Science.gov

Sample records for atmospheric pollution monitor

  1. Monitoring environmental pollution by atmospheric corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kharafi, F.M.; Ismail, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution is monitored by outdoor exposure of several commercial alloys including steel, Al, Cu, and brass (Cu-30Zu) alloys. Three districts of Kuwait were selected for this study including of residential, industrial, and marine areas. The atmospheric pollution level could be monitored directly by observation of the corrosion of the test alloys.

  2. Atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution (AP), its causes, and measures to prevent or reduce it are examined in reviews and reports presented at a workshop held in Damascus, Syria in August 1985. Topics discussed include AP and planning studies, emission sources, pollutant formation and transformation, AP effects on man and vegetation, AP control, atmospheric dispersion mechanisms and modeling, sampling and analysis techniques, air-quality monitoring, and applications. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  3. An advanced open path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mani, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over 100 million gallons of radioactive and toxic waste materials generated in weapon materials production are stored in 322 tanks buried within large areas at DOE sites. Toxic vapors occur in the tank headspace due to the solvents used and chemical reactions within the tanks. To prevent flammable or explosive concentration of volatile vapors, the headspace are vented, either manually or automatically, to the atmosphere when the headspace pressure exceeds preset values. Furthermore, 67 of the 177 tanks at the DOE Hanford Site are suspected or are known to be leaking into the ground. These underground storage tanks are grouped into tank farms which contain closely spaced tanks in areas as large as 1 km{sup 2}. The objective of this program is to protect DOE personnel and the public by monitoring the air above these tank farms for toxic air pollutants without the monitor entering the tanks farms, which can be radioactive. A secondary objective is to protect personnel by monitoring the air above buried 50 gallon drums containing moderately low radioactive materials but which could also emit toxic air pollutants.

  4. The laser absorption spectrometer - A new remote sensing instrument for atmospheric pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    An instrument capable of remotely monitoring trace atmospheric constituents is described. The instrument, called a laser absorption spectrometer, can be operated from an aircraft or spacecraft to measure the concentration of selected gases in three dimensions. This device will be particularly useful for rapid determination of pollutant levels in urban areas.

  5. Seasonal comparison of moss bag technique against vertical snow samples for monitoring atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Salo, Hanna; Berisha, Anna-Kaisa; Mäkinen, Joni

    2016-03-01

    This is the first study seasonally applying Sphagnum papillosum moss bags and vertical snow samples for monitoring atmospheric pollution. Moss bags, exposed in January, were collected together with snow samples by early March 2012 near the Harjavalta Industrial Park in southwest Finland. Magnetic, chemical, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), K-means clustering, and Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) data showed parallel spatial trends of pollution dispersal for both materials. Results strengthen previous findings that concentrate and slag handling activities were important (dust) emission sources while the impact from Cu-Ni smelter's pipe remained secondary at closer distances. Statistically significant correlations existed between the variables of snow and moss bags. As a summary, both methods work well for sampling and are efficient pollutant accumulators. Moss bags can be used also in winter conditions and they provide more homogeneous and better controlled sampling method than snow samples. PMID:26969058

  6. The Due Innovators II Apollo Project: Monitoring Atmospheric Pollution with Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.; Di Noia, A.; Sambucini, V.; Bojkov, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we present the Innovators II - APOLLO (monitoring Atmospheric POLLution with earth Observation) project which has been carried out in the framework of the ESA Data User Element programme (http://www.esa.int/due). The projects aims at the development of an innovative service for the monitoring of the air quality from ground based measurements and by means of satellite data e.g. provided by the OMI mission. The core of the APOLLO project is the OMI-TOC NN (neural networks) algorithm.

  7. Atmospheric Composition Monitoring with MOPITT and IASI: CO, a Tracer of Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Bouarar, I.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P. F.; Edwards, D. P.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.; Inness, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important trace gas for understanding air quality and atmospheric composition. It is a good tracer of pollution plumes and atmospheric dynamics. In this presentation we analyse the global and regional CO distributions as seen by remote sensors onboard of satellites, in particular the nadir-looking thermal infrared MOPITT/Terra and IASI/MetOp instruments. Since several years of data are now available, we show CO distributions over polluted and clean regions for the period 2008-2013, and we discuss their evolution with time. A detailed analysis was performed to compare both datasets and we show the influence of the a priori assumptions in the retrieval process. We did a retrieval experience where the MOPITT retrieval code was run on the MOPITT dataset using the IASI a priori profile and covariance matrix. The agreement for total columns and profiles distributions is discussed, and the retrieved profiles are validated with aircraft IAGOS data. Finally, we will also describe how MOPITT and IASI data are routinely assimilated in the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) system (the pre-operational Copernicus Atmosphere Service of the European Union), which provides analyses and forecasts of global CO distributions.

  8. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  9. Global pollution aerosol monitoring (GPAM) in the atmospheric boundary layer using future earth observing satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianhe; Kafatos, Menas; Yang, Ruixin; Chiu, Long S.; Riebau, Allen R.

    2003-04-01

    Global pollution aerosol monitoring is a very important climatic and environmental problem. It affects not only human health but also ecological systems. Because most pollution aerosols are concentrated in the atmospheric boundary layer where human, animal and vegetation live, global pollution aerosol stuides have been an important topic since about a decade ago. Recently, many new chemistry remote sensing satellite systems, such as NASA's Aura (EOS-CHEM), have been established. However, pollution aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer cannot be detected using current remote sensing technologies. George Mason University (GMU) proposes to design scientific algorithms and technologies to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer pollution aerosols, using both satellite remote sensing measurements and ground measurements, collaborating with NASA and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Forest Services (FS). Boundary layer pollution aerosols result from industrial pollution, desert dust storms, smoke from wildfires and biomass burning, volcanic eruptions, and from other trace gases. The current and next generation satellite instruments, such as The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) can be used for this study. Some surface measurements from USDA/FS and other agencies may also be used in this study. We will discuss critical issues for GPAM in the boundary layer using Earth observing satellite remote sensing in detail in this paper.

  10. Optical Remote-sensing Monitoring and Forecasting of Atmospheric Pollution in Huaibei Area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-wen; Xie, Pin-hua; Jiang, En-hua; Zhang, Yong; Dai, Hai-feng

    2012-12-01

    Huaibei is an energy city. Coal as the primary energy consumption brings a large number of regional pollution in Huaibei area. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) as optical remote sensing technology has been applied to monitor regional average concentrations and inventory of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone. DOAS system was set up and applied to monitor the main air pollutants in Huaibei area. Monitoring data were obtained from 7 to 28 August, 2011. Monitoring results show measurements in controlling pollution are effective, and emissions of pollutants are up to the national standard in Huaibei area. Prediction model was also created to track changing trend of pollutions. These will provide raw data support for effective evaluation of environmental quality in Huaibei area.

  11. Instrumentation for Air Pollution Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Craig D.; McLaughlin, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the techniques which form the basis of current commercial instrumentation for monitoring five major gaseous atmospheric pollutants (sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxidants, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons). (JR)

  12. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  13. Quantifying the influences of atmospheric stability on air pollution in Lanzhou, China, using a radon-based stability monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Scott D.; Wang, Fenjuan; Williams, Alastair G.; Xiaodong, Deng; Zhang, Hua; Lonati, Giovanni; Crawford, Jagoda; Griffiths, Alan D.; Ianniello, Antonietta; Allegrini, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Commercially-available "stability monitors" based on in situ atmospheric radon progeny measurements remain underutilised as a tool for urban pollution studies, due in part to difficulties experienced in relating their standard output directly to the atmospheric mixing state in a consistent manner. The main confounding factor has been a lack of attention to the fact that the observed near-surface atmospheric radon concentration includes large synoptic and fetch-related components in addition to the local stability influence. Here, a technique recently developed for stability classification using a research-quality dual-flow-loop two-filter radon detector is adapted for use with a commercially-available radon-based stability monitor. Performance of the classification scheme is then tested in Lanzhou, China, a topographically-complex region renowned for low mean annual wind speeds (0.8 m s-1) and winter stagnation episodes. Based on an 11-month composite, a factor of seven difference is estimated between peak NOx concentrations in the city's industrial region and a rural background location under stable conditions. The radon-based scheme is evaluated against the Pasquil-Gifford "radiation" (PGR) scheme, and assigns pollutant concentrations more consistently between defined atmospheric stability states than the PGR scheme. Furthermore, the PGR scheme consistently underestimates all peak pollutant concentrations under stable conditions compared with the radon-based scheme, in some cases (e.g. CO in the industrial region) by 25%.

  14. Online vehicle and atmospheric pollution monitoring using GIS and wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova-Lopez, L. E.; Mason, A.; Cullen, J. D.; Shaw, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2007-07-01

    A Geographical Information System (GIS) is a computer system designed to integrate, store, edit, analyse, share and display geographically referenced data. A wireless sensor network (WSN) is a wireless network of spatially distributed autonomous devices using sensors to monitor physical or environmental conditions. This paper presents the integration of these two technologies to create a system able to detect measure and transmit information regarding the presence and quantities of internal combustion derived pollution and the geographical location in real time with the aim of creating pollution maps in urban environments.

  15. An advanced open-path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.

    1995-10-01

    Large amounts of toxic waste materials, generated in manufacturing fuel for nuclear reactors, are stored in tanks buried over large areas at DOE sites. Flammable and hazardous gases are continually generated by chemical reactions in the waste materials. To prevent explosive concentrations of these gases, the gases are automatically vented to the atmosphere when the pressure exceeds a preset value. Real-time monitoring of the atmosphere above the tanks with automatic alarming is needed to prevent exposing workers to unsafe conditions when venting occurs. This report describes the development of a monitor which can measure concentrations of hazardous gases over ranges as long as 4km. The system consists of a carbon dioxide laser combined with an acousto-optic tunable filter.

  16. Deposition of Atmospheric Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, L. M.

    Deposition of Atmospheric Pollutants, containing the proceedings of a colloquium held at Oberursel/Taunus, FRG, November 9-11, 1981, is divided into three main parts: dry deposition; wet deposition; and deposition on plants and vegetation.The 20 articles in the volume permit a fair survey of present-day knowledge and will be a useful tool to all working on the topic. Pollution by deposition of either the dry or wet sort is very insidious; its importance only appears in the long range, when its effects are or are almost irreversible. That is why concern was so long in emerging from decision makers.

  17. Lidar Monitoring of Mexico City's Atmosphere During High Air Pollution Episodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, C. R., Jr.; Archuleta, F. L.; Hof, D. E.; Karl, R. R., Jr.; Tiee, J. J., Jr.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Tellier, L.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Mexico City, like many large industrial and populous urban areas, has developed a serious air pollution problem, especially during the winter months when there are frequent temperature inversions and weak winds. The deteriorating air quality is the result of several factors. The basin within which Mexico City lies in Mexico's center of political, administrative and economic activity, generating 34 percent of the gross domestic product and 42 percent of the industrial revenue, and supporting a population which is rapidly approaching the 20 million mark. The basin is surrounded by mountains on three sides which end up preventing rapid dispersal of pollutants. Emissions from the transportation fleet (more than 3 million vehicles) are one of the primary pollution sources, and most are uncontrolled. Catalytic converters are just now working their way into the fleet. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative in an international collaboration project between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are dedicated to the investigation of the air quality problem in Mexico City. The main objective of the project is to identify and assess the cost and benefits of major options being proposed to improve the air quality. The project is organized into three main activity areas: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) characterization and measurements; and (3) strategic evaluation.

  18. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  19. Photographic coronagraph, Skylab particulate experiment T025. [earth atmospheric pollution and Kohoutek Comet monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovane, F.; Schuerman, D. W.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A photographic coronagraph, built to monitor Skylab's extravehicular contamination, is described. This versatile instrument was used to observe the earth's vertical aerosol distribution and Comet Kohoutek (1973f) near perihelion. Although originally designed for deployment from the solar airlock, the instrument was modified for EVA operation when the airlock was rendered unusable. The results of the observations made in four EVA's were almost completely ruined by the failure of a Skylab operational camera used with the coronagraph. Nevertheless, an aerosol layer at 48 km was discovered in the southern hemisphere from the few useful photographs.

  20. Mobile Instruments Measure Atmospheric Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    As a part of NASA's active research of the Earth s atmosphere, which has included missions such as the Atmospheric Laboratory of Applications and Science (ATLAS, launched in 1992) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS, launched on the Earth Probe satellite in 1996), the Agency also performs ground-based air pollution research. The ability to measure trace amounts of airborne pollutants precisely and quickly is important for determining natural patterns and human effects on global warming and air pollution, but until recent advances in field-grade spectroscopic instrumentation, this rapid, accurate data collection was limited and extremely difficult. In order to understand causes of climate change and airborne pollution, NASA has supported the development of compact, low power, rapid response instruments operating in the mid-infrared "molecular fingerprint" portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These instruments, which measure atmospheric trace gases and airborne particles, can be deployed in mobile laboratories - customized ground vehicles, typically - to map distributions of pollutants in real time. The instruments must be rugged enough to operate rapidly and accurately, despite frequent jostling that can misalign, damage, or disconnect sensitive components. By measuring quickly while moving through an environment, a mobile laboratory can correlate data and geographic points, revealing patterns in the environment s pollutants. Rapid pollutant measurements also enable direct determination of pollutant sources and sinks (mechanisms that remove greenhouse gases and pollutants), providing information critical to understanding and managing atmospheric greenhouse gas and air pollutant concentrations.

  1. Atmospheric aerosol and gaseous pollutant concentrations in Bucharest area using first datasets from the city AQ monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaceanu, Cristina; Iorga, Gabriela

    2010-05-01

    City of Bucharest is the largest and most populated (about 2.8 million inhabitants) city in the Romanian Plain and encounters environmental problems and meteorology typical for several cities in southeastern Europe. City environment includes intense emissions arising from traffic (about 1 million cars per day), five thermo-electrical power-generation stations, that use both natural gas and oil derivatives for power generation and domestic heating, and from industrial sources (more than 800 small and medium plants). In the present work we performed an extensive analysis of the air pollution state for the Bucharest area (inside and outside the city) using filter measurement aerosol data PM10 and PM2.5. Data spanning over first year of continuous sampling (2005) were taken from the city Air Quality Monitoring Network, which consists of eight sampling stations: three industrial and two traffic, one EPA urban background, one suburban and one regional station located outside of Bucharest. The objective was to assess the PM10 recorded levels and their degree of compliance with the EU-legislated air quality standards and to provide a statistical investigation of the factors controlling seasonal and spatial variations of PM levels. PM10 relationships with other measured air pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx) and meteorological parameters (temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity and direction) were investigated by statistical analysis. Back trajectory modeling and wind direction frequency distributions were used to identify the origin of the polluted air masses. Contribution of combustion (slopes) and non-combustion (intercepts) sources to PM10 recorded levels was quantified by linear analysis, for two seasonal periods: cold (15 October-14 April) and warm (15 April-14 October). PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were compared with corresponding values in other European urban areas. Main conclusions are as follows: Traffic and industrial sites contribute to the

  2. Remote measurement of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.; Hoell, J.; Seals, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The concentration and vertical distribution of atmospheric ammonia and ozone are remotely sensed, using dual-C02-laser multichannel infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer (1HS). Innovation makes atmospheric pollution measurements possible with nearly-quantum-noise-limited sensitivity and ultrafine spectral resolution.

  3. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore » and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  4. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    No observed data have been found in the Fukushima Prefecture (FP) for the time-series of atmospheric radionuclides concentrations just after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident. Accordingly, current estimates of internal radiation doses from inhalation, and atmospheric radionuclide concentrations by atmospheric transport models are highly uncertain. Here, we present a new method for retrieving the hourly atmospheric (137)Cs concentrations by measuring the radioactivity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected on filter tapes in SPM monitors which were operated even after the accident. This new dataset focused on the period of March 12-23, 2011 just after the accident, when massive radioactive materials were released from the FD1NPP to the atmosphere. Overall, 40 sites of the more than 400 sites in the air quality monitoring stations in eastern Japan were studied. For the first time, we show the spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric (137)Cs concentrations in the FP and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The comprehensive dataset revealed how the polluted air masses were transported to the FP and TMA, and can be used to re-evaluate internal exposure, time-series radionuclides release rates, and atmospheric transport models. PMID:25335435

  5. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-10-01

    No observed data have been found in the Fukushima Prefecture (FP) for the time-series of atmospheric radionuclides concentrations just after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident. Accordingly, current estimates of internal radiation doses from inhalation, and atmospheric radionuclide concentrations by atmospheric transport models are highly uncertain. Here, we present a new method for retrieving the hourly atmospheric 137Cs concentrations by measuring the radioactivity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected on filter tapes in SPM monitors which were operated even after the accident. This new dataset focused on the period of March 12-23, 2011 just after the accident, when massive radioactive materials were released from the FD1NPP to the atmosphere. Overall, 40 sites of the more than 400 sites in the air quality monitoring stations in eastern Japan were studied. For the first time, we show the spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric 137Cs concentrations in the FP and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The comprehensive dataset revealed how the polluted air masses were transported to the FP and TMA, and can be used to re-evaluate internal exposure, time-series radionuclides release rates, and atmospheric transport models.

  6. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  7. Clean Air Slots Amid Atmospheric Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    This article investigates the mechanism for those layers in the atmosphere that are free of air borne pollution even though the air above and below them carry pollutants. Atmospheric subsidence is posed as a mechanism for this phenomenon.

  8. Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Darrach, Muray

    2007-01-01

    Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) identifies gases that are present in minute quantities in the International Space Station (ISS) breathing air that could harm the crew s health. If successful, instruments like VCAM could accompany crewmembers during long-duration exploration missions to the Moon or traveling to Mars.

