Science.gov

Sample records for atmospheric neutrino experiments

  1. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  2. Nuclear effects in atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino (antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei at intermediate energy region. We have applied this study to calculate the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The study of the nuclear effects has been done for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  3. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations. PMID:20431258

  4. Atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    2016-05-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  5. Atmospheric neutrinos: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation studies at atmospheric neutrino experiments. While the current data gives some tantalising hints regarding the neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of θ23 and δCP, the hints are not statistically significant. We summarise the sensitivity to these sub-dominant three-generation effects from the next-generation proposed atmospheric neutrino experiments. We next present the prospects of new physics searches such as non-standard interactions, sterile neutrinos and CPT violation studies at these experiments.

  6. Phenomenology of atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynitch, Anatoli

    2016-04-01

    The detection of astrophysical neutrinos, certainly a break-through result, introduced new experimental challenges and fundamental questions about acceleration mechanisms of cosmic rays. On one hand IceCube succeeded in finding an unambiguous proof for the existence of a diffuse astrophysical neutrino flux, on the other hand the precise determination of its spectral index and normalization requires a better knowledge about the atmospheric background at hundreds of TeV and PeV energies. Atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range originate mostly from decays of heavy-flavor mesons, which production in the phase space relevant for prompt leptons is uncertain. Current accelerator-based experiments are limited by detector acceptance and not so much by the collision energy. This paper recaps phenomenological aspects of atmospheric leptons and calculation methods, linking recent progress in flux predictions with particle physics at colliders, in particular the Large Hadron Collider.

  7. MINOS atmospheric neutrino contained events

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, A.; /Minnesota U.

    2007-10-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment has continued to collect atmospheric neutrino events while doing a precision measurement of NuMI beam {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations. The 5.4 kton iron calorimeter is magnetized to provide the unique capability of discriminating between {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} interactions on an event-by-event basis and has been collecting atmospheric neutrino data since July 2003. An analysis of the neutrino events with interaction vertices contained inside the detector will be presented.

  8. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  9. Nucleon decay and atmospheric neutrinos in the Mont Blanc experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, E.; Bologne, G.; Campana, P.; Castagnoli, C.; Chiarella, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cundy, D. C.; Dettorepiazzoli, B.; Fiorini, E.

    1985-01-01

    In the NUSEX experiment, during 2.8 years of operation, 31 fully contained events have been collected; 3 among them are nucleon decay candidates, while the others have been attributed to upsilon interactions. Limits on nucleon lifetime and determinations of upsilon interaction rates are presented.

  10. Establishing atmospheric neutrino oscillations with Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, T.; Kearns, E.; Shiozawa, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we review the discovery of atmospheric neutrino oscillation by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. This review outlines the sequence of observations and their associated publications that solved the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and established the existence of neutrino oscillations with nearly maximal mixing of muon neutrinos and tau neutrinos. We also discuss subsequent and ongoing studies that use atmospheric neutrinos to continue to reveal the nature of the neutrino.

  11. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  12. Charm contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan

    2016-07-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of K+Λ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward D¯0Λc pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate the much-studied central component and represent a significant contribution to the TeV atmospheric neutrino flux. Importantly, it cannot accommodate the PeV flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, or the excess of events observed by IceCube in the 30-200 TeV energy range indicating either structure in the flux of cosmic accelerators, or a presence of more than one component in the cosmic flux observed.

  13. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The Sun is a source of high-energy neutrinos (E(greater-or-similar sign)10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged vacuum oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23})

  14. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  15. Atmospheric neutrinos in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M. C.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-03-30

    Soudan 2 has measured the atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio with 4.2 fiducial kiloton-years of exposure. It measures a flavor ratio of 0.66 {+-} 0.11(stat), inconsistent with the expected ratio but consistent with the hypothesis of neutrino oscillations and the Super-Kamiokande data. In a sample of events with good angular resolution, fits to the L/E distribution suggest that {Delta}m{sup 2} > 10{sup {minus}3} eV{sup 2}.

  16. Nuclear effects in neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2011-10-06

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino(antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei which are relevant for present neutrino oscillation experiments in the few GeV energy region. The study is specially focused on calculating the cross sections and the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The nuclear effects are found to be important for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  17. Atmospheric neutrinos in ice and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show that the very high statistics atmospheric neutrino data can be used to obtain precise measurements of the main oscillation parameters.

  18. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very

  19. Neutrino Decay as an Explanation of Atmospheric Neutrino Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Barger, V.; Learned, J.G.; Pakvasa, S.; Weiler, T.J.

    1999-03-01

    We show that the observed zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos can be accounted for by neutrino decay. Furthermore, it is possible to account for all neutrino anomalies with just three flavors. A decay model for Majorana neutrinos appears consistent with big-bang nucleosynthesis and supernova constraints. The decay model is testable in the near future. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Neutrino experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  1. Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    With a mass at least six orders of magnitudes smaller than the mass of an electron – but non-zero – neutrinos are a clear misfit in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. On the one hand, its tiny mass makes the neutrino one of the most interesting particles, one that might hold the key to physics beyond the Standard Model. On the other hand this minute mass leads to great challenges in its experimental determination. Three approaches are currently pursued: An indirect neutrino mass determination via cosmological observables, the search for neutrinoless double β-decay, and a direct measurement based on the kinematics of single β-decay. In this paper the latter will be discussed in detail and the status and scientific reach of the current and near-future experiments will be presented.

  2. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Howcroft, Caius L.F.

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  3. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  4. NOνA Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jediny, Filip

    2015-06-01

    The NOνA experiment is a long-baseline accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment. It uses the upgraded NuMI beam from Fermilab and measures electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance at its far detector in Ash River, Minnesota. Goals of the experiment include measurements of θ13, mass hierarchy and the CP violating phase. NOνA has begun to take neutrino data and first neutrino candidates are observed in its detectors. This document provides an overview of the scientific reach of the experiment, the status of detector operation and physics analysis, as well as the first data.

  5. Linking solar and long baseline terrestrial neutrino experiments.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, E K; Branco, G C; Rebelo, M N

    2000-04-17

    We show that, in the framework of three light neutrino species with hierarchical masses and assuming no fine tuning between the entries of the neutrino mass matrix, one can use the solar neutrino data to obtain information on the element U(e3) of the lepton mixing matrix. Conversely, a measurement of U(e3) in atmospheric or long baseline accelerator or reactor neutrino experiments would help discriminate between possible oscillation solutions of the solar neutrino problem. PMID:11019139

  6. Reactor neutrino experiments: θ13 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We review the current-generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments that have firmly established the third neutrino mixing angle θ13 to be nonzero. The relative large value of θ13 (around 9°) has opened many new and exciting opportunities for future neutrino experiments. Daya Bay experiment with the first measurement of Δ m2ee is aiming for a precision measurement of this atmospheric mass-squared splitting with a comparable precision as Δ m2μ μ from accelerator muon neutrino experiments. JUNO, a next-generation reactor neutrino experiment, is targeting to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) with medium baselines ( 50 km). Beside these opportunities enabled by the large θ13, the current-generation (Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO) and the next-generation (JUNO, RENO-50, and PROSPECT) reactor experiments, with their unprecedented statistics, are also leading the precision era of the three-flavor neutrino oscillation physics as well as constraining new physics beyond the neutrino Standard Model.

  7. Review of Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    New generation of reactor neutrino experiments, Daya Bay and RENO, have made definitive measurements of the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 in 2012, based on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos. More precise measurements of the mixing angle and reactor neutrino spectra have been made and presented. A rather large value of θ13 has opened a new window to find the CP violation phase and to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. Future reactor experiments, JUNO and RENO-50, are proposed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make highly precise measurements of θ12, Δm212, and Δm312.

  8. Double-Chooz Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares, Carmen; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Double Chooz experiment will use the electron anti-neutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear power station to search for a non-vanishing value of the θ13 neutrino mixing angle. Double Chooz will be the first of a new generation of neutrino experiments using identical detectors at different distances from the neutrino source to reduce the systematic errors due to the uncertainties on the neutrino flux and to the detector acceptance. The far detector will be operative by the beginning of 2011. Installation of the near detector will occur in 2012.

  9. Neutrino cross-sections: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez, F.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino-nucleus cross-sections are as of today the main source of systematic errors for oscillation experiments together with neutrino flux uncertainties. Despite recent experimental and theoretical developments, future experiments require even higher precisions in their search of CP violation. We will review the experimental status and explore possible future developments required by next generation of experiments.

  10. Atmospheric neutrinos observed in underground detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced when the primary cosmic ray beam hits the atmosphere and initiates atmospheric cascades. Secondary mesons decay and give rise to neutrinos. The neutrino production was calculated and compared with the neutrino fluxes detected in underground detectors. Contained neutrino events are characterized by observation of an interaction within the fiducial volume of the detector when the incoming particle is not observed. Both the neutrino flux and the containment requirement restrict the energy of the neutrinos observed in contained interactions to less than several GeV. Neutrinos interact with the rock surrounding the detector but only muon neutrino interactions can be observed, as the electron energy is dissipated too fast in the rock. The direction of the neutrino is preserved in the interaction and at energies above 1 TeV the angular resolution is restricted by the scattering of the muon in the rock. The muon rate reflects the neutrino spectrum above some threshold energy, determined by the detector efficiency for muons.

  11. Testing nonstandard neutrino matter interactions in atmospheric neutrino propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Mehta, Poonam; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Gandhi, Raj

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of nonstandard interactions on the oscillation pattern of atmospheric neutrinos. We use neutrino oscillograms as our main tool to infer the role of nonstandard interactions (NSI) parameters at the probability level in the energy range, E ∈[1 ,20 ] GeV and zenith angle range, cos θ ∈[-1 ,0 ] . We compute the event rates for atmospheric neutrino events in presence of NSI parameters in the energy range E ∈[1 ,10 ] GeV for two different detector configurations—a magnetized iron calorimeter and an unmagnetized liquid argon time projection chamber which have different sensitivities to NSI parameters due to their complementary characteristics.

  12. Global analyses of neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the determination of some neutrino properties from the global analysis of solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino data in the framework of three-neutrino mixing as well as in some extended scenarios such as the mixing with eV-scale sterile neutrinos invoked for the interpretation of the short baseline anomalies, and the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions.

  13. Atmospheric Neutrino Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Thomas

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we present the first results from observing through-going atmospheric and neutrino-induced muon events in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The current analysis is based on a data sample equaling a total of 7600 muons or 149 detector live days. The majority of these events are highly energetic atmospheric muons penetrating more than 6010 m.w.e. of rock before reaching the detector. The large depth of SNO and it's flat rock overburden restrict the atmospheric muon data to zenith angles in the range above cosθ>0.4. Hence, at larger zenith angles (-1 neutrino-induced. The angular distribution of the latter conveys information about neutrino oscillations.

  14. Neutrino Experiments at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2009-12-17

    This talk describes planned neutrino physics experiments at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with a focus on the proposed CLEAR (Coherent Low Energy Nuclear(A) Recoils) experiment.

  15. Neutrino mass hierarchy extraction using atmospheric neutrinos in ice

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Razzaque, Soebur

    2008-11-01

    We show that the measurements of 10 GeV atmospheric neutrinos by an upcoming array of densely-packed phototubes buried deep inside the IceCube detector at the South Pole can be used to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy for values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} close to the present bound, if the hierarchy is normal. These results are obtained for an exposure of 100 Mton years and systematic uncertainties up to 10%.

  16. Limits on sterile neutrino mixing using atmospheric neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kametani, I.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; McLachlan, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Akiri, T.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Bronner, C.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Wilking, M. J.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Connolly, K.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We present limits on sterile neutrino mixing using 4,438 live-days of atmospheric neutrino data from the Super-Kamiokande experiment. We search for fast oscillations driven by an eV2 -scale mass splitting and for oscillations into sterile neutrinos instead of tau neutrinos at the atmospheric mass splitting. When performing both of these searches we assume that the sterile mass splitting is large, allowing sin2(Δ m2L /4 E ) to be approximated as 0.5, and we assume that there is no mixing between electron neutrinos and sterile neutrinos (|Ue 4|2=0 ). No evidence of sterile oscillations is seen and we limit |Uμ 4|2 to less than 0.041 and |Uτ 4|2 to less than 0.18 for Δ m2>0.1 eV2 at the 90% C.L. in a 3 +1 framework. The approximations that can be made with atmospheric neutrinos allow these limits to be easily applied to 3 +N models, and we provide our results in a generic format to allow comparisons with other sterile neutrino models.

  17. Atmospheric electron neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Speakman, Benjamin Phillip; /Minnesota U.

    2007-01-01

    Neutrinos produced as a result of cosmic-ray interactions in the earth's atmosphere offer a powerful probe into the nature of this three-membered family of low-mass, weakly-interacting particles. Ten years ago, the Super-Kamiokande Experiment has confirmed earlier indications that neutrinos undergo lepton-flavor oscillations during propagation, proving that they are massive contrary to the previous Standard Model assumptions. The Soudan Underground Laboratory, located in northern Minnesota, was host to the Soudan2 Experiment, which has made important contributions to atmospheric neutrino research. This same lab has more recently been host to the MINOS far detector, a neutrino detector which serves as the downstream element of an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino-oscillation experiment. This thesis has examined 418.5 live days of atmospheric neutrino data (fiducial exposure of 4.18 kton-years) collected in the MINOS far detector prior to the activation of the NuMI neutrino beam, with a specific emphasis on the investigation of electron-type neutrino interactions. Atmospheric neutrino interaction candidates have been selected and separated into showering or track-like events. The showering sample consists of 89 observed events, while the track-like sample consists of 112 observed events. Based on the Bartol atmospheric neutrino flux model of Barr et al. plus a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of interactions in the MINOS detector, the expected yields of showering and track-like events in the absence of neutrino oscillations are 88.0 {+-} 1.0 and 149.1 {+-} 1.0 respectively (where the uncertainties reflect only the limited MC statistics). Major systematic uncertainties, especially those associated with the flux model, are cancelled by forming a double ratio of these observed and expected yields: R{sup data}{sub trk/shw}/R{sup MC}{sub trk/shw} = 0.74{sup +0.12}{sub -01.0}(stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.) This double ratio should be equal to unity in the absence of

  18. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  19. Sensitivity to neutrino mixing parameters with atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2009-12-01

    We have analyzed the atmospheric neutrino data to study the octant of {theta}{sub 23} and the precision of the oscillation parameters for a large iron calorimeter detector. The iron calorimeter being a tracking detector has the ability to measure the energy and the direction of the muon with high resolution. From bending of the track in the magnetic field it can also distinguish its charge. We have generated events by Nuance and then considered only the muons (directly measurable quantities) produced in charge current interactions in our analysis. This encounters the main problem of wide resolutions of energy and baseline. The energy-angle correlated two-dimensional resolution functions are used to migrate the energy and the zenith angle of the neutrino to those of the muon. A new type of binning has been introduced to get better reflection of the oscillation pattern in {chi}{sup 2} analysis. Then the marginalization of the {chi}{sup 2} over all parameters has been carried out for neutrinos and antineutrinos separately. We find that the measurement of {theta}{sub 13} is possible at a significant precision with atmospheric neutrinos. The precisions of {delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 23} are found {approx}8% and 38%, respectively, at 90% C.L. The discrimination of the octant as well as the deviation from maximal mixing of atmospheric neutrinos is also possible for some combinations of ({theta}{sub 23},{theta}{sub 13}). We also discuss the impact of the events at near horizon on the precision studies.

  20. Test of Lorentz invariance with atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kametani, I.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; McLachlan, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Akiri, T.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Bronner, C.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Wilking, M. J.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Connolly, K.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    A search for neutrino oscillations induced by Lorentz violation has been performed using 4,438 live-days of Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data. The Lorentz violation is included in addition to standard three-flavor oscillations using the nonperturbative standard model extension (SME), allowing the use of the full range of neutrino path lengths, ranging from 15 to 12,800 km, and energies ranging from 100 MeV to more than 100 TeV in the search. No evidence of Lorentz violation was observed, so limits are set on the renormalizable isotropic SME coefficients in the e μ , μ τ , and e τ sectors, improving the existing limits by up to 7 orders of magnitude and setting limits for the first time in the neutrino μ τ sector of the SME.

  1. Three dimensional calculation of flux of low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.; Bludman, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of low energy flux of atmospheric neutrinos are presented and compared with earlier one-dimensional calculations 1,2 valid at higher neutrino energies. These low energy neutrinos are the atmospheric background in searching for neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Primary cosmic rays produce the neutrino flux peaking at near E sub=40 MeV and neutrino intensity peaking near E sub v=100 MeV. Because such neutrinos typically deviate by 20 approximately 30 from the primary cosmic ray direction, three-dimensional effects are important for the search of atmospheric neutrinos. Nevertheless, the background of these atmospheric neutrinos is negligible for the detection of solar and supernova neutrinos.

  2. Prospects of measuring the leptonic CP phase with atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2009-10-01

    We have studied the prospects of measuring the CP violating phase with atmospheric neutrinos at a large magnetized iron calorimeter detector considering the muons (directly measurable) of the neutrino events generated by a Monte Carlo event generator Nuance. The effect of {theta}{sub 13} and {delta}{sub CP} appears dominantly neither in atmospheric neutrino oscillation nor in solar neutrino oscillation, but appears as subleading in both cases. These are observable in the range of E{approx}1 GeV for atmospheric neutrino, where solar and atmospheric oscillation couple. In this regime, the quasielastic events dominate and the energy resolution is very good, but the angular resolution is very poor. Unlike beam experiments this poor angular resolution acts against its measurements. However, we find that one can be able to distinguish {delta}{sub CP}{approx_equal}0 deg. and 180 deg. at 90% confidence level. We find no significant sensitivity for {delta}{sub CP}{approx_equal}90 deg. or 270 deg.

  3. Future atmospheric neutrino measurements with PINGU

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino oscillations, first measured in 1998 via atmospheric neutrinos, have provided the only current direct evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of Elementary Particles. The full neutrino mixing, described by six parameters, has been measured in the last decade with the exception of the charge-parity phase and the ordering of the mass eigenstates (the neutrino mass hierarchy – NMH). A relatively large mixing-angle between the first and third mass eigenstates has opened the possibility of measuring the mass hierarchy via atmospheric neutrinos using very large volume detectors. A leading proposal to perform this measurement is the future low-energy extension to the IceCube–DeepCore detector, called PINGU (the Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade). By increasing the photocathode density in the DeepCore region, it is possible to lower the energy threshold in the fiducial volume to the region that is affected by the MSW [1, 2], and thus permits extraction of the hierarchy. Here we discuss the design of the PINGU detector, its sensitivity to the mass hierarchy (approximately 3σ in 3.5 years) and measurements of ν{sub μ} disappearance and ν{sub τ} appearance.

