms. Values of the eddy diffusion coefficent are estimated separately for the convective troposphere and the more stable mesosphere, and equilibrium condensation is studied for compounds containing Na, Cl, or both. The photoproduction of chromophores and nonequilibrium organic molecules is analyzed, and the motion of hypothetical organisms is examined along with the diffusion of metabolites and the consequent growth of organisms. Four kinds of organisms are considered: primary photosynthetic autotrophs ('sinkers'), larger autotrophs or heterotrophs that actively maintain their pressure level ('floaters'), organisms that seek out others ('hunters'), and organisms that live at almost pyrolytic depths ('scavengers'). It is concluded that ecological niches for sinkers, floaters, and hunters appear to exist in the Jovian atmosphere.

  18. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) study of atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, J. G.; Seals, R. D.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The results of analyses by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) on several Nuclepore filters which were exposed during air pollution studies are presented along with correlative measurements by Neutron Activation Analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Samples were exposed during air pollution studies at Norfolk, Virginia and the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It was demonstrated that with the ESCA technique it was possible to identify the chemical (bonding) state of elements contained in the atmospheric particulate matter collected on Nuclepore filters. Sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, chlorine, alkali, and alkaline earth metal species were identified in the Norfolk samples. ESCA binding energy data for aluminum indicated that three chemically different types of aluminum are present in the launch and background samples from NASA-KSC.

  19. [Atmospheric Particle Retaining Function of Common Deciduous Tree Species Leaves in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-yan; Niu, Xiang; Zhang, Wei-kang; Wang, Jin-song

    2015-06-01

    In order to explore the atmospheric particle-retaining function of common deciduous tree species leaves in Beijing, six typical tree species (Populus, Robinia pseudoacacia, Koelreuteria paniculata, Salix babylonica, Acer truncatum, Ginkgo biloba) were chosen to measure retaining amount of unit leaf area of air total suspended particles (TSP), coarse particles and fine particulate with aerosol generator (QRJZFSQ-I). The results showed that (1) All six tree species leaves had a certain level of retaining ability to different sizes of atmospheric particles, and different species exhibited some differences. For different sizes of atmospheric particle, retaining amounts of unit leaf area were higher in Koelreuteria paniculata and Robinia pseudoacacia than those of other four species, and the amount of Populus was the lowest among all tree species; (2) The retaining amount of unit leaf area for different tree species was not entirely increased with sampling time. The retaining amounts of TSP and coarse particles for all tree species on the eighth day after rain were significantly higher than those on the fifth day after rain, however, the retaining amount of fine particles was not significantly different under different sampling times. In order to select deciduous tree species for ecological management of air pollution in Beijing, Koelreuteria paniculata should be considered as the priority, followed by Robinia pseudoacacia, compared with Ginkgo biloba, Salix babylonica, Acer truncatum and Populus. PMID:26387301

  20. Are coarse particles unexpected common reservoirs for some atmospheric anthropogenic trace elements? A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinon, Mickaël; Ayrault, Sophie; Boudouma, Omar; Bordier, Louise; Agnello, Gregory; Reynaud, Stéphane; Tissut, Michel

    2013-08-01

    Without specific experimental equipment, it is very difficult to sample long-term atmospheric deposits on a pure state. That is why the composition of air-transferred solid material accumulated for 40 years in the 2 m-high walls, pierced with numerous holes of an outdoor public shelter, Grenoble city, France, was studied. An appropriate fractionation procedure allowed to obtain several fractions which were i) a sand fraction (8.3%) (fraction A), ii) a large mass of organic matter corresponding mostly to large fragments (>250 ?m) of plant origin (66.7%) (fraction B) or to pollen fraction C (0.4%), iii) a slowly depositing organo-clay fraction (20%) (fractions D1 and D2) and iv) a solution mixed with non-settable particles (4.3%) (fraction E). The composition of each fraction was determined for 20 elements. The sand fraction showed very high concentrations specifically in Cu, Pb and Fe corresponding respectively to 81.5, 48.2 and 35.2% of the samples content in these elements. In contrast, Cd and Zn were mainly accumulated in the fraction B (67.5 and 62.2%, respectively). The scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) study of the fraction A showed the presence of large particles bearing Pb and Fe, particles rich in Cu and typical fly ashes originating mostly from iron industry. Most of these particles had a crystalline shape suggesting that they were formed after emission at a high temperature. The Pb-Fe-Cu deposit seen in fraction A likely originates from the neighbouring road surface contaminated by car traffic for several decades. The 206Pb/207Pb ratio (1.146 ± 0.004) showed that in the coarse sandy fraction A, Pb was represented at 65% by non-gasoline lead and 35% by "gasoline" lead emitted before 1999. The fraction A particles can only be transported on a limited distance by high magnitude events. They constitute a large reservoir for Cu and Pb and may play a major role in the long-term contamination of urban soils.

  1. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful new type discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Gurevich, A V

    2004-01-01

    The runaway breakdown -- extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB - EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles ($\\epsilon_p>10^{17} - 10^{19}$ eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB - EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  2. High energy cosmic ray particles and the most powerful new type discharges in thunderstorm atmosphere

    E-print Network

    A. V. Gurevich; K. P. Zybin

    2004-04-05

    The runaway breakdown -- extensive atmospheric shower discharge (RB - EAS) excited in thunderstorm atmosphere by high energy cosmic ray particles ($\\epsilon_p>10^{17} - 10^{19}$ eV) generate very powerful radio pulse. The RB - EAS theory is compared with observations of radio pulses. An agreement between the theory and experiment is established. The existence of nowaday satellite and ground based systems which obtain regularly a large amount of observational radio data could allow to use them in combination with other methods for effective study of high energy cosmic ray particles

  3. Method and apparatus for making articles from particle based materials

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, A.J.; Menchhofer, P.A.

    1995-12-19

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the production of articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is conveyed through an elongate flow area having a desired cross-sectional configuration. The slurry is heated as it is advanced through the flow area causing the slurry to set or harden in a shape which conforms to the cross-sectional configuration of the flow area. The material discharges from the flow area as a self-supporting solid of near net final dimensions. The article may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product. 10 figs.

  4. The Interior Analysis and 3-D Reconstruction of Internally-Mixed Light-Absorbing Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Collins, S. M.; Anderson, I.; Herzing, A.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-containing atmospheric particles may either absorb solar or outgoing long-wave radiation or scatter solar radiation, and thus, affect Earth’s radiative balance in multiple ways. Light-absorbing carbon that is common in urban air particles such as industrial coke dust, road dust, and diesel soot, often exists in the same particle with other phases that contain, for example, aluminum, calcium, iron, and sulfur. While the optical properties of atmospheric particles in general depend on overall particle size and shape, the inhomogeneity of chemical phases within internally-mixed particles may also greatly affect particle optical properties. In this study, a series of microscopic approaches were used to identify individual light-absorbing coarse-mode particles and to assess their interior structure and composition. Particle samples were collected in 2004 from one of the U.S. EPA’s Los Angeles Particulate Matter Supersites, and were likely affected substantially by road dust and construction dust. First, bright-field and dark-field light microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to distinguish predominantly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles from other particle types such as mineral dust, sea salt, and brake wear. Second, high-resolution SEM-EDX elemental mapping of individual carbonaceous particles was used to select particles with additional elemental phases that exhibited spatial inhomogeneity. Third, focused ion-beam SEM (FIB-SEM) with EDX was used to slice through selected particles to expose interior surfaces and to determine the spatial distribution of element phases throughout the particles. Fourth, study of the interior phases of a particle was augmented by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a thin section of the particle prepared by FIB-SEM. Here, electron energy loss spectroscopy with TEM was used to study chemical bonding in the carbonaceous phase. Finally, automated serial slicing and imaging in the FIB-SEM generated a stack of secondary electron images of the particles’ interior surfaces that allowed for the 3-D reconstruction of the particles, a process known as FIB tomography. Interior surface of light-absorbing carbonaceous particle from FIB-SEM analysis.

  5. Exoelectronic emission of particles of lunar surface material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mints, R. I.; Alimov, V. I.; Melekhin, V. P.; Milman, I. I.; Kryuk, V. I.; Kunin, L. L.; Tarasov, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    A secondary electron multiplier was used to study the thermostimulated exoelectronic emission of particles of lunar surface material returned by the Soviet Luna 16 automatic station. The natural exoemission from fragments of slag, glass, anorthosite, and a metallic particle was recorded in the isochronic and isothermal thermostimulation regimes. The temperature of emission onset depended on the type of regolith fragment. For the first three particles the isothermal drop in emission is described by first-order kinetic equations. For the anorthosite fragment, exoemission at constant temperature is characterized by a symmetric curve with a maximum. These data indicate the presence of active surface defects, whose nature can be due to the prehistory of the particles.

  6. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 ?m diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  7. Preparation and characterization of energetic materials coated superfine aluminum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songsong; Ye, Mingquan; Han, Aijun; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to protect the activity of aluminum in solid rocket propellants by means of solvent/non-solvent method in which nitrocellulose (NC) and Double-11 (shortened form of double-base gun propellant, model 11) have been used as coating materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to characterize the morphology of coated Al particles. Other characterization data of coated and uncoated Al particles, such as infrared absorption spectrum, laser particle size analysis and the active aluminum content were also studied. The thermal behavior of pure and coated aluminum samples have also been studied by simultaneous thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that: superfine aluminum particles could be effectively coated with nitrocellulose and Double-11 through a solvent/non-solvent method. The energetic composite particles have core-shell structures and the thickness of the coating film is about 20-50 nm. The active aluminum content of different coated samples was measured by means of oxidation-reduction titration method. The results showed that after being stored in room temperature and under 50% humidity condition for about 4months the active aluminum content of coated Al particles decreased from 99.8 to 95.8% (NC coating) and 99.2% (Double-11 coating) respectively. Double-11 coating layer had a much better protective effect. The TG-DTA and DSC results showed that the energy amount and energy release rate of NC coated and Double-11 coated Al particles were larger than those of the raw Al particles. Double-11 coated Al particles have more significant catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition characters of AP than that of NC coated Al particles. These features accorded with the energy release characteristics of solid propellant.

  8. Atmospheric fate of oil matter adsorbed on sea salt particles under UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitilingom, M.; Avij, P.; Huang, H.; Valsaraj, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons at the sea water surface is an important source of marine pollution. An oil spill in sea-water will most likely occur due to an involuntary accident from tankers, offshore platforms, etc. However, a large amount of oil is also deliberately spilled in sea-water during the clean-out process of tank vessels (e.g. for the Mediterranean Sea, 490,000 tons/yr). Moreover, the pollution caused by an oil spill does not only affect the aquatic environment but also is of concern for the atmospheric environment. A portion of the oil matter present at the sea-water surface is transported into the atmosphere viaevaporation and adsorption at the surface of sea spray particles. Few studies are related to the presence of oil matter in airborne particles resulting from their adsorption on sea salt aerosols. We observed that the non-volatile oil matter was adsorbed at the surface of sea-salt crystals (av. size of 1.1 ?m). Due to their small size, these particles can have a significant residence time in the atmosphere. The hydrocarbon matter adsorbed at the surface of these particles can also be transformed by catalyzers present in the atmosphere (i.e. UV, OH, O3, ...). In this work, we focused on the photo-oxidation rates of the C16 to C30alkanes present in these particles. We utilized a bubble column reactor, which produced an abundance of small sized bubbles. These bubbles generated droplets upon bursting at the air-salt water interface. These droplets were then further dried up and lifted to the top of the column where they were collected as particles. These particles were incubated in a controlled reactor in either dark conditions or under UV-visible light. The difference of alkane content analyzed by GC-MS between the particles exposed to UV or the particles not exposed to UV indicated that up to 20% in mass was lost after 20 min of light exposure. The degradation kinetics varied for each range of alkanes (C16-20, C21-25, C26-30) from 20 to 60 ?g L-1 min-1. To observe the effect on air composition when samples are exposed to solar light, experiments were conducted under controlled atmospheric conditions: oxygen free or with O3 gas. The results showed the importance of the photo-transformation processes of oil in airborne particles and its relation to the gaseous nature of the ambient atmosphere.

  9. The dynamics of atmospheric dust particles in aircraft auxiliary power radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenger, W. B., Jr.; Tabakoff, W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of analytical and experimental studies of the trajectories that atmospheric dust particles follow as they move through a radial inflow turbine are presented. The study reveals the nature of the impacts that occur within the turbine and indicates which surfaces are expected to experience the most severe erosion. In addition, a dimensionless parameter is derived which can be used during preliminary design analysis to indicate the sizes of the particles that will be most damaging to the turbine.

  10. An Overview of Particle Beam Materials Processing Techniques*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylla, H. F.

    1996-05-01

    Materials processing techniques can lead to the development of new products, create new applications by modifying existing materials, and add significant value to existing product lines. Additionally, there is ever-increasing consumer and regulatory pressure to develop "greener" products utilizing "dry chemistry" which have reduced environmental impact, and where the production process yields only product and no waste. Such processing can result from the use of photons or elementary particles. Accelerated particle beams offer many diverse opportunities, to process materials if economic targets can be met. This mini-symposium, a joint endeavor of the APS Division of the Physics of Beams (DPB) and the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics (FIAP), seeks to review these opportunities and the current state-of-the-art, by assembling leading practitioners of particle beam materials processing for review presentations. Beam processing areas covered in the symposium will include: electron beam processing of biomass, curing of composite materials, sterilization and other applications; ion beams and plasma accelerators for surface processing; proposed next-generation lithography tools that utilize either compact synchrotrons or small ion and electron accelerators; high-volume UV surface processing of polymers and metals using free-electron lasers or excimer lamps, and beam generation of tritium. * This work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150.

  11. The characterization of atmospheric aerosols: Application to heterogeneous gas-particle reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Henson, B.F.; Wilson, K.R.; Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this collaborative research project is the measurement and modeling of atmospheric aerosols and heterogeneous (gas/aerosol) chemical reactions. The two major accomplishments are single particle characterization of tropospheric particles and experimental investigation of simulated stratospheric particles and reactions thereon. Using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry, real-time and composition measurements of single particles are performed on ambient aerosol samples. This technique allows particle size distributions for chemically distinct particle types to be described. The thermodynamics and chemical reactivity of polar stratospheric clouds are examined using vapor deposited thin ice films. Employing nonlinear optical methods, as well as other techniques, phase transitions on both water and acid ices are monitored as a function of temperature or the addition of gases.

  12. Reactor for producing large particles of materials from gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagan, Richard C. (Inventor); Alam, Mohammed K. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing large particles of material from gas, or gases, containing the material (e.g., silicon from silane) in a free-space reactor comprised of a tube (20) and controlled furnace (25). A hot gas is introduced in the center of the reactant gas through a nozzle (23) to heat a quantity of the reactant gas, or gases, to produce a controlled concentration of seed particles (24) which are entrained in the flow of reactant gas, or gases. The temperature profile (FIG. 4) of the furnace is controlled for such a slow, controlled rate of reaction that virtually all of the material released condenses on seed particles and new particles are not nucleated in the furnace. A separate reactor comprised of a tube (33) and furnace (30) may be used to form a seed aerosol which, after passing through a cooling section (34) is introduced in the main reactor tube (34) which includes a mixer (36) to mix the seed aerosol in a controlled concentration with the reactant gas or gases.

  13. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles based on active remote sensing and radiosounding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Titos, G.; Fernández-Gálvez, J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-10-01

    A new methodology based on combining active and passive remote sensing and simultaneous and collocated radiosounding data to study the aerosol hygroscopic growth effects on the particle optical and microphysical properties is presented. The identification of hygroscopic growth situations combines the analysis of multiespectral aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and particle linear depolarization ratio with thermodynamic profiling of the atmospheric column. We analysed the hygroscopic growth effects on aerosol properties, namely the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and the volume concentration profiles, using data gathered at Granada EARLINET station. Two study cases, corresponding to different aerosol loads and different aerosol types, are used for illustrating the potential of this methodology. Values of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factors range from 2.10 ± 0.06 to 3.90 ± 0.03, being similar to those previously reported in the literature. Differences in the enhancement factor are directly linked to the composition of the atmospheric aerosol. The largest value of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factor corresponds to the presence of sulphate and marine particles that are more affected by hygroscopic growth. On the contrary, the lowest value of the enhancement factor corresponds to an aerosol mixture containing sulphates and slight traces of mineral dust. The Hänel parameterization is applied to these case studies, obtaining results within the range of values reported in previous studies, with values of the ? exponent of 0.56 ± 0.01 (for anthropogenic particles slightly influenced by mineral dust) and 1.07 ± 0.01 (for the situation dominated by anthropogenic particles), showing the convenience of this remote sensing approach for the study of hygroscopic effects of the atmospheric aerosol under ambient unperturbed conditions. For the first time, the retrieval of the volume concentration profiles for these cases using the Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) allows us to analyse the aerosol hygroscopic growth effects on aerosol volume concentration, observing a stronger increase of the fine mode volume concentration with increasing relative humidity.

  14. The effect of particles and electromagnetic waves on vortex structures in the atmosphere and the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.

    2015-05-01

    The formation of vortex structures in an inhomogeneous gyrotropic atmosphere was stochastically determined. Atmospheric gyrotropy is induced by the Coriolis force acting as the Earth rotates and the motion of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. Vortices of a plasma nature are observed in the atmosphere. The electric field of such plasma vortices originates within the fields of pressure gradients of a mosaic cell topology upon the ionization of particles. It is shown that waves in a neutral atmosphere, electric fields, and electromagnetic waves affect the stability of vortex structures. Wave signals from anthropogenic sources and smog may stimulate local precipitation upon the passage of a cloud front and weaken or strengthen vortex structures. The plasma vortex may capture charged particles of different masses. The charge separation in plasma vortex structures is driven by the polarization drift at the decay of electric fields. The self-focusing of plasma vortices upon the condensation of moisture in the atmospheric cloud cover leads to an increase in the energy of vortices.

  15. Identification of the typical metal particles among haze, fog, and clear episodes in the Beijing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunjie; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Suanqin; Kong, Lingdong; Fu, Hongbo; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    For a better understanding of metal particle morphology and behaviors in China, atmospheric aerosols were sampled in the summer of 2012 in Beijing. The single-particle analysis shows various metal-bearing speciations, dominated by oxides, sulfates and nitrates. A large fraction of particles is soluble. Sources of Fe-bearing particles are mainly steel industries and oil fuel combustion, whereas Zn- and Pb-bearing particles are primarily contributed by waste incineration, besides industrial combustion. Other trace metal particles play a minor rule, and may come from diverse origins. Mineral dust and anthropogenic source like vehicles and construction activities are of less importance to metal-rich particles. Statistics of 1173 analyzed particles show that Fe-rich particles (48.5%) dominate the metal particles, followed by Zn-rich particles (34.9%) and Pb-rich particles (15.6%). Compared with the abundances among clear, haze and fog conditions, a severe metal pollution is identified in haze and fog episodes. Particle composition and elemental correlation suggest that the haze episodes are affected by the biomass burning in the southern regions, and the fog episodes by the local emission with manifold particle speciation. Our results show the heterogeneous reaction accelerated in the fog and haze episodes indicated by more zinc nitrate or zinc sulfate instead of zinc oxide or carbonate. Such information is useful in improving our knowledge of fine airborne metal particles on their morphology, speciation, and solubility, all of which will help the government introduce certain control to alleviate metal pollution. PMID:25555257

  16. PARTICLE-ASSOCIATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF HONG KONG

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Mei

    PARTICLE-ASSOCIATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF HONG KONG M. ZHENG and M@ust.hk) (Received 3 June 1998; accepted 22 December 1998) Abstract. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in total-mass spectrometry, Hong Kong, PAH, poly- cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, suspended particulates 1. Introduction

  17. HETEROGENEOUS NOX CHEMISTRY IN POLLUTED URBAN ATMOSPHERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION OF PARTICLES AND OZONE AND

    E-print Network

    Dabdub, Donald

    HETEROGENEOUS NOX CHEMISTRY IN POLLUTED URBAN ATMOSPHERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION OF PARTICLES AND OZONE AND CONTROL STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT Final Report Contract No. 00-323 Prepared for: California Air Resources Board and the California Environmental Protection Agency Research Division P.O. Box

  18. Morphology and Chemical composition of Atmospheric Particles over Semi-Arid region (Jaipur, Rajasthan) of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Agnihotri, R.; Yadav, P.; Singh, S.; Tawale, J. S.; Rashmi, R.; Prasad, M.; Arya, B. C.; Mishra, N.

    2012-12-01

    Uncertainties associated with the radiative forcing of atmospheric dust particles is highest, owing to lack of region-specific dust morphology (particle shape, size) and mineralogy (chemical composition) database, needed for modeling their optical properties (Mishra and Tripathi, 2008). To fill this gap for the Indian region, we collected atmospheric particles (with aerodynamic size <5um, PM5 and a few bulk particles; TSP) from seven sites of Jaipur and nearby locales (semi-arid region, in the vicinity of Thar Desert of Rajasthan) at varying altitude, during late winters of ca. 2012. PM5 particles were collected on Teflon filters (for bulk chemical analyses), while pure Tin substrates (~1×1 mm2) were used for investigating individual particle morphology. Using Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive X ray (SEM-EDX) facility at NPL, images of individual particles were recorded and the morphological parameters (e.g. Aspect ratio; AR, Circulatory parameter; CIR.) were retrieved following Okada et al. (2001), whereas chemical compositions of individual particles were determined by EDX and bulk samples by X ray fluorescence (XRF). The geometrical size distributions of atmospheric particles were generated for each site. Based on NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology, USA) morphology database, the site-specific individual particle shapes reveal predominance of "Layered" (calcite and quartz rich), "Angular" structures (quartz rich) and "Flattened" particles over all the sites. Particles were found to be highly non-spherical with irregular shapes (CIR varying from 1 to 0.22 with median value ~0.76; AR varying from 1 to 5.4 with median value ~1.64). Noteworthy to mention, that unit values of AR and CIR represent spherical particles. Chemical analyses of PM5 particles revealed dominance of crustal elements e.g. Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, in general. Particles over Kukas Hill (27.027° N, 75.919° E; ~800 MAGL) showed highest Fe mass fractions (~43%), i.e. a key element (in form of hematite; Fe2O3) for solar (visible) energy absorption and thus heating the atmosphere. The retrieved morphological parameters help to construct particle shape and number size distribution that are highly useful to reduce the uncertainty in radiative forcing of dust particles appreciably when combined with particle chemical composition as suggested by Kalashnikova and Sokolik (2004). References : Mishra, S. K., and S. N. Tripathi (2008), Modeling optical properties of mineral dust over the Indian Desert, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D23201, 19 PP., doi:10.1029/2008JD010048. Okada, K., J. Heintzenberg, K. Kai, and Y. Qin (2001), Shape of atmospheric mineral particles collected in three Chinese arid-regions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 3123-3126 Kalashnikova OV, Sokolik IN. (2004) Modeling the radiative properties of nonspherical soil-derived mineral aerosols, J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 87, 137-66.

  19. Fog droplets—an atmospheric source of secondary biological aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzzi, Sandro; Mandrioli, Paolo; Perfetto, Antonio

    The occurrence of airborne biological particles (bacteria, yeasts and moulds) in fog water and the influence of temperature and fog chemical composition and acidity on their concentration are described in this paper. Our results show that the concentration of airborne bacteria and yeasts is enriched in foggy conditions up to two orders of magnitude compared to clear air conditions, while concentration of moulds is not influenced by the presence of fog. These results support the hypothesis that fog droplets act as culture media for airborne biological particles, i.e. they represent an atmospheric source of secondary biological particles.

  20. Generation of volatile organic compounds by alpha particle degradation of WIPP plastic and rubber material

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    The generation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen, and carbon oxides due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, and neoprene, is being investigated. A wide diversity of VOCs was found including alkenes, alkanes, alcohols, ketones, benzene derivatives, and nitro compounds. Their yields however, were quite low. The relative amounts of these compounds depended on the material, atmosphere present, and the absorbed dose. This investigation will help evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the long-term performance assessment and regulatory compliance issues related to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  1. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-19

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5 {mu}m with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth's surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3x10{sup -21} particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9x10{sup -23} particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  2. Internal composition of atmospheric dust particles from focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Conny, Joseph M

    2013-08-01

    Use of focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal composition of atmospheric particles is demonstrated for assessing particle optical properties. In the FIB-SEM instrument equipped with an X-ray detector, a gallium-ion beam mills the particle, while the electron beam images the slice faces and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy provides element maps of the particle. Differences in assessments of optical behavior based on FIB-SEM and conventional SEM were shown for five selected urban dust particles. The benefit of FIB-SEM for accurately determining the depth and size of optically important phases within particles was shown. FIB-SEM revealed that iron oxide grains left undetected by conventional SEM could potentially shift the single-scattering albedo of the particle from negative to positive radiative forcing. Analysis of a coke-like particle showed that 73% of the light-scattering inclusion went undetected with conventional SEM, causing the bulk absorption coefficient to vary by as much as 25%. Optical property calculations for particles as volume-equivalent spheres and as spheroids that approximated actual particle shapes revealed that the largest effect between conventional SEM and FIB-SEM analyses was on backscattering efficiency, in some cases varying several-fold. PMID:23763344

  3. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  4. Relating atmospheric and oceanic DMS levels to particle nucleation events in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Sjostedt, Steven J.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Papakyriakou, Tim N.; Scarratt, Michael G.; Michaud, Sonia; Levasseur, Maurice; Leaitch, W. Richard; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2011-09-01

    Measurements of ocean surface and atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and particle size distributions were made in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during the fall of 2007 and the late summer of 2008 aboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen. Nucleation-mode particles were observed during the 2008 cruise, which took place in the eastern Arctic from August to September when the atmosphere and ocean were more photo-active as compared to the October 2007 transit in the Beaufort Sea during which no nucleation/growth events were observed. The observed nucleation periods in 2008 coincided with high atmospheric and ocean surface DMS concentrations, suggesting that the particles originated from marine biogenic sources. An aerosol microphysics box model was used to simulate nucleation given the measured conditions in the marine boundary layer. Although other sources may have contributed, we find that the newly formed particles can be accounted for by a marine biogenic DMS source for combinations of the following parameters: [OH] ? 3 × 105 molecules cm-3, DMS mixing ratio is ? 100 pptv, the activation coefficient is ? 10-7 and the background particle concentration is ? 100 cm-3.

  5. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling.

    PubMed

    Boone, Eric J; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B; Stirm, Brian H; Pratt, Kerri A

    2015-07-21

    Cloudwater and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and direct infusion electrospray ionization (ESI) were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloudwater samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloudwater, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloudwater samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloudwater when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol. PMID:26068538

  6. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  7. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  8. Development of an Analytical Method for Quantitative Determination of Atmospheric Particles By Laap-TOF Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, R.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Hellebust, S.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the chemical composition of the atmospheric particles is of paramount importance in order to understand their impact on the health and climate. Hence, there is an imperative need for the development of appropriate analytical methods of analysis for the on-line, time-resolved measurements of atmospheric particles. Laser Ablation Aerosol Particle Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LAAP-TOF-MS) allows a real time qualitative analysis of nanoparticles of differing composition and size. LAAP-TOF-MS is aimed for on-line and continuous measurements of atmospheric particles with the fast time resolution in order of millisecond. This system uses a 193 nm excimer laser for particle ablation/ionization and a 403 nm scattering laser for sizing (and single particle detection/triggering). The charged ions are then extracted into a bi-polar Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer. Here we present an analytical methodology for quantitative determination of the composition and size-distribution of the particles by LAAP-TOF instrument. We developed and validate an analytical methodology of this high time resolution instrument by comparison with the conventional analysis systems with lower time resolution (electronic microscopy, optical counters…) with final aim to render the methodology quantitative. This was performed with the aid of other instruments for on-line and off-line measurement such as Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, electronic microscopy... Validation of the analytical method was performed under laboratory conditions by detection and identification of the targeted main types such as SiO2, CeO2, and TiO2

  9. Materials for Active Engagement in Nuclear and Particle Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loats, Jeff; Schwarz, Cindy; Krane, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Physics education researchers have developed a rich variety of research-based instructional strategies that now permeate many introductory courses. Carrying these active-engagement techniques to upper-division courses requires effort and is bolstered by experience. Instructors interested in these methods thus face a large investment of time to start from scratch. This NSF-TUES grant, aims to develop, test and disseminate active-engagement materials for nuclear and particle physics topics. We will present examples of these materials, including: a) Conceptual discussion questions for use with Peer Instruction; b) warm-up questions for use with Just in Time Teaching, c) ``Back of the Envelope'' estimation questions and small-group case studies that will incorporate use of nuclear and particle databases, as well as d) conceptual exam questions.

  10. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  11. Contact efflorescence as a pathway for crystallization of atmospherically relevant particles.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan D; Lance, Sara; Gordon, Joshua A; Ushijima, Shuichi B; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2015-12-29

    Inadequate knowledge of the phase state of atmospheric particles represents a source of uncertainty in global climate and air quality models. Hygroscopic aqueous inorganic particles are often assumed to remain liquid throughout their atmospheric lifetime or only (re)crystallize at low relative humidity (RH) due to the kinetic limitations of efflorescence (salt crystal nucleation and growth from an aqueous solution). Here we present experimental observations of a previously unexplored heterogeneous nucleation pathway that we have termed "contact efflorescence," which describes efflorescence initiated by an externally located solid particle coming into contact with the surface of a metastable aqueous microdroplet. This study demonstrates that upon a single collision, contact efflorescence is a pathway for crystallization of atmospherically relevant aqueous particles at high ambient RH (?80%). Soluble inorganic crystalline particles were used as contact nuclei to induce efflorescence of aqueous ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], sodium chloride (NaCl), and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), with efflorescence being observed in several cases close to their deliquescence RH values (80%, 75%, and 62%, respectively). To our knowledge, these observations represent the highest reported efflorescence RH values for microdroplets of these salts. These results are particularly important for considering the phase state of NH4NO3, where the contact efflorescence RH (?20-60%) is in stark contrast to the observation that NH4NO3 microdroplets do not homogeneously effloresce, even when exposed to extremely arid conditions (<1% RH). Considering the occurrence of particle collisions in the atmosphere (i.e., coagulation), these observations of contact efflorescence challenge many assumptions made about the phase state of inorganic aerosol. PMID:26668396

  12. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23...Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23...Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23...Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23...Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23...Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  17. Elemental and individual particle analysis of atmospheric aerosols from high Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhiyuan; Kang, Shichang; Dong, Shuping; Liu, Xiande; Qin, Dahe

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected during the scientific expedition to Mt. Qomolangma (Everest) in May-June, 2005. The elemental concentrations of the aerosols were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This yielded data for the concentration of 14 elements: Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb. The mean elemental concentrations were generally comparable with those from central Asia and the Arctic, while much higher than those from Antarctic. Size, morphology, and chemical composition of 900 individual aerosol particles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Based on morphology and elemental composition, the particles were clustered into eight groups: soot (8%), tar ball (3%), alumosilicates/silica (55%), calcium sulfate (16%), Ca/Mg carbonate (2%), Fe/Ti-rich particles (3%), Pb-rich particles (1%), and biological particles (12%). The sampling site, located at 6,520 m in the Himalayas, is particularly remote and located at high altitude. Nonetheless, high aerosol enrichment factors for copper, chromium, lead, nickel, vanadium, and zinc all suggest the influence of long-range transported pollution, while enrichment in calcium and the presence of alumino-silicates in individual particle analyses indicates a distinct mineral dust influence. The backward air mass trajectories showed that the northwestern part of India may contribute to the atmospheric aerosol in the central high Himalayas. PMID:19083111

  18. Measuring the spectral emissivity of thermal protection materials during atmospheric reentry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere encounter extreme heat due to atmospheric friction. Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials shield the craft from this searing heat, which can reach temperatures of 2900 F. Various thermophysical and optical properties of TPS materials are tested at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility, which has the capability to simulate critical environmental conditions associated with entry into the earth's atmosphere. Emissivity is an optical property that determines how well a material will reradiate incident heat back into the atmosphere upon reentry, thus protecting the spacecraft from the intense frictional heat. This report describes a method of measuring TPS emissivities using the SR5000 Scanning Spectroradiometer, and includes system characteristics, sample data, and operational procedures developed for arc-jet applications.

  19. Mass-particle size distributions of atmospheric dust and the dry deposition of dust to the remote ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Ray, B. J.; Lewis, N. F.; Tomza, U.; Duce, R. A.

    1997-07-01

    Size-separated mineral aerosol samples were collected and analyzed to investigate the relationships between the mass-particle size distributions (MSDs) of dust particles and the dust loadings in the atmosphere. The data also were used to assess the changes in the MSDs of dust in relation to transport processes and especially the associated effects on dry deposition. Atmospheric dust concentrations, as indicated by aluminum or scandium, in samples collected from three sites in the remote North Atlantic were higher than those in samples collected during a cruise in the North Pacific on board the R/V Moana Wave. However, the mass median diameters (MMDs) for the North Pacific samples were both larger on average (˜3 ?m versus ˜2 ?m aerodynamic equivalent diameter) and more variable than those from the North Atlantic; this difference was attributed to wet conditions and particle aggregation over the North Pacific. In addition, for the ensemble of all samples the geometric standard deviations of the mass-particle size distributions, which are analogous to the sorting values used to characterize sedimentary materials, tended to vary inversely and nonlinearly with the mass median diameters. Model-derived dry deposition velocities for the samples were at most weakly related to either the dust concentrations or the MMDs. However, the dry deposition velocities for two subsets of samples were correlated with the geometric standard deviations of the distributions; this is further evidence that the mass flux of dust via dry deposition can be controlled by a relatively small fraction of aerodynamically large particles.

  20. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Daniel J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene) in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process. PMID:19337412

  1. Estimating bacteria emissions from inversion of atmospheric transport: sensitivity to modelled particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, S. M.; Rayner, P. J.; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2013-06-01

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Source estimation via Markov Chain Monte Carlo is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations, and the global mean emissions are estimated for the example problem of bacteria-containing aerosol particles. We present an analysis of the uncertainties in the global mean emissions, and a partitioning of the uncertainties that are attributable to particle size, activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. For this example, uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 ?m error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to observation uncertainty, as measured by the 5-95th percentile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mixed-phase clouds is as high as 10-20% of that attributable to observation uncertainty. Taken together, the four model parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the observations. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial observation uncertainty, which ranges from 81-870% of the mean for each of ten ecosystems for this case study. The effects of these and other model parameters in contributing to the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and systematically in both forward and inverse modelling studies.

  2. A review of measurement and modelling results of particle atmosphere-surface exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Gallagher, M.; Sievering, H.; Larsen, S. E.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Birsan, F.; Nemitz, E.; Rinne, J.; Kulmala, M.; Grönholm, T.; Taipale, R.; Vesala, T.

    2008-02-01

    Atmosphere-surface exchange represents one mechanism by which atmospheric particle mass and number size distributions are modified. Deposition velocities (vd) exhibit a pronounced dependence on surface type, due in part to turbulence structure (as manifest in friction velocity), with minima of approximately 0.01 and 0.2 cm s-1 over grasslands and 0.1-1 cm s-1 over forests. However, as noted over 20 yr ago, observations over forests generally do not support the pronounced minimum of deposition velocity (vd) for particle diameters of 0.1-2 ?m as manifest in theoretical predictions. Closer agreement between models and observations is found over less-rough surfaces though those data also imply substantially higher surface collection efficiencies than were originally proposed and are manifest in current models. We review theorized dependencies for particle fluxes, describe and critique model approaches and innovations in experimental approaches, and synthesize common conclusions of experimental and modelling studies. We end by proposing a number of research avenues that should be pursued in to facilitate further insights and development of improved numerical models of atmospheric particles.

  3. Brighter material on Deimos - A particle size effect in a carbonaceous material?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, L. M.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.

    1988-01-01

    The values obtained for brightness ratios between contiguous bright and dark areas on Deimos from Viking Orbiter images, together with the lack of a significant wavelength dependence of these ratios in the 0.4-0.6-micron range, are presently noted to be consistent with particle size fraction measurements of the Murchison CM meteorite. These data, and a near-coincidence of Deimos absolute reflectances with those of laboratory samples, render the present data consistent with both brighter and darker materials on Deimos being akin to carbonaceous chondrites; the material with smaller average particle size is associated with the brighter patches.

  4. Estimating the contribution of photochemical particle formation to ultrafine particle number averages in an urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ma, N; Birmili, W

    2015-04-15

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter<100 nm) have gained major attention in the environmental health discussion due to a number of suspected health effects. Observations of UFPs in urban air reveal the presence of several, time-dependent particle sources. In order to attribute measured UFP number concentrations to different source type contributions, we analyzed observations collected at a triplet of observation sites (roadside, urban background, rural) in the city of Leipzig, Germany. Photochemical new particle formation (NPF) events can be the overwhelming source of UFP particles on particular days, and were identified on the basis of characteristic patterns in the particle number size distribution data. A subsequent segmentation of the diurnal cycles of UFP concentration yielded a quantitative contribution of NPF events to daily, monthly, and annual mean values. At roadside, we obtained source contributions to the annual mean UFP number concentration (diameter range 5-100 nm) for photochemical NPF events (7%), local traffic (52%), diffuse urban sources (20%), and regional background (21%). The relative contribution of NPF events rises when moving away from roadside to the urban background and rural sites (14 and 30%, respectively). Their contribution also increases when considering only fresh UFPs (5-20 nm) (21% at the urban background site), and conversely decreases when considering UFPs at bigger sizes (20-100 nm) (8%). A seasonal analysis showed that NPF events have their greatest importance on UFP number concentration in the months May-August, accounting for roughly half of the fresh UFPs (5-20 nm) at the urban background location. The simplistic source apportionment presented here might serve to better characterize exposure to ambient UFPs in future epidemiological studies. PMID:25617781

  5. Reports of workshops on Probe Measurements of Particles and Radiation in the Atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragent, Boris (comp. and ed.); Swenson, Byron L. (comp. and ed.)

    1990-01-01

    The planned 1995 joint ESA-NASA Cassini mission to the Saturnian system will include an atmospheric probe to be dropped into the atmosphere of Titan for in situ measurements during descent. Because of the unique properties of the Titan atmosphere it is necessary to consider the peculiar requirements for such measurements and applicable techniques. The proceedings of two workshops dealing with the measurement of particles and radiation in the atmosphere of Titan are presented in two parts. The first part dealt with the measurement of particulate matter in the atmosphere of Titan. The second part dealt with the measurement of radiation in the atmosphere of Titan. The proceedings were first published and distributed informally, and are presented with only minor editorial changes. In the report of the particulate matter workshop, discussions of the mission background, the importance of the measurements, and descriptions of the desired information are followed by a description of appropriate measurement techniques and conclusions and recommendations. The proceeding for the workshop on radiation measurement and imaging contains a discussion of the importance of radiation measurements and imaging, and presents a summary of participants' experience with such measurements made from entry probes. This is followed by a description of appropriate measurement techniques and conclusions and recommendations.

  6. Characterization of organic coatings on hygroscopic salt particles and their atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Ezell, Michael J.; Perraud, Véronique; Johnson, Stanley N.; Bruns, Emily A.; Yu, Yong; Imre, Dan; Alexander, M. Liz; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-03-01

    The photooxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of NO 2, with and without added NaNO 3 seed particles, has been studied in a large-diameter flow tube. Particles formed by homogeneous nucleation and by condensation on the pre-existing seeds were sampled at various stages of the reaction, dried using four diffusion dryers, size selected at different mobility diameters ( dm) using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), and characterized with a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II). It was found that homogeneously nucleated particles are spherical, have a density ( ?) of 1.25 ± 0.02 g cm -3 (±2 ?) and contain a significant amount of organic nitrates. The mass spectra of the low volatility products condensed on the NaNO 3 seed particles were found to be virtually the same as in the case of homogeneous nucleation. The data show that the presence of even a submonolayer of organics on the NaNO 3 particles causes water retention that leads to a decrease in particle density and that the amount of water retained increases with organic coating thickness. Thicker coatings appear to inhibit water evaporation from the particle seeds altogether. This suggests that in the atmosphere, where low volatility organics are plentiful, some hygroscopic salts will retain water and have different densities and refractive indices than expected in the absence of the organic coating. This water retention combined with the organic shell on the particles can potentially impact light scattering by these particles and activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), as well as heterogeneous chemistry and photochemistry on the particles.

  7. Nano- and Microscale Particles in Vortex Motions in Earth's Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Popel, S. I.; Izvekova, Yu. N.; Shukla, P. K.

    2010-12-14

    Vortex motions in the atmosphere are shown to be closely connected with dynamics of the dust nano- and microscale particles. The mechanism by which nano- and microscale particles are transported from the troposphere into the lower stratosphere by synoptic-scale vortices, simulated by the soliton solutions to the Charney-Obukhov equations (Rossby vortices), is described. Redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions is discussed. It is shown that excitation of acoustic-gravitational vortices at altitudes of 110-130 km as a result of development of acoustic-gravitational wave instability, associated with nonzero balance of heat fluxes, owing to solar radiation, water vapors condensation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, and thermal conductivity, leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing at altitudes of 110-120 km. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is shown to be vertical flows (streamers), which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  8. Dynamics of Space Particles and Spacecrafts Passing by the Atmosphere of the Earth

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini de Almeida; Golebiewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    The present research studies the motion of a particle or a spacecraft that comes from an orbit around the Sun, which can be elliptic or hyperbolic, and that makes a passage close enough to the Earth such that it crosses its atmosphere. The idea is to measure the Sun-particle two-body energy before and after this passage in order to verify its variation as a function of the periapsis distance, angle of approach, and velocity at the periapsis of the particle. The full system is formed by the Sun, the Earth, and the particle or the spacecraft. The Sun and the Earth are in circular orbits around their center of mass and the motion is planar for all the bodies involved. The equations of motion consider the restricted circular planar three-body problem with the addition of the atmospheric drag. The initial conditions of the particle or spacecraft (position and velocity) are given at the periapsis of its trajectory around the Earth. PMID:24396298

  9. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  10. Nature of the Martian surface as inferred from the particle-size distribution of lunar-surface material.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of lunar particle size distribution data indicates that the surface material is composed of two populations. One population is caused by comminution from the impact of the larger-sized meteorites, while the other population is caused by the melting of fine material by the impact of smaller-sized meteorites. The results are referred to Mars, and it is shown that the Martian atmosphere would vaporize the smaller incoming meteorites and retard the incoming meteorites of intermediate and large size, causing comminution and stirring of the particulate layer. The combination of comminution and stirring would result in fine material being sorted out by the prevailing circulation of the Martian atmosphere and the material being transported to regions where it could be deposited. As a result, the Martian surface in regions of prevailing upward circulation is probably covered by either a rubble layer or by desert pavement; regions of prevailing downward circulation are probably covered by sand dunes.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON PARTICLE IMPACTION AND BOUNCE: EFFECTS OF SUBSTRATE DESIGN AND MATERIAL. (R825270)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the effects of impaction substrate designs and material in reducing particle bounce and reentrainment. Particle collection without coating by using combinations of different impaction substrate designs and surface materials was...