  9. Atmospheric pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R

    1978-01-01

    Lung cancer is consistently more common in urban areas than in rural. The excess cannot be accounted for by specific occupational hazards but some of it might be due to the presence of carcinogens in urban air. The excess cannot be wholly due to such agents, because the excess in nonsmokers is small and variable. Cigarette consumption has also been greater in urban areas, but it is difficult to estimate how much of the excess it can account for. Occupational studies confirm that pollutants present in town air are capable of causing lung cancer in man and suggest that the pollutants and cigarette smoke act synergistically. The trends in the mortality from lung cancer in young and middle-aged men in England and Wales provide uncertain evidence but support the belief that atmospheric pollution has contributed to the production of the disease. In the absence of cigarette smoking, the combined effect of all atmospheric carcinogens is not responsible for more than about 5 cases of lung cancer per 100,000 persons per year in European populations. PMID:648488

  10. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  11. Archives of Atmospheric Lead Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Shotyk, William; Kempf, Oliver

    Environmental archives such as peat bogs, sediments, corals, trees, polar ice, plant material from herbarium collections, and human tissue material have greatly helped to assess both ancient and recent atmospheric lead deposition and its sources on a regional and global scale. In Europe detectable atmospheric lead pollution began as early as 6000years ago due to enhanced soil dust and agricultural activities, as studies of peat bogs reveal. Increased lead emissions during ancient Greek and Roman times have been recorded and identified in many long-term archives such as lake sediments in Sweden, ice cores in Greenland, and peat bogs in Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. For the period since the Industrial Revolution, other archives such as corals, trees, and herbarium collections provide similar chronologies of atmospheric lead pollution, with periods of enhanced lead deposition occurring at the turn of the century and since 1950. The main sources have been industry, including coal burning, ferrous and nonferrous smelting, and open waste incineration until c.1950 and leaded gasoline use since 1950. The greatest lead emissions to the atmosphere all over Europe occurred between 1950 and 1980 due to traffic exhaust. A marked drop in atmospheric lead fluxes found in most archives since the 1980s has been attributed to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. The isotope ratios of lead in the various archives show qualitatively similar temporal changes, for example, the immediate response to the introduction and phasing out of leaded gasoline. Isotope studies largely confirm source assessments based on lead emission inventories and allow the contributions of various anthropogenic sources to be calculated.

  12. A process for selecting ecological indicators for application in monitoring impacts to Air Quality Related Values (AQRVs) from atmospheric pollutants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    Section 160 of the Clean Air Act (CAA) calls for measures be taken {open_quotes}to preserve, protect, and enhance air quality in national parks, national wilderness areas, national monuments, national seashores, and other areas of special national or regional natural, recreational, scenic, or historic value.{close_quotes} Pursuant to this, stringent requirement have been established for {open_quotes}Class I{close_quotes} areas, which include most National Parks and Wilderness Areas. Federal Land Managers (FLMs) are charged with the task of carrying out these requirements through the identification of air quality related values (AQRVs) that are potentially at risk from atmospheric pollutants. This is a complex task, the success of which is dependent on the gathering of information on a wide variety of factors that contribute to the potential for impacting resources in Class I areas. Further complicating the issue is the diversity of ecological systems found in Class I areas. There is a critical need for the development of monitoring programs to assess the status of AQRVs in Class I areas with respect to impacts caused by atmospheric pollutants. These monitoring programs must be based on the measurement of a carefully selected suite of key physical, chemical, and biological parameters that serve as indicators of the status of the ecosystems found in Class I areas. Such programs must be both scientifically-based and cost-effective, and must provide the data necessary for FLMs to make objective, defensible decisions. This document summarizes a method for developing AQRV monitoring programs in Class I areas.

  13. [Current data on atmospheric pollutions].

    PubMed

    Festy, B; Petit-Coviaux, F; Le Moullec, Y

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutions (AP) are very important for human health and ecological equilibrium. They may be natural or anthropogenic and in this later case they can appear outdoor or indoor. Urban air pollution is the most known form of AP. Its main sources are industries, individual and collective heating and now mainly automobile traffic in most cities. Classical AP indicators are SO2, particles, NOx, CO and Pb measured in networks. Important factors of AP are amounts of pollutants emitted and local climatic and meteorological characteristics. Health effects of AP peaks and of AP background levels are not well known. But generally, mean AP levels of SO2 and particles decreased in the last years in most towns as the consequence of collective actions on the three main sources of AP and on fuels, emission and immission levels; but more is wanted about motor-cars. Progress are necessary for limitation of three major ecological risks: "acid-rain" (SO2 and NOx derivatives, ozone,...) which participates in lake and forest attacks; "green house" effects whose air CO2 concentration increase is the main responsible, and stratospheric ozone depletion mainly due to freons (CFC); the consequences of these two last phenomena are not well known but ecological and health risk exist. Besides, indoor air pollution (IAP) is very important because we live more than 20 h a day indoor. IAP may be occupational (a lot of chemical or biological agents) or not. In the later case air pollutants are very various: CO, NOx and particles from heating or cooking, formaldehyde from wood glue, plywood or urea-formol foams, radon and derivatives in some granitic countries, odd jobs products, cosmetics, aero-allergens of chemical or biological origins, microbes,... Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is also an important pollutant complex. Risks of IAP are real or potential: acute risk is obvious for CO, aero-allergens, formaldehyde, NOx,...); irritations are produced by ETS, formaldehyde, solvants

  14. Pollution Analyzing and Monitoring Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Compiled in this book is basic, technical information useful in a systems approach to pollution control. Descriptions and specifications are given of what is available in ready made, on-the-line commercial equipment for sampling, monitoring, measuring and continuously analyzing the multitudinous types of pollutants found in the air, water, soil,…

  15. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2015-04-01

    The current estimates for the internal radiation doses from inhalation by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011 have large uncertainty, because no observed data has been found of continuous monitoring of radioactive materials in the atmosphere in the Fukushima prefecture (FP) just after the accident, compared with the many observed datasets of deposition densities of radionuclides on the grounds in eastern Japan. To retrieve the atmospheric transport of radioactive materials released from the FD1NPS, we collected the used filter tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. Then, we measured hourly Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations in SPM at 40 monitoring sites in the FP and Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS, after more than one year. The period for measurements was during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan by a large amount of radioactive materials released from the FD1NPS. In this paper, a comprehensive study will be reported for the first time on a spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations in the FP and the TMA. Major results are as follows; (1) Nine major plumes with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, of which 5 and 4 plumes were transported to the FP and TMA, respectively. The radioactive materials from the FD1NPS was transported four times in the period to the northern part of Hamadori located in the east coast of the FP, and which was little known up to this study. (2) Two plumes transported to the TMA were newly founded, in addition to the well-known two major plumes on March 15 and 21, 2011. (3) The radiation dose rate measured at some monitoring posts in Nakadori located in the central area of the FP, did not increase even when

  16. KINETIC STUDIES OF SIMULATED POLLUTED ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of several important atmospheric contaminants - SO2, formaldehyde, nitrous acid, and the nitrosamines - were assessed to help quantify some key aspects of the chemistry of polluted atmospheres. The reactions and lifetimes of excited sulfur dio...

  17. Biological monitors of pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, M.

    1990-02-01

    This article discusses the use of biological monitors to assess the biological consequences of toxicants in the environment, such as bioavailability, synergism, and bioaccumulation through the food web. Among the organisms discussed are fly larvae, worms, bees, shellfish, fishes, birds (starlings, owls, hawks, songbirds) and mammals (rabbits, field mice, shrews).

  18. Long Term Baseline Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Mark A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a program designed to measure the normal concentrations of certain chemical and physical parameters of the atmosphere so that quantitative estimates can be made of local, regional, and global pollution. (GS)

  19. Upper atmosphere pollution measurements (GASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The environmental effects are discussed of engine effluents of future large fleets of aircraft operating in the stratosphere. Topics discussed include: atmospheric properties, aircraft engine effluents, upper atmospheric measurements, global air sampling, and data reduction and analysis

  20. Advection fog formation in a polluted atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, R.J.; Liaw, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ have been detected in highly industrialized areas. The major portions of aerosol products are the results of energy related fuel combustion. Both microphysical and macrophysical processes are considered in investigating the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with both polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results show that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog with condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere for monodisperse distribution.

  1. Atmospheric pollutants and trace gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ranieri, A.; Schenone, G.; Lencioni, L.; Soldatini, G.F.

    1994-03-01

    Pumpkin [Cucurbita pepo (L.) cv. Ambassador] plants were grown under either nonfiltered or filtered ambient air in open-top field chambers (OTCs) near the urban area of Milan, Northern Italy. The effects of ambient air pollution on the enzymatic detoxfication system of the leaves, both in terms of activity and isoform pattern were investigated. The data on air quality showed that ozone was the main phytotoxic pollutant present in ambient air, reaching a 7 h mean of 63 nL L{sup -1} and a maximum hourly peak of 104 nL L{sup -1} The peroxidase and catalase activities increased fourfold and twofold, respectively in the nonfiltered air plants In comparison to the filtered air ones. The peroxidase patterns were very modified in the polluted plants. In contrast no significant changes were found in the activity and isoenzyme pattern of superoxide dismutase. The data reported here suggest that in field-grown pumpkin plants exposed to ambient levels of photooxidants, a stimulation of the peroxddase-catalase detoxification system takes place. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Atmospheric Pollution: Its Origins and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meetham, A. R.

    Although atmospheric pollution can be reduced or eliminated in many different ways, each way involves questions of economics, the time factor, availability of materials, priority over other urgent reforms, and individual and social psychology. To provide a basis for consideration of these questions, this book gives information not only about the…

  3. Some applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, A. N.; Bryson, J. C.; Vasuki, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs are described. The organization, operations, and functions of an air quality monitoring network at New Castle County, Delaware is discussed. The data obtained by the air quality monitoring network ground stations and the equipment used to obtain atmospheric data are explained. It is concluded that correlation of the information obtained by the network will make it possible to anticipate air pollution problems in the Chesapeake Bay area before a crisis develops.

  4. Clean Air Slots Amid Atmospheric Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    Layering in the Earth's atmosphere is most commonly seen where parts of the atmosphere resist the incursion of air parcels from above and below - for example, when there is an increase in temperature with height over a particular altitude range. Pollutants tend to accumulate underneath the resulting stable layers. which is why visibility often increases markedly above certain altitudes. Here we describe the occurrence of an opposite effect, in which stable layers generate a layer of remarkably clean air (we refer to these layers as clean-air 'slots') sandwiched between layers of polluted air. We have observed clean-air slots in various locations around the world, but they are particularly well defined and prevalent in southern Africa during the dry season August-September). This is because at this time in this region, stable layers are common and pollution from biomass burning is widespread.

  5. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  6. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.; Tempo Science Team

    2013-05-01

    TEMPO has been selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (Mexico City is measured at 1.6 km N/S by 4.5 km E/W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary

  7. Radar monitoring of oil pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinard, N. W.

    1970-01-01

    Radar is currently used for detecting and monitoring oil slicks on the sea surface. The four-frequency radar system is used to acquire synthetic aperature imagery of the sea surface on which the oil slicks appear as a nonreflecting area on the surface surrounded by the usual sea return. The value of this technique was demonstrated, when the four-frequency radar system was used to image the oil spill of tanker which has wrecked. Imagery was acquired on both linear polarization (horizontal, vertical) for frequencies of 428, 1228, and 8910 megahertz. Vertical returns strongly indicated the presence of oil while horizontal returns failed to detect the slicks. Such a result is characteristic of the return from the sea and cannot presently be interpreted as characteristics of oil spills. Because an airborne imaging radar is capable of providing a wide-swath coverage under almost all weather conditions, it offers promise in the development of a pollution-monitoring system that can provide a coastal watch for oil slicks.

  8. Space Station atmospheric monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoni, C.; Coutant, R.; Barnes, R.; Slivon, L.

    1988-01-01

    A technology assessment study on atmospheric monitoring systems was performed by Battelle Columbus Division for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center under Contract No. NAS 10-11033. In this assessment, the objective was to identify, analyze, and recommend systems to sample and measure Space Station atmospheric contaminants and identify where additional research and technology advancements were required. To achieve this objective, it was necessary to define atmospheric monitoring requirements and to assess the state of the art and advanced technology and systems for technical and operational compatibility with monitoring goals. Three technical tasks were defined to support these needs: Definition of Monitoring Requirements, Assessment of Sampling and Analytical Technology, and Technology Screening and Recommendations. Based on the analysis, the principal candidates recommended for development at the Space Station's initial operational capability were: (1) long-path Fourier transform infrared for rapid detection of high-risk contamination incidences, and (2) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry utilizing mass selective detection (or ion-trap) technologies for detailed monitoring of extended crew exposure to low level (ppbv) contamination. The development of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/matrix isolation-Fourier transform infrared system was recommended as part of the long range program of upgrading Space Station trace-contaminant monitoring needs.

  9. Space Station atmospheric monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Buoni, C; Coutant, R; Barnes, R; Slivon, L

    1988-05-01

    A technology assessment study on atmospheric monitoring systems was performed by Battelle Columbus Division for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center under Contract No. NAS 10-11033. In this assessment, the objective was to identify, analyze, and recommend systems to sample and measure Space Station atmospheric contaminants and identify where additional research and technology advancements were required. To achieve this objective, it was necessary to define atmospheric monitoring requirements and to assess the state of the art and advanced technology and systems for technical and operational compatibility with monitoring goals. Three technical tasks were defined to support these needs: Definition of Monitoring Requirements, Assessment of Sampling and Analytical Technology, and Technology Screening and Recommendations. Based on the analysis, the principal candidates recommended for development at the Space Station's initial operational capability were: (1) long-path Fourier transform infrared for rapid detection of high-risk contamination incidences, and (2) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry utilizing mass selective detection (or ion-trap) technologies for detailed monitoring of extended crew exposure to low level (ppbv) contamination. The development of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/matrix isolation-Fourier transform infrared system was recommended as part of the long range program of upgrading Space Station trace-contaminant monitoring needs. PMID:11542838

  10. Pollution Monitoring: An Engineering Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snodgrass, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    One purpose in presenting this material is to bring to the attention of engineers background material which they would not normally encounter in the course of routine development work. An excellent and timely reference is as follows: Seminar on Methods of Detection, Measurement and Monitoring of Pollutants in the Marine Environment. The international seminar was organized by FAO with the support of UNESCO, IAEA, SCOR and WMO, and was held in Rome, Italy, 4-10 December 1970. The final report, the title of which was given, is a very thoroughgoing document and certainly a must reference for anyone seriously considering the development of sensors for pollution measurement. Perhaps it would be appropriate to present some exact quotations selected from the referenced document. The quotations follow: 1) "The pressures to develop sensitive and reliable methods come about when those responsible for the management of our environment need an objective evaluation of existing or potential perils." 2) "Nearly all of the Panels concerned with the contaminants identified specific examples of man's waste products which may be leaking to the environment in substantial quantities and for which as yet there are no analytical techniques available ". 3) "Very few analyses for organochlorine pesticides appear to have been carried out on sea water and the panel considered that the present methodology was not capable of detecting, on a routine basis, the quantities of these compounds in open sea waters." and 4) "This corresponds essentially to the ratio of useful data produced to the labour expended, since instrumentation costs in the long run become negligible."

  11. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  12. Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Monitoring – National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) developed and operates a collaborative network of atmospheric mercury monitoring sites based in North America – the Atmospheric Mercury Network (AMNet). The justification for the network was growing interest and demand from many ...

  13. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Janz, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    TEMPO is a proposed concept to measure pollution for greater North America using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (9 km2). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007

  14. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, H.; Oura, Y.; Ebihara, M.; Ohara, T.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, nine major plumes with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly found in this study. A local area of relatively high Cs-137 deposition density in the TMA by precipitation on the morning of March 21, was consistent with an area where the time-integrated atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations were also high due to the transport of a plume on the morning of March 21. In the FP, however, the correlation was not so clear. High radionuclides trapped in a cloud layer might be transported to the ST with relatively high Cs-137 deposition densities, because the atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations were under the detection limit.