  4. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  5. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  6. Scientific Opportunities with the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.; et al.,

    2013-07-28

    In this document, we describe the wealth of science opportunities and capabilities of LBNE, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. LBNE has been developed to provide a unique and compelling program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of particle physics. Chief among the discovery opportunities are observation of CP symmetry violation in neutrino mixing, resolution of the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination of maximal or near-maximal mixing in neutrinos, searches for nucleon decay signatures, and detailed studies of neutrino bursts from galactic supernovae. To fulfill these and other goals as a world-class facility, LBNE is conceived around four central components: (1) a new, intense wide-band neutrino source at Fermilab, (2) a fine-grained `near' neutrino detector just downstream of the source, (3) the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota at an optimal distance (~1300 km) from the neutrino source, and (4) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) deployed there as a 'far' detector. The facilities envisioned are expected to enable many other science opportunities due to the high event rates and excellent detector resolution from beam neutrinos in the near detector and atmospheric neutrinos in the far detector. This is a mature, well developed, world class experiment whose relevance, importance, and probability of unearthing critical and exciting physics has increased with time.

  7. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Stephen James

    2011-05-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting Δm232 = (2.32-0.08+0.12) x 10-3 eV2/c4 and the mixing angle sin2(2θ32) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2σ and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0σ.

  8. The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

    2010-05-11

    The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

  9. A study of atmospheric neutrinos with the IMB detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losecco, J. M.; Bionta, R. M.; Blewitt, G.; Bratton, C. B.; Casper, D.; Chrysicopoulou, P.; Claus, R.; Cortez, B. G.; Errede, S.; Foster, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A sample of 401 contained neutrino interactions collected in the 3300 metric ton fiducial mass IMB detector was used to study neutrino oscillations, geomagnetic modulation of the flux and to search for point sources. The majority of these events are attributed to neutrino interactions. For the most part, these neutrinos are believed to originate as tertiary products of cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The neutrinos are a mixture of v sub e and v sub micron.

  10. Oscillations of very low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    There are several new features in the production, oscillations, and detection of the atmospheric neutrinos of low energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The flavor ratio r of muon to electron neutrino fluxes is substantially smaller than 2 and decreases with energy, a significant part of events is due to the decay of invisible muons at rest, etc. Oscillations in a two-layer medium (atmosphere-Earth) should be taken into account. We derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities of these 'sub-sub-GeV' neutrinos. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed, and the dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing, and the CP-violation phase are studied. We find that variations of {theta}{sub 23} in the presently allowed region change the number of e-like events by about 15%-20% as well as lead to distortion of the energy spectrum. The 1-3 mixing and CP violation can lead to {approx}10% effects. Detailed study of the sub-sub-GeV neutrinos will be possible in future megaton-scale detectors.

  11. Review of direct neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dragoun, O.

    2015-10-28

    Advantages and drawbacks of the kinematic methods of the neutrino mass determination are discussed. The meaning of the effective neutrino mass, resulting from measurements of the endpoint region of β-spectra is clarified. Current experimental constraints on the mass of active as well as sterile neutrinos are presented. Several new experiments are briefly outlined.

  12. Oscillation of Very Low Energy Atmospheric Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.

    2010-03-30

    We discuss the oscillation effects of sub-sub-GeV atmospheric neutrinos, the sample with energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed and dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle, theta{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing and CP-violation phase are studied.

  13. Future Reactor Neutrino Experiments (RRNOLD)1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, David E.

    The prospects for future reactor neutrino experiments that would use tens of kilotons of liquid scintillator with a ∼ 50 km baseline are discussed. These experiments are generically dubbed "RRNOLD" for Radical Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Liquid scintillator Detector experiment. Such experiments are designed to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy and make sub-percent measurements sin2θ12, Δm232 and Δm122 . RRNOLD would also be sensitive to neutrinos from other sources and have notable sensitivity to proton decay.

  14. Atmospheric Neutrino Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Dipu; /Minnesota U.

    2007-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS Far Detector, located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan MN, has been collecting data since August 2003. The scope of this dissertation involves identifying the atmospheric neutrino induced muons that are created by the neutrinos interacting with the rock surrounding the detector cavern, performing a neutrino oscillation search by measuring the oscillation parameter values of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}, and searching for CPT violation by measuring the charge ratio for the atmospheric neutrino induced muons. A series of selection cuts are applied to the data set in order to extract the neutrino induced muons. As a result, a total of 148 candidate events are selected. The oscillation search is performed by measuring the low to high muon momentum ratio in the data sample and comparing it to the same ratio in the Monte Carlo simulation in the absence of neutrino oscillation. The measured double ratios for the ''all events'' (A) and high resolution (HR) samples are R{sub A} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.60{sub -0.10}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst) and R{sub HR} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.58{sub -0.11}{sup +0.14}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), respectively. Both event samples show a significant deviation from unity giving a strong indication of neutrino oscillation. A combined momentum and zenith angle oscillation fit is performed using the method of maximum log-likelihood with a grid search in the parameter space of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}. The best fit point for both event samples occurs at {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 1. This result is compatible with previous measurements from the Super Kamiokande experiment and Soudan 2 experiments. The MINOS Far Detector is the first underground neutrino

  15. A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonley, Thomas John

    Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of -1 < cos( [straight theta] zenith ) < 0.4 are selected as atmospheric neutrino-induced muons. A two- neutrino analysis of these events agrees with the oscillation parameters observed by the Super Kamiokande and Minos experiments, and places 2-D limits of [Special characters omitted.] at the 68% confidence level, and sin 2 (2 [straight theta] 23 ) > 0.33 at the 90% confidence level. In addition, the flux of atmospheric neutrinos is measured in 1-D with a 68% confidence level to be [Special characters omitted.] times the prediction of the BARTOL group based on SNO data alone, and 1.27± 0.09 times the prediction when the oscillation parameters are constrained by the Super Kamiokande and Minos results. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139- 4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  16. Can lepton flavor violating interactions explain the atmospheric neutrino problem?

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Sven; Grossman, Yuval; Pierce, Damien M.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate whether flavor changing neutrino interactions (FCNIs) can be sufficiently large to provide a viable solution to the atmospheric neutrino problem. Effective operators induced by heavy boson exchange that allow for flavor changing neutrino scattering off quarks or electrons are related by an SU(2){sub L} rotation to operators that induce anomalous tau decays. Since SU(2){sub L} violation is small for new physics at or above the weak scale, one can use the upper bounds on lepton flavor violating tau decays or on lepton universality violation to put severe, model-independent bounds on the relevant non-standard neutrino interactions. Also Z-induced flavor changing neutral currents, due to heavy singlet neutrinos, are too small to be relevant for the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. We conclude that the FCNI solution to the atmospheric neutrino problem is ruled out. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  18. Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larsen, D. T.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Rees, I.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser IceCube instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10 and 100 GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The IceCube detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by Δ m322=2.72-0.20+0.19×10-3 eV2 and sin2θ23=0.53-0.12+0.09 (normal mass ordering assumed). The results are compatible, and comparable in precision, to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  19. NuCraft: Oscillation probabilities for atmospheric neutrinos calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallraff, Marius

    2016-02-01

    NuCraft calculates oscillation probabilities for atmospheric neutrinos, taking into account matter effects and the Earth's atmosphere, and supports an arbitrary number of sterile neutrino flavors with easily configurable continuous Earth models. Continuous modeling of the Earth instead of the often-used approximation of four layers with constant density and consideration of the smearing of baseline lengths due to the variable neutrino production heights in Earth's atmosphere each lead to deviations of 10% or more for conventional neutrinos between 1 and 10 GeV.

  20. Constraining sterile neutrinos with AMANDA and IceCube atmospheric neutrino data

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, O.L.G.; Halzen, Francis E-mail: halzen@icecube.wisc.edu

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that atmospheric neutrino data accumulated with the AMANDA and the partially deployed IceCube experiments constrain the allowed parameter space for a hypothesized fourth sterile neutrino beyond the reach of a combined analysis of all other experiments, for Δm{sup 2}{sub 41}∼<1 eV{sup 2}. Although the IceCube data wins the statistics in the analysis, the advantage of a combined analysis of AMANDA and IceCube data is the partial remedy of yet unknown instrumental systematic uncertainties. We also illustrate the sensitivity of the completed IceCube detector, that is now taking data, to the parameter space of 3+1 model.

  1. Behaviour of the high-energy neutrino flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, Aleksey; Sinegovskiy, Sergey; Sinegovskaya, Tatyana; Morozova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The processing of the IceCube experiment data obtained during 988 days (2010-2013) revealed 37 high-energy neutrino-induced events with deposited energies of 30 TeV - 2 PeV. The hypothesis of an astrophysical origin of these neutrinos is confirmed at the statistical confidence level of 5.7σ. To identify reliably the neutrino events, a thorough calculation of the atmospheric neutrino background is required. In this work we calculate the atmospheric neutrino spectra in the energy range of 100 GeV - 10 PeV with usage of several hadronic models and a few parametrizations of cosmic ray spectra supported by experimental data which take into account the knee. It is shown that rare decays of short-lived neutral ka ns K_S^0 contribute more than a third of the total ν_e +(ν)_e flux at the energies above 100 eV. The account for kaons production in pion-nucleus collisions increases the ν_e +(ν)_e flux by 5-7% in the energy range of 102-104 GeV. Calculated neutrino spectra agree on the whole with the measurement data. The neutrino flavor ratio extracted from the IceCube data possibly indicates that the conventional atmospheric electron neutrino flux obtained in the IceCube experiment contains an admixture of the astrophysical neutrinos in the range of 20-50 TeV.

  2. Resolving the reactor neutrino anomaly with the KATRIN neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Barrett, J.

    2011-11-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) combines an ultra-luminous molecular tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer to gain sensitivity to the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. The projected sensitivity of the experiment on the electron neutrino mass is 200 meV at 90% C.L. With such unprecedented resolution, the experiment is also sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, particularly to the existence of additional sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale. A recent analysis of available reactor data appears to favor the existence of such a sterile neutrino with a mass splitting of | Δmsterile | 2 ⩾ 1.5eV2 and mixing strength of sin2 2θsterile = 0.17 ± 0.08 at 95% C.L. Upcoming tritium beta decay experiments should be able to rule out or confirm the presence of the new phenomenon for a substantial fraction of the allowed parameter space.

  3. Light dark matter detection prospects at neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jason; Learned, John G.; Smith, Stefanie

    2009-12-01

    We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find, in particular, that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus antineutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or antineutrinos (Rμ and Rμ¯) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to neutrinos from secondary and tertiary decays as well, but will suffer from decreased detectability.

  4. The SOX experiment in the neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Noto, L.; Agostini, M.; Althenmüller, K.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo-Berguño, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cribier, M.; DAngelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Durero, M.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jonquères, N.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, T.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Meindl, Q.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Musenich, R.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Veyssière, C.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-01-01

    SOX (Short distance neutrino Oscillations with BoreXino) is a new experiment that takes place at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and it exploits the Borexino detector to study the neutrino oscillations at short distance. In different phases, by using two artificial sources 51Cr and 144Ce-144Pr, neutrino and antineutrino fluxes of measured intensity will be detected by Borexino in order to observe possible neutrino oscillations in the sterile state. In this paper an overview of the experiment is given and one of the two calorimeters that will be used to measure the source activity is described. At the end the expected sensitivity to determine the neutrino sterile mass is shown.

  5. Solar neutrinos: Real-time experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    1993-04-01

    This report outlines the principle of real-time solar neutrino detection experiments by detecting electrons with suitable target material, via Charged-Current (CC) reaction using conventional counting techniques developed in high-energy physics. Only B-8 neutrinos can be detected by minimum detectable energy of several MeV. The MSW (Mikheyev, Smirnov, Wolfenstein) effect not only distorts the energy spectrum but also induces new type of neutrinos, i.e. mu-neutrinos or tau-neutrinos. These neutrinos do not participate in the CC reaction. Therefore real-time experiment is to be sensitive to Neutral Current (NC) reactions. It is a challenge to eliminate environment background as much as possible and to lower the minimum detectable energy to several 100 keV, which will enable observation of Be-7 neutrinos. Target particles of real-time experiments currently running and under construction or planning are electron, deuteron, or argon. The relevant reactions corresponding to CC reaction and some relevant comments on the following targets are described: (1) electron target; (2) deuteron target; and (3) argon target. On-going experiment and future experiments for real-time neutron detection are also outlined.

  6. Latest results on atmospheric neutrino oscillations from IceCube/DeepCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de André, J. P. A. M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, located at the South Pole, is the world’s largest neutrino detector. DeepCore, the low energy extension for IceCube, with a threshold of about ten GeV is well suited to study neutrino oscillations using neutrinos produced in the Earth’s atmosphere and traveling distances as large as the Earth’s diameter before being detected. Using these neutrinos DeepCore makes measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters θ23 and |Δm 2 32| with precisions approaching that of dedicated experiments, and based on preliminary studies these results can still be further improved. These new studies as well as the current results obtained in DeepCore are discussed here.

  7. A search for oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos with the IMB detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajewski, W.

    1992-07-01

    Neutrino oscillations have been studied using a flux of atmospheric neutrinos and the IMB water C¯erenkov detector. The study is based on: 1) a sample of 935 events in the detector volume during 7.7 kton-yrs exposure. About 70% of events have a single track which allows identification of the parent neutrino flavor. 2) a sample of 593 up-going muon tracks from neutrino interactions in rock below the detector. These studies are sensitive to δm2 down to 10-4eV2 and sin2(2θ) > 0.4, a region unexplored in previous experiments. Future plans of long baseline neutrino oscillation studies using the IMB detector and neutrinos from artificial sources are described. They include νe from a power reactor 13 km from the detector and νμ produced by the Main Injector at Fermilab at a distance of 570 km.

  8. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  9. Long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, D.; Goodman, M.

    1994-12-31

    There is no unambiguous definition for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The term is generally used for accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments which are sensitive to {Delta}m{sup 2} < 1.0 eV{sup 2}, and for which the detector is not on the accelerator site. The Snowmass N2L working group met to discuss the issues facing such experiments. The Fermilab Program Advisory Committee adopted several recommendations concerning the Fermilab neutrino program at their Aspen meeting immediately prior to the Snowmass Workshop. This heightened the attention for the proposals to use Fermilab for a long-baseline neutrino experiment at the workshop. The plan for a neutrino oscillation program at Brookhaven was also thoroughly discussed. Opportunities at CERN were considered, particularly the use of detectors at the Gran Sasso laboratory. The idea to build a neutrino beam from KEK towards Superkamiokande was not discussed at the Snowmass meeting, but there has been considerable development of this idea since then. Brookhaven and KEK would use low energy neutrino beams, while FNAL and CERN would plan have medium energy beams. This report will summarize a few topics common to LBL proposals and attempt to give a snapshot of where things stand in this fast developing field.

  10. NOνA neutrino experiment status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jediný, Filip

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal of the NOνA neutrino oscillation experiment is to study the probabilities of transformation of muonic-neutrinos into electron-neutrinos. The experiment is currently under construction and will use a 700 kW accelerator-based NuMI beam (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) and two detectors. The Near Detector (329 t at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Illinois) and the Far Detector (14 kt, Ash River, Minnesota) are aligned to 14 mrad off-axis and separated by 810 km. They are made of active liquid scintillator and readout by avalanche photo-diodes. Recent results from world-wide neutrino experiments indicate that NOνA is in the position to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy as it is also searching for the first hints of CP violation in neutrino sector. The design, the goals and the current status of the NOνA experiment are presented here with the current estimates of its sensitivity to the mass hierarchy measurement.

  11. Report on solar neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Jr.; Cleveland, B.T.; Rowley, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    A summary is given of the status of solar neutrino research that includes results of the Brookhaven chlorine detector, a discussion of the development of the gallium, bromine, and lithium radiochemical detectors, and some proposals for direct counting detectors. The gallium and bromine radiochemical detectors are developed and are capable of giving critical information of interest about neutrino physics and the fusion reactions in the interior of the sun. A plan for building these detectors is outlined and a rough cost estimate is given. A review is given of the plans in the Soviet Union in solar neutrino research.

  12. MONOLITH: a massive magnetized iron detector for atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MONOLITH Collaboration

    2001-08-01

    The MONOLITH (Massive Observatory for Neutrino Oscillation or LImits on THeir existence) project is a proposal (N.Y. Agafonova et al., 2000) for an experiment to be installed in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with a massive magnetized iron tracking calorimeter . The main purpose is to confirm the existence of atmospheric neutrino oscillations through the explicit observation of the first oscillation minimum in νµ disappearance. The MONOLITH detector has been designed in order to discriminate among different oscillation modes and to accurately measure the oscillation parameters in a range that completely covers the Super-Kamiokande allowed region. Other measurements include studies of matter effects, the NC up down ratio, the ¯ν/ν ratio, the study of cosmic ray muons in the multi-TeV energy region, and auxiliary measurements from the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam. Correspondence to: G. C. Trinchero (trinchero@to.infn.it) 1 Institutions participating to the MONOLITH Collaboration: INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli, Italy Moscow Engineering Physics Insitute, Moscow, Russia Universit´a di Bologna and INFN, Bologna, Italy Columbia University, New York, USA Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Frascati, Italy Universit´a di Torino,Torino, Italy Universit`a di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano, Italy M¨unster University, M¨unster, Germany Hamburg University, Hamburg, Germany INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino, Italy Istituto di Cosmogeofisica, CNR, Torino, Italy Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Moscow, Russia Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi, Italy Universit`a de L'Aquila and INFN, L'Aquila, Italy Universit´a di Roma, Roma, Italy Bonn University, Bonn, Germany Humboldt University Berlin, Berlin, Germany

  13. Nuclear Propelled Vessels and Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, J.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, N.; Uchida, Y.

    2002-10-01

    We study the effect of naval nuclear reactors on the study of neutrino oscillations. We find that the presence of naval reactors at unknown locations and times may limit the accuracy of future very long baseline reactor-based neutrino oscillation experiments. At the same time, we argue that a nuclear powered surface ship such as a large Russian icebreaker may provide an ideal source for precision experiments.

  14. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  15. Optimal configurations of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Bhattacharya, Atri; Chatterjee, Animesh; Gandhi, Raj; Marfatia, Danny; Masud, Mehedi

    2016-02-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the ability of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to answer outstanding questions in the neutrino sector. We consider the sensitivities to the mass hierarchy, the octant of θ23 and to CP violation using data from beam and atmospheric neutrinos. We evaluate the dependencies on the precision with which θ13 will be measured by reactor experiments, on the detector size, beam power and exposure time, on detector magnetization, and on the systematic uncertainties achievable with and without a near detector. We find that a 35 kt far detector in DUNE with a near detector will resolve the eightfold degeneracy that is intrinsic to long baseline experiments and will meet the primary goals of oscillation physics that it is designed for.