  12. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols. PMID:25836102

  13. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using Simulation chamber Study techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-06-01

    The anthropogenic influence on climate and environment has increased strongly since industrialization about 150 yr ago. The consequences for the atmosphere became more and more apparent and nowadays affect our life quality on Earth progressively. Because of that it is very important to understand the atmospheric processes, on which these effects are based on, in detail. In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes such as particle formation online and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically with a residence time (xT (COMPASS 1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS 2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min) at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a deposition rate (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system a set of experiments was conducted at different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhancing ozone and terpenes as well as reducing sunlight. In the ozone enhanced ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions in a different strength. Solar radiation displayed a clear positive effect on particle number as well as terpene addition did at remote conditions. Therefore the system is a useful tool to investigate local precursors, the details of ambient particle formation at surface locations as well as future feedback processes.

  14. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-06-04

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81% to 870% for each of ten ecosystems for this case study. The effects of these and other model parameters in contributing to the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and systematically in both forward and inverse modelling studies.

  15. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, M. Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J. C.; Onge, D. A. St.; Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.

    2014-11-15

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques.

  16. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe.

    PubMed

    Lucia, M; Kaita, R; Majeski, R; Bedoya, F; Allain, J P; Boyle, D P; Schmitt, J C; Onge, D A St

    2014-11-01

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques. PMID:25430248

  17. Force models for particle-dynamics simulations of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.

    1994-12-01

    Engineering-mechanics contact models are utilized to describe the inelastic, frictional interparticle forces acting in dry granular systems. Simple analyses based on one-dimensional chains are utilized to illustrate wave propagation phenomena in dense and dilute discrete particulates. The variation of restitution coefficient with impact velocity is illustrated for a variety of viscous and hysteretic normal force models. The effects of interparticle friction on material strength in discrete-particle simulations are much closer to measured values than are theories that do not allow article rotations.

  18. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  19. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  20. Prediction of material strength and fracture of brittle materials using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwwerf, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of many devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in windshields; and rock and concrete that are used in oil wells. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, they did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  1. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Li, Y. K.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2015-06-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits, and analysed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometres in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should be assessed.

  2. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Li, Y.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2014-11-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits and analyzed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometers in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should to be assessed.

  3. Challenges in Simulating the Indirect Effect of Energetic Particle Precipitation on the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Cora; Bailey, Scott; Harvey, V. Lynn; Marsh, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    A comprehensive description of Sun-Earth connections requires quantifying the atmospheric processes that indirectly amplify the effects of solar and magnetospheric input. The atmospheric response to energetic particle precipitation (EPP) is a key driver of these processes. EPP during the 2003-2004 Arctic winter led to the production and subsequent descent of reactive odd nitrogen (NOx) from the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) into the stratosphere. This caused NOx enhancements in the polar upper stratosphere in April 2004 that were unprecedented in the satellite record. Simulations of the 2003-2004 Arctic winter with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model using Specified Dynamics (SD-WACCM) are compared to satellite measurements to assess how well SD-WACCM captures the observed NOx enhancements. The comparisons show that SD-WACCM clearly displays the descent of NOx produced by EPP, but underestimates the enhancements by a factor of four. The results suggest that problems simulating the atmosphere's recovery from a sudden stratospheric warming, as well as the lack of high energy electron precipitation in the model, both contribute to the inability of SD-WACCM to simulate the NOx enhancements. The work highlights the importance of measuring the full spectrum of precipitating electrons in order to understand the impact of EPP on the atmosphere, and suggests a need for more and higher quality meteorological data and measurements of NOx throughout the polar winter MLT.

  4. Materials with a desired refraction coefficient can be created by embedding small particles into a given material

    E-print Network

    Materials with a desired refraction coefficient can be created by embedding small particles-2602, USA Abstract A method is given for creating material with a desired refraction coefficient. The method consists of embedding into a material with known refraction coefficient many small particles of size a, ka

  5. Size-dependent atmospheric deposition and inhalation exposure of particle-bound organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pei; Bao, Lian-Jun; Guo, Ying; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric size-fractionated particles were collected at different heights in an e-waste recycling zone (QY) and urban Guangzhou (GZ), China and analyzed for organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). The total air concentrations of eight OPFRs were 130±130 and 138±127ngm(-3) in QY and GZ, respectively. Compositional profiles of chlorinated OPFRs were different between QY and GZ, but the size distribution patterns of all OPFRs were not significantly different at different heights. Estimated atmospheric deposition fluxes of OPFRs were 51±67 and 55±13?gm(-2)d(-1) in QY and GZ, respectively, and the coarse particles (Dp>1.8?m) dominated both the dry and wet deposition fluxes. Moreover, not all particle-bound OPFRs were inhalable and deposited in the human respiratory tract. The calculated inhalation doses of OPFRs were much lower than the reference doses, suggesting that potential health risk due to inhalation exposure to particle-bound OPFRs in the e-waste recycling zone and urban site was low. PMID:26414926

  6. Light Induced Degradation of Eight Commonly Used Pesticides Adsorbed on Atmospheric Particles: Kinetics and Product Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Durand, A.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.; Quivet, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world whether in agricultural production or in non-agricultural settings. They may pose a potential human health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. Pesticides are found in the atmosphere removed from the target area by volatilization or wind erosion, and carried over long distances. These compounds are partitioned between the gaseous and particulate atmospheric phases. The increasingly used pesticides are semi-volatile compounds which are usually adsorbed on the surface of the atmospheric particles. These pesticides may undergo chemical and photo-chemical transformation. New compounds may then be formed that could be more hazardous than the primary pesticides. The atmospheric fate and lifetime of adsorbed pesticides on particles are controlled by the these (photo)chemical processes. However, there is a lack of kinetic data regarding the pesticides in the particle phase. This current work focuses on the photolytic degradation of commonly used pesticides in particulate phase. It aims at estimating the photolytic rates and thus the lifetimes of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles as a proxy of atmospheric particles. The following eight commonly used pesticides, cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole, were chosen because of their physico-chemical properties. The photolysis rates of tetraconazole and permethrin were extremely slow ? 1.2 · 10-6 s-1. The photolysis rates for the other pesticides were determined in the range of: (5.9 ± 0.3) · 10-6 < k < (1.7 ± 0.1) · 10-4 s-1 from slowest to the fastest: pendimethalin < cyprodinil < deltamethrin < difenoconazole < oxadiazon < fipronil. Finally, the identification of the surface products upon light irradiation was performed, using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-IMS-ToF)-MS/MS. The potentially formed gas-phase products during these photolysis processes were followed continuously and on-line by PTR-ToF-MS. We hope that the obtained results from this study will help in the development of future environmental strategies to better understand and control phyto-sanitary product application and human exposure.

  7. Influence of Particle Phase Morphology on the Hygroscopic Behavior of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2014-12-01

    While current models generally treat organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosol particles as well-mixed liquids, these particles can exist in multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). For example, multi-component particles can undergo phase separations in which an inorganic-electrolyte-rich phase and an organic-rich phase coexist within one particle. Organic aerosols have been shown to exist in an amorphous, highly viscous semi-solid state under atmospherically relevant conditions. Hygroscopic growth factors (GFs) of ten laboratory-generated, organic-inorganic aerosol systems with phase morphologies ranging from well-mixed liquids, to phase-separated particles, to viscous semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 30 - 90%. Measured GFs were compared to water-uptake calculations in which it was assumed that particles could be represented as thermodynamically ideal, well-mixed liquids, as well as those predicted by the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. Both ideal and AIOMFAC-predicted GFs were in good agreement with experimental GFs for aerosol systems that exist as well-mixed liquids across the range of RHs tested; however, substantial disagreement between experimental and ideal GFs was observed for phase-separated particles. This disagreement was greatest at low to moderate RHs, whereas experimental GFs approached the ideal curve at high RH as phase-separated particles merged to a single phase with increased water content. AIOMFAC, which offers the ability to predict liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separations within a thermodynamic equilibrium computation, was within 10% of experimental GFs at all RHs for all aerosol systems. The assumption that water uptake is driven by ideal, equilibrium partitioning leads to errors in calculated particle size and refractive index and has implications for predicted aerosol scattering efficiencies and radiative properties.

  8. Optimization of GOSAT Atmospheric Retrieval of CO2 in Presence of Atmospheric Particles Using Empirical Orthogonal Function Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbiens, R.; Aoki, T.; Yokota, T.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the international effort to promote greenhouse-gases observation and to understand furthermore the carbon cycle, the Ministry of Environment of Japan (MOE), the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plan to launch GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite) in 2008 for the global monitoring of CO2 and CH4 from space. The inverse problem that must be solved for GOSAT level 2 retrieval algorithms is very complex, involving thousands of measurement parameters (wavenumber channels) for 3 of the spectral bands of the TANSO Fourier transform spectrometer. Potentially more than one hundred state parameters would need to be retrieved, depending on the vertical resolution of the volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles required for the retrieval of each species, to which we must add aerosols and cloud parameters. The most computationally expensive part of current signal processing comes from the computation of the forward model itself, based on HSTAR radiative transfer code, and also from the calculation of the Jacobian (derivative of the forward model relative to state parameters). The Jacobian is calculated using numerical derivatives, which implies computing perturbed states of the forward model. Furthermore, iterative algorithms selected to solve non-linear inverse problems require computing a new Jacobian at each iteration. We explored the benefit of using an optimal representation for the state parameters based on empirical orthogonal functions (EOF). This compact representation allows reducing the number of state parameters near to the level of the number of degrees of freedom in the signal, which is significantly smaller than the actual number of state parameters required for the accurate computation of the forward model in nadir observation mode. We present EOF based on the singular vectors of the normalized Jacobian, taking into account the prior covariance matrix of the state parameters. Such optimal representation proved to be efficient also for non-linear retrieval involving light scattering by atmospheric particles like thin clouds and aerosols. Using EOF derived from clear sky conditions, we developed a simple way to approximate efficiently the Jacobian when considering atmospheric particles, without need to change the EOF basis when particles parameters are updated. This optimization requires evaluating the forward model a number of times that is only the number of optimal parameters (number of EOF) instead of computing it a number of times equal to the number of parameters in full representation. For example, CO2 retrieval in 1.6 ? m band must be performed for more than 25 atmospheric layers, while the number of degrees of freedom of the signal is less than 3 for the vertical profile. When particles parameters are retrieved simultaneously (leading to a non-linear inverse problem), this advantage may becomes even more significant since iterative methods require to recalculate the Jacobian at each iteration. This aspect will be discussed at the meeting.

  9. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    farquar, G; Leif, R

    2008-09-12

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds are being used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres are being produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. The advantages and disadvantages of each method will be presented and discussed in greater detail along with fluorescent and charge properties of the aerosols. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  10. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Virid, Sparisoma

    2015-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of alti...

  11. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  12. Viscosity of ?-pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Grayson, James W.; Bateman, Adam P.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Sellier, Mathieu; Murray, Benjamin J.; Shilling, John E.; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2013-05-14

    Particles composed of secondary organic material (SOM) are abundant in the lower troposphere and play important roles in climate, air quality, and health. The viscosity of these particles is a fundamental property that is presently poorly quantified for conditions relevant to the lower troposphere. Using two new techniques, namely a bead-mobility technique and a poke-flow technique, in conjunction with simulations of fluid flow, we measure the viscosity of the watersoluble component of SOM produced by ?-pinene ozonolysis. The viscosity is comparable to that of honey at 90% relative humidity (RH), comparable to that of peanut butter at 70% RH and greater than or comparable to that of bitumen for ? 30% RH, implying that the studied SOM ranges from liquid to semisolid/solid at ambient relative humidities. With the Stokes-Einstein relation, the measured viscosities further imply that the growth and evaporation of SOM by the exchange of organic molecules between the gas and condensed phases may be confined to the surface region when RH ? 30%, suggesting the importance of an adsorption-type mechanism for partitioning in this regime. By comparison, for RH ? 70% partitioning of organic molecules may effectively occur by an absorption mechanism throughout the bulk of the particle. Finally, the net uptake rates of semi-reactive atmospheric oxidants such as O3 are expected to decrease by two to five orders of magnitude for a change in RH from 90% to ? 30% RH, with possible implications for the rates of chemical aging of SOM particles in the atmosphere.

  13. Modelling Contribution of Biogenic VOCs to New Particle Formation in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, L.; Boy, M.; Mogensen, D.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillman, R.; Kulmala, M. T.; Dal Maso, M.

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are substantially emitted from vegetation to atmosphere. The oxidation of BVOCs by OH, O3, and NO3 in air generating less volatile compounds may lead to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosol, and thus presents a link to the vegetation, aerosol, and climate interaction system (Kulmala et al, 2004). Studies including field observations, laboratory experiments and modelling have improved our understanding on the connection between BVOCs and new particle formation mechanism in some extent (see e.g. Tunved et al., 2006; Mentel et al., 2009). Nevertheless, the exact formation process still remains uncertain, especially from the perspective of BVOC contributions. The purpose of this work is using the MALTE aerosol dynamics and air chemistry box model to investigate aerosol formation from reactions of direct tree emitted VOCs in the presence of ozone, UV light and artificial solar light in an atmospheric simulation chamber. This model employs up to date air chemical reactions, especially the VOC chemistry, which may potentially allow us to estimate the contribution of BVOCs to secondary aerosol formation, and further to quantify the influence of terpenes to the formation rate of new particles. Experiments were conducted in the plant chamber facility at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany (Jülich Plant Aerosol Atmosphere Chamber, JPAC). The detail regarding to the chamber facility has been written elsewhere (Mentel et al., 2009). During the experiments, sulphuric acid was measured by CIMS. VOC mixing ratios were measured by two GC-MS systems and PTR-MS. An Airmodus Particle size magnifier coupled with a TSI CPC and a PH-CPC were used to count the total particle number concentrations with a detection limit close to the expected size of formation of fresh nanoCN. A SMPS measured the particle size distribution. Several other parameters including ozone, CO2, NO, Temperature, RH, and flow rates were also measured. MALTE is a modular model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere, developed by Boy, et al. (2006). We first evaluate the modelled results with measurements, and further we investigate the influence of different order of magnitude of terpene mixing ratios, especially isoprene and monoterpenes to the most important parameter of new particles formation, i.e. the formation rate (J1). Also, the influence of varying organic source rates on the sulphuric acid concentration available for particle formation is discussed. M. Boy et al., (2006). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 4499-4517. M. Kulmala et al., (2004). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 4, 557-562. P. Tunved et al., (2006). Science, 14, 261-263. Th. F. Mentel et al., (2009). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 4387-4406.

  14. From Clusters to Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Nucleation in the CLOUD Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    Globally, a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei for cloud formation is thought to originate from new particle formation (aerosol nucleation). Despite extensive research, many questions remain about the dominant nucleation mechanisms. Specifically, a quantitative understanding of the dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of the nucleating substances such as gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, water vapor and others has not been reached. This is of relevance for climate as the atmospheric concentrations of sulfuric acid, ammonia and other nucleating agents are strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. By providing extremely well controlled and essentially contaminant free conditions in the CLOUD chamber, we were able to show that indeed sulfuric acid is an important component for such new particle formation, however, for the typical temperatures encountered in the planetary boundary layer the concentrations of sulfuric acid are not high enough to explain the atmospheric observations. Moreover, the effect of ammonia, amines and oxidized organic molecules on the nucleation rate of sulfuric acid has been investigated in CLOUD so far. Recent developments in instrument technology such as the Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer have allowed us to investigate the chemical composition of charged as well as neutral clusters during such nucleation experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) collaboration consists of 20 institutions from Europe and the United States and is funded by national funding institutions as well as the EU training network CLOUD-TRAIN (http://www.cloud-train.eu/).

  15. First Steps in Atmospheric Particle Formation: Nucleation of the Smallest Ice Snowflake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Fedor, Juraj; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Poterya, Viktoriya; Pysanenko, Andriy; Farnik, Michal; Molecular; cluster dynamics Team

    2015-03-01

    The study of atmospheric aerosols attracts a considerable attention because of its influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Perhaps the most famous example is the ozone hole where the polar stratospheric clouds play a key role in the ozone depletion process. The atmospheric cloud generation starts with the growing of small ice nanoparticles via uptake of molecules on water clusters. Therefore the cross-sections for uptake have been investigated. The measured cross sections of ice particles can be more than twice larger than the geometrical cross sections of these particles. This can have significant consequences in modelling of growth ice nanoparticles. Subsequently, we have investigated the size-dependence of the measured cross-sections for water clusters. Here, the cross sections of water clusters depart from the theoretically predicted dependence and are considerably larger starting from the clusters of approximately 300 water molecules. We interpret this increase of cross section by the occurrence of highly irregular water cluster shapes, e.g. formation of the ``nanosnowflakes''. Grant agency of the Czech Republic, Grant No. 14-08937S.

  16. Biological contribution to ice nucleation active particles in clouds at the puy de Dôme atmospheric station, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Pierre; Joly, Muriel; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2015-04-01

    The distribution, abundance and nature of ice nucleation active particles in the atmosphere are major sources of uncertainty in the prediction of cloud coverage, precipitation patterns and climate. Some biological ice nuclei (IN) induce freezing at temperatures at which most other atmospheric particles exhibit no detectable activity (> -10°C), but their actual contribution to the pool of IN in clouds remains poorly known. In order to help elucidating this, cloud water was collected aseptically from the summit of Puy de Dome (1465m a.s.l., France) within contrasted meteorological and physico-chemical situations. Total and biological (i.e. heat-sensitive) IN were quantified by droplet-freezing assay between -5°C and -14°C. We observed that freezing was systematically induced by biological material, between -6°C and -8°C in 92{%} of the samples. Its removal by heat treatment consistently led to a decrease of the onset freezing temperature, by 3°C or more in most samples. At -10°C, 0 to 220 biological IN mL-1 of cloud water were measured (i.e. 0 to 22 m-3 of cloud air), and these represented 65{%} to 100{%} of the total IN. Based on back-trajectories and on physico-chemical analyses, the high variability observed resulted probably from a source effect, with IN originating mostly from continental sources. Bacteria concentration in the air at altitude relevant for clouds typically ranges from ˜102 to ˜105 cells m-3. Assuming that biological IN measured in cloud water samples at -8°C were all bacteria, ice nucleation active bacteria represented at maximum 0.6{%} of the total bacteria cells present (3.1{%} at -12°C). These results should help elucidating the role of biological and bacterial IN on cloud microphysics and their impact on precipitation at local scale. References: Joly, M., Amato, P., Deguillaume, L., Monier, M., Hoose, C., and Delort A-M (2014). Quantification of ice nuclei active at near 0°C temperatures in low altitude clouds at the puy de Dome atmospheric station. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 14, 8185-8195. Joly, M., Attard, E., Sancelme, M., Deguillaume, L., Guilbaud, C., Morris, C., Amato, P. and Delort A-M (2013). Ice nucleation activity of bacteria isolated from cloud water. Atmospheric Environment 70, 392-400.

  17. Asian dust particles converted into aqueous droplets under remote marine atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tobo, Yutaka; Zhang, Daizhou; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2010-01-01

    The chemical history of dust particles in the atmosphere is crucial for assessing their impact on both the Earth’s climate and ecosystem. So far, a number of studies have shown that, in the vicinity of strong anthropogenic emission sources, Ca-rich dust particles can be converted into aqueous droplets mainly by the reaction with gaseous HNO3 to form Ca(NO3)2. Here we show that other similar processes have the potential to be activated under typical remote marine atmospheric conditions. Based on field measurements at several sites in East Asia and thermodynamic predictions, we examined the possibility for the formation of two highly soluble calcium salts, Ca(NO3)2 and CaCl2, which can deliquesce at low relative humidity. According to the results, the conversion of insoluble CaCO3 to Ca(NO3)2 tends to be dominated over urban and industrialized areas of the Asian continent, where the concentrations of HNO3 exceed those of HCl ([HNO3/HCl] >  ? 1). In this regime, CaCl2 is hardly detected from dust particles. However, the generation of CaCl2 becomes detectable around the Japan Islands, where the concentrations of HCl are much higher than those of HNO3 ([HNO3/HCl] <  ? 0.3). We suggest that elevated concentrations of HCl in the remote marine boundary layer are sufficient to modify Ca-rich particles in dust storms and can play a more important role in forming a deliquescent layer on the particle surfaces as they are transported toward remote ocean regions. PMID:20921372

  18. Gas-to-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyam, V.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Thibodeaux, L. J.; Reible, D. D.

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) are present in the atmosphere as vapors and are adsorbed to particulate matter. Knowledge of the gas-to-particle distribution of these compounds is important in understanding their atmospheric fate and transport. A baseline experimental study to estimate the vapor- and particle-phase-associated concentrations of the SOCs (specifically, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHS) in the Baton Rouge (Louisiana) air was carried out. A comparison of the levels of concentrations of PAHs obtained in Baton Rouge to those obtained in other parts of the world is made. The sampling artifacts associated with a traditional high-volume sampler introduced errors in the estimation of the partition coefficient. Different air sampling procedures (a modified. low-volume sampler and an annular denuder) were evaluated in order to obtain a more accurate measure of the gas-to-particle partition coefficient. The effects of temperature and precipitation on the partitioning of PAHs between the vapor and particulate phase were ascertained.

  19. Proton and alpha particle precipitation onto the upper atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg Wieser, G.; Ashfaque, M.; Nilsson, H.; Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Diéval, C.; Fedorov, A.; Zhang, T. L.

    2015-08-01

    We study the precipitation of protons and alpha-particles onto the upper atmosphere of Venus, using particle data recorded by the Venus Express spacecraft inside the induced magnetosphere. Our investigations are limited to the dayside close to the terminator. We observe on average a net downward flux of protons, which originate partly from the planetary atmosphere and partly from the solar wind. We present median energy spectra of the precipitating protons divided into two energy ranges, 10-100 eV and 100 eV-30 keV. The total dayside precipitation of solar wind protons is estimated to be 3×1022 s-1, assuming only protons with energies above 500 eV will reach the exobase. Downgoing protons are frequently observed but only in 3% of the available data records we see He2+. These observations are made close to the induced magnetosphere boundary and we argue that at lower altitude the countrates for alpha-particles fall below detection limits. We estimate the precipitation of He2+ onto the dayside exobase to be 1×1021 s-1, which is not enough enough to replace the helium escaping from the planet.

  20. Atmospheric Visibility and PM10 as Indicators of New Particle Formation in an Urban Environment.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Clifford, S; Morawska, L

    2015-11-01

    It is well-known that new particle formation (NPF) in the atmosphere is inhibited by pre-existing particles in the air that act as condensation sinks to decrease the concentration and, thus, the supersaturation of precursor gases. In this study, we investigate the effects of two parameters-atmospheric visibility, expressed as the particle backscatter coefficient (BSP), and PM10 particulate mass concentration-on the occurrences of NPF events in an urban environment where the majority of precursor gases originate from motor vehicle and industrial sources. This is the first attempt to derive direct relationships between these two parameters and the occurrence of NPF. NPF events were identified from data obtained with a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer over 245 days within a calendar year. Bayesian logistic regression was used to determine the probability of observing NPF as functions of BSP and PM10. We show that the BSP at 08 h on a given day is a reliable indicator of an NPF event later that day. The posterior median probability of observing an NPF event was greater than 0.5 (95%) when the BSP at 08 h was less than 6.8 Mm(-1). PMID:26485451

  1. Studying seasonal variations in carbonaceous aerosol particles in the atmosphere over central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironova, S. Yu.; Makarova, M. V.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Panov, A. V.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-07-01

    The results of 2-year (2010-2012) measurements of the concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), which were taken at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) Siberian background station (61° N, 89° E), are given. Despite the fact that this station is located far from populated areas and industrial zones, the concentrations of OC and EC in the atmosphere over boreal forests in central Siberia significantly exceed their background values. In winter and fall, high concentrations of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosol particles are caused by the long-range transport (~1000 km) of air masses that accumulate pollutants from large cities located in both southern and southwestern regions of Siberia. In spring and summer, the pollution level is also high due to regional forest fires and agricultural burning in the steppe zone of western Siberia in the Russian-Kazakh border region. Background concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol particles were observed within relatively short time intervals whose total duration was no more than 20% of the entire observation period. In summer, variations in the background concentrations of OC closely correlated with air temperature, which implies that the biogenic sources of organic-particle formation are dominating.

  2. Particle size distribution of halogenated flame retardants and implications for atmospheric deposition and transport.

    PubMed

    Okonski, Krzysztof; Degrendele, Céline; Melymuk, Lisa; Landlová, Linda; Kuku?ka, Petr; Vojta, Šimon; Kohoutek, Ji?í; ?upr, Pavel; Klánová, Jana

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates the distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and a group of novel flame retardants (NFRs) on atmospheric aerosols. Two high volume cascade impactors were used to collect particulate fractions of ambient air over a one year period at urban and rural sites. The majority of FRs were found on the finest aerosols (<0.95 ?m). Concentrations of HBCD were higher than those of ?PBDEs. Moreover, we noted seasonality and spatial differences in particle size distributions, yet a large portion of the observed differences were due to differences in particulate matter (PM) itself. When normalized by PM, the size distributions of the FRs exhibited much greater heterogeneity. Differences existed between the FR distributions by molecular weight, with the higher molecular weight FRs (e.g., BDE-209, Dechlorane Plus) distributed more uniformly across all particulate size fractions. The seasonal, spatial, and compound-specific differences are of crucial importance when estimating dry and wet deposition of FRs as smaller aerosols have longer atmospheric residence times. Estimated wet and dry deposition of four representative FRs (BDE-47, BDE-209, HBCD, and Dechlorane Plus) using size-segregated aerosol data resulted in lower deposition estimates than when bulk aerosol data were used. This has implications for estimates of long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric residence times, as it suggests that without size-specific distributions, these parameters could be underestimated for FRs. PMID:25380095

  3. The Effect of Particle Size on Iron Solubility in Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, A. R.; Majestic, B. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    The long range transport of mineral dust aerosols, which contain approximately 3% iron by mass, results in an estimated 14-16 Tg of iron deposited into the oceans annually; however, only a small percentage of the deposited iron is soluble. In high-nutrient, low chlorophyll ocean regions iron solubility may limit phytoplankton primary productivity. Although the atmospheric transport processes of mineral dust aerosols have been well studied, the role of particle size has been given little attention. In this work, the effect of particle size on iron solubility in atmospheric aerosols is examined. Iron-containing minerals (illite, kaolinite, magnetite, goethite, red hematite, black hematite, and quartz) were separated into five size fractions (10-2.5, 2.5-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and <0.25?m) and extracted into buffer solutions simulating environments in the transport of aerosol particles for 150 minutes. Particle size was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Soluble iron content of the extracted mineral solutions was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Extracted mineral solutions were also analyzed for Fe(II) and Fe(III) content using a ferrozine/UV-VIS method. Preliminary results show that differences in solution composition are more important than differences in size. When extracted into acetate and cloudwater buffers (pH 4.25-4.3), < 0.3% of the Fe in iron oxides (hematite, magnetite, and goethite) is transferred to solution as compared to ~0.1-35% for clays (kaolinite and illite). When extracted into a marine aerosol solution (pH 1.7), the percentage of Fe of the iron oxides and clays transferred to solution increases to approximately 0.5-3% and 5-70%, respectively. However, there is a trend of increased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the largest and smallest size fractions (~0.01-0.3% and ~0.5-35% for iron oxides and clays, respectively), and decreased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the mid-range size fraction (~0.01-0.08% and ~0.1-1% for iron oxides and clays, respectively) when extracted into the acetate and cloudwater buffers. When extracted into the marine aerosol solution the %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution increases with decreasing particle size (from ~0.7% to ~2% and ~10 to 70% in iron oxides and clays, respectively). By examining the role of particle size, this work will provide a more complete understanding of iron dissolution during atmospheric transport of mineral dust aerosols.

  4. Study of individual atmospheric aerosol particles at the Debrecen ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Simon, A.; Huszank, R.; Uzonyi, I.

    2009-06-01

    Aerosol samples collected in outside and indoor environments with a 9-stage PI cascade impactor were analysed using PIXE, STIM (on and off-axis) and RBS ion beam analytical techniques at the Debrecen ion microprobe. Elemental composition, size and morphology of single aerosol particles were determined. Since the quantitative determination of light element concentrations requires a support material with small or no light element content, impactor surfaces made of different materials were tested in order to optimize the sampling and analysis. Thin polymer and Al foils were found to be possibly adequate substrate materials.

  5. Mass and elemental distributions of atmospheric particles nearby blast furnace and electric arc furnace operated industrial areas in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, Kazi; Strezov, Vladimir; Nelson, Peter F; Stelcer, Eduard; Evans, Tim

    2014-07-15

    The improved understanding of mass and elemental distributions of industrial air particles is important due to their heterogeneous atmospheric behaviour and impact on human health and the environment. In this study, particles of different size ranges were collected from three sites in Australia located in the vicinity of iron and steelmaking industries and one urban background site with very little industrial influence. In order to determine the importance of the type of industrial activity on the urban atmospheric quality, the industrial sites selected in this study were in the close proximity to two blast furnace operated and one electric arc furnace based steelmaking sites. The chemical compositions of the collected air particles were analysed using the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. This study revealed significantly higher metal concentrations in the atmospheric particles collected in the industrial sites, comparing to the background urban site, demonstrating local influence of the industrial activities to the air quality. The modality types of the particles were found to be variable between the mass and elements, and among elements in the urban and industrial areas indicating that the elemental modal distribution is as important as particle mass for particle pollution modelling. The highest elemental number distribution at all studied sites occurred with particle size of 0.1 ?m. Iron was found as the main dominant metal at the industrial atmosphere in each particle size range. The industrial Fe fraction in the submicron and ultrafine size particles was estimated at up to 95% which may be released from high temperature industrial activities with the iron and steelmaking industries being one of the major contributors. Hence, these industrial elemental loadings can highly influence the atmospheric pollution at local urban and regional levels and are required to consider in the atmospheric modelling settings. PMID:24793329

  6. Exploring the Origin of High-Energy Particle Beams in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot A.

    2014-11-01

    High-energy processes in the magnetosphere and atmosphere such as thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), and transient luminous events (TLEs) and recently discovered relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt trigger various dynamic processes in the Earth's environments and have broad astrophysical relevance. Investigation of the accelerated structures in the geospace plasmas can shed light on particle acceleration to much higher energy in the similar structures of space plasmas in the most distant objects in the universe. The Earth's broad environment is a real laboratory for high-energy astrophysics.

  7. An improved pulse-height analyzer for energetic particle measurements in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, L.; Smith, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    An energetic particle spectrometer for measurements in the upper atmosphere by rocket is described. The system has two methods of processing data. One is a staircase generator using threshold detectors; the other is a peak detector. The system incorporates a logarithmic converter for better resolution at low amplitudes and better use of telemetry channels. The circuits are described and calibration procedures are given. Modifications are recommended for high flux environments. Appendices cover sampling error in the peak detector and modifications made to the receiver of the propagation experiment.

  8. Exploring Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry with Advanced High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Particle Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and chemical complexity of atmospheric aerosols presents significant challenges both to experimentalists working on aerosol characterization and to modelers trying to parameterize critical aerosol properties. Multi-modal approaches that combine state-of-the-art experimental, theoretical, and modeling methods are becoming increasingly important in aerosol research. This presentation will discuss recent applications of unique high-resolution mass spectrometry and particle imaging tools developed at two Department of Energy's user facilities, the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and Advanced Light Source (ALS), to studies of molecular composition, photochemical aging, and properties of laboratory-generated and field aerosols. Specifically, this presentation will attempt to address the following questions: (a) how do NO2, SO2, and NH3 affect molecular level composition of anthropogenic aerosols?; (b) what factors determine viscosity/surface tension of organic aerosol particles?; (c) how does photolysis affect molecular composition and optical properties of organic aerosols?

  9. On the size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Feng, W.; Nesvorný, D.; Janches, D.

    2015-08-01

    The size and velocity distribution of cosmic dust particles entering the Earth's atmosphere is uncertain. Here we show that the relative concentrations of metal atoms in the upper mesosphere, and the surface accretion rate of cosmic spherules, provide sensitive probes of this distribution. Three cosmic dust models are selected as case studies: two are astronomical models, the first constrained by infrared observations of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud and the second by radar observations of meteor head echoes; the third model is based on measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector. For each model, a Monte Carlo sampling method combined with a chemical ablation model is used to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Mg, and Ca above 60 km and cosmic spherule production rate. It appears that a significant fraction of the cosmic dust consists of small (<5 µg) and slow (<15 km s-1) particles.

  10. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to adversely affect human health (Lighty et al., 2000; Pope and Dockery, 2006). Gan et al. (Gan et al., accepted) examined the indoor air quality aboard submarines and found that the diesel particulate matter concentrations exceeded the EPA 24 hour standard. Claeys et al. (Claeys et al., accepted) studied the importance and sources of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in remote marine environment during a period of high biological activity. Methanesulphonate was the major SOA compound detected and there was no evidence for SOA from isoprene. The optical properties of gasoline and diesel vehicle particulate emissions and their relative contribution to radiative forcing was studied by Strawa et al. (Strawa et al., accepted).

  11. COMPASS - COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using portable Simulation chamber Study techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Sun, S.; Haunold, W.; Sitals, R.; van Beesel, E.; dos Santos, L.; Nillius, B.; Jacobi, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes, such as particle formation online, and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically, with a residence time xT (COMPASS1) = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS2) = 26.6 ± 0.4 min, at a typical flow rate of 15 L min-1 and a gas leak rate of (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-5 s-1. Particle loss rates were found to be larger (due to the particles' stickiness to the chamber walls), with an extrapolated maximum of 1.8 × 10-3 s-1 at 1 nm, i.e. a hundredfold of the gas leak rate. This latter value is associated with sticky non-volatile gaseous compounds, too. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system, a set of experiments was conducted under different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhanced ozone and terpenes as well as reduced sunlight. In order to do so, an ozone lamp was applied to enhance ozone in one of two chambers; the measurement chamber was protected from radiation by a first-aid cover and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were added using a small additional flow and a temperature-controlled oven. During the elevated ozone period, ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions, but by a different intensity. Protection of solar radiation displayed a clear negative effect on particle number, while terpene addition did cause a distinct daily pattern. E.g. adding ? pinene particle number concentration rose by 13% maximum at noontime, while no significant effect was observable during darkness. Therefore, the system is a useful tool for investigating local precursors and the details of ambient particle formation at surface locations as well as potential future feedback processes.

  12. Long-term observations of new particle formation in Eastern Mediterranean atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Manninen, Hanna E.; Kulmala, Markku; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    New particle formation (NPF) is a frequent phenomenon in the marine boundary layer (MBL) atmosphere. So far, for the Mediterranean region, NPF events have been reported in the literature but this is the first time that long-term continuous measurements are used to identify and characterize NPF events. We analyzed continuous measurements from the environmental research station of University of Crete at Finokalia, Crete, Greece (35° 20' N, 25° 40' E, 250m a.s.l). The site has been reported to be representative for the eastern Mediterranean MBL atmosphere. Number size distributions of particles in the size range 8 to 848 nm were measured using scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) since 2008 (with additional data available for 2004 and 2005 ). Particle growth rates up to the diameter of 25 nm were calculated as well as the condensational sink Additionally, mobility distributions of air ions were measured using an Air Ion Spectrometer (AIS) in the mobility range between 3.2 and 0.0013 cm2V-1s-1 (0.8-42 nm ) for the periods April 2008-April 2009 and December 2012-December 2013. During the NPF event days, the formation and growth rates of sub-3 nm ions could be calculated from AIS data. We found for the Eastern Mediterranean MBL, 22% of the available days could be identified as event days. Although Finokalia is a sub-tropical site with intense photochemistry leading to the production of high concentrations of sulfuric acid, the necessary compound for triggering atmospheric nucleation, NPF at Finokalia has been found to be less frequent than in other locations across Europe. However, NPF takes place all year long indicating that the necessary precursors are available throughout the year. The probability of an event to take place was greatly dependent on the condensational sink, which was two times lower on event than non-event days. The growth rates of the fresh particles presented an annual cycle with maximum values in summer and the average growth rate to 25 nm for all the events was 4.9 ±0.7 nm h-1. Using air ion mobility distributions for the two periods we calculated average growth rate of 2.9 nm h-1 for the diameters 1.5 -3 nm.

  13. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  14. Relative humidity-dependent viscosities of isoprene-derived secondary organic material and atmospheric implications for isoprene-dominant forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Liu, P. F.; Hanna, S. J.; Li, Y. J.; Martin, S. T.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-05-01

    Oxidation of isoprene is an important source of secondary organic material (SOM) in atmospheric particles, especially in areas such as the Amazon Basin. Information on the viscosities, diffusion rates, and mixing times within isoprene-derived SOM is needed for accurate predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate. Currently, however, this information is not available. Using a bead-mobility technique and a poke-flow technique combined with fluid simulations, the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities of SOM produced from isoprene photo-oxidation were quantified for 20-60 ?m particles at 295 ± 1 K. From 84.5 to 0% RH, the viscosities for isoprene-derived SOM varied from ~ 2 × 10-1 to ~ 3 × 105 Pa s, implying that isoprene-derived SOM ranges from a liquid to a semisolid over this RH range. These viscosities correspond to diffusion coefficients of ~ 2 × 10-8 to ~ 2 × 10-14 cm2 s-1 for large organic molecules that follow the Stokes-Einstein relation. Based on the diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm isoprene-derived SOM particles ranges from approximately 0.1 h to less than 1 s. To illustrate the atmospheric implications of this study's results, the Amazon Basin is used as a case study for an isoprene-dominant forest. Considering the RH and temperature range observed in the Amazon Basin and with some assumptions about the dominant chemical compositions of SOM particles in the region, it is likely that SOM particles in this area are liquid and reach equilibrium with large gas-phase organic molecules on short time scales, less than or equal to approximately 0.1 h.

  15. Ideas and perspectives: on the emission of amines from terrestrial vegetation in the context of new atmospheric particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintermann, J.; Neftel, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this article we summarise recent science which shows how airborne amines, specifically methylamines (MAs), play a key role in new atmospheric particle formation (NPF) by stabilising small molecule clusters. Agricultural emissions are assumed to constitute the most important MA source, but given the short atmospheric residence time of MAs, they can hardly have a direct impact on NPF events observed in remote regions. This leads us to the presentation of existing knowledge focussing on natural vegetation-related MA sources. High MA contents as well as emissions by plants was already described in the 19th century. Strong MA emissions predominantly occur during flowering as part of a pollination strategy. The behaviour is species-specific, but examples of such species are common and widespread. In addition, vegetative plant tissue exhibiting high amounts of MAs might potentially lead to significant emissions. The decomposition of organic material constitutes another, potentially ubiquitous, source of airborne MAs. These mechanisms would provide sources, which could be crucial for the amine's role in NPF, especially in remote regions. Knowledge about vegetation-related amine emissions is, however, very limited, and thus it is also an open question how global change and the intensified cycling of reactive nitrogen over the last 200 years have altered amine emissions from vegetation with a corresponding effect on NPF.

  16. Ideas and Perspectives: On the emission of amines from terrestrial vegetation in the context of atmospheric new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintermann, J.; Neftel, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this article we summarise recent science, which shows how airborne amines, specifically methylamines (MAs), play a key role in atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) by stabilising small molecule clusters. Agricultural emissions are assumed to constitute the most important MA source, but given the short atmospheric residence time of MAs, they can hardly have a direct impact on NFP events observed in remote regions. This leads us to the presentation of existing knowledge focussing on natural vegetation-related MA sources. High MA contents as well as emissions by plants have already been described in the 19th century. Strong MA emissions predominantly occur during flowering as part of a pollination strategy. The behaviour is species specific, but examples of such species are common and widespread. In addition, vegetative plant tissue exhibiting high amounts of MAs might potentially lead to significant emissions, and the decomposition of organic material could constitute another source for airborne MAs. These mechanisms would provide sources, which could be crucial for the amine's role in NPF, especially in remote regions. Knowledge about vegetation-related amine emissions is, however, very limited and thus it is also an open question how Global Change and the intensified cycling of reactive nitrogen over the last 200 years have altered amine emissions from vegetation with a corresponding effect on NPF.

  17. Quantitative characterization of the spatial distribution of particles in materials: Application to materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parse, Joseph B.; Wert, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of second phase particles in engineering materials are known to affect certain mechanical properties. Progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of a convenient method for quantitative description of the spatial distribution of the second phase. This study intends to develop a broadly applicable method for the quantitative analysis and description of the spatial distribution of second phase particles. The method was designed to operate on a desktop computer. The Dirichlet tessellation technique (geometrical method for dividing an area containing an array of points into a set of polygons uniquely associated with the individual particles) was selected as the basis of an analysis technique implemented on a PC. This technique is being applied to the production of Al sheet by PM processing methods; vacuum hot pressing, forging, and rolling. The effect of varying hot working parameters on the spatial distribution of aluminum oxide particles in consolidated sheet is being studied. Changes in distributions of properties such as through-thickness near-neighbor distance correlate with hot-working reduction.

  18. Atmospheric forcing of the three-dimensional distribution of dust particles over Australia: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh Choobari, O.; Zawar-Reza, P.; Sturman, A.

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of atmospheric processes responsible for horizontal and vertical distribution of dust particles is important for identifying their transport pathways. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model, complemented by observations, was used to simulate and observe the three-dimensional distribution of Australian dust for a severe dust event during 22-23 September 2009. The passage of a cold front modified the boundary layer structure during this event, allowing dust to be lifted and subsequently transported for a significant distance. The model simulated the maximum dust concentrations to be located behind the cold front as a result of strong post-frontal wind speeds. The boundary layer depths were also shown to be significantly deeper behind the cold front where dust particles could be lifted to the top of the boundary layer by turbulent fluxes associated with strong mixing. However, dust was predicted to reach its maximum height ahead of the cold front as a result of lifting in the warm conveyor belt. Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data and the WRF/Chem model results for this event highlight two transport pathways of dust: southeastward to the Tasman Sea and northward toward tropical regions of Australia. The vertical distribution of dust from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite data and cross-sectional analysis of the model results indicate that significant amounts of dust aerosols were transported over the Tasman Sea toward New Zealand within the lower atmosphere.

  19. The effect of atmospheric aerosol particles and clouds on Net Ecosystem Exchange in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. F.; Adams, D. K.; Artaxo, P.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon cycling in Amazonia is closely linked to atmospheric processes and climate in the region as a consequence of the strong coupling between the atmosphere and biosphere. This work examines the effects of changes in net radiation due to atmospheric aerosol particles and clouds on the Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of CO2 in the Amazon region. Some of the major environmental factors affecting the photosynthetic activity of plants, such as air temperature and relative humidity were also examined. An algorithm for clear-sky irradiance was developed and used to determine the relative irradiance f, which quantifies the percentage of solar radiation absorbed and scattered due to atmospheric aerosol particles and clouds. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) was calculated from irradiances measured with the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor, onboard the TERRA and AQUA satellites, and was validated with ground-based AOD measurements from AERONET sun photometers. Carbon fluxes were measured using eddy-correlation techniques at LBA (The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia) flux towers. Two sites were studied: the Biological Reserve of Jaru (located in Rondonia) and the Cuieiras Biological Reserve (located in a preserved region in central Amazonia). In the Jaru Biological Reserve, a 29% increase in carbon uptake (NEE) was observed when the AOD ranged from 0.10 to 1.5. In the Cuieiras Biological Reserve, this effect was smaller, accounting for an approximately 20% increase in NEE. High aerosol loading (AOD above 3 at 550 nm) or cloud cover leads to reductions in solar flux and strong decreases in photosynthesis up to the point where NEE approaches 0. The observed increase in NEE is attributed to an enhancement (~50%) in the diffuse fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Significant changes in air temperature and relative humidity resulting from changes in solar radiation fluxes under high aerosol loading were also observed at both sites. Considering the long-range transport of aerosols in Amazonia, the observed changes in NEE for these two sites may occur over large areas in Amazonia, significantly altering the carbon balance in the largest rainforest of the world.