  15. Association between atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions in Lisbon.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A M J; Sarmento, S; Almeida, S M; Silva, A V; Alves, C; Freitas, M C; Wolterbeek, H

    2015-04-01

    Ambient air pollution is recognised as one of the potential environmental risk factors causing health hazards to the exposed population, demonstrated in numerous previous studies. Several longitudinal, ecological and epidemiological studies have shown associations between outdoor levels of outdoor atmospheric pollutants and adverse health effects, especially associated with respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of atmospheric pollutants over the hospital admissions in Lisbon, by Ordinary Least Squares Linear Regression. The pollutants (CO, NO, NO2, SO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) were obtained from 13 monitoring stations of the Portuguese Environmental Agency, which provide hourly observations. Hospital admission data were collected from the Central Administration of the Health System and were compiled by age: <15, 15-64, >64 years old. The study period was 2006-2008. Results showed significant positive associations between the following: (1) the pollutants CO, NO, NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 and circulatory diseases for ages between 15 and 64 years (0.5% hospital admissions (HA) increase with 10 μg m(-3) NO increase) and above 64 years (1.0% stroke admission increase with 10 μg m(-3) NO2 increase); (2) the pollutants CO, NO, NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 and respiratory diseases for ages below 15 years (up to 1.9% HA increase with 10 μg m(-3) pollutant increase); and (3) the pollutants NO, NO2 and SO2 and respiratory diseases for ages above 64 years (1.3% HA increase with 10 μg m(-3) CO increase). PMID:25471710

  16. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-04-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. The SPM monitoring stations are mostly located in the urban and/or industrial area to measure the hourly mass concentration of SPM less than 10 μm in diameter for health effect due to atmospheric aerosols. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, about 10 plumes/polluted air masses with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly detected in this study. And the spatio-temporal distributions of atmospheric Cs-137 were clearly shown for all the plumes. The east coast area of the FP where the FD1NPS was located in the centre was attacked several times by the plumes, and suffered the highest time-integrated Cs-137 concentration during the period among the ST and TMA

  17. Metallic corrosion in the polluted urban atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Da-Wei; Guo, Hai; Ling, Zhen-Hao; Cheung, Kalam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between air pollutants, particularly acidic particles, and metallic material corrosion. An atmospheric corrosion test was carried out in spring-summer 2012 at a polluted urban site, i.e., Tung Chung in western Hong Kong. Nine types of metallic materials, namely iron, Q235 steel, 20# steel, 16Mn steel, copper, bronze, brass, aluminum, and aluminum alloy, were selected as specimens for corrosion tests. Ten sets of the nine materials were all exposed to ambient air, and then each set was collected individually after exposure to ambient air for consecutive 6, 13, 20, 27, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days, respectively. After the removal of the corrosion products on the surface of the exposed specimens, the corrosion rate of each material was determined. The surface structure of materials was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the corrosion tests. Environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of gaseous pollutants, i.e., sulfur dioxide (SO₂), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O₃), and particulate-phase pollutants, i.e., PM₂.₅ (FSP) and PM₁₀ (RSP), were monitored. Correlation analysis between environmental factors and corrosion rate of materials indicated that iron and carbon steel were damaged by both gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and NO₂) and particles. Copper and copper alloys were mainly corroded by gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and O₃), while corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloy was mainly attributed to NO₂ and particles. PMID:25400029

  18. Water Pollution: Monitoring the Source.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, James W.

    1980-01-01

    Described is an advanced biology class project involving study of the effects of organic pollution on an aquatic ecosystem from an sewage treatment plant overflow to evaluate the chemical quality and biological activity of the river water. (DS)

  19. Review on atmospheric turbulence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-07-01

    In the past years, intensive Site Characterization campaigns have been performed to chose the sites for the future giant ELTs. Various atmospheric turbulence profilers with different resolution and sensed altitude ranges have been used, as well as climatological tools and satellite data analysis. Mixing long term statistics at low altitude resolution with high resolution data collected during short term campaigns allows to produce the reference profiles as input to the Adaptive Optics instrument performance estimators. In this paper I will perform a brief review of the principal and most used instruments and tools in order to give to the reader a panorama of the work and the efforts to monitor the atmospheric turbulence for astronomical purposes.

  20. The use of video for air pollution source monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, F.; Camara, A.

    1999-07-01

    The evaluation of air pollution impacts from single industrial emission sources is a complex environmental engineering problem. Recent developments in multimedia technologies used by personal computers improved the digitizing and processing of digital video sequences. This paper proposes a methodology where statistical analysis of both meteorological and air quality data combined with digital video images are used for monitoring air pollution sources. One of the objectives of this paper is to present the use of image processing algorithms in air pollution source monitoring. CCD amateur video cameras capture images that are further processed by computer. The use of video as a remote sensing system was implemented with the goal of determining some particular parameters, either meteorological or related with air quality monitoring and modeling of point sources. These parameters include the remote calculation of wind direction, wind speed, gases stack's outlet velocity, and stack's effective emission height. The characteristics and behavior of a visible pollutant's plume is also studied. Different sequences of relatively simple image processing operations are applied to the images gathered by the different cameras to segment the plume. The algorithms are selected depending on the atmospheric and lighting conditions. The developed system was applied to a 1,000 MW fuel power plant located at Setubal, Portugal. The methodology presented shows that digital video can be an inexpensive form to get useful air pollution related data for monitoring and modeling purposes.

  1. Interdisciplinary study of atmospheric processes and constituents of the mid-Atlantic coastal region. Attachment 3: Data set for Craney Island oil refinery installation experiment. [air pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindle, E. C.; Bandy, A.; Copeland, G.; Blais, R.; Levy, G.; Sonenshine, D.; Adams, D.; Maier, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data tables and maps are presented which include background information and experimental data on the Craney Island oil refinery installation experiment. The experiment was to investigate air pollution effects.

  2. Changing the Paradigm of Air Pollution Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, approaches for monitoring air pollution generally use expensive, complex, stationary equipment,1,2 which limits who collects data, why data are collected, and how data are accessed. This paradigm is changing with the materialization of lower-cost, easy-to...

  3. Monitoring of atmospheric behaviour of NOx from vehicular traffic.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Patil, R S

    2001-04-01

    In recent years the concern about the behaviour of oxides of nitrogen (NOx: NO, NO2) in atmosphere has increased considerably. NOx undergoes various complex atmospheric reactions to generate secondary pollutants which are known to cause severe adverse effects on human health. This work focuses on the study of physical and chemical fate of NOx released in the atmosphere from vehicles, which are the main sources of atmospheric NOx. Keeping the objective and standard guidelines for monitoring in view, two typical sites near the road with high vehicular density were chosen for the study. One site was a relatively cleaner area with only vehicles as major source of pollution, and the second site was a traffic junction in an industrial region, where pollution levels are amongst the highest in Mumbai. Ambient monitoring of NOx was done for 24 hr continuously using chemiluminescent NOx analyser. The data was used to analyse temporal and spatial variation of NO, NO2 and NOx and their atmospheric chemical reactions. The monitoring results show that at larger distance from the road the level of NO decreases but the concentration of NO2 which is very harmful remains the same. Statistical analysis is conducted to establish the relationship between likely change in NO2 concentration as a result of NOx emission changes. PMID:11336410

  4. Cost analysis of atmosphere monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The cost analyses of two leading atmospheric monitoring systems, namely the mass spectrometer and the gas chromatograph, are reported. A summary of the approach used in developing the cost estimating techinques is presented; included are the cost estimating techniques, the development of cost estimating relationships and the atmospheric monitoring system cost estimates.

  5. Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Tong, Loretta

    1996-01-01

    The program objective is to obtain atmospheric transmission statistics data to support optical communications through: (1) Atmospheric loss in optical communication channel; (2) Joint PDFs for multiple site reception; (3) Statistical modeling; and (4) extrapolate PDFs for other sites.

  6. Atmospheric Pollution and Emission Sources in South Asian Urban Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. F.; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-04-01

    Rapid urbanization, and lack of efficient monitoring and control of pollution, along with phenomena like Asian Brown Haze or prolonged episodes of winter fog, makes the South Asian atmospheric chemistry a very complex one. The anthropogenic aerosols released from this region are projected to become the dominant component of anthropogenic aerosols worldwide in the next 25 years (Nakicenovic and Swart, 2000). The region is one of the most densely populated in the world, with present population densities of 100-500 persons km-2. There are six big cities, namely, Delhi, Dhaka, Karachi, Kolkata, Lahore, and Mumbai, each housing a population around or above 10 million. There is now a real concern about the sustainability of the region's ability to support the population due to air pollution, loss of biodiversity and soil degradation. Therefore, we conducted several extensive campaigns over last 10 years in Lahore, Karachi, and Islamabad in Pakistan to (1) chemically characterize the aerosols (PM2.5 mass, concentrations of trace elements, ions, black and organic carbon), and gaseous pollutants (concentrations of NH3, SO2, HONO, HNO3, HCl and (COOH)2, and (2) identify the major emission sources in this region. Exceedingly high concentrations of all species, relative to major urban areas of US and Europe, were observed. Concentrations of PM2.5, BC, Pb, SO42-, NH4+, HONO, NH3 respectively, up to 476, 110, 12, 66, 60, 19.6 and 50 μgm-3 were observed in these cities, which were far in excess of WHO and US EPA air quality standard (Biswas et al., 2008). We use air parcel back trajectories, intercomponent relationships and meteorological observations to explain chemistry and emission sources of aerosol constituents. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed up to 69% of the PM2.5 mass (Husain et al., 2007). Source apportionment was conducted using positive matrix factorization. The analysis has classified six emission sources of aerosol components, namely, industrial activities, wood

  7. Monitoring air pollution in the Bialowieza Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzahn, Elżbieta; Sondej, Izabela; Paluch, Rafał

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution, as sulfur dioxide(SO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), affects forest health negatively and can initiate forest dieback. Long-term monitoring (since 1986) and analyses are conducted in the Bialowieza Forest due to the threat by abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. This forest has a special and unique natural value, as confirmed by the various forms of protection of national and international rank. The main aim of monitoring is to determine the level and trends of deposition of air pollutants and their effects on selected forest stands and forest communities in the Bialowieza Forest. Concentration measurements of gaseous pollutants and the chemical composition of the precipitation are performed at seven points within the forest area (62 219 ha). Measurement gauges are measuring gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NOx) by the passive method and collecting precipitation at each point at a height of three meters. The period of measuring by the instruments is 30 days. All analyses are conducted according to the methodology of the European forest monitoring program in the certified Laboratory of Natural Environment Chemistry of the Polish Forest Research Institute (IBL). The concentration of pollutant gases (dry deposition) in the years 2002-2015 accounted for only 6-13% of the limit in Poland, as defined by the Polish Ministry of Environment, and are of no threat to the forest environment. Wet deposition of pollutants, which dependents directly from the amount of precipitation and its concentration of pollutants, varied strongly between different months and years. Total deposition (dry and wet) of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) was calculated for seasonal and annual periods. On an annual basis, wet deposition represented approximately 80% of the total deposition of S and N. Total deposition of S did not exceed the average deposition values for forests in north-eastern Europe (5-10 kg ha‑1 year‑1) at any of the seven measuring points. Total deposition of N did

  8. Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    The application of statistics to environmental pollution monitoring studies requires a knowledge of statistical analysis methods particularly well suited to pollution data. This book fills that need by providing sampling plans, statistical tests, parameter estimation procedure techniques, and references to pertinent publications. Most of the statistical techniques are relatively simple, and examples, exercises, and case studies are provided to illustrate procedures. The book is logically divided into three parts. Chapters 1, 2, and 3 are introductory chapters. Chapters 4 through 10 discuss field sampling designs and Chapters 11 through 18 deal with a broad range of statistical analysis procedures. Some statistical techniques given here are not commonly seen in statistics book. For example, see methods for handling correlated data (Sections 4.5 and 11.12), for detecting hot spots (Chapter 10), and for estimating a confidence interval for the mean of a lognormal distribution (Section 13.2). Also, Appendix B lists a computer code that estimates and tests for trends over time at one or more monitoring stations using nonparametric methods (Chapters 16 and 17). Unfortunately, some important topics could not be included because of their complexity and the need to limit the length of the book. For example, only brief mention could be made of time series analysis using Box-Jenkins methods and of kriging techniques for estimating spatial and spatial-time patterns of pollution, although multiple references on these topics are provided. Also, no discussion of methods for assessing risks from environmental pollution could be included.

  9. 40 CFR 58.61 - Monitoring other pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring other pollutants. 58.61... (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Federal Monitoring § 58.61 Monitoring other pollutants. The... pollutant for which an NAAQS does not exist. Such an action would be taken whenever the...

  10. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  11. Implementation of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The updated status of TEMPO, as it proceeds from formulation phase into implementation phase is presented. TEMPO, the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. GEO-CAPE is not planned for implementation this decade. However, instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form parts of a global GEO constellation for pollution monitoring later this decade, with a major focus on intercontinental

  12. Ideas in Practice: Studies in Atmospheric Pollution For Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Donald R.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the content and structure of an enviromental course offered by the Department of Engineering Technology at Western Kentucky University. The course focuses on atmospheric pollution and is designed for science teachers currently teaching in the school system. (JR)

  13. Atmospheric analyzer, carbon monoxide monitor and toluene diisocyanate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the atmospheric analyzer and the carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate monitors is to analyze the atmospheric volatiles and to monitor carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate levels in the cabin atmosphere of Skylab. The carbon monoxide monitor was used on Skylab 2, 3, and 4 to detect any carbon monoxide levels above 25 ppm. Air samples were taken once each week. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used only on Skylab 2. The loss of a micrometeoroid shield following the launch of Skylab 1 resulted in overheating of the interior walls of the Orbital Workshop. A potential hazard existed from outgassing of an isocyanate derivative resulting from heat-decomposition of the rigid polyurethane wall insulation. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used to detect any polymer decomposition. The atmospheric analyzer was used on Skylab 4 because of a suspected leak in the Skylab cabin. An air sample was taken at the beginning, middle, and the end of the mission.

  14. VERITAS Distant Laser Calibration and Atmospheric Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C. M.

    2008-12-24

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the intensity of the Rayleigh scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This allows for absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) to be simple and straightforward. In these proceedings, we present the comparison between laser data and simulation to estimate the light collection efficiencies of the VERITAS telescopes, and the analysis of multiple laser data sets taken in different months for atmospheric monitoring purpose.

  15. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  16. A Review of the Effects of Major Atmospheric Pollutants on Pollen Grains, Pollen Content, and Allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Hélène; Visez, Nicolas; Charpin, Denis; Shahali, Youcef; Peltre, Gabriel; Biolley, Jean-Philippe; Lhuissier, Franck; Couderc, Rémy; Yamada, Ohri; Malrat-Domenge, Audrey; Pham-Thi, Nhân; Poncet, Pascal; Sutra, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the available data related to the effects of air pollution on pollen grains from different plant species. Several studies carried out either on in situ harvested pollen or on pollen exposed in different places more or less polluted are presented and discussed. The different experimental procedures used to monitor the impact of pollution on pollen grains and on various produced external or internal subparticles are listed. Physicochemical and biological effects of artificial pollution (gaseous and particulate) on pollen from different plants, in different laboratory conditions, are considered. The effects of polluted pollen grains, subparticles, and derived aeroallergens in animal models, in in vitro cell culture, on healthy human and allergic patients are described. Combined effects of atmospheric pollutants and pollen grains-derived biological material on allergic population are specifically discussed. Within the notion of “polluen,” some methodological biases are underlined and research tracks in this field are proposed. PMID:26819967

  17. Brown dwarf Atmosphere Monitoring (BAM): Characterizing the Coolest Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patience, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    Using the G141 WFC3/IR grism, we propose a HST spectrophotometric monitoring study of the coolest variable brown dwarf (~650K) identified as part of our Brown dwarf Atmosphere Monitoring (BAM) program. The proposed observations will enable exploration of the dynamic atmospheric evolution of a benchmark T8.5 binary brown dwarf system, which we have discovered to exhibit the second-largest amplitude variation amongst all currently known brown dwarf variables. The close binarity of this system requires the exquisite stability of the HST point spread function to enable resolved monitoring of both components and to discriminate the source of the variability - the second component is a planetary mass object based on evolutionary models. This BAM follow-up study is designed to characterize both the longitudinal and vertical structure of the atmospheric properties of this system via multi-wavelength observations covering the entire spectral range of the WFC3/IR detector. Additionally, by monitoring the target over two separate epochs we will measure the evolution of atmospheric features giving rise to the flux variations. The proposed program will provide a comprehensive dataset serving as a benchmark comparison to directly imaged planets, intensely irradiated Hot Jupiters, and synthetic atmospheric models incorporating different physical processes.

  18. Atmospheric pollutants in peri-urban forests of Quercus ilex: evidence of pollution abatement and threats for vegetation.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Héctor; Aguillaume, Laura; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Valiño, Fernando; Àvila, Anna; Elustondo, David; Santamaría, Jesús M; Alastuey, Andrés; Calvete-Sogo, Héctor; González-Fernández, Ignacio; Alonso, Rocío

    2016-04-01

    Peri-urban vegetation is generally accepted as a significant remover of atmospheric pollutants, but it could also be threatened by these compounds, with origin in both urban and non-urban areas. To characterize the seasonal and geographical variation of pollutant concentrations and to improve the empirical understanding of the influence of Mediterranean broadleaf evergreen forests on air quality, four forests of Quercus ilex (three peri-urban and one remote) were monitored in different areas in Spain. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3) and ozone (O3) were measured during 2 years in open areas and inside the forests and aerosols (PM10) were monitored in open areas during 1 year. Ozone was the only air pollutant expected to have direct phytotoxic effects on vegetation according to current thresholds for the protection of vegetation. The concentrations of N compounds were not high enough to directly affect vegetation but could be contributing through atmospheric N deposition to the eutrophization of these ecosystems. Peri-urban forests of Q. ilex showed a significant below-canopy reduction of gaseous concentrations (particularly NH3, with a mean reduction of 29-38%), which indicated the feasibility of these forests to provide an ecosystem service of air quality improvement. Well-designed monitoring programs are needed to further investigate air quality improvement by peri-urban ecosystems while assessing the threat that air pollution can pose to vegetation. PMID:26620865

  19. A contaminant monitor for submarine atmospheres.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruecker, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    A requirement for monitoring selected atmospheric constituents on board nuclear powered submarines has been met by the development of the Central Atmosphere Monitoring System, Mark I. This system employs a mass spectrometer to monitor H2, H2O, N2, O2, CO2, Freon 11, Freon 12, and Freon 114, in addition to an infrared sensor for CO. The CAMS MKI development is discussed, including background, operating fundamentals, principal requirements, functional and physical descriptions, and summarized test results. Each of two prototype units has successfully completed over 9000 hr of operational sea trails, providing the necessary ground work for the manufacture of production units. At the same time, these units, which have benefited extensively from NASA hardware experience, may in turn provide useful data for the development of a new class of maintainable atmospheric monitoring instrumentation for manned spacecraft.