  16. Probing heavy neutrinos in the COMET experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takehiko; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    We argue that the COMET experiment-a dedicated experiment for the μ -e conversion search-has a good potential to search for heavy neutrinos in the mass range 1 MeV ≲ M ≲ 100 MeV. The stopped muons captured by the target nuclei or decaying in orbit efficiently produce heavy neutrinos via the active-sterile mixing. The produced heavy neutrinos then decay to electron-positron pairs (plus an active neutrino), which charged particles hit the cylindrical drift chamber surrounding the target. If the backgrounds from gamma rays are sufficiently rejected by some method, the expected sensitivity becomes comparable to the PS191 bound when the COMET experiment achieves {˜ }10^{17} stopping muons in the target.

  17. Neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Dave; Cowen, Doug; Selen, Mats; Wiebusch, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos represent a new “window” to the Universe, spanning a large range of energy. We discuss the science of neutrino astrophysics and focus on two energy regimes. At “lower” energies (≈1 MeV), studies of neutrinos born inside the sun, or produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere, have allowed the first incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos have mass. At energies typically one thousand to one million times higher, sources further than the sun (both within the Milky Way and beyond) are expected to produce a flux of particles that can be detected only through neutrinos. PMID:10588680

  18. Constraint on neutrino decay with medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahão, Thamys; Minakata, Hisakazu; Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Quiroga, Alexander A.

    2015-11-01

    The experimental bound on lifetime of ν 3, the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest ν e component, is much weaker than those of ν 1 and ν 2 by many orders of magnitude to which the astrophysical constraints apply. We argue that the future reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with medium-baseline (˜50 km), such as JUNO or RENO-50, has the best chance of placing the most stringent constraint on ν3 lifetime among all neutrino experiments which utilize the artificial source neutrinos. Assuming decay into invisible states, we show by a detailed χ 2 analysis that the ν 3 lifetime divided by its mass, τ 3 /m 3, can be constrained to be τ 3 /m 3 > 7 .5 (5 .5) × 10-11 s/eV at 95% (99%) C.L. by 100 kt·years exposure by JUNO. It may be further improved to the level comparable to the atmospheric neutrino bound by its longer run. We also discuss to what extent ν 3 decay affects mass-ordering determination and precision measurements of the mixing parameters.

  19. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  20. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  1. Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Harnik, Roni; Kaplan, Jared; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

  2. Atmospheric neutrinos can make beauty strange

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Larson, Daniel T.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierce, Aaron

    2002-12-01

    The large observed mixing angle in atmospheric neutrinos, coupled with Grand Unification, motivates the search for a large mixing between right-handed strange and bottom squarks. Such mixing does not appear in the standard CKM phenomenology, but may induce significant b {yields} s transitions through gluino diagrams. Working in the mass eigenbasis, we show quantitatively that an order one effect on CP violation in B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}K{sub S} is possible due to a large mixing between right-handed b and s squarks, while still satisfying constraints from b {yields} s {gamma}. We also include the effect of right- and left-handed bottom squark mixing proportional to m{sub b}{mu} tan{beta}. For small {mu}tan{beta} there may also be a large effect in B{sub s} mixing correlated with a large effect in B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub S}, typically yielding an unambiguous signal of new physics at Tevatron Run II.

  3. Radiochemical Solar Neutrino Experiments - Successful and Otherwise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,R.L.

    2008-05-25

    Over the years, several different radiochemical systems have been proposed as solar neutrino detectors. Of these, two achieved operating status and obtained important results that helped to define the current field of neutrino physics: the first solar-neutrino experiment, the Chlorine Detector ({sup 37}Cl) that was developed by chemist Raymond Davis and colleagues at the Homestake Mine, and the subsequent Gallium ({sup 71}Ga) Detectors that were operated by (a) the SAGE collaboration at the Baksan Laboratory and (b) the GALLEX/GNO collaborations at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. These experiments have been extensively discussed in the literature and in many previous International Neutrino Conferences. In this paper, I present important updates to the results from SAGE and GALLEX/GNO. I also review the principles of the radiochemical detectors and briefly describe several different detectors that have been proposed. In light of the well-known successes that have been subsequently obtained by real-time neutrino detectors such as Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND, I do not anticipate that any new radiochemical neutrino detectors will be built. At present, only SAGE is still operating; the Chlorine and GNO radiochemical detectors have been decommissioned and dismantled.

  4. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    2010-02-01

    The 3x3 PMNS leptonic mixing matrix relates the mass and flavor eigenstates of the 3 known neutrinos. The θ13 mixing angle is the last unknown mixing angle in the PMNS matrix, the parameters of which must be determined experimentally. The Daya Bay experiment will search for the ``disappearance'' of reactor anti-neutrinos from the Daya Bay and Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plants located in Daya Bay, Guangdong, China using multiple identical detectors at different baselines. The disappearance probability of reactor anti-neutrinos at short baselines of 1-2km is directly proportional to 2̂(2 θ13). The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 2̂(2 θ13) = 0.01 at the 90 % C.L. The status and prospects of the experiment will be presented. )

  5. Status of the RENO Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, K. K.; RENO Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) is a reactor based neutrino oscillation experiment to measure the neutrino mixing angle θ13 using anti-neutrinos emitted from the Yonggwang nuclear power plant in Korea. Its thermal power output is 16.4 Gwth. The experimental setup consists of two identical 16-ton gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator detectors. The near and far detectors are placed roughly 290 m and 1.4 km from the center of the reactor array, respectively. The near detector is constructed at underground of a 70 m high hill and the far detector at underground of a 260 m high mountain. The construction of experimental halls and access tunnels for both near and far detector sites was completed in early 2009. The experiment is planned to start data-taking from early 2011. An expected number of observed anti-neutrinos is roughly 1300 per day and 100 per day in the far and near detector, respectively. We expect that an estimated systematic uncertainty is less than 0.5%. With three years of data taken, RENO is sensitive to measure sin2(2θ13)>0.02. Sensitivity is ten times better than the current limit obtained by Chooz. In this review, current status of RENO is presented.

  6. A select overview of neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanski, Raymond J.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between the lepton sector and the quark sector is an interesting source of discourse in the current theoretical climate. Models that might someday supersede the Standard Model typically require quark structure, with implications for the lepton sector. This talk will explore some of the consequences of newer models, in the context of certain neutrino experiments.

  7. An overview of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2016-07-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment discovered an unexpectedly large neutrino oscillation related to the mixing angle θ13 in 2012. This finding paved the way to the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. In this article, we review the history, featured design, and scientific results of Daya Bay. Prospects of the experiment are also described.

  8. Solar neutrino experiments: recent results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recent results from the SNO and Borexino solar neutrino experiments have pushed the observation of solar neutrinos to lower energies. Borexino's measurement of the rate of 7Be solar neutrinos demonstrates that the survival probability for solar neutrinos below 1 MeV is larger than for the 8B solar neutrinos, consistent with our expectation for neutrino propagation affected by matter. On the other hand, by looking at lower energy 8B solar neutrinos, SNO (and also Borexino) do not see the predicted rise in the survival probability and there is even a hint that the survival probability drops to a lower value. Future solar neutrino experiments, in particular the SNO+ experiment, will look at this question by making precision measurements of the survival probability of the pep solar neutrinos (1.44 MeV energy).

  9. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with IceCube.

    PubMed

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; Benzvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H-P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Palazzo, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-08-23

    We present the first statistically significant detection of neutrino oscillations in the high-energy regime (>20 GeV) from an analysis of IceCube Neutrino Observatory data collected in 2010 and 2011. This measurement is made possible by the low-energy threshold of the DeepCore detector (~20 GeV) and benefits from the use of the IceCube detector as a veto against cosmic-ray-induced muon background. The oscillation signal was detected within a low-energy muon neutrino sample (20-100 GeV) extracted from data collected by DeepCore. A high-energy muon neutrino sample (100 GeV-10 TeV) was extracted from IceCube data to constrain systematic uncertainties. The disappearance of low-energy upward-going muon neutrinos was observed, and the nonoscillation hypothesis is rejected with more than 5σ significance. In a two-neutrino flavor formalism, our data are best described by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters |Δm(32)(2)|=(2.3(-0.5)(+0.6))×10(-3) eV(2) and sin(2)(2θ(23))>0.93, and maximum mixing is favored. PMID:24010427

  10. Improvement of low energy atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the JAM nuclear interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    2011-06-15

    We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes with an interaction model named JAM, which is used in PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System) [K. Niita et al., Radiation Measurements 41, 1080 (2006).]. The JAM interaction model agrees with the HARP experiment [H. Collaboration, Astropart. Phys. 30, 124 (2008).] a little better than DPMJET-III[S. Roesler, R. Engel, and J. Ranft, arXiv:hep-ph/0012252.]. After some modifications, it reproduces the muon flux below 1 GeV/c at balloon altitudes better than the modified DPMJET-III, which we used for the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux in previous works [T. Sanuki, M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043005 (2007).][M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, S. Midorikawa, and T. Sanuki, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043006 (2007).]. Some improvements in the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux are also reported.

  11. Report on the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C. Jr.

    1976-09-22

    This report is intended as a brief statement of the recent developments and results of the Brookhaven Solar Neutrino Experiment communicated through Professor G. Kocharov to the Leningrad conference on active processes on the sun and the solar neutrino problem. The report summarizes the results of experiments performed over a period of 6 years, from April 1970 to January 1976. Neutrino detection depends upon the neutrino capture reaction /sup 37/Cl(..nu..,e/sup -/)/sup 37/Ar producing the isotope /sup 37/Ar (half life of 35 days). The detector contains 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ liters of C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ (2.2 x 10/sup 30/ atoms of /sup 37/Cl) and is located at a depth of 4400 meters of water equivalent (m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine at Lead, South Dakota, U.S.A. The procedures for extracting /sup 37/Ar and the counting techniques used were described in previous reports. The entire recovered argon sample was counted in a small gas proportional counter. Argon-37 decay events were characterized by the energy of the Auger electrons emitted following the electron capture decay and by the rise-time of the pulse. Counting measurements were continued for a period sufficiently long to observe the decay of /sup 37/Ar.

  12. Search for a Lorentz-violating sidereal signal with atmospheric neutrinos in IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube; etal, Abbasi, R,

    2010-11-11

    A search for sidereal modulation in the flux of atmospheric muon neutrinos in IceCube was performed. Such a signal could be an indication of Lorentz-violating physics. Neutrino oscillationmodels, derivable from extensions to the Standard Model, allow for neutrino oscillations that depend on the neutrino's direction of propagation. No such direction-dependent variation was found. Adiscrete Fourier transform method was used to constrain the Lorentz and CPT-violating coefficients in one of these models. Due to the unique high energy reach of IceCube, it was possible to improveconstraints on certain Lorentz-violating oscillations by three orders of magnitude with respect to limits set by other experiments.

  13. Status of the San Onofre neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hertenberger, R.; Chen, M.; Henrikson, H.; Mascarenhas, M.

    1993-10-01

    The San Onofre experiment is designed to investigate neutrino oscillations in the parameter space suggested by the atmospheric neutrino problem. A liquid-scintillator-based 12-ton detector will be installed at 650 m from the two units of the San Onofre power reactor. For the detection of the {anti v}{sub e}-induced inverse beta decay reaction a novel four-fold coincidence method is used allowing effective suppression of background at the relatively low shallow depth of 25 mwe. We report on the experimental method and demonstrate its feasibility by presenting results from recent test experiments performed with a prototype detector in the Tendon Gallery of the San Onofre Unit 2 reactor.

  14. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishai, Mary

    2007-04-01

    The 3x3 PMNS leptonic mixing matrix relates the mass and flavor eigenstates of the 3 known neutrinos. The θ13 mixing angle is the last unknown mixing angle in the PMNS matrix, the parameters of which must be determined experimentally. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to measure θ13 with a sensitivity in 2circ(2θ13) of 0.01. The Daya Bay experiment will search for the `disappearance' of reactor electron anti-neutrinos from the Daya Bay and Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plants located in Daya Bay, Guangdong, China using multiple identical detectors at different baselines. The status and prospects of the experiment will be presented.

  15. Comparison of the sensitivities of the parameters with atmospheric neutrinos for different analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2009-03-01

    In the atmospheric neutrino experiments the primary problems are the huge uncertainties of flux, very rapid fall of flux with increase of energy, the energy dependent wide resolutions of energy and zenith angle between true neutrinos and reconstructed neutrinos. These all in together make the choice of binning of the data for chi-square analysis complicated. The large iron calorimeter has the ability to measure the energy and the direction of the muon with high resolution. From the bending of the track in the magnetic field it can also distinguish its charge. We have analyzed the atmospheric neutrino oscillation generating events by Nuance and then considering the muons produced in the charge current interactions as the reconstructed neutrinos. This practically takes into account the major problem of wide resolutions. We have binned the data in three ways: (i) in the grids of logE-logL plane, (ii) in the grids of logE-cos{theta}{sub zenith} plane, and (iii) in the bins of log(L/E). We have performed a marginalized {chi}{sup 2} study over {delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 13} and {theta}{sub 23} for neutrinos and antineutrinos separately for each method and finally compared the results.

  16. Light sterile neutrinos, lepton number violating interactions and short baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; McKay, D. W.; Mocioiu, Irina; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    We develop the consequences of introducing a purely leptonic, non-standard interaction (NSI) ΔL = 2, four-fermion effective Lagrangian and standard model neutrino mixing with a fourth, sterile neutrino in the analysis of short-baseline, neutrino experiments. We focus on the muon decay at rest (DAR) results from the Liquid Scintillation Neutrino Experiment (LSND) and the Karlsruhe and Rutherford medium Energy Neutrino Experiment (KARMEN), seeking a reconciliation between the two. Both v¯e appearance from v¯μ oscillation and v¯e survival after production from NSI decay of the µ+ contribute to the expected signal. This is a unique feature of our scheme. We comment on further implications of the lepton number violating interaction and sterile neutrino-standard neutrino mixing.

  17. Mass hierarchy determination via future atmospheric neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Mehta, Poonam; Uma Sankar, S.; Shalgar, Shashank

    2007-10-01

    We study the problem of determination of the sign of Δm312, or the neutrino mass hierarchy, through observations of atmospheric neutrinos in future detectors. We consider two proposed detector types: (a) Megaton sized water C̆erenkov detectors, which can measure the event rates of νμ+ν¯μ and νe+ν¯e and (b) 100 kton sized magnetized iron detectors, which can measure the event rates of νμ and ν¯μ. For energies and path lengths relevant to atmospheric neutrinos, these rates obtain significant matter contributions from Pμe, Pμμ and Pee, leading to an appreciable sensitivity to the hierarchy. We do a binned χ2 analysis of simulated data in these two types of detectors which includes the effect of smearing in neutrino energy and direction and incorporates detector efficiencies and relevant statistical, theoretical and systematic errors. We also marginalize the χ2 over the allowed ranges of neutrino parameters in order to accurately account for their uncertainties. Finally, we compare the performance of both types of detectors vis a vis the hierarchy determination.

  18. Panofsky Prize Lecture: Evidence for Oscillation of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are decay products of pions and kaons (and of their decay products muons) produced by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with air nuclei. Though their flux is not known well, only within 20 %, physics quantities that are independent of the flux uncertainty exist. The ratio of the number of muon neutrinos to the number of electron neutrinos is estimated to be accurate within 5 %. The other quantity is the shape of the zenith-angle distribution. Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande are water Cherenkov detectors with 3,000 ton and 50,000 ton pure water, respectively. Kamiokande was operational in 1983 - 1996, and Super-K in 1996 - 2001 and 2003 - in future. We had already noted in 1988 that the observed μ/e ratio, which represented ν_mu/ν_e, was smaller by about 40 %. Later in 1994 we noted that the zenith angle distribution of muon neutrinos was strongly distorted, namely much fewer muons observed in the upward direction, while downward-going muons were what we expected. Electrons were quite normal. In 1996 Super-Kamiokande was ready. Its fiducial volume is 22.5 kton, much larger than Kamiokande's 1.04 kton. In 1998 based on 25.5 kton years of data we presented convincing results on the small μ/e ratio which was caused by fewer number of muons in the upward direction. The essential feature of the observed anomaly was that the disappearance of muon neutrinos depended strongly on their path length and on their energies. Electrons showed no anomaly within the experimental limit. These results were quantitatively and almost uniquely explained by oscillation of muon neutrinos to tau neutrinos, thus evidence for the finite but tiny mass of neutrinos.

  19. Status of the KATRIN Neutrino Mass Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Katrin Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), presently under construction in Germany, will probe the absolute mass scale of the neutrino through the kinematics of tritium beta decay, a nearly model-independent approach. To achieve the projected sensitivity of 0.2 eV at the 90% confidence level, KATRIN will use a windowless, gaseous tritium source and a large magnetic adiabatic collimation-electrostatic filter. The collaboration has now completed a second commissioning phase of the spectrometer and detector section, and construction of the tritium sections is proceeding well. We will report on the current status of the experiment and the outlook for data-taking with tritium. US participation in KATRIN is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  20. Status of the neutrino mass experiment KATRIN

    SciTech Connect

    Bornschein, L.; Bornschein, B.; Sturm, M.; Roellig, M.; Priester, F.

    2015-03-15

    The most sensitive way to determine the neutrino mass scale without further assumptions is to measure the shape of a tritium beta spectrum near its kinematic end-point. Tritium is the nucleus of choice because of its low endpoint energy, superallowed decay and simple atomic structure. Within an international collaboration the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently being built up at KIT. KATRIN will allow a model-independent measurement of the neutrino mass scale with an expected sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c{sup 2} (90% CL). KATRIN will use a source of ultrapure molecular tritium. This contribution presents the status of the KATRIN experiment, thereby focusing on its Calibration and Monitoring System (CMS), which is the last component being subject to research/development. After a brief overview of the KATRIN experiment in Section II the CMS is introduced in Section III. In Section IV the Beta Induced X-Ray Spectroscopy (BIXS) as method of choice to monitor the tritium activity of the KATRIN source is described and first results are presented.

  1. New results for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Justin; Whitehead, Lisa; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment situated along Fermilab's high-intensity NuMI neutrino beam. MINOS has completed an updated search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino transitions, observation of which would indicate a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The present 7 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target data set represents more than double the exposure used in the previous analysis. The new result and its implications are presented.

  2. Experiments on atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab technology is examined as applied to the observation of the earth's weather patterns, composition, thermodynamics, and kinematics. An atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and a geophysical fluid flow cell are individually outlined as planned payload experiment efforts.

  3. An atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance measurement with the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gogos, Jeremy Peter

    2007-12-01

    It is now widely accepted that the Standard Model assumption of massless neutrinos is wrong, due primarily to the observation of solar and atmospheric neutrino flavor oscillations by a small number of convincing experiments. The MINOS Far Detector, capable of observing both the outgoing lepton and associated showering products of a neutrino interaction, provides an excellent opportunity to independently search for an oscillation signature in atmospheric neutrinos. To this end, a MINOS data set from an 883 live day, 13.1 kt-yr exposure collected between July, 2003 and April, 2007 has been analyzed. 105 candidate charged current muon neutrino interactions were observed, with 120.5 ± 1.3 (statistical error only) expected in the absence of oscillation. A maximum likelihood analysis of the observed log(L/E) spectrum shows that the null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at over 96% confidence and that the best fit oscillation parameters are sin223 = 0.95 -0.32 and Δm$2\\atop{23}$ = 0.93$+3.94\\atop{ -0.44}$ x 10-3 eV2. This measurement of oscillation parameters is consistent with the best fit values from the Super-Kamiokande experiment at 68% confidence.