  20. The effect of atmospheric aerosol particles and clouds on net ecosystem exchange in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F.; Adams, D. K.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-07-01

    Carbon cycling in the Amazon is closely linked to atmospheric processes and climate in the region as a consequence of the strong coupling between the atmosphere and biosphere. This work examines the effects of changes in net radiation due to atmospheric aerosol particles and clouds on the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 in the Amazon region. Some of the major environmental factors affecting the photosynthetic activity of plants, such as air temperature and relative humidity, were also examined. An algorithm for clear-sky irradiance was developed and used to determine the relative irradiance, f, which quantifies the percentage of solar radiation absorbed and scattered due to atmospheric aerosol particles and clouds. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) was calculated from irradiances measured with the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor, onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, and was validated with ground-based AOD measurements from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sun photometers. Carbon fluxes were measured using eddy covariance technique at the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) flux towers. Two sites were studied: the Jaru Biological Reserve (RBJ), located in Rondonia, and the Cuieiras Biological Reserve at the K34 LBA tower (located in a preserved region in the central Amazon). Analysis was performed continuously from 1999 to 2009 at K34 and from 1999 to 2002 at RBJ, and includes wet, dry and transition seasons. In the Jaru Biological Reserve, a 29% increase in carbon uptake (NEE) was observed when the AOD ranged from 0.10 to 1.5 at 550 nm. In the Cuieiras Biological Reserve, the aerosol effect on NEE was smaller, accounting for an approximate 20% increase in NEE. High aerosol loading (AOD above 3 at 550 nm) or high cloud cover leads to reductions in solar flux and strong decreases in photosynthesis up to the point where NEE approaches zero. The observed increase in NEE is attributed to an enhancement (~50%) in the diffuse fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). The enhancement in diffuse PAR can be done through increases in aerosols and/or clouds. In the present study, it was not possible to separate these two components. Significant changes in air temperature and relative humidity resulting from changes in solar radiation fluxes under high aerosol loading were also observed at both sites. Considering the long-range transport of aerosols in the Amazon, the observed changes in NEE for these two sites may occur over large areas in the Amazon, significantly altering the carbon balance in the largest rainforest in the world.

  1. Soft materials design via self assembly of functionalized icosahedral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Vidyalakshmi Chockalingam

    In this work we simulate self assembly of icosahedral building blocks using a coarse grained model of the icosahedral capsid of virus 1m1c. With significant advancements in site-directed functionalization of these macromolecules [1], we propose possible application of such self-assembled materials for drug delivery. While there have been some reports on organization of viral particles in solution through functionalization, exploiting this behaviour for obtaining well-ordered stoichiometric structures has not yet been explored. Our work is in well agreement with the earlier simulation studies of icosahedral gold nanocrystals, giving chain like patterns [5] and also broadly in agreement with the wet lab works of Finn, M.G. et al., who have shown small predominantly chain-like aggregates with mannose-decorated Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) [22] and small two dimensional aggregates with oligonucleotide functionalization on the CPMV capsid [1]. To quantify the results of our Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations I developed analysis routines in MATLAB using which we found the most preferable nearest neighbour distances (from the radial distribution function (RDF) calculations) for different lengths of the functional groups and under different implicit solvent conditions, and the most frequent coordination number for a virus particle (histogram plots further using the information from RDF). Visual inspection suggests that our results most likely span the low temperature limits explored in the works of Finn, M.G. et al., and show a good degree of agreement with the experimental results in [1] at an annealing temperature of 4°C. Our work also reveals the possibility of novel stoichiometric N-mer type aggregates which could be synthesized using these capsids with appropriate functionalization and solvent conditions.

  2. Characterization of spatial impact of particles emitted from a cement material production facility on outdoor particle deposition in the surrounding community.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Fan, Zhihua; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Stern, Alan H; Lioy, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution of a facility that processes steel production slag into raw material for cement production to local outdoor particle deposition in Camden, NJ. A dry deposition sampler that can house four 37-mm quartz fiber filters was developed and used for the collection of atmospheric particle deposits. Two rounds of particle collection (3-4 weeks each) were conducted in 8-11 locations 200-800 m downwind of the facility. Background samples were concurrently collected in a remote area located -2 km upwind from the facility. In addition, duplicate surface wipe samples were collected side-by-side from each of the 13 locations within the same sampling area during the first deposition sampling period. One composite source material sample was also collected from a pile stored in the facility. Both the bulk of the source material and the < 38 microm fraction subsample were analyzed to obtain the elemental source profile. The particle deposition flux in the study area was higher (24-83 mg/m2 x day) than at the background sites (13-17 mg/m2day). The concentration of Ca, a major element in the cement source production material, was found to exponentially decrease with increasing downwind distance from the facility (P < 0.05). The ratio of Ca/Al, an indicator of Ca enrichment due to anthropogenic sources in a given sample, showed a similar trend. These observations suggest a significant contribution of the facility to the local particle deposition. The contribution of the facility to outdoor deposited particle mass was further estimated by three independent models using the measurements obtained from this study. The estimated contributions to particle deposition in the study area were 1.8-7.4% from the regression analysis of the Ca concentration in particle deposition samples against the distance from the facility, 0-11% from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source-receptor model, and 7.6-13% from the EPA Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST3) dispersion model using the particle-size-adjusted permit-based emissions estimates. PMID:22070034

  3. Characterization of Spatial Impact of Particles Emitted from a Cement Material Production Facility on Outdoor Particle Deposition in the Surrounding Community

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Fan, Zhihua (Tina); McCandlish, Elizabeth; Stern, Alan H.; Lioy, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution of a facility that processes steel production slag into raw material for cement production to local outdoor particle deposition in Camden, NJ. A dry deposition sampler that can house four 37-mm quartz fiber filters was developed and used for the collection of atmospheric particle deposits. Two rounds of particle collection (3–4 weeks each) were conducted in 8–11 locations 200–800 m downwind of the facility. Background samples were concurrently collected in a remote area located ~2 km upwind from the facility. In addition, duplicate surface wipe samples were collected side-by-side from each of the 13 locations within the same sampling area during the first deposition sampling period. One composite source material sample was also collected from a pile stored in the facility. Both the bulk of the source material and the <38 ?m fraction subsample were analyzed to obtain the elemental source profile. The particle deposition flux in the study area was higher (24–83 mg/m2 day) than at the background sites (13–17 mg/m2·day). The concentration of Ca, a major element in the cement source production material, was found to exponentially decrease with increasing downwind distance from the facility (P < 0.05). The ratio of Ca/Al, an indicator of Ca enrichment due to anthropogenic sources in a given sample, showed a similar trend. These observations suggest a significant contribution of the facility to the local particle deposition. The contribution of the facility to outdoor deposited particle mass was further estimated by three independent models using the measurements obtained from this study. The estimated contributions to particle deposition in the study area were 1.8–7.4% from the regression analysis of the Ca concentration in particle deposition samples against the distance from the facility, 0–11% from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source-receptor model, and 7.6–13% from the EPA Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST3) dispersion model using the particle-size-adjusted permit-based emissions estimates. PMID:22070034

  4. Light scattering at small angles by atmospheric irregular particles: modelling and laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurton, T.; Renard, J.-B.; Vignelles, D.; Jeannot, M.; Akiki, R.; Mineau, J.-L.; Tonnelier, T.

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated the behaviour of light scattering by particulates of various sizes (0.1 ?m to 100 ?m) at a small scattering angle (below 20°). It has been previously shown that, for a small angle, the scattered intensities are weakly dependent upon the particulates' composition (Renard et al., 2010). Particles found in the atmosphere exhibit roughness that leads to large discrepancies with the classical Mie solution in terms of scattered intensities in the low angular set-up. This article focuses on building an effective theoretical tool to predict the behaviour of light scattering by real particulates at a small scattering angle. We present both the classical Mie theory and its adaptation to the case of rough particulates with a fairly simple roughness parameterisation. An experimental device was built, corresponding to the angular set-up of interest (low scattering angle and therefore low angular aperture). Measurements are presented that confirm the theoretical results with good agreement. It was found that differences between the classical Mie solution and actual measurements - especially for large particulates - can be attributed to the particulate roughness. It was also found that, in this low angular set-up, saturation of the scattered intensities occurs for relatively small values of the roughness parameter. This confirms the low variability in the scattered intensities observed for atmospheric particulates of different kinds. A direct interest of this study is a broadening of the dynamic range of optical counters: using a small angle of aperture for measurements allows greater dynamics in terms of particle size. Thus it allows a single device to observe a broad range of particle sizes whilst utilising the same electronics.

  5. Retrieving of Microphysical Properties of Spheroidal Particles in the Atmosphere-Surface System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkin, S.; Lyapustin, A.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation, we continue our study of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm [1, 2] as a tool for retrieval of properties of particles, suspended in the plane-parallel atmosphere coupled with the reflecting surface [3]. The effect of polarization of light is included. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm provides an iterative solution to the problem of minimization of a function over a space of its parameters. Each iteration involves solution of the forward problem and computation of the Jacobian matrix (the derivatives of signal over optical parameters). The recently developed code APC (Atmospheric Polarization Computations) is used to solve the forward problem [4, 5]. We use O.Dubovik's et al. [6] package to simulate scattering by spheroidal particles. Unlike for the purely spherical particles (Mie scattering), the Jacobian matrix for spheroids is computed numerically. We will consider retrievals over the land and the ocean with the bidirectional polarization distribution functions from [7-8]. Using MISR observation geometry and spectral bands [9] as an example, we will discuss the problem of convergence of iterations, sensitivity of the algorithm to the initial guess, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the geometry of observation. Possible ways of acceleration of iterations will be discussed, as well as the role of polarization in the retrieval process. References: 1. Levenberg K, Q. App. Math., 1944, V.2, P.164. 2. Marquardt D, J. Appl. Math., 1963, V.11, N.2, P.431. 3. Korkin S, Lyapustin A, AGU 2012, A23A-011. 4. Korkin S et al., JQSRT, 2013, V.127, P.1 5. ftp://climate1.gsfc.nasa.gov/skorkin/ 6. Dubovik O et al., Geophys. Res. Letters, 2006, V.111, D11208. 7. Ota Y, et al., JQSRT, 2010, V.111, P.878. 8. Nadal F, Breon F-M, IEEE Trans. Geos. Rem. Sens., 1999, V.37, N.3, P.1709. 9. http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov/Mission/misrInstrument/

  6. Effects of Sintering Atmosphere on the Mechanical Properties of Al-Fe Particle-Reinforced Al-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yang; Shen, Rujuan; Ni, Song; Xiao, Daihong; Song, Min

    2015-05-01

    Al-based composites reinforced by Al-Fe intermetallic compounds have been fabricated by powder metallurgy technique. The reinforcements were formed in the aluminum matrix by in situ solid-state reaction between pure Al and pure Fe powders. The effects of sintering atmosphere on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the composites were systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and compressive tests. It has been shown that Al-Fe intermetallic particles (including a large number of the Fe-Al5Fe2 core-shell structured particles) were the dominant reinforcements in the composites sintered under Ar atmosphere, while pure Fe particles were the dominant reinforcements in the composites sintered under N2 atmosphere. N2 atmosphere is more effective than Ar atmosphere in increasing the sintered density of the composites due to the formation of aluminum nitride, which can effectively fill the pores. Thus, the compressive mechanical properties of the composites sintered under N2 atmosphere are higher than those of the composites sintered under Ar atmosphere.

  7. Iodine observed in new particle formation events in the Arctic atmosphere during ACCACIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Najera, J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Flynn, M. J.; Taylor, J. W.; Liu, D.; Darbyshire, E.; Carpenter, L. J.; Chance, R.; McFiggans, G.

    2014-11-01

    Accurately accounting for new particle formation (NPF) is crucial to our ability to predict aerosol number concentrations and thus cloud properties, which is in turn vital in simulating radiative transfer and climate. Here we present an analysis of NPF events observed in the Greenland Sea during the summertime as part of the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) project. While NPF events have been reported in the Arctic before, we were able, for the first time, to detect iodine in the growing particles using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) during a persistent event in the region of the coastal sea ice near Greenland. Given the potency of iodine as a nucleation precursor, the results imply that iodine was responsible for the initial NPF, a phenomenon that has been reported at lower latitudes and associated with molecular iodine emissions from coastal macroalgae. The initial source of iodine in this instance is not clear, but it was associated with air originating approximately 1 day previously over melting coastal sea ice. These results show that atmospheric models must consider iodine as a source of new particles in addition to established precursors such as sulphur compounds.

  8. Children exposure to atmospheric particles in indoor of Lisbon primary schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Susana Marta; Canha, Nuno; Silva, Ana; Freitas, Maria do Carmo; Pegas, Priscilla; Alves, Célia; Evtyugina, Margarita; Pio, Casimiro Adrião

    2011-12-01

    Evidence continues to emerge showing that poor Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) can cause illness requiring absence from schools, and can cause acute health symptoms that decrease students' performance. Since children spend on average 7-11 h per weekday at school, the IAQ in classrooms is expected to play a key role in the assessment of the effects of their personal exposure to air pollution. Within this context the present study was conducted in order to fulfill three primary objectives 1) to measure the levels and the element composition of PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10, in three primary schools placed in Lisbon, in order to assess the children exposure to these pollutants; 2) to study the relationship between indoor and outdoor atmospheric particles concentrations and 3) to investigate the sources of high aerosols concentrations in classrooms. In the studied classrooms, the concentrations of coarse particles significantly exceeded the ambient levels. Element concentrations suggested that the physical activity of students highly contributed to the re-suspension of sedimented particles. The high levels of CO 2 indicated that in these schools the ventilation was inadequate. This fact contributed to the establishment of poor IAQ.

  9. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Particle Introduction to a Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Ionization Source

    SciTech Connect

    Carado, Anthony J.; Quarles, C. Derrick; Duffin, Andrew M.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Russo, Richard; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Eiden, Gregory C.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2012-01-16

    This work describes the use of a compact, liquid sampling – atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source to ionize metal particles within a laser ablation aerosol. Mass analysis was performed with a Thermo Scientific Exactive Mass Spectrometer which utilizes an orbitrap mass analyzer capable of producing mass resolution exceeding M/?M > 160,000. The LS-APGD source generates a low-power plasma between the surface of an electrolytic solution flowing at several µl min-1 through a fused silica capillary and a counter electrode consisting of a stainless steel capillary employed to deliver the laser ablation particles into the plasma. Sample particles of approximately 100 nm were generated with an Applied Spectra femtosecond laser located remotely and transported through 25 meters of polyurethane tubing by means of argon carrier gas. Samples consisted of an oxygen free copper shard, a disk of solder, and a one-cent U.S. coin. Analyte signal onset was readily detectable relative to the background signal produced by the carrier gas alone. The high mass resolution capability of the orbitrap mass spectrometer was demonstrated on the solder sample with resolution exceeding 90,000 for Pb and 160,000 for Cu. In addition, results from a laser ablation depth-profiling experiment of a one cent coin revealed retention of the relative locations of the ~10 µm copper cladding and zinc rich bulk layers.

  10. Observational and laboratory studies of optical properties of black and brown carbon particles in the atmosphere using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Light absorption and scattering by aerosols are as an important contributor to radiation balance in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) is considered to be the most potent light absorbing material in the visible region of the spectrum, although light absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon or BrC) and mineral dust may also act as sources of significant absorption, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) and shorter visible wavelength regions. The optical properties of such particles depend on wavelength, particle size and shape, morphology, coating, and complex refractive index (or chemical composition), and therefore accurate in situ measurements of the wavelength dependence of the optical properties of particles are needed. Recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the direct measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients of particles suspended in air. We have applied these techniques to the observational studies of optical properties of BC and BrC in an urban site in Japan and to the laboratory studies of optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds and those of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). In the presentation, the basic principles of these techniques and the results obtained in our studies and in the recent literatures will be overviewed. References Guo, X. et al., Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer, Atmos. Environ., 94, 428-437 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Measurements of aerosol optical properties in central Tokyo during summertime using cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Comparison with conventional techniques, Atmos. Environ., 44, 3034-3042 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene, J. Geophys. Res., 115, D24204, doi:10.1029/2010JD014387 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Wavelength dependence of refractive index of secondary organic aerosols generated during the ozonolysis and photooxidation of alpha-pinene, SOLA, 8, 119-124 (2012). Nakayama, T. et al., Wavelength and NOx dependent complex refractive index of SOAs generated from the photooxidation of toluene, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 531-545 (2013). Nakayama, T. et al., Properties of light-absorbing aerosols in the Nagoya urban area, Japan, in August 2011 and January 2012: Contributions of brown carbon and lensing effect, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 12721-12739 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Characterization of a three wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and a photoacoustic extinctiometer (PAX), J. Meteor. Soc. Japan, (2015, in press).

  11. Potential health impact of ultrafine particles under clean and polluted urban atmospheric conditions: a model-based study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Leila Droprinchinski; Martins, Jorge A; Freitas, Edmilson D; Mazzoli, Caroline R; Gonçalves, Fabio Luiz T; Ynoue, Rita Y; Hallak, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Taciana Toledo A; Andrade, Maria de Fatima

    2010-03-01

    The main goal of this study was to improve the knowledge of ultrafine particle number distributions in large urban areas and also to call the attention to the importance of these particles on assessing health risks. Measurements of aerosol size distributions were performed during 2 weeks, with distinct pollutant concentrations (polluted and clean periods), on the rooftop of a building located in downtown of the megacity of São Paulo, Brazil. CO, NO(2), PM(10), SO(2), and O(3) concentrations and meteorological variables were also used. Aerosol size distribution measurements showed that geometric mean diameters of the size spectra in the polluted period are on average considerably larger than those in the clean one. Besides the fact that total number of ultrafine particles did not show significant differences, during the polluted period, geometric mean diameter was larger than during the clean one. The results of a mathematical model of particle deposition on human respiratory tract indicated a more significant effect of smaller particles fraction of the spectra, which predominate under clean atmospheric conditions. The results also indicated that urban environmental conditions usually considered good for air quality, under the criteria of low mass concentration, do not properly serve as air quality standard to very small particles. In the size range of ultrafine particles, this traditional clean atmospheric condition can offer a strong risk to pulmonary hazards, since the cleansing of the atmosphere creates good conditions to increase the concentration of nucleation mode particles. PMID:20376166

  12. Modelling the contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds to new particle formation in the Jülich plant atmosphere chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Liao, L.; Mogensen, D.; Dal Maso, M.; Rusanen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Mentel, T. F.; Wildt, J.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2015-09-01

    We used the Aerosol Dynamics gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM) to simulate the contribution of BVOC plant emissions to the observed new particle formation during photooxidation experiments performed in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Chamber and to evaluate how well smog chamber experiments can mimic the atmospheric conditions during new particle formation events. ADCHAM couples the detailed gas-phase chemistry from Master Chemical Mechanism with a novel aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module. Our model simulations reveal that the observed particle growth may have either been controlled by the formation rate of semi- and low-volatility organic compounds in the gas phase or by acid catalysed heterogeneous reactions between semi-volatility organic compounds in the particle surface layer (e.g. peroxyhemiacetal dimer formation). The contribution of extremely low-volatility organic gas-phase compounds to the particle formation and growth was suppressed because of their rapid and irreversible wall losses, which decreased their contribution to the nano-CN formation and growth compared to the atmospheric situation. The best agreement between the modelled and measured total particle number concentration (R2 > 0.95) was achieved if the nano-CN was formed by kinetic nucleation involving both sulphuric acid and organic compounds formed from OH oxidation of BVOCs.

  13. Processing materials inside an atmospheric-pressure radiofrequency nonthermal plasma discharge

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Park, Jaeyoung; Herrmann, Hans W.

    2006-04-11

    Apparatus for the processing of materials involving placing a material either placed between an radio-frequency electrode and a ground electrode, or which is itself one of the electrodes. This is done in atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus effectively etches or cleans substrates, such as silicon wafers, or provides cleaning of spools and drums, and uses a gas containing an inert gas and a chemically reactive gas.

  14. Simulated atmospheric processing of iron oxyhydroxide minerals at low pH: Roles of particle size and acid anion in iron dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Lentz, Robert W.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that iron dissolution in Fe-containing dust aerosol can be linked to source material (mineral or anthropogenic), mineralogy, and iron speciation. All of these factors need to be incorporated into atmospheric chemistry models if these models are to accurately predict the impact of Fe-containing dusts into open ocean waters. In this report, we combine dissolution measurements along with spectroscopy and microscopy to focus on nanoscale size effects in the dissolution of Fe-containing minerals in low-pH environments and the importance of acid type, including HNO3, H2SO4, and HCl, on dissolution. All of these acids are present in the atmosphere, and dust particles have been shown to be associated with nitrate, sulfate, and/or chloride. These measurements are done under light and dark conditions so as to simulate and distinguish between daytime and nighttime atmospheric chemical processing. Both size (nano- versus micron-sized particles) and anion (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride) are found to play significant roles in the dissolution of ?-FeOOH under both light and dark conditions. The current study highlights these important, yet unconsidered, factors in the atmospheric processing of iron-containing mineral dust aerosol. PMID:20360560

  15. Atmospheric new particle formation and the potential role of organic peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawny, Katrin; Bonn, Boris; Jacobi, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere belongs to the currently most discussed aspects of atmospheric aerosols with significant implications for cloud formation and microphysics, once these particles have grown beyond about 50 nm in particle diameter. If these particles act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei they can affect the radiation budget at the Earths surface and cause climate couplings important to understand when aiming to predict climate change scenarios. One aspect widely discussed is the potential contribution of organic trace gases from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this study we analysed datasets from a Central European measurement station in Germany in a spruce forest approximately 800 m above sea level and a distance of about 20 km to Frankfurt (southeast). Continuous particle size distribution measurements were classified in nucleation-event or not and unidentified and intercompared to meteorological and basic trace gas observations. Additionally meteorological backtrajektories calculated by the German Weather Service for the station every 12 hours have been considered. These led to the following conclusions: Nucleation was most likely if (A) the air has not get significantly into touch with the surface within the last days, or if (B) at least human impact was minor and the air faced forest surfaces mainly (northwest). As observed already in Hyytiälä (Finland) nucleation appeared, when the relative humidity and ambient water vapour mixing ratio were low, ozone was high and the condensation sink was small. A further important point was the amount of global radiation measured at the Taunus Observatory (Mt. Kleiner Feldberg). The higher the radiation, the more likely a nucleation event and the more intense. Temperature impacted on the intensity of nucleation, i.e. the higher the temperature the more intense the event, but did not directly affect the occurrence of an event or not, if a threshold value of ca. -6 °C was exceeded. This latter observation indicates a potential role of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as their emission is strongly coupled to temperature. Because of our observations in the laboratory and beacuse of observed nighttime events, we approximated the concentration of different radicals, e.g. OH, HO2 and RO2. The values of RO2 and especially the ones of biogenic (e.g. terpene) origin showed a good correlation with new particle formation occurrence and seemed to be one essential point of several to allow new particle formation to occur. This might be an indication of the important role of the biosphere and its stress effects for the particle formation process. The seasonality observed for the time period since February 2008 displayed two maxima in May and August, September with a minimum in June, when the weather conditions were more humid and is in line with the observations made above. July and August displayed the higest HO2 concentrations, which will act as a sink for the organic peroxy radicals. In connection to the supressive effect of water vapour on terpene induced nucleating molecules (secondary ozonides) this might serve as an explanation for the commonly observed summer minimum in nucleation events.

  16. ATMOSPHERIC DRY PARTICLE DEPOSITION OF POPS AND TRACE METALS IN AN URBAN- AND INDUSTRIALLY-IMPACTED MID-ATLANTIC ESTUARY (AEOLOS B MID-ATLANTIC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of hazardous air pollutants into the coastal urban-industrial atmosphere increase atmospheric depositional fluxes to proximate water bodies. Dry deposition of large particles containing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and trace metals were a major contribu...

  17. Gas-to-Particle Conversion in Surface Discharge Nonthermal Plasmas and Its Implications for Atmospheric Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental data on gas-to-particle conversion of benzene using nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology and discusses the possibility of its technical application in atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol measurement using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) revealed that the parts of benzene molecules were converted into a nanometer-sized aerosol. Aerosol formation was found to be highly related with the missing part in carbon balance. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the aerosols formed in synthetic humid air are the collection of nanoparticles. The carbonyl band (C=O) was found to be an important chemical constituent in the aerosol. The potential of the NTP as an accelerated test tool in studying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from VOCs will be also addressed. PMID:22163781

  18. Gas-to-particle conversion in surface discharge nonthermal plasmas and its implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental data on gas-to-particle conversion of benzene using nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology and discusses the possibility of its technical application in atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol measurement using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) revealed that the parts of benzene molecules were converted into a nanometer-sized aerosol. Aerosol formation was found to be highly related with the missing part in carbon balance. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the aerosols formed in synthetic humid air are the collection of nanoparticles. The carbonyl band (C=O) was found to be an important chemical constituent in the aerosol. The potential of the NTP as an accelerated test tool in studying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from VOCs will be also addressed. PMID:22163781

  19. Measurement of the Hygroscopicity and Wet Removal of Black-Carbon-Containing Particles in the Urban Atmosphere of Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, Sho; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Makoto; Schwarz, Joshua; Takami, Akinori; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Megacities are very large, concentrated anthropogenic sources of black carbon (BC) aerosols. Freshly emitted BC particles inside megacities affect local air quality and regional and global climate. The microphysical properties (e.g., number size distribution, coating thickness, and hygroscopicity) of atmospheric BC-containing particles are important because their efficiency of wet removal from the atmosphere can be highly dependent on these properties. In this study, we developed a method for independent measurement of the hygroscopicity of BC-free and BC-containing particles, and then applied it to the ambient observation in the urban atmosphere of Tokyo. A single particle soot photometer (SP2) was modified as a humidified-SP2, which quantifies the BC-core mass (BC content within a BC-containing particle) and optical diameter of individual aerosol particles, under controlled relative humidity (RH), by detecting both the laser-induced incandescence emitted and laser light scattered from each particle (Schwarz et al., 2014, Journal of Aerosol Science). Measurements of growth factor (GF) and hygroscopicity parameter ? for BC-free and BC-containing particles can be achieved by combining an aerosol particle mass analyzer with the newly developed humidified-SP2. This method was tested in the laboratory and then employed in ambient observations in summer 2014. The ambient measurements were made while also measuring number size distribution of BC cores in rainwater with a nebulizer-SP2 system. Throughout the observation period, for BC-containing particles with a dry diameter of about 200 nm, the particles with smaller BC fractions tended to represent greater water uptake, and the number fraction of the less hygroscopic (GF < 1.2 at 85% RH) BC-containing particles was more than 70% of the total BC-containing particles. The measured average number size distribution of BC cores in rainwater was larger than that in the surface air before precipitation began, and the dependence of the wet removal of BC-containing particles on their BC-core sizes was successfully explained by the measured microphysical properties of BC-containing particles in the air and an assumed maximum supersaturation that the particles would have experienced during rain events. These measurement data indicated that BC-containing particles in Tokyo, especially particles with small BC cores (or with high critical supersaturation), were efficiently transported upward without being removed by precipitation.

  20. Atmospheric particles retrieval using satellite remote sensing: Applications for sandstorms and volcanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yingxin

    This thesis is concerned with atmospheric particles produced by sandstorms and volcanic eruptions. Three studies were conducted in order to examine particle retrieval methodology, and apply these towards an improved understanding of large-scale sandstorms. A thermal infrared remote sensing retrieval method developed by Wen and Rose [1994], which retrieves particle sizes, optical depth, and total masses of silicate particles in the volcanic cloud, was applied to an April 07, 2001 sandstorm over northern China, using MODIS. Results indicate that the area of the dust cloud observed was 1.34 million km2, the mean particle radius of the dust was 1.44 mum, and the mean optical depth at 11 mum was 0.79. The mean burden of dust was approximately 4.8 tons/km2 and the main portion of the dust storm on April 07, 2001 contained 6.5 million tons of dust. The results are supported by both independent remote sensing data (TOMS) and in-situ data for a similar event in 1998, therefore suggesting that the technique is appropriate for quantitative analysis of silicate dust clouds. This is the first quantitative evaluation of annual and seasonal dust loading in 2003 produced by Saharan dust storms by satellite remote sensing analysis. The retrieved mean particle effective radii of 2003 dust events are between 1.7--2.6 mum which is small enough to be inhaled and is hazardous to human health. The retrieved yearly dust mass load is 658--690 Tg, which is ˜45% of the annual global mineral dust production. Winter is the heaviest dust loading season in the year 2003, which is more than 5 times larger than that in the summer season in 2003.The mean optical depths at 11 mum in the winter season (around 0.7) are higher than those in the summer season (around 0.5). The results could help both meteorologists and environmental scientists to evaluate and predict the hazard degree caused by Saharan dust storms. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  2. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  3. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  4. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  5. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  6. Risk Assessment Related to Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gas and Particle Phases near Industrial Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Noelia; Cuadras, Anna; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inhalation is one of the main means of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because of their ubiquitous presence in the atmosphere. However, most studies have considered only PAHs found in the particle phase and have omitted the contribution of the gas-phase PAHs to the risk. Objective: We estimated the lifetime lung cancer risk from PAH exposure by inhalation in people living next to the largest chemical site in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area. Methods: We determined 18 PAHs in the atmospheric gas and particle phase. We monitored the PAHs for 1 year in three locations near the chemical site in different seasons. We used toxic equivalence factors to calculate benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) equivalents (BaP-eq) for individual PAHs and applied the World Health Organization unit risk (UR) for BaP (UR = 8.7 × 10–5) to estimate lifetime cancer risks due to PAH exposures. Results: We observed some spatial and seasonal variability in PAH concentrations. The contribution of gas-phase PAHs to the total BaP-eq value was between 34% and 86%. The total estimated average lifetime lung cancer risk due to PAH exposure in the study area was 1.2 × 10–4. Conclusions: The estimated risk was higher than values recommended by the World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency but lower than the threshold value of 10–3 that is considered an indication of definite risk according to similar risk studies. The results also showed that risk may be underestimated if the contributions of gas-phase PAHs are not considered. PMID:21478082

  7. Influences of fireworks on chemical characteristics of atmospheric fine and coarse particles during Taiwan's Lantern Festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Chien, Li-Hsing; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Jen, Yi-Hsiu; Ie, Iau-Ren

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, the celebration activities of various folk-custom festivals have been getting more and more attention from the citizens in Taiwan. Festivities throughout the whole island are traditionally accompanied by loud and brightly colored firework displays. Among these activities, the firework displays during Taiwan's Lantern Festival in Kaohsiung harbor is one of the largest festivals in Taiwan each year. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the influence of fireworks displays on the ambient air quality during the Taiwan's Lantern Festival. Field measurements of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) were conducted on February 9th-11th, 2009 during Taiwan's Lantern Festival in Kaohsiung City. Moreover, three kinds of fireworks powders obtained from the same manufacturing factory producing Kaohsiung Lantern Festival fireworks were burned in a self-designed combustion chamber to determine the physicochemical properties of the fireworks' particles and to establish the source profile of firework burning. Several metallic elements of PM during the firework display periods were notably higher than those during the non-firework periods. The concentrations of Mg, K, Pb, and Sr in PM2.5 during the firework periods were 10 times higher than those during the non-firework periods. Additionally, the Cl-/Na+ ratio was approximately 3 during the firework display periods as Cl- came from the chlorine content of the firework powder. Moreover, the OC/EC ratio increased up to 2.8. Results obtained from PCA and CMB receptor modeling showed that major sources of atmospheric particles during the firework display periods in Kaohsiung harbor were fireworks, vehicular exhausts, soil dusts and marine sprays. Particularly, on February 10th, the firework displays contributed approximately 25.2% and 16.6% of PM10 at two downwind sampling sites, respectively.

  8. Dechlorane Plus and decabromodiphenyl ether in atmospheric particles of northeast Asian cities.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kajimura, Keiji; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Toriba, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric particles were collected in several cities in Japan (Sapporo, Sagamihara, Kanazawa, and Kitakyushu), Korea (Busan), and China (Beijing) using a high-volume air sampler equipped with a quartz fiber filter. The summer and winter samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry for Dechlorane Plus (DP). Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) was also analyzed for the samples from Kanazawa and Beijing. DP was detected in all samples. The mean total DP (?DP) concentration was highest (6.7 pg/m(3)) and lowest (0.87 pg/m(3)) in the winter samples from Sagamihara and Busan, respectively. The seasonal variation of DP concentrations varied by sampling site in this study. BDE-209 was detected in all the analyzed samples except for one of the Kanazawa winter samples. BDE-209 concentration was considerably higher in Beijing than in Kanazawa. Significant correlations were found between the concentrations of ?DP and BDE-209 in the winter samples from Kanazawa and in both summer and winter samples from Beijing. This similarity in the atmospheric behavior of DP and BDE-209, especially in winter, is assumed to reflect a common end usage and release mechanism. PMID:24737022

  9. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 ?g m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 ?g m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 ?g m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  10. Health risk assessment for residents exposed to atmospheric diesel exhaust particles in southern region of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chio, Chia-Pin; Liao, Chung-Min; Tsai, Ying-I.; Cheng, Man-Ting; Chou, Wei-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Evidence shows a strong association among air pollution, oxidative stress (OS), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, and diseases. Recent studies indicated that the aging, human neurodegenerative diseases and cancers resulted from mitochondrial dysfunction and OS. The purpose of this study is to provide a probabilistic risk assessment model to quantify the atmospheric diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced pre-cancer biomarker response and cancer incidence risk for residents in south Taiwan. We conducted entirely monthly particulate matter sampling data at five sites in Kaohsiung of south Taiwan in the period 2002-2003. Three findings were found: (i) the DEP dose estimates and cancer risk quantification had heterogeneously spatiotemporal difference in south Taiwan, (ii) the pre-cancer DNA damage biomarker and cancer incidence estimates had a positive yet insignificant association, and (iii) all the estimates of cancer incidence in south Taiwan populations fell within and slight lower than the values from previous cancer epidemiological investigations. In this study, we successfully assessed the tumor incidence for residents posed by DEP exposure in south Taiwan compared with the epidemiological approach. Our approach provides a unique way for assessing human health risk for residences exposed to atmospheric DEP depending on specific combinations of local and regional conditions. Our work implicates the importance of incorporating both environmental and health risk impacts into models of air pollution exposure to guide adaptive mitigation strategies.

  11. Effect of atmospheric aging on volatility and reactive oxygen species of biodiesel exhaust nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhesalian, A. M.; Stevanovic, S.; Rahman, M. M.; Faghihi, E. M.; Bottle, S. E.; Masri, A. R.; Brown, R. J.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2015-08-01

    In the prospect of limited energy resources and climate change, effects of alternative biofuels on primary emissions are being extensively studied. Our two recent studies have shown that biodiesel fuel composition has a significant impact on primary particulate matter emissions. It was also shown that particulate matter caused by biodiesels was substantially different from the emissions due to petroleum diesel. Emissions appeared to have higher oxidative potential with the increase in oxygen content and decrease of carbon chain length and unsaturation levels of fuel molecules. Overall, both studies concluded that chemical composition of biodiesel is more important than its physical properties in controlling exhaust particle emissions. This suggests that the atmospheric aging processes, including secondary organic aerosol formation, of emissions from different fuels will be different as well. In this study, measurements were conducted on a modern common-rail diesel engine. To get more information on realistic properties of tested biodiesel particulate matter once they are released into the atmosphere, particulate matter was exposed to atmospheric oxidants, ozone and ultra-violet light; and the change in their properties was monitored for different biodiesel blends. Upon the exposure to oxidative agents, the chemical composition of the exhaust changes. It triggers the cascade of photochemical reactions resulting in the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particulate phase. In most of the cases, aging lead to the increase in volatility and oxidative potential, and the increment of change was mainly dependent on the chemical composition of fuels as the leading cause for the amount and the type of semi-volatile compounds present in the exhaust.

  12. Effect of atmospheric ageing on volatility and ROS of biodiesel exhaust nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhesalian, A. M.; Stevanovic, S.; Rahman, M. M.; Faghihi, E. M.; Bottle, S. E.; Masri, A. R.; Brown, R. J.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2015-03-01

    In the prospect of limited energy resources and climate change, effects of alternative biofuels on primary emissions are being extensively studied. Our two recent studies have shown that biodiesel fuel composition has a~significant impact on primary particulate matter emissions. It was also shown that particulate matter caused by biodiesels was substantially different from the emissions due to petroleum diesel. Emissions appeared to have higher oxidative potential with the increase in oxygen content and decrease of carbon chain length and unsaturation levels of fuel molecules. Overall, both studies concluded that chemical composition of biodiesel is more important than its physical properties in controlling exhaust particle emissions. This suggests that the atmospheric ageing processes, including secondary organic aerosol formation, of emissions from different fuels will be different as well. In this study, measurements were conducted on a modern common-rail diesel engine. To get more information on realistic properties of tested biodiesel particulate matter once they are released into the atmosphere, particulate matter was exposed to atmospheric oxidants, ozone and ultra-violet light; and the change in their properties was monitored for different biodiesel blends. Upon the exposure to oxidative agents, the chemical composition of the exhaust changes. It triggers the cascade of photochemical reactions resulting in the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particulate phase. In most of the cases, aging lead to the increase in volatility and oxidative potential, and the increment of change was mainly dependent on the chemical composition of fuels as the leading cause for the amount and the type of semi-volatile compounds present in the exhaust.

  13. Heterogeneous Combustion Particles with Distinctive Light-Absorbing and Light-Scattering Phases as Mimics of Internally-Mixed Ambient Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Ma, X.; Gunn, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    Particles with heterogeneously-distributed light-absorbing and light-scattering phases were generated from incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition to mimic real atmospheric particles with distinctive optical properties. Individual particles and particle populations were characterized microscopically. The purpose was to examine how optical property measurements of internally-mixed ambient air particles might vary based on the properties of laboratory-generated particles produced under controlled conditions. The project is an initial stage in producing reference samples for calibrating instrumentation for monitoring climatically-important atmospheric aerosols. Binary-phase particles containing black carbon (BC) and a metal or a metal oxide phase were generated from the thermal decomposition or partial combustion of liquid fuels at a variety of temperatures from 600 °C to 1100 °C. Fuels included mixtures of toluene or isooctane and iron pentacarbonyl or titanium tetrachloride. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed that burning the fuels at different temperatures resulted in distinctive differences in morphology and carbon vs. metal/metal oxide composition. Particles from toluene/Fe(CO)5 thermal decomposition exhibited aggregated morphologies that were classified as dendritic, soot-like, globular, or composited (dendritic-globular). Particles from isooctane/TiCl4 combustion were typically spherical with surface adducts or aggregates. Diameters of the BC/TiO2 particles averaged 0.68 ?m to 0.70 ?m. Regardless of combustion temperature, the most abundant particles in each BC/TiO2 sample had an aspect ratio of 1.2. However, for the 600 °C and 900 °C samples the distribution of aspect ratios was skewed toward much larger ratios suggesting significant chainlike aggregation. Carbon and titanium compositions (wt.) for the 600 °C sample were 12 % and 53 %, respectively. In contrast, the composition trended in the opposite direction for the 900 °C sample with carbon at 57 % and titanium at 27 %.

  14. Waveguides in three-dimensional photonic bandgap materials for particle-accelerator on a

    E-print Network

    Byer, Robert L.

    Waveguides in three-dimensional photonic bandgap materials for particle-accelerator on a chip@physics.anu.edu.au Abstract: The quest for less costly and more compact high-energy particle accelerators," in Proceedings of Particle Accelerator Conference 2011, (2011) pp. 277­279. 12. M. Deubel, G. von Freymann, M

  15. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  16. Ignition Resistance of Polymeric Materials to Particle Impact in High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, Elliot T.; Stolzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Particle impact ignition has been the primary cause of numerous fires in oxygen systems. This ignition phenomenon is known to occur where particles are present in high-velocity gas, and where impact occurs on a flammable material. The particle impact ignition behavior of many metals has been widely studied, but the particle impact ignition behavior of polymeric materials is relatively unknown. Particle impact ignition in polymeric materials is a concern as these materials are commonly used in component seat and seal applications, where high-velocity particle impacts can occur. This study evaluates several polymeric materials and compares the minimum temperature required for ignition (threshold temperature) of these materials: Kel-F 81 (CTFE), Teflon (PTFE), PEEK, Vespel SP-21, and Nylon 6/6. The materials were configured as targets in the White Sands Test Facility high-velocity particle impact test system. Gaseous oxygen was flowed at 4000 psi and sonic velocity, and the targets were impacted with 2000-micron aluminum 2017 particles. This paper discusses the results of these tests and ranks the materials according to their threshold temperatures at these conditions.

  17. 1 INTRODUCTION Asphalt mixtures are composite materials that consist of solid particles, viscous binder/fluid

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    1 INTRODUCTION Asphalt mixtures are composite materials that consist of solid particles, viscous binder/fluid (bitumen) and pores filled with air. When considering asphalt we should distinguish interactions) characterize the material behavior of the asphalt mixture. In addition, aggregate particles

  18. Viscosity of -pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity

    E-print Network

    Viscosity of -pinene secondary organic material and implications for particle growth and reactivity of secondary organic material (SOM) are abun- dant in the lower troposphere. The viscosity of these particles-mobility" technique and a "poke-flow" technique, in conjunction with simulations of fluid flow, the viscosity

  19. Investigation of particle sizes in Pluto's atmosphere from the 29 June 2015 occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Bosh, A. S.; Person, M. J.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Levine, S. E.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Dunham, E. W.; McLean, I.; Wolf, J.; Abe, F.; Bida, T. A.; Bright, L. P.; Brothers, T.; Christie, G.; Collins, P. L.; Durst, R. F.; Gilmore, A. C.; Hamilton, R.; Harris, H. C.; Johnson, C.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kosiarek, M. R.; Leppik, K.; Logsdon, S.; Lucas, R.; Mathers, S.; Morley, C. J. K.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, P.; Ngan, H.; Pfüller, E.; de, H.-P.; Sallum, S.; Savage, M.; Seeger, C. H.; Siu, H.; Stockdale, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thanathibodee, T.; Tilleman, T.; Tristam, P. J.; Van Cleve, J.; Varughese, C.; Weisenbach, L. W.; Widen, E.; Wiedemann, M.