  20. Does toxicity of aromatic pollutants increase under remote atmospheric conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-03-01

    Aromatic compounds contribute significantly to the budget of atmospheric pollutants and represent considerable hazard to living organisms. However, they are only rarely included into atmospheric models which deviate substantially from field measurements. A powerful experimental-simulation tool for the assessment of the impact of low- and semi-volatile aromatic pollutants on the environment due to their atmospheric aqueous phase aging has been developed and introduced for the first time. The case study herein reveals that remote biotopes might be the most damaged by wet urban guaiacol-containing biomass burning aerosols. It is shown that only after the primary pollutant guaiacol has been consumed, its probably most toxic nitroaromatic product is largely formed. Revising the recent understanding of atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry, which is mostly concerned with the radical nitration mechanisms, the observed phenomenon is mainly attributed to the electrophilic nitrogen-containing reactive species. Here, their intriguing role is closely inspected and discussed from the ecological perspective.

  1. Does toxicity of aromatic pollutants increase under remote atmospheric conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds contribute significantly to the budget of atmospheric pollutants and represent considerable hazard to living organisms. However, they are only rarely included into atmospheric models which deviate substantially from field measurements. A powerful experimental-simulation tool for the assessment of the impact of low- and semi-volatile aromatic pollutants on the environment due to their atmospheric aqueous phase aging has been developed and introduced for the first time. The case study herein reveals that remote biotopes might be the most damaged by wet urban guaiacol-containing biomass burning aerosols. It is shown that only after the primary pollutant guaiacol has been consumed, its probably most toxic nitroaromatic product is largely formed. Revising the recent understanding of atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry, which is mostly concerned with the radical nitration mechanisms, the observed phenomenon is mainly attributed to the electrophilic nitrogen-containing reactive species. Here, their intriguing role is closely inspected and discussed from the ecological perspective. PMID:25748923

  2. ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE AND POLLUTANT DISPERSION NEAR ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objectives of this investigation are: (1) to determine the time and space scales of the eddies generated by the traffic, (2) to study the effects of traffic-induced turbulence on the near-field dispersion of pollutants, (3) to evaluate several commonly used highway air ...

  3. Monitoring of pyrocatechol indoor air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eškinja, I.; Grabarić, Z.; Grabarić, B. S.

    Spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods for monitoring of pyrocatechol (PC) indoor air pollution have been investigated. Spectrophotometric determination was performed using Fe(III) and iodine methods. The adherence to Beer's law was found in the concentration range between 0 and 12 μg ml - for iodine method at pH = 5.7 measuring absorbance at 725 nm, and in the range 0-30 μg ml - for Fe(III) method at pH = 9.5 measuring absorbance at 510 nm. The former method showed greater sensitivity than the latter one. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and chronoamperometric (CA) detection in flow injection analysis (FIA) using carbon paste electrode in phosphate buffer solution of pH = 6.5 was also used for pyrocatechol determination. The electrochemical methods allowed pyrocatechol quantitation in submicromolar concentration level with an overall reproducibility of ± 1%. The efficiency of pyrocatechol sampling collection was investigated at two temperatures (27 and 40°C) in water, 0.1 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl solutions. Solution of 0.1 M HCl gave the best collection efficiency (95.5-98.5%). A chamber testing simulating the indoor pollution has been performed. In order to check the reliability of the proposed methods for monitoring of the indoor pyrocatechol pollution, the air in working premises with pyrocatechol released from meteorological charts during mapping and paper drying was analyzed using proposed methods. The concentration of pyrocatechol in the air during mapping was found to be 1.8 mg m -3 which is below the hygienic standard of permissible exposure of 20 mg m -3 (≈ 5 ppm). The release of pyrocatechol from the paper impregnated with pyrocatechol standing at room temperature during one year was also measured. The proposed methods can be used for indoor pyrocatechol pollution monitoring in working premises of photographic, rubber, oil and dye industries, fur and furniture dyeing and cosmetic or pharmaceutical premises where pyrocatechol and related

  4. Pollution monitoring using networks of honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Dewart, M.L.; Thomas, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Each year thousands of chemicals in large quantities are introduced into the global environment and the need for effective methods of monitoring these substances has steadily increased. Most monitoring programs rely upon instrumentation to measure specific contaminants in air, water, or soil. However, it has become apparent that humans and their environment are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals rather than single entities. As our ability to detect ever smaller quantities of pollutants has increased, the biological significance of these findings has become more uncertain. Also, it is clear that monitoring efforts should shift from short-term studies of easily identifiable sources in localized areas to long-term studies of multiple sources over widespread regions. Our investigations aim at providing better tools to meet these exigencies. Honey bees are discussed as an effective, long-term, self-sustaining system for monitoring environmental impacts. Our results indicate that the use of regional, and possibly national or international, capability can be realized with the aid of beekeepers in obtaining samples and conducting measurements. This approach has the added advantage of public involvement in environmental problem solving and protection of human health and environmental quality.

  5. Laser systems for stand-off detection of contamination and pollution of atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Zygmunt

    2007-02-01

    The paper presents selected laser systems used for remote detection of contamination and pollution of atmosphere. Having in view a way of taking samples for analysis, the methods used for atmosphere monitoring can be divided into two groups: sampling at the place of existing pollution and remote detection, identification, and measurement of concentration. "Stand-off" and "remote" systems of atmosphere monitoring are described here. The "stand-off" systems provide detection of pollution (gas, aerosol, smoke, dust) at long distances, without the contact with a contaminated area. These systems are active laser systems (lidars) or passive thermal systems with narrow filters matched to the bands of gas absorption and imaging the transmission changes of radiation absorbed along the path of gas presence. A single "stand-off" station can cover significant area, the size of which depends on the range of sampling radiation, field of view, and scanning speed. "Remote" systems employ various types of small point sensors and the data from these sensors are transmitted by wire or wireless connections to alarm centres. It should be pointed out that in this case, a contact between sensor and analysed area is necessary and remote detection is performed by the transmission systems of measurement data. The paper presents construction, principle of operation, and basic analytical characteristics of the chosen "standoff" and "remote" measuring systems developed at Military University of Technology, devoted to continuous monitoring of contaminations and pollution of atmosphere.

  6. The etymological role of the main atmosphere pollutants in development of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Lomtatidze, N; Kiknadze, N; Khakhnalidze, R; Tusishvili, Kh; Alasania, N; Kiknadze, M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of research was monitoring of the main atmospheric air pollutants concentration on Adjara Autonomous Republic territory in order to determine their role in causing different diseases. The following atmospheric air pollutants have been determined in Batumi: dust, carbon monoxide, sulfur and nitrogen dioxide. The number of diseases registered in Adjara Autonomous Republic, which may be linked to the air pollution, has been studied. These are the following: chronic and nonspecific bronchitis, asthma and asthma status diseases, allergic rhinitis, trachea-, bronchi- and lung malignant tumor. In order to reduce the number of risk-factors significant attention should be paid to the proper functionality of the vehicles and systematic observations should continue on the chemical pollution of the air to make proper decisions to reduce the number of diseases. PMID:23676494

  7. Medical aspects of atmosphere pollution in Tbilisi, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Lagidze, Lamzira; Matchavariani, Lia; Tsivtsivadze, Nodar; Khidasheli, Nargiz; Paichadze, Nino; Motsonelidze, Nargiz; Vakhtangishvili, Maia

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and its impact on ecosystems is one of the main problem of 21st century. Increase in green house gas in the atmosphere was regarded as an important cause. Atmospheric composition had significantly changed due to intensive technogenic pollution. Increase in aerosol (solid, liquid and gas) concentration had serious impact on human health and raised the level of risk factors for longevity of life. Despite, global character of climatic change and its intensity in numerous ways was influenced by local specificity of regions, their geographical location and meteorological factors. A study on the atmospheric quality (quantitative and percentage estimation of aerosols) of Georgia was carried out. Also the assessment of impact of meteorological and ecological conditions on human health was made for Tbilisi city. A relation between contaminants and meteorological factors was evaluated, particularly gas pollutants were strongly correlated with each other due to their photochemical activity; positive correlation (0.65; 0.69) between air temperature and pollutants. All the contaminants showed negative correlation with relative humidity, due to hydrolyzing ability. On the basis of multi-factorial statistical analysis, correlation between ambulance call, weather type, atmosphere pollution index, change in ground ozone quantity and earth magnetic field were determined. Atmospheric pollution due to dust, carbon, sulfur and nitrogen oxides, ground ozone quantity in Tbilisi significantly exceeded maximum permissible level, that effected human health. PMID:26591888

  8. A mobile system for active otpical pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunesson, A.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Uneus, L.; Wendt, W.; Fredriksson, K.

    1986-01-01

    The remote monitoring of atmospheric pollutants can now be performed in several ways. Laser radar techniques have proven their ability to reveal the spatial distribution of different species or particles. Classical optical techniques can also be used, but yield the average concentration over a given path and hence no range resolution. One such technique is Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy, DOAS. Such schemes can be used to monitor paths that a preliminary lidar investigation has shown to be of interest. Having previously had access to a mobile lidar system, a new system has been completed. The construction builds on experience from using the other system and it is meant to be more of a mobile optical laboratory than just a lidar system. A complete system description is given along with some preliminary usage. Future uses are contemplated.

  9. Dispersion modeling of air pollutants in the atmosphere: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Molnár, Ferenc; Izsák, Ferenc; Havasi, Ágnes; Lagzi, István; Mészáros, Róbert

    2014-09-01

    Modeling of dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere is one of the most important and challenging scientific problems. There are several natural and anthropogenic events where passive or chemically active compounds are emitted into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemical species can have serious impacts on our environment and human health. Modeling the dispersion of air pollutants can predict this effect. Therefore, development of various model strategies is a key element for the governmental and scientific communities. We provide here a brief review on the mathematical modeling of the dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several model tools and strategies, namely Gaussian, Lagrangian, Eulerian and CFD models. We especially focus on several recent advances in this multidisciplinary research field, like parallel computing using graphical processing units, or adaptive mesh refinement.

  10. Sampling of Atmospheric Precipitation and Deposits for Analysis of Atmospheric Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Skarżyńska, K.; Polkowska, Ż; Namieśnik, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews techniques and equipment for collecting precipitation samples from the atmosphere (fog and cloud water) and from atmospheric deposits (dew, hoarfrost, and rime) that are suitable for the evaluation of atmospheric pollution. It discusses the storage and preparation of samples for analysis and also presents bibliographic information on the concentration ranges of inorganic and organic compounds in the precipitation and atmospheric deposit samples. PMID:17671615

  11. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  12. GENASIS national and international monitoring networks for persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabec, Karel; Dušek, Ladislav; Holoubek, Ivan; Hřebíček, Jiří; Kubásek, Miroslav; Urbánek, Jaroslav

    2010-05-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) remain in the centre of scientific attention due to their slow rates of degradation, their toxicity, and potential for both long-range transport and bioaccumulation in living organisms. This group of compounds covers large number of various chemicals from industrial products, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, etc. The GENASIS (Global Environmental Assessment and Information System) information system utilizes data from national and international monitoring networks to obtain as-complete-as-possible set of information and a representative picture of environmental contamination by persistent organic pollutants (POPs). There are data from two main datasets on POPs monitoring: 1.Integrated monitoring of POPs in Košetice Observatory (Czech Republic) which is a long term background site of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) for the Central Europe; the data reveals long term trends of POPs in all environmental matrices. The Observatory is the only one in Europe where POPs have been monitored not only in ambient air, but also in wet atmospheric deposition, surface waters, sediments, soil, mosses and needles (integrated monitoring). Consistent data since the year 1996 are available, earlier data (up to 1998) are burdened by high variability and high detection limits. 2.MONET network is ambient air monitoring activities in the Central and Eastern European region (CEEC), Central Asia, Africa and Pacific Islands driven by RECETOX as the Regional Centre of the Stockholm Convention for the region of Central and Eastern Europe under the common name of the MONET networks (MONitoring NETwork). For many of the participating countries these activities generated first data on the atmospheric levels of POPs. The MONET network uses new technologies of air passive sampling, which was developed, tested, and calibrated by RECETOX in cooperation with Environment Canada and Lancaster University, and was originally launched as a

  13. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form

  14. Atmospheric trace gases monitoring by UV-vis spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pinhua; Li, Ang; Wu, Fengcheng; Qin, Min; Hu, Rezhi; Xu, Jin; Si, Fuqi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Due to rapidly economic development, air pollution has become an important issue in China. Phenomena such as regional haze in winter and high O3 concentration in summer are strongly related to increasing trace species. For better understanding the air pollution formation, it is necessary to know spatial and temporal distribution of trace species in the atmosphere. UV-vis spectroscopic techniques are of great advantages for trace species monitoring to meet several requirements, e.g. versatility, high sensitivity, good temporal resolution and field applicability. We have studied and developed various trace gases monitoring techniques and instruments based on UV-vis spectroscopic technique for in-situ measurements and remote sensing, e.g. LP-DOAS, IBBCEAS, CRDS, MAX-DOAS and mobile DOAS for NO2, SO2, HCHO, HONO, NO3, and N2O5 etc. The principle, instrumentation and inversion algorithm are presented. As typical applications of these techniques, investigation of the evolution of HONO and NO3 radicals over Beijing area, measurements of regional pollution in NCP and YRD are discussed in the aspects of HONO and nocturnal NO3 radical characteristics, trace gases (NO2, SO2 etc.) temporal and spatial distribution, pollution transport pathway, emission sources.

  15. An advanced open-path atmospheric monitor design

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mech, S.

    1996-05-01

    The conceptual design of an open-path atmospheric monitor combines an acousto-optic tunable filter for emission spectroscopy (3-14 {mu}m) with a mid-IR (4.6-5.4 {mu}m) for absorption spectroscopy. It utilizes mostly commercially available components, covers a large area ({approximately}4 km radius), measures the distance to any reflecting object, can take measurements along any line-of-sight, and is eye safe. Of twenty test pollutants it is to detect, the concentrations of all twenty will be measurable via emission spectroscopy and ten by the more sensitive absorption spectroscopy.

  16. 40 CFR 58.61 - Monitoring other pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 58.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... pollutant for which an NAAQS does not exist. Such an action would be taken whenever the Administrator determines that a nationwide monitoring program is necessary to monitor such a pollutant....

  17. 40 CFR 58.61 - Monitoring other pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 58.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... pollutant for which an NAAQS does not exist. Such an action would be taken whenever the Administrator determines that a nationwide monitoring program is necessary to monitor such a pollutant....

  18. 40 CFR 58.61 - Monitoring other pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 58.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... pollutant for which an NAAQS does not exist. Such an action would be taken whenever the Administrator determines that a nationwide monitoring program is necessary to monitor such a pollutant....

  19. 40 CFR 58.61 - Monitoring other pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 58.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... pollutant for which an NAAQS does not exist. Such an action would be taken whenever the Administrator determines that a nationwide monitoring program is necessary to monitor such a pollutant....

  20. A Regulation for the Control of Atmospheric Pollution, Amended Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board, San Juan.

    Nine articles, related to the preservation of the natural quality of the air, and to prevention, elimination and control of atmospheric pollution in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, are contained in this document. These articles were written and enacted by the Environmental Quality Board in accordance with Law No. 9, approved June 18, 1970 -…

  1. New microwave spectrometer/imager has possible applications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooley, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Microwave imager forms thermal-emissivity image of solid portion of planet Venus and provides data on the planet's atmosphere, surface, terminator, and temperature changes. These thermally produced multifrequency microwaves for image production of temperature profiles can be applied to water pollution monitoring, agriculture, and forestry survey.

  2. POLLUTANT SAMPLER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acidic pollutant sampler for dry deposition monitoring has been designed and evaluated in laboratory and field studies. The system, which is modular and simple to operate, samples gaseous HNO3, NH3, SO2 and NO2 and particulate SO4(-2), NO3(1-) and NH4(1+) and is made of Teflon...

  3. Lidar monitoring of atmospheric ozone and aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudzynski, Stanislaw; Czyzewski, A.; Ernst, Krzysztof; Skubiszak, Wojciech; Stacewicz, Tadeusz; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Szymanski, Artur

    2000-11-01

    The growth of aerosol and ozone concentrations in the troposphere stimulates development of monitoring techniques allowing their detection. DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar) is one of the most promising methods. It allows the remote measurements of selected pollutants within the range of few kilometers and with spatial resolution of few meters. We introduce the basic principles of the DIAL method and describe shortly our mobile lidar system. We present and comment selected registrations of ozone and aerosol concentration distributions obtained during summer field campaigns of 1997 and 1998.

  4. The propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.

    2012-12-01

    Recent methods to map artificial night-sky brightness and stellar visibility across large territories or their distribution over the entire sky at any site are based on computation of the propagation of light pollution with Garstang models, a simplified solution of the radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere that allows fast computation by reducing it to a ray-tracing approach. They are accurate for a clear atmosphere, when a two-scattering approximation is acceptable, which is the most common situation. We present here up-to-date extended Garstang models (EGM), which provide a more general numerical solution for the radiative transfer problem applied to the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere. We also present the LPTRAN software package, an application of EGM to high-resolution Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) satellite measurements of artificial light emission and to GTOPO30 (Global 30 Arcsecond) digital elevation data, which provides an up-to-date method to predict the artificial brightness distribution of the night sky at any site in the world at any visible wavelength for a broad range of atmospheric situations and the artificial radiation density in the atmosphere across the territory. EGM account for (i) multiple scattering, (ii) wavelengths from 250 nm to infrared, (iii) the Earth's curvature and its screening effects, (iv) site and source elevation, (v) many kinds of atmosphere with the possibility of custom set-up (e.g. including thermal inversion layers), (vi) a mix of different boundary-layer aerosols and tropospheric aerosols, with the possibility of custom set-up, (vii) up to five aerosol layers in the upper atmosphere, including fresh and aged volcanic dust and meteoric dust, (viii) variations of the scattering phase function with elevation, (ix) continuum and line gas absorption from many species, ozone included, (x) up to five cloud layers, (xi) wavelength-dependent bidirectional

  5. Long path DOAS measurements of atmospheric pollutants concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2015-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy gas-analyzer consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was used. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 35 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. As a result of experiments time series of concentrations of gases polluting the atmosphere were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 480 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk city are presented.