  4. Status and commissioning of the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuemmler, Thomas; Katrin Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino properties, and especially the determination of the neutrino rest mass, play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double β decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. Experiments based on single β decay investigate electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino mass by a modelindependent method. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β spectroscopy close to the tritium endpoint with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/c2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino mass.

  5. Dissipative effect in long baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Roberto L. N.

    2016-07-01

    The propagation of neutrinos in long baselines experiments may be influenced by dissipation effects. Using the Lindblad master equation we evolve neutrinos taking into account these dissipative effects. The MSW and the dissipative effects may change the behavior of the probabilities. In this work, we show and explain how the behavior of the probabilities can change due to the decoherence and relaxation effects acting individually with the MSW effect. A new exotic peak appears in this case and we show the difference between the decoherence and relaxation effects in the appearance of this peak. We also adapt the usual approximate expression for survival and appearance probabilities with all possible decoherence effects. We suppose the baseline of DUNE and show how each of the decoherence parameters changes the probabilities analyzing the possible modification using a numeric and an analytic approach.

  6. Sensitivity on earth core and mantle densities using atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, E.; Marotta, A.; Miele, G.; Pisanti, O.; Strolin, P.; Mangano, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moura, C.A.; Pastor, S. E-mail: mangano@na.infn.it E-mail: miele@na.infn.it E-mail: moura@na.infn.it E-mail: pisanti@na.infn.it

    2009-06-01

    Neutrino radiography may provide an alternative tool to study the very deep structures of the Earth. Though these measurements are unable to resolve the fine density layer features, nevertheless the information which can be obtained are independent and complementary to the more conventional seismic studies. The aim of this paper is to assess how well the core and mantle averaged densities can be reconstructed through atmospheric neutrino radiography. We find that about a 2% sensitivity for the mantle and 5% for the core could be achieved for a ten year data taking at an underwater km{sup 3} Neutrino Telescope. This result does not take into account systematics related to the details of the experimental apparatus.

  7. Laboratory atmospheric compensation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drutman, C.; Moran, James P.; Faria-e-Maia, Francisco; Hyman, Howard; Russell, Jeffrey A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes an in-house experiment that was performed at the Avco Research Labs/Textron to test a proprietary atmospheric phase compensation algorithm. Since the laser energies of interest were small enough that thermal blooming was not an issue, it was only necessary to simulate the effect of atmospheric turbulence. This was achieved by fabricating phase screens that mimicked Kolmogorov phase statistics. A simulated atmosphere was constructed from these phase screens and the phase at the simulated ground was measured with a digital heterodyne interferometer. The result of this effort was an initial verification of our proprietary algorithm two years before the field experiment.

  8. SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer

    SAGE Collaboration

    SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

  9. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, Stephen J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  10. Study of atmospheric neutrino interactions and search for nucleon decay in Soudan 2

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, W.R.

    1995-12-14

    Contained event samples, including 30 single-track muon-like events, 35 single-shower electron-like events, and 34 multiprong events, have been obtained from a 1.0 kiloton-year exposure of the Soudan 2 detector. A sample of 15 multiprong events which are partially contained has also been isolated. Properties of these events are used to examine the verity of the atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio anomaly as reported by the Kamiokande and IMB-3 water Cherenkov experiments. The compatibility of the Soudan data with each of two `new physics` explanations for the anomaly, namely proton decay and neutrino oscillations, is investigated. We examine background processes which have not been explicitly treated by the water Cherenkov detectors. Chapters discuss underground non-accelerator particle physics, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and its interpretation, the Soudan 2 detector and event selection, reconstruction of neutrino events, rock event contamination in Soudan `quasi-elastic` samples, contained multiprong events in Soudan 2, neutrino flavor composition of the multiprong sample, partially contained events in Soudan 2, nucleon decay in Soudan 2, and a summary and discussion. 12 refs., 124 figs., 28 tabs., 7 appendices.

  11. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precision measurements in electron and muon neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, S.J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric {Delta}m{sup 2} measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}), was proposed. If {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) is larger (smaller) than {Delta}m{sup 2} ({mu}{mu}) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of ({theta}{sub 13}, {delta}) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If {theta}{sub 13} is relatively large, sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.05, and both of {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) and {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) can be measured with the precision of {approx} 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3{pi} {approx}< {delta} {approx}< 1.7 {pi} for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.

  12. NEUTRINO FACTORIES - PHYSICS POTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-02-16

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric and solar neutrino observations opens a new era in neutrino physics and has sparked a considerable interest in the physics possibilities with a Neutrino Factory based on the muon storage ring. We present physics opportunities at a Neutrino Factory, and prospects of Neutrino oscillation experiments. Using the precisely known flavor composition of the beam, one could envision an extensive program to measure the neutrino oscillation mixing matrix, including possible CP violating effects. These and Neutrino Interaction Rates for examples of a Neutrino Factory at BNL (and FNAL) with detectors at Gran Sasso, SLAC and Sudan are also presented.

  13. Solar neutrino experiments and a test for neutrino oscillations with radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Rowley, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment are given and compared to the most recent standard solar model calculations. The observations are about a factor of 4 below theoretical expectations. In view of the uncertainties involved in the theoretical models of the sun, the discrepancy is not considered to be evidence for neutrino oscillations. The status of the development of a gallium solar neutrino detector is described. Radiochemical neutrino detectors can be used to search for ..nu../sub e/ oscillations by using megacurie sources of monoenergetic neutrinos like /sup 65/Zn. A quantitative evaluation of possible experiments using the Brookhaven chlorine solar neutrino detector and a gallium detector is given. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  14. PromptNuFlux: Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottoli, Luca

    2015-11-01

    PromptNuFlux computes the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux E3Φ(GeV2/(cm2ssr)), including the total associated theory uncertainty, for a range of energies between E=103 GeV and E=107.5 GeV. Results are available for five different parametrizations of the input cosmic ray flux: BPL, H3P, H3A, H14a, H14b.

  15. Implications of results of neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, B.H.; Garbutt, M.

    2000-10-01

    The long standing negative (mass){sup 2} anomaly encountered in attempts to measure the mass of the electron neutrino may be an indication of physics beyond the standard model. It is demonstrated that an additional charged current interaction which is not of V--A form, and which is at least an order of magnitude weaker than the standard model charged current interaction, will produce a spectrum, which, if fitted by the standard model, may give a negative value for m{sub {nu}}{sup 2}. A possible physical explanation of the time dependent effects seen by the Troitsk experiment is also provided.

  16. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2011-11-23

    The MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is aimed at precision measurements of neutrino interactions in nuclei for energies up to a few GeV. MINER{nu}A makes use of a fine-grained, fully active detector design and a range of nuclear target materials. The experiment began taking data in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab in late 2009 and will collect data in both the neutrino and antineutrino configurations of the beamline.

  17. Cosmic muon background and reactor neutrino detectors: the Angra experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimiro, E.; Anjos, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss on the importance of appropriately taking into account the cosmic background in the design of reactor neutrino detectors. In particular, as a practical study case, we describe the Angra Project, a new reactor neutrino oscillation experiment proposed to be built in the coming years at the Brazilian nuclear power complex, located near the Angra dos Reis city. The main goal of the experiment is to measure with high precision θ13, the last unknown of the three neutrino mixing angles. The experiment will in addition explore the possibility of using neutrino detectors for purposes of safeguards and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  18. CPT conservation and atmospheric neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Bernard Raymond

    2006-02-01

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5400 ton iron calorimeter located at the Soudan state park in Soudan Minnesota. The MINOS far detector can observe atmospheric neutrinos and separate charge current {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} interactions by using a 1.4 T magnetic field to identify the charge of the produced muon. The CPT theorem requires that neutrinos and anti-neutrinos oscillate in the same way. In a fiducial exposure of 5.0 kilo-ton years a total of 41 candidate neutrino events are observed with an expectation of 53.1 {+-} 7.6(system.) {+-} 7.2(stat.) unoscillated events or 31.6 {+-} 4.7(system.) {+-} 5.6(stat.) events with {Delta}m{sup 2} = 2.4 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2}(2{theta}) = 1.0 as oscillation parameters. These include 28 events which can have there charge identified with high confidence. These 28 events consist of 18 events consistent with being produced by {nu}{sub {mu}} and 10 events being consistent with being produced by {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. No evidence of CPT violation is observed.

  19. Detection of atmospheric muon neutrinos with the IceCube 9-string detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Beimforde, M.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Griesel, T.; Grullon, S.; Groß, A.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Hart, J. E.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kislat, F.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meagher, K.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Peña-Garay, C.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Viscomi, V.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.

    2007-07-01

    The IceCube neutrino detector is a cubic kilometer TeV to PeV neutrino detector under construction at the geographic South Pole. The dominant population of neutrinos detected in IceCube is due to meson decay in cosmic-ray air showers. These atmospheric neutrinos are relatively well understood and serve as a calibration and verification tool for the new detector. In 2006, the detector was approximately 10% completed, and we report on data acquired from the detector in this configuration. We observe an atmospheric neutrino signal consistent with expectations, demonstrating that the IceCube detector is capable of identifying neutrino events. In the first 137.4 days of live time, 234 neutrino candidates were selected with an expectation of 211±76.1(syst)±14.5(stat) events from atmospheric neutrinos.

  20. Detector Development for the MARE Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Galeazzi, M.; Bogorin, D.; Molina, R.; Saab, T.; Ribeiro Gomes, M.

    2009-12-16

    The MARE experiment is designed to measure the mass of the neutrino with sub-eV sensitivity by measuring the beta decay of {sup 187}Re with cryogenic microcalorimeters. A preliminary analysis shows that, to achieve the necessary statistics, between 10,000 and 50,000 detectors are likely necessary. We have fabricated and characterized Iridium transition edge sensors with high reproducibility and uniformity for such a large scale experiment. We have also started a full scale simulation of the experimental setup for MARE, including thermalization in the absorber, detector response, and optimum filter analysis, to understand the issues related to reaching a sub-eV sensitivity and to optimize the design of the MARE experiment. We present our characterization of the Ir devices, including reproducibility, uniformity, and sensitivity, and we discuss the implementation and capabilities of our full scale simulation.

  1. MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C.

    2007-10-26

    With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

  2. Future experiments with neutrino superbeams, beta-beams, and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah A Harris

    2003-10-27

    This report describes the goals of the next generations of accelerator-based neutrino experiments, and the various strategies that are being considered to achieve those goals. Because these next steps in the field are significantly different from the current or previous steps, novel techniques must be considered for both the detectors and the neutrino beams themselves. We consider not only conventional neutrino beams created by decays of pions, but also those which could be made by decays of beams of relativistic isotopes (so-called ''beta-beams'') and also by decays of beams of muons (neutrino factories).

  3. Prospects for cosmic neutrino detection in tritium experiments in the case of hierarchical neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the effects of neutrino mixing and the neutrino mass hierarchy when considering the capture of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) on radioactive nuclei. The implications of mixing and hierarchy at future generations of tritium decay experiments are considered. We find that the CNB should be detectable at these experiments provided that the resolution for the kinetic energy of the outgoing electron can be pushed to a few 0.01 eV for the scenario with inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, about an order of magnitude better than that of the upcoming KATRIN experiment. Another order of magnitude improvement is needed in the case of normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also note that mixing effects generally make the prospects for CNB detection worse due to an increased maximum energy of the normal beta decay background.

  4. The History of "Anomalous" Atmospheric Neutrino Events: A First Person Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoSecco, John M.

    2016-07-01

    The modern picture of the neutrino as a multiple-mass, highly mixed neutral particle has emerged over forty years of study. Best known of the issues leading to this picture was the apparent loss of neutrinos coming from the sun. This article describes another piece of evidence that supports the picture; the substantial reduction of high-energy muon-type neutrinos observed in nature. For much of the forty-year period before the modern picture emerged, this observation was known as the "atmospheric neutrino anomaly," since these neutrinos originate in the Earth's atmosphere. This paper describes the discovery of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. I explore the scientific context and motivations in the late 1970s, from which this work emerged. The gradual awareness that the observations of atmospheric neutrinos were not as expected took place in the 1983-1986 period.

  5. The History of "Anomalous" Atmospheric Neutrino Events: A First Person Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoSecco, John M.

    2016-08-01

    The modern picture of the neutrino as a multiple-mass, highly mixed neutral particle has emerged over forty years of study. Best known of the issues leading to this picture was the apparent loss of neutrinos coming from the sun. This article describes another piece of evidence that supports the picture; the substantial reduction of high-energy muon-type neutrinos observed in nature. For much of the forty-year period before the modern picture emerged, this observation was known as the "atmospheric neutrino anomaly," since these neutrinos originate in the Earth's atmosphere. This paper describes the discovery of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. I explore the scientific context and motivations in the late 1970s, from which this work emerged. The gradual awareness that the observations of atmospheric neutrinos were not as expected took place in the 1983-1986 period.

  6. New results of the Borexino experiment: pp solar neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Misiaszek, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Borexino experiment is an ultra-pure liquid scintillator detector, running at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). Borexino has completed the real time spectroscopy of the solar neutrinos generated in the proton-proton chain in the core of the Sun. This article reviews the Borexino experiment and the first direct measurment of pp solar neutrinos.

  7. Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment: Goal, Progress and Schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillation, as a breakthrough in particle physics, prompted the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment, which is designed to make a precise measurement of the last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta13, with a sensitivity of 0.01 for sin2(2 * θ13), using reactor anti-neutrinos from the 17.4GW Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant located in Shenzhen, China. This talk will introduce the goal of this experiment including an overall introduction of the selection of the site and baseline, the detector optimization, the current construction progress and the schedule for expected data taking.

  8. Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2016-05-01

    The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of ∼10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for photomultipliers on different lines at a precision level of 0.5 ns. It has also been validated for calibrating photomultipliers on the same line, using a system of LEDs and laser light devices.

  9. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  10. Lunar atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 17 carried a miniature mass spectrometer, called the Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment (LACE), to the moon as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) to study the composition and variations in the lunar atmosphere. The instrument was successfully deployed in the Taurus-Littrow Valley with its entrance aperture oriented upward to intercept and measure the downward flux of gases at the lunar surface. During the ten lunations that the LACE operated, it produced a large base of data on the lunar atmosphere, mainly collected at night time. It was found that thermal escape is the most rapid loss mechanism for hydrogen and helium. For heavier gases, photoionization followed by acceleration through the solar wind electric field accounted for most of the loss. The dominant gases on the moosn were argon and helium, and models formed for their distribution are described in detail. It is concluded that most of the helium in the lunar atmosphere is of solar wind origin, and that there also exist very small amounts of methane, ammonia, and carbon dioxide.

  11. Calculation of oscillation probabilities of atmospheric neutrinos using nuCraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallraff, Marius; Wiebusch, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    NuCraft (nucraft.hepforge.org) is an open-source Python project that calculates neutrino oscillation probabilities for neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere for their propagation through Earth. The solution is obtained by numerically solving the Schrödinger equation. The code supports arbitrary numbers of neutrino flavors including additional sterile neutrinos, CP violation, arbitrary mass hierarchies, matter effects with a configurable continuous Earth model, and takes into account the production height distribution of neutrinos in the Earth's atmosphere.

  12. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Holin, Anna Maria

    2010-02-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin213 for the rst time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any e appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of θ 13 from background neutral current (NC) and short-track vμ charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from vμ-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 σ ve-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 1020 protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin213. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin2 2 θ 13 < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase δ = 0.

  13. Use of microprocessors in a neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, P.L.; Cutts, D.

    1981-01-01

    Microprocessors are a fundamental part of the neutrino detector for Experiment 734, a study of ..nu..e elastic scattering at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four DEC LSI-11s are interfaced each to 1/4 of the detector apparatus via programmable scan controllers and to the central DEC 11-34 via separate DMA links. These microprocessors act in parallel to collect and reformat data from ..nu.. events; further, they can act independently, orchestrating an elaborate variety of calibrations asynchronously in different regions of the apparatus. Our micros have proved to be very valuable for a number of reasons. It is much easier to manage a large detector in separate pieces. Each LSI-11 can run in stand-alone mode, allowing independent installation or checkout of different parts of the detector. When operational the apparatus must be continuously calibrated; with a very large number of separate detector elements, distributed intelligence is most useful.

  14. Neutrino Detectors Review

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, Nicola

    2005-10-12

    The neutrino physics is one of the most important research field and there are several experiments made and under construction focused on it. This paper will present a review on some detectors used for Solar Neutrinos detection, Atmospheric Neutrinos detection and in Long Baseline Experiments.

  15. Light sterile neutrino sensitivity of 163Ho experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastaldo, L.; Giunti, C.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the sensitivity of 163Ho electron capture experiments to neutrino masses in the standard framework of three-neutrino mixing and in the framework of 3+1 neutrino mixing with a sterile neutrino which mixes with the three standard active neutrinos, as indicated by the anomalies found in short-baseline neutrino oscillations experiments. We calculate the sensitivity to neutrino masses and mixing for different values of the energy resolution of the detectors, of the unresolved pileup fraction and of the total statistics of events, considering the expected values of these parameters in the two planned stages of the ECHo project (ECHo-1k and ECHo-1M). We show that an extension of the ECHo-1M experiment with the possibility to collect 1016 events will be competitive with the KATRIN experiment. This statistics will allow to explore part of the 3+1 mixing parameter space indicated by the global analysis of short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to cover all the allowed region, a statistics of about 1017 events will be needed.

  16. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  17. Status of the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Kevin B.

    2006-11-17

    The Borexino experiment is designed to measure the flux of 7Be solar neutrinos. The experiment, having a 100-ton fiducial volume of organic liquid scintillator, should detect roughly 35 neutrinos per day in the energy range 250 - 1300 keV, a range lower than that of any previous real-time neutrino detector. Though the 862-keV 7Be neutrinos make up roughly 10% of the total solar neutrino flux, they have not previously been directly observed. Their energy is at a delicate point for confirmation of the vacuum-to-matter oscillation transition. In these proceedings, I will present the status of the Borexino experiment as of August 2006, as we prepare for final filling of the detector.