    2015-11-01

    The 29 June 2015 observations of a stellar occultation by Pluto, from SOFIA and ground-based sites in New Zealand, indicate that haze was present in the lower atmosphere (Bosh et al., this conference). Previously, slope changes in the occultation light curve profile of Pluto’s lower atmosphere have been attributed to haze, a steep thermal gradient, and/or a combination of the two. The most useful diagnostic for differentiating between these effects has been observing occultations over a range of wavelengths: haze scattering and absorption are functions of particle size and are wavelength dependent, whereas effects due to a temperature gradient should be largely independent of observational wavelength. The SOFIA and Mt. John data from this event exhibit obvious central flashes, from multiple telescopes observing over a range of wavelengths at each site (Person et al. and Pasachoff et al., this conference). SOFIA data include Red and Blue observations from the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO, at ~ 500 and 850 nm), First Light Infrared Test Camera (FLITECAM, at ~1800 nm), and the Focal Plan Imager (FPI+, at ~ 600 nm). Mt. John data include open filter, g', r', i', and near infrared. Here, we analyze the flux at the bottom of the light curves versus observed wavelength. We find that there is a distinct trend in flux versus wavelength, and we discuss applicable Mie scattering models for different particle size distributions and compositions (as were used to characterize haze in Pluto's lower atmosphere in Gulbis et al. 2015).SOFIA is jointly operated by the Universities Space Research Association, Inc. (USRA), under NASA contract NAS2-97001, and the Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) under DLR contract 50 OK 0901 to the University of Stuttgart. Support for this work was provided by the National Research Foundation of South Africa, NASA SSO grants NNX15AJ82G (Lowell Observatory), PA NNX10AB27G (MIT), and PA NNX12AJ29G (Williams College), and the NASA SOFIA Cycle 3 grant NAS2-97001 issued by USRA.

  20. An Overview of Energetic Particle Precipitation Effects on the Earth's Atmosphere and (Potentially) Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Energetic precipitating particles (EPPs) can cause significant constituent changes in the polar mesosphere and stratosphere (middle atmosphere) during certain periods. Both protons and electrons can influence the polar middle atmosphere through ionization and dissociation processes. EPPs can enhance HOx (H, OH, HO2) through the formation of positive ions followed by complex ion chemistry and NOx (N, NO, NO2) through the dissociation of molecular nitrogen. The solar EPP-created HOx increases can lead to ozone destruction in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere via several catalytic loss cycles. Such middle atmospheric HOx-caused ozone loss is rather short-lived due to the relatively short lifetime (hours) of the HOx constituents. The HOx-caused ozone depletion of greater than 30% has been observed during several large solar proton events (SPEs) in the past 50 years. HOx enhancements due to SPEs were confirmed by observations in solar cycle 23. A number of modeling studies have been undertaken over this time period that show predictions of enhanced HOx accompanied by decreased ozone due to energetic particles. The solar EPP-created NOx family has a longer lifetime than the HOx family and can also lead to catalytic ozone destruction. EPP-caused enhancements of the NOx family can affect ozone promptly, if produced in the stratosphere, or subsequently, if produced in the lower thermosphere or mesosphere and transported to the stratosphere. NOx enhancements due to auroral electrons, medium and high energy electrons, relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events, and SPEs have been measured and/or modeled for decades. Model predictions and measurements show that certain years have significant winter-time meteorological events, which result in the transport of EPP-caused NOx enhancements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere to lower altitudes. The NOx-caused ozone depletion has also been observed during several solar proton events (SPEs) in the past 50 years. Model predictions indicate that the longer-lived SPE-caused polar stratospheric and mesospheric ozone decrease can be >10% for up to five months past the largest events and is statistically significant; however, total ozone measurements do not indicate any long-term SPE impact.

  1. Seasonal pollution characteristics of organic compounds in atmospheric fine particles in Beijing.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Yan; Hu, Min; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Yuan-Hang; Tang, Xiao-Yan

    2006-04-15

    Beijing is a rapidly developing city with severe and unique air pollution problems. Organic matter is the most abundant fraction in fine particles in Beijing, occupying 30-50% of the total mass, indicating its key role in air pollution control. However, detailed chemical characterization of particulate organic matter in Beijing has never been reported. In this study, fine particles in the urban atmosphere in Beijing were investigated for its organic components by GC/MS technique. Over 100 individual organic compounds were identified and quantified in 25 PM2.5 samples from the summer, autumn and winter of 2002-2003. Alkanes, fatty acids, dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and some important tracer compounds (hopanes, levoglucosan and steroids) were the major constituents with the sum of their concentrations of 502, 1471 and 1403 ng m(-3) in summer, autumn and winter, respectively. Different organic compounds presented apparently different seasonal characteristics, reflecting their different dominant emission sources, such as coal combustion, biomass burning and cooking emission. The abundance and origin of these organic compounds are discussed to reveal seasonal air pollution characteristics of Beijing. PMID:16083946

  2. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. PMID:23712117

  3. Development of a computer model for calculation of radioactive materials into the atmosphere after an accident

    SciTech Connect

    Schershakov, V.

    1997-11-01

    Secondary atmospheric contamination with radioactive dust and chemical species deposited on the ground and resuspended by wind occur very widely. This process is particularly pronounced in case of extensive contamination of soil and under extreme weather conditions, for example, during dust storms. The mechanism of wind dust generation consists in the following. At low wind speed U=2-3 m/s, which is most common in midlatitude, small radioactive dust particles (diameter of hundredth of a micron to 10-20 microns) are lifted from soil surface due to turbulent vortexes. Under the gravitational force the particles of 1-2 micron diameter practically do not settle. Larger dust particles cannot remain in the air for a long time: they are lifted by turbulent vortexes and settle, their motion in the wind flow is jump-wise and the interaction of particles with the flow is called saltation /I/. Saltation is the main mechanism of dust generation up to the wind velocity at which wind erosion starts. The size of dust particles can be as large as 100 pm. When dropping they can be ricocheting from ground or pass the impulse to other particles which begin rolling over and jumping up. The process of dust transport by wind can be compared to a chain reaction. At the velocity of 10 m/s large particles of about 500 pm stop skipping and roll over only, while particles of more than 1 mm remain stationary. Thus, the fine fraction is blown out from the polydispersed soil particles. The intensity of wind resuspension of radioactive dust from the ground is characterized either by a resuspension factor or a resuspension rate.

  4. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - fluorescent biomolecules, biological standard particles and potential interferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, C.; Huffmann, J. A.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-04-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, bacteria, biogenic polymers and debris from larger organisms are known to influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere and public health. PBAP account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in urban, rural and pristine environment and are released with estimated emission rates of up to ~1000 Tg/a [1]. Continuous measurements of the abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP have been difficult until recently, however. The application of on-line instruments able to detect autofluorescence from biological particles in real-time has been a promising development for the measurement of PBAP concentrations and fluxes in different environments [2,3]. The detected fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) can be regarded as a subset of PBAP, although the exact relationship between PBAP and FBAP is still being investigated. Autofluorescence of FBAP is usually a superposition of fluorescence from a mixture of individual fluorescent molecules (fluorophores). Numerous biogenic fluorophores such as amino acids (e.g., tryptophan, tyrosine), coenzymes (e.g., NAD(P)H, riboflavin) and biopolymers (e.g., cellulose) emit fluorescent light due to heterocyclic aromatic rings or conjugated double bonds within their molecular structures. The tryptophan emission peak is a common feature of most bioparticles because the amino acid is a constituent of many proteins and peptides. The influence of the coenzymes NAD(P)H and riboflavin on the autofluorescence of bacteria can be regarded as an indicator for bacterial metabolism and has been utilized to discriminate between viable and non-viable organisms [4]. However, very little information is available about other essential biofluorophores in fungal spores and pollen. In order to better understand the autofluorescence behavior of FBAP, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to analyze standard bioparticles (pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria) as well as atmospherically relevant chemical substances. We found varying levels of fluorescent emission and significant differences in the spectral properties of major PBAP classes. The combination will support the quantitative interpretation of data obtained by real-time FBAP instrumentation [5]. [1] Elbert, W., Taylor, P. E., Andreae, M. O., & Pöschl, U. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569-4588. [2] Huffman, J. A., Treutlein, B., & Pöschl, U. (2010). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3215-3233. [3] Pöschl, U., et al. (2010). Science, 329, 1513-1516. [4] Lakowicz, J., Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, Plenum publishers, New York, 1999. [5] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., & Pöschl, U., (2012). Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 37-71.

  5. Estimation of particle size variations for laser speckle rheology of materials

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle rheology (LSR) is an optical technique for assessing the viscoelastic properties of materials with several industrial, biological, and medical applications. In LSR, the viscoelastic modulus, G* (?), of a material is quantified by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of speckle patterns. However, the size of scattering particles within the material also influences the rate of speckle fluctuations, independent of sample mechanical properties, and complicates the accurate estimation of G* (?). Here, we demonstrate that the average particle size may be retrieved from the azimuth-angle dependence of time-averaged speckle intensities, permitting the accurate quantification of the viscoelastic moduli of materials with unknown particle size distribution using LSR. PMID:25723427

  6. ISSARS Aerosol Database : an Incorporation of Atmospheric Particles into a Universal Tool to Simulate Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) entered its third and final year of development with an overall goal of providing a unified tool to simulate active and passive space borne atmospheric remote sensing instruments. These simulations focus on the atmosphere ranging from UV to microwaves. ISSARS handles all assumptions and uses various models on scattering and microphysics to fill the gaps left unspecified by the atmospheric models to create each instrument's measurements. This will help benefit mission design and reduce mission cost, create efficient implementation of multi-instrument/platform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE), and improve existing models as well as new advanced models in development. In this effort, various aerosol particles are incorporated into the system, and a simulation of input wavelength and spectral refractive indices related to each spherical test particle(s) generate its scattering properties and phase functions. These atmospheric particles being integrated into the system comprise the ones observed by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer(MISR) and by the Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager(MSPI). In addition, a complex scattering database generated by Prof. Ping Yang (Texas A&M) is also incorporated into this aerosol database. Future development with a radiative transfer code will generate a series of results that can be validated with results obtained by the MISR and MSPI instruments; nevertheless, test cases are simulated to determine the validity of various plugin libraries used to determine or gather the scattering properties of particles studied by MISR and MSPI, or within the Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust particles database created by Prof. Ping Yang.

  7. Pesticides in the atmosphere: a comparison of gas-particle partitioning and particle size distribution of legacy and current-use pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrendele, C.; Okonski, K.; Melymuk, L.; Landlová, L.; Kuku?ka, P.; Audy, O.; Kohoutek, J.; ?upr, P.; Klánová, J.

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a comparison of seasonal variation, gas-particle partitioning and particle-phase size distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in air. Two years (2012/2013) of weekly air samples were collected at a background site in the Czech Republic using a high-volume air sampler. To study the particle-phase size distribution, air samples were also collected at an urban and rural site in the area of Brno, Czech Republic, using a cascade impactor separating atmospheric particulates according to six size fractions. The timing and frequencies of detection of CUPs related to their legal status, usage amounts and their environmental persistence, while OCPs were consistently detected throughout the year. Two different seasonal trends were noted: certain compounds had higher concentrations only during the growing season (April-September) and other compounds showed two peaks, first in the growing season and second in plowing season (October-November). In general, gas-particle partitioning of pesticides was governed by physicochemical properties, with higher vapor pressure leading to higher gas phase fractions, and associated seasonality in gas-particle partitioning was observed in nine pesticides. However, some anomalous partitioning was observed for fenpropimorph and chlorpyrifos suggesting the influence of current pesticide application on gas-particle distributions. Nine pesticides had highest particle phase concentrations on fine particles (< 0.95 ?m) and four pesticides on coarser (> 1.5 ?m) particles.

  8. Measurements of aerosol-cloud interactions, including on-line particle chemical composition, at the Jungfraujoch Global Atmospheric Watch Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, P. I.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Weingartner, E.; Corrigan, C.; Baltensperger, U.

    2003-04-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research laboratory is located in the Sphinx building, 3580 m asl; 46.55oN, 7.98oE on the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps. The site is exposed to a wide range of conditions and frequently samples long range transported lower free tropospheric air, and is exposed to cloudy conditions. The Paul Scherrer Institute have previously developed a dual inlet system that allows measurements of the total sub-micron aerosol population (dry residuals and interstitial particles) and interstitial particles alone to be made alternately every few minutes. During July 2002 an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was coupled to the dual inlet and was used to sample the composition of both the total particle distribution and the interstitial fraction and hence derive the mass loadings of the dry droplet residuals. In out of cloud conditions the aerosol composition can be linked to air mass history and age of the air mass. Microphysical measurements include cloud droplet size distributions made using an FSSP and also a new phase Doppler anemometry system. A comparison between these probes will be made. Two different types of cloud droplet spectra were observed. In the first type a large number of cloud droplets were measured with a single, narrow drop size distribution and modal diameter of around 10 um. In the second type, a bimodal cloud droplet spectrum occurred with a smaller mode (by number) at around 20 um, in addition to the 10 um mode. The aerosol mass spectrometry shows that the composition of the residuals from the two spectrum types is very different, the former type being composed mainly of sulphate, the latter a combination of nitrate, sulphate and organic material. We have also shown that the organic material observed is highly oxidized. We argue that the bimodality arises as a result of mixing of cloud droplets below the site that have been activated separately: the larger a less numerous mode in the widespread strato-cumulus forming under low updraught conditions, the smaller more numerous mode forming during vigorous orographic lift from the valley below the mountain ridge.

  9. Microgel particles for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M.; Murthy, Niren

    2006-06-06

    Novel microgels, microparticles and related polymeric materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or therapeutic agents. The materials are made using a crosslinker molecule that contains a linkage cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The crosslinker molecule is exemplified by a bisacryloyl acetal crosslinker. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and sites of inflammation.

  10. Microgel particles for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Murthy Niren (Atlanta, GA)

    2010-03-23

    Novel microgels, microparticles and related polymeric materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or therapeutic agents. The materials are made using a crosslinker molecule that contains a linkage cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The crosslinker molecule is exemplified by a bisacryloyl acetal crosslinker. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and sites of inflammation.

  11. Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star Our atmosphere is a dynamic creature. Its tiny particles constantly dance around the sky. Our eyes

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    declassified "Star Wars" research on laser weapons (the US military had a similar problem, their laser beamTwinkle, Twinkle Little Star Our atmosphere is a dynamic creature. Its tiny particles constantly and the twinkling of a star. Astronomers dislike this twinkling. Their photos are blurred and they can't see as much

  12. VIABLE BACTERIAL AEROSOL PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE MIDSUMMER ATMOSPHERE AT AN ISOLATED LOCATION IN THE HIGH DESERT CHAPARRAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The viable bacterial particle size distribution in the atmosphere at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Richland, WA during two 1-week periods in June 1992, was observed at three intervals during the day (morning, midday and evening) and at three heights (2, 4, and 8 m) above groun...

  13. The relationships between high latitude convection reversals and the energetic particle morphology observed by the Atmosphere Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.; Hanson, W. B.; Burch, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the auroral zone particle precipitation and the ion convection velocity by Atmosphere Explorer show a consistent difference between the location of the poleward boundary of the auroral particle precipitation and the ion convection reversal. The difference of about 1.5 degrees of invariant latitude is such that some part of the antisunward convection lies wholly within the auroral particle precipitation region. The nature of the convection reversals within the precipitation region suggests that in this region the convection electric field is generated on closed field lines that connect in the magnetosphere to the low latitude boundary layer.

  14. Chemical Imaging and Stable Isotope Analysis of Atmospheric Particles by NanoSIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, B.; Harris, E. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Tilgner, A.; Fomba, K. W.; Schneider, J.; Roth, A.; Gnauk, T.; Fahlbusch, B.; Mertes, S.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Smith, M.; Artaxo, P. P.; Gilles, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L.; Moffet, R.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical imaging analysis of the internal distribution of chemical compounds by a combination of SEM-EDX, and NanoSIMS allows investigating the physico-chemical properties and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles. Stable sulphur isotope analysis provides insight into the sources, sinks and oxidation pathways of SO2 in the environment. Oxidation by OH radicals, O3 and H2O2 enriches the heavier isotope in the product sulphate, whereas oxidation by transition metal ions (TMI), hypohalites and hypohalous acids depletes the heavier isotope in the product sulphate. The isotope fractionation during SO2 oxidation by stabilized Criegee Intermediate radicals is unknown. We studied the relationship between aerosol chemical composition and predominant sulphate formation pathways in continental clouds in Central Europe and during the wet season in the Amazon rain forest. Sulphate formation in continental clouds in Central Europe was studied during HCCT-2010, a lagrangian-type field experiment, during which an orographic cloud was used as a natural flow-through reactor to study in-cloud aerosol processing (Harris et al. 2013). Sulphur isotopic compositions in SO2 and H2SO4 gas and particulate sulphate were measured and changes in the sulphur isotope composition of SO2 between the upwind and downwind measurement sites were used to determine the dominant SO2 chemical removal process occurring in the cloud. Changes in the isotopic composition of particulate sulphate revealed that transition metal catalysis pathway was the dominant SO2 oxidation pathway. This reaction occurred primarily on coarse mineral dust particles. Thus, sulphate produced due to in-cloud SO2 oxidation is removed relatively quickly from the atmosphere and has a minor climatic effect. The aerosol samples from the Amazonian rainforest, a pristine tropical environment, were collected during the rainy season. The samples were found to be dominated by SOA particles in the fine mode and primary biological aerosol particles in the coarse mode (Pöhlker et al. 2012). We applied STXM-NEXAFS analysis, SEM-EDX analysis and NanoSIMS analysis to investigate the morphology, chemical composition and isotopic composition of aerosol samples. Biogenic salt particles emitted from active biota in the rainforest were found to be enriched in the heavier sulphur isotope, whereas particles with a high organic mass fraction modified by condensation of VOC oxidation products and/or cloud processing were significantly depleted in the heavier sulphur isotope compared to the seed particles. This indicates either a depleted gas phase source of sulphur dioxide contributed to the sulphate formation via the H2O2, O3 or OH oxidation pathway or an unaccounted reaction pathway which depletes the heavier isotope in the product sulphate contributes to the secondary sulphate formation in the pristine Amazon rainforest. Harris, E., et al., Science 340, 727-730, 2013 Pöhlker, C., Science 337, 1075-1078, 2012

  15. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - Biological standard particles and the influence of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Huffman, J. Alex; Förster, Jan-David; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, bacteria, biogenic polymers and debris from larger organisms are known to influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere and public health. PBAP can account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in urban, rural and pristine environment and are released with estimated emission rates of up to ~1000 Tg/a [1]. Continuous measurements of the abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP have been difficult until recently, however. The application of on-line instruments able to detect autofluorescence from biological particles in real-time has been a promising development for the measurement of PBAP concentrations and fluxes in different environments [2,3]. The detected fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) can be regarded as a subset of PBAP, although the exact relationship between PBAP and FBAP is still being investigated. Autofluorescence of FBAP is usually a superposition of fluorescence from a mixture of individual fluorescent molecules (fluorophores). Numerous biogenic fluorophores such as amino acids (e.g., tryptophan, tyrosine), coenzymes (e.g., NAD(P)H, riboflavin) and biopolymers (e.g., cellulose) emit fluorescent light due to heterocyclic aromatic rings or conjugated double bonds within their molecular structures. The tryptophan emission peak is a common feature of most bioparticles because the amino acid is a constituent of many proteins and peptides. The influence of the coenzymes NAD(P)H and riboflavin on the autofluorescence of bacteria can be regarded as an indicator for bacterial metabolism and has been utilized to discriminate between viable and non-viable organisms [4]. However, very little information is available about other essential biofluorophores in fungal spores and pollen. In order to better understand the autofluorescence behavior of FBAP, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to analyze standard bioparticles (pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria) as well as atmospherically relevant chemical substances. We addressed the sensitivity and selectivity of autofluorescence based online techniques. Moreover, we investigated the influence of environmental conditions, such as relative humidity and oxidizing agents in the atmosphere, on the autofluorescence signature of standard bioparticles. Our results will support the molecular understanding and quantitative interpretation of data obtained by real-time FBAP instrumentation [5,6]. [1] Elbert, W., Taylor, P. E., Andreae, M. O., & Pöschl, U. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569-4588. [2] Huffman, J. A., Treutlein, B., & Pöschl, U. (2010). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3215-3233. [3] Pöschl, U., et al. (2010). Science, 329, 1513-1516. [4] Lakowicz, J., Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, Plenum publishers, New York, 1999. [5] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., & Pöschl, U., (2012). Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 37-71. [6] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., Förster J.-D., & Pöschl, U., (2012) in preparation.

  16. Atmospheric Effects of Energetic Particle Precipitation in the Arctic Winter 1978-1979 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, L. A.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V. L.; Remsberg, E. E.; Stiller, G. P.; Funke, B.; Bernath, P. F.; Walker, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) measured polar stratospheric enhancements of NO2 mixing ratios due to energetic particle precipitation (EPP) in the Arctic winter of 1978-1979. Recently reprocessed LIMS data are compared to more recent measurements from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) to place the LIMS measurements in the context of current observations. The amount of NOx (NO + NO2) entering the stratosphere that has been created by EPP in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (EPP-NOx) has been quantified for the 1978-1979 and 2002-2003 through 2008-2009 Arctic winters. The NO2 enhancements in the LIMS data are similar to those in MIPAS and ACE-FTS data in the Arctic winters of 2002-2003, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, and 2007-2008. The largest enhancement by far is in 2003-2004 (approximately 2.2 Gmol at 1500 K), which is attributed to a combination of elevated EPP and unusual dynamics that led to strong descent in the upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere in late winter. The enhancements in 2005-2006 and 2008-2009, during which large stratospheric NOx enhancements were caused by a dynamical situation similar to that in 2003 2004, are larger than in all the other years (except 2003-2004) at 3000 K. However, by 2000 K the enhancements in 2005-2006 (2008-2009) are on the same order of magnitude as (smaller than) all other years. These results highlight the importance of the timing of the descent in determining the potential of EPP-NOx for reaching the middle stratosphere.

  17. A critical evaluation of proxy methods used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigan, C. J.; Izumi, J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.

    2014-11-01

    Given significant challenges with available measurements of aerosol acidity, proxy methods are frequently used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles. In this study, four of the most common aerosol acidity proxies are evaluated and compared: (1) the ion balance method, (2) the molar ratio method, (3) thermodynamic equilibrium models, and (4) the phase partitioning of ammonia. All methods are evaluated against predictions of thermodynamic models and against direct observations of aerosol-gas equilibrium partitioning acquired in Mexico City during the MILAGRO study. The ion balance and molar ratio methods assume that any deficit in inorganic cations relative to anions is due to the presence of H+; and that a higher H+ loading and lower cation/anion ratio both correspond to increasingly acidic particles (i.e., lower pH). Based on the MILAGRO measurements, no correlation is observed between H+ levels inferred with the ion balance and aerosol pH predicted by the thermodynamic models and ammonia-ammonium (NH3-NH4+) partitioning. Similarly, no relationship is observed between the cation / anion molar ratio and predicted aerosol pH. Using only measured aerosol chemical composition as inputs without any constraint for the gas phase, the Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium models tend to predict aerosol pH levels that are inconsistent with the observed NH3-NH4+ partitioning. The modeled pH values from both models run with gas + aerosol inputs agreed well with the aerosol pH predicted by the phase partitioning of ammonia. It appears that (1) thermodynamic models constrained by gas + aerosol measurements, and (2) the phase partitioning of ammonia provide the best available predictions of aerosol pH. Furthermore, neither the ion balance nor the molar ratio can be used as surrogates for aerosol pH, and published studies to date with conclusions based on such acidity proxies may need to be reevaluated. Given the significance of acidity for chemical processes in the atmosphere, the implications of this study are important and far reaching.

  18. A critical evaluation of proxy methods used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigan, C. J.; Izumi, J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.

    2015-03-01

    Given significant challenges with available measurements of aerosol acidity, proxy methods are frequently used to estimate the acidity of atmospheric particles. In this study, four of the most common aerosol acidity proxies are evaluated and compared: (1) the ion balance method, (2) the molar ratio method, (3) thermodynamic equilibrium models, and (4) the phase partitioning of ammonia. All methods are evaluated against predictions of thermodynamic models and against direct observations of aerosol-gas equilibrium partitioning acquired in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Objectives (MILAGRO) study. The ion balance and molar ratio methods assume that any deficit in inorganic cations relative to anions is due to the presence of H+ and that a higher H+ loading and lower cation / anion ratio both correspond to increasingly acidic particles (i.e., lower pH). Based on the MILAGRO measurements, no correlation is observed between H+ levels inferred with the ion balance and aerosol pH predicted by the thermodynamic models and NH3-NH4+ partitioning. Similarly, no relationship is observed between the cation / anion molar ratio and predicted aerosol pH. Using only measured aerosol chemical composition as inputs without any constraint for the gas phase, the E-AIM (Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model) and ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium models tend to predict aerosol pH levels that are inconsistent with the observed NH3-NH4+ partitioning. The modeled pH values from both E-AIM and ISORROPIA-II run with gas + aerosol inputs agreed well with the aerosol pH predicted by the phase partitioning of ammonia. It appears that (1) thermodynamic models constrained by gas + aerosol measurements and (2) the phase partitioning of ammonia provide the best available predictions of aerosol pH. Furthermore, neither the ion balance nor the molar ratio can be used as surrogates for aerosol pH, and previously published studies with conclusions based on such acidity proxies may need to be reevaluated. Given the significance of acidity for chemical processes in the atmosphere, the implications of this study are important and far reaching.

  19. Aerosol trace metals, particle morphology and total gaseous mercury in the atmosphere of Oxford, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, M. L. I.; Meheran, N.; Mather, T. A.; de Hoog, J. C. M.; Pyle, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    An investigation of atmospheric trace metals was conducted in Oxford, UK, a small city ˜60 miles northwest of London, in 2007 and 2008. Concentrations of Sr, Mo, Cd, Pb, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn in aerosol were measured in bulk and size segregated samples. In addition, total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were monitored semi-continuously by cold vapour-atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. Metal concentrations in Oxford were intermediate between previously reported levels of UK rural and urban areas for most metals studied and levels of Cd, Ni and Pb were within European guidelines. Metal concentrations appeared to be influenced by higher traffic volume on a timescale of hours. The influence of traffic on the aerosols was also suggested by the observation of carbonaceous particles via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Air mass back trajectories suggest air masses arriving in Oxford from London and mainland Europe contained the highest metal concentrations. Aerosol samples collected over Bonfire Weekend, a period of intense firework use and lighting of bonfires in the UK, showed metal concentrations 6-46 times higher than at other times. Strontium, a tracer of firework release, was present at higher concentrations and showed a change in its size distribution from the coarse to fine mode over Bonfire Weekend. The presence of an abundance of spherical Sr particles was also confirmed in SEM images. The average TGM concentration in Oxford was 3.17 ng m -3 (st. dev. 1.59) with values recorded between 1.32 and 23.2 ng m -3. This is a higher average value than reported from nearby rural locations, although during periods when air was arriving from the west, similar concentrations to these rural areas were seen in Oxford. Comparison to meteorological data suggests that TGM in Oxford's air is highest when wind is arriving from the east/southeast. This may be due to emissions from London/mainland Europe with a possible contribution from emissions from a local crematorium situated 4 miles east of the sampling site. A diurnal pattern was also observed in the TGM data with a minimum concentration during the day when mercury may have been diluted by thermal mixing of the atmospheric boundary layer. Additionally, this diurnal pattern may reflect variations in a local source of TGM.

  20. The Ultrafine Mineralogy of a Molten Interplanetary Dust Particle as an Example of the Quench Regime of Atmospheric Entry Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Melting and degassing of interplanetary dust particle L2005B22 at approx. 1200 C was due to flash heating during atmospheric entry. Preservation of the porous particle texture supports rapid quenching from the peak heating temperature whereby olivine and pyroxene nanocrystals (3 nm-26 nm) show partial devitrification of the quenched melt at T approx. = 450 C - 740 C. The implied ultrahigh cooling rates are calculated at approx. 105 C/h-106 C/h, which is consistent with quench rates inferred from the temperature-time profiles based on atmospheric entry heating models. A vesicular rim on a nonstoichiometric relic forsterite grain in this particle represents either evaporative magnesium loss during flash heating or thermally annealed ion implantation texture.

  1. First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1–2 nm Particle Number Size Distributions During Nucleation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Zhao, J.; Chen, M.; Eisele, F. L.; Scheckman, J.; Williams, B. J.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    Recent observations throughout the atmosphere have shown that nucleation occurs frequently (Kulmala et al. 2004). Modeling studies and observations have shown that nucleated particles contribute significantly to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (Spracklen et al. 2008), thereby affecting climate (IPCC 2007). Size-resolved measurements extending down to molecular dimensions can provide information on processes that lead to nucleation and would enable development and verification of theories for particle nucleation and growth in the atmosphere and other aerosol systems. This article describes measurements of the complete number size distribution, spanning the size range from vapor molecules and molecular clusters to submicrometer particles, during atmospheric nucleation events. The measurements used two new instruments, the cluster chemical ionization mass spectrometer (Cluster CIMS) and the DEG SMPS. The Cluster CIMS measures neutral molecular clusters from 50 to 900 amu. The DEG SMPS is a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) equipped with a diethylene glycol (DEG)-based condensation particle counter (CPC) capable of 1.1 nm mobility diameter particle detection, and overlapping the sizes detected by the Cluster CIMS (Iida et al. 2009; Jiang et al. 2011). The Cluster CIMS distinguishes neutral clusters from ions formed by ion-induced clustering by varying the reaction time for ions with the sampled air (Zhao et al. 2010). It distinguishes clusters from high molecular weight gases by measuring the incremental signal at a specified mass detected during nucleation events. The clusters that were measured in this study contain sulfuric acid, which is known to participate in atmospheric nucleation (Kuang et al. 2008).

  2. Absorption of Beta Particles in Different Materials: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The absorption of beta rays from a radioactive source in different materials was investigated by the use of a simple setup based on a Geiger counter and a set of absorber sheets. The number of electrons traversing the material was measured as a function of its thickness. Detailed GEANT simulations were carried out to reproduce the obtained…

  3. Solid spherical glass particle impingement studies of plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Erosion experiments on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polycarbonate, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were conducted with spherical glass beads impacting at normal incidence. Optical and scanning electron microscopic studies and surface profile measurements were made on specimens at predetermined test intervals. During the initial stage of damage to PMMA and polycarbonate, material expands or builds up above the original surface. However, this buildup disappears as testing progresses. Little or no buildup was observed on PTFE. PTFE is observed to be the most resistant material to erosion and PMMA the least. At low impact pressures, material removal mechanisms are believed to be similar to those for metallic materials. However, at higher pressures, surface melting is indicated at the center of impact. Deformation and fatigue appear to play major roles in the material removal process with possible melting or softening.

  4. Adsorption and reactions of atmospheric constituents and pollutants on ice particles: an FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakova, A. V.; Marinov, I. L.; Poretskiy, M. S.; Tsyganenko, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    Processes on icy particles attract much attention due to their importance for atmospheric science, ecology and astrophysics. In this work, adsorption and ecologically important reactions of some molecules on pure and mixed water icy films by means of FTIR spectroscopy have been investigated. The cell for spectral studies of adsorbed molecules at variable temperatures (55-370 K), described elsewhere1, enables one to run the spectra in the presence of gaseous adsorbate, and even to perform adsorption from the solution in some cryogenic solvents. For the studies of ice films, it was equipped with a device for water vapour sputtering from the heated capillaries and deposition onto the inner BaF2 or ZnSe windows of the cell, cooled by liquid nitrogen. Lower temperatures were obtained by pumping off evaporating nitrogen from the coolant volume. The estimated specific surface area of freshly deposited at 77 K water ice film was about 160 m2/g and decreases on raising the temperature together with the diminishing intensity of the bands of dangling OH (OD) groups at 3696 (2727) cm-1 until the latter disappear at 130 - 160 K when the changes of bulk absorption provide evidence for a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline ice. CO adsorption at 77 K results in two bands at 2153 and 2137 cm-1 assigned to molecules forming weak H-bond with the dangling hydroxyl groups and bound to unsaturated surface oxygen atoms, respectively2. The band of dangling hydroxyl groups moves to lower wavenumbers on adsorption of different molecules (hydrogen, nitrogen, methane, ozone, NO, ethane or chlorinated ethenes, etc.). The shift value depends on the nature of adsorbate. Besides this shift, spectra of adsorbed nitrogen and methane registered at 55 K reveal the adsorption intensity decrease at ~ 2650 cm-1 at the high-frequency slope of bulk adsorption, and increase at about 25 cm-1 below. We interpret this perturbation as a strengthening of H-bonds between surface water molecules, which act as adsorption sites either as a proton-donor or as a donor of the lone pair of electrons. Such adsorption-induced relaxation explains the dependence of physico-chemical properties of icy particles on the presence of atmospheric gases. Spectra HCN/D2O and ND3/D2O mixed icy films with low (1:10) dopant/water ratios do not manifest any changes in the acidic or basic properties of dangling hydroxyl groups or surface oxygen atoms, but reveal a difference in the proportion between the concentrations of these sites as compared with that for pure water ice. For high dopant concentrations (1:1), the dangling hydroxyls were not observed; the dominant adsorption sites for CO are likely to be the unsaturated oxygen atoms, while serious structural changes occur in the bulk of ices. Ecologically important reactions of atmospheric pollutants such as ozonolysis of ethene, chlorinated ethenes, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl bromide adsorbed on water ice film as well as the influence of UV radiation on this process have been studied in 77 - 200 K temperature range by FTIR spectroscopy. Ozone co-adsorption with ethene or C2H3Cl readily leads to ozonolysis reaction, which also starts for C2H2Cl2 isomers but only at temperatures elevated up to 120 - 150 K. Co-adsorption of O3 with HCN or CH3Br molecules in the dark does not lead to any noticeable spectral changes. Irradiation of HCN or CH3Br deposited on ice films in the presence of ozone leads to appearance of new bands revealing the formation of ozonolysis products. The same "synergetic effect" of simultaneous action of ozone and UV radiation at 77 K, was found for C2H2Cl2 isomers and C2Cl4, which are resistant against O3 even at higher temperatures. The obtained spectral dependence of photo-ozonolysis of C2Cl4 and HCN at 77 K shows that photoexcitation or photodissociation of ozone, evidently, accounts for the observed processes. The surface of ice particles, thus, plays the role of a condenser of atmospheric pollutants and acts as a micro- photoreactor in the atmospheric chemistry. Acknowledgments. The work was

  5. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of ?-pinene, ?-pinene, limonene, ?3-carene and ?-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids ?-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The ?-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that ?-caryophyllene emissions or ?-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The ?-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  6. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Lynn M.; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA. PMID:21317360

  7. Water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) in size-segregated atmospheric particles over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violaki, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2010-11-01

    Atmospheric water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) was determined on size-segregated aerosol particles collected during a two years period (2005-2006) in a remote marine location in the Eastern Mediterranean (Finokalia, Crete island). Average concentration of WSON was 5.5 ± 3.9 nmol m -3 and 11.6 ± 14.0 nmol m -3 for coarse (PM 1.3-10) and fine (PM 1.3) mode respectively, corresponding to 13% of Total Dissolved Nitrogen (TDN) in both modes. Air masses origin and correlation with tracers of natural and anthropogenic sources indicate that combustion process (biomass burning and fossil fuel) and African dust play an important role in regulating levels of WSON in both coarse and fine aerosol fractions. Chemical speciation of organic nitrogen pool was attempted by analyzing 47 fine aerosol samples (PM 1) for 17 free amino acids (N-FAA), dimethylamine (DMA) and trimethylamine (TMA). The average concentration of N-FAA was 0.5 ± 0.5 nmol m -3, while the average concentration of DMA was 0.2 ± 0.8 nmol m -3, TMA was below detection limit. The percentage contribution of N-FAA and DMA to WSON was 2.1 ± 2.3% and 0.9 ± 3.4%, respectively.

  8. Neutral-particle wake method for measuring the atmospheric temperature from a satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Hoegy, W. R.; Theis, R. F.; Wharton, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a method that would permit a satellite-borne neutral mass spectrometer to measure the atmospheric temperature. The spectrometer examines the partial pressure variations that occur as the wake of a small rectangular baffle is swept across the entrance orifice of the spectrometer. For a given baffle size and for a mounting distance from the orifice, the depth of the resulting pressure minimum depends only on the thermal velocity or temperature of the observed species. The validity of the method can be checked by measuring the wake characteristics of more than one species and/or by employing each of several baffle sizes. The theory includes the effect of a finite orifice size, finite baffle length, and the backscattering of particles from the baffle into the orifice. It is found that a suitable baffle arrangement can be achieved that will permit the temperature to be measured over at least the range normally encountered in the thermosphere (200 to 2000 K) and, depending on the sensitivity and background pressure of the spectrometer, over an altitude range of about 140 to 600 km.

  9. Modeling of the optical properties of nonspherical particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang

    The single scattering properties of atmospheric particles are fundamental to radiative simulations and remote sensing applications. In this study, an efficient technique, namely, the pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) method which was first developed to study acoustic wave propagation, is applied to the scattering of light by nonspherical particles with small and moderate size. Five different methods are used to discretize Maxwell's equations in the time domain. The perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition is employed in the present simulation for eliminating spurious wave propagations caused by the spectral method. A 3-D PSTD code has been developed on the basis of the five aforementioned discretization methods. These methods provide essentially the same solutions in both absorptive and nonabsorptive cases. In this study, the applicability of the PSTD method is investigated in comparison with the Mie theory and the T-matrix method. The effects of size parameter and refractive index on simulation accuracy are discussed. It is shown that the PSTD method is quite accurate when it is applied to the scattering of light by spherical and nonspherical particles, if the spatial resolution is properly selected. Accurate solutions can also be obtained from the PSTD method for size parameter of 80 or refractive index of 2.0+j0. Six ice crystal habits are defined for the PSTD computational code. The PSTD results are compared with the results acquired from the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method at size parameter 20. The PSTD method is about 8-10 times more efficient than the conventional FDTD method with similar accuracy. In this study, the PSTD is also applied to the computation of the phase functions of ice crystals with a size parameter of 50. Furthermore, the PSTD, the FDTD, and T-matrix methods are applied to the study of the optical properties of horizontally oriented ice crystals. Three numerical schemes for averaging horizontal orientations are developed in this study. The feasibility of using equivalent circular cylinders as surrogates of hexagonal prisms is discussed. The horizontally oriented hexagonal plates and the equivalent circular cylinders have similar optical properties when the size parameter is in the region about from 10 to 40. Otherwise, the results of the two geometries are substantially different.

  10. Photons and particles emitted from cold atmospheric-pressure plasma inactivate bacteria and biomolecules independently and synergistically

    PubMed Central

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Edengeiser, Eugen; Jarzina, Fabian; Brinckmann, Steffen; Steinborn, Elena; Havenith, Martina; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E.

    2013-01-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas are currently in use in medicine as surgical tools and are being evaluated for new applications, including wound treatment and cosmetic care. The disinfecting properties of plasmas are of particular interest, given the threat of antibiotic resistance to modern medicine. Plasma effluents comprise (V)UV photons and various reactive particles, such as accelerated ions and radicals, that modify biomolecules; however, a full understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie plasma-based disinfection has been lacking. Here, we investigate the antibacterial mechanisms of plasma, including the separate, additive and synergistic effects of plasma-generated (V)UV photons and particles at the cellular and molecular levels. Using scanning electron microscopy, we show that plasma-emitted particles cause physical damage to the cell envelope, whereas UV radiation does not. The lethal effects of the plasma effluent exceed the zone of physical damage. We demonstrate that both plasma-generated particles and (V)UV photons modify DNA nucleobases. The particles also induce breaks in the DNA backbone. The plasma effluent, and particularly the plasma-generated particles, also rapidly inactivate proteins in the cellular milieu. Thus, in addition to physical damage to the cellular envelope, modifications to DNA and proteins contribute to the bactericidal properties of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma. PMID:24068175

  11. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials at 2.2-2.3 micron and 2.75 microns remain largely unaffected by the environmental conditions. A shift in the Christiansen feature towards shorter wavelengths has also been observed with decreasing atmospheric pressure and temperature in the midinfrared spectra of these samples.

  12. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials at 2.2-2.3 micrometers and 2.27 micrometers remain largely unaffected by the environmental conditions. A shift in the Christiansen feature towards shorter wavelengths has also been observed with decreasing atmospheric pressure and temperature in the midinfrared spectra of these samples.

  13. Materials with a desired refraction coefficient can be made by embedding small particles

    E-print Network

    A. G. Ramm

    2007-06-15

    A method is proposed to create materials with a desired refraction coefficient, possibly negative one. The method consists of embedding into a given material small particles. Given $n_0(x)$, the refraction coefficient of the original material in a bounded domain $D \\subset \\R^3$, and a desired refraction coefficient $n(x)$, one calculates the number $N(x)$ of small particles, to be embedded in $D$ around a point $x \\in D$ per unit volume of $D$, in order that the resulting new material has refraction coefficient $n(x)$.

  14. Dynamics of Granular Materials and Particle-Laden Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-07-11

    Rapid granular flows and particle-laden flows were studied in laboratory experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and simulations of continuum equations. The research demonstrated that the inclusion of friction is crucial in realistic modeling of granular flows; hence extensive previous analyses and simulations by many researchers for frictionless particles must be reconsidered in the light of our work. We also made the first detailed comparison between experiment and the predictions of continuum theory for granular media (hydrodynamic equations). We found that shock waves easily form in granular flows since the speed of sound waves (pressure fluctuations) in a granular gas is small, typically 10 cm, while flow velocities are easily an order of magnitude larger. Our measurements on vertically oscillating granular layers led to the development of a novel technique for continuously separating particles of different sizes. Our study of craters formed by the impact of a projectile in a granular medium showed, surprisingly, that the time taken for a projectile to come to a rest in the granular layer is independent of the projectile’s impact energy. Another study supported by this grant examined a vertically oscillating layer of a mixture of cornstarch and water. The discovery of stable holes in the mixture was reported widely in the popular press, e.g., Science News [15 May 2004], “Imaging poking a liquid to create holes that persist like the holes in Swiss cheese. Incredible as that might sound, a group of scientists has done it.” Further experiments on glass spheres in an aqueous solution yielded the same holey fluid phenomenon, supporting our conjecture that such holes may occur in dense concentrations of particles in solution in industrial applications.

  15. Acoustic properties and durability of liner materials at non-standard atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Hsu, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on how acoustic properties of certain absorbing liner materials are affected by nonstandard atmospheric conditions. This study was motivated by the need to assess risks associated with incorporating acoustic testing capability in wind tunnels with semicryogenic high Reynolds number aerodynamic and/or low pressure capabilities. The study consisted of three phases: 1) measurement of acoustic properties of selected liner materials at subatmospheric pressure conditions, 2) periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure of liner materials for 250 cycles, and 3) determination of the effect of periodic cold soak on the acoustic properties of the liner materials at subatmospheric conditions and the effect on mechanical resiliency. The selected liner materials were Pyrell foam, Fiberglass, and Kevlar. A vacuum facility was used to create the subatmospheric environment in which an impedance tube was placed to measure acoustic properties of the test materials. An automated cryogenic cooling system was used to simulate periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure. It was found that lower ambient pressure reduced the absorption effectiveness of the liner materials to varying degrees. Also no significant change in the acoustic properties occurred after the periodic cold soak. Furthermore, mechanical resiliency tests indicated no noticeable change.