  6. Changes in atmospheric lead and other pollution elements at Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Suilou; Arimoto, Richard; Rahn, Kenneth A.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of atmospheric lead at Bermuda during the Atmosphere-Ocean Chemistry Experiments (AEROCE) in 1993-1994 showed that annual-mean concentrations had decreased by an order of magnitude from the 1970s and by a factor of 4 since the 1980s. Seasonal patterns had changed as well, with lead no longer being highest during winter. Both changes are consistent with decreased use of leaded gasoline in North America. Pollution-derived zinc and antimony also decreased, probably because of reduced smelting in the United States or changed atmospheric transport to Bermuda. Lead/aluminum mass ratios depended on direction: 0.04 with western air-mass trajectories (pollution from North America) versus 0.0001 and 0.0003 with eastern trajectories. The eastern Pb/Al ratios were indistinguishable from typical crustal values of 0.0002. The lower eastern ratio probably represents pure Saharan dust, while the higher ratio may indicate minor amounts of superimposed pollution aerosol, possibly from Europe or the Mediterranean area. Crustal lead was not evident in the 1970s because more lead was emitted from gasoline and dust transport from the Sahara was weaker.

  7. Network of LAMP systems for atmospheric monitoring in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar; Jayaraman, Achuthan

    2012-07-01

    A systematic knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is required for understanding many atmospheric processes such as dynamics of boundary layer, pollution transport, modification of cloud microphysics etc. At present, the information on the particle distribution in the atmosphere is far from sufficient to estimate properly the load of aerosols in the atmosphere. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has been demonstrated to be a reliable remote sensing technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering. A LIDAR network is being implemented by National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a Department of Space unit, in India for the measurement and monitoring of the atmospheric aerosols and clouds. Towards this, the technology of boundary layer lidar (BLL) (Bhavani Kumar, 2006) has been exploited. Several industrial grade BLL systems are being fabricated at a private industry in India through technological transfer from NARL. The industrial BLL lidar is named as LAMP, stands for LIDAR for Atmospheric Measurement and Probing. Five LAMP systems have already been fabricated and deployed at several locations of the country for continuous monitoring of aerosols and clouds under the Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. The LAMP system employs a single barrel construction so that no realignment is required in future. Moreover, the network lidar system employs several features like rotation facility about the elevation (EL) axis, a provision of front window for environmental protection to the telescope optics and a silica gel pocket for desiccation (for transmit and receive assembly) and a provision of nitrogen purging to overcome the humidity effects. The LAMP system is an autonomous system equipped with a diode pumped Nd-YAG laser, a PMT for the detection of the backscattered photons, and a PC based photon counting electronics for recording the photon returns. In this paper, a report describing

  8. Monitoring of air pollution by plants methods and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Steubing, L.; Jager, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Ecosystem pollution is often discovered too late for preventive measure to be implemented. Papers include the topics of methods and problems of bioindication of air pollution. The participants discussed passive and active biological monitoring, including mapping of natural vegetation (lichens and mosses, for example) and plant exposure. Morphological and microscopical studies, chemical, physiological and biochemical investigations are presented.

  9. Significant atmospheric aerosol pollution caused by world food cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-05-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  10. Significant Atmospheric Aerosol Pollution Caused by World Food Cultivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  11. Pierre Auger Atmosphere-Monitoring Lidar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipcic, A.; Horvat, M.; Veberic, D.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Chiosso, M.; Mussa, R.; Sequeiros, G.; Mostafa, M. A.; Roberts, M. D.

    2003-07-01

    The fluorescence-detection techniques of cosmic-ray air-shower experiments require precise knowledge of atmospheric properties to reconstruct air-shower energies. Up to now, the atmosphere in desert-like areas was assumed to be stable enough so that o ccasional calibration of atmospheric attenuation would suffice to reconstruct shower profiles. However, serious difficulties have been reported in recent fluorescence-detector experiments causing systematic errors in cosmic ray spectra at extreme energies. Therefore, a scanning backscatter lidar system has been constructed for the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malargue, Argentina, where ¨ on-line atmospheric monitoring will be performed. One lidar system is already deployed at the Los Leones fluorescence detector (FD) site and the second one is currently (April 2003) under construction at the Coihueco site. Next to the established ones, a novel analysis method with assumption on horizontal invariance, using multi-angle measurements is shown to unambiguously measure optical depth, as well as absorption and backscatter coefficient.

  12. Variation of atmospheric air pollution under conditions of rapid economic change—Estonia 1994-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, V.; Tammet, H.; Truuts, T.

    Estonia is an example of a country with economy in transition whose atmospheric air pollution has been remarkably influenced by economic changes. During the period of 1994-1999 GDP increased by one-fourth, while agricultural production, electricity and heat production dropped by one-sixths during the studied period. These processes are reflected in the quantity of emissions and structure of air pollution. The study is based on the measurements of concentrations of pollutants at six Estonian Euroairnet monitoring stations—at three sites in the capital city and at three sites in remote areas. The pollutants concerned are the first-priority pollutants in the European Union legislation—nitrogen oxides, SO 2, O 3, particulate matter, and additionally CO. The study reveals that concentrations of gaseous pollutants in Estonia remain within the EU limit values except for ozone in remote areas. The main trend during the studied period was a significant, up to several times, decrease in concentrations of SO 2 and CO while the decrease of nitrogen oxides was less remarkable. The paper propose ratio of NO x/SO 2 as an index describing increasing transport loads and drop in use of sulphur-rich fuels—thus of structure of economy. The annual variation of pollutants is explained by seasonal variations of anthropogenic activity in conditions where local fuels are widely used for heating during winter. Air pollution in Estonian rural stations mostly originated from transboundary fluxes. The 1-3 day delay of the weekly minimum of pollutant concentrations and the wind roses allow to conclude that essential part of pollutants is imported from West Europe.

  13. Atmospheric pollutant outflow from southern Asia: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, M. G.; Lelieveld, J.

    2010-11-01

    Southern Asia, extending from Pakistan and Afghanistan to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, is one of the most heavily populated regions of the world. Biofuel and biomass burning play a disproportionately large role in the emissions of most key pollutant gases and aerosols there, in contrast to much of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere, where fossil fuel burning and industrial processes tend to dominate. This results in polluted air masses which are enriched in carbon-containing aerosols, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons. The outflow and long-distance transport of these polluted air masses is characterized by three distinct seasonal circulation patterns: the winter monsoon, the summer monsoon, and the monsoon transition periods. During winter, the near-surface flow is mostly northeasterly, and the regional pollution forms a thick haze layer in the lower troposphere which spreads out over millions of square km between southern Asia and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), located several degrees south of the equator over the Indian Ocean during this period. During summer, the heavy monsoon rains effectively remove soluble gases and aerosols. Less soluble species, on the other hand, are lifted to the upper troposphere in deep convective clouds, and are then transported away from the region by strong upper tropospheric winds, particularly towards northern Africa and the Mediterranean in the tropical easterly jet. Part of the pollution can reach the tropical tropopause layer, the gateway to the stratosphere. During the monsoon transition periods, the flow across the Indian Ocean is primarily zonal, and strong pollution plumes originating from both southeastern Asia and from Africa spread across the central Indian Ocean. This paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge based on the many observational and modeling studies over the last decades that have examined the southern Asian atmospheric pollutant outflow and its large scale effects. An outlook

  14. CONTINUOUS AIR POLLUTION SOURCE MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook provides the eetailed information necessary to develop a continuous emissions monitoring program at a stationary source facility. Federal and State EPA requirements are given, including design and performance specifications and monitoring and date reporting requirem...

  15. Measurements of atmospheric pollutants by a DOAS spectrometer in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Evangelisti, Franco; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, Paolo; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Kostadinov, Ivan

    1997-05-01

    A monitoring campaign of atmospheric pollutants was conducted in February 1993 by several of Italy's CNR institute in heavily polluted greater Milan. This metropolitan area, the largest one in northern Italy, is situated in the northernmost part of the Po Valley and, because of its topography and orography is frequently marked by low ventilation and inversion phenomena, a fast that promotes the accumulation and vertical layering over the city of pollutants. The need for more detailed information on air circulation and changes occurring in the lower atmospheric layers, as well as to understand why air-mass exchange does not take place, thereby impeding the dispersion of pollutants, was the project's goal- orientation. Measurement of NO2, SO2, O3, HNO2 were carried out over a 1.7 Km path in the city center by means of a DOAS system called GASCOD developed by remote sensing group of FISBAT-CNR at Bologna. The light source has been equipped with a remote-controlled occulting devices in order to separate the sky light scattered into the field of bye of the receiving system, which can interfere with the lamp spectra during daytime. The light from the source is collected by a Cassegrain telescope and focused on the spectrograph's entrance slit receiving system; the detector is a linear image sensor featuring an array of 512 MOS photodiodes. Data recorded in the same and boundary areas by a conventional analyzer from city's air-pollution monitoring network are reported for comparison. The statistical correlation of concentration values to the main weather and atmospheric stability parameters are stressed.

  16. [Comprehensive study of lead pollution in atmospheric aerosol of Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-lin; Tan, Ming-guang; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Yuan-xun; Yue, Wei-sheng; Chen, Jian-min; Wang, Yin-song; Li, Ai-guo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yuan-mao; Shan, Zhu-ci

    2006-05-01

    The lead contamination, lead species and source assignment were studied by a combination of several analytical techniques such as Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), Proton microprobe (micro-PIXE), Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The results indicate that the lead concentration in the air of Shanghai gradually decreased over the last years. The atmospheric lead concentration of PM10 in the winter of 2002 was 369 ng x m(-3), which had declined by 28% in 2001, and in the winter of 2003 it decreased further to 237 ng x m(-3). The main lead species in the samples collected in the winter of 2003 were probably PbCl2, PbSO4 and PbO. The source apportionment was calculated in terms of the combination of lead isotope ratios and lead mass balance method, assisted by single particle analysis with micro-PIXE and pattern recognition. The results suggest that the major contributors of atmospheric lead pollution in Shanghai are the coal combustion dust; the metallurgic dust and vehicle exhaust particles, with a contribution around 50%, 35% and 15%, respectively. It probably is the first time to give a city a quantitative estimation of lead pollution contribution from emission sources. The influence from leaded gasoline was still present in the atmosphere by four or five years after the phasing out of leaded gasoline. PMID:16850817

  17. CAPACITY: Operational Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelder, H.; Goede, A.; van Weele, M.

    The ESA project CAPACITY refers to future Operational Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring Missions. Here operational is meant in the sense that a reliable service of specified information products can be established that satisfies user needs. Monitoring is meant in the sense that long-term continuity and consistency in the quality of the information products can be achieved. The objectives of the project are: To consult with user communities to develop high level information requirements and the form of the information products. To identify and prioritise mission objectives. To derive mission data requirements from the high level user information requirements and iterate these with the users. To set these requirements against observation systems available or approved for the future. To identify missing information products or information products of insufficient quality. To define a global observation system that would satisfy user requirements. The time frame of this operational system is projected to cover the period 2010 to 2020 concurrent with the operational satellites MetOp and NPOESS. In order to address these objectives a large European consortium has been formed consisting of approximately 30 partners from 9 ESA countries (F, D, UK, I, SW, N, DK, B, NL). The project is led by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and the core team includes the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Univ Leicester, Univ Bremen and industry. Four application areas are identified: Protocol Monitoring (Montreal and Kyoto) and Policy Support Air Quality Monitoring and Policy Support (CLRTAP) Long Term Science Issues and Climate Monitoring Forecast Capacity In the derivation of data level 2/3 requirements from high level user requirements the consortium relies on a large group of modellers using satellite data, and of space research institutes with expertise in retrieval and calibration/validation of satellite data as well as Industry with experience in building space

  18. Assessment of the spatial and temporal distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Nordic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Pia; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Hansson, Katarina; Hakola, Hannele; Vestenius, Mika

    2016-09-01

    Long-term atmospheric monitoring data (1994-2011) of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were assembled from a rural site in southern Sweden, Råö, and a remote, sub-Arctic site in Finland, Pallas. The concentration levels, congener profiles, seasonal and temporal trends, and projections were evaluated in order to assess the status of POPs in the Scandinavian atmosphere. Our data include atmospheric concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), altogether comprising a selection of 27 different compounds. The atmospheric POP levels were generally higher in the south, closer to the sources (primary emissions) of the pollutants. The levels of low-chlorinated PCBs and chlordanes were equal at the two sites, and one of the studied POPs, α-HCH, showed higher levels in the north than in the south. Declining temporal trends in the atmospheric concentrations for the legacy POPs - PCBs (2-4% per year), HCHs (6-7% per year), chlordanes (3-4% per year) and DTTs (2-5% per year) - were identified both along Sweden's west coast and in the sub-Arctic area of northern Finland. Most of PAHs did not show any significant long-term trends. The future projections for POP concentrations suggest that in Scandinavia, low-chlorinated PCBs and p,p‧-DDE will remain in the atmospheric compartment the longest (beyond 2030). HCH's and PCB180 will be depleted from the Nordic atmosphere first, before 2020, whereas chlordanes and rest of the PCBs will be depleted between the years 2020 and 2025. PCBs tend to deplete sooner and chlordanes later from the sub-Arctic compared to the south of Sweden. This study demonstrates that the international bans on legacy POPs have successfully reduced the concentrations of these particular substances in the Nordic atmosphere. However, the most long-lived compounds may continue in the atmospheric cycle for another couple of decades.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A POLLUTANT MONITORING SYSTEM FOR BIOSPHERE RESERVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an initial approach to identifying and solving the problems of developing a monitoring system for Biosphere Reserves. To date, most proposals have only focused on the selection of Reserves, pollutants to monitor, etc.; the real-world problems of how to monito...

  20. The Role of Monitoring in Controlling Water Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, Allan

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of trends in the national water pollution control effort and to describe the role of monitoring in that effort, particularly in relation to the responsibilities of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). I hope the paper will serve as a useful framework for the more specific discussions of monitoring technology to follow.

  1. Laboratory measurements of Photochemical Properties of Atmospheric Pollutants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orkin, V. L.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important parameters in estimating the environmental impact due to emission of a compound is its residence time in the atmosphere, which is driven by the reaction of a compound with hydroxyl radicals (OH) for many atmospheric trace gases. The atmospheric lifetime is important for estimating ozone depletion potential (ODP) and global warming potential (GWP) of industrial compounds which are needed for evaluation of their environmental impact and regulatory purposes. The sources of critically evaluated photochemical data for atmospheric modeling, NASA/JPL Publications and IUPAC Publications, recommend uncertainties within 10%-60% for the majority of OH reaction rate constants with only a few cases where uncertainties lie at the low end of this range. These uncertainties can be somewhat conservative because evaluations are based on the data from various laboratories obtained during the last few decades. Nevertheless, even the authors of the original experimental works rarely estimate the total combined uncertainties of the published OH reaction rate constants to be less than ca. 10%. Thus, uncertainties in the photochemical properties of potential and current atmospheric trace gases obtained under controlled laboratory conditions still constitute a major source of uncertainty in estimating the compound's environmental impact. One of the purposes of the present work was to illustrate the potential for obtaining accurate laboratory measurements of the OH reaction rate constant over the temperature range of atmospheric interest. We provide a detailed inventory of accountable sources of instrumental uncertainties related to our FP-RF experiment to prove a total uncertainty of the OH reaction rate constant to be ca. 2%. The results of accurate measurements of photochemical properties of industrial and natural atmospheric pollutants will be presented.

  2. Influence of meteorological parameters on particulates and atmospheric pollutants at Taichung harbor sampling site.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Wen, Chih-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chang, Shih-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles and metallic concentrations, ionic species were monitored at the Experimental harbor of Taichung sampling site in this study. This work attempted to characterize metallic elements and ionic species associated with meteorological conditions variation on atmospheric particulate matter in TSP, PM2.5, PM2.5-10. The concentration distribution trend between TSP, PM2.5, PM2.5-10 particle concentration at the TH (Taichung harbor) sampling site were also displayed in this study. Besides, the meteorological conditions variation of metallic elements (Fe, Mg, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Pb) and ions species (Cl(-), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Na+) concentrations attached with those particulate were also analyzed in this study. On non-parametric (Spearman) correlation analysis, the results indicated that the meteorological conditions have high correlation at largest particulate concentrations for TSP at TH sampling site in this study. In addition, the temperature and relative humidity of meteorological conditions that played a key role to affect particulate matter (PM) and have higher correlations then other meteorological conditions such as wind speed and atmospheric pressure. The parameter temperature and relative humidity also have high correlations with atmospheric pollutants compared with those of the other meteorological variables (wind speed, atmospheric pressure and prevalent wind direction). In addition, relative statistical equations between pollutants and meteorological variables were also characterized in this study. PMID:17057996

  3. Laboratory studies of sources of HONO in polluted urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Najat A.; Mochida, Michihiro; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara. J.

    2000-10-01

    Laboratory studies reported here and in previous work show that the reaction of NO(g) with surface adsorbed HNO3 may be a significant source of HONO in polluted urban atmospheres. If these laboratory studies can be extrapolated to ambient conditions, this heterogeneous reaction may generate HONO to about the same extent as the hydrolysis of NO2 on surfaces, which is greater than the heterogeneous reaction of NO, NO2 and water. It may also be involved in generating HONO in snowpacks, and important in reconciling the discrepancy between measured and modeled HNO3/NOx ratios in the troposphere.