  18. Sterile Neutrino Searches in MINOS and MINOS+ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Junting

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents the searches on sterile neutrinos using the data collected in MINOS+ Experiment from September 2013 to September 2014, and the full data set of MINOS Experiment collected from 2005 to 2012. Anomalies in short baseline experiments, such as LSND and MiniBooNE, showed hints of sterile neutrinos, a type of neutrino that does not interact with the Standard Model particles. In this work, two models are considered: 3+1 and large extra dimension (LED). In the 3+1 model, one sterile neutrino state is added into the standard oscillation scheme consisting of three known active neutrino states ve, vμ and vτ. In the LED model, sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein (KK) states due to assumed large extra dimensions. Mixing between sterile and active neutrino states may modify the oscillation patterns observed in the MINOS detectors. Both searches yield null results. For 3+1, a combined fit of MINOS and MINOS+ data gives a stronger limit on θ24 in the range of 10-2 eV2 < Δm412 < 1 eV2 than previous experiments. For LED, with the complete MINOS data set, the size of extra dimensions is constrained to be smaller than ~ 0.35 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest neutrino mass.

  19. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill

    2013-12-05

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  20. NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    Perko, John; Williams, Ron; Miller, Bill;

    2014-05-30

    The NOvA neutrino experiment is searching for the answers to some of the most fundamental questions of the universe. This video documents how collaboration between government research institutions like Fermilab, academia and industry can create one of the largest neutrino detectors in the world.

  1. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  2. The Opera Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment:. Status and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besnier, M.

    2009-09-01

    OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion tRacking Apparatus)1 is an international collaboration (Europe-Asia). It aims to give the first direct proof of the νμ → ντ atmospheric oscillation hypothesis, by searching for a ντ appearance at Gran Sasso laboratory in a νμ beam produced at CERN 730 km away. Electronic detectors have been fully commissioned and tested with the first neutrino beam run in 2006, and the full target is expected for summer 2008. OPERA started its neutrino data taking in October 2007, and neutrino interactions have already been reconstructed in the target.

  3. Atmospheric neutrino observations in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, John Derek; /Cambridge U.

    2007-09-01

    This thesis presents the results of atmospheric neutrino observations from a 12.23 ktyr exposure of the 5.42 kt MINOS Far Detector between 1st August 2003 until 1st March 2006. The separation of atmospheric neutrino events from the large background of cosmic muon events is discussed. A total of 277 candidate contained vertex {nu}/{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} CC data events are observed, with an expectation of 354.4{+-}47.4 events in the absence of neutrino oscillations. A total of 182 events have clearly identified directions, 77 data events are identified as upward going, 105 data events are identified as downward going. The ratio between the measured and expected up/down ratio is: R{sup data}{sub u/d}/R{sup MC}{sub u/d} = 0.72{sup +0.13}{sub -0.11}(stat.){+-} 0.04 (sys.). This is 2.1{sigma} away from the expectation for no oscillations. A total of 167 data events have clearly identified charge, 112 are identified as {nu}{sub {mu}} events, 55 are identified as {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events. This is the largest sample of charge-separated contained-vertex atmospheric neutrino interactions so far observed. The ratio between the measured and expected {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}/{nu}{sub {mu}} ratio is: R{sup data}{sub {bar {nu}}{nu}} / R{sup MC}{sub {bar {nu}}{nu}} = 0.93 {sup +0.19}{sub -0.15} (stat.) {+-} 0.12 (sys.). This is consistent with {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} having the same oscillation parameters. Bayesian methods were used to generate a log(L/E) value for each event. A maximum likelihood analysis is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 23}. The likelihood function uses the uncertainty in log(L/E) to bin events in order to extract as much information from the data as possible. This fit rejects the null oscillations hypothesis at the 98% confidence level. A fit to independent {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation assuming maximal mixing for both is also performed

  4. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Neutrinos are electrically neutral ELEMENTARY PARTICLES which experience only the weak nuclear force and gravity. Their existence was introduced as a hypothesis by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain the apparent violation of energy conservation in radioactive beta decay. Chadwick had discovered in 1914 that the energy spectrum of electrons emitted in beta decay was not monoenergetic but continuous...

  5. Improvement of low energy atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the JAM nuclear interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    2011-06-01

    We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes with an interaction model named JAM, which is used in PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System) [K. Niita , Radiation MeasurementsRMEAEP1350-4487 41, 1080 (2006).10.1016/j.radmeas.2006.07.013]. The JAM interaction model agrees with the HARP experiment [H. Collaboration, Astropart. Phys. 30, 124 (2008).APHYEE0927-650510.1016/j.astropartphys.2008.07.007] a little better than DPMJET-III [S. Roesler, R. Engel, and J. Ranft, arXiv:hep-ph/0012252.]. After some modifications, it reproduces the muon flux below 1GeV/c at balloon altitudes better than the modified DPMJET-III, which we used for the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux in previous works [T. Sanuki, M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 75, 043005 (2007).10.1103/PhysRevD.75.043005][M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, S. Midorikawa, and T. Sanuki, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 75, 043006 (2007).10.1103/PhysRevD.75.043006]. Some improvements in the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux are also reported.

  6. Prospects for a Low Threshold Neutrino Experiment at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane

    2008-10-01

    A low-threshold neutrino scattering experiment at a high-intensity stopped-pion neutrino source has the potential to measure coherent neutral current neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering. Coherent scattering is a vital process for driving stellar explosion mechanisms which are as yet poorly understood in supernova evolution, and may provide a means to detect neutrino bursts from nearby supernova. The coherent scattering interaction rate can be very precisely calculated in the Standard Model, therefore comparison to measurements provides for another means to test the Standard Model and an opportunity to search for non-standard neutrino interactions. A promising prospect for the measurement of this process is a proposed noble-liquid-based experiment, dubbed CLEAR (Coherent Low-Energy A(Nuclear) Recoils), at the Spallation Neutron Source located at ORNL in Tennessee. This talk will describe the CLEAR proposal and its physics reach.

  7. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Parameter Sensitivity in Future Long-Baseline Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The study of neutrino interactions and propagation has produced evidence for physics beyond the standard model and promises to continue to shed light on rare phenomena. Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations in the late 1990s there have been rapid advances in establishing the three flavor paradigm of neutrino oscillations. The 2012 discovery of a large value for the last unmeasured missing angle has opened the way for future experiments to search for charge-parity symmetry violation in the lepton sector. This thesis presents an analysis of the future sensitivity to neutrino oscillations in the three flavor paradigm for the T2K, NO A, LBNE, and T2HK experiments. The theory of the three flavor paradigm is explained and the methods to use these theoretical predictions to design long baseline neutrino experiments are described. The sensitivity to the oscillation parameters for each experiment is presented with a particular focus on the search for CP violation and the measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy. The variations of these sensitivities with statistical considerations and experimental design optimizations taken into account are explored. The effects of systematic uncertainties in the neutrino flux, interaction, and detection predictions are also considered by incorporating more advanced simulations inputs from the LBNE experiment.

  9. Neutrino Oscillations and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David

    2001-04-01

    When the existence of the neutrino was almost apologetically first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli it was intended to explain the mysterious apparent absence of energy and momentum in beta decay. 70 years later the neutrino has indeed solved that mystery, but it has generated still more of its own. Are neutrinos massive? Is it possible to create a neutrino with its spin in the same direction as its momentum? What fraction of the mass of the Universe is made up of neutrinos? Are the flavour labels which we put on neutrinos, like electron and muon, really fixed or can they change? Why does no experiment see the predicted flux of neutrinos from the Sun? Why do there appear to be roughly equal numbers of muon and electron neutrinos created in our atmosphere, rather than the 2:1 ratio we would expect? Many of these questions were coupled when Bruno Pontecorvo first suggested that the shortfall in solar neutrino measurements were caused by neutrino oscillations - neutrinos spontaneously changing flavour as they travel from the Sun. 30 years later we still await definitive proof of that conjecture, and providing that proof is the reason for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The talk will discuss the current state of neutrino oscillations studies, and show how the unique capabilities of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory can provide definitive proof of whether neutrino oscillations are the long-sought answer to the solar neutrino problem.

  10. Results from the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaprice, Frank; Galbiati, Cristiano; Wright, Alex; Ianni, Aldo

    2012-11-01

    Borexino is a low-background liquid scintillation detector currently acquiring solar and terrestrial neutrino data at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy. Since the start of operations in 2007, Borexino has produced measurements of 7Be, 8B, and pep solar neutrinos, as well as measurements of terrestrial and long-baseline reactor antineutrinos. The measurements were made possible by the development of low-background scintillator spectroscopy that enabled direct detection of sub-MeV solar neutrinos. The general design features of the detector are described together with current results and prospects for future measurements.

  11. Discovering the Majorana neutrino: The next generation of experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, L. A.

    2015-07-15

    The discovery of a Majorana neutrino would be revolutionary with far-reaching consequences in both particle physics and cosmology. The only feasible experiments to determine the Majorana nature of the neutrino are searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The next generation of double-beta decay experiments are being prepared. The general goal is to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay throughout the parameter space corresponding to the inverted hierarchy for neutrino mass. There are a several strong proposals for how to achieve this goal. The status of these efforts is reviewed.

  12. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Daya Bay Collaboration; Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-12-15

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin^2(2*theta_13) to better than 0.01 at 90percent CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  13. Neutrino mass ordering in future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jue

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by recent intensive experimental efforts on searching for neutrinoless double beta decays, we present a detailed quantitative analysis on the prospect of resolving neutrino mass ordering in the next generation 76Ge-type experiments.

  14. Wave-packet treatment of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yat-Long; Chu, M.-C.; Tsui, Ka Ming; Wong, Chan Fai; Xu, Jianyi

    2016-06-01

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 σ confidence level.

  15. Precision measurement of solar neutrino oscillation parameters by a long-baseline reactor neutrino experiment in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcov, S. T.; Schwetz, T.

    2006-11-01

    We consider the determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters Δm212 and θ12 by studying oscillations of reactor anti-neutrinos emitted by nuclear power plants (located mainly in France) with a detector installed in the Frejus underground laboratory. The performances of a water Čerenkov detector of 147 kt fiducial mass doped with 0.1% of gadolinium (MEMPHYS-Gd) and of a 50 kt scale liquid scintillator detector (LENA) are compared. In both cases 3σ uncertainties below 3% on Δm212 and of about 20% on sin2θ12 can be obtained after one year of data taking. The gadolinium doped Super-Kamiokande detector (SK-Gd) in Japan can reach a similar precision if the SK/MEMPHYS fiducial mass ratio of 1 to 7 is compensated by a longer SK-Gd data taking time. Several years of reactor neutrino data collected by MEMPHYS-Gd or LENA would allow a determination of Δm212 and sin2θ12 with uncertainties of approximately 1% and 10% at 3σ, respectively. These accuracies are comparable to those that can be reached in the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters Δm312 and sin2θ23 in long-baseline superbeam experiments.

  16. NEUTRINO FACTORY AND BETA BEAM EXPERIMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALBRIGHT, C.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.; GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; ET AL.

    2004-09-21

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here. There has been no corresponding activity in the U.S. on Beta Beam facility design and, given the very limited resources, there is little prospect of starting a significant U.S. Beta Beam R&D effort in the near future. However, the Beta Beam concept is interesting, and progress on its development in Europe should be followed. The Neutrino Factory R&D program has reached a critical stage in which support is required for two crucial international experiments and a third-generation international design study. If this support is forthcoming, a Neutrino Factory could be added to the Neutrino Community's road map in about a decade.

  17. Muon and neutrino results from KGF experiment at a depth of 7000 hg/square cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Menon, M. G. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Streekantan, B. V.; Hayashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Kawakami, S.; Miyake, S.

    1985-01-01

    The KGF nucleon decay experiment at a depth of 7000 hg/sq cm has provided valuable data on muons and neutrinos. The detector comprised of 34 crossed layers of proportional counters (cross section 10 x 10 sq cm; lengths 4m and 6m) sandwiched between 1.2 cm thick iron plates can record tracks of charged particles to an accuracy of 1 deg from tracks that traverse the whole of the detector. A special two-fold coincidence system enables the detector to record charged particles that enter at very large zenith angles. In a live time of 3.6 years about 2600 events have been recorded. These events include atmospheric muons, neutrino induced muons from rock, stopping muons, showers and events which have their production vertex inside the detectors. The results on atmospheric muons and neutrino events are presented.

  18. Latest progress from the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Recently the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has presented several new results about neutrino and reactor physics after acquiring a large data sample and after gaining a more sophisticated understanding of the experiment. In this talk I will introduce the latest progress made by the experiment including a three-flavor neutrino oscillation analysis using neutron capture on gadolinium, which gave sin2 2θ 13 = 0.084 ± 0.005 and |Δm2 ee| = (2.42 ±0.11) × 10-3 eV2, an independent θ 13 measurement using neutron capture on hydrogen, a search for a light sterile neutrino, and a measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum.

  19. A Sterile-Neutrino Search with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the the NuMI beamline at Fermilab, USA. Using a near detector at 1 km distance from the neutrino production target, and a far detector at 735 km from the target, it is designed primarily to measure the disappearance of muon neutrinos. This thesis presents an analysis using MINOS data of the possibility of oscil- lation of the neutrinos in the NuMI beam to a hypothetical sterile flavour, which would have no Standard Model couplings. Such oscillations would result in a deficit in the neutral current interaction rate in the MINOS far detector relative to the expectation derived from the near detector data. The method used to identify neutral current and charged current events in the MINOS detectors is described and a new method of predicting and fitting the far detector spectrum presented, along with the effects of systematic uncertainties on the sterile neutrino oscillation analysis. Using this analysis, the fraction fs of the disappearing neutrinos that go to steriles is constrained to be below 0.15 at the 90% confidence level in the absence of electron neutrino appearance in the NuMI beam. With electron appearance at the CHOOZ limit, fs < 0.41 at 90% C.L.

  20. Prompt atmospheric neutrinos and muons: NLO versus LO QCD predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela; Gondolo, Paolo; Varieschi, Gabriele

    2000-02-01

    We compare the leading and next-to-leading order QCD predictions for the flux of atmospheric muons and neutrinos from decays of charmed particles. We find that the full NLO lepton fluxes can be approximated to within {approx}10% by the Born-level fluxes multiplied by an overall factor of 2.2-2.4, which depends slightly on the PDF. This supports the approach of Thunman, Ingelman and Gondolo. We also find that their very low lepton fluxes are due to the mild slope they used for the gluon distribution function at small momentum fractions, and that substantially larger lepton fluxes result when the slope of the gluon distribution function at small momentum fractions is larger. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Search for the appearance of atmospheric tau neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zepeng; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Super-K is a 50 kiloton Water Cherenkov detector with 22.5 kiloton of fiducial volume located at a depth of 2700 meters water equivalent. The large target mass in the fiducial volume offers an opportunity to search for rare tau neutrino appearance from oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos. Events after reduction are classified by a particle identification, based on a neural network (Multilayer Perceptrons), that is optimized to distinguish tau leptons produced by charged-current tau neutrino interactions from electron and muon neutrino interactions in the detector. Super-K atmospheric neutrino data are fit with an unbinned maximum likelihood method to search for tau neutrino appearance. The talk presented results with data taken between 1996 and 2014, comprising 4582 days of live time.

  2. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  3. Light sterile neutrinos, spin flavor precession, and the solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Pulido, João; Picariello, Marco

    2009-04-01

    We generalize to three active flavors a previous two-flavor model for the resonant spin flavor conversion of solar neutrinos to sterile ones, a mechanism which is added to the well-known large mixing angle (LMA) one. The transition magnetic moments from the muon and tau neutrinos to the sterile play the dominant role in fixing the amount of active flavor suppression. We also show, through numerical integration of the evolution equations, that the data from all solar neutrino experiments except Borexino exhibit a clear preference for a sizable magnetic field either in the convection zone or in the core and radiation zone. This is possibly related to the fact that the data from the first set are average ones taken during a period of mostly intense solar activity, whereas in contrast Borexino data were taken during a period of quiet Sun. We argue that the solar neutrino experiments are capable of tracing the possible modulation of the solar magnetic field. Those monitoring the high-energy neutrinos, namely, the B8 flux, appear to be sensitive to a field modulation either in the convection zone or in the core and radiation zone. Those monitoring the low-energy fluxes will be sensitive to the second type of solar field profiles only. In this way Borexino alone may play an essential role, since it examines both energy sectors, although experimental redundancy from other experiments will be most important.

  4. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  5. The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment: Scintillator purification and surface contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Michael

    The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment will observe the monoenergetic (862 keV) 7Be neutrinos, produced in the solar reaction 7Be+e- →7 Li+nue. These neutrinos are the second most abundant species of solar neutrinos, with an expected flux at earth of 5 x 109/cm2/s. Using nu - e scattering in an aromatic liquid scintillator, Borexino will make the first real time measurement of the solar neutrino flux at energies less than 1 MeV. In addition to checking Standard Solar Model and neutrino oscillation predictions at low energies, Borexino will test the MSW vacuum-matter transition, luminosity constraint, and non-standard theories such as mass varying neutrinos. The Borexino detector will also be sensitive to supernova neutrinos, geoneutrinos, reactor neutrinos, and pep solar neutrinos. The pep measurement will tightly constrain the primary pp solar neutrino flux whose energy is below the Borexino threshold. With an expected rate of 35 events per day from solar 7Be neutrinos, the maximum tolerable background rate is one count per day. Removal of radioactive isotopes from the liquid scintillator is essential for the experiment's success and will be achieved with purification techniques including filtration, distillation, water extraction, nitrogen stripping, and silica gel adsorption. Results from small-scale purification efficiency tests are presented. Water extraction showed moderate but inadequate removal of 210Po which is a dominant background. Distillation reduced 210Po by a factor of more than 500. Online purification involves cycling over 300 m3 of scintillator from the detector though the purification plants. Flow patterns within the detector that influence the purification efficiency were determined with numerical simulations. Poor flow in the prototype Counting Test Facility showed effectively stagnant volumes within the detector. These are not present in the larger Borexino detector. Surface contamination in Borexino arises primarily from contact with

  6. Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

    1963-06-01

    Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

  7. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect

    Mangano, Salvatore; Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  8. OscSNS: A Precision Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, William

    2012-03-01

    Short baseline neutrino experiments are consistent with neutrino oscillations at a δm^2 of approximately 1 eV^2, and world neutrino and antineutrino data fit reasonably well to a 3+2 (active+sterile) neutrino oscillation model with CP violation. The OscSNS experiment at ORNL would be able to make precision short-baseline neutrino oscillation measurements and prove that sterile neutrinos exist. The OscSNS experiment will be described and the corresponding neutrino oscillation sensitivities will be discussed.

  9. Review of Current and Future Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    There has been a surge of progress and published results in neutrino cross-section physics in recent years. In many cases, absolute differential cross-sections are being measured for the first time and can be compared to interaction models first developed decades ago. These measurements are important input for the next generation of accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments where precise understanding of both signal and background channels will be critical to the observation of sub-dominant oscillation effects. This paper discusses recent results from several experiments and describes new experiments currently under construction dedicated to making these measurements with unprecedented precision.