  16. Acoustic properties and durability of liner materials at non-standard atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Hsu, J. S.

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on how acoustic properties of certain absorbing liner materials are affected by nonstandard atmospheric conditions. This study was motivated by the need to assess risks associated with incorporating acoustic testing capability in wind tunnels with semicryogenic high Reynolds number aerodynamic and/or low pressure capabilities. The study consisted of three phases: 1) measurement of acoustic properties of selected liner materials at subatmospheric pressure conditions, 2) periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure of liner materials for 250 cycles, and 3) determination of the effect of periodic cold soak on the acoustic properties of the liner materials at subatmospheric conditions and the effect on mechanical resiliency. The selected liner materials were Pyrell foam, Fiberglass, and Kevlar. A vacuum facility was used to create the subatmospheric environment in which an impedance tube was placed to measure acoustic properties of the test materials. An automated cryogenic cooling system was used to simulate periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure. It was found that lower ambient pressure reduced the absorption effectiveness of the liner materials to varying degrees. Also no significant change in the acoustic properties occurred after the periodic cold soak. Furthermore, mechanical resiliency tests indicated no noticeable change.

  17. Automated technologies needed to prevent radioactive materials from reentering the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David; Angelo, Joseph A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion Nuclear) has been created to identify and evaluate the technologies and operational strategies needed to rendezvous with and capture aerospace radioactive materials (e.g., a distressed or spent space reactor core) before such materials can reenter the terrestrial atmosphere and then to safely move these captured materials to an acceptable space destination for proper disposal. A major component of the current Project SIREN effort is the development of an interactive technology model (including a computerized data base) that explores in building block fashion the interaction of the technologies and procedures needed to successfully accomplish a SIREN mission. This SIREN model will include appropriate national and international technology elements-both contemporary and projected into the next century. To permit maximum flexibility and use, the SIREN technology data base is being programmed for use on 386-class PC's.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  19. The Exploration Atmospheres Working Group's Report on Space Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Thibeault, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    This part of Exploration Atmospheres Working Group analyses focuses on the potential use of nonmetallic composites as the interior walls and structural elements exposed to the atmosphere of the spacecraft or habitat. The primary drive to consider nonmetallic, polymer-based composites as an alternative to aluminum structure is due to their superior radiation shielding properties. But as is shown in this analysis, these composites can also be made to combine superior mechanical properties with superior shielding properties. In addition, these composites can be made safe; i.e., with regard to flammability and toxicity, as well as "smart"; i.e., embedded with sensors for the continuous monitoring of material health and conditions. The analysis main conclusions are that (1) smart polymer-based composites are an enabling technology for safe and reliable exploration missions, and (2) an adaptive, synergetic systems approach is required to meet the missions requirements from structure, properties, and processes to crew health and protection for exploration missions.

  20. Parameter estimation approach for particle flow model of rockfill materials using response surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouju; Li, De; Cao, Lijuan; Shangguan, Zichang

    2015-02-01

    Particle flow code (PFC) is widely used to model deformation and stress states of rockfill materials. The accuracy of numerical modeling with PFC is dependent upon the model parameter values. How to accurately determine model parameters remains one of the main challenges. In order to determine model parameters of particle flow model of rockfill materials, some triaxial compression experiments are performed, and the inversion procedure of model parameters based on response surface method is proposed. Parameters of particle flow model of rockfill materials are determined according to the observed data in triaxial compression tests for rockfill materials. The investigation shows that the normal stiffness, tangent stiffness and friction coefficient of rockfill materials will slightly increase with increase of confining pressure in triaxial compression tests. The experiments in laboratory show that the proposed inversion procedure behaves higher computing efficiency and the forecasted stress-strain relations agree well with observed values.

  1. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  2. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  3. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  4. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  5. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  6. The effect of particle precipitation events on the neutral and ion chemistry of the middle atmosphere. II - Odd hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Rusch, D. W.; Gerard, J.-C.; Reid, G. C.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    A one dimensional time-dependent model of the neutral and ion chemistry of the middle atmosphere has been used to examine the production of odd hydrogen (H, OH, and HO2) during charged particle precipitation. At altitudes above about 65 km, odd hydrogen production depends on the ionization rate, and the atomic oxygen and water vapor densities. Odd hydrogen production is shown to exhibit diurnal and other time dependent variations during such an event at these altitudes, and the assumption that two odd hydrogen particles are always produced per ionization is reexamined.

  7. Organophosphate and halogenated flame retardants in atmospheric particles from a European Arctic site.

    PubMed

    Salamova, Amina; Hermanson, Mark H; Hites, Ronald A

    2014-06-01

    Levels of 13 organophosphate esters (OPEs) and 45 brominated and chlorinated flame retardants (BFRs) were measured in particle phase atmospheric samples collected at Longyearbyen on Svalbard in the European Arctic from September 2012 to May 2013. Total OPE (?OPEs) concentrations ranged from 33 to 1450 pg/m3, with the mean ?OPE concentration of 430±57 pg/m3. The nonchlorinated tri-n-butyl phosphate (TnBP) and 2-ethylhexyl-diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP) were the most abundant OPE congeners measured, and the sum of all nonchlorinated OPE concentrations comprised ?75% of the ?OPE concentrations. The most abundant chlorinated OPE was tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP). Total BFR concentrations (?BFRs) were in the range of 3-77 pg/m3, with a mean concentration of 15±3 pg/m3. 2-Ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) were among the relatively abundant BFRs measured in these samples and comprised ?46% and 17% of ?BFR concentrations, respectively. Total PBDE (?PBDE) concentrations constituted ?37% of ?BFR concentrations on average and ranged from 1 to 31 pg/m3. The most abundant PBDE congener was BDE-209, which contributed 24% to ?PBDE concentrations. Dechlorane Plus (DP) was detected in all of the samples, and ?DP concentrations (syn-+anti-DP concentrations) ranged from 0.05 to 5 pg/m3. Overall, ?OPE concentrations were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the ?BFR concentrations. PMID:24848787

  8. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of ?-pinene, ?-pinene, limonene, ?3-carene and ?-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, ?-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The ?-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the ?-caryophyllene emissions or ?-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The ?-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  9. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric... Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY...

  10. ACIDIC DEPOSITION AND THE CORROSION AND DETERIORATION OF MATERIALS IN THE ATMOSPHERE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY, 1880-1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bibliography contains more than 1300 article citations and abstracts on the effects of acidic deposition, air pollutants, and biological and meteorological factors on the corrosion and deterioration of materials in the atmosphere. The listing includes citations for the years ...

  11. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G.; Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K.

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock & Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  12. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G. ); Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K. )

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  13. Wood dust particle and mass concentrations and filtration efficiency in sanding of wood materials.

    PubMed

    Welling, Irma; Lehtimäki, Matti; Rautio, Sari; Lähde, Tero; Enbom, Seppo; Hynynen, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2009-02-01

    The importance of fine particles has become apparent as the knowledge of their effects on health has increased. Fine particle concentrations have been published for outside air, plasma arc cutting, welding, and grinding, but little data exists for the woodworking industry. Sanding was evaluated as the producer of the woodworking industry's finest particles, and was selected as the target study. The number of dust particles in different particle size classes and the mass concentrations were measured in the following environments: workplace air during sanding in plywood production and in the inlet and return air; in the dust emission chamber; and in filter testing. The numbers of fine particles were low, less than 10(4) particles/cm(3) (10(7) particles/L). They were much lower than typical number concentrations near 10(6) particles/cm(3) measured in plasma arc cutting, grinding, and welding. Ultrafine particles in the size class less than 100 nm were found during sanding of MDF (medium density fiberboard) sheets. When the cleaned air is returned to the working areas, the dust content in extraction systems must be monitored continuously. One way to monitor the dust content in the return air is to use an after-filter and measure pressure drop across the filter to indicate leaks in the air-cleaning system. The best after-filtration materials provided a clear increase in pressure drop across the filter in the loading of the filter. The best after-filtration materials proved to be quite effective also for fine particles. The best mass removal efficiencies for fine particles around 0.3 mum were over 80% for some filter materials loaded with sanding wood dust. PMID:19065389

  14. Crystallization of atmospheric sulfate-nitrate-ammonium particles Scot T. Martin, Julie C. Schlenker, Adam Malinowski, and Hui-Ming Hung

    E-print Network

    Crystallization of atmospheric sulfate-nitrate-ammonium particles Scot T. Martin, Julie C the crystallization RH (CRH) at 293 K of particles throughout the entire sulfate-nitrate-ammonium composition space the same particle for compositions enriched in nitrate or somewhat acidic, although the CRH is under 30

  15. Materials, methods and devices to detect and quantify water vapor concentrations in an atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Allendorf, Mark D; Robinson, Alex L

    2014-12-09

    We have demonstrated that a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a nanoporous framework material (NFM) film can perform ultrasensitive water vapor detection at concentrations in air from 0.05 to 12,000 ppmv at 1 atmosphere pressure. The method is extendable to other MEMS-based sensors, such as microcantilevers, or to quartz crystal microbalance sensors. We identify a specific NFM that provides high sensitivity and selectivity to water vapor. However, our approach is generalizable to detection of other species using NFM to provide sensitivity and selectivity.

  16. The fluxes of sub--cutoff particles detected by AMS, the cosmic ray albedo and atmospheric neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Paolo Lipari

    2001-01-31

    New measurements of the cosmic ray fluxes (p, e+, e- and Helium) performed by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during a ten days flight of space shuttle have revealed the existence of significant fluxes of particles below the geomagnetic cutoff. These fluxes exhibit a number of remarkable properties, such as a He-3/He-4 ratio of order ~10, an e+/e- ratio of order ~4 and production from well defined regions of the Earth that are distinct for positively and negatively charged particles. In this work we show that the natural hypothesis, that these subcutoff particles are generated as secondary products of primary cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere can reproduce all the observed properties. We also discuss the implications of the subcutoff fluxes for the estimate of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes, and find that they represent a negligibly small correction. On the other hand the AMS results give important confirmations about the assumption of isotropy for the interplanetary cosmic ray fluxes also on large angular scales, and on the validity of the geomagnetic effects that are important elements for the prediction of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes.

  17. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles based on active remote sensing and radiosounding measurements: selected cases in southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Titos, G.; Fernández-Gálvez, J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-02-01

    A new methodology based on combining active and passive remote sensing and simultaneous and collocated radiosounding data to study the aerosol hygroscopic growth effects on the particle optical and microphysical properties is presented. The identification of hygroscopic growth situations combines the analysis of multispectral aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and particle linear depolarization ratio with thermodynamic profiling of the atmospheric column. We analyzed the hygroscopic growth effects on aerosol properties, namely the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and the volume concentration profiles, using data gathered at Granada EARLINET station. Two study cases, corresponding to different aerosol loads and different aerosol types, are used for illustrating the potential of this methodology. Values of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factors range from 2.1 ± 0.8 to 3.9 ± 1.5, in the ranges of relative humidity 60-90 and 40-83%, being similar to those previously reported in the literature. Differences in the enhancement factor are directly linked to the composition of the atmospheric aerosol. The largest value of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factor corresponds to the presence of sulphate and marine particles that are more affected by hygroscopic growth. On the contrary, the lowest value of the enhancement factor corresponds to an aerosol mixture containing sulphates and slight traces of mineral dust. The Hänel parameterization is applied to these case studies, obtaining results within the range of values reported in previous studies, with values of the ? exponent of 0.56 ± 0.01 (for anthropogenic particles slightly influenced by mineral dust) and 1.07 ± 0.01 (for the situation dominated by anthropogenic particles), showing the convenience of this remote sensing approach for the study of hygroscopic effects of the atmospheric aerosol under ambient unperturbed conditions. For the first time, the retrieval of the volume concentration profiles for these cases using the Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) allows us to analyze the aerosol hygroscopic growth effects on aerosol volume concentration, observing a stronger increase of the fine mode volume concentration with increasing relative humidity.

  18. Phase inversion of particle-stabilized materials from foams to dry water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binks, Bernard P.; Murakami, Ryo

    2006-11-01

    Small particles attached to liquid surfaces arise in many products and processes, including crude-oil emulsions and food foams and in flotation, and there is a revival of interest in studying their behaviour. Colloidal particles of suitable wettability adsorb strongly to liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces, and can be sole stabilizers of emulsions and foams, respectively. New materials, including colloidosomes, anisotropic particles and porous solids, have been prepared by assembling particles at such interfaces. Phase inversion of particle-stabilized emulsions from oil in water to water in oil can be achieved either by variation of the particle hydrophobicity (transitional) or by variation of the oil/water ratio (catastrophic). Here we describe the phase inversion of particle-stabilized air-water systems, from air-in-water foams to water-in-air powders and vice versa. This inversion can be driven either by a progressive change in silica-particle hydrophobicity at constant air/water ratio or by changing the air/water ratio at fixed particle wettability, and has not been observed in the corresponding systems stabilized by surfactants. The simplicity of the work is that this novel inversion is achieved in a single system. The resultant materials in which either air or water become encapsulated have potential applications in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries.

  19. Hybrid metal organic scintillator materials system and particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Christina A.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Doty, F. Patrick; Simmons, Blake A.

    2011-07-26

    We describe the preparation and characterization of two zinc hybrid luminescent structures based on the flexible and emissive linker molecule, trans-(4-R,4'-R') stilbene, where R and R' are mono- or poly-coordinating groups, which retain their luminescence within these solid materials. For example, reaction of trans-4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid and zinc nitrate in the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) yielded a dense 2-D network featuring zinc in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination environments connected by trans-stilbene links. Similar reaction in diethylformamide (DEF) at higher temperatures resulted in a porous, 3-D framework structure consisting of two interpenetrating cubic lattices, each featuring basic to zinc carboxylate vertices joined by trans-stilbene, analogous to the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) series. We demonstrate that the optical properties of both embodiments correlate directly with the local ligand environments observed in the crystal structures. We further demonstrate that these materials produce high luminescent response to proton radiation and high radiation tolerance relative to prior scintillators. These features can be used to create sophisticated scintillating detection sensors.

  20. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (?N). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the boundary layer, derived from backscatter signals of a portable Raman lidar POLLYXT, allows a quick overview of the current vertical structure of atmospheric particles. Ground-based aerosol number concentrations are consistent with the results from flights in heights of a few metres. In addition, a direct comparison of ALADINA aerosol data and ground-based aerosol data, sampling the air at the same location for more than 1 h, shows comparable values within the range of ± 20 %. MASC was operated simultaneously with complementary flight patterns. It is equipped with the same meteorological instruments that offer the possibility to determine turbulent fluxes. Therefore, additional information about meteorological conditions was collected in the lowest part of the atmosphere. Vertical profiles up to 1000 m in altitude indicate a high variability with distinct layers of aerosol, especially for the small particles of a few nanometres in diameter on 1 particular day. The stratification was almost neutral and two significant aerosol layers were detected with total aerosol number concentrations up to 17 000 ± 3400 cm-3 between 180 and 220 m altitude and 14 000 ± 2800 cm-3 between 550 and 650 m. Apart from those layers, the aerosol distribution was well mixed and reached the total number concentration of less than 8000 ± 1600 cm-3. During another day, the distribution of the small particles in the lowermost ABL was related to the stratification, with continuously decreasing number concentrations from 16 000 ± 3200 cm-3 to a minimum of 4000 ± 800 cm-3 at the top of the inversion at 320 m. Above this, the total number concentration was rather constant. In the region of 500 to 600 m altitude, a significant difference of both CPCs was observed. This event occurred during the boundary layer development in the morning and represents a particle burst within the ABL.

  1. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 68636878 Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles

    E-print Network

    Elrod, Matthew J.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 6863­6878 Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe

  2. On Formation Of HXR, Hydrogen, White Light Emission and Sunquakes in Hydrodynamic Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranskis, R.; Zharkova, V. V.; Zharkov, S.; Druett, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report analysis of kinetic simulations for precipitation of various particle beams (electrons, protons, mixed beam) and hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmosphere heating by these beams using the approach described by Zharkova and Zharkov (2007). The results show temperature, density and macro-velocity variations as functions of both column and linear depths that for some beam parameters reveals a strong suppression of the upper atmosphere in a form of shocks towards the photosphere and beneath into the solar interior at some distances of 500-3000 km. The shocks deposited at different depths below the photosphere are found to produce varying seismic responses as per model by Zharkov (2013) while the atmospheres above the photosphere reveal various degrees of evaporation of the pressed ambient plasma into the corona depending on beam parameters. After a beam switch off the flaring atmospheres are shown to relax within short timescales to their original status. For physical models corresponding to hydrodynamic responses above we also simulate hydrogen emission produced by these atmospheres using full non-LTE approach and considering collisional excitation and ionisation by electron beams. We compare temporal and spatial distributions of HXR and optical emission in some flares with those produced by the complex simulations above, in attempt to resolve the puzzle of co-spatial formation of HXR and WL emission reported by Martinez-Oliveros et al. (2012).

  3. Impact of different energies of precipitating particles on NOx generation in the middle and upper atmosphere during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Esa; Verronen, Pekka T.; Seppälä, Annika; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Tamminen, Johanna; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Ulich, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Energetic particle precipitation couples the solar wind to the Earth's atmosphere and indirectly to Earth's climate. Ionisation and dissociation increases, due to particle precipitation, create odd nitrogen (NOx) and odd hydrogen (HOX) in the upper atmosphere, which can affect ozone chemistry. The long-lived NOx can be transported downwards into the stratosphere, particularly during the polar winter. Thus, the impact of NOx is determined by both the initial ionisation production, which is a function of the particle flux and energy spectrum, as well as transport rates. In this paper, we use the Sodankylä Ion and Neurtal Chemistry (SIC) model to simulate the production of NOx from examples of the most representative particle flux and energy spectra available today of solar proton events (SPE), auroral energy electrons, and relativistic electron precipitation (REP). Large SPEs are found to produce higher initial NOx concentrations than long-lived REP events, which themselves produce higher initial NOx levels than auroral electron precipitation. Only REP microburst events were found to be insignificant in terms of generating NOx. We show that the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) observations from the Arctic winter 2003-2004 are consistent with NOx generation by a combination of SPE, auroral altitude precipitation, and long-lived REP events.

  4. Mechanistic modelling of Middle Eocene atmospheric carbon dioxide using fossil plant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Michaela; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Wilde, Volker; Konrad, Wilfried; Utescher, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Various proxies (such as pedogenic carbonates, boron isotopes or phytoplankton) and geochemical models were applied in order to reconstruct palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide, partially providing conflicting results. Another promising proxy is the frequency of stomata (pores on the leaf surface used for gaseous exchange). In this project, fossil plant material from the Messel Pit (Hesse, Germany) is used to reconstruct atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration in the Middle Eocene by analyzing stomatal density. We applied the novel mechanistic-theoretical approach of Konrad et al. (2008) which provides a quantitative derivation of the stomatal density response (number of stomata per leaf area) to varying atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The model couples 1) C3-photosynthesis, 2) the process of diffusion and 3) an optimisation principle providing maximum photosynthesis (via carbon dioxide uptake) and minimum water loss (via stomatal transpiration). These three sub-models also include data of the palaeoenvironment (temperature, water availability, wind velocity, atmospheric humidity, precipitation) and anatomy of leaf and stoma (depth, length and width of stomatal porus, thickness of assimilation tissue, leaf length). In order to calculate curves of stomatal density as a function of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, various biochemical parameters have to be borrowed from extant representatives. The necessary palaeoclimate data are reconstructed from the whole Messel flora using Leaf Margin Analysis (LMA) and the Coexistence Approach (CA). In order to obtain a significant result, we selected three species from which a large number of well-preserved leaves is available (at least 20 leaves per species). Palaeoclimate calculations for the Middle Eocene Messel Pit indicate a warm and humid climate with mean annual temperature of approximately 22°C, up to 2540 mm mean annual precipitation and the absence of extended periods of drought. Mean relative air humidity was probably rather high, up to 77%. The combined results of the three selected plant taxa indicate values for atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration between 700 and 1100 ppm (probably about 900 ppm). Reference: Konrad, W., Roth-Nebelsick, A., Grein, M. (2008). Modelling of stomatal density response to atmospheric CO2. Journal of Theoretical Biology 253(4): 638-658.

  5. Anthropogenic Influence on Secondary Aerosol Formation and Total Water-Soluble Carbon on Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioda, Adriana; Mateus, Vinicius; Monteiro, Isabela; Taira, Fabio; Esteves, Veronica; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    On a global scale, the atmosphere is an important source of nutrients, as well as pollutants, because of its interfaces with soil and water. Important compounds in the gaseous phase are in both organic and inorganic forms, such as organic acids, nitrogen, sulfur and chloride. In spite of the species in gas form, a huge number of process, anthropogenic and natural, are able to form aerosols, which may be transported over long distances. Sulfates e nitrates are responsible for rain acidity; they may also increase the solubility of organic compounds and metals making them more bioavailable, and also can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol samples (PM2.5) were collected in a rural and industrial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in order to quantify chemical species and evaluate anthropogenic influences in secondary aerosol formation and organic compounds. Samples were collected during 24 h every six days using a high-volume sampler from August 2010 to July 2011. The aerosol mass was determined by Gravimetry. The water-soluble ionic composition (WSIC) was obtained by Ion Chromatography in order to determine the major anions (NO3-, SO4= and Cl-); total water-soluble carbon (TWSC) was determined by a TOC analyzer. The average aerosol (PM2.5) concentrations ranged from 1 to 43 ug/m3 in the industrial site and from 4 to 35 ug/m3 in the rural area. Regarding anions, the highest concentrations were measured for SO42- (10.6 ?g/m3-12.6 ?g/m3); where the lowest value was found in the rural site and the highest in the industrial. The concentrations for NO3- and Cl- ranged from 4.2 ?g/m3 to 9.3 ?g/m3 and 3.1 ?g/m3 to 6.4 ?g /m3, respectively. Sulfate was the major species and, like nitrate, it is related to photooxidation in the atmosphere. Interestingly sulfate concentrations were higher during the dry period and could be related to photochemistry activity. The correlations between nitrate and non-sea-salt sulfate were weak, suggesting different sources for these species. The secondary aerosol represented an important fraction of total compounds in PM2.5 ranged from 16 to 18% for (NH4)2SO4 and 6 to 8% for NH4NO3. The values for TWSC ranged from 0.28 to 6.35 ?g/m3 in the industrial area and 0.12 to 7.49 ?g/m3 for rural area. The similarity between the areas regarding secondary aerosols formation and water-soluble carbon compounds is probably due to the particle size.

  6. Large area nuclear particle detectors using ET materials, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, Charles Y.; Storti, George M.; Walter, Lee; Mathews, Scott

    1990-01-01

    This report presents work done under a Phase 2 SBIR contract for demonstrating large area detector planes utilizing Quantex electron trapping materials as a film medium for storing high-energy nuclide impingement information. The detector planes utilize energy dissipated by passage of the high-energy nuclides to produce localized populations of electrons stored in traps. Readout of the localized trapped electron populations is effected by scanning the ET plane with near-infrared, which frees the trapped electrons and results in optical emission at visible wavelengths. The effort involved both optimizing fabrication technology for the detector planes and developing a readout system capable of high spatial resolution for displaying the recorded nuclide passage tracks.

  7. Comparison of Contributions of Wind-blown and Anthropogenic Fugitive Dust Particles to Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Gong, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new wind-blown-dust emissions module was recently implemented into AURAMS, a Canadian regional air quality model (Park et al., 2009; Park et al., 2007), to investigate the relative impact of wind-blown dust vs. anthropogenic fugitive dust on air quality in North America. In order to apply the wind-blown dust emissions module to the entire North American continent, a soil-grain-size-distribution map was developed using the outputs of four monthly runs of AURAMS for 2002 and available PM2.5 dust-content observations. The simulation results using the new soil-grain-size-distribution map showed that inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions is essential to predict the impact of dust aerosols on air quality in North America, especially in the western U.S.. The wind-blown dust emissions varied widely by season, whereas the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions did not change significantly. In the spring (April), the continental monthly average emissions rate of wind-blown dust was much higher than that of anthropogenic fugitive dust. The total amount of wind-blown dust emissions in North America predicted by the model for 2002 was comparable to that of anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions. Even with the inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions, however, the model still had difficulty simulating dust concentrations. Further improvements are needed, in terms of both limitations of the wind-blown-dust emission module and uncertainties in the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions inventories, for improved dust modelling. References Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C.A. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Sensitivity of surface characteristics on the simulation of wind-blown dust source in North America, Atmospheric Environment, 43 (19), 3122-3129, 2009. Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, T.L. Zhao, R.J. Vet, V.S. Bouchet, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Simulation of entrainment and transport of dust particles within North America in April 2001 ("Red Dust Episode"), Journal of Geophysical Research, 112, D20209, doi:10.1029/2007JD008443, 2007.

  8. Classification of Multiple Types of Organic Carbon Composition in Atmospheric Particles by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcoyne, Arthur L; Takahama, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Russell, L.M.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.

    2007-05-16

    A scanning transmission X-ray microscope at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to measure organic functional group abundance and morphology of atmospheric aerosols. We present a summary of spectra, sizes, and shapes observed in 595 particles that were collected and analyzed between 2000 and 2006. These particles ranged between 0.1 and 12 mm and represent aerosols found in a large range of geographical areas, altitudes, and times. They include samples from seven different field campaigns: PELTI, ACE-ASIA, DYCOMS II, Princeton, MILAGRO (urban), MILAGRO (C-130), and INTEX-B. At least 14 different classes of organic particles show different types of spectroscopic signatures. Different particle types are found within the same region while the same particle types are also found in different geographical domains. Particles chemically resembling black carbon, humic-like aerosols, pine ultisol, and secondary or processed aerosol have been identified from functional group abundance and comparison of spectra with those published in the literature.

  9. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Lampert, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Bange, J.; Baars, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturized by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time. Each system was characterized in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 6 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs. Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on two days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the boundary layer, derived from backscatter signals of a portable Raman lidar POLLYXT, allows a quick overview of the current vertical structure of atmospheric particles. Ground-based aerosol number concentrations are consistent with the results from flights in heights of a few meters. In addition, a direct comparison of ALADINA aerosol data and ground-based aerosol data, sampling the air at the same location, shows comparable values. MASC was operated simultaneously with complementary flight patterns. It is equipped with the same meteorological instruments that offer the possibility to determine turbulent fluxes. Therefore additional information about meteorological conditions was collected in the lowest part of the atmosphere. Vertical profiles up to 1000 m altitude indicate a high variability with distinct layers of aerosol especially for the small particles of a few nanometers in diameter. Particle bursts were observed on one day during the boundary layer development in the morning.

  10. Phase Transitions and Phase Miscibility of Mixed Particles of Ammonium Sulfate, Toluene-Derived Secondary Organic Material,

    E-print Network

    in atmospheric particles, such as sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, have been significantly studied.6 neither the ERH() nor DRH() curves, implying an absence of kinetic effects on the observations over

  11. Direct observation of aerosol particles in aged agricultural biomass burning plumes impacting urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Y.; Shao, L. Y.

    2010-04-01

    Emissions from agricultural biomass burning (ABB) in northern China have a significant impact on the regional and the global climate. According to the Giovanni's Aerosol optical depth (AOD) map, the monthly average AOD at 550 nm in northern China in 2007 shows a maximum value of 0.7 in June, suggesting that episodes of severe aerosol pollution occurred in this region. Aerosol particles were collected in urban Beijing during regional brown hazes from 12 to 30 June, 2007. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry characterized the morphology, composition, and mixing state of aerosol particles. Potassium salts (K2SO4 and KNO3), ammonium sulfate, soot, and organic particles predominated in fine particles (diameter <1 ?m) collected from 12 to 20 June, 2007. In contrast, from 21 to 30 June, 2007, ammonium sulfate, soot, and organic particles were dominant. Potassium-dominant particles as a tracer of biomass burning, together with wildfire maps, show that intensive regional ABB in northern China from 10 to 20 June, 2007 contributed significantly to the regional haze. After long-range transport, ABB particles exhibited marked changes in their morphology, elemental composition, and mixing state. Heterogeneous reactions completely converted KCl particles from ABB into K2SO4 and KNO3. Soot particles were generally mixed with potassium salts, ammonium salts, and organic particles. In addition, the abundant aged organic particles and soluble salts emitted by ABB become more hygroscopic and increase their size during long-range transport, becoming in effect additional cloud condensation nuclei. The high AOD (average value at 2.2) during 12 to 20 June, 2007, in Beijing is partly explained by the hygroscopic growth of aged fine aerosol particles and by the strong absorption of internally mixed soot particles, both coming from regional ABB emissions.

  12. The Stopping Power of Asteroidal Materials as High-Energy Charged Particle Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Leos; Johnson, Daniel; Britt, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Extended human missions in deep space face a challenging radiation environment from high-energy galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles generated by solar flares and related coronal mass ejections. Shielding to attenuate these high-energy particles will require significant mass and volume, and would be extremely expensive launch from the surface of the earth. One possible solution could be the use of asteroidal resources as shielding for these high-energy particles. The effectiveness of shielding material for moderately relativistic charged particles is a function of the mean rate of energy loss, primarily to ionization and atomic excitation and is termed stopping power. In general, low atomic number elements are more effective per unit volume. We have calculated the stopping power for the average compositions of all major meteorite groups and will compare these data with typical spacecraft materials.

  13. Atmospheric concentrations and gas/particle partitioning of neutral poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances in northern German coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Xie, Zhiyong; Möller, Axel; Mi, Wenying; Wolschke, Hendrik; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Total 58 high volume air samples were collected in Büsum, Germany, from August 2011 to October 2012 to investigate air concentrations of 12 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and their gas/particle partitioning. The total concentration (vapor plus particle phases) of the 12 PFASs (?PFASs) ranged from 8.6 to 155 pg/m3 (mean: 41 pg/m3) while fluorotelomer alcohols 8:2 (8:2 FTOH) dominated all samples accounting for 61.9% of ?PFASs and the next most species were 10:2 FTOH (12.7%). Air mass back trajectory analysis showed that atmospheric PFASs in most samples were from long range atmospheric transport processes and had higher ratios of 8:2 to 6:2 FTOH compared to the data obtained from urban/industrial sources. Small portion of particle PFASs in the atmosphere was observed and the average percent to ?PFASs was 2.0%. The particle-associated fractions of different PFASs decreased from perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs) (15.5%) to fluorotelomer acrylates (FTAs) (7.6%) to perfluorooctane sulfonamides (FOSAs) (3.1%) and FTOHs (1.8%), indicating the functional group obviously influenced their gas/particle partitioning. For neutral compounds with acid dissociation constant (pKa) > 7.0 (i.e., FTOHs, FOSEs and FOSAs), a significant log-linear relationship was observed between their gas/particle partition coefficients (KSP) and vapor pressures (pºL), suggesting the gas/particle partitioning of neutral PFASs agreed with the classical logKSP-logpºL relation. Due to the pKa values of 6:2 and 8:2 FTA below the typical environmental pH conditions, they mainly exist as ionic form in aerosols, and the corrected logKSP (neutral form) were considerably lower than those of FTOHs, FOSEs and FOSAs with similar vapor pressures. Considering the strong partitioning potential to aqueous phases for ionic PFASs at higher pH values, a need exists to develop a model taking account of the ad/absorption mechanism to the condensed phase of aerosols for ionizable PFASs (e.g., FTAs).

  14. Composition and properties of atmospheric particles in the eastern Atlantic and impacts on gas phase uptake rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Topping, D. O.; Good, N.; Irwin, M.; Flynn, M.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.; Baker, A. R.; Martino, M.; Niedermeier, N.; Wiedensohler, A.; Lehmann, S.; Müller, K.; Herrmann, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2009-09-01

    Marine aerosol composition continues to represent a large source of uncertainty in the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry. In addition to their physical size and chemical composition, hygroscopicity plays a significant role, increasing the particles' surface areas and scattering potential. Simultaneous aerosol measurements were performed on board the RRS Discovery and at the Cape Verde atmospheric observatory during the Aerosol Composition and Modelling in the Marine Environment (ACMME) and Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHAMBLE) experiments. These included online measurements of number and dry size and bulk collection for offline analysis of aqueous ions. In addition, the measurements on board the Discovery included online measurements of composition using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, optical absorption using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer, ambient humidity size distribution measurements using a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) and optical particle counter (OPC) and hygroscopicity measurements with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA). Good agreement between platforms in terms of the sea salt (ss) and non sea salt (nss) modes was found during the period when the Discovery was in close proximity to Cape Verde and showed a composition consistent with remote marine air. As the Discovery approached the African coast, the aerosol showed signs of continental influence such as an increase in particle number, optical absorption, enhancement of the nss mode and dust particles. The Cape Verde site was free of this influence during this period. Chloride and bromide showed concentrations with significant deviations from seawater relative to sodium, indicating that atmospheric halogen processing (and/or acid displacement for chloride) had taken place. The time dependent ambient size distribution was synthesised using humidified DMPS and OPC data, corrected to ambient humidity using HTDMA data. Heterogeneous uptake rates of HOI were also predicted and the nss accumulation mode was found to be the most significant part of the size distribution, which could act as an inert sink for this species. The predicted uptake rates were enhanced by around a factor of 2 during the African influence period due to the addition of both coarse and fine particles. The hygroscopicity of the nss fraction was modelled using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM) using the measured composition and results compared with the HTDMA data. This was the first time such a reconciliation study with this model has been performed with marine data and good agreement was reached within the resolution of the instruments. The effect of hygroscopic growth on HOI uptake was also modelled and ambient uptake rates were found to be approximately doubled compared to equivalent dry particles.

  15. Composition and properties of atmospheric particles in the eastern Atlantic and impacts on gas phase uptake rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Topping, D. O.; Good, N.; Irwin, M.; Flynn, M.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.; Baker, A. R.; Martino, M.; Niedermeier, N.; Wiedensohler, A.; Lehmann, S.; Müller, K.; Herrmann, H.; McFiggans, G.

    2009-12-01

    Marine aerosol composition continues to represent a large source of uncertainty in the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry. In addition to their physical size and chemical composition, hygroscopicity plays a significant role, increasing the particles' surface areas and scattering potential. Simultaneous aerosol measurements were performed on board the RRS Discovery and at the Cape Verde atmospheric observatory during the Aerosol Composition and Modelling in the Marine Environment (ACMME) and Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHAMBLE) experiments. These included online measurements of number and dry size and bulk collection for offline analysis of aqueous ions. In addition, the measurements on board the Discovery included online measurements of composition using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, optical absorption using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer, ambient humidity size distribution measurements using a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) and optical particle counter (OPC) and hygroscopicity measurements with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA). Good agreement between platforms in terms of the sea salt (ss) and non sea salt (nss) modes was found during the period when the Discovery was in close proximity to Cape Verde and showed a composition consistent with remote marine air. As the Discovery approached the African coast, the aerosol showed signs of continental influence such as an increase in particle number, optical absorption, enhancement of the nss mode and dust particles. The Cape Verde site was free of this influence during this period. Chloride and bromide showed concentrations with significant deviations from seawater relative to sodium, indicating that atmospheric halogen processing (and/or acid displacement for chloride) had taken place. The time dependent ambient size distribution was synthesised using humidified DMPS and OPC data, corrected to ambient humidity using HTDMA data. Heterogeneous uptake rates of hypoiodous acid (HOI) were also predicted and the nss accumulation mode was found to be the most significant part of the size distribution, which could act as an inert sink for this species. The predicted uptake rates were enhanced by around a factor of 2 during the African influence period due to the addition of both coarse and fine particles. The hygroscopicity of the nss fraction was modelled using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM) using the measured composition and results compared with the HTDMA data. This was the first time such a reconciliation study with this model has been performed with marine data and good agreement was reached within the resolution of the instruments. The effect of hygroscopic growth on HOI uptake was also modelled and ambient uptake rates were found to be approximately doubled compared to equivalent dry particles.

  16. UV-VIS backscattering measurements on atmospheric particles mixture using polarization lidar coupled with numerical simulations and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miffre, Alain; Francis, Mirvatte; Anselmo, Christophe; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    As underlined by the latest IPCC report [1], tropospheric aerosols are nowadays recognized as one of the main uncertainties affecting the Earth's climate and human health. This issue is not straightforward due to the complexity of these nanoparticles, which present a wide range of sizes, shapes and chemical composition, which vary as a function of altitude, especially in the troposphere, where strong temperature variations are encountered under different water vapour content (from 10 to 100 % relative humidity). During this oral presentation, I will first present the scientific context of this research. Then, the UV-VIS polarimeter instrument and the subsequent calibration procedure [2] will be presented, allowing quantitative evaluation of particles backscattering coefficients in the atmosphere. In this way, up to three-component particles external mixtures can be partitioned into their spherical and non-spherical components, by coupling UV-VIS depolarization lidar measurements with numerical simulations of backscattering properties specific to non-spherical particles, such as desert dust or sea-salt particles [3], by applying the T-matrix numerical code [4]. This combined methodology is new, as opposed to the traditional approach using the lidar and T-matrix methodologies separately. In complement, recent laboratory findings [5] and field applications [6] will be presented, enhancing the sensitivity of the UV-VIS polarimeter. References [1] IPCC report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC, (2013). [2] G. David, A. Miffre, B. Thomas, and P. Rairoux: "Sensitive and accurate dual-wavelength UV-VIS polarization detector for optical remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols," Appl. Phys. B 108, 197-216 (2012). [3] G. David, B. Thomas, T. Nousiainen, A. Miffre and P. Rairoux: "Retrieving simulated volcanic, desert dust, and sea-salt particle properties from two / three-component particle mixtures using UV-VIS polarization Lidar and T-matrix," Atmos. Chem Phys. 13, 6757-6776 (2013). [4] M.I. Mishchenko, L.D. Travis and A.A. Lacis: "Scattering, absorption and emission of Light by small particles," 3rd edition, Cambridge University Press UK, (2002). [5] G. David, B. Thomas, E. Coillet, A. Miffre, and P. Rairoux, Polarization-resolved exact light backscattering by an ensemble of particles in air, Opt. Exp., 21, No. 16, 18624-18639, (2013). [6] G. David, B. Thomas, Y. Dupart, B. D'Anna, C. George, A. Miffre and P. Rairoux, UV polarization lidar for remote sensing new particles formation in the atmosphere, Opt. Exp., 22, A1009-A1022, (2014).

  17. Trace elements in chondritic stratospheric particles - Zinc depletion as a possible indicator of atmospheric entry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Major-element abundances in 11 C, C?, and TCA cosmic dust particles have been measured using SEM and TEM energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) systems. The Fe/Ni ratio, when coupled with major element abundances, appears to be a useful discriminator of cosmic particles. Three particles classified as C?, but having Fe/Ni peak height ratios similar to those measured on the powdered Allende meteorite sample in their HSC EDX spectra, exhibit chondritic minor-/trace-element abundance patterns, suggesting they are extraterrestrial. The one particle classified as C-type, but without detectable Ni in its JSC EDX spectrum, exhibits an apparently nonchondritic minor-/trace-element abundance pattern. A class of particles that are chondritic except for large depletions in the volatile elements Zn and S has been identified. It is likely that these particles condensed with a C1 abundance pattern and that Zn and S were removed by some subsequent process.

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric sulfur-containing gases and particles during the Albatross campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, J.; Baboukas, E.; Kanakidou, M.; Krischke, U.; Belviso, S.; Bardouki, H.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the oxidation chemistry of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the marine atmosphere, atmospheric DMS, SO2, as well as several DMS oxidation products in aerosol phase such as non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4), methanesulfonate (MSA), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSOp) have been measured during the Albatross campaign in the Atlantic Ocean from October 9 to November 2, 1996. Long-range transport, local sea-to-air flux of DMS (FDMS), marine boundary layer (MBL) height variation, and photochemistry were found to be the major factors controlling atmospheric DMS concentration which ranged from 29 to 396 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) (mean of 120±68 pptv) over the cruise. The spatial variability of MSA and DMSOp follows the latitudinal variations of FDMS. A 2-day period of intensive photochemistry associated with quite stable atmospheric conditions south of the equator allowed the observation of anticorrelated diurnal variations between DMS and its main oxidation products. A chemical box model describing sulfur chemistry in the marine atmosphere was used to reproduce these variations and investigate coherence of experimentally calculated fluxes FDMS with observed DMS atmospheric concentrations. The model results reveal that the measured OH levels are not sufficient to explain the observed DMS daytime variation. Oxidizing species other than OH, probably BrO, must be involved in the oxidation of DMS to reproduce the observed data.

  19. Nanostructured coatings by adhesion of phosphonated polystyrene particles onto titanium surface for implant material applications.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Anke; Musyanovych, Anna; Kappl, Michael; Ethirajan, Anitha; Dass, Martin; Markova, Dilyana; Klapper, Markus; Landfester, Katharina

    2010-08-01

    Titanium that is covered with a native oxide layer is widely used as an implant material; however, it is only passively incorporated in the human bone. To increase the implant-bone interaction, one can graft multifunctional phosphonic compounds onto the implant material. Phosphonate groups show excellent adhesion properties onto metal oxide surfaces such as titanium dioxide, and therefore, they can be used as anchor groups. Here, we present an alternative coating material composed of phosphonate surface-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles synthesized via free radical copolymerization in a direct (oil-in-water) miniemulsion process. Two types of functional monomers, namely, vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) and vinylbenzyl phosphonic acid (VBPA), were employed in the copolymerization reaction. Using VBPA as a comonomer leads to particles with a higher density of surface phosphonate groups in comparison to those obtained with VPA. VBPA-functionalized particles were used for the coating formation on the titanium surface. The particles monolayer was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) employing titanium and silicium tip with the native OH groups. Force versus distance curves proves the strong adhesion between the phosphonated particles and the titanium (or silicium) surfaces in contrast to the nonfunctionalized polystyrene particles. Finally, as a proof of concept, the particles adhered to the surface were further used to nucleate hydroxyapatite, which has high potential for bioimplants. PMID:20690639

  20. Hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction of functionalised carboxylic acids from atmospheric particles combined with capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    van Pinxteren, D; Teich, M; Herrmann, H

    2012-12-01

    A method was developed to enrich various mono- and dicarboxylic acids from aqueous extracts of atmospheric particles by three-phase hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction. Analysis was performed by capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry applying a previously reported separation method. Several extraction parameters (pH of donor and acceptor phase, composition of supported liquid membrane, shaking speed, and extraction time) were tested for their influence on analyte recovery. A strong dependence of the recovery on the acceptor phase pH was observed. The final method consisted of 10% (w/v) trioctylphosphine oxide in dihexylether as supported liquid membrane, 1.8 ml aqueous particle extract, acidified by sulfuric acid to a pH of 2 as donor phase, and 15 ?l of 50 mM aqueous ammonia solution as acceptor phase. The extraction devices were shaken at 2200 rpm for 2 h. With this method, the recoveries from aqueous standards were between 10 and 80% with a repeatability of 4-14% for most compounds. Generally, more polar compounds were extracted less efficient than less polar ones. A few of the most polar compounds showed recoveries <10% with a repeatability of 20-55%. The enrichment factor was typically 10-100. The analyte recovery from real samples was found to strongly depend on the sample matrix due to co-extraction of mineral acids and organic acidic material present in atmospheric particles. Quantification was achieved by the method of standard addition. The easy handling of the hollow fibre devices, the low costs per extraction and the possibility to do many extractions in parallel allowed for an application of the developed method to a large set of real samples. PMID:22824217

  1. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  2. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked composite exhibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young`s modulus (stiffness). 3 figs.