  4. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  5. Monitoring and control of atmosphere in a closed environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, R.; Perry, J.

    1991-01-01

    Applications requiring new technologies for atmosphere monitoring and control in the closed environment and their principal functions aboard the Space Station Freedom are described. Oxygen loop closure, involving the conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen; carbon dioxide reduction and removal; and monitoring of atmospheric contamination are discussed. The Trace Contaminant Monitor, the Major Constituent Analyzer, the Carbon Dioxide Monitor, and the Particulate Counter Monitor are discussed.

  6. Utilization of bark pockets as time capsules of atmospheric-lead pollution in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åberg, Gøran; Abrahamsen, Gunnar; Steinnes, Eiliv; Hjelmseth, Harry

    The outer bark being enveloped by and grown into the tree trunk (bark pocket), acts as a passive biomonitor which readily accumulates pollution on its surface. Analysed with stable lead isotopes, these environmental historical archives are very strong candidates for unwinding pollution history. The Røros sulphide ore district, central Norway, has a well-documented mining activity which started in 1647 and the quarrying and smelting in Røros was easily monitored from the middle of the 18th century until the smelting stopped in 1977. Thereafter other sources, like the increase in use of leaded gasoline and further on its outphasing, can be followed. In southern Norway analyses of bark pockets show a good correlation with Pb isotope data from peat cores and tree rings. This region has not been dominated by a single source for many centuries. From the 17th century until about 1925 coal firing and ore smelting in England and on the continent were the dominating sources of pollution in southwestern Norway. From about 1925 and until about 1950 other sources like waste burning contributed, and from about 1950 onwards the pollution has been a mixture of mainly leaded gasoline, coal and coke firing, and incineration of waste. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the historical changes of environmental pollution in Norway during the last several hundred years up to the present time using tree bark pockets as pollution time capsules. Analyses of stable lead isotopes makes it possible to trace and identify lead from different sources of pollution and atmospherically transported lead deposited in central and southern Norway. Of special interest is the relationship between the industrialization of Europe and the global environmental pollution. Understanding this evolution is of considerable value for evaluating the present day situation.

  7. Characterisation of gaseous and particulate atmospheric pollutants in the East Mediterranean by diffusion denuder sampling lines.

    PubMed

    Perrino, C; Catrambone, M; Esposito, G; Lahav, D; Mamane, Y

    2009-05-01

    A field study aimed to characterize atmospheric pollutants in the gaseous and the particulate phases was conducted during the fall-winter of 2004 and the summer of 2005 in the Ashdod area, Israel. The site is influenced by both anthropogenic sources (power plants, refineries, chemical and metal industries, a cargo port, road traffic) and natural sources (sea-spray and desert dust). The use of diffusion lines--a series of annular diffusion denuders for sampling gaseous compounds followed by a cyclone and a filter pack for determining PM(2.5) composition--allowed a good daily characterization of the main inorganic compounds in both the gaseous (HCl, HNO(3), SO(2), NH(3)) and the particulate phase (Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(=), NH(4)(+), and base cations). During the summer campaign two other activities were added: an intensive 3-h sampling period and the determination of PM(2.5) bulk composition. The results were interpreted on the basis of meteorological condition, especially the mixing properties of the lower atmosphere as determined by monitoring the natural radioactivity due to Radon progeny, a good proxy of the atmospheric ability to dilute pollutants. Several pollution episodes were identified and the predominance of different sources was highlighted (sea-spray, desert dust, secondary photochemical pollutants). During the summer period a considerable increase of nitric acid and particulate sulphate was observed. Secondary inorganic pollutants (nitrate, sulphate and ammonium) constituted, on the average, 57% of the fine particle fraction, organic compounds 20%, primary anthropogenic compounds 14%, natural components (sea-spray and crustal elements) 9%. The advantages of the diffusion lines in determining gaseous and particulate N- and S- inorganic compounds are discussed. PMID:18535917

  8. Monitoring of stream pollution using protozoan communities on artificial substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Henebry, M.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Monitoring of stream pollution using protozoan communities on artificial substrates. Protozoan communities were sampled in 1978 from the South River near Waynesboro, Virginia, and compared with a study carried out in 1972. Five study stations were located above and below sources of pollution. Species richness followed the same pattern as in the 1972 study except at Station 2 (just below a major source of pollution) where a marked improvement in water quality occurred. Numbers of species increased significantly downstream from a source of pollution. This study provides evidence that protozoan communities may be used effectively in the assessment of water pollution and that results compare favorably with those based on macroinvertebrates which are more expensive to collect.

  9. Change of the dynamics of heavy metals concentration in atmospheric precipitation in chatkal nature reservation of the republic of uzbekistan as anthropogenic index of the atmospheric pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, T.; Tolkacheva, G.

    2003-04-01

    At present the investigation of the chemical composition of precipitation is a very actual task in the monitoring of environmental pollution. It is known that heavy metals can be the indices of the anthropogenic atmospheric pollution. The emissions from the mining enterprises, of non-ferrous metallurgy, of chemical industry, from heat-and-power production plants, from transport vehicles fare the sources of the heavy metals ingress into the atmosphere. Their emissions in atmosphere form fine-disperse aerosol fractions and afterwards they fall down together with precipitation onto the underlying surface. Heavy metals have the property of accumulation in environmental objects, which disturbs its ecological balance. One of the problems of the study of the influence of heavy metals pollution on the environment is their travel with the air masses of different origin on large distance. In this concern it is interesting to study the content of the heavy metals in atmospheric aerosols and precipitation in the background zones. Chatkal nature reservation on the territory of Tashkent province presents such background point. For the estimation of the level of atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and evaluation of the possible impact on the background level of air pollution of Chatkal nature reservation by anthropogenic sources (industrial cities of the capital province of Uzbekistan) the data analysis was carried out by the Administration of Environment Pollution Monitoring (AEPM) of hydrometeorological service of the Republic of Uzbekistan. It is necessary to mention that Chatkal biospheric nature reservation is situated in 100 km from Tashkent (the capital of the Republic of Uzbekistan) and in 60 km from Almalyk (the biggest centre of mining-metallurgical and chemical industry of the republic). The station of the complex background monitoring of atmospheric pollution (SCBM) is situated on the territory of this nature reservation. This area is characterized by a typical

  10. Development of a Scheimpflug Lidar System for Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a Scheimpflug lidar system which was employed for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in southern Sweden. Atmospheric aerosol fluctuation was observed around rush-hour. The extinction coefficient over 6 km was retrieved, i.e., 0.15 km-1, by employing the slop-method during the time when the atmosphere was relatively homogenous. The measurements successfully demonstrate the potential of using a Scheimpflug lidar technique for atmospheric aerosol monitoring applications.

  11. Pollution Permanent Monitoring PANEL--2013 Annual Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lorne G.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * POLLUTION PANEL ACTIVITIES 2013 * NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 2013 * MTBE NEW HAMPSHIRE LITIGATION--APRIL 12, 2013 * ALTERNATIVES FOR MANAGING THE NATION's COMPLEX CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER SITES--NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, 2013 * HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE: KEY FINDINGS AND SCIENTIFIC ISSUES. MARCH 1, 2013 REVIEWS * BAROMETRIC PRESSURE DRIVES SOIL-GAS CONCENTRATIONS * WATER RESOURCES--TERRORISM TARGETS * WITH A LITTLE INGENUITY THE PROBLEM IS NOT INSOLUBLE * HIGH RISE BUILDINGS * TERRORIST MATERIAL MAY DESTROY WATER TRANSMISSION INFRASTRUCTURE * WATER THREAT CONCLUSIONS * MULTINATIONAL REPOSITORIES

  12. Use of tree bark to monitor radionuclide pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Brownridge, J.D.

    1985-08-01

    The outer surface bark of many trees is an excellent monitoring source of fallout radionuclides. The accumulation and retention of these pollutants is evident by the presence of /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 144/Ce and /sup 155/Eu in the outer layer of bark from many trees surveyed during this study. The accumulation and retention of these and other radionuclides suggest that tree bark is an ecosystem monitoring resource that should be exploited for these and possible other environmental pollutants. Therefore, the emphasis of this study was a broad survey of the detectability of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in and on tree bark rather than a narrow quantitative study.

  13. Study of organic pollutants oxidation by atmospheric plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumuchian, Diane; Cavadias, Simeon; Duten, Xavier; Tatoulian, Michael; da Costa, Patrick; Ognier, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    Ozonation is one of the usual steps in water treatment processes. However, some organic molecules (acetic acid) cannot be decomposed during ozonation. In that context, we are developing an Advanced Oxidation Process based on the use of a needle plate discharge at atmospheric pressure. The process is a reactor with a plasma discharge between a high voltage electrode and the solution in controlled atmosphere. Characterizations of the plasma obtained in different atmospheres were carried out (Optical Emission Spectroscopy, iCCD camera observations, etc). The efficiency of the process was evaluated by the percentage of degradation of the model-pollutant, measured by liquid chromatography analysis. Treatments in nitrogen lead to the formation of NOx species that decrease the efficiency of the process. Indeed, NOx lead to the consumption of actives species created. Treatments in argon are the most efficient. Two hypotheses are considered: (i) metastable argon participates to the degradation of acetic acid or to the formation of radicals (ii) discharges in argon lead to the formation of many streamers of low energy that increase the interface plasma/solution.

  14. Detection and monitoring of pollutant sources with Lidar/Dial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Malizia, A.; Parracino, S.; Richetta, M.; De Leo, L.; Perrimezzi, C.; Bellecci, C.

    2015-11-01

    It's well known that air pollution due to anthropogenic sources can have adverse effects on humans and the ecosystem. Therefore, in the last years, surveying large regions of the atmosphere in an automatic way has become a strategic objective of various public health organizations for early detection of pollutant sources in urban and industrial areas. The Lidar and Dial techniques have become well established laser based methods for the remote sensing of the atmosphere. They are often implemented to probe almost any level of the atmosphere and to acquire information to validate theoretical models about different topics of atmospheric physics. They can also be used for environment surveying by monitoring particles, aerosols and molecules. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the potential of these methods to detect pollutants emitted from local sources (such as particulate and/or chemical compounds) and to evaluate their concentration. This is exemplified with the help of experimental data acquired in an industrial area in the south of Italy by mean of experimental campaign by use of pollutants simulated source. For this purpose, two mobile systems Lidar and Dial have been developed by the authors. In this paper there will be presented the operating principles of the system and the results of the experimental campaign.

  15. A new conceptual model for quantifying transboundary contribution of atmospheric pollutants in the East Asian Pacific rim region.

    PubMed

    Lai, I-Chien; Lee, Chon-Lin; Huang, Hu-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Transboundary transport of air pollution is a serious environmental concern as pollutant affects both human health and the environment. Many numerical approaches have been utilized to quantify the amounts of pollutants transported to receptor regions, based on emission inventories from possible source regions. However, sparse temporal-spatial observational data and uncertainty in emission inventories might make the transboundary transport contribution difficult to estimate. This study presents a conceptual quantitative approach that uses transport pathway classification in combination with curve fitting models to simulate an air pollutant concentration baseline for pollution background concentrations. This approach is used to investigate the transboundary transport contribution of atmospheric pollutants to a metropolitan area in the East Asian Pacific rim region. Trajectory analysis categorized pollution sources for the study area into three regions: East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Taiwan cities. The occurrence frequency and transboundary contribution results suggest the predominant source region is the East Asian continent. This study also presents an application to evaluate heavy pollution cases for health concerns. This new baseline construction model provides a useful tool for the study of the contribution of transboundary pollution delivered to receptors, especially for areas deficient in emission inventories and regulatory monitoring data for harmful air pollutants. PMID:26760713

  16. Passive Samplers for Monitoring Insidious N Air Pollutants and Estimating N Deposition to Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.

    2004-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are the main biologically important nitrogenous (N) air pollutants. At highly elevated concentrations, these pollutants have a potential of causing injury to sensitive plants. More importantly, gaseous N pollutants may provide significant amounts of atmospheric N to the terrestrial ecosystems. This is especially true for wildlands affected by photochemical smog and agricultural emissions (e.g. mountains near California Central Valley or Los Angeles Basin). Passive samplers developed in the 1990s and 2000s have allowed for reliable monitoring of ambient concentrations of the pollutants at large geographic scales. Information on spatial and temporal distribution of NH3, HNO3, NO and NO2 from passive samplers may allow for determining potential "hot spots" of N pollutants effects. Information on ambient concentrations of gaseous N can also be used for estimates of N deposition to various ecosystems. Monitoring of N air pollutants and estimates of N deposition have been conducted in deserts, coastal sage, serpentine grassland, chaparral, and mixed conifer forests in California. These efforts and potential future use of passive samplers will be discussed.

  17. HANDBOOK: CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR NON-CRITERIA POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides a description of the methods used to continuously monitor non-criteria pollutants emitted from stationary sources. The Handbook contains a review of current regulatory programs, the state-of-the-art sampling system design, analytical techniques, and the use...

  18. Raman gas analyzer applicability to monitoring of gaseous air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, D. V.; Matrosov, I. I.; Tikhomirov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that the main problem, arising when designing a stationary Raman gas analyzer intended to monitor gaseous air pollutions, is to get SRS signals of sufficient intensity. The engineering solutions are presented that provide the required sensitivity (~ 50-100 ppb). It is achieved by compressing a gas medium under analysis and gaining intensity of the exciting laser radiation.

  19. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  20. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  1. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  2. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  3. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  4. Preliminary results of a lidar-dial integrated system for the automatic detection of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Richetta, M.

    2012-11-01

    In the last decades, atmospheric pollution in urban and industrial areas has become a major concern of both developed and developing countries. In this context, surveying relative large areas in an automatic way is an increasing common objective of public health organisations. The Lidar-Dial techniques are widely recognized as a cost-effective approach to monitor large portions of the atmosphere and, for example, they have been successful applied to the early detection of forest fire. The studies and preliminary results reported in this paper concern the development of an integrated Lidar-Dial system able to detect sudden releases in air of harmful and polluting substances. The propose approach consists of continuous monitoring of the area under surveillance with a Lidar type measurement (by means of a low cost system). Once a significant increase in the density of a pollutant is revealed, the Dial technique is used to identify the released chemicals. In this paper, the specifications of the proposed station are discussed. The most stringent requirement is the need for a very compact system with a range of at least 600-700 m. Of course, the optical wavelengths must be in an absolute eye-safe range for humans. A conceptual design of the entire system is described and the most important characteristic of the main elements are provided. In particular the capability of the envisaged laser sources, Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers, to provide the necessary quality of the measurements is carefully assessed. Since the detection of dangerous substances must be performed in an automatic way, the monitoring station will be equipped with an adequate set of control and communication devices for independent autonomous operation. The results of the first preliminary tests illustrate the potential of the chosen approach.

  5. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  6. Real-time monitoring for low-level pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kishkovich, O.P.; Joffe, M.A.

    1997-11-01

    Real-time monitors provide a valuable addition to the arsenal of air-sampling methods used for IAQ applications. They are accurate, dependable, flexible, and provide IAQ professionals with more detailed quantitative information. RTM improves efficiency of many IAQ sampling applications and, in some cases, cannot be matched by other sampling techniques. Adequate instrumentation for demanding IAQ applications is available today. Future needs are expanding the range of pollutants that can be monitored with real-time instruments, improving reliability and portability of monitoring instrumentation, and devising cost-effective multiplexing schemes for multi-point RTM sampling.

  7. Air Pollution Monitoring and Use of Nanotechnology Based Solid State Gas Sensors in Greater Cairo Area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, A. B. A.

    Air pollution is a serious problem in thickly populated and industrialized areas in Egypt, especially in greater Cairo area. Economic growth and industrialization are proceeding at a rapid pace, accompanied by increasing emissions of air polluting sources. Furthermore, though the variety and quantities of polluting sources have increased dramatically, the development of a suitable method for monitoring the pollution causing sources has not followed at the same pace. Environmental impacts of air pollutants have impact on public health, vegetation, material deterioration etc. To prevent or minimize the damage caused by atmospheric pollution, suitable monitoring systems are urgently needed that can rapidly and reliably detect and quantify polluting sources for monitoring by regulating authorities in order to prevent further deterioration of the current pollution levels. Consequently, it is important that the current real-time air quality monitoring system, controlled by the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA), should be adapted or extended to aid in alleviating this problem. Nanotechnology has been applied to several industrial and domestic fields, for example, applications for gas monitoring systems, gas leak detectors in factories, fire and toxic gas detectors, ventilation control, breath alcohol detectors, and the like. Here we report an application example of studying air quality monitoring based on nanotechnology `solid state gas sensors'. So as to carry out air pollution monitoring over an extensive area, a combination of ground measurements through inexpensive sensors and wireless GIS will be used for this purpose. This portable device, comprising solid state gas sensors integrated to a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) linked through Bluetooth communication tools and Global Positioning System (GPS), will allow rapid dissemination of information on pollution levels at multiple sites simultaneously.

  8. Weather and Climate on the Reliability of Enviromagnetic Studies of Tree Leaves in Air Pollution Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, D.; Rodríguez-Germade, I.; Mohamed Falcon, K. J.; Rubio, B.; Garcia, A.