  10. Review of Current and Future Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.

    2010-03-30

    There has been a surge of progress and published results in neutrino cross-section physics in recent years. In many cases, absolute differential cross-sections are being measured for the first time and can be compared to interaction models first developed decades ago. These measurements are important input for the next generation of accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments where precise understanding of both signal and background channels will be critical to the observation of sub-dominant oscillation effects. This paper discusses recent results from several experiments and describes new experiments currently under construction dedicated to making these measurements with unprecedented precision.

  11. The Borexino solar neutrino experiment and its scintillator containment vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadonati, Laura

    2001-05-01

    Thirty years ago, the first solar neutrino detector proved fusion reactions power the Sun. However, the total rate detected in this and all subsequent solar neutrino experiments is consistently two to three times lower than predicted by the Standard Solar Model. Current experiments seek to explain this ``solar neutrino puzzle'' through non-standard particle properties, like neutrino mass and flavor mixing, within the context of the MSW theory. The detection of the monoenergetic 7Be solar neutrino is the missing clue for the solution of the solar neutrino problem; this constitutes the main physics goal of Borexino, a real- time, high-statistics solar neutrino detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain, in Italy. In the first part of this thesis, I present a Monte Carlo study of the expected performance of Borexino, with simulations of the neutrino rate, the external y background and the α/β/γ activity in the scintillator. The Standard Solar Model predicts a solar neutrino rate of about 60 events/day in Borexino in the 0.25-0.8 MeV window, mostly due to 7Be neutrinos. Given the design scintillator radiopurity levels (10-16 g/g 238U and 232Th and 10-14 g/g K), Borexino will detect such a rate with a ~2.4% statistical error, after one year. In the MSW Small (Large) Angle scenario, the predicted rate of ~13 (33) events/day will be detected with 8% (4%) error. The sensitivity of Borexino to 8B and pp neutrinos and to a Galactic supernova event is also discussed. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to the liquid scintillator containment vessel, an 8.5 m diameter sphere built of bonded panels of 0.125 mm polymer film. Through an extensive materials testing program we have identified an amorphous nylon-6 film which meets all the critical requirements for the success of Borexino. I describe tests of tensile strength, measurements of 222Rn diffusion through thin nylon films and of optical clarity. I discuss how the materials' radiopurity and mechanical

  12. Long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, D.; Carroll, A.; Chiang, I.

    1995-04-01

    The authors present a design for a multidetector long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the BNL AGS. It has been approved by the BNL-HENP-PAC as AGS Experiment 889. The experiment will search for oscillations in the nu(sub mu) disappearance channel and the nu(sub mu) reversible reaction nu(sub e) appearance channel by means of four identical neutrino detectors located 1, 3, 24, and 68 km from the AGS neutrino source. Observed depletion of the nu(sub mu) flux (via quasi-elastic muon neutrino events, nu(sub mu)n yields mu(-)p) in the far detectors not attended by an observed proportional increase of the nu(sub e) flux (via quasi-elastic electron neutrino events, nu(sub e)n yields e(-)p) in those detectors will be prima facie evidence for the oscillation channel nu(sub mu) reversible reaction nu(sub tau). The experiment is directed toward exploration of the region of the neutrino oscillation parameters Delta m(exp 2) and sin(exp 2) 2 theta, suggested by the Kamiokande and IMB deep underground detectors but it will also explore a region more than two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous accelerator experiments. The experiment will run in a mode new to BNL. It will receive the fast extracted proton beam on the neutrino target approximately 20 hours per day when the AGS is not filling RHIC. A key aspect of the experimental design involves placing the detectors 1.5 degrees off the center line of the neutrino beam, which has the important advantage that the central value of the neutrino energy (approximately 1 GeV) and the beam spectral shape are, to a good approximation, the same in all four detectors. The proposed detectors are massive, imaging, water Cherenkov detectors similar in large part to the Kamiokande and IMB detectors. The design has profited from their decade-long experience, and from the detector designs of the forthcoming SNO and SuperKamiokande detectors.

  13. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Ruth B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  14. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  15. Detector-related backgrounds in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leber, Michelle; Katrin Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment, or KATRIN, is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment to directly measure neutrino mass with an expected sensitivity of 0.2 eV [KATRIN Design Report 2004 see http://www-ik.fzk.de/~katrin/]. Neutrino mass does not fit into the Standard Model, and determining this mass may set the scale of new physics. To achieve this level of sensitivity, backgrounds in the experiment must be minimized. A complete Geant4 [Agostinelli S et al. 2003 Nuclear Instr. Methods A 506 250-303 Allison J et al. 2006 IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science53 No. 1 270-8] simulation of KATRIN's focal plane detector and surrounding region is being developed. These simulations will help guide the design and selection of shielding and detector construction materials to reduce backgrounds from cosmic rays and natural radioactivity.

  16. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos, and the neutrino-induced muon flux underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liland, A.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion equation for neutrino-induced cosmic ray muons underground was solved. The neutrino-induced muon flux and charge ratio underground have been calculated. The calculated horizontal neutrino-induced muon flux in the energy range 0.1 - 10000 GeV is in agreement with the measured horizontal flux. The calculated vertical flux above 2 GeV is in agreement with the measured vertical flux. The average charge ratio of neutrino-induced muons underground was found to be mu+/mu- = 0.40.

  17. Bounds on sterile neutrino parameters from reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Kalpana

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we present a realistic analysis of the potential of the present-day reactor experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO for probing the existence of sterile neutrinos. We present exclusion regions for sterile oscillation parameters and find that these experimental set-ups give significant bounds on the parameter Θee especially in the low sterile oscillation region 0.01 < Δm241 < 0.05 eV2. These bounds can add to our understanding of the sterile neutrino sector since there is still a tension in the allowed regions from different experiments for sterile parameters.

  18. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiali; Tiedt, Douglas

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  19. Atmospheric Climate Experiment Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, K.

    ACE+ is an atmospheric sounding mission using radio occultation techniques and is a combination of the two Earth Explorer missions ACE and WATS earlier proposed to ESA. ACE was highly rated by ESA in the Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 1999 and was prioritised as number three and selected as a "hot-stand-by". A phase A study was carried out during 2000 and 2001. ACE will observe atmospheric parameters using radio occultations from an array of 6 micro-satellites which track the L- band signal of GPS satellites to map the detailed refractivity and thermal structure of the global atmosphere from surface to space. Water vapour and wind in Atmospheric Troposphere and Stratosphere WATS was the response to ESA's Call for Ideas for the next Earth Explorer Core Missions in 2001. WATS combines ACE GPS atmospheric occultations and LEO-LEO cross-link occultations. Cross-links strongly enhance the capability of measuring humidity relative to the ACE mission. The Earth Science Advisory Committée at ESA noted that the LEO-GNSS occultation technique is already well established through several missions in recent years and could not recommend WATS for a Phase A study as an Earth Explorer Core Mission. The ESAC was, however, deeply impressed by the LEO-LEO component of the WATS proposal and would regard it as regrettable if this science would be lost and encourages the ACE/WATS team to explore other means to achieve its scientific goal. ACE+ is therefore the response to ESA's 2nd Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 2001 and will contribute in a significant manner to ESA's Living Planet Programme. ACE+ will considerably advance our knowledge about atmosphere physics and climate change processes. The mission will demonstrate a highly innovative approach using radio occultations for globally measuring profiles of humidity and temperature throughout the atmosphere and stratosphere. A constellation of 4 small satellites, tracking L-band GPS/GALILEO signals and

  20. MINERvA: A Dedicated neutrino scattering experiment at NuMI

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin S.; /Rochester U.

    2006-05-01

    MINERvA is a dedicated neutrino cross-section experiment planned for the near detector hall of the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. I summarize the detector design and physics capabilities of the experiment.

  1. Discrimination of the mass hierarchy with atmospheric neutrinos at a magnetized muon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2010-02-01

    We have studied the mass hierarchy with atmospheric neutrinos considering the muon energy and zenith angle of the event at the magnetized iron calorimeter detector. For {chi}{sup 2} analysis we have migrated the number of events from neutrino energy and zenith angle bins to muon energy and zenith angle bins using the two-dimensional energy-angle correlated resolution functions. Then the {chi}{sup 2} is marginalized considering all possible systematic uncertainties of the atmospheric neutrino flux and cross section. The effects of the ranges of oscillation parameters on the marginalization are also studied. The lower limit of the range of {theta}{sub 13} for marginalization is found to be very crucial in determining the sensitivity of hierarchy for a given {theta}{sub 13}. Finally, we show that one can discriminate atmospheric neutrino mass hierarchy at >90% C.L. if the lower limit of {theta}{sub 13{>=}}5 deg.

  2. Sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.; Maltoni, M.; Schwetz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  3. Evidence for the appearance of atmospheric tau neutrinos in super-Kamiokande.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Marti, Ll; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Labarga, L; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Lopez, G D; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Martens, K; Schuemann, J; Vagins, M R; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E; Wilkes, R J

    2013-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data were fit with an unbinned maximum likelihood method to search for the appearance of tau leptons resulting from the interactions of oscillation-generated tau neutrinos in the detector. Relative to the expectation of unity, the tau normalization is found to be 1.42 ± 0.35(stat)(-0.12)(+0.14)(syst) excluding the no-tau-appearance hypothesis, for which the normalization would be zero, at the 3.8σ level. We estimate that 180.1 ± 44.3(stat)(-15.2)(+17.8) (syst) tau leptons were produced in the 22.5 kton fiducial volume of the detector by tau neutrinos during the 2806 day running period. In future analyses, this large sample of selected tau events will allow the study of charged current tau neutrino interaction physics with oscillation produced tau neutrinos. PMID:23683190

  4. Omnibus experiment: CPT and CP violation with sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Novikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, M. V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wurm, M.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to probe both the CPT and CP violation together with the search for sterile neutrinos in one do-it-all experiment. This omnibus experiment would utilize neutrino oscillometry with large scintillator detectors like LENA, JUNO or RENO-50 and manmade radioactive sources similar to the ones used by the GALLEX experiment. Our calculations indicate that such an experiment is realistic and could be performed in parallel to the main research plan for JUNO, LENA, or RENO-50. Assuming as the starting point the values of the oscillation parameters indicated by the current global fit (in 3 active + 1 sterile scenario) and requiring at least 5 sigma confidence level, we estimate that with the proposed experiment we would be able to detect CPT mass anomalies of the order of 1% or larger.

  5. Three flavor oscillation analysis of atmospheric neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Roger Alexandre

    In this dissertation atmospheric neutrino data from the 50 kiloton water-Cherenkov detector, Super-Kamiokande, are studied in the context of neutrino oscillations. Data presented here are taken from the 1489-day SK-I and 803-day SK-II exposures. Super-Kamiokande's atmospheric neutrino sample exhibits a zenith angle dependent deficit of numu interactions which is well explained by maximal two-flavor numu↔nutau oscillations. This analysis extends the two-flavor framework to include all active neutrino flavors and searches for sub-dominant oscillation effects in the oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos. If the last unknown mixing angle, theta 13, is non-zero there is enhancement (suppression) of the nu mu→nue three-flavor oscillation probability in matter for several GeV neutrinos with long baselines under the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy. At Super-Kamiokande this effect would manifest itself as an increase in the high energy nue event rate coming from below the detector. Searching the SK-I, SK-II and their combined data finds no evidence of a rate excess and yields a best fit to theta 13 of zero assuming either hierarchy. This extended analysis remains consistent with the current knowledge of two-flavor atmospheric mixing finding best fit values sin2theta23 = 0.5 and Delta m2 = 2.6 x 10-3 eV2. No preference for either the normal or inverted mass hierarchy is found in the data.

  6. Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics with AMANDA-II

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Collaboration, IceCube

    2009-06-02

    The AMANDA-II detector, operating since 2000 in the deep ice at the geographic South Pole, has accumulated a large sample of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the 100 GeV to 10 TeV energy range. The zenith angle and energy distribution of these events can be used to search for various phenomenological signatures of quantum gravity in the neutrino sector, such as violation of Lorentz invariance (VLI) or quantum decoherence (QD). Analyzing a set of 5511 candidate neutrino events collected during 1387 days of livetime from 2000 to 2006, we find no evidence for such effects and set upper limits on VLI and QD parameters using a maximum likelihood method. Given the absence of evidence for new flavor-changing physics, we use the same methodology to determine the conventional atmospheric muon neutrino flux above 100 GeV.

  7. Searching for quantum gravity with high-energy atmospheric neutrinos and AMANDA-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, John Lawrence

    2008-06-01

    The AMANDA-II detector, operating since 2000 in the deep ice at the geographic South Pole, has accumulated a large sample of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the 100 GeV to 10 TeV energy range. The zenith angle and energy distribution of these events can be used to search for various phenomenological signatures of quantum gravity in the neutrino sector, such as violation of Lorentz invariance (VLI) or quantum decoherence (QD). Analyzing a set of 5511 candidate neutrino events collected during 1387 days of livetime from 2000 to 2006, we find no evidence for such effects and set upper limits on VLI and QD parameters using a maximum likelihood method. Given the absence of new flavor-changing physics, we use the same methodology to determine the conventional atmospheric muon neutrino flux above 100 GeV.

  8. Neutrino oscillation physics potential of the T2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T2K Collaboration; Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; de Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaker, F.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2015-04-01

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle θ _{13} have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal sin ^22θ _{23}, the octant of θ _{23}, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of δ _{CP}, sin ^2θ _{23}, and Δ m^2_{32}, for various combinations of ν-mode and bar {ν }-mode data-taking. With an exposure of 7.8× 10^{21} protons-on-target, T2K can achieve 1σ resolution of 0.050 (0.054) on sin ^2θ _{23} and 0.040 (0.045)× 10^{-3} {eV}^2 on Δ m^2_{32} for 100% (50%) neutrino beam mode running assuming sin ^2θ _{23}=0.5 and Δ m^2_{32} = 2.4× 10^{-3} eV^2. T2K will have sensitivity to the CP-violating phase δ _{CP} at 90% C.L. or better over a significant range. For example, if sin ^22θ _{23} is maximal (i.e. θ _{23}=45°) the range is -115° < δ _{CP}< -60° for normal hierarchy and +50° < δ _{CP}< +130° for inverted hierarchy. When T2K data is combined with data from the NOνA experiment, the region of oscillation parameter space where there is sensitivity to observe a non-zero δ _{CP} is substantially increased compared to if each experiment is analyzed alone.

  9. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  10. Search for Neutrino Radiation from Collapsing Stars and the Sensitivity of Experiments to the Different Types of Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.

    2013-11-01

    The experiments running to search for neutrino radiation from collapsing stars up to now traditionally take one's bearings for the detection of the ˜ ν e p -> e^ + n reaction and, accordingly, for the use of the hadrogenate targets. The observation of neutrino radiation from SN1987A showed that it is important to have in the composition of the targets beside the hadrogen also other nuclei suitable to neutrino radiation detection. In particular the presence of iron nuclei in the LSD provided for the sensational detection of νe flux at 2:52 UT on February 23 1987 when other more powerful detectors with their hadrogenate targets could not respond to this type of neutrino. The sensitivity of present searching experiments to different types of neutrino radiation from collapsing stars is discussed in the paper.

  11. Atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos above 1 TeV interacting in IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Larsen, D. T.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Rees, I.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory was designed primarily to search for high-energy (TeV-PeV) neutrinos produced in distant astrophysical objects. A search for ≳100 TeV neutrinos interacting inside the instrumented volume has recently provided evidence for an isotropic flux of such neutrinos. At lower energies, IceCube collects large numbers of neutrinos from the weak decays of mesons in cosmic-ray air showers. Here we present the results of a search for neutrino interactions inside IceCube's instrumented volume between 1 TeV and 1 PeV in 641 days of data taken from 2010-2012, lowering the energy threshold for neutrinos from the southern sky below 10 TeV for the first time, far below the threshold of the previous high-energy analysis. Astrophysical neutrinos remain the dominant component in the southern sky down to a deposited energy of 10 TeV. From these data we derive new constraints on the diffuse astrophysical neutrino spectrum, Φν=2.0 6-0.3+0.4×1 0-18(Eν/1 05 GeV ) -2.46 ±0.12GeV-1 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 for 25 TeV neutrinos from charmed-meson decay in the atmosphere, 1.52 times the benchmark theoretical prediction used in previous IceCube results at 90% confidence.

  12. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-01

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  13. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  14. Some comments on high precision study of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    I discuss here some problems connected with the high precision study of neutrino oscillations. In the general case of n-neutrino mixing I derive a convenient expression for transition probability in which only independent terms (and mass-squared differences) enter. For three-neutrino mixing I discuss a problem of a definition of a large (atmospheric) neutrino mass-squared difference. I comment also possibilities to reveal the character of neutrino mass spectrum in future reactor neutrino experiments.

  15. The radon monitoring system in Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. C.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Pun, C. S. J.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a highly sensitive, reliable and portable automatic system (H3) to monitor the radon concentration of the underground experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. H3 is able to measure radon concentration with a statistical error less than 10% in a 1-h measurement of dehumidified air (R.H. 5% at 25 °C) with radon concentration as low as 50 Bq/m3. This is achieved by using a large radon progeny collection chamber, semiconductor α-particle detector with high energy resolution, improved electronics and software. The integrated radon monitoring system is highly customizable to operate in different run modes at scheduled times and can be controlled remotely to sample radon in ambient air or in water from the water pools where the antineutrino detectors are being housed. The radon monitoring system has been running in the three experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment since November 2013.

  16. Constraining the nonstandard interaction parameters in long baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huitu, Katri; Kärkkäinen, Timo J.; Maalampi, Jukka; Vihonen, Sampsa

    2016-03-01

    In this article we investigate the prospects for probing the strength of the possible nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We find that these experiments are sensitive to NSI couplings down to the level of 0.01-0.1 depending on the oscillation channel and the baseline length, as well as on the detector's fiducial mass. We also investigate the interference of the leptonic C P angle δC P with the constraining of the NSI couplings. It is found that the interference is strong in the case of the νe↔νμ and νe↔ντ transitions but not significant in other transitions. In our numerical analysis we apply the GLoBES software and use the LBNO setup as our benchmark.

  17. Meson production in photon and neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shimony, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{sub fast}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} has been studied with the linearly polarized 20 GeV monochromatic photon beam at the SLAC Hybrid Facility, to test the prediction of s channel helicity conservation in inelastic diffraction for t{prime} < 0.4 (GeV/c){sup 2}. In a sample of 1934 events from this reaction, the {rho}{sup 0} decay angular distributions and spin density matrix elements are consistent with s channel helicity conservation. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} mass shape displays the same skewing as seen in the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, and the p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} mass distribution compares well and scale according to the vector dominance model with that produced in {pi}{sup {plus minus}}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}. Coherent production of the a{sub 1} meson has been observed through the reaction {nu}Fr {yields} {mu}{sup {minus}}a{sub 1}{sup +}Fr in the Tohoku 1m freon bubble chamber hybrid system. The bubble chamber was exposed to the Fermilab wideband neutrino beam, generated by 800 GeV protons at the Tevatron. The observed rate from the final charged current sample of 1792 events was 1.1 {plus minus} 0.47%, and the a{sub 1} - W coupling is calculated to be f{sup 2}{sub a}/f{sup 2}{sub {rho}} = 5.2 {plus minus} 2.2. A comparison of the cross section and the kinematical parameters with the theoretical predictions of the vector dominance model, gives reasonable agreement with the data. A Monte-Carlo study was performed to check the possibility of detecting the radiative decay of the D*{sub s} in our bubble chamber. Using the most favorable predicted rate through the {phi} branching ratio, it was determined that three times our data sample would be needed for a one {sigma} effect above background.