  3. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, Suleyman B. (Ames, IA); Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Lograsso, Barbara K. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quaiscrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked compositehibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus (stiffness).

  4. Nucleation and growth of sub-3 nm particles in the polluted urban atmosphere of a megacity in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Zhou, L. Y.; Dai, L.; Shen, W. C.; Zheng, J.; Ma, Y.; Chen, M. D.

    2015-07-01

    Particle size distribution down to 1.38 nm was measured in the urban atmosphere of Nanjing, China in spring, summer and winter during 2014-2015. Nucleation event occurred on 42 out of total 90 observation days, but new particles could grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)-active sizes on only 9 days. In summer, infrequent nucleation was limited by both unfavorable meteorological conditions (high temperature and RH) and reduced anthropogenic precursor availability due to strict emission control measures during the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing. The limiting factors for nucleation in winter and spring were meteorological conditions (radiation, temperature, and RH) and condensation sink, but for the further growth of sub-3 nm particles to CCN-active sizes, anthropogenic precursors again became limiting factors. Nucleation events were strong in the polluted urban atmosphere. Initial J1.38 at the onset and peak J1.38 at the noontime could be up to 2.1 × 102 and 2.5 × 103 cm-3 s-1, respectively, during the 8 nucleation events selected from different seasons. Time-dependent J1.38 usually showed good linear correlations with a sulfuric acid proxy for every single event (R2 = 0.56-0.86, excluding a day with significant nocturnal nucleation), but the correlation among all the 8 events deteriorated (R2 = 0.17) due to temperature or season change. We observed that new particle growth rate did not increase monotonically with particle size, but had a local maximum up to 25 nm h-1 between 1-3 nm. The growth rate behavior was interpreted in this study as the solvation effect of organic activating vapor in newly formed inorganic nuclei using nano-Köhler theory.

  5. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry of Lead Oxide Particles with Nitrogen Dioxide Increases Lead Solubility: Environmental and Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chen, Haihan; Rubasinghege, Gayan

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrogen dioxide with lead-containing particles is investigated to better understand lead metal mobilization in the environment. In particular, PbO particles, a model lead-containing compound due to its wide spread presence as a component of lead paint and as naturally occurring minerals, massicot and litharge, are exposed to nitrogen dioxide at different relative humidity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that upon exposure to nitrogen dioxide the surface of PbO particles react to form adsorbed nitrates and lead nitrate thin films with the extent of formation of nitrate relative humidity dependent. Surface adsorbed nitrate increases the amount of dissolved lead. These reacted particles are found to have an increase in the amount of lead that dissolves in aqueous suspensions at circumneutral pH compared to unreacted particles. These results point to the potential importance and impact that heterogeneous chemistry with trace atmospheric gases can have on increasing solubility and therefore the mobilization of heavy metals, such as lead, in the environment. This study also show that surface intermediates, such as adsorbed nitrates, that form can yield higher concentrations of lead in water systems. In the environment, these water systems can include drinking water, ground water, estuaries and lakes. PMID:23057678

  6. An Observational Case Study on the Influence of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Dynamics on New Particle Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platis, Andreas; Altstädter, Barbara; Wehner, Birgit; Wildmann, Norman; Lampert, Astrid; Hermann, Markus; Birmili, Wolfram; Bange, Jens

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the influence of atmospheric boundary-layer development on new particle formation (NPF) during the morning transition. Continuous in-situ measurements of vertical profiles of temperature, humidity and aerosol number concentrations were quasi-continously measured near Melpitz, Germany, by unmanned aerial systems to investigate the potential connection between NPF and boundary-layer dynamics in the context of turbulence, temperature and humidity fluctuations. On 3 April 2014 high number concentrations of nucleation mode particles up to 6.0 × 10^4 {cm}^{-3} were observed in an inversion layer located about 450 m above ground level. The inversion layer exhibited a spatial temperature structure parameter C_T^2 15 times higher and a spatial humidity structure parameter C_q^2 5 times higher than in the remaining part of the vertical profile. The study provides hints that the inversion layer is responsible for creating favorable thermodynamic conditions for a NPF event. In addition, this layer showed a strong anti-correlation of humidity and temperature fluctuations. Using estimates of the turbulent mixing and dissipation rates, it is concluded that the downward transport of particles by convective mixing was also the reason of the sudden increase of nucleation mode particles measured on ground. This work supports the hypothesis that many of the NPF events that are frequently observed near the ground may, in fact, originate at elevated altitude, with newly formed particles subsequently being mixed down to the ground.

  7. Interplanetary dust particles, quantitative material properties and bulk chemical composition of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J.

    Meteors fill the gap between interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteorites that are collected for laboratory analyses. When interacting with the atmosphere meteors leave potentially extractable information on mass (size), density, internal texture (massive or aggregates), sizes of building blocks (meteor fragmentation behavior), and bulk composition of "coherent entities" (light curves). Most comet nuclei and many undifferentiated asteroids are rubble piles that could potentially produce meteors ranging from several hundreds of meter-sized pre-protoplanets, boulders (several meters to sub-meter-size), cm/mm-size pebbles and dust. The hypothesis of hierarchical dust accretion describes the mineralogical variations and chemical changes of heterogeneous, micron to mm-sized meteors and constituent grain size. The initially accreting dusts had a non-chondritic composition. Dust in "dirty-ice" or "icy-dirt" was latest-accreted nebular dust once most of the evolved dust had accreted into pre-protoplanets where it was subjected to aqueous, thermal, or both, modification. The hypothesis can no longer be traced when dust +/- ice aggregates material strength. It is generally assumed that such modifications will require a sustained thermal regime but the metastable nature of sub-millimeter grains would allow modification well below equilibrium temperatures. After modification or lithification of accretionary-evolved pre-proto-planets, the resulting rubble pile will preserve a fractal nature from the largest down to the smallest dust aggregates. Its mm-sized and larger meteors would range from Si-rich proto-CI aggregates to fully-hydrated CI, possible also CM, boulders. Mapping the properties listed at the top for individual "dust and small boulder" meteors from comet nuclei in different meteor streams might produce a picture of accretion and (pre)protoplanetary dust modification from these near-surface source sample to asses differences between and among active, dormant and extinct rubble piles from the Oort cloud, KBOs and NEAs, even on-orbit meteoroid modification. Ironically the smallest, thus faintest, meteors would be of greatest interest. Yet, larger meteoroids will remain the only option to learn the nature of the pebbles and boulders that could be CI/CM like, or much-less modified precursor materials.

  8. A Massively Parallel Particle Code for Rarefied Ionized and Neutral Gas Flows in Earth and Planetary Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important.

  9. Physicochemical properties and ability to generate free radicals of ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles in the atmosphere of Xuanwei, China, an area of high lung cancer incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Yi, Fei; Hao, Xiaojie; Yu, Shang; Ren, Jingjing; Wu, Minghong; Jialiang, Feng; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2014-11-01

    The link between the high incidence of lung cancer and harmful pollutants emitted by local coal combustion in Xuanwei, Yunnan province, China, has been a focus of study since the 1980s. However, the mechanisms responsible for the high lung cancer rate remain unclear, necessitating further study. Since a close relationship between ambient air particle pollution and respiratory diseases exists, we sampled size-resolved ambient particles from the atmosphere of Xuanwei. In our indoor experiment, cutting-edge methods, including scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray detection (SEM/EDX), particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and the cell-free DCFH-DA assay, were employed to investigate the physicochemical properties, the potential to generate free radicals and the oxidative potential of ambient coarse (diameter, 1.8-10 ?m), fine (diameter, 0.1-1.8 ?m), and ultrafine (diameter, <0.1 ?m) particles. We found the total mass concentrations of the size-resolved particles collected in spring were higher than that in early winter. Mass percentage of fine particles accounted for 68% and 61% of the total particulate mass in spring and in early winter samples, respectively, indicating that fine particles were the major component of the Xuanwei ambient particulate matters. On the other hand, the results of SEM/EDX analysis showed that the coarse particles were dominated by minerals, the fine particles by soot aggregates and fly ashes, and the ultrafine particles by soot particles and unidentified particles. Our PIXE results revealed that crustal elements (Ca, Ti Si, Fe) were mainly distributed in coarse particles, while trace metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) dominated in the fine particle fraction, and S, a typical element emitted by coal combustion, mainly resided in fine particles collected from the winter atmosphere. EPR results indicated that the magnitude of free radical intensity caused by size-resolved particles followed these patterns: fine particles > coarse particles > ultrafine particles for spring samples and ultrafine particles > fine particles > coarse particles for winter samples. Cell-free DCFH assay results conclusively showed that all of the measured particle suspensions displayed a higher oxidative potential than the negative control. The correlation coefficient (R2) between free radical intensity and fluorescent intensity generated by the size-resolved particles was 0.535 and 0.507 for the spring and winter seasons, respectively, implying that ambient air particles in the Xuanwei atmosphere have the ability to generate free radicals, and fine and ultrafine particles could be hazardous to local residents.

  10. Influence of the Spray Angle on the Characteristics of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Hard Material Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Vogli, Evelina; Krebs, Benjamin

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the influence of the spray angle on thermally sprayed coatings. Spray beads were manufactured with different spray angles between 90 and 20° by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) on heat-treated mild steel (1.0503). WC-12Co and Cr3C2-10(Ni20Cr) powders were employed as feedstock materials. Every spray bead was characterized by a Gaussian fit. This opens the opportunity to analyze the influence of the spray angle on coating properties. Furthermore, metallographic studies of the surface roughness, porosity, hardness, and morphology were carried out and the deposition efficiency as well as the tensile strength was measured. The thermally sprayed coatings show a clear dependence on the spray angle. A decrease in spray angle changes the thickness, width, and form of the spray beads. The coatings become rougher and their quality decreases.

  11. Atmosphere expansion and mass loss of close-orbit giant exoplanets heated by stellar XUV. I. Modeling of hydrodynamic escape of upper atmospheric material

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Sasunov, Yu. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Erkaev, N. V.

    2014-11-10

    In the present series of papers we propose a consistent description of the mass loss process. To study in a comprehensive way the effects of the intrinsic magnetic field of a close-orbit giant exoplanet (a so-called hot Jupiter) on atmospheric material escape and the formation of a planetary inner magnetosphere, we start with a hydrodynamic model of an upper atmosphere expansion in this paper. While considering a simple hydrogen atmosphere model, we focus on the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas with its consequent expansion in the outer space. Primary attention is paid to an investigation of the role of the specific conditions at the inner and outer boundaries of the simulation domain, under which different regimes of material escape (free and restricted flow) are formed. A comparative study is performed of different processes, such as X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) heating, material ionization and recombination, H{sub 3}{sup +} cooling, adiabatic and Ly? cooling, and Ly? reabsorption. We confirm the basic consistency of the outcomes of our modeling with the results of other hydrodynamic models of expanding planetary atmospheres. In particular, we determine that, under the typical conditions of an orbital distance of 0.05 AU around a Sun-type star, a hot Jupiter plasma envelope may reach maximum temperatures up to ?9000 K with a hydrodynamic escape speed of ?9 km s{sup –1}, resulting in mass loss rates of ?(4-7) · 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1}. In the range of the considered stellar-planetary parameters and XUV fluxes, that is close to the mass loss in the energy-limited case. The inclusion of planetary intrinsic magnetic fields in the model is a subject of the follow-up paper (Paper II).

  12. Hygroscopicity of internally mixed multi-component aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qifan; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2016-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of two water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) relevant to urban haze pollution (phthalic acid and levoglucosan) and their internally mixtures with inorganic salts (ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate) are investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) system. The multi-component particles uptake water gradually in the range 5-90% relative humidity (RH). The experimental results are compared with the thermodynamic model predictions. For most mixtures, Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) predictions agree well with the measured growth factors. The hygroscopic growth of mixed particles can be well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation as long as the mixed particles are completely liquid. ZSR calculations underestimate the water uptake of mixed particles at moderate RH due to the partial dissolution of ammonium sulfate in the organic and ammonium nitrate solution in this RH region. The phase of ammonium nitrate in the initial dry particles changes dramatically with the composition of mixtures. The presence of organics in the mixed particles can inhibit the crystallization of ammonium nitrate during the drying process and results in water uptake at low RH (RH < 60%). These results demonstrate that certain representative WSOCs can substantially influence the hygroscopicity of inorganic salts and overall water uptake of particles.

  13. Measurement of atmospheric boundary layer based on super-large-scale particle image velocimetry using natural snowfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, M.; Riley, S.; Hong, J.; Howard, K.; Chamorro, L. P.; Guala, M.; Tucker, J.

    2014-05-01

    We present an implementation of super-large-scale particle image velocimetry (SLPIV) to characterize spatially the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer using natural snowfall as flow tracers. The SLPIV technique achieves a measurement area of ~22 m × 52 m, up to 56 m above the ground, with a spatial resolution of ~0.34 m. The traceability of snow particles is estimated based on their settling velocity obtained from the wall-normal component of SLPIV velocity measurements. The results are validated using coincident measurements from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower situated in close proximity to the SLPIV sampling area. A contrast of the mean velocity and the streamwise Reynolds stress component obtained from the two techniques shows less than 3 and 12 % difference, respectively. Additionally, the turbulent energy spectra measured by SLPIV show a similar inertial subrange and trends when compared to those measured by the sonic anemometers.

  14. Exploration of Heterogeneous Chemistry in Model Atmospheric Particles Using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante,J.; Hinrichs, R.; Brown, E.; Calvin, S.

    2007-01-01

    As models of the composition and heterogeneous chemical reactions of the troposphere undergo refinement, novel application of state-of-the-art analytical techniques will be necessary to propound realistic characterizations of mineral dust chemistry. In this study, strontium carbonate particles treated with gaseous nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide were examined with X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (EXAFS). The X-ray spectra of carbonate and nitrate standards were fitted to ab initio calculations, which were used to determine the structure and consistency of strontium nitrate formed on strontium carbonate. By examining differences in mean square radial displacement and lattice spacing values obtained for bulk Sr(NO3)2 as compared to Sr(NO3)2 formed on SrCO3, EXAFS proves effective as a tool for investigating the local structure and composition of heterogeneous aerosol particles. The implications of findings on reacted strontium carbonate for atmospheric models of calcium carbonate aerosol are discussed.

  15. Free fatty acid particles in protein formulations, part 2: contribution of polysorbate raw material.

    PubMed

    Siska, Christine C; Pierini, Christopher J; Lau, Hollis R; Latypov, Ramil F; Fesinmeyer, R Matthew; Litowski, Jennifer R

    2015-02-01

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20) is a nonionic surfactant frequently used to stabilize protein biopharmaceuticals. During the development of mAb formulations containing PS20, small clouds of particles were observed in solutions stored in vials. The degree of particle formation was dependent on PS20 concentration. The particles were characterized by reversed-phase HPLC after dissolution and labeling with the fluorescent dye 1-pyrenyldiazomethane. The analysis showed that the particles consisted of free fatty acids (FFAs), with the distribution of types consistent with those found in the PS20 raw material. Protein solutions formulated with polysorbate 80, a chemically similar nonionic surfactant, showed a substantial delay in particle formation over time compared with PS20. Multiple lots of polysorbates were evaluated for FFA levels, each exhibiting differences based on polysorbate type and lot. Polysorbates purchased in more recent years show a greater distribution and quantity of FFA and also a greater propensity to form particles. This work shows that the quality control of polysorbate raw materials could play an important role in biopharmaceutical product quality. PMID:25196966

  16. Toward Quantifying the Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Individual Submicron Atmospheric Aerosol Particles with STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey Piens, D.; Kelly, S. T.; OBrien, R. E.; Wang, B.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols influences their optical and cloud-nucleation properties, and therefore affects climate. Although changes in particle size as a function of relative humidity have often been used to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles, it has been noted that calculations of hygroscopicity based on size contain error due to particle porosity, non-ideal volume additivity and changes in surface tension. We will present a method to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles based on changes in mass, rather than size, as a function of relative humidity. This method results from a novel experimental approach combining scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near-edge x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), as well as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) on the same individual particles. First, using STXM/NEXAFS, our methods are applied to aerosol particles of known composition ? for instance ammonium sulfate, sodium bromide and levoglucosan ? and validated by theory. Then, using STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX, these methods are extended to mixed atmospheric aerosol particles collected in the field at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Planes sampling site in Oklahoma, USA. We have observed and quantified a range of hygroscopic behaviors which are correlated to the composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles. These methods will have implications for parameterizing aerosol mixing state and cloud-nucleation activity in atmospheric models.

  17. The Effects of Particle Size, Relative Humidity, and Sulfur Dioxide on Iron Solubility in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartledge, B. T.; Marcotte, A.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.; Majestic, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study focuses on studying how iron (Fe) solubility is affected by particle size, relative humidity, and exposure to sulfur dioxide (SO2). Fe, the most abundant transition metal in atmospheric particulate matter, plays a critical role in the atmospheric sulfur cycle and is a micronutrient for phytoplankton in remote regions of the ocean. To mimic oceanic particles, iron-containing minerals (hematite, magnetite, goethite, and illite) were resuspended with sodium chloride and size-segregated on Teflon filters into five different size fractions: 10-2.5 ?m, 2.5-1.0 ?m, 1.0-0.5 ?m, 0.5-0.25 ?m, and <0.25 ?m. Mineral phases were then exposed to 5 ppm SO2 in air at marine environment humidity (>80%) and arid environment humidity (24%). Trials with no SO2 ­were also performed as comparisons. Total Fe was determined by using microwave-assisted acid digestion and soluble Fe was determined by extracting the samples in a simulated cloud water buffer (pH 4.25, 0.5 mM acetate, 0.5 mM formate, and 0.2 mM ammonium nitrate). Both total and soluble Fe concentrations were determined via inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We found that, as particle size decreased, Fe percent solubility increased for hematite, magnetite, and goethite. The percent solubility of Fe in these mineral phases steadily increased from 0.5-10% as particle size decreased. In contrast, the Fe percent solubility in illite was relatively constant for the largest four size fractions but increased dramatically in the smallest size fraction. The percent solubility of Fe in illite ranged from 5-20% as the particle size decreased. Additionally, increased Fe solubility was linked to increased relative humidity with higher percent solubility generally observed in all mineral phases for the samples exposed at the higher humidity. No correlation was observed for the effects of the SO2 on Fe percent solubility. The likely lack of Fe-SO2 interactions were also supported by synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy. These results help further the knowledge of how the solubilization of particulate Fe is affected by atmospheric transport.

  18. Atmospheric Aerosols Aging Involving Organic Compounds and Impacts on Particle Properties 

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Chong

    2013-02-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, we study the aging of soot, a representative type of primary aerosols, in the presence of OH-initiated oxidation products of toluene. Monodisperse soot particles are introduced into ...

  19. Sieveless particle size distribution analysis of particulate materials through computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C.; Pordesimo, L. O.; Columbus, Eugene P; Batchelor, William D; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-05-01

    This paper explores the inconsistency of length-based separation by mechanical sieving of particulate materials with standard sieves, which is the standard method of particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. We observed inconsistencies of length-based separation of particles using standard sieves with manual measurements, which showed deviations of 17 22 times. In addition, we have demonstrated the falling through effect of particles cannot be avoided irrespective of the wall thickness of the sieve. We proposed and utilized a computer vision with image processing as an alternative approach; wherein a user-coded Java ImageJ plugin was developed to evaluate PSD based on length of particles. A regular flatbed scanner acquired digital images of particulate material. The plugin determines particles lengths from Feret's diameter and width from pixel-march method, or minor axis, or the minimum dimension of bounding rectangle utilizing the digital images after assessing the particles area and shape (convex or nonconvex). The plugin also included the determination of several significant dimensions and PSD parameters. Test samples utilized were ground biomass obtained from the first thinning and mature stand of southern pine forest residues, oak hard wood, switchgrass, elephant grass, giant miscanthus, wheat straw, as well as Basmati rice. A sieveless PSD analysis method utilized the true separation of all particles into groups based on their distinct length (419 639 particles based on samples studied), with each group truly represented by their exact length. This approach ensured length-based separation without the inconsistencies observed with mechanical sieving. Image based sieve simulation (developed separately) indicated a significant effect (P < 0.05) on number of sieves used in PSD analysis, especially with non-uniform material such as ground biomass, and more than 50 equally spaced sieves were required to match the sieveless all distinct particles PSD analysis. Results substantiate that mechanical sieving, owing to handling limitations and inconsistent length-based separation of particles, is inadequate in determining the PSD of non-uniform particulate samples. The developed computer vision sieveless PSD analysis approach has the potential to replace the standard mechanical sieving. The plugin can be readily extended to model (e.g., Rosin Rammler) the PSD of materials, and mass-based analysis, while providing several advantages such as accuracy, speed, low cost, automated analysis, and reproducible results.

  20. ENERGY MATERIALS & THERMOELECTRICS Reduction of nickel oxide particles by hydrogen studied

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ENERGY MATERIALS & THERMOELECTRICS Reduction of nickel oxide particles by hydrogen studied with the ETEM observations. Introduction Nickel oxide (NiO) reduction and the subsequent Ni behaviour online: 28 November 2012 Ó Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012 In situ reduction of nickel

  1. USE OF METAL- AND FLUORESCEIN-TAGGED MATERIALS TO STUDY SETTLED PARTICLES EXPOSURE PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through the use of ten size ranges of tagged materials (Antley et. al., 2000a), inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and flourometry are being used to study the movement of settled particles in the indoor environment, exposure pathways, and the collection effi...

  2. Bioaccessibility of trace elements in fine and ultrafine atmospheric particles in an industrial environment.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Saliou; Alleman, Laurent Y; Flament, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    The lung bioaccessibility, i.e., the solubility in alveolar lung fluid of metals in particulate matter, has been recognized as an important parameter for health risk assessment, associated with the inhalation of airborne particles. The purpose of this study is to use an in vitro method to estimate the pulmonary bioaccessibility of toxic metals in different particle sizes, from a multi-influenced industrial emission area. The fine and ultrafine particles collected with cascade impactors in the chimneys and at different distances from a Fe-Mn smelter were extracted with a simulated alveolar fluid (Gamble solution). In addition, a four-step sequential extraction procedure was employed to approach the metal speciation. The bioaccessibility of metals ranged from almost insoluble for Fe (<1%) to extremely soluble for Rb (>80%). In terms of particle size, the trace element bioaccessibility is generally higher for the finer size fractions (submicron and ultrafine particles) than for the coarse one (>1 µm). These submicron particles have a very high number concentration and specific surface area, which confer them an important contact surface with the alveolar fluid, i.e., a higher bioaccessibility. Interestingly, the bioaccessibility of most metals clearly increases between the chimney stacks and the close environment of the studied Fe-Mn smelter, over a very short distance (800 m), possibly due to a mix with surrounding steelworks emissions. This increase is not observed over a greater distance from the smelter (2000 m), when industrial particles were mixed with urban aerosols, except for Fe, under more soluble forms in combustion particles. PMID:26254887

  3. On Efficient Multigrid Methods for Materials Processing Flows with Small Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James (Technical Monitor); Diskin, Boris; Harik, VasylMichael

    2004-01-01

    Multiscale modeling of materials requires simulations of multiple levels of structural hierarchy. The computational efficiency of numerical methods becomes a critical factor for simulating large physical systems with highly desperate length scales. Multigrid methods are known for their superior efficiency in representing/resolving different levels of physical details. The efficiency is achieved by employing interactively different discretizations on different scales (grids). To assist optimization of manufacturing conditions for materials processing with numerous particles (e.g., dispersion of particles, controlling flow viscosity and clusters), a new multigrid algorithm has been developed for a case of multiscale modeling of flows with small particles that have various length scales. The optimal efficiency of the algorithm is crucial for accurate predictions of the effect of processing conditions (e.g., pressure and velocity gradients) on the local flow fields that control the formation of various microstructures or clusters.

  4. mu-Scale Variations Of Elemental Composition In Individual Atmospheric Particles By Means Of Synchrotron Radiation Based mu-XRF Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schleicher, N.; Kramar, U.; Norra, S.; Dietze, V.; Kaminski, U.; Cen, K.; Yu, Y.

    2010-04-06

    Atmospheric pollution poses a huge challenge especially for densely populated urban areas. Although a tremendous knowledge already exists on atmospheric particulate pollution, only very limited knowledge is available on mineral and chemical composition of single atmospheric particles because most studies on air pollution focus on total mass concentrations or bulk elemental analysis. However, it is of particular importance to investigate the properties of single particles since according to their individually composition they differ in their specific impact on climate change, negative environment and health effects, as well as accelerating the weathering of stone buildings in urban areas. Particles with sulfate and nitrate coatings together with sufficient moisture increase metal solubility and possibly catalyze further surface reactions on stone facades of buildings. From the viewpoint of health effects of aerosols it is important to consider agglomerations processes of fine anthropogenic and highly toxic particles with coarse geogenic and less toxic particles. With respect to fundamental research in mineralogy, processes forming composed coarse particles consisting of geogenic and anthropogenic substances are valuable to study since a new type of particle is produced. In this context, the important and still in detail unknown role of geogenic particles as catchers for anthropogenic aerosols can be investigated more closely. Coarse particles can provide a possible sink for fine particles. Moreover, the intermixture of particles from geogenic and anthropogenic sources and the spatial and temporal variations of contributions from different sources, which plays a decisive role in the study area of Beijing, can be clarified with this approach. For this study, particles were collected with the passive sampling device Sigma-2 and analyzed for particles from 3 to 96 {mu}m. The analyzed particles showed a very inhomogeneous distribution in their elemental composition. For this study, synchrotron radiation based mu-X-ray fluorescence analysis (mu-SXRF) proved to be an excellent tool to investigate mu-scalic distributions of main and trace element concentrations within individual airborne particles.

  5. Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs and their toxicity using PMF: Impact of gas/particle partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bo; Wang, Xin-Ming; Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Ding, Xiang; Fu, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Yan-Li; He, Quan-Fu; Zhang, Zhou; Liu, Teng-Yu; Huang, Zou-Zhao; Chen, Lai-Guo; Peng, Yan; Guo, Hai

    2015-02-01

    24-h PM2.5 samples were simultaneously collected at six sites in a subtropical city of South China during November-December, 2009. Particle-phase concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organic tracers such as hopanes for vehicular emissions (VE), levoglucosan for biomass burning (BB) and picene for coal combustion (CC) were determined. Meanwhile, their gas-phase concentrations were calculated from gas/particle (G/P) partitioning theory using the particle-phase concentrations. The 4 ring PAHs (fluoranthene to chrysene) had lower particle-phase fractions (10%-79%) than other species. Estimated BaPeq and lifetime cancer risk for particle-only (P-only) vs gas + particle (G + P) data sets showed similar values, indicating PAHs with 5-7 rings dominated the carcinogenicity of PAHs. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied on both P-only and G + P data sets to estimate the source contributions to PAHs and their toxicity. Three common sources were identified: VE, BB and CC, with CC as the most significant source for both particulate (58%) and total (G + P, 40%) PAHs. While CC exhibited consistent contributions to BaPeq for P-only (66%) vs G + P (62%) solutions, VE and BB contributions were under- and overestimated by 68% and 47%, respectively by the P-only solution, as compared to the G + P solution. The results provide an insight on the impact of G/P partitioning on the source apportionment of PAHs and their toxicity.

  6. In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Allen

    pure compounds or simple mixtures, whereas hourly TAG phase partitioning measurements can be made in the complex mixture of thousandsof polar/nonpolar and organic/ inorganic compounds found in the atmosphere compounds Brent J. Williamsa,b,c,1 , Allen H. Goldsteina,d , Nathan M. Kreisberge , and Susanne V. Heringe

  7. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-01

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained. PMID:25578046

  8. The influence of particle shape on structure, mechanics, and transport in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kyle C.

    The development of materials with tailored transport properties is essential to energy conversion and storage applications. Utilization of heterogeneous composite materials composed of discrete particles (i.e., granular materials) represents a promising approach to sustainable, scalable materials production. The so-called jamming point, which represents the transition between fluid-like and solid-like regimes of granular materials, has been the subject of recent fundamental studies. Prior studies have incorporated highly simplified grain shapes that do not reflect the diversity commonly observed in advanced composite materials (e.g., nanomaterials). In the present work, the coupling of heat and charge transport to the level of order in jammed microstructures composed of faceted 3D grains is explored. The systems investigated include lithium ion battery cathodes composed of LiFePO4 nanoparticles, solid state H2 storage in packed beds composed of metal hydride particles, and the Platonic solids. Empirical and theoretical representations of particle shape are determined with single crystal growth models, statistical geometric models, and experimental measurements. An energy-based structural optimization method for the jamming of such arbitrary polyhedral grains is developed to model the mesoscopic structure of heterogeneous materials. Diffusion through the resulting microstructures is simulated with the finite volume method. In LiFePO4 systems a strong dependence of jamming on particle shapes is observed, in which columnar structures aligned with the [010] direction inhibit diffusion along [010] in anisotropic LiFePO4. Transport limitations are induced by [010] columnar order and lead to catastrophic performance degradation in anisotropic LiFePO4 cathodes. Further, judicious mixing of nanoplatelets with additive nanoparticles can frustrate columnar ordering and thereby enhance the rate capability of LiFePO4 electrodes by nearly an order of magnitude. In contrast, metal hydride particles (and all Platonic solids except cubes) jam into highly disordered structures, as a result of anisotropic shape and size distribution. Such systems exhibit fundamentally different pathways of heat transport than that of packed spheres and consequently display close agreement with granular effective medium theory predictions. Also, despite possessing rigidity percolation at the jamming point, conductivity percolation does not occur at the jamming point. From these initial studies it is clear that knowledge of particle shape effects on structure and transport provide a pathway for scalable, bottom-up design of materials.

  9. The impact of particle size, relative humidity, and sulfur dioxide on iron solubility in simulated atmospheric marine aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cartledge, Benton T; Marcotte, Aurelie R; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D; Majestic, Brian J

    2015-06-16

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in about half of the world's oceans, and its most significant source is atmospheric deposition. To understand the pathways of iron solubilization during atmospheric transport, we exposed size segregated simulated marine aerosols to 5 ppm sulfur dioxide at arid (23 ± 1% relative humidity, RH) and marine (98 ± 1% RH) conditions. Relative iron solubility increased as the particle size decreased for goethite and hematite, while for magnetite, the relative solubility was similar for all of the fine size fractions (2.5-0.25 ?m) investigated but higher than the coarse size fraction (10-2.5 ?m). Goethite and hematite showed increased solubility at arid RH, but no difference (p > 0.05) was observed between the two humidity levels for magnetite. There was no correlation between iron solubility and exposure to SO2 in any mineral for any size fraction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements showed no change in iron speciation [Fe(II) and Fe(III)] in any minerals following SO2 exposure. SEM-EDS measurements of SO2-exposed goethite revealed small amounts of sulfur uptake on the samples; however, the incorporated sulfur did not affect iron solubility. Our results show that although sulfur is incorporated into particles via gas-phase processes, changes in iron solubility also depend on other species in the aerosol. PMID:26000788

  10. Seasonal variation of source contributions to atmospheric fine and coarse particles at suburban area in Istanbul, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Karaca, F.; Alagha, O.; Erturk, F.; Yilmaz, Y.Z.; Ozkara, T.

    2008-06-15

    Daily samples of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) particles were collected from July 2002 to July 2003 to provide a better understanding of the elemental concentration and source contribution to both PM fractions. Sampling location represents suburban part of Istanbul metropolitan city. Samples were collected on Teflon filters using a 'Dichotomous Sampler.' Concentrations of Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were measured by GFAAS, FAAS, and FAES techniques. Elemental variations of heating and nonheating seasons were discussed. Fossil fuel-related atmospheric metals dramatically increased during the heating season, while natural originated atmospheric metals increased during the nonheating season. Seasonal variations of source contributions were evaluated using factor analysis, which was separately applied to the collected fine and coarse particles data sets during heating and nonheating seasons (four data sets: PM2.5 heating, PM2.5 nonheating, PM2.5-10 heating, and PM2.5-10 nonheating). Significant seasonal differences in source contributions were observed. Four factor groups were extracted for PM2.5 dataset during the nonheating season, while five factor groups were extracted for all the other cases. Mineral dust transportation, traffic, and industry-related activities were classified as different factor groups in all the cases.

  11. Seasonality and interspecies differences in particle/gas partitioning of PAHs observed by the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarneau, Elisabeth; Bidleman, Terry F.; Blanchard, Pierrette

    This study presents partitioning data from eight locations in the Laurentian Great Lakes region collected by the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN) over periods ranging from 1 to 6 years. Particle/gas partitioning varies sufficiently between sites in the Great Lakes region to preclude the use of a uniform temperature dependence for its description. Site-specific parameters for describing partitioning as a function of inverse temperature are presented. Relationships between partitioning of appreciably semivolatile PAHs and saturated vapour pressure at Chicago (IIT) and Sturgeon Point (STP) demonstrate that anthracene, benz[a]anthracene and retene behave differently than phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene and chrysene+triphenylene. Possible reasons for these differences include interspecies variations in the fraction of atmospherically non-exchangeable, though analytically extractable, PAHs on particles and differences in soot-air partition coefficients as they relate to saturated vapour pressure. The observed interspecies differences are not consistent with sampling artefacts such as filter adsorption or sorbent breakthrough. At IIT, but not at STP, values of the slope of the relationship between the log partition coefficient and log vapour pressure vary in a manner opposing the annual temperature cycle. A comparison of partitioning calculated by a combined absorption/adsorption model shows good predictability at Chicago but underestimates values at a rural site (Eagle Harbor, EGH) by an order of magnitude.

  12. Investigation of Thermal Hardening of the FCC Material Containing Strengthening Particles with an L12 Superstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneyko, O. I.; Kulaeva, N. A.; Kovalevskaya, C. A.; Kolupaeva, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    A mathematical model of plastic deformation of dispersion-hardened materials with an fcc matrix containing strengthening particles with an L12 superstructure having a coherent relationship with the matrix is presented. The model is based on the balance equations of deformation defects of different types with taking into account their transformation during plastic deformation. The influence of scale characteristics of the hardening phase, temperature, and deformation rate on the evolution of the dislocation subsystem and strain hardening of an alloy with an fcc matrix hardened by particles with an L12 super structure is studied. A temperature anomaly of mechanical properties is found for the materials with different fcc matrices (Al,Cu, Ni). It is shown that the temperature anomaly is more pronounced for the material with larger volume fraction of the hardening phase.

  13. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  14. A Method for Estimating the Bipolar Charge Distribution Variation on Aerosol Particles with Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppä, J.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Flagan, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Many commonly used instruments that measure the aerosol particle number size distribution, such as Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, are based on the following principle: The particle sample is brought to a steady-state charge distribution in a bipolar aerosol charger. The particles are then segregated according to their electrical mobilities using differential mobility analyzer, DMA. Finally, the concentration of the particles is measured using a condensation particle counter, CPC. To estimate the particle size distribution, the concentration data are then inverted using an algorithm that takes into account the steady-state charge distribution and the performance characteristics of the DMA and CPC. Considerable effort has gone into the characterization of the instruments used in these measurements. The charge distribution remains the greatest source of uncertainty in the mobility based size distribution measurements. The charge distribution depends, at least, on the properties of the ion and particle (radius, density, relative permittivity and number of charges), concentrations of negative and positive ions, temperature and pressure. With these values given, the collision frequencies of ions and particles can be modeled to determine the charge distribution, but that can be very time consuming. Instead, the charge distribution is usually estimated using a simple parameterization of the results of one such model. The collision process can, however, be described using only two dimensionless parameters, namely the diffusive Knudsen number, KnD, and the ratio of electric potential energy to thermal energy, ?E. A given pair of KnD and ?E may describe multiple collision conditions, but it defines a single value of dimensionless flux coefficient, H. This allows us to tabulate the values of KnD, ?E and H, so that H can be determined by interpolation for conditions corresponding to the measurements. The charge distribution can readily be calculated from the interpolated values of H. This procedure is particularly useful in the case of airborne measurements, since pressure and temperature variations with altitude result in a large deviations of the charge distribution from the commonly used parameterization.

  15. Strong atmospheric new particle formation in winter in urban Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S.; Wang, M. Y.; Yao, L.; Kulmala, M.; Zhou, B.; Yang, X.; Chen, J. M.; Wang, D. F.; Fu, Q. Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wang, L.

    2015-02-01

    Particle size distributions in the range of 1.34-615 nm were recorded from 25 November 2013 to 25 January 2014 in urban Shanghai, using a combination of one nano condensation nucleus counter system, one nano scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and one long-SMPS. Measurements of sulfur dioxide by an SO2 analyzer with pulsed UV fluorescence technique allowed calculation of sulfuric acid proxy. In addition, concentrations of ammonia were recorded with a differential optical absorption spectroscopy. During this 62-day campaign, 13 new particle formation (NPF) events were identified with strong bursts of sub-3 nm particles and subsequent fast growth of newly formed particles. The observed nucleation rate (J1.34), formation rate of 3 nm particles (J3), and condensation sink were 112.4-271.0 cm-3 s-1, 2.3-19.2 cm-3 s-1, and 0.030-0.10 s-1, respectively. Subsequent cluster/nanoparticle growth (GR) showed a clear size dependence, with average values of GR1.35~1.39, GR1.39~1.46, GR1.46~1.70, GR1.70~2.39, GR2.39~7, and GR7~20 being 1.6±1.0, 1.4±2.2, 7.2±7.1, 9.0±11.4, 10.9±9.8, and 11.4±9.7 nm h-1, respectively. Correlation between nucleation rate (J1.34) and sulfuric acid proxy indicates that nucleation rate J1.34 was proportional to a 0.65±0.28 power of sulfuric acid proxy, indicating that the nucleation of particles can be explained by the activation theory. Correlation between nucleation rate (J1.34) and gas-phase ammonia suggests that ammonia was associated with NPF events. The calculated sulfuric acid proxy was sufficient to explain the subsequent growth of 1.34-3 nm particles, but its contribution became smaller as the particle size grew. Qualitatively, NPF events in urban Shanghai likely occur on days with low levels of aerosol surface area, meaning the sulfuric acid proxy is only a valid predictor when aerosol surface area is low.

  16. Polarization signatures and brightness temperatures caused by horizontally oriented snow particles at microwave bands: Effects of atmospheric absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Simmer, Clemens; Miao, Jungang

    2015-06-01

    This study analyzes the effects of atmospheric absorption and emission on the polarization difference (PD) and brightness temperature (TB) generated by horizontally oriented snow particles. A three-layer plane-parallel atmosphere model is used in conjunction with a simplified radiative transfer (RT) scheme to illustrate the combined effects of dichroic and nondichroic media on microwave signatures observed by ground-based and spaceborne sensors. Based on idealized scenarios which encompass a dichroic snow layer and adjacent nondichroic layers composed of supercooled liquid water (SCLW) droplets and water vapor, we demonstrate that the presence of atmospheric absorption/emission enhances TB and damps PD when observed from the ground. From a spaceborne perspective, however, TB can be reduced or enhanced by an absorbing/emitting layer above the snow layer, while a strong absorbing/emitting layer below the dichroic snow layer may even enhance PD. The induced PD and TB, which rely on snow microphysical assumptions, can vary up to 2 K and 10 K, respectively, due to the temperature-dependent absorption of SCLW. RT calculations based on 223 snowfall profiles selected from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data sets indicate that the existence of SCLW has a noticeable impact on PD and TB at three window frequencies (150 GHz, 243 GHz, and 664 GHz) during snowfall. Our results imply that while polarimetric channels at the three window channels have the potential for snowfall characterization, accurate information on liquid water is required to correctly interpret the polarimetric observations.

  17. The sulphur stable isotope compositions of urban sources and atmospheric particles (PM2.5 & PM10) from Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widory, D.; Landry, J.; Helie, J.; Ravelomanantsoa, H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulphur (S) in atmospheric particles in the environment can be derived from a variety of primary sources and cycled through numerous secondary processes, complicating identification of its origin. Using the PM10 fraction of aerosols from Paris and its vicinity, we are investigating the suitability of sulphur stable isotope compositions (?34S) as tracers of origins and processes affecting the atmospheric S budget. Characterization of S isotope compositions of emissions from the different potential sources (e.g. waste incinerators, coal-fired power plants, metal refining plants, road traffic and heating sources) shows these are clearly discriminated by specific coupled S-?34S isotope signatures. While S concentrations vary from 0.7 to 11.5%, ?34S display a large range of values from -2.2 and 13.4‰. PM10 samples from Paris and its vicinity show that S is usually present at low levels, around 1 ?g.m-3 in average, but that concentrations as high as 100 ?g.m-3 can punctually be observed. By the time of the conference, we will have analysed and interpreted the corresponding ?34S in order to help elucidate the origin(s) of sulphur in the atmosphere of the city.

  18. The application of Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) for the sterilisation of spacecraft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Morfill, Gregor; Thomas, Hubertus; Satoshi Shimizu, .; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias

    2012-07-01

    Plasma, oft called the fourth state of matter after solid, liquid and gas, is defined by its ionized state. Ionization can be induced by different means, such as a strong electromagnetic field applied with a microwave generator. The concentration and composition of reactive atoms and molecules produced in Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) depends on the gases used, the gas flow, the power applied, the humidity level etc.. In medicine, low-temperature plasma is already used for the sterilization of surgical instruments, implants and packaging materials as plasma works at the atomic level and is able to reach all surfaces, even the interior of small hollow items like needles. Its ability to sterilise is due to the generation of biologically active bactericidal agents, such as free radicals and UV radiation. In the project PLASMA-DECON (DLR/BMWi support code 50JR1005) a prototype of a device for sterilising spacecraft material and components was built based on the surface micro-discharge (SMD) plasma technology. The produced plasma species are directed into a closed chamber which contains the parts that need to be sterilised. To test the inactivation efficiency of this new device bacterial spores were used as model organisms because in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy all bioburden constraints are defined with respect to the number of spores (and other heat-tolerant aerobic microorganisms). Spores from different Bacillus species and strains, i.e. wildtype strains from culture collections and isolates from spacecraft assembly cleanrooms, were dried on three different spacecraft relevant materials and exposed to CAP. The specificity, linearity, precision, and effective range of the device was investigated. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the application of CAP proved to be a suitable method for bioburden reduction / sterilisation in the frame of planetary protection measures and the design of a larger plasma device is planned in the future.

  19. Atmospheric Ionization by Solar Particles Detected by Nitrate Measurements in Antarctic Snow. FY91 AASERT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitt, Francis M.; Jackman, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    The odd nitrogen source strengths associated with Solar Proton Events (SPEs), Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), and the oxidation of nitrous oxide in the Earth's middle atmosphere from 1974 through 1993 have been compared globally, at middle and lower latitudes (less than 50 deg), and polar regions (greater than 50 deg) with a two-dimensional (2-D) photochemical transport model. As discovered previously, the oxidation of nitrous oxide dominates the global odd nitrogen source while GCRs and SPEs are significant at polar latitudes. The horizontal transport of odd nitrogen, produced by the oxidation of nitrous oxide at latitudes < 50 deg, was found to be the dominant source of odd nitrogen in the polar regions with GCRs contributing substantially during the entire solar cycle. The source of odd nitrogen from SPEs was more sporadic; however, contributions during several years (mostly near solar maximum) were significant in the polar middle atmosphere.