    2014-12-01

    Monthly monitoring of the magnetic properties of Platanus hispanica tree leaves to assess atmospheric pollution in Madrid (Spain) and its suburban town of Pozuelo de Alarcon showed anthropogenic time-related klf enhancement of tree leaves. We established a significant correlation between metal concentration (leaching) in the leaves with Klf and IRM1T. This relationship was not as high as those found in other studies carried out on airborne dust, sediments and soils. Further analyses pointed out that local humidity played a dual roll, controlling availability of airborne lithogenic dust and the incorporation of trace metals in the leaf tissue, modulating the magnetic enhancement. Further to these findings, the comparison between cities of different climatic regimes showed that air humidity is the major factor controlling the interaction of the atmosphere and tree leaves, thus their magnetic properties. The relative influence of pollutants, lithogenic dust and biological effects depends not only on local meteorology but also on climate. Their influence should be most seriously considered to design methodological approaches that are appropriate to the environmental characteristics of each study area, if the magnetic properties of tree leaves are intended as an atmospheric pollution-monitoring tool.

  9. Transboundary Air Pollution over the Central Himalayas: Monitoring network and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianggong; Kang, Shichang

    2016-04-01

    The Himalayas, stretching over 3000 kms along west-east, separates South Asia continent and the Tibetan Plateau with its extreme high altitudes. The South Asia is being increasingly recognized to be among the hotspots of air pollution, posing multi-effects on regional climate and environment. Recent monitoring and projection have indicated an accelerated decrease of glacier and increasing glacier runoff in the Himalayas, and a remarkable phenomenon has been recognized in the Himalayas that long-range transport atmospheric pollutants (e.g., black carbon and dust) deposited on glacier surface can promote glacier melt, and in turns, may liberate historical contaminant legacy in glaciers into downward ecosystems. To understand the air pollution variation and how they can infiltrate the Himalayas and beyond, we started to operate a coordinated atmospheric pollution monitoring network composing 11 sites with 5 in Nepal and 6 in Tibet since April 2013. Atmospheric total suspended particles ( TSP < 100 μm) are collected for 24h at an interval of 3-6 days at all sites. Black carbon, typical persistent organic pollutants (PAHs) and heavy metals (particulate-bounded mercury) are measured to reveal their spatial and temporal distributions. Results revealed a consistent gradient decrease in almost all analyzed parameters along south-north gradient across the Himalayas, with a clear seasonal variation of higher values in pre-monsoon seasons. Analysis of geochemical signatures of carbonaceous aerosols indicated dominant sources from biomass burning and vehicle exhaust. PAHs concentrations and signatures from soils and aerosols indicated that low-ring PAHs can readily transport across the Himalayas. Integrated analysis of satellite images and air mass trajectories suggested that the transboundary air pollution over the Himalayas is episodic and is likely concentrated in pre-monsoon seasons. Our results emphasis the potential transport and impact of air pollution from South Asia

  10. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    PubMed

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed. PMID:24564165

  11. Monitoring Mediterranean marine pollution using remote sensing and hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Loggia, Goffredo; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; Drago, Aldo; Maltese, Antonino

    2011-11-01

    Human activities contaminate both coastal areas and open seas, even though impacts are different in terms of pollutants, ecosystems and recovery time. In particular, Mediterranean offshore pollution is mainly related to maritime transport of oil, accounting for 25% of the global maritime traffic and, during the last 25 years, for nearly 7% of the world oil accidents, thus causing serious biological impacts on both open sea and coastal zone habitats. This paper provides a general review of maritime pollution monitoring using integrated approaches of remote sensing and hydrodynamic modeling; focusing on the main results of the MAPRES (Marine pollution monitoring and detection by aerial surveillance and satellite images) research project on the synergistic use of remote sensing, forecasting, cleanup measures and environmental consequences. The paper also investigates techniques of oil spill detection using SAR images, presenting the first results of "Monitoring of marine pollution due to oil slick", a COSMO-SkyMed funded research project where X-band SAR constellation images provided by the Italian Space Agency are used. Finally, the prospect of using real time observations of marine surface conditions is presented through CALYPSO project (CALYPSO-HF Radar Monitoring System and Response against Marine Oil Spills in the Malta Channel), partly financed by the EU under the Operational Programme Italia-Malta 2007-2013. The project concerns the setting up of a permanent and fully operational HF radar observing system, capable of recording surface currents (in real-time with hourly updates) in the stretch of sea between Malta and Sicily. A combined use of collected data and numerical models, aims to optimize intervention and response in the case of marine oil spills.

  12. Assessment of space sensors for ocean pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Tomiyasu, K.; Gulatsi, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Several passive and active microwave, as well as passive optical remote sensors, applicable to the monitoring of oil spills and waste discharges at sea, are considered. The discussed types of measurements relate to: (1) spatial distribution and properties of the pollutant, and (2) oceanic parameters needed to predict the movement of the pollutants and their impact upon land. The sensors, operating from satellite platforms at 700-900 km altitudes, are found to be useful in mapping the spread of oil in major oil spills and in addition, can be effective in producing wind and ocean parameters as inputs to oil trajectory and dispersion models. These capabilities can be used in countermeasures.

  13. Terahertz sensor for air pollution monitoring from spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Rui; Guo, Aiyan

    2016-07-01

    Terahertz wave is a radio wave which wavelength between infrared and microwave, substantial is from 0.1-1mm that is 300-3000GHz(0.3-3THz). Compare to microwave and visible/infrared it is advantage of resolution and better penetration in atmosphere respectively, and because of wavelength is similar to scale of micro-particle of air pollution, the absorption coefficient due to the many relevant molecules have a maximum signature in the THz region, such as SO2、CH4、H2S、NH3、CO、O3 etc. of molecules of polluted atmosphere . This paper present a conceptional solution of THz sensor for air pollution sounder which using of large aperture antenna and FSS with 15 channels in 0.183-1.5THz region, each channel with 2MHz by extreme narrow band filter for detecting signature of polluted air. Analysis data show that 2Km spatial resolution at 700km altitude orbit. Sensitive is about 10-12W/Hz1/2 level at cryogenic temp.

  14. Atmospheric Pollution over the Eastern Mediterranean during summer - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, Uri; Ricaud, Philippe; Zbinden, Regina; Dulac, François

    2016-04-01

    The subsiding air aloft induced by global circulation systems affecting the EM and the depth of the Persian Trough, control the spatio-temporal distribution of the boundary layer during summer. The shallow mixed layer and weak zonal flow, leads to poor ventilation rates, inhibiting an efficient dispersion of the pollutants. Several studies pointing at specific local (e.g. ventilation rates) and regional peculiarities (long range transport) enhancing the building up of pollutant concentrations are presented. Tropospheric-ozone concentrations over the EM basin are among the highest over the Northern Hemisphere. The processes controlling its formation (i.e., long range transport from Europe, dynamic subsidence at mid-troposphere, and stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange) are reviewed. Airborne and satellite-borne initiatives have indicated that the concentration values of reactive nitrogen are 2 to 10 times higher than in the hemispheric background troposphere. Models, aircraft measurements, and satellite data, have shown that sulfate has a maximum during spring and summer. The CO seasonal cycle, mainly governed by the concentration of the hydroxyl radical demonstrates high concentrations over winter months and lowest during summer when photochemistry is active. The daily variations in CO concentration are caused by long-range CO transport from European anthropogenic sources. The spatial distribution of methane, derived from satellite identified August as the month with the highest levels over the EM. The results of a comprehensive analysis of atmospheric methane over the EM Basin as part of the ChArMEx program, using satellite data and model simulations is consistent with other previous studies.

  15. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  16. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  17. Source regions of some persistent organic pollutants measured in the atmosphere at Birkenes, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, S.; Breivik, K.; Li, Y. F.; Manø, S.; Stohl, A.

    2009-09-01

    A key feature of POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) is their potential for long-range atmospheric transport. In order to better understand and predict atmospheric source-receptor relationships of POPs, we have modified an existing Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART) to include some of the key processes that control the atmospheric fate of POPs. We also present four years (2004-2007) of new atmospheric measurement data for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) obtained at Birkenes, an EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) site in southern Norway. The model overestimates measured PCB-28 and γ-HCH concentrations by factors of 2 and 8, respectively, which is most likely because the emissions used as input to the model are overestimated. FLEXPART captures the temporal variability in the measurements very well and, depending on season, explains 31-67% (14-62%) of the variance of measured PCB-28 (γ-HCH) concentrations. FLEXPART, run in a time-reversed (adjoint) mode, was used to identify the source regions responsible for the POP loading at the Birkenes station. Emissions in Central Europe and Eastern Europe contributed 32% and 24%, respectively, to PCB-28 at Birkenes, while Western Europe was found to be the dominant source (50%) for γ-HCH. Intercontinental transport from North America contributed 13% γ-HCH. While FLEXPART has no treatment of the partitioning of POPs between different surface media, it was found a very useful tool for studying atmospheric source-receptor relationships for POPs and POP-like chemicals that do not sorb strongly to atmospheric particles and whose atmospheric levels are believed to be mainly controlled by primary sources.

  18. Development of wireless sensor network for monitoring indoor air pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Shaharil Mad; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Saad, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Yusof @ Kamarudin, Azman Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    The air that we breathe with everyday contains variety of contaminants and particles. Some of these contaminants and particles are hazardous to human health. Most of the people don't realize that the content of air they being exposed to whether it was a good or bad air quality. The air quality whether in indoor or outdoor environment can be influenced by physical factors like dust particles, gaseous pollutants (including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds) and biological like molds and bacteria growth which largely depend on temperature and humidity condition of a room. These kinds of pollutants can affect human health, physical reaction, comfort or work performance. In this study, a wireless sensor network (WSN) monitoring system for monitor air pollutant in indoor environment was developed. The system was divided into three parts: web-based interface program, sensing module and a base station. The measured data was displayed on the web which is can be accessed by the user. The result shows that the overall measured parameters were meet the acceptable limit, requirement and criteria of indoor air pollution inside the building. The research can be used to improve the indoor air quality level in order to create a comfortable working and healthy environment for the occupants inside the building.

  19. Tracking of atmospheric release of pollution using unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmídl, Václav; Hofman, Radek

    2013-03-01

    Tracking of an atmospheric release of pollution is usually based on measurements provided by stationary networks, occasionally complemented with deployment of mobile sensors. In this paper, we extend the existing concept to the case where the sensors are carried onboard of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The decision theoretic framework is used to design an unsupervised algorithm that navigates the UAVs to minimize the selected loss function. A particle filter with a problem-tailored proposal function was used as the underlying data assimilation procedure. A range of simulated twin experiments was performed on the problem of tracking an accidental release of radiation from a nuclear power plant in realistic settings. The main uncertainty was in the released activity and in parametric bias of the numerical weather forecast. It was shown that the UAVs can complement the existing stationary network to improve the accuracy of data assimilation. Moreover, two autonomously navigated UAVs alone were shown to provide assimilation results comparable to those obtained using the stationary network with more than thirty sensors.

  20. Study on wet scavenging of atmospheric pollutants in south Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Flavio; Pereira, Felipe Norte; Teixeira, Elba Calesso

    2011-09-01

    The present paper presents the study of in-cloud and below-cloud SO 2 and SO 42-scavenging processes by applying numerical models in the Candiota region, located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, South Brazil. The BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) model was applied to simulate the vertical structure of the clouds, and the B.V.2 (Below-Cloud Beheng Version 2) scavenging model was applied to simulate in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging processes of the pollutants SO 2 and SO 42-. Five events in 2004 were selected for this study and were sampled at the Candiota Airport station. The concentrations of SO 2 and SO 42- sampled in the air and the simulated meteorological parameters of rainfall episodes were used as input data in the B.V.2, which simulates raindrop interactions associated with the scavenging process. Results for the Candiota region showed that in-cloud scavenging processes were more significant than below-cloud scavenging processes for two of the five events studied, with a contribution of approximately 90-100% of SO 2 and SO 42- concentrations in rainwater. A few adjustments to the original version of B.V.2 were made to allow simulation of scavenging processes in several types of clouds, not only cumulus humilis and cumulus congestus.

  1. The magnetic way of quantifying road traffic pollution in atmospheric particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassov, S.; Egli, R.; Heller, F.

    2003-12-01

    The steadily increasing number of motor vehicles requires continuous air quality monitoring in large urban and sub-urban areas. We present a fast and simple method for analysing samples of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) based on magnetic measurements, which is suitable for systematic pollution monitoring of extensive areas at low costs. Representative samples have been collected in Switzerland at sites with variable exposure to pollution sources. Atmospheric PM consists of natural and of anthropogenic components which both contain magnetic mineral fractions with specific magnetic properties. Our method relies on the analysis of the remanent magnetisation of PM samples. Detailed demagnetisation curves of anhysteretic remanent magnetisation (ARM) of these samples have been modelled using a linear combination of appropriate model functions, which represent the contribution of different magnetic mineral sources to the total magnetisation. Two magnetic components C1 and C2 with well-defined magnetic properties have been identified in all samples. The low-coercivity component C1 predominates in less polluted sites, whereas the concentration of the higher coercivity component C2 is large in urban areas. Once the coercivity distributions of C1 and C2 have been characterised, a simple method has been developed to quantify C1 and C2. This method is based on four-step demagnetisation curves, which can be measured in 12 minutes using a 2G cryogenic magnetometer with an in-line AF degausser. Our results are confirmed by independent chemical investigations at the same sites. The magnetic contribution of C2 is shown to be proportional to the chemically estimated total PM10 mass contribution of exhaust emissions. The mass concentration of traffic related elements in PM10 such as Fe, Ba, Cu, Mo, Br and elemental carbon also correlates with our results. Traffic is the most important PM pollution source in Switzerland: it includes exhaust emissions and abrasion products released

  2. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing. PMID:26698808

  3. Monitoring of Air Pollution by Satellites (MAPS), phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Griggs, M.; Bartle, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported upon which the design of a satellite remote gas filter correlation (RGFC) instrument can be based. Although a final decision about the feasibility of measuring some of the pollutants with the required accuracy is still outstanding and subject to further theoretical and experimental verifications, viable concepts are presented which permit the initiation of the design phase. The pollutants which are of concern in the troposphere and stratosphere were selected. The infrared bands of these pollutants were identified, together with the bands of interfering gases, and the line parameters of the pollutants as well as interfering gases were generated through a computer program. Radiative transfer calculations (line-by-line) were made to establish the radiation levels at the top of the atmosphere and the signal levels at the detector of the RGFC instrument. Based upon these results the channels for the RGFC were selected. Finally, the problem areas, which need further investigations, were delineated and the supporting data requirements were established.

  4. Atmospheric monitoring in MAGIC and data corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruck, Christian; Gaug, Markus

    2015-03-01

    A method for analyzing returns of a custom-made "micro"-LIDAR system, operated alongside the two MAGIC telescopes is presented. This method allows for calculating the transmission through the atmospheric boundary layer as well as thin cloud layers. This is achieved by applying exponential fits to regions of the back-scattering signal that are dominated by Rayleigh scattering. Making this real-time transmission information available for the MAGIC data stream allows to apply atmospheric corrections later on in the analysis. Such corrections allow for extending the effective observation time of MAGIC by including data taken under adverse atmospheric conditions. In the future they will help reducing the systematic uncertainties of energy and flux.

  5. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Atmospheric corrosion model and monitor for low cost solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.; Mansfeld, F. B.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M.

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric corrosion model and corrosion monitoring system has been developed for low cost solar arrays (LSA). The corrosion model predicts that corrosion rate is the product of the surface condensation probability of water vapor and the diffusion controlled corrosion current. This corrosion model is verified by simultaneous monitoring of weather conditions and corrosion rates at the solar array test site at Mead, Nebraska.

  10. An experimental/analytical program to assess the utility of lidar for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, F. S.; Allen, R. J.; Butler, C. F.; Kindle, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and demonstration of lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric constituents and transport processes in the lower troposphere was carried out. Particular emphasis was given to techniques for monitoring SO2 and particulates, the principal pollutants in power plant and industrial plumes. Data from a plume dispersion study conducted in Maryland during September and October 1976 were reduced, and a data base was assembled which is available to the scientific community for plume model verification. A UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) was built, and preliminary testing was done.

  11. Report to the congress on ocean pollution, monitoring and research October 1980 through September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of FY 1981 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monitoring and research efforts under Title II of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-532). Section 201 of Title II assigns responsibility to the Department of Commerce for a comprehensive and continuing program of monitoring and research regarding the effects of dumping material into ocean waters, coastal waters, and the Great Lakes. Section 202 of Title II directs the Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with other appropriate parts of the U.S. Government, to 'initiate a comprehensive and continuing program of research with respect to the possible long-range effects of pollution, overfishing, and man-induced changes of ocean ecosystems.' The legislation also directs the Secretary of Commerce to report the findings from the monitoring and research programs to the Congress at least once a year. There are intrinsic difficulties, however, in distinguishing 'long-range' effects from the 'acute' effects of ocean dumping, or more generally of marine pollution. In response to these considerations and to the responsibilities assigned to NOAA under the National Ocean Pollution Planning Act (P.L. 95-273), NOAA has consolidated and coordinated its research efforts in these areas to make the overall program more cost-effective and productive.

  12. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2006-04-12

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several powerful analytical techniques, well suited for characterizing atmospheric composition. A few applications of infrared spectroscopy include air quality monitoring of building environs, automotive exhaust emissions, “fence-line” or open-path monitoring near industrial facilities and smokestack emissions. Regardless of the application or the specific instrumental configuration (Fourier transform, dispersive, laser based, …) a comprehensive reference library is critical to interpreting spectral data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), through the support of the Department of Energy is developing a comprehensive infrared spectral library tailored for atmospheric environmental monitoring.

  13. Identifying atmospheric monitoring needs for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casserly, Dennis M.

    1989-01-01

    The atmospheric monitoring needs for Space Station Freedom were identified by examining the following from an industrial hygiene perspective: the experiences of past missions; ground based tests of proposed life support systems; the unique experimental and manufacturing facilities; the contaminant load model; metabolic production; and a fire. A target list of compounds to be monitored is presented and information is provided relative to the frequency of analysis, concentration ranges, and locations for monitoring probes.