  18. A search for sterile neutrinos at the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pittam, Robert Neil

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. The experiment was designed to study neutrino oscillation phenomena. The vμ beam produced by the NuMI beam facility at FNAL is used along with two functionally identical detectors. The Near Detector at FNAL and a Far Detector 735 km away in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. Comparison of the observed spectra of neutrinos at the two detectors provides the evidence for neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work on the postulated phenomena of sterile neutrinos. Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos will lead to a deficit in the expected rate of measured Neutral Current interactions at the Far Detector. A technique for selecting Neutral Current events utilizing an Artificial Neural Network is presented with resulting overall efficiency of 91.1% and purity of 66.0%. A method of predicting the expected Charged and Neutral Current energy spectra at the Far Detector given the data recorded at the Near Detector is presented. A model to search for oscillations between sterile and active neutrinos is developed. Sources of systematic uncertainty that can effect the results of the analysis are discussed. The analysis developed is applied to a Standard Model 3 flavour oscillation model as a cross check under the scenarios with and without ve appearance. The oscillation parameters measured by this model are Δm322 = (2.39-0.15+0.23) x 10-3 eV2 and θ23 = 0.727-0.11+0.22 for the no ve appearance result. An analysis of the resulting prediction reveals no evidence for active neutrino disappearance. The analysis is then performed using the 4 flavour neutrino oscillation model developed. Again this is done under the 2 scenarios of ve appearance and no ve appearance

  19. Probing new physics with long-lived charged particles produced by atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Profumo, Stefano; Beacom, John F; Rainwater, David E-mail: beacom@mps.ohio-state.edu E-mail: rain@pas.rochester.edu

    2008-04-15

    As suggested by some extensions of the standard model of particle physics, dark matter may be a super-weakly-interacting lightest stable particle, while the next-to-lightest particle (NLP) is charged and metastable. One could test such a possibility with neutrino telescopes, by detecting the charged NLPs produced in high-energy neutrino collisions with Earth matter. We study the production of charged NLPs by both atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos; only the latter, which is largely uncertain and has not been detected yet, was the focus of previous studies. We compute the resulting fluxes of the charged NLPs, compare those of different origins and analyze the dependence on the underlying particle physics set-up. We point out that, even if the astrophysical neutrino flux is very small, atmospheric neutrinos, especially those from the prompt decay of charmed mesons, may provide a detectable flux of NLP pairs at neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. We also comment on the flux of charged NLPs expected from proton-nucleon collisions and show that, for theoretically motivated and phenomenologically viable models, it is typically subdominant and below detectable rates.

  20. Probing new physics with long-lived charged particles produced by atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Beacom, John F.; Profumo, Stefano; Rainwater, David

    2008-04-01

    As suggested by some extensions of the standard model of particle physics, dark matter may be a super-weakly-interacting lightest stable particle, while the next-to-lightest particle (NLP) is charged and metastable. One could test such a possibility with neutrino telescopes, by detecting the charged NLPs produced in high-energy neutrino collisions with Earth matter. We study the production of charged NLPs by both atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos; only the latter, which is largely uncertain and has not been detected yet, was the focus of previous studies. We compute the resulting fluxes of the charged NLPs, compare those of different origins and analyze the dependence on the underlying particle physics set-up. We point out that, even if the astrophysical neutrino flux is very small, atmospheric neutrinos, especially those from the prompt decay of charmed mesons, may provide a detectable flux of NLP pairs at neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. We also comment on the flux of charged NLPs expected from proton-nucleon collisions and show that, for theoretically motivated and phenomenologically viable models, it is typically subdominant and below detectable rates.

  1. Slow control systems of the Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Jang, H. I.; Choi, W. Q.; Choi, Y.; Jang, J. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y. D.; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, J. K.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Park, I. G.; Park, J. S.; Park, R. G.; Seo, H. K.; Seo, S. H.; Shin, C. D.; Siyeon, K.; Yeo, I. S.; Yu, I.

    2016-02-01

    The RENO experiment has been in operation since August 2011 to measure reactor antineutrino disappearance using identical near and far detectors. For accurate measurements of neutrino mixing parameters and efficient data taking, it is crucial to monitor and control the detector in real time. Environmental conditions also need to be monitored for stable operation of detectors as well as for safety reasons. In this paper, we report the design, hardware, operation, and performance of the slow control system.

  2. Direct neutrino mass experiments and exotic charged current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludl, Patrick Otto; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of exotic charged current interactions on the electron energy spectrum in tritium decay, focussing on the KATRIN experiment and a possible modified setup that has access to the full spectrum. Both sub-eV and keV neutrino masses are considered. We perform a fully relativistic calculation and take all possible new interactions into account, demonstrating the possible sizable distortions in the energy spectrum.

  3. NASA's atmospheric variability experiments /AVE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, K.; Turner, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    A series of seven mesoscale experiments were conducted under the NASA program, Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE). Rawinsonde, satellite, aircraft, and ground observations were recorded during specially selected meteorological periods lasting from 1 to 3 days. Details are presented for each AVE relative to observation times, experiment size and location, and significant weather. Some research results based on the use of these AVE data are referenced. These include contributions to regional numerical prediction; relations between wind shears, instability, and thunderstorm motion and development; relations between moisture and temperature and the probability of convection; retrieval of tropospheric temperature profiles from cloud-contaminated satellite data; variation of convection intensity as a result of atmospheric variability; and effects of cloud rotation on their trajectories.

  4. Contribution of gallium experiments to the understanding of solar physics and neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrin, V. N.

    2013-10-15

    The results of gallium measurements of solar neutrino and measurements with artificial sources of neutrinos are presented. Conclusions are drawn from these results, and the potential of the SAGE experiment for studying transitions of active neutrinos to sterile states for {Delta}m{sup 2} > 0.5 eV{sup 2} and a sensitivity of a few percent to the disappearance of electron neutrinos is examined.

  5. Testing SO(10)-inspired leptogenesis with low energy neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: Antonio.Riotto@cern.ch

    2011-04-01

    We extend the results of a previous analysis of ours showing that, when both heavy and light flavour effects are taken into account, successful minimal (type I + thermal) leptogenesis with SO(10)-inspired relations is possible. Barring fine tuned choices of the parameters, these relations enforce a hierarchical RH neutrino mass spectrum that results into a final asymmetry dominantly produced by the next-to-lightest RH neutrino decays (N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis). We present the constraints on the whole set of low energy neutrino parameters. Allowing a small misalignment between the Dirac basis and the charged lepton basis as in the quark sector, the allowed regions enlarge and the lower bound on the reheating temperature gets relaxed to values as low as ∼ 10{sup 10} GeV. It is confirmed that for normal ordering (NO) there are two allowed ranges of values for the lightest neutrino mass: m{sub 1} ≅ (1−5) × 10{sup −3} eV and m{sub 1} ≅ (0.03−0.1) eV. For m{sub 1}∼<0.01 eV the allowed region in the plane θ{sub 13}-θ{sub 23} is approximately given by θ{sub 23}∼<49°+0.65 (θ{sub 13}−5°), while the neutrinoless double beta decay effective neutrino mass falls in the range m{sub ee} = (1−3) × 10{sup −3} eV for θ{sub 13} = (6°−11.5°). For m{sub 1}∼>0.01 eV, one has quite sharply m{sub ee} ≅ m{sub 1} and an upper bound θ{sub 23}∼<46°. These constraints will be tested by low energy neutrino experiments during next years. We also find that inverted ordering (IO), though quite strongly constrained, is not completely ruled out. In particular, we find approximately θ{sub 23} ≅ 43°+12° log (0.2 eV/m{sub 1}), that will be fully tested by future experiments.

  6. A letter of intent for a neutrino scattering experiment on the booster neutrino meanline: FINeSSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.T.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Yale U.

    2005-03-01

    The experiment described in this Letter of Intent provides a decisive measurement of {Delta}s, the spin of the nucleon carried by strange quarks. This is crucial as, after more than thirty years of study, the spin contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon is still not understood. The interpretation of {Delta}s measurements from inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments using charged leptons suffers from two questionable techniques; an assumption of SU(3)-flavor symmetry, and an extrapolation into unmeasured kinematic regions, both of which provide ample room for uncertain theoretical errors in the results. The results of recent semi-inclusive DIS data from HERMES paint a somewhat different picture of the contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon spin than do the inclusive results, but since HERMES does not make use of either of the above-mentioned techniques, then the results are somewhat incomparable. What is required is a measurement directly probing the spin contribution of the strange quarks in the nucleon. Neutrino experiments provide a theoretically clean and robust method of determining {Delta}s by comparing the neutral current interaction, which is isoscalar plus isovector, to the charged current interaction, which is strictly isovector. A past experiment, E734, performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has pioneered this effort. Building on what they have learned, we present an experiment which achieves a measurement to {+-} 0.025 using neutrino scattering, and {+-} 0.04 using anti-neutrino scattering, significantly better than past measurements. The combination of the neutrino and anti-neutrino data, when combined with the results of the parity-violating electron-nucleon scattering data, will produce the most significant result for {Delta}s. This experiment can also measure neutrino cross sections in the energy range required for accelerator-based precision oscillation measurements. Accurate measurements of cross sections have been

  7. Degeneracies in long-baseline neutrino experiments from nonstandard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, Danny; Whisnant, Kerry

    2016-05-01

    We study parameter degeneracies that can occur in long-baseline neutrino appearance experiments due to nonstandard interactions (NSI) in neutrino propagation. For a single off-diagonal NSI parameter, and neutrino and antineutrino measurements at a single L /E , there exists a continuous four-fold degeneracy (related to the mass hierarchy and θ23 octant) that renders the mass hierarchy, octant, and C P phase unknowable. Even with a combination of NO ν A and T2K data, which in principle can resolve the degeneracy, both NSI and the C P phase remain unconstrained because of experimental uncertainties. A wide-band beam experiment like DUNE will resolve this degeneracy if the nonzero off-diagonal NSI parameter is ɛe μ. If ɛe τ is nonzero, or the diagonal NSI parameter ɛe e is O (1 ), a wrong determination of the mass hierarchy and of C P violation can occur at DUNE. The octant degeneracy can be further complicated by ɛe τ, but is not affected by ɛe e.

  8. Neutrino horn power supply operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Stillman, P.; Sandberg, J.; Carroll, A.S.; Leonhardt, W.; Monaghan, R.; Pearson, C.; Pendzich, A.; Ryan, G.; Sims, W.P.; Smith, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational experiences required to run the 300 kA pulsed power supply at Brookhaven National Laboratory are given. Various interlocks and monitoring circuits are described and the impact on system reliability are discussed. The initial conditioning process of the power supply during startup is described.

  9. Atmospheric variability experiment /AVE II/ pilot experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Scroggins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) was conducted in May 1974. Rawinsonde releases were made at 54 upper-air stations in two thirds of the eastern U.S. at 3-hr intervals for a 24-hr period. Radar data were obtained from 11 stations located near the center of the observational area, and as many data as possible were collected from the Nimbus 5, NOAA 2, ATS-3, and DMSP satellites. The present paper provides an overview of the experiment and describes how the user community can obtain copies of the data.

  10. Results on θ13 Neutrino Oscillations from Reactor Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    2014-03-01

    Definitive measurements of the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 were made by Daya Bay, Double Chooz and RENO in 2012, based on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos emitted from reactors. The new generation reactor experiments have significantly improved a sensitivity for θ13 down to the sin2(2θ13)~0.01 level using two identical detectors of 10 ~ 40 tons at near (300 ~ 400 m) and far (1 ~ 2 km) locations. The θ13 measurements by the three reactor experiments are presented with their future expected sensitivities.

  11. Experiment to measure the electron neutrino mass using frozen tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Sticker, H.; Mugge, M.; White, R.M.; Woerner, R.

    1985-01-01

    We are performing an experiment to determine the electron neutrino mass with the precision of a few eV by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. To make this measurement, we have built a spectrometer with a resolution of 2 eV. Our source is frozen tritium since tritium and the HeT/sup +/ daughter ion have electronic wavefunctions that can be calculated with high accuracy. We describe the experiment and discuss the excited final molecular state calculations.

  12. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: MICE and Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an accelerator and particle physics experiment aimed at demonstrating the technique of ionization cooling on a beam of muons. Ionization cooling is the process by which muons are sent through an absorbing material, thereby losing energy and decreasing their normalized emittance. The muons are then reaccelerated in the appropriate direction with radio frequency (RF) cavities. This produces an overall reduction in transverse emittance of the muon beam. Ionization cooling could be a key technique in the design of a high intensity Neutrino Factory.

  13. Solar neutrino interactions with liquid scintillators used for double beta-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Zuber, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Solar neutrinos interact within double-beta-decay (DBD) detectors and hence will contribute to backgrounds (BGs) for DBD experiments. Background contributions due to solar neutrinos are evaluated for their interactions with atomic electrons and nuclei in liquid scintillation detectors used for DBD experiments. They are shown to be serious BGs for high-sensitivity DBD experiments to search for the Majorana neutrino masses in the inverted and normal hierarchy regions.

  14. Discovery of τ Neutrino Appearance in the CNGS Neutrino Beam with the OPERA Experiment.

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N; Aleksandrov, A; Anokhina, A; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bender, D; Bertolin, A; Bodnarchuk, I; Bozza, C; Brugnera, R; Buonaura, A; Buontempo, S; Büttner, B; Chernyavsky, M; Chukanov, A; Consiglio, L; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Serio, M; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Di Crescenzo, A; Di Ferdinando, D; Di Marco, N; Dmitrievski, S; Dracos, M; Duchesneau, D; Dusini, S; Dzhatdoev, T; Ebert, J; Ereditato, A; Fini, R A; Fornari, F; Fukuda, T; Galati, G; Garfagnini, A; Goldberg, J; Gornushkin, Y; Grella, G; Guler, A M; Gustavino, C; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hayakawa, H; Hollnagel, A; Hosseini, B; Ishiguro, K; Jakovcic, K; Jollet, C; Kamiscioglu, C; Kamiscioglu, M; Kim, J H; Kim, S H; Kitagawa, N; Klicek, B; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; Laudisio, F; Lauria, A; Ljubicic, A; Longhin, A; Loverre, P F; Malgin, A; Malenica, M; Mandrioli, G; Matsuo, T; Matsushita, T; Matveev, V; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Meregaglia, A; Mikado, S; Miyanishi, M; Mizutani, F; Monacelli, P; Montesi, M C; Morishima, K; Muciaccia, M T; Naganawa, N; Naka, T; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Nakatsuka, Y; Niwa, K; Ogawa, S; Olchevsky, A; Omura, T; Ozaki, K; Paoloni, A; Paparella, L; Park, B D; Park, I G; Pasqualini, L; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Pessard, H; Pistillo, C; Podgrudkov, D; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Pupilli, F; Roda, M; Roganova, T; Rokujo, H; Rosa, G; Ryazhskaya, O; Sato, O; Schembri, A; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Shakirianova, I; Shchedrina, T; Sheshukov, A; Shibuya, H; Shiraishi, T; Shoziyoev, G; Simone, S; Sioli, M; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Sotnikov, A; Spinetti, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stellacci, S M; Stipcevic, M; Strolin, P; Takahashi, S; Tenti, M; Terranova, F; Tioukov, V; Tufanli, S; Vilain, P; Vladymyrov, M; Votano, L; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Wonsak, B; Yoon, C S; Zemskova, S

    2015-09-18

    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for ν_{μ}→ν_{τ} oscillations in appearance mode, i.e., by detecting the τ leptons produced in charged current ν_{τ} interactions. The experiment took data from 2008 to 2012 in the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso beam. The observation of the ν_{μ}→ν_{τ} appearance, achieved with four candidate events in a subsample of the data, was previously reported. In this Letter, a fifth ν_{τ} candidate event, found in an enlarged data sample, is described. Together with a further reduction of the expected background, the candidate events detected so far allow us to assess the discovery of ν_{μ}→ν_{τ} oscillations in appearance mode with a significance larger than 5σ. PMID:26430986

  15. Discovery of τ Neutrino Appearance in the CNGS Neutrino Beam with the OPERA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bender, D.; Bertolin, A.; Bodnarchuk, I.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Büttner, B.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; de Lellis, G.; de Serio, M.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; di Crescenzo, A.; di Ferdinando, D.; di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Fini, R. A.; Fornari, F.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Goldberg, J.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Guler, A. M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hayakawa, H.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Laudisio, F.; Lauria, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P. F.; Malgin, A.; Malenica, M.; Mandrioli, G.; Matsuo, T.; Matsushita, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Mikado, S.; Miyanishi, M.; Mizutani, F.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Olchevsky, A.; Omura, T.; Ozaki, K.; Paoloni, A.; Paparella, L.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Shakirianova, I.; Shchedrina, T.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Sotnikov, A.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladymyrov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yoon, C. S.; Zemskova, S.; Opera Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for νμ→ντ oscillations in appearance mode, i.e., by detecting the τ leptons produced in charged current ντ interactions. The experiment took data from 2008 to 2012 in the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso beam. The observation of the νμ→ντ appearance, achieved with four candidate events in a subsample of the data, was previously reported. In this Letter, a fifth ντ candidate event, found in an enlarged data sample, is described. Together with a further reduction of the expected background, the candidate events detected so far allow us to assess the discovery of νμ→ντ oscillations in appearance mode with a significance larger than 5 σ .

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the Neutrino-4 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Fomin, A. K.; Onegin, M. S.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Matrosov, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of the two-section reactor antineutrino detector of the Neutrino-4 experiment is carried out. The scintillation-type detector is based on the inverse beta-decay reaction. The antineutrino is recorded by two successive signals from the positron and the neutron. The simulation of the detector sections and the active shielding is performed. As a result of the simulation, the distributions of photomultiplier signals from the positron and the neutron are obtained. The efficiency of the detector depending on the signal recording thresholds is calculated.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of the Neutrino-4 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Fomin, A. K.; Onegin, M. S.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Matrosov, L. N.

    2015-12-15

    Monte Carlo simulation of the two-section reactor antineutrino detector of the Neutrino-4 experiment is carried out. The scintillation-type detector is based on the inverse beta-decay reaction. The antineutrino is recorded by two successive signals from the positron and the neutron. The simulation of the detector sections and the active shielding is performed. As a result of the simulation, the distributions of photomultiplier signals from the positron and the neutron are obtained. The efficiency of the detector depending on the signal recording thresholds is calculated.