  20. Dynamics and particle fluxes in atmospheric-pressure electronegative radio frequency microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, K.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.; Liu, D. X.; Rong, M. Z.

    2011-08-29

    We report on intricate dynamics observed in atmospheric-pressure rf electronegative discharges where electrons and anions are separated due to their different mobilities. This results in the formation of positively charged regions between an electronegative plasma core and an oscillating electron ensemble. It is found that for a given input power, the electron, ion (both positive and negative) and neutral fluxes increase as the gap size is reduced, resulting in a more efficient delivery of chemical species to a treated target.

  1. Middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification by particle precipitation at the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for a localized middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification at low latitudes (southern Brazilian coast) of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA), in association with enhanced geomagnetic activity, are presented in a unified way combining recent observational efforts and related numerical studies. They involve a distortion effect in the fair weather electric field at balloon altitudes. This effect is attributed to a local intensification of energetic electron precipitation through a related middle atmospheric ionization enhancement and is elucidated by numeric simulation. From the electric field measurements and the numeric simulation, the intensification of precipitation is considered to occur in fairly narrow regions at the observed low L values (around L = 1.13) of the SAMA, with horizontal extensions of the order of a few hundred kilometers. A physical mechanism that could be responsible for this sort of intensification is suggested. Furthermore, a comparison of the phenomenon of middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification at the SAMA with a similar one at auroral latitudes, in response to enhanced solar and geomagnetic activity, is also given.

  2. Determination of alkylamines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Jia, W. T.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkylamines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkylamines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkylamines in aerosol particles. Alkylamines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg (or 0.02-0.04 ng m-3). For the IC approach, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkylamines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkylamines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng (or 0.9-6.4 ng m-3), and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkylamines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  3. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  4. Reconstruction of 20th Century Atmospheric Deposition Rates in the Sierra Nevada (California) using Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, A.; Sickman, J. O.; Rose, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is altering biogeochemical cycles and ecological processes in high-elevation aquatic ecosystems. A need for stricter standards based on measurable ecological effects has been identified as an important step towards their long-term protection. One of the challenges with identifying ecological thresholds is a lack of knowledge of background conditions (pre- industrial) and changes that may have occurred prior to extensive monitoring programs. However, this information can be obtained using paleolimnological approaches. We are investigating historic atmospheric deposition in the Sierra Nevada using spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in lake sediments. SCPs are strong geochemical indicators of anthropogenic atmospheric deposition because they are only produced by industrial combustion of fossil fuels---there are no natural sources. We detected SCPs as early as 1870 at Moat Lake in the eastern Sierra Nevada. SCP concentrations increased over time, peaking in the mid-1980's (2,399 gDM-1) while SCP accumulation rates peaked in the early 1920's (105 no, cm-2 yr-1) (Figure 1). Lakes along the western slope of the Sierra (Pear and Emerald) show similar patterns although differences vary by site and are likely explained by watershed characteristics and proximity to emission sources. SCP concentrations at Pear and Emerald lakes peak 10-15 years earlier than Moat. A consistent decrease was observed at Pear and Moat following the peak concentrations until present. Present day concentrations are 556 gDM-1 at Moat and 473 gDM-1 at Pear. At Emerald lake SCPs also initially decreased starting in 1964, but an increasing trend is observed from 1995 through present. These data improve our understanding of historic atmospheric deposition patterns and are being used to inform additional palaeolimnological research, including diatom analyses, with the broader objective of reconstructing historic nitrogen deposition and estimating critical loads for Sierra Nevada lakes.igure 1: SCP concentrations and accumulation rates from three Sierra Nevada Lake sediment cores (Moat, Pear, and Emerald Lakes).

  5. LEVOGLUCOSAN, A TRACER FOR CELLULOSE IN BIOMASS BURNING AND ATMOSPHERIC PARTICLES. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The major organic components of smoke particles from biomass burning are monosaccharide derivatives from the breakdown of cellulose, accompanied by generally lesser amounts of straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and terpenoids from vegetation wa...

  6. Parameterization of Cloud Optical Properties for a Mixture of Ice Particles for use in Atmospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Yang, Ping; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the single-scattering optical properties that are pre-computed using an improve geometric optics method, the bulk mass absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor of ice particles have been parameterized as a function of the mean effective particle size of a mixture of ice habits. The parameterization has been applied to compute fluxes for sample clouds with various particle size distributions and assumed mixtures of particle habits. Compared to the parameterization for a single habit of hexagonal column, the solar heating of clouds computed with the parameterization for a mixture of habits is smaller due to a smaller cosingle-scattering albedo. Whereas the net downward fluxes at the TOA and surface are larger due to a larger asymmetry factor. The maximum difference in the cloud heating rate is approx. 0.2 C per day, which occurs in clouds with an optical thickness greater than 3 and the solar zenith angle less than 45 degrees. Flux difference is less than 10 W per square meters for the optical thickness ranging from 0.6 to 10 and the entire range of the solar zenith angle. The maximum flux difference is approximately 3%, which occurs around an optical thickness of 1 and at high solar zenith angles.

  7. Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon progeny atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon þ progeny: Natural radioactivity; Radon; Detector sensitivity; Monte Carlo methods 1. Introduction It has been established a long time ago that the absorbed radon dose in the human lung is not delivered by radon itself

  8. A New Class of Engineering Materials: Particle-Stabilized Metallic Emulsions and Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, István; Kaptay, George

    2009-07-01

    Al-matrix particulate composites are melted and mixed with immiscible metals to form their small droplets in liquid aluminum. It is shown that, in the Al-Si/SiC/Bi system, the Bi droplets are stabilized by the SiC particles in the liquid Al matrix. Upon solidification, homogeneous distribution of solidified Bi droplets is obtained in the Al matrix at the bottom part of the ingot. Thus, a new class of engineering materials (particle-stabilized monotectic alloys) is obtained.

  9. Predicting emissions of SVOCs from polymeric materials and their interaction with airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Little, John C

    2006-01-15

    A model that predicts the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials is extended and used to predict the emission rate of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from polymeric materials. Reasonable agreement between model predictions and gas-phase di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) concentrations is achieved using data collected in a previous experimental study that measured emissions of DEHP from vinyl flooring in two very different chambers. While emissions of highly volatile VOCs are subject to "internal" control (the material-phase diffusion coefficient), emissions of the very low volatility SVOCs are subject to "external" control (partitioning into the gas phase, the convective mass-transfer coefficient, and adsorption onto interior surfaces). The effect of SVOCs partitioning onto airborne particles is also examined. The DEHP emission rate is increased when the gas-phase concentration is high, and especially when partitioning to the airborne particles is strong. Airborne particles may play an important role in inhalation exposure as well as in transporting SVOCs well beyond the source. Although more rigorous validation is needed, the model should help elucidate the mechanisms governing emissions of phthalate plasticizers, brominated flame retardants, biocides, and other SVOCs from a wide range of building materials and consumer products. PMID:16468389

  10. Biological aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their impact on clouds (BIOCLOUDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Pierre; Attard, Eleonore; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie; Flossmann, Andrea; Good, Nicholas; Joly, Muriel; Koop, Thomas; Möhler, Ottmar; Monier, Marie; Morris, Cindy; Oehm, Caroline; Pöschl, Ulrich; Sancelme, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The project BIOCLOUDS aimed at investigating and quantifying the role of bioaerosols in tropospheric clouds. We focused on the studies on microorganisms, mainly bacteria. To reach our objective we (1) isolated and identified INA bacterial strains in cloud waters, (2) studied in more details IN properties of bacteria isolated from cloud waters in laboratories and cloud chamber, (3) used new data as input to cloud models. 1. Isolation and Identification of INA bacterial strains in cloud waters Cloud water samples were collected at the puy de Dôme station under sterile conditions, microorganisms were cultured on agar plates and further identified by DNA sequencing coding for16SrRNA. 257 bacterial strains isolated from 25 cloud events were screened and 44 isolates were selected as they belonged to Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas and Erwinia genera which are potential INA candidates. Using the classical "Droplet Freezing method" as ice nucleation test, 7 strains were shown INA+. Their cumulative IN frequency profiles were established and showed that some of them are very efficient, for example the strain Pseudomonas syringae 13b74 started to nucleate a t-3°C and 4% of the cells were active at- 5°C. 2. Further laboratory investigations of IN properties of cloud bacterial strains All the experiments presented in this section were carried out with 3 Pseudomonas syringae strains. We tested the influence of O3, NO, UV and pH, which are atmospheric markers of anthropogenic activity, on the IN activity of the Pseudomonas strains. It was clearly shown that pH had a main influence, acidic pHs decreased the IN activity of the strains. This suggests a negative impact of human emissions on the natural capacity of bacteria to precipitate with rain. The 3 Pseudomas strains were sprayed in the AIDA cloud chamber. The survival of these strains with time before cloud formation was measured and will be used in the future to parameterize models for bacterial transport. After cloud formation, IN activity of bacteria was followed with time, our results suggest that bacteria are precipitated in the cloud chamber as a result of their IN activity. Also the coating of bacteria with sulfates decreased their IN activity, pointing out the negative potential anthropogenic influence on IN bacteria activity. 3. Modeling study to see if any impact of bacteria on cloud development and/or precipitation is realistic. Modeling studies were performed with DESCAM (Detailed SCAvenging Model) using as an input the new data from the different campaigns in AIDA. M. VAÏTILINGOM et al. Atmospheric Environment, 2012, 56, 88-100. E. ATTARD et al. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2012, 12, 10667-10677. M. JOLY et al. Atmospheric Environment, 2013, 70, 392-400.

  11. A neutral particle wake method for measuring the atmospheric temperature from a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Hoegy, W. R.; Theis, F. R.; Wharton, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described that permits a satellite-borne neutral mass spectrometer to perform measurements of the atmospheric temperature. The method employs the spectrometer to examine the partial pressure variations that occur as the wake of a small rectangular baffle is swept across the entrance orifice of the spectrometer. For a given baffle size and mounting distance from the orifice the depth of the resulting pressure minimum depends only upon the thermal velocity, or temperature, of the observed species. A check upon the validity of the method is obtained by measuring the wake characteristics of more than one species and/or by employing each of several baffle sizes.

  12. Continuous collection of soluble atmospheric particles with a wetted hydrophilic filter.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Ullah, S M Rahmat; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Collins, Donald R; Williams, Allen

    2005-12-15

    Approximately one-third of the area (14-mm diameter of a 25-mm diameter) of a 5-microm uniform pore size polycarbonate filter is continuously wetted by a 0.25 mL/min water mist. The water forms a continuous thin film on the filter and percolates through it. The flowing water substantially reduces the effective pore size of the filter. At the operational air sampling flow rate of 1.5 standard liters per minute, such a particle collector (PC) efficiently captures particles down to very small size. As determined by fluorescein-tagged NaCl aerosol generated by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator, the capture efficiency was 97.7+% for particle aerodynamic diameters ranging from 0.28 to 3.88 microm. Further, 55.3 and 80.3% of 25- and 100-nm (NH4)2SO4 particles generated by size classification with a differential mobility analyzer were respectively collected by the device. The PC is integrally coupled with a liquid collection reservoir. The liquid effluent from the wetted filter collector, bearing the soluble components of the aerosol, can be continuously collected or periodically withdrawn. The latter strategy permits the use of a robust syringe pump for the purpose. Coupled with a PM2.5 cyclone inlet and a membrane-based parallel plate denuder at the front end and an ion chromatograph at the back end, the PC readily operated for at least 4-week periods without filter replacement or any other maintenance. PMID:16351153

  13. Assessing the 3-D Structure and Composition of Climatically-Relevant Atmospheric Particles Using Focused Ion-Beam Milling and X-ray Microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    A critical component in reducing uncertainties in radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols is the accurate determination of the particle single-scattering albedo, i.e., ratio of light-scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency. The scattering and absorption properties of climatically-relevant particles depend, however, on their internal structure and composition as well as their overall size and shape. Demonstrated here is the use of state-of-the-art dual-beam microscopic techniques to image the internal composition of selected atmospheric particles for a better understanding of how variation in internal composition affects particle optical properties. A focused gallium-ion beam was used to mill a series of narrow slices through each particle. The electron beam, tilted at a 52° angle from the ion beam and focused at a point eucentric with the ion beam, was used to generate a secondary electron image for each slice. Concurrently, energy- dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to generate elemental maps for each slice to assess particle internal chemical composition. Imaging software was then used to provide a 3-dimensional reconstruction of the composition of each particle from the x-ray maps and secondary electron images. Selected particles included fine-mode (<2.5 ?m) particles and coarse-mode particles <10 ?m from urban sampling sites in Atlanta, Los Angeles, and Seattle collected during late summer, late fall, and late winter, respectively.

  14. Size distribution of chemical elements and their source apportionment in ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles in Shanghai urban summer atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lü, Senlin; Zhang, Rui; Yao, Zhenkun; Yi, Fei; Ren, Jingjing; Wu, Minghong; Feng, Man; Wang, Qingyue

    2012-01-01

    Ambient coarse particles (diameter 1.8-10 microm), fine particles (diameter 0.1-1.8 microm), and ultrafine particles (diameter < 0.1 microm) in the atmosphere of the city of Shanghai were sampled during the summer of 2008 (from Aug 27 to Sep 08). Microscopic characterization of the particles was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Mass concentrations of Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, and Pb in the size-resolved particles were quantified by using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF). Source apportionment of the chemical elements was analyzed by means of an enrichment factor method. Our results showed that the average mass concentrations of coarse particles, fine particles and ultrafine particles in the summer air were 9.38 +/- 2.18, 8.82 +/- 3.52, and 2.02 +/- 0.41 microg/m3, respectively. The mass percentage of the fine particles accounted for 51.47% in the total mass of PM10, indicating that fine particles are the major component in the Shanghai ambient particles. SEM/EDX results showed that the coarse particles were dominated by minerals, fine particles by soot aggregates and fly ashes, and ultrafine particles by soot particles and unidentified particles. SRXRF results demonstrated that crustal elements were mainly distributed in the coarse particles, while heavy metals were in higher proportions in the fine particles. Source apportionment revealed that Si, K, Ca, Fe, Mn, Rb, and Sr were from crustal sources, and S, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, and Pb from anthropogenic sources. Levels of P, V, Cr, and Ni in particles might be contributed from multi-sources, and need further investigation. PMID:22893966

  15. Speciation of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present during fog time collected submicron particles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Sharma, Swati; Habib, Gazala; Gupta, Tarun

    2015-08-01

    Airborne submicron particles (PM1) were collected using PM1 sampler during the fog-dominated days (December 2013-January 2014). PM1 values varied between 58.12 ?g/m(3) and 198.75 ?g/m(3), and average mass concentration was 162.33?±?38.25 ?g/m(3) while total average concentration of particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) determined was 616.31?±?30.31 ng/m(3). This is a signal for an alarming high pollution level at this site situated in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). PAHs were extracted from filters using toluene and acetonitrile. Quantitative measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The extracts were analyzed for 16 target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including carcinogenic compound benzo(a)pyrene (19.86?±?38.98 ng/m(3)). Fluoranthene, benzo(a)anthracene, anthracene, and fluorene were the predominant compounds found in the samples collected during foggy days. Based on number of rings, four-ring PAH compounds had maximum contribution (43%) in this fog time collected submicron particles followed by three-ring (21%), five-ring (20%), six-ring (13%), and two-ring (3%), respectively. In winter and foggy days, wood and coal combustion and biomass burning also significantly contribute to the PAH levels. However, diagnostic ratio suggests diesel emissions as the prime source of PAHs at this sampling site. PMID:25903173

  16. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 ?m was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  17. In vitro evaluation of atmospheric particulate matter and sedimentation particles using yeast bioassay system.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Inudo, Makiko; Takao, Yuji; Koga, Minoru; Takemasa, Takehiro; Shinohara, Ryota; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Little information on the evaluation of airborne particulate matter (APM) and sedimentation particles from subway stations is available. The thermal metamorphism of train wheels generating toxic particles in subway stations is a possibility. In this study, the toxicity and physiological effects of particles from subway stations were evaluated using a yeast bioassay system. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of APM in APM extracts from subway stations were determined. No estrogenic activity was found in the APM fractions and their S9-activated APM samples. Sedimentation dust samples also showed no estrogen activity. In contrast, extracts from sedimentation dust samples showed antiestrogen activity. Marked yeast toxicity was observed in the samples extracted from sedimentation dust. Potent yeast toxicity was also found in the S9-activated extracts from sedimentation dust. The results suggest that sedimentation dust from a semiclosed area of a subway system has antiestrogen activity, although both the origin and generation system of this activity are uncertain. These pollutants in sedimentation dust may change to a more toxic form in vivo by S9 activation. PMID:17762843

  18. Adhesion of finely dispersed particles to the surface of coating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petryanov, I.V.; Lyashkevich, I.M.; Sadovskii, B.F.; Chernaya, L.G.; Chernyaeva, G.A.

    1986-12-01

    It was established experimentally that compressed gypsums with added organosilicon liquids GKZh-10 and GKZh-94 have the lowest values of the molecular and capillary components of adhesive strength of particles to surface. The specific bulk and surface electrical conductivities of natural marble are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than those of the gypsums. Thus the high-strength gypsums with the special additives have significantly lower adhesive strength toward dust particles than does natural marble. The dependence of the adhesive properties of materials on surface structure was estimated by scanning electron microscopy. The dust-retentive capability of the sample surfaces was determined by blow-off of precipitated particles by a current of filtered air.

  19. Liquid-liquid phase separation in atmospheric aerosol particles: dependence on organic functionalities and mixture complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Peter, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the troposphere, aerosol particles undergo phase transitions such as deliquescence and efflorescence during humidity cycles (Marcolli and Krieger, 2006). In addition, interactions between organic and inorganic compounds lead to liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) (Ciobanu et al., 2009). Recent studies on a limited number of model systems have shown that oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O:C) of the organic aerosol fraction might be a good predictor for LLPS in mixed organic/ammonium sulfate (AS) particles (Bertram et al., 2011; Song et al., 2011). However, in order to corroborate this hypothesis experiments with an organic fraction that consists of a higher number of components with different O:C ratios and functional groups are needed. In order to determine the influence of O:C ratio, the specific organic functionalities and the mixture complexity on LLPS, we subjected organic/AS particles deposited on a hydrophobically coated substrate to relative humidity (RH) cycles and observed phase changes using optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. To determine the influence of mixture complexity, we mixed together up to 10 organic compounds. We also prepared mixtures that were rich in different types of functional groups like polyols, aromatics and dicarboxylic acids which were identified from field measurements. We screened for a miscibility gap by varying the organic-to-inorganic ratio from 2:1 to 1:6. AS in the investigated single particles effloresced at 27 - 50 %RH and deliquesced at 72 - 79 %RH during humidity cycles. The occurrence of LLPS is determined to a high degree by the O:C of the organics: there was no LLPS for mixtures with O:C > 0.8 and there was always LLPS for mixtures with O:C < 0.57. In the range in between, we observed a dependence on the specific functional groups: a high share of aromatic functionalities shifts the range of O:C for which LLPS occurs to lower values. A correlation was also found for the onset RH of LLPS as a function of O:C. We did not find any dependence of LLPS on the complexity of the mixture. Overall, the RH range of coexistence of two liquid phases depends in first place on the O:C ratio of the particles and in second place also on the specific organic functionalities.

  20. Determination of the size of particles of highly dispersed materials by low temperature nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilkina, A. V.; Gordienko, A. A.; Prokudina, N. A.; Trusov, L. I.; Kuz'micheva, G. M.; Dulina, N. A.; Savinkina, E. V.

    2013-04-01

    The average size of particles of highly dispersed materials (Al2O3, TiO2, Y2O3) is calculated from their specific surface areas. The latter is determined with the analysis of sorption capacity of materials with nitrogen at -196°C in the ranges of relative equilibrium pressures of 0.05-0.35 (the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, BET) and 0.4-0.7 (the comparative method). Good agreement is obtained between results produced with the comparative method and familiar methods of analysis such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering.

  1. Subscale Testing of Nozzle Ablative Materials in a Supersonic Particle Impingement Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howse, S.; Lawrence, T.

    2004-01-01

    Recent efforts to evaluate materials to replace the current NARC rayon used in the nozzle ablative of the NASA's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (SRM), several tests were developed to look at the performance of supersonic particle impact region of the aft exit cone. It was seen in early testing that some potential candidates did not perform as well as the current NARC based material and so the 24 inch Solid Rocket Motor (SRTM) exit cone design was extended and contoured to induce particle impingement in the aft end. The SRTM testing provided a larger testbed to evaluate the results seen in the Solid Fuel Supersonic Blast Tube. Testing was performed in each test bed on two variants of the final two candidate materials. The materials were a standard prewoven Lyocell, a postwoven Lyocell, an Enka rayon, and Enka rayon processed at a higher carbonization temperature. This paper presents the results of the four materials in the SSBT and the SRTM tests as compared against the NARC baseline. Erosion, char, and plylift results are discussed in detail.

  2. Porous Chromatographic Materials as Substrates for Preparing Synthetic Nuclear Explosion Debris Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Liezers, Martin; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Garcia, Ben J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2013-06-13

    In this study, we investigated several porous chromatographic materials as synthetic substrates for preparing surrogate nuclear explosion debris particles. The resulting synthetic debris materials are of interest for use in developing analytical methods. Eighteen metals, including some of forensic interest, were loaded onto materials by immersing them in metal solutions (556 mg/L of each metal) to fill the pores, applying gentle heat (110°C) to drive off water, and then treating them at high temperatures (up to 800°C) in air to form less soluble metal species. High-boiling-point metals were uniformly loaded on spherical controlled-pore glass to emulate early fallout, whereas low-boiling-point metals were loaded on core-shell silica to represent coated particles formed later in the nuclear fallout-formation process. Analytical studies were applied to characterize solubility, material balance, and formation of recalcitrant species. Dissolution experiments indicated loading was 1.5 to 3 times higher than expected from the pore volume alone, a result attributed to surface coating. Analysis of load solutions before and after filling the material pores revealed that most metals were passively loaded; that is, solutions filled the pores without active metal discrimination. However, niobium and tin concentrations were lower in solutions after pore filling, and were found in elevated concentrations in the final products, indicating some metals were selectively loaded. High-temperature treatments caused reduced solubility of several metal species, and loss of some metals (rhenium and tellurium) because volatile species were formed. Sample preparation reproducibility was high (the inter-batch relative standard deviation was 7.8%, and the intra-batch relative standard deviation was 0.84%) indicating that this material is suitable for use as a working standard for analytical methods development. We anticipate future standardized radionuclide-loaded materials will find use in radioanalytical methods development and/or serve as a starting material for the synthesis of more complex forms of nuclear explosion debris (e.g., Trinitite).

  3. Summarizing results on the performance of a selective set of atmospheric plasma jets for separation of photons and reactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Simon; Jarzina, Fabian; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Golda, Judith; Layes, Vincent; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Benedikt, Jan

    2015-11-01

    A microscale atmospheric-pressure plasma jet is a remote plasma jet, where plasma-generated reactive particles and photons are involved in substrate treatment. Here, we summarize our efforts to develop and characterize a particle- or photon-selective set of otherwise identical jets. In that way, the reactive species or photons can be used separately or in combination to study their isolated or combined effects to test whether the effects are additive or synergistic. The final version of the set of three jets—particle-jet, photon-jet and combined jet—is introduced. This final set realizes the highest reproducibility of the photon and particle fluxes, avoids turbulent gas flow, and the fluxes of the selected plasma-emitted components are almost identical in the case of all jets, while the other component is effectively blocked, which was verified by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Schlieren-imaging and a fluid dynamics simulation show the stability of the gas flow. The performance of these selective jets is demonstrated with the example of the treatment of E. coli bacteria with the different components emitted by a He-only, a He/N2 and a He/O2 plasma. Additionally, measurements of the vacuum UV photon spectra down to the wavelength of 50?nm can be made with the photon-jet and the relative comparison of spectral intensities among different gas mixtures is reported here. The results will show that the vacuum UV photons can lead to the inactivation of the E.coli bacteria.

  4. Formation of secondary light-absorbing ``fulvic-like'' oligomers: A common process in aqueous and ionic atmospheric particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Dziedzic, Pawel; Córdova, Armando

    2007-11-01

    Light-absorbing ``humic-like'' compounds of secondary origin have been consistently reported in partly inorganic aerosols and in fog waters but their formation could not be explained until now. In this work, we demonstrate that amino acid- and ammonium sulfate-catalyzed reactions in water and ionic solutions produce compounds of identical molecular and optical properties and account well for the quantities found in atmospheric particles. For typical aerosol concentrations of amino acids or ammonium sulfate the rate constants of reaction are found to be identical to the one in concentrated sulfuric acid (10-15 M), clearly demonstrating the efficiency of these catalysts. Our results also show that these reactions should be common in aqueous and ionic aerosols, as confirmed by the observations, and significantly impact their absorption index. In particular, previous radiative calculations indicate that they should substantially reduce current estimates of the cooling contribution of sulfate aerosols on climate.

  5. Atmospheric pollution in the Venice area I. Sulphur dioxide, suspended particles and sulphates.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M A; Gucci, P M

    1985-06-01

    The results of 2 years monitoring of sulphur dioxide, suspended particles and sulphates at three different sites (an industrial zone on the mainland, an urban zone on the mainland and an urban insular zone) in the Venice area are presented. The 24-h mean concentrations of the three pollutants fit a lognormal distribution, the parameters of which are estimated. The zero-order correlation coefficients between the concentrations of the three pollutants are determined: they are very high in the insular zone of Venice and lower in the industrial and urban zones of the mainland. PMID:4012297

  6. Study of particle rebound characteristics and material erosion at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.; Metwally, A.; Yeuan, J.; Pasin, M. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics)

    1990-10-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the ash particle rebound characteristics and the associated erosion behavior of superalloys and aluminide coatings subjected to gas-particle flows at elevated temperatures. At three-component LDV system was used to measure the restitution parameters of 15 micron mean diameter coal ash particles impacting some widely used superalloys and coatings at different angles. Results show the variation restitution ratios with the impingement angle for the coated and uncoated superalloys. Experimental results were used to develop correlations for the restitution parameters for coated and uncoated superalloys. A theoretical model based on elastic-plastic theory has been developed to simulate single solid particle impacts on solid targets. The erosion behaviors of many superalloys and protective coatings have also been investigated experimentally at high temperatures using a specially designed erosion tunnel. Also, the cumulative effect of the impacting particle mass on the weight loss and erosion rate were investigated. Semi-empirical erosion equations were developed for these materials based on the experimental erosion data and correlations of the restitution parameters. Coatings tested include: platinum alimunides, cobalt aluminides, nickel aluminides, rhodium platinum aluminides, and chromium carbide. Superalloys tested were nickel base alloys Inco in-738 and Mar-M246, as well as Cobalt base alloys X40 and FSX-414. 10 refs., 86 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. The reactive oxidant potential of different types of aged atmospheric particles: An outdoor chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Rosen, Eli; Zhang, Haofei; Li, Qianfeng; Pantong, Karun; Kamens, Richard M.

    2011-07-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) potential of aged diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM) and other aged aerosol systems in the presence and absence of an urban hydrocarbon environment was assessed. Experiments were performed in a 274 m 3 dual outdoor Teflon film chamber. Filter samples were taken to assess the oxidant generation associated with PM by an optimized dithiothreitol (DTT) method. Diesel exhaust PM had a higher ROS response when it was in the presence of an urban hydrocarbon mixture and was associated with significant O 3 production. For all the aged dilute diesel systems, ROS expression increased by a factor of 2-4 over fresh diesel particles. Other particle systems were also investigated. A low ROS was observed in most of the nighttime experiments, including the nighttime aerosols from SO 2 with O 3 and SO 2 aged by itself. However, when all the systems were compared, aged diesel exhaust tended to express very high ROS potentials, with secondary organic aerosols from an ?-pinene + toluene + an urban HC mixture giving the highest ROS response.

  8. Preparation of spherical particles by laser melting in liquid using TiN as a raw material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasoe, Kosuke; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto; Yano, Tetsuji; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Submicron spherical particles comprising TiN, TiO2, and TiOxNy were prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of TiN colloidal nanoparticles. A second harmonic generation Nd:YAG laser (wavelength: 532 nm) was used. We investigated how laser fluence, irradiation time, and raw material concentration affected spherical particle diameters and compositions. Laser irradiation of about 80 mJ/cm2 was required to obtain spherical particles. When laser fluence was increased to more than 350 mJ/cm2, spherical particles disappeared and nanoparticles formed. In the fluence range in which spheronization occurred, particle sizes increased with the laser fluence. XRD spectra showed that the oxidation of particles occurred during melting. From EDS mapping and XPS spectra, oxidization was clearly visible on particle surfaces, and the presence of TiOxNy and TiO2 was confirmed. Irradiation time and raw material concentration had little effect on product grain size.

  9. Particle characteristics of different materials after ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Joerg; Schelle, Florian; Kowalczyk, Philip; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The exposition of nanoparticles caused by laser application in dental health care is an open discussion. Based on the fact that nanoparticles can penetrate through the mucosa, the knowledge about particle characteristics after irradiation with an USPL is of high importance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the particle characteristics, especially the size of the ablated debris after USPL irradiation. The irradiation was carried out with an USP Nd:YVO4 laser with a center wavelength of 1064 nm. Based on the pulse duration of 8 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 500 kHz the laser emits an average power of 9 W. The materials investigated were dental tissues and dental restorative materials (composite and amalgam), ceramic and different metals (gold and aluminium). The samples were irradiated with a power density in the order of 300 GW/cm2 at distances of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm. The debris was collected on an object plate. SEM pictures were used for analysis of the ablation debris. Depending on the irradiated material, we observed different kinds of structures: vitreous, flocculent, and pellet-like. The mean particle sizes were 10 x 10 up to 30 x 30 ?m2. In addition, a cluster of ablated matter (nanometer range) distributed over the whole irradiated area was found. With increasing distances the cluster structure reduced from multi-layer to mono-layer clusters. Particle sizes in the micrometer and nanometer range were found after irradiation with an USPL. The nanoparticles create a cluster structure which is influenced by increasing distances.

  10. Lead and cadmium phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility for vegetables exposed to soil or atmospheric pollution by process ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tiantian; Leveque, Thibault; Shahid, Muhammad; Foucault, Yann; Mombo, Stéphane; Dumat, Camille

    2014-09-01

    When plants are exposed to airborne particles, they can accumulate metals in their edible portions through root or foliar transfer. There is a lack of knowledge on the influence of plant exposure conditions on human bioaccessibility of metals, which is of particular concern with the increase in urban gardening activities. Lettuce, radish, and parsley were exposed to metal-rich ultrafine particles from a recycling factory via field atmospheric fallouts or polluted soil. Total lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in of the edible plant parts and their human bioaccessibility were measured, and Pb translocation through the plants was studied using Pb isotopic analysis. The Pb and Cd bioaccessibility measured for consumed parts of the different polluted plants was significantly higher for root exposure (70% for Pb and 89% for Cd in lettuce) in comparison to foliar exposure (40% for Pb and 69% for Cd in lettuce). The difference in metal bioaccessibility could be linked to the metal compartmentalization and speciation changes in relation to exposure conditions. Metal nature strongly influences the measured bioaccessibility: Cd presents higher bioaccessibility in comparison to Pb. In the case of foliar exposure, a significant translocation of Pb from leaves toward the roots was observed. To conclude, the type of pollutant and the method of exposure significantly influences the phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility of metals, especially in relation to the contrasting phenomena involved in the rhizosphere and phyllosphere. The conditions of plant exposure must therefore be taken into account for environmental and health risk assessment. PMID:25603245

  11. Monitoring of atmospheric particles and ozone in Sequoia National Park: 1985-1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The Air Quality Group Monitored particles and ozone in Sequoia National Park as part of an effort to understand the impact of acid deposition and other air pollutants on the park's forests and watersheds. For high-elevation ozone measurement, the project developed a new solar-powered ozone monitoring system. The particulate matter sampled was analyzed for elemental content using nuclear techniques. The measurements were correlated with meteorology, known elemental sources, and wet and dry deposition measurements. The results show that particulate matter at Sequoia National Park is similar to that present at other sites on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada range at equivalent elevations. Some anthropogenic species, including nickel and sulfate, are present in higher concentrations at Sequoia than at Yosemite National Park.

  12. Solar cycle dynamics of solar, magnetospheric, and heliospheric particles, and long-term atmospheric coupling: SAMPLEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M. (Principal Investigator); Hamilton, D. C.; Blake, J. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Baker, D. N.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.; Callis, L. B.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes science analysis activities by the SAMPEX mission science team during the period during the period July 1, 1995 through July 1, 1996. Bibliographic entries for 1995 and 1996 to date (July 1996) are included. The SAMPEX science team was extremely active, with 20 articles published or submitted to refereed journals, 18 papers published in their entirety in Conference Proceedings, and 53 contributed papers, seminars, and miscellaneous presentations. The bibliography at the end of this report constitutes the primary description of the research activity. Science highlights are given under the major activity headings of anomalous cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, magnetospheric precipitating electrons, trapped H and He isotopes, and data analysis activities.

  13. Elemental characterization and source identification of size resolved atmospheric particles in French classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Dinh Trinh; Alleman, Laurent Y.; Coddeville, Patrice; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Indoor airborne particles were chemically characterized to identify their major sources in 3 elementary schools presenting different site typologies (rural, urban, and industrial) in the North of France. The sampling campaigns were conducted simultaneously indoors and outdoors during 2 weekly periods successively in each school, in presence and absence of pupils. The indoor weekly mean PM10 mass concentrations in presence of pupils varied from 72.7 to 85.3 ?g m-3, generally exceeding the WHO guidelines. The presence/absence PM10 ratios confirm the PM10 concentrations raise during children's activities. Their presence leads to an increase of elemental concentration (ng m-3) but does not influence the elemental distribution in the different particulate fractions. Crustal elements represent an important portion (7-10%) of the indoor PM10 mass, mostly driven by the Ca content (4.4-7.2%) due to the use of chalk. The trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, …) are enriched in the fine fractions (70-100%) compared to the coarse ones. Crustal elements (Al, Ca, Ti, Sr, …) present higher concentrations in the coarse fractions (40-60%). Elemental ratios and Cluster Analysis confirmed different particulate metal sources from the school surroundings. Among these sources, re-suspension dust, traffic, and marine aerosols were observed in all schools. Mixed anthropogenic sources were identified in urban and industrial sites, and petro-chemistry was only evidenced in the school near the industrial zone. Indoors, these outdoor anthropogenic particles represent the only sources of trace elements evidenced during this study.

  14. Gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric PCDD/Fs: Measurements and observations on modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.G.M.; Jones, K.C.

    1999-10-15

    The gas-particle partitioning of 2--8PCDD/Fs in ambient air was investigated at a semirural U.K. site, sampled with glass microfiber filters (GFFs) and polyurethane foam (PUF) plugs, and quantified by HRGC-HRMS. Nine samples, each {approximately}1,000 m{sup 3} of air, were collected over different periods of 7 days between May and Aug, when the average ambient temperatures varied between 12 and 17 C for the different sampling periods. The proportion of the different homologues associated with the PUF plugs (i.e., operationally defined as the gas phase) varied greatly. 2CDFs were almost exclusively (> 99.5%) in the gas phase, along with 82--96% of the 4CDD/Fs, 15--65% of the 6CDD/Fs, and 2--20% of the 8CDD/Fs. PCDFs tended to be slightly more associated with the gas phase than the equivalent homologue group of the PCDDs. Plots of the log partitioning coefficient (K{sub p}) versus the log subcooled liquid vapor pressure (p{sub L}{sup 0}) gave slopes in the range {minus}0.64 to {minus}0.79 ({bar x}, {minus}0.68) and intercepts of {minus}6.49 to {minus}7.32 ({bar x}, {minus}6.73) for the homologue groups. The data set was used to compare the Junge-Pankow adsorptive gas-particle distribution model and a parametrization of Pankow's absorption model by Harner and Bidleman. Although uncertainties remain over the physicochemical property data reported for PCDD/Fs, the former overpredicted the proportion of PCDD/Fs found associated with the particulate phase by between a factor of 1.1 and 5. The latter gave better agreement, to within a factor of 1.2--1.5, despite the requirement to use calculated rather than measured values for the octanol: air partition coefficient (K{sub oa}).

  15. Particle size distributions and elemental composition of atmospheric particulate matter in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola

    2008-06-01

    Three 2-wk seasonal field campaigns were performed in 2003 and 2004 at a sampling site on the southern Tyrrhenian coast of Italy with the aim to investigate the dynamics and characteristics of particle-bound pollutants in the Mediterranean area. Fine (PM(2.5)) and coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) size fractions were collected by a manual dichotomous sampler on 37-mm Teflon filters over a 24-hr sampling period. On average, 70% of the total PM(10) (PM(2.5) + PM(10-2.5)) mass was associated with the coarse fraction and 30% with the fine fraction during the three campaigns. The ambient concentrations of Pb, Ni, Cr, Zn, Mn, V, Cd, Fe, Cu, Ca, and Mg associated with both size fractions were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Ambient concentrations showed differences in their absolute value, ranging from few ng x m(-3) to microg x m(-3), as well as in their variability within the PM(2.5) and PM(10-2.5) size fractions. PM(10) levels were well below the European Union (EU) limit value during the study period with the exception of three events during the first campaign (fall) and five events during the third campaign (spring). Two main sources were identified as the major contributors including mineral dust, transported from North Africa, and sea spray from the Tyrrhenian Sea. Comparing the results with backward trajectories, calculated using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (TOMS-NASA) maps, it was observed that in central and eastern Europe, the Tyrrhenian Sea and North Africa were the major emission source regions that affected the temporal variations and daily averages of PM(2.5) and PM(10-2.5) concentrations. PMID:18581809

  16. Sucrose as a dosimetric material for photon and heavy particle radiation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2015-05-01

    The application of high-energy radiation in many areas of human activity and its harmful effects on human health makes necessary knowledge of the radiation chemistry of various materials upon exposure to high-energy radiation. Among these materials, saccharides (particularly sucrose) maintain the greatest advantage for potential radiochemistry applications. Until now, radiation chemistry studies have been conducted primarily with ?-ray irradiation; however, in the past few years there has been increased interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiochemistry on substances irradiated with heavy particles. To this end, this review discusses the possibilities of employing sucrose as a radiation-sensitive material for the determination of absorbed doses of high-energy radiation both for emergency situations and for dosimeters used in standard applications.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particles in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallarosa, Juliana Braga; Mônego, Josiane Garcia; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Stefens, Josemar Luis; Wiegand, Flávio

    The aim of the present study is to identify and quantify the main sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with aerosols (PM 10) collected at three different sampling stations: 8° Distrito, CEASA and Charqueadas. The samples were collected between November 2001 and November 2002, and the concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. The filters containing particulate matter were extracted with dichloromethane in Soxhlet and the extracts were later analysed in a gaseous chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GS/MS). The average concentrations of PAHs ranged between 0.04 and 2.30 ng m -3. The analysis of principal components was applied to the chemical and meteorological variables in order to facilitate the identification of sources of PAHs emission into the atmospheric particulate. The study identified the following sources of PAHs: vehicular emissions, such as diesel oil, petrol, alcohol, and kerosene; industrial emissions, like lubricating oils; emissions from hospital waste burning, and coal burning at power plants.

  18. Study on the compatibility of insulation materials for hermetic motor under alternative refrigerants and new lubricants atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsubara, Takeo; Sunaga, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yasuki

    HFC407C and HFC410A were introduced as the alternative refrigerants for HCFC22 in air conditioner to follow the Motreal protocol. But HFCs were also regulated by the Kyoto protocol and natural refrigerants like hydrocarbon (HC) and CO2 are researched and introduced in the market. Under these circumstances the compatibility of motor insulation materials for hermetic motor under alternative refrigerants and lubricants become important. In this paper we discuss the compatibility of magnet wires and films of hermetic motor for air conditioner under atmosphere of HFC407C and HFC410A with POE and PVE lubricants and also discuss it under atmosphere of R600a with mineral oil and CO2 with PAG lubricant in comparison of conventional atmosphere.

  19. Particle-Phase Chemistry of Secondary Organic Material: Modeled Compared to Measured O:C and H:C Elemental Ratios Provide Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Liu, Yingjun; Donahue, N. M.; Shilling, John E.; Martin, Scot T.

    2011-05-11

    Chemical mechanisms for the production of secondary organic material (SOM) are developed in focused laboratory studies but widely used in the complex modeling context of the atmosphere. Given this extrapolation, a stringent testing of the mechanisms is important. In addition to particle mass yield as a typical standard for model-measurement comparison, particle composition expressed as O:C and H:C elemental ratios can serve as a higher dimensional constraint. A paradigm for doing so is developed herein for SOM production from a C5 C10 C15 terpene sequence, namely isoprene, R-pinene, and ?-caryopyhllene. The model MCM-SIMPOL is introduced based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) and a group contribution method for vapor pressures (SIMPOL). The O:C and H:C ratios of the SOM are measured using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Detailed SOM-specific AMS calibrations for the organic contribution to the H2Oþ and COþ ions indicate that published O:C and H:C ratios for SOM are systematically too low. Overall, the measurement-model gap was small for particle mass yield but significant for particle-average elemental composition. The implication is that a key chemical pathway is missing from the chemical mechanism. The data can be explained by the particle-phase homolytic decomposition of organic hydroperoxides and subsequent alkyl-radical-promoted oligomerization.

  20. Particle interaction and rheological behavior of cement-based materials at micro- and macro-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomboy, Gilson Rescober

    Rheology of cement based materials is controlled by the interactions at the particle level. The present study investigates the particle interactions and rheological properties of cement-based materials in the micro- and macro-scales. The cementitious materials studied are Portland cement (PC), fly ash (FA), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) and densified silica fume (SF). At the micro-scale, aside from the forces on particles due to collisions, interactions of particles in a flowing system include the adhesion and friction. Adhesion is due to the attraction between materials and friction depends on the properties of the sliding surfaces. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is used to measure the adhesion force and coefficient of friction. The adhesion force is measured by pull-off force measurements and is used to calculate Hamaker constants. The coefficient of friction is measured by increasing the deflection set-points on AFM probes with sliding particles, thereby increasing normal loads and friction force. AFM probes were commercial Si3N4 tips and cementitious particles attached to the tips of probe cantilevers. SF was not included in the micro-scale tests due to its limiting size when attaching it to the AFM probes. Other materials included in the tests were silica, calcite and mica, which were used for verification of the developed test method for the adhesion study. The AFM experiments were conducted in dry air and fluid environments at pH levels of 7, 8, 9, 11 and 13. The results in dry air indicate that the Hamaker constant of Class F FA can be similar to PC, but Class C FA can have a high Hamaker constant, also when in contact with other cementitious materials. The results in fluid environments showed low Hamaker constants for Class F fly ashes compared to PC and also showed high Hamaker constants for PC and Class C fly ash. The results for the friction test in dry air indicated that the coefficient of friction of PC is lower than fly ashes, which is attributed to the asperities present on the particle surface. At the macro-scale, flow of cementitious materials may be in its dry or wet state, during transport and handling or when it is used in concrete mixtures, respectively. Hence, the behavior of bulk cementitious materials in their dry state and wet form are studied. In the dry state, the compression, recompression and swell indices, and stiffness modulus of plain and blended cementitious materials are determined by confined uniaxial compression. The coefficients of friction of the bulk materials studied are determined by a direct shear test. The results indicate that shape of particles has a great influence on the compression and shear parameters. The indices for PC blends with FA do not change with FA replacement, while it increases with GGBFS replacement. Replacement with GGBFS slightly decreases coefficient of friction, while replacement with FA significantly decreases coefficient of friction. At low SF replacement, coefficient of friction decreases. In wet state, unary, binary, ternary and quaternary mixes with w/b of 0.35, 0.45 and 0.55 were tested for yield stress, viscosity and thixotropy. It is found that fly ash replacement lowers the rheological properties and replacement with GGBFS and SF increases rheological properties. The distinct element method (DEM) was employed to model particle interaction and bulk behavior. The AFM force curve measurement is simulated to validate the adhesion model in the DEM. The contact due to asperities was incorporated by considering the asperities as a percentage of the radius of the contacting particles. The results of the simulation matches the force-curve obtained from actual AFM experiments. The confined uniaxial compression test is simulated to verify the use of DEM to relate micro-scale properties to macros-scale behavior. The bulk stiffness from the physical experiments is matched in the DEM simulation. The particle stiffness and coefficient of friction are found to have a direct relation to bulk stiffness.

  1. The effect of the condensation of ice materials in the atmosphere on the thermal evolution of ice giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, Kenji; Ikoma, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Though Uranus and Neptune are similar in mass and radius, the former is significantly fainter than the latter. As previous theoretical studies of thermal evolution of the ice giants demonstrated, the faintness of Uranus is not explained by simple three-layer models that are composed of a H/He-dominated envelope, an ice mantle and a rocky core. Namely, the observed effective temperature of Uranus is lower than theoretically predicted (e.g., Fortney et al., 2011; Nettelmann et al., 2013). Since the speed of the thermal evolution is determined by how efficiently the planetary atmosphere radiates energy, the atmospheric structure is important. If the atmosphere contains ice materials such as water, ammonia and methane, those materials have been condensed and removed from the atmosphere during the cooling. In this study, we quantify the impact of the condensation of ice components in the atmosphere on the thermal evolution, which previous studies ignore, to explain the current luminosity of Uranus. To do so, we simulate the thermal cooling of ice giants, based on three layer models with a relatively ice-component-rich, H/He-dominated atmosphere on top of a water mantle that surrounds a rocky core. We demonstrate that the effect of the condensation makes the timescale of the thermal cooling of the planet shorter by an order of magnitude than in the case without condensation. Such accelerated cooling is shown to be fast enough to explain the current faintness of Uranus. We also discuss what caused the difference in current luminosity between Uranus and Neptune.

  2. Particle-Support Interferences in Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering from Supported-Catalyst Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Garganourakis, Marios; Han, Jun; Patru, Alexandra; Fabbri, Emiliana; Sereda, Olha; Kötz, Rüdiger; Menzel, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-02-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful technique for the investigation of catalyst materials at the nanoscale. We present results of an anomalous SAXS study on metal-oxide-supported platinum particles used as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction. The scattering interferences between catalyst particles and support material are taken into account qualitatively and quantitatively by a mathematical model for the data-fitting procedure. Our results clearly demonstrate the fundamental importance of these catalyst-particle-support-material interferences in the analysis of SAXS data from supported catalysts.

  3. Counterpropagating wave acoustic particle manipulation device for the effective manufacture of composite materials.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Marc-S; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Llewellyn-Jones, Thomas M; Trask, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    An ultrasonic assembly device exhibiting broadband behavior and a sacrificial plastic frame is described. This device is used to assemble a variety of microscopic particles differing in size, shape, and material into simple patterns within several host fluids. When the host fluid is epoxy, the assembled materials can be cured and the composite sample extracted from the sacrificial frame. The wideband performance means that within a single device, the wavelength can be varied, leading to control of the length scale of the acoustic radiation force field. We show that glass fibers of 50 ?m length and 14 ?m diameter can be assembled into a series of stripes separated by hundreds of microns in a time of 0.3 s. Finite element analysis is used to understand the attributes of the device which control its wideband characteristics. The bandwidth is shown to be governed by the damping produced by a combination of the plastic frame and the relatively large volume of the fluid particle mixture. The model also reveals that the acoustic radiation forces are a maximum near the substrate of the device, which is in agreement with experimental observations. The device is extended to 8-transducers and used to assemble more complex particle distributions. PMID:26470047

  4. The influence of formation material properties on the response of water levels in wells to Earth tides and atmospheric loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.; Agnew, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The water level in an open well can change in response to deformation of the surrounding material, either because of applied strains (tidal or tectonic) or surface loading by atmospheric pressure changes. Under conditions of no vertical fluid flow and negligible well bore storage (static-confined conditions), the sensitivities to these effects depend on the elastic properties and porosity which characterize the surrounding medium. The hydraulic diffusivity which governs pressure diffusion in response to surface loading is slightly smaller than that which governs fluid flow in response to applied strain. Analysis of the static-confined response of five wells to atmospheric loading and Earth tides gives generally reasonable estimates for material properties. -from Authors

  5. Numerical simulations of granular dynamics II. Particle dynamics in a shaken granular material

    E-print Network

    Naomi Murdoch; Patrick Michel; Derek C. Richardson; Kerstin Nordstrom; Christian R. Berardi; Simon F. Green; Wolfgang Losert

    2013-06-07

    Surfaces of planets and small bodies of our Solar System are often covered by a layer of granular material that can range from a fine regolith to a gravel-like structure of varying depths. Therefore, the dynamics of granular materials are involved in many events occurring during planetary and small-body evolution thus contributing to their geological properties. We demonstrate that the new adaptation of the parallel N-body hard-sphere code pkdgrav has the capability to model accurately the key features of the collective motion of bidisperse granular materials in a dense regime as a result of shaking. As a stringent test of the numerical code we investigate the complex collective ordering and motion of granular material by direct comparison with laboratory experiments. We demonstrate that, as experimentally observed, the scale of the collective motion increases with increasing small-particle additive concentration. We then extend our investigations to assess how self-gravity and external gravity affect collective motion. In our reduced-gravity simulations both the gravitational conditions and the frequency of the vibrations roughly match the conditions on asteroids subjected to seismic shaking, though real regolith is likely to be much more heterogeneous and less ordered than in our idealised simulations. We also show that collective motion can occur in a granular material under a wide range of inter-particle gravity conditions and in the absence of an external gravitational field. These investigations demonstrate the great interest of being able to simulate conditions that are to relevant planetary science yet unreachable by Earth-based laboratory experiments.

  6. The effect of particle size on the shock compaction of a quasi-mono-disperse brittle granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, William; Chapman, David James; Proud, William

    2012-03-01

    Several continuum models aim to represent the shock compaction of brittle granular materials but their success is limited by their insensitivity to the effects of meso-scopic features. This investigation is part of early attempts to quantify the effects of particle size on the macro shock response of a granular material. Plate impact experiments were conducted on beds of soda-lime glass microspheres. Three different quasimono-disperse particle size distributions were subjected to shock pressures between 0.6 - 4.5 GPa. There is an obvious difference between the compaction behaviour of 63 ?m particles compared to beds of 200 and 500 ?m particles. A precursor wave is present at low stresses that potentially signifies bulk material strength; the precursor magnitude decreases with increasing particle size.

  7. FREE AND COMBINED AMINO COMPOUNDS IN ATMOSPHERIC FINE PARTICLES (PM2.5) AND FOG WATERS FROM NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5) collected during August 1997–July 1998 and wintertime fog waters collected during 1997–1999 at Davis, California were analyzed for free and combined amino compounds. In both PM2.5 and fog waters, the averag...

  8. Complex experiment on studying the microphysical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosol particles and estimating the contribution of atmospheric aerosol-to-earth radiation budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Belan, B. D.; Panchenko, M. V.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Turchinovich, S. A.; Turchinovich, Y. S.; Eremina, T. A.; Kozlov, V. S.; Terpugova, S. A.; Pol'kin, V. V.; Yausheva, E. P.; Chernov, D. G.; Zhuravleva, T. B.; Bedareva, T. V.; Odintsov, S. L.; Burlakov, V. D.; Nevzorov, A. V.; Arshinov, M. Y.; Ivlev, G. A.; Savkin, D. E.; Fofonov, A. V.; Gladkikh, V. A.; Kamardin, A. P.; Balin, Y. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. E.; Samoilova, S. V.; Antokhin, P. N.; Arshinova, V. G.; Davydov, D. K.; Kozlov, A. V.; Pestunov, D. A.; Rasskazchikova, T. M.; Simonenkov, D. V.; Sklyadneva, T. K.; Tolmachev, G. N.; Belan, S. B.; Shmargunov, V. P.; Kozlov, A. S.; Malyshkin, S. B.

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of this complex aerosol experiment was the measurement of microphysical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosol particles in the surface air layer and free atmosphere. The measurement data were used to retrieve the whole set of aerosol optical parameters, necessary for radiation calculations. Three measurement cycles were performed within the experiment during 2013: in spring, when the aerosol generation is maximal; in summer (July), when atmospheric boundary layer altitude and, hence, mixing layer altitude are maximal; and in late summer/early autumn, during the period of nucleation of secondary particles. Thus, independently obtained data on the optical, meteorological, and microphysical parameters of the atmosphere allow intercalibration and inter-complement of the data and thereby provide for qualitatively new information which explains the physical nature of the processes that form the vertical structure of the aerosol field.

  9. Hybrid algorithm of minimum relative entropy-particle swarm optimization with adjustment parameters for gas source term identification in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Denglong; Wang, Simin; Zhang, Zaoxiao

    2014-09-01

    In order to identify the source term of gas emission in atmosphere, an improved hybrid algorithm combined with the minimum relative entropy (MRE) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) method was presented. Not only are the estimated source parameters obtained, but also the confidence intervals at some probability levels. If only the source strength was required to be determined, the problem can be viewed as a linear inverse problem directly, which can be solved by original MRE method successfully. When both source strength and location are unknown, the common gas dispersion model should be transformed to be a linear system. Although the transformed linear model has some differences from that in original MRE method, satisfied estimation results were still obtained by adding iteratively adaptive adjustment parameters in the MRE-PSO method. The dependence of the MRE-PSO method on prior information such as lower and upper bound, prior expected values and noises were also discussed. The results showed that the confidence intervals and estimated parameters are influenced little by the prior bounds and expected values, but the errors affect the estimation results greatly. The simulation and experiment verification results showed that the MRE-PSO method is able to identify the source parameters with satisfied results. Finally, the error model was probed and then it was added in the MRE-PSO method. The addition of error model improves the performance of the identification method. Therefore, the MRE-PSO method with adjustment parameters proposed in this paper is a potential good method to resolve inverse problem in atmosphere environment.

  10. Optical properties of atmospheric fine particles near Beijing during the HOPE-J3A Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Zhao, W.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, S.; Fang, B.; Chen, W.; Venables, D. S.; Wang, X.; Pu, W.; Wang, X.; Gao, X.; Zhang, W.

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties and chemical composition of PM1.0 (particulate with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 1.0 ?m) particles in a suburban environment (Huairou) near the mega-city Beijing were measured during the HOPE-J3A (Haze Observation Project Especially for Jing-Jin-Ji Area) field campaign. The campaign covered the period November 2014 to January 2015 during the winter coal heating season. The average and standard deviations for the extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at ? = 470 nm during the measurement period were 201 ± 240, 164 ± 202, 37 ± 43 Mm-1, and 0.80 ± 0.08, respectively. The mean mass scattering (MSE) and absorption (MAE) efficiencies were 4.77 ± 0.01 and 0.87 ± 0.03 m2g-1, respectively. Highly time-resolved air pollution episodes clearly show the dramatic evolution of the PM1.0 size distribution, extensive optical properties (extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients) and intensive optical properties (single scattering albedo and complex refractive index) during haze formation, development and decline. Time periods were classified into three different pollution levels (clear, slightly polluted, and polluted) for further analysis. It was found that: (1) The diurnal patterns of the aerosol extinction, scattering, absorption coefficients, and SSA differed for the three pollution classes. (2) The real and imaginary part of complex refractive index (CRI) increased, while the SSA decreased from clear to polluted days. (3) The relative contributions of organic and inorganic species to observed aerosol composition changed significantly from clear to polluted days: the organic mass fraction decreased (50 to 43 %) while the proportion of sulfates, nitrates, and ammonium increased strongly (34 to 44 %). (4) The fractional contribution of chemical components to extinction coefficients was calculated by using the modified IMPROVE algorithm. Organic mass was the largest contributor (58 %) to the total extinction of PM1.0. When the air quality deteriorated, the change of the relative contribution of sulfate aerosol to the total extinction was small, but the contribution of nitrate aerosol increased significantly (from 17 % on clear days to 23 % on polluted days). (5) The observed mass scattering efficiencies increased consistently with the pollution extent, however, the observed mass absorption efficiencies increased consistently with increasing mass concentration in slightly pollution conditions, but decreased under polluted conditions.

  11. High-Columbic-Efficiency Lithium Battery Based on Silicon Particle Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Zhang, Chunqian; Wu, Shouming; Zhang, Xu; Li, Chuanbo; Xue, Chunlai; Cheng, Buwen

    2015-12-01

    Micro-sized polycrystalline silicon particles were used as anode materials of lithium-ion battery. The columbic efficiency of the first cycle reached a relatively high value of 91.8 % after prelithiation and increased to 99 % in the second cycle. Furthermore, columbic efficiency remained above 99 % for up to 280+ cycles. The excellent performances of the batteries were the results of the use of a proper binder to protect the electrode from cracking and the application of a suitable conductive agent to provide an efficient conductive channel. The good performance was also significantly attributed to the electrolyte in the packaging process. PMID:26450619

  12. Interfacial behavior between particle and matrix in a composite rubber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentadue, Bartolomeo

    2011-12-01

    Electronic holography moiré is applied to the measurement of interfacial deformation field between an embedded particle and its surrounding matrix in a non-homogeneous rubber material. A tensile specimen is subjected to creep loading. The loads are applied in steps and measurements are carried out at equal intervals of time. The final output is provided by the Holo-Moiré Strain Analyzer and gives the principal strains and their directions in the region of observation. A definition of adhesion as an experimental measurable quantity through the evaluation of contour integrals is introduced.

  13. High-Columbic-Efficiency Lithium Battery Based on Silicon Particle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junying; Zhang, Chunqian; Wu, Shouming; Zhang, Xu; Li, Chuanbo; Xue, Chunlai; Cheng, Buwen

    2015-10-01

    Micro-sized polycrystalline silicon particles were used as anode materials of lithium-ion battery. The columbic efficiency of the first cycle reached a relatively high value of 91.8 % after prelithiation and increased to 99 % in the second cycle. Furthermore, columbic efficiency remained above 99 % for up to 280+ cycles. The excellent performances of the batteries were the results of the use of a proper binder to protect the electrode from cracking and the application of a suitable conductive agent to provide an efficient conductive channel. The good performance was also significantly attributed to the electrolyte in the packaging process.

  14. Computations with near-field coupled plasmon particles interacting with phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shohei; Kuwamura, Kenta; Kihara, Yuya; Hirukawa, Yusuke; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2015-07-01

    The computing functionality emerging from spatial correlations due to near-field interactions between local processing and memory elements is discussed. In particular, we investigate the possibility of solving a problem analogous to the spin-glass problem by using a coupled dipole system, in which the individual coupling strengths can be modified to optimize the system so that the exact solution can be easily reached. For this algorithm, we propose an implementation based on a coupled plasmon-particle system interacting with a phase-change material; this system exhibits threshold behavior and plasticity to provide processing and memory functions, respectively.

  15. Exploring the relationship between critical state and particle shape for granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Luo, X. D.

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between critical state and particle shape corresponds to the most fundamental aspect of the mechanics of granular materials. This paper presents an investigation into this relationship through macro-scale and micro-scale laboratory experiments in conjunction with interpretation and analysis in the framework of critical state soil mechanics. Spherical glass beads and crushed angular glass beads of different percentages were mixed with a uniform quartz sand (Fujian sand) to create a sequence of mixtures with varying particle shape. On the micro-scale, particle shape was accurately measured using a laser scanning technique, and was characterized by aspect ratio, sphericity and convexity; a new shape index, taken as the average of the three shape measures and referred to as overall regularity, was proposed to provide a collective characterization of particle shape. On the macro-scale, both undrained and drained triaxial tests were carried out to provide evidence that varying particle shape can alter the overall response as well as the critical states in both stress space and volumetric compression space. The mixtures of Fujian sand and spherical glass beads were found to be markedly more susceptible to liquefaction than the mixtures of Fujian sand and crushed angular glass beads. The change in liquefaction susceptibility was shown to be consistent with the change in the position of the critical state locus (CSL) in the compression space, manifested by a decrease in the intercept and gradient of the CSL due to the presence of spherical glass beads. Quantitative relationships have been established between each of the critical state parameters and each of the shape parameters, thereby providing a way to construct macro-scale constitutive models with intrinsic micro-scale properties built in.

  16. Inorganic salts interact with oxalic acid in submicron particles to form material with low hygroscopicity and volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, G.; Woo, J.; Häkkinen, S. A. K.; Nenes, A.; McNeill, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Volatility and hygroscopicity are two key properties of organic aerosol components, and both are strongly related to chemical identity. While the hygroscopicities of pure salts, di-carboxylic acids (DCA), and DCA salts are known, the hygroscopicity of internal mixtures of these components, as they are typically found in the atmosphere, has not been fully characterized. Here we show that inorganic-organic component interactions typically not considered in atmospheric models can lead to very strongly bound metal-organic complexes and greatly affect aerosol volatility and hygroscopicity; in particular, the bi-dentate binding of DCA to soluble inorganic ions. We have studied the volatility of pure, dry organic salt particles and the hygroscopicity of internal mixtures of oxalic acid (OxA, the dominant DCA in the atmosphere) and a number of salts, both mono- and di-valent. The formation of very low volatility organic salts was confirmed, with minimal evaporation of oxalate salt particles below 75 °C. Dramatic increases in the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation diameter for particles with di-valent salts (e.g., CaCl2) and relatively small particle volume fractions of OxA indicate that standard volume additivity rules for hygroscopicity do not apply. Thus small organic compounds with high O : C ratios are capable of forming low-volatility and very low hygroscopicity particles. Given current knowledge of the formation mechanisms of OxA and M-Ox salts, surface enrichment of insoluble M-Ox salts is expected. The resulting formation of an insoluble coating of metal-oxalate salts can explain low-particle hygroscopicities. The formation of particles with a hard coating could offer an alternative explanation for observations of glass-like particles without the need for a phase transition.

  17. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    E-print Network

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials Dale P. Bentz* Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute-Jochen Haecker* Wilhelm Dyckerhoff Institut, 65203 Wiesbaden, Germany The influence of cement particle

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring properties of particle beams using thermo-resistive material properties

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V. (Williamsburg, VA); Dotson, Danny Wayne (Gloucester, VA)

    2007-10-09

    A beam position detector for measuring the properties of a charged particle beam, including the beam's position, size, shape, and intensity. One or more absorbers are constructed of thermo-resistive material and positioned to intercept and absorb a portion of the incoming beam power, thereby causing local heating of each absorber. The local temperature increase distribution across the absorber, or the distribution between different absorbers, will depend on the intensity, size, and position of the beam. The absorbers are constructed of a material having a strong dependence of electrical resistivity on temperature. The beam position detector has no moving parts in the vicinity of the beam and is especially suited to beam areas having high ionizing radiation dose rates or poor beam quality, including beams dispersed in the transverse direction and in their time radio frequency structure.

  19. Contrast Between the Sources and Atmospheric Processing of Fine Particles from Asia and North America Measured During INTEX B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R.; Peltier, R.; Hecobian, A.; Blake, D.; Atlas, E.; Riemer, D.; Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Campos, T.; Stohl, A.

    2007-12-01

    During the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment, Phase B (INTEX B), conducted in the spring of 2006, airborne measurements were made in the United States Pacific Northwest of the major inorganic ions and the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of submicron (PM1.0) aerosol. An atmospheric trajectory and a particle dispersion model for CO sources (Flexpart) was used to segregate air masses into those of primarily Asian influence (greater than 75 percent Asian CO) or North American influence (greater than 75 percent North American CO). Measured components of fine particle mass mostly consisted of water-soluble organic carbon and sulfate, with highest median WSOC and sulfate concentrations in North American air masses. Curiously, the fraction of sulfate to WSOC was significantly higher at altitudes above 3 km, opposite to what has been observed closer to Asia and in the northeastern United States. The observations could be explained by loss of sulfate and organic aerosol due to precipitation scavenging near Asia, with reformation of only sulfate during advection from Asia to North America. WSOC sources were investigated by multivariate linear regression analyses of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In Asian air masses detected over the Pacific Northwest, of the WSOC variability that could be explained (49 percent), most was related to fossil fuel combustion VOCs, compared to North American air masses, where 75 percent of the WSOC variability was explained through a nearly equal combination of fossil fuel combustion and biogenic VOCs. The most distinct WSOC plumes of the mission were from the California Central Valley, where WSOC variability was related to a mix of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs. These plumes appeared to be related to secondary organic aerosol formation associated with cloud processing.

  20. Investigating the sources and atmospheric processing of fine particles from Asia and the Northwestern United States measured during INTEX B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, R. E.; Hecobian, A. H.; Weber, R. J.; Stohl, A.; Atlas, E. L.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, D. R.; Apel, E.; Campos, T.; Karl, T.

    2007-11-01

    During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment, Phase B (INTEX-B), in the spring of 2006, airborne measurements were made in the United States Pacific Northwest of the major inorganic ions and the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of submicron (PM1.0) aerosol. An atmospheric trajectory (Hysplit) and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (Flexpart) quantifying source contributions for carbon monoxide (CO) was used to segregate air masses into those of primarily Asian influence (>75% Asian CO) or North American influence (>75% North American CO). Of the measured compounds, fine particle mass mostly consisted of water-soluble organic carbon and sulfate, with highest median WSOC and sulfate concentrations in North American air masses. The fraction of WSOC to sulfate was significantly lower than one at altitudes above 3 km, opposite to what has been observed closer to Asia and in the northeastern United States, where organic components were at higher concentrations than sulfate in the free troposphere. The observations could be explained by loss of sulfate and organic aerosol due to precipitation scavenging, with reformation of mainly sulfate during advection from Asia to North America. WSOC sources were investigated by multivariate linear regression analyses of WSOC and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In Asian air masses, of the WSOC variability that could be explained (49%), most were related to fossil fuel combustion VOCs, compared to North American air masses, where 75% of the WSOC variability was explained through a nearly equal combination of fossil fuel combustion and biogenic VOCs. Distinct WSOC plumes encountered during the experiment were also studied. A plume observed near the California Central Valley at 0.6 km altitude was related to both fossil fuel combustion and biogenic VOCs. Another Central Valley plume observed over Nevada at 3 to 5 km, in a region of cloud detrainment, was mostly related to biogenic VOCs.

  1. Trace metals in atmospheric fine particles in one industrial urban city: spatial variations, sources, and health implications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengzhen; Yuan, Qi; Li, Weijun; Lu, Yaling; Zhang, Yangmei; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-01-01

    Trace metals in PM2.5 were measured at one industrial site and one urban site during September, 2010 in Ji'nan, eastern China. Individual aerosol particles and PM2.5 samples were collected concurrently at both sites. Mass concentrations of eleven trace metals (i.e., Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, and Pb) and one metalloid (i.e., As) were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The result shows that mass concentrations of PM2.5 (130 microg/m3) and trace metals (4.03 microg/m3) at the industrial site were 1.3 times and 1.7 times higher than those at the urban site, respectively, indicating that industrial activities nearby the city can emit trace metals into the surrounding atmosphere. Fe concentrations were the highest among all the measured trace metals at both sites, with concentrations of 1.04 microg/m 3 at the urban site and 2.41 microg/m3 at the industrial site, respectively. In addition, Pb showed the highest enrichment factors at both sites, suggesting the emissions from anthropogenic activities existed around the city. Correlation coefficient analysis and principal component analysis revealed that Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn were originated from vehicular traffic and industrial emissions at both sites; As, Cr, and part of Pb from coal-fired power plant; Ba and Ti from natural soil. Based on the transmission electron microscopy analysis, we found that most of the trace metals were internally mixed with secondary sulfate/organic particles. These internally mixed trace metals in the urban air may have different toxic abilities compared with externally mixed trace metals. PMID:24649708

  2. Making the material: The formation of silt sized primary mineral particles for loess deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Ian

    In 1911 E.E. Free wrote... "it may be well to point out that there are really two problems of the loess—a problem of the origin of material and a problem of deposition". The problem of the 'origin of material' has been relatively neglected, in comparison to problems of deposition. of the formation of deposits, and latterly in comparison to studies of loess stratigraphy. If we are to understand the true nature of loess, this fascinating material, we need to be aware of all the significant events in the processing of the particles which form a deposit. A large amount of silt-sized primary mineral material has to be produced to make a loess deposit. Loess is a Quaternary phenomenon and we see the entire process being completed in Quaternary times. Some powerful Quaternary forces are able to produce very large amounts of granular material. 'Glacial grinding', vigorously supported by Smalley (1966a), provides an obvious source for some loess material, but the vast deposits of North China and Central Asia have no obvious glacial connection. However they are adjacent to 'High Asia', a region of vast tectonic activity and an enormous release of terrestrial energy in the last several million years. 'High Asia' is a large producer of loess silt, much of which finds its way south to make the Ganges delta but large amounts are moved north and east to make huge loess deposits. Africa presents a problem. Recent work (e.g. Coudé-Gaussen, 1987) suggests that there is a region of 'peri-Saharan' loess but earlier observations (e.g. Penck) indicate quite clearly that the Sahara region is free of loess. Rathjens (1928) in his study of Tripolitania indicated the presence of loess-like deposits and described their nature, but he did point out that 90% of the granular material was greater than 100 pm in diameter—which would remove it from a strict loess definition. On the Soil Taxonomy map of Africa there is a belt of soil D3 which could include considerable loess deposits; it stretches from the Matmata 'loess' in Tunisia, across northern Libya to the western part of the Egyptian coastal region. If D3 contains loess this points to a genuine desert loess particle producing mechanism operating in the Sahara.

  3. Bio-organic materials in the atmosphere and snow: measurement and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ariya, P A; Kos, G; Mortazavi, R; Hudson, E D; Kanthasamy, V; Eltouny, N; Sun, J; Wilde, C

    2014-01-01

    Bio-organic chemicals are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and at air-snow interfaces, as well as in aerosols and in clouds. It has been known for centuries that airborne biological matter plays various roles in the transmission of disease in humans and in ecosystems. The implication of chemical compounds of biological origins in cloud condensation and in ice nucleation processes has also been studied during the last few decades, and implications have been suggested in the reduction of visibility, in the influence on oxidative potential of the atmosphere and transformation of compounds in the atmosphere, in the formation of haze, change of snow-ice albedo, in agricultural processes, and bio-hazards and bio-terrorism. In this review we critically examine existing observation data on bio-organic compounds in the atmosphere and in snow. We also review both conventional and cutting-edge analytical techniques and methods for measurement and characterisation of bio-organic compounds and specifically for microbial communities, in the atmosphere and snow. We also explore the link between biological compounds and nucleation processes. Due to increased interest in decreasing emissions of carbon-containing compounds, we also briefly review (in an Appendix) methods and techniques that are currently deployed for bio-organic remediation. PMID:23832685

  4. Characterization and parameterization of atmospheric particle number-, mass-, and chemical-size distributions in central Europe during LACE 98 and MINT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neusüß, C.; Wex, H.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Koziar, C.; Busch, B.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Ebert, M.; Covert, D. S.

    2002-11-01

    Intensive measurements of chemical and physical properties of the atmospheric aerosol have been performed at two sites in central Europe during the Melpitz-Intensive (MINT) in November 1997 and the Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment 1998 (LACE 98) in July and August 1998. Number-size distributions, hygroscopic particle growth, size-segregated gravimetric mass, and size-segregated chemical masses of water-soluble ions and organic and elemental carbon of aerosol particles have been measured. To obtain information on the quality of the different methods, the number-derived, gravimetric, and chemically derived mass distributions are compared. Gravimetric mass of fine particles is attributed completely to chemical composition by carbonaceous material and ions, including an estimate of the water content due to hygroscopic compounds. For the characterization of coarse particles, which contribute less to the total mass concentration, insoluble material has to be included in the mass balance. Mass concentrations calculated from the number-size distributions are well correlated with the gravimetric mass concentration; however, the calculated mass is larger, especially for the Aitken and accumulation modes. The number-derived mass concentration is most sensitive to the sizing uncertainty of the measured number-size distribution. Moreover, the impactor cutoffs and the limited knowledge about the density of the particles (especially with high carbon content) account for a major part of the uncertainties. The overall uncertainty of the calculated mass, determined as the standard deviation of the average value in a Monte Carlo approach, is found to be about 10%. Lognormal parameters for the number-size and volume-size distributions as well as gravimetric mass-size distribution and corresponding chemical composition are presented for different air mass types. Most of the modal parameters do not differ significantly between the air mass types. Higher mass concentrations are mostly due to an increase in size (of Aitken and accumulation mode) rather than an increase in the number of particles in a given mode. Generally, the mass percent carbon content increases with decreasing particle size. The most pronounced difference with season is an increase of carbon content from summer to winter as well as an increase in nitrate content, resulting in a decrease of sulfate. For nitrate a strong dependence on air mass direction is observed. Sulfate and nitrate are predominantly neutralized by ammonium. With the results of the two experiments, quality-controlled mode parameters and corresponding chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol particles in central Europe are now available for application in models.

  5. Hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles over the Eastern Mediterranean: implications for regional direct radiative forcing under clean and polluted conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Cheng, Y. F.; Birmili, W.; Massling, A.; Wehner, B.; Müller, T.; Leinert, S.; Kalivitis, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-05-01

    This work examines the effect of direct radiative forcing of aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean troposphere as a function of air mass composition, particle size distribution and hygroscopicity, and relative humidity (RH). During intensive field measurements on the island of Crete, Greece, the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric particles were determined using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) and a Hygroscopicity Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (H-DMA-APS). Similar to former studies, the H-TDMA identified three hygroscopic sub-fractions of particles in the sub-?m range: a more hygroscopic group, a less hygroscopic group and a nearly hydrophobic particle group. The average hygroscopic particle growth factors at 90 % RH were a significant function of particle mobility diameter (Dp): 1.42 (± 0.05) at 30 nm compared to 1.63 (± 0.07) at 250 nm. The H-DMA-APS identified up to three hygroscopic sub-fractions at mobility diameters of 1.0 and 1.2 ?m. The data recorded between 12 August and 20 October 2005 were classified into four distinct synoptic-scale air mass types distinguishing between different regions of origin (western Mediterranean vs. the Aegean Sea) as well as the degree of continental pollution (marine vs. continentally influenced). The hygroscopic properties of particles with diameter Dp?150 nm showed the most pronounced dependency on air mass origin, with growth factors in marine air masses exceeding those in continentally influenced air masses. Particle size distributions and hygroscopic growth factors were used to calculate aerosol light scattering coefficients at ambient RH using a Mie model. A main result was the pronounced enhancement of particle scattering over the eastern Mediterranean due to hygroscopic growth, both in the marine and continentally influenced air masses. When RH reached its summer daytime values around 70-80 %, up to 50-70 % of the calculated visibility reduction was due to the hygroscopic growth of the particles by water compared to the effect of the dry particles alone. The estimated aerosol direct radiative forcings for both, marine and continentally influenced air masses were negative indicating a net cooling of the atmosphere due to the aerosol. The radiative forcing ?Fr was nevertheless governed by the total aerosol concentration most of the time: ?Fr was typically more negative for continentally influenced aerosols (ca. -4 W m-2) compared to rather clean marine aerosols (ca. -1.5 W m-2). When RH occasionally reached 90 % in marine air masses, ?Fr even reached values down to -7 W m-2. Our results emphasize, on the basis of explicit particle hygroscopicity measurements, the relevance of ambient RH for the radiative forcing of regional atmospheres.

  6. Hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles over the Eastern Mediterranean: implications for regional direct radiative forcing under clean and polluted conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Cheng, Y. F.; Birmili, W.; Massling, A.; Wehner, B.; Müller, T.; Leinert, S.; Kalivitis, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2010-11-01

    This work examines the effect of direct radiative forcing of aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean troposphere as a function of air mass composition, particle size distribution and hygroscopicity, and relative humidity (RH). During intensive field measurements on the island of Crete, Greece, the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric particles were determined using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) and a Hygroscopicity Differential Mobility Analyzer - Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (H-DMA-APS). Like in several studies before, the H-TDMA identified three hygroscopic sub-fractions of particles in the sub-?m range: a more hygroscopic group, a less hygroscopic group and a nearly hydrophobic particle group. The hygroscopic particle growth factors at 90% RH were a significant function of particle mobility diameter (Dp): 1.42 (± 0.05) at 30 nm compared to 1.63 (± 0.07) at 250 nm. The H-DMA-APS identified up to three hygroscopic sub-fractions at mobility diameters of 1.0 and 1.2 ?m. All data recorded between 12 August and 20 October, 2005 were classified into four distinct synoptic-scale air mass types distinguishing between different regions of origin (western Mediterranean vs. the Aegean Sea) as well as the degree of continental pollution (marine vs. continentally influenced). The hygroscopic properties of particles with diameter Dp ? 150 nm showed the most pronounced dependency on air mass origin, with growth factors in marine air masses exceeding those in more continentally influenced air masses. Particle size distributions and hygroscopic growth factors were employed to calculate aerosol light scattering coefficients at ambient RH using a Mie model. A main result was the pronounced enhancement of particle scattering over the eastern Mediterranean due to hygroscopic growth, both in the marine and continentally influenced air masses. When RH reached its daytime values around 70-80% in summer, up to 50-70% of the calculated visibility reduction was due to the hygroscopic growth of the particles by water compared to the effect of the dry particles alone. The estimated aerosol direct radiative forcings for both, marine and continentally influenced air masses were negative indicating a net cooling of the atmosphere due to the aerosol. The radiative forcing ?Fr was, nevertheless, dominated by the total aerosol concentration most of the time: ?Fr was typically more negative for continentally influenced aerosols (ca. -4 W m-2) compared to rather clean marine aerosols (ca. -1.5 W m-2). When RH occasionally reached 90% in marine air, ?Fr even reached values down to -7 W m-2. Our results emphasize, on the basis of explicit particle hygroscopicity measurements, the relevance of ambient relative humidity for the radiative forcing of regional atmospheres.

  7. Thermal protection for hypervelocity flight in earth's atmosphere by use of radiation backscattering ablating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.; Yang, Lily

    1991-01-01

    A heat-shield-material response code predicting the transient performance of a material subject to the combined convective and radiative heating associated with the hypervelocity flight is developed. The code is dynamically interactive to the heating from a transient flow field, including the effects of material ablation on flow field behavior. It accomodates finite time variable material thickness, internal material phase change, wavelength-dependent radiative properties, and temperature-dependent thermal, physical, and radiative properties. The equations of radiative transfer are solved with the material and are coupled to the transfer energy equation containing the radiative flux divergence in addition to the usual energy terms.

  8. Two-dimensional particle-in cell/Monte Carlo simulations of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Wang, Hong-yu; Jiang, Wei; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-08-01

    The plasma behavior in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is simulated by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model, comparing for the first time an unpacked (empty) DBD with a packed bed DBD, i.e., a DBD filled with dielectric spheres in the gas gap. The calculations are performed in air, at atmospheric pressure. The discharge is powered by a pulse with a voltage amplitude of -20 kV. When comparing the packed and unpacked DBD reactors with the same dielectric barriers, it is clear that the presence of the dielectric packing leads to a transition in discharge behavior from a combination of negative streamers and unlimited surface streamers on the bottom dielectric surface to a combination of predominant positive streamers and limited surface discharges on the dielectric surfaces of the beads and plates. Furthermore, in the packed bed DBD, the electric field is locally enhanced inside the dielectric material, near the contact points between the beads and the plates, and therefore also in the plasma between the packing beads and between a bead and the dielectric wall, leading to values of 4× {10}8 V m-1, which is much higher than the electric field in the empty DBD reactor, i.e., in the order of 2× {10}7 V m-1, thus resulting in stronger and faster development of the plasma, and also in a higher electron density. The locally enhanced electric field and the electron density in the case of a packed bed DBD are also examined and discussed for three different dielectric constants, i.e., {? }r=22 (ZrO2), {? }r=9 (Al2O3) and {? }r=4 (SiO2). The enhanced electric field is stronger and the electron density is higher for a larger dielectric constant, because the dielectric material is more effectively polarized. These simulations are very important, because of the increasing interest in packed bed DBDs for environmental applications.

  9. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol: Kinetics of Changes to the Amount and Oxidation State of Particle-Phase Organic Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jesse H; Lim, Christopher Y; Kessler, Sean H; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric oxidation reactions are known to affect the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) particles over timescales of several days, but the details of such oxidative aging reactions are poorly understood. In this study we examine the rates and products of a key class of aging reaction, the heterogeneous oxidation of particle-phase organic species by the gas-phase hydroxyl radical (OH). We compile and reanalyze a number of previous studies from our laboratories involving the oxidation of single-component organic particles. All kinetic and product data are described on a common basis, enabling a straightforward comparison among different chemical systems and experimental conditions. Oxidation chemistry is described in terms of changes to key ensemble properties of the OA, rather than to its detailed molecular composition, focusing on two quantities in particular, the amount and the oxidation state of the particle-phase carbon. Heterogeneous oxidation increases the oxidation state of particulate carbon, with the rate of increase determined by the detailed chemical mechanism. At the same time, the amount of particle-phase carbon decreases with oxidation, due to fragmentation (C-C scission) reactions that form small, volatile products that escape to the gas phase. In contrast to the oxidation state increase, the rate of carbon loss is nearly uniform among most systems studied. Extrapolation of these results to atmospheric conditions indicates that heterogeneous oxidation can have a substantial effect on the amount and composition of atmospheric OA over timescales of several days, a prediction that is broadly in line with available measurements of OA evolution over such long timescales. In particular, 3-13% of particle-phase carbon is lost to the gas phase after one week of heterogeneous oxidation. Our results indicate that oxidative aging represents an important sink for particulate organic carbon, and more generally that fragmentation reactions play a major role in the lifecycle of atmospheric OA. PMID:26381466

  10. Secondary-Particle Production in Organic Material by Cosmic Rays: Simulations and CRaTER Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, M. D.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Spence, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that material between a radiation environment and a sensitive target, whether the target is an electronic device or living tissue, can enhance the dose received by the target instead of shielding it, depending on the characteristics of the material and of the radiation. The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is designed to measure this effect on the dose that would be received from the space radiation environment by an astronaut on or near the lunar surface. In between its silicon solid-state detectors are two pieces of Tissue-Equivalent Plastic (TEP) with a density and composition similar to muscle tissue, in which interacting primary cosmic-ray nuclei will produce secondary particles that increase dose in an underlying target beyond the base LET of the cosmic-ray particle itself. We will present results of Geant4 simulations of this effect given an incident cosmic-ray spectrum, and will compare those results with observations from CRaTER's first months in lunar orbit.

  11. Estimates of Carrington-class solar particle event radiation exposures as a function of altitude in the atmosphere of Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Anderson, J. A.; Adamczyk, A. M.; Werneth, C. M.

    2013-08-01

    Radiation exposure estimates for crew members on the surface of Mars may vary widely because of the large variations in terrain altitude. The maximum altitude difference between the highest (top of Olympus Mons) and the lowest (bottom of the Hellas impact basin) points on Mars is about 32 km. In this work estimates of radiation exposures as a function of altitude, from the Hellas impact basin to Olympus Mons, are made for a solar particle event proton radiation environment comparable to the Carrington event of 1859. We assume that the proton energy distribution for this Carrington-type event is similar to that of the Band Function fit of the February 1956 event. In this work we use the HZETRN 2010 radiation transport code, originally developed at NASA Langley Research Center, and the Computerized Anatomical Male and Female human geometry models to estimate exposures for aluminum shield areal densities similar to those provided by a spacesuit, surface lander, and permanent habitat as a function of altitude in the Mars atmosphere. Comparisons of the predicted organ exposures with current NASA Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) are made.

  12. Development of an H-TDMA for long-term unattended measurement of the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Sjogren, S.; Löndahl, J.; Nyman, M.; Svenningsson, B.

    2009-06-01

    A new hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) has been constructed at Lund University within the frameworks of the EU FP6 Infrastructure Project EUSAAR (http://www.eusaar.org/). The aim of this coordinated H-TDMA development is to design and evaluate a new generation of H-TDMAs that are capable of conducting long term measurements of the hygroscopic growth and state of mixing of sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles at the EUSAAR aerosol super-sites across Europe. The H-TDMA constructed for this project has been validated with respect to hygroscopic growth factor, stability of relative humidity (RH), temperature stability and its ability to operate unattended for longer periods of time. When measuring growth factors of ammonium sulphate, the new H-TDMA system was found to measure within a growth factor deviation of ±0.05 compared to previously recorded data by Tang et al. (1994). The long term RH of the system has been found stable at 90.0% with a standard deviation of ±0.23% and an average temperature variability of the second DMA less than ±0.1 K. Daily automated ammonium sulphate measurements have validated the ambient measurements. The instrument is operated at the EMEP/EUSAAR background station Vavihill in the southern part of Sweden.

  13. Development of an H-TDMA for long-term unattended measurement of the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Sjogren, S.; Löndahl, J.; Nyman, M.; Svenningsson, B.

    2009-04-01

    A new hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) has been constructed at Lund University within the frameworks of the EU FP6 Infrastructure Project EUSAAR (http://www.eusaar.org/). The aim of this coordinated H-TDMA development is to design and evaluate a new generation of H-TDMAs that are capable of conducting long term measurements of the hygroscopic growth and state of mixing of sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles at the EUSAAR aerosol super-sites across Europe. The H-TDMA constructed for this project has been validated with respect to hygroscopic growth factor, stability of relative humidity (RH), temperature stability and its ability to operate unattended for longer periods of time. When measuring growth factors of ammonium sulphate, the new H-TDMA system was found to measure within a growth factor deviation of ±0.05 compared to previously recorded data by Tang et al. (1994). The long term RH of the system has been found stable at 90.0% with a standard deviation of ±0.23% and an average temperature variability of the second DMA less than ±0.1 K. Daily automated ammonium sulphate measurements have validated the ambient measurements. The instrument is operated at the EMEP/EUSAAR background station Vavihill in the southern part of Sweden.

  14. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).