  18. Implications of the Recent Results of Solar Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, M.; Petcov, S. T.

    2002-12-01

    Detailed predictions for the D-N asymmetry for the Super-Kamiokande and SNO experiments, as well as for the ratio of the CC and NC event rates measured by SNO, in the cases of the LMA MSW and of the LOW solutions of the solar neutrino problem, are presented. The possibilities to use the forthcoming SNO data on these two observables to discriminate between the LMA and LOW solutions and/or to further constrain the regions of the two solutions are also discussed.

  19. MUON EDM EXPERIMENT USING STAGE II OF THE NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.; GALLARDO,J.C.; MORSE,W.M.; SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.

    2002-07-01

    During the second stage of a future neutrino factory unprecedented numbers of bunched muons will become available. The cooled medium-energy muon beam could be used for a high sensitivity search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) of the muon with a sensitivity better than 10{sup -24}e {center_dot} cm. This will make the sensitivity of the EDM experiment to non-standard physics competitive and in many models more sensitive than the present limits on edms of the electron and nucleons. The experimental design exploits the strong motional electric field sensed by relativistic particles in a magnetic storage ring.

  20. Recent Results from the K2K - Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, James E.

    2002-12-01

    The K2K Long-Baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has been aquiring data since mid-1999 and has analysed those up to July of 2001. Fifty-six fully contained events are observed in the fiducial volume of the far detector where 80.6-8.0+7.3 are expected based partly on measurements near the beam production point. There is virtually no background for the contained event search. The methods established in this experiment are crucial for operation of future similar experiments to probe the nature of mixing in the neutral lepton sector, a necessary step in understanding the nature of family structure and of mass itself. A brief history and a few notes about the future and direction of the field precede the description of the experiment and its results.

  1. Prompt atmospheric neutrinos and muons: Dependence on the gluon distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela; Gondolo, Paolo; Varieschi, Gabriele

    2000-03-01

    We compute the next-to-leading order QCD predictions for the vertical flux of atmospheric muons and neutrinos from decays of charmed particles, for different PDF's (MRS-R1, MRS-R2, CTEQ-4M and MRST) and different extrapolations of these at a small partonic momentum fraction x. We find that the predicted fluxes vary up to almost two orders of magnitude at the largest energies studied, depending on the chosen extrapolation of the PDF's. We show that the spectral index of the atmospheric leptonic fluxes depends linearly on the slope of the gluon distribution function at very small x. This suggests the possibility of obtaining some bounds on this slope in ''neutrino telescopes,'' at values of x not reachable at colliders, provided the spectral index of atmospheric leptonic fluxes could be determined. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhe, T.; Scheriau, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2016-04-01

    IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  3. Hunting for cosmic neutrinos under the deep sea: the ANTARES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Attempts to detect high energy neutrinos originating in violent Galactic or Extragalactic processes have been carried out for many years, both using the polar-cap ice and the sea as a target/detection medium. The first large detector built and operated for several years has been the AMANDA Ĉerenkov array, installed under about two km of ice at the South Pole. More recently a much larger detector, ICECUBE has been successfully installed and operated at the same location. Attempts by several groups to install similar arrays under large sea depths have been carried out following the original pioneering attempts by the DUMAND collaboration, initiated in 1990 and terminated only six years later. ANTARES has been so far the only detector deployed at large sea depths and successfully operated for several years. It has been installed in the Mediterranean by a large international collaboration and is in operation since 2007. I describe in the following the experimental technique, the sensitivity of the experiment, the detector performance and the first results that have been obtained in the search for neutrinos from cosmic point sources and on the oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos.

  4. Laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, M; Tammer, R

    1998-03-20

    Old and new laboratory experiments on atmospheric optics with a focus on mirages, rainbows, and halos are presented. Some qualitative demonstrations serve primarily didactical purposes, e.g., by proving the existence of curved light rays in media with a gradient of the index of refraction, by directly visualizing the minimum-deviation curve for rainbow paths in water droplets, or by helping to elucidate the ray classes in hexagons that contribute to a specific halo. In addition, quantitative experiments allow a direct comparison of angular positions and intensities with analytical computations or Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering from small water droplets or ice hexagons. In particular, the latter can help us to understand complex halo phenomena. PMID:18268748

  5. Laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, M; Tammer, R

    1999-08-16

    Old and new laboratory experiments on atmospheric optics with a focus on mirages, rainbows, and halos are presented. Some qualitative demonstrations serve primarily didactical purposes, e.g., by proving the existence of curved light rays in media with a gradient of the index of refraction, by directly visualizing the minimum-deviation curve for rainbow paths in water droplets, or by helping to elucidate the ray classes in hexagons that contribute to a specific halo. In addition, quantitative experiments allow a direct comparison of angular positions and intensities with analytical computations or Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering from small water droplets or ice hexagons. In particular, the latter can help us to understand complex halo phenomena. PMID:19399049

  6. Observing a light dark matter beam with neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniverville, Patrick; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2011-10-01

    We consider the sensitivity of fixed-target neutrino experiments at the luminosity frontier to light stable states, such as those present in models of MeV-scale dark matter. To ensure the correct thermal relic abundance, such states must annihilate via light mediators, which in turn provide an access portal for direct production in colliders or fixed targets. Indeed, this framework endows the neutrino beams produced at fixed-target facilities with a companion “dark matter beam,” which may be detected via an excess of elastic scattering events off electrons or nuclei in the (near-)detector. We study the high-luminosity proton fixed-target experiments at LSND and MiniBooNE, and determine that the ensuing sensitivity to light dark matter generally surpasses that of other direct probes. For scenarios with a kinetically-mixed U(1)' vector mediator of mass mV, we find that a large volume of parameter space is excluded for mDM˜1-5MeV, covering vector masses 2mDM≲mV≲mη and a range of kinetic mixing parameters reaching as low as κ˜10-5. The corresponding MeV-scale dark matter scenarios motivated by an explanation of the galactic 511 keV line are thus strongly constrained.

  7. Neutrino Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.

    1963-01-09

    The prediction and verification of the neutrino are reviewed, together with the V A theory for its interactions (particularly the difficulties with the apparent existence of two neutrinos and the high energy cross section). The Brookhaven experiment confirming the existence of two neutrinos and the cross section increase with momentum is then described, and future neutrino experiments are considered. (D.C.W.)

  8. Status and Prospects for Hadron Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, Raphaeel

    2010-03-30

    The latest results from the HARP, MIPP and NA61 Hadron Production Experiments are reviewed and their implications for neutrinos physics experiments are discussed. We emphasize three neutrino sources: accelerator-based neutrino beams, advanced neutrino sources and atmospheric neutrinos. Finally, prospects from additional forthcoming hadron production measurements are presented.

  9. Restricting the LSND and MiniBooNE sterile neutrinos with the IceCube atmospheric neutrino data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Arman; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2013-12-01

    We study oscillations of the high energy atmospheric neutrinos in the Earth into sterile neutrinos with the eV-scale mass. The MSW resonance and parametric enhancement of the μ → s oscillations lead to distortion of the zenith angle distribution of the muon-track events which can be observed by IceCube. Due to matter effect, the IceCube signal depends not only on the mixing element U μ4 relevant for LSND and MiniBooNE but also on U τ4 and the CP-violating phase δ 24. We show that the case with U τ4 = δ 24 = 0 leads to the weakest IceCube signal and therefore should be used to bound U μ4. We compute the zenith angle distributions of the ν μ - events for different energy intervals in the range (0.1 - 10) TeV and find that inclusion of the energy information (binning in energy) improves the sensitivity to ν s drastically. We estimate that with already collected (during 3-4years) IceCube statistics thebound | U μ4|2 <0 .01(99% C.L.)canbeestablished and the mixing required by LSND and MiniBooNE can be excluded at (4-6) σ confidence level.

  10. Status and perspectives of neutrino physics at present and future experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio

    2016-03-01

    Neutrino Physics and Dark Matter searches play a crucial role in nowadays Particle and Astroparticle Physics. The present review paper will describe general properties of neutrinos and neutrino mass phenomenology (Dirac and Majorana masses). Space will be dedicated to the experimental attempts to answer the question of the neutrino mass hierarchy. We will give, then, a short review of the results of part of the experiments that have been running so far. We will also shortly summarize future experiments that plan to explore this very wide scientific area.

  11. Photon detection system designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  12. Photon Detection System Designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver

    2015-11-19

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  13. Evidence for neutrino mass: A decade of discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2004-12-08

    Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of flavor change in solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments to the measurements of neutrino mixing with terrestrial neutrinos, recent experiments have provided consistent and compelling evidence for the mixing of massive neutrinos. The discoveries at Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND have solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem and demand that we make the first significant revision of the Standard Model in decades. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay probe the particle nature of neutrinos and continue to place limits on the effective mass of the neutrino. Possible signs of neutrinoless double-beta decay will stimulate neutrino mass searches in the next decade and beyond. I review the recent discoveries in neutrino physics and the current evidence for massive neutrinos.

  14. REPORT OF THE US LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    BARGER,V.; FINLEY, D.; LAUGHTON, C.; PORDES, S.; MARCHIONNI, A.; RAMEIKA, R.; SAOULIDOU, N.; ZWASKA, R.; BISHAI, M.; DIWAN, M.; DIERCKXSENS, M.; KIRK, H.; KAHN, S.; SIMOS, N.; MARCIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.; VIREN, B.; ET AL.

    2007-01-01

    This report provides the results of an extensive and important study of the potential for a U.S. scientific program that will extend our knowledge of neutrino oscillations well beyond what can be anticipated from ongoing and planned experiments worldwide. The program examined here has the potential to provide the U.S. particle physics community with world leading experimental capability in this intensely interesting and active field of fundamental research. Furthermore, this capability is not likely to be challenged anywhere else in the world for at least two decades into the future. The present study was initially commissioned in April 2006 by top research officers of Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermilab and, as the study evolved, it also provides responses to questions formulated and addressed to the study group by the Neutrino Scientific Advisory Committee (NuSAG) of the U.S. DOE and NSF. The participants in the study, its Charge and history, plus the study results and conclusions are provided in this report and its appendices. A summary of the conclusions is provided in the Executive Summary.

  15. Neutrino-4 experiment on the search for a sterile neutrino at the SM-3 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Tsinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; and others

    2015-10-15

    In view of the possibility of the existence of a sterile neutrino, test measurements of the dependence of the reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from the reactor core has been performed on SM-2 reactor with the Neutrino-2 detector model in the range of 6–11 m. Prospects of the search for reactor antineutrinos at short distances have been discussed.

  16. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  17. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment simulation studies on Offset of Detector and Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashyal, Amit; Yu, Jaehoon; Park, Seongtae; Watson, Blake

    2014-03-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment(LBNE), hosted by Fermilab is a world class physics program aiming to probe our understanding on neutrino physics and look for physics beyond Standard Model. While LBNE is still under development, the LBNE beam simulation group performs the simulation using the G4LBNE simulation software and packaged geometry. The simulation studies are done by shifting and offsetting several parameters (which represent the physical components of the real experiment). The results obtained were analyzed graphically and statistically. In this talk, I will explain the effect of beam offset and detector shifting on parameters like pion production in the decay pipe, intensity of neutrino flux, variation on the number of neutrinos in specific energy ranges. Simulation experiment results will help to simplify the complex nature of neutrinos itself to a small extent and the collective work from the beam simulation group can provide a raw guideline for the experiment itself in the long run.

  18. Precise study of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation pattern using Super-Kamiokande I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Fanny Maude

    Neutrino oscillation arises because the mass eigenstates of neutrinos are not identical to the flavor eigenstates, and it is described by the PMNS (Pontecorvo, Maki, Nakagawa and Sakata) flavor mixing matrix. This matrix contains 6 parameters: 3 angles, 2 mass splittings and one CP violating phase. Using the atmospheric neutrino data collected by the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector, we can measure two of these parameters, Dm223 and sin2 2theta23, which govern the oscillation of numu → nutau. The L/E analysis studies the ratio of flight length (L) to energy (E) and is the only analysis which is able to resolve the expected oscillatory pattern of the survival probability: P(numu → numu) = 1 - sin 2 (2theta) x sin2 (1.27 x Deltam 2 LkmE GeV ). To observe this oscillation pattern, we divide the L/E distribution of muon neutrino data by a normalized unoscillated set of Monte Carlo. Events used in this analysis need good flight length and energy resolution, therefore strict resolution cuts are applied. Hence, the data sample is smaller than the sample used in the other Super-Kamiokande analysis [1]. Despite the smaller sample, the L/E analysis gives a stronger constraint on Dm223 . This thesis covers the L/E analysis of the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric data collected during the Super-Kamiokande I (SK1: 1996-2001, 1489 days) and Super-Kamiokande II (SK2: 2003-2005, 804 days) data-taking periods. The final values of the oscillation parameters for the combined SK1+SK2 datasets, at 90% confidence level, are sin2 2theta 23 > 0.94 and 1.85 x 10-3 eV 2 < Dm223 < 2.65 x 10-3 eV2. The chi2 obtained with the oscillation hypothesis is lower than when we assume other models like neutrino decay (3.7sigma) or neutrino decoherence (4.7sigma). A significant part of this work was the improvement of the partially contained (PC) event sample. This sample consists of neutrino events in which the outgoing charged lepton exits the inner detector and deposits energy in the outer

  19. Looking for High Energy Astrophysical Neutrinos:. the Antares Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Vincenzo

    2011-03-01

    Attempts to detect high energy neutrinos originating in violent Galactic or Extragalactic processes have been carried out for many years, both using the polar-cap ice and the sea as a target/detection medium. The first large detector built and operated for several years has been the AMANDA Čerenkov array, installed under about two km of ice at the South Pole. More recently a much larger detector, ICECUBE is being installed at the same location. Attempts by several groups to install similar arrays under large sea depths have been carried out following the original pioneering attempts by the DUMAND collaboration, initiated in 1990 and terminated only six years later. ANTARES has been so far the only experiment installed at large sea depths and successfully operated for several years. This report will provide a short review of the expected ν sources, of the detector characteristics, the installation operations performed, the data collected and the first results obtained.

  20. Energy reconstruction in the long-baseline neutrino experiment.

    PubMed

    Mosel, U; Lalakulich, O; Gallmeister, K

    2014-04-18

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the CP-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies. PMID:24785030

  1. Neutrino-nucleus interactions in the T2K experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.

    2010-09-15

    We present a study of neutrino-nucleus interactions at the T2K experiment based on the GiBUU transport model. The aim of T2K is to measure {nu}{sub e} appearance and {theta}{sub 13}, but it will also be able to do a precise measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}}disappearance. The former requires a good understanding of {pi}{sup 0} production, while the latter is closely connected with a good understanding of quasielastic scattering. For both processes we investigate the influence of nuclear effects and particular final-state interactions on the expected event rates, taking into account the T2K detector setup.

  2. Resolving the mass hierarchy with atmospheric neutrinos using a liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Sankar, S. Uma

    2008-10-01

    We explore the potential offered by large-mass liquid argon detectors for determination of the sign of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2}, or the neutrino mass hierarchy, through interactions of atmospheric neutrinos. We give results for a 100 kT sized magnetized detector which provides separate sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and, over a limited energy range, to {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub e}. We also discuss the sensitivity for the unmagnetized version of such a detector. After including the effect of smearing in neutrino energy and direction and incorporating the relevant statistical, theoretical, and systematic errors, we perform a binned {chi}{sup 2} analysis of simulated data. The {chi}{sup 2} is marginalized over the presently allowed ranges of neutrino parameters and determined as a function of {theta}{sub 13}. We find that such a detector offers superior capabilities for hierarchy resolution, allowing a >4{sigma} determination for a 100 kT detector over a 10-year running period for values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}{>=}0.05. For an unmagnetized detector, a 2.5{sigma} hierarchy sensitivity is possible for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}=0.04.

  3. The search for Majorana neutrinos with neutrinoless double beta decays: From CUORICINO to LUCIFER experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.

    2012-11-20

    The study of neutrino properties is one of the fundamental challenges in particle physics nowadays. Fifty years of investigations established that neutrinos are massive but the absolute mass scale has not yet been measured. Moreover its true nature is still unknown. Is the neutrino its own antiparticle (thus violating the lepton number) as proposed by Majorana in 1937? The only way to probe the neutrino nature is through the observation of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}), a very rare spontaneous nuclear transition which emits two electrons and no neutrinos. In this paper, after a brief introduction to the theoretical framework of Majorana's neutrino, a presentation of experimental challenges posed by 0{nu}{beta}{beta} search will be given as well as an overview of present status and future perpectives of experiments.

  4. The search for Majorana neutrinos with neutrinoless double beta decays: From CUORICINO to LUCIFER experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, F.

    2012-11-01

    The study of neutrino properties is one of the fundamental challenges in particle physics nowadays. Fifty years of investigations established that neutrinos are massive but the absolute mass scale has not yet been measured. Moreover its true nature is still unknown. Is the neutrino its own antiparticle (thus violating the lepton number) as proposed by Majorana in 1937? The only way to probe the neutrino nature is through the observation of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0νββ), a very rare spontaneous nuclear transition which emits two electrons and no neutrinos. In this paper, after a brief introduction to the theoretical framework of Majorana's neutrino, a presentation of experimental challenges posed by 0νββ search will be given as well as an overview of present status and future perpectives of experiments.

  5. The status of the solar neutrino problem and the Russian-American gallium experiment (SAGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1994-04-01

    Perhaps the most outstanding discrepancy between prediction and measurements in current particle physics comes from the solar neutrino problem, in which a large deficit of high-energy solar neutrinos is observed. Many Nonstandard Solar Models have been invoked to try to reduce the predicted flux, but all have run into problems in trying to reproduce other measured parameters (e.g., the luminosity) of the Sun. Other explanations involving new physics such as neutrino decay and neutrino oscillations, etc. have also been proffered. Again, most of these explanations have been ruled out by either laboratory or astrophysical measurements. It appears that perhaps the most likely particle physics solution is that of matter enhanced neutrino oscillation, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) oscillations. Two new radiochemical gallium experiments, which have a low enough threshold to be sensitive to the dominant flux of low-energy p-p neutrinos, now also report a deficit and also favor a particle physics solution.

  6. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, A. O. Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T.

    2012-02-15

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  7. Studies of Near-Far Neutrino Beam Correlations for the DUNE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashyal, Amit; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    In the DUNE long-baseline neutrino experiment, the Near Detector near to the beamline sees a high neutrino flux, which helps to characterize the neutrino beam. Given a prediction for the neutrino flux at the Near Detector, the unoscillated flux at the Far Detector can be predicted and a transfer matrix constructed. We present results from a beam matrix method to predict the Far Detector flux from the Near Detector flux for the DUNE beamline and studies of the sensitivity to different physics models of the flux.

  8. SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

    2006-08-01

    We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

  9. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (˜ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  10. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.