  14. A rationale for atmospheric monitoring on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casserly, Dennis M.; Russo, Dane M.

    1989-01-01

    The atmosphere monitoring needs for the Space Station Freedom are identified by examining the monitoring requirements for supplied breathing air in confined spaces, as in the case of submarines and the Shuttle. Some other factors influencing the monitoring requirements for Space Station Freedom are also identified. These include: the experience of past missions and ground based tests; the proposed experimental and manufacturing processes and their hazards; and limitations of the life support systems.

  15. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to Bjørnøya (Bear island).

    PubMed

    Kallenborn, Roland; Christensen, Guttorm; Evenset, Anita; Schlabach, Martin; Stohl, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    A first medium term monitoring of atmospheric transport and distribution for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Bjørnøya (Bear island) air samples has been performed in the period between week 51/1999 and week 28/2003. A total of 50 single compounds consisting of polychlorinated biphenyls (33 congeners), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (alpha-, beta-, gamma-HCH), alpha-endosulfan, cyclodiene pesticides (chlordanes, nonachlor-isomers, oxy-chlordane, heptachlor and chlordane) as well as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) derivatives were analysed and quantified. Atmospheric transport of POPs was identified as an important contamination source for the island. PCBs, HCB and HCH isomers were the predominant POP groups, contributing with 70-90% to the overall POP burden quantified in the Bjørnøya air samples. The highest concentration levels for a single compound were found for HCB (25-35 pg m(-3)). However, the sum of 33 PCB congeners was found to be in the same concentration range (annual means between 15 and 30 pg m(-3)). Cyclodiene pesticides, DDT derivatives and alpha-endosulfan were identified as minor contaminants. Several atmospheric long-range transport episodes were identified and characterised. Indications for industrial emissions as well as agricultural sources were found for the respective atmospheric transport episodes. A first simple statistical correlation assessment showed that for long-range transport of pollution, the local meteorological situation is not as important as the air mass properties integrated over the time period of the transport event. The local weather situation, on the other hand, is important when investigating deposition rates and up-take/accumulation properties in the local ecosystem. Based upon chemical data interpretation, valuable information about the influence of primary and secondary sources on the air mass contamination with chlorinated insecticides (e.g., HCHs) was found and discussed. The

  16. Modeling and evaluation of urban pollution events of atmospheric heavy metals from a large Cu-smelter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Stein, Ariel F; Castell, Nuria; Gonzalez-Castanedo, Yolanda; Sanchez de la Campa, A M; de la Rosa, J D

    2016-01-01

    Metal smelting and processing are highly polluting activities that have a strong influence on the levels of heavy metals in air, soil, and crops. We employ an atmospheric transport and dispersion model to predict the pollution levels originated from the second largest Cu-smelter in Europe. The model predicts that the concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and arsenic (As) in an urban area close to the Cu-smelter can reach 170, 70, and 30 ng m−3, respectively. The model captures all the observed urban pollution events, but the magnitude of the elemental concentrations is predicted to be lower than that of the observed values; ~300, ~500, and ~100 ng m−3 for Cu, Zn, and As, respectively. The comparison between model and observations showed an average correlation coefficient of 0.62 ± 0.13. The simulation shows that the transport of heavy metals reaches a peak in the afternoon over the urban area. The under-prediction in the peak is explained by the simulated stronger winds compared with monitoring data. The stronger simulated winds enhance the transport and dispersion of heavy metals to the regional area, diminishing the impact of pollution events in the urban area. This model, driven by high resolution meteorology (2 km in horizontal), predicts the hourly-interval evolutions of atmospheric heavy metal pollutions in the close by urban area of industrial hotspot. PMID:26352643

  17. New Approach to Monitor Transboundary Particulate Pollution over Northeast Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, M. E.; Song, C. H.; Park, R. S.; Lee, Jaehwa; Kim, J.; Lee, S.; Woo, J. H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Eck, Thomas F.; Holben, Brent N.; Lee, S. S.; Song, C. K.; Hong, Y. D.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach to more accurately monitor and evaluate transboundary particulate matter (PM) pollution is introduced based on aerosol optical products from Korea's Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI). The area studied is Northeast Asia (including eastern parts of China, the Korean peninsula and Japan), where GOCI has been monitoring since June 2010. The hourly multi-spectral aerosol optical data that were retrieved from GOCI sensor onboard geostationary satellite COMS (Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite) through the Yonsei aerosol retrieval algorithm were first presented and used in this study. The GOCI-retrieved aerosol optical data are integrated with estimated aerosol distributions from US EPA Models-3/CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality) v4.5.1 model simulations via data assimilation technique, thereby making the aerosol data spatially continuous and available even for cloud contamination cells. The assimilated aerosol optical data are utilized to provide quantitative estimates of transboundary PM pollution from China to the Korean peninsula and Japan. For the period of 1 April to 31 May, 2011 this analysis yields estimates that AOD as a proxy for PM2.5 or PM10 during long-range transport events increased by 117-265% compared to background average AOD (aerosol optical depth) at the four AERONET sites in Korea, and average AOD increases of 121% were found when averaged over the entire Korean peninsula. This paper demonstrates that the use of multi-spectral AOD retrievals from geostationary satellites can improve estimates of transboundary PM pollution. Such data will become more widely available later this decade when new sensors such as the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) and GOCI-2 are scheduled to be launched.

  18. GREENHOUSE GAS RESEARCH AREAS (ATMOSPHERIC PROTECTION BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions programs in the Atmospheric Protection Branch (APB) of NRMRL's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division are primarily dedicated to anthropogenic (human-influenced) sources of methane and high-global-warming refrigerants, though some work addresses carbon dioxid...

  19. GREENHOUSE GASES (ATMOSPHERIC PROTECTION BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are projected for various scenarios and the most appropriate approaches and technologies for mitigation are identified by NRMRL's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division's Atmospheric Protection Branch (APB). These methods contribute to reduct...

  20. Toward the next generation of air quality monitoring: Persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Hayley; MacLeod, Matthew; Guardans, Ramon; Scheringer, Martin; Barra, Ricardo; Harner, Tom; Zhang, Gan

    2013-12-01

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are global pollutants that can migrate over long distances and bioaccumulate through food webs, posing health risks to wildlife and humans. Multilateral environmental agreements, such as the Stockholm Convention on POPs, were enacted to identify POPs and establish the conditions to control their release, production and use. A Global Monitoring Plan was initiated under the Stockholm Convention calling for POP monitoring in air as a core medium; however long temporal trends (>10 years) of atmospheric POPs are only available at a few selected sites. Spatial coverage of air monitoring for POPs has recently significantly improved with the introduction and advancement of passive air samplers. Here, we review the status of air monitoring and modeling activities and note major uncertainties in data comparability, deficiencies of air monitoring and modeling in urban and alpine areas, and lack of emission inventories for most POPs. A vision for an internationally-integrated strategic monitoring plan is proposed which could provide consistent and comparable monitoring data for POPs supported and supplemented by global and regional transport models. Key recommendations include developing expertise in all aspects of air monitoring to ensure data comparability and consistency; partnering with existing air quality and meteorological networks to leverage synergies; facilitating data sharing with international data archives; and expanding spatial coverage with passive air samplers. Enhancing research on the stability of particle-bound chemicals is needed to assess exposure and deposition in urban areas, and to elucidate long-range transport. Conducting targeted measurement campaigns in specific source areas would enhance regional models which can be extrapolated to similar regions to estimate emissions. Ultimately, reverse-modeling combined with air measurements can be used to derive “emission” as an indicator to assess environmental

  1. 40 CFR 60.1365 - What records must I keep for continuously monitored pollutants or parameters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuously monitored pollutants or parameters? 60.1365 Section 60.1365 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1365 What records must I keep for continuously monitored pollutants or parameters? You must... items: (1) Calendar dates whenever any of the five pollutant or parameter levels recorded in...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1850 - What records must I keep for continuously monitored pollutants or parameters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuously monitored pollutants or parameters? 60.1850 Section 60.1850 Protection of Environment... continuously monitored pollutants or parameters? You must keep records of eight items. (a) Records of... five pollutant or parameter levels recorded in paragraph (b) of this section or the opacity...

  3. Atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions due to pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    Negrisoli, Juliana; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between exposure to air pollutants and hospitalizations due to pneumonia in children of Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Time series ecological study, from 2007 to 2008. Daily data were obtained from the State Environmental Agency for Pollution Control for particulate matter, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, besides air temperature and relative humidity. The data concerning pneumonia admissions were collected in the public health system of Sorocaba. Correlations between the variables of interest using Pearson cofficient were calculated. Models with lags from zero to five days after exposure to pollutants were performed to analyze the association between the exposure to environmental pollutants and hospital admissions. The analysis used the generalized linear model of Poisson regression, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: There were 1,825 admissions for pneumonia, with a daily mean of 2.5±2.1. There was a strong correlation between pollutants and hospital admissions, except for ozone. Regarding the Poisson regression analysis with the multi-pollutant model, only nitrogen dioxide was statistically significant in the same day (relative risk - RR=1.016), as well as particulate matter with a lag of four days (RR=1.009) after exposure to pollutants. CONCLUSIONS: There was an acute effect of exposure to nitrogen dioxide and a later effect of exposure to particulate matter on children hospitalizations for pneumonia in Sorocaba. PMID:24473956

  4. ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS OF TRACE POLLUTANTS; LONG PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Described are the results of a four-year study to measure trace pollutant concentrations in polluted atmospheres by kilometer pathlength Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy. The study covers selected smog episodes during the years 1976 to 1979. During 1976 ...

  5. Monitoring PM2.5 in the Atmosphere by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Honglei; Zhao, Kun; Bao, Rima; Xiao, Lizhi

    2016-09-01

    The real-time monitoring of the air pollution with multiple sources is of great significance for pollution control and environmental protection. In this paper, we presented a study of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) as a direct tool for monitoring the component and content of PM2.5 in atmosphere. Due to the THz absorption, the intensities of the peaks in THz-TDS decreased with the augment of PM2.5 and were proportional to the PM2.5 content. The ratio of absorbance A to PM2.5 reflected a basically unchanged tendency, indicating the little change of principal elements under the pollution degree. In the high-pollution condition, a lot of SO2 from vehicle and factory was emitted into air. The elements, such as S and O from anions, had a stronger absorption effect in THz range. Based on the absorbance spectra, the absorption tendencies with PM2.5 over the whole range were validated by principal component analysis and the quantitative model with a high correlation was built by using back propagation artificial neural network. BPANN model improved the precision of linear fitting between peak intensities and PM2.5. The research demonstrates that THz-TDS is a promising tool for fast, direct, and reliable monitoring in environmental applications.

  6. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  7. EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTANTS ON HUMAN PHYSIOLOGIC FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short-term health effects of common ambient air pollutants, particularly photochemical oxidants, were investigated under controlled conditions simulating typical ambient exposures. Volunteer subjects were exposed, in an environmental control chamber providing highly purified back...

  8. Atmospheric chemistry: Ozone pollution from near and far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Ruth M.

    2015-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone is generated from precursor pollutants, but can be blown far afield. Satellite observations show rising ozone levels over China -- and almost stable levels over western North America despite stricter regulations.

  9. Molecular Biomarkers: their significance and application in marine pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A; Ray, D; Shrivastava, Amulya N; Sarker, Subhodeep

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the significance of the use of molecular biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools for marine pollution monitoring. In order to assess the impact of highly persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDF), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), tributyltin (TBT) and other toxic metals on the marine ecosystem a suite of biomarkers are being extensively used worldwide. Among the various types of biomarkers, the following have received special attention: cytochrome P4501A induction, DNA integrity, acetylcholinesterase activity and metallothionein induction. These biomarkers are being used to evaluate exposure of various species of sentinel marine organisms (e.g. mussels, clams, oysters, snails, fishes, etc.) to and the effect of various contaminants (organic xenobiotics and metals) using different molecular approaches [biochemical assays, enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA), spectrophotometric, fluorometric measurement, differential pulsed polarography, liquid chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry]. The induction of the biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P4501A in fishes (Callionymus lyra, Limanda limanda, Serranus sp., Mullus barbatus) and mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by various xenobiotic contaminants such as PCBs, PAHs, PCDs is used as a biomarker of exposure to such organic pollutants. The induction of cytochrome P4501A is involved in chemical carcinogenesis through catalysis of the covalent bonding of organic contaminants to a DNA strand leading to formation of DNA adduct. Measurement of the induction of cytochrome P4501A in terms of EROD (7-ethoxy resorufin O-deethylase) activity is successfully used as a potential biomarker of exposure to xenobiotic contaminants in marine pollution monitoring. In order to assess the impact of neurotoxic compounds on marine environment the evaluation of acetylcholinesterase

  10. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-05-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data.

  11. Using an epiphytic moss to identify previously unknown sources of atmospheric cadmium pollution.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Geoffrey H; Jovan, Sarah E; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Burstyn, Igor; Michael, Yvonne L; Amacher, Michael C; Monleon, Vicente J

    2016-07-15

    Urban networks of air-quality monitors are often too widely spaced to identify sources of air pollutants, especially if they do not disperse far from emission sources. The objectives of this study were to test the use of moss bio-indicators to develop a fine-scale map of atmospherically-derived cadmium and to identify the sources of cadmium in a complex urban setting. We collected 346 samples of the moss Orthotrichum lyellii from deciduous trees in December, 2013 using a modified randomized grid-based sampling strategy across Portland, Oregon. We estimated a spatial linear model of moss cadmium levels and predicted cadmium on a 50m grid across the city. Cadmium levels in moss were positively correlated with proximity to two stained-glass manufacturers, proximity to the Oregon-Washington border, and percent industrial land in a 500m buffer, and negatively correlated with percent residential land in a 500m buffer. The maps showed very high concentrations of cadmium around the two stained-glass manufacturers, neither of which were known to environmental regulators as cadmium emitters. In addition, in response to our findings, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality placed an instrumental monitor 120m from the larger stained-glass manufacturer in October, 2015. The monthly average atmospheric cadmium concentration was 29.4ng/m(3), which is 49 times higher than Oregon's benchmark of 0.6ng/m(3), and high enough to pose a health risk from even short-term exposure. Both stained-glass manufacturers voluntarily stopped using cadmium after the monitoring results were made public, and the monthly average cadmium levels precipitously dropped to 1.1ng/m(3) for stained-glass manufacturer #1 and 0.67ng/m(3) for stained-glass manufacturer #2. PMID:27058127

  12. Trinidad Head, California: New NOAA/CMDL Baseline Observatory for Monitoring Asian Atmospheric Effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R. C.; Butler, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    Long-range transport of dust and air pollution from Asia to the Mauna Loa, Hawaii, Atmospheric Baseline Observatory has been documented since the early 1970s. In a single year, as many as 30 distinct pollution flow events from Asia have been observed there. Some flows last a few hours, whereas others persist for up to 5 days. More recently, it has been recognized by both measurements and satellite photos that there are significant numbers of air pollution flow events from Asia into North America along a broad front, ranging from the north slope of Alaska to central California. There is a valid concern that ozone and ozone precursors advecting from Asia could eventually put California into noncompliance with federal air-quality regulations. As a component of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) program, NOAA/CMDL established an atmospheric monitoring observatory (April 2002) at Trinidad Head, California in collaboration with Humboldt State University, to monitor both the inflow of air pollution from Asia as well as regionally influenced air. The station monitors aerosols, ozone (continuous surface and weekly ozonesonde balloon profiles), radiation, and halocarbon and carbon cycle trace gases (weekly flasks). Data from Trinidad Head are monitored via the internet at CMDL in Boulder. Plans call for the installation of a GC/MS for the measurement of PAN, hydrocarbons, and certain halocarbons, and for vertical profiles of trace gases and ozone to be obtained (with light aircraft) upwind and above the site on a weekly basis. It is expected that the Trinidad Head observatory will expand measurement programs over the next 5 years and be in operation for many decades to come.

  13. Continuous emission monitoring of metal aerosol concentrations in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Anne-Marie; Sarrette, Jean-Philippe; Madon, Lydie; Almi, Abdenbi

    1996-11-01

    Improvements of an apparatus for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) of metal aerosols in air are described. The method simultaneously offers low operating costs, large volume of tested air for valuable sampling and avoids supplementary contamination or keeping of the air pollutant concentrations. Questions related to detection and calibration are discussed. The detection limits (DL) obtained for the eight pollutants studied are lower than the recommended threshold limit values (TLV) and as satisfactory as the results obtained with other CEM methods involving air-argon plasmas.

  14. Usefulness of the infrared heterodyne radiometer in remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    The application of narrow-band optical receivers to the problem of sensing atmospheric pollution is discussed. The emission/absorption lines of many major atmospheric pollutant molecules overlap the operating frequency bands of CO2 laser and CO laser heterodyne receivers. Several remote pollution sensing systems which are based upon utilization of these spectral overlaps are described, and an analysis of their potential is presented. The possibility of using other lasers (e.g.: the PbSnTe tunable diode laser) as local oscillators is also considered. Results of laboratory experiments with a CO2 laser heterodyne radiometer are presented.

  15. Atmospheric mercury monitoring survey in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shili; Nadim, Farhad; Perkins, Chris; Carley, Robert J; Hoag, George E; Lin, Yuhan; Chen, Letian

    2002-07-01

    With the aid of one industrial, two urban, two suburban, and two rural sampling locations, diurnal patterns of total gaseous mercury (TGM) were monitored in January, February and September of 1998 in Beijing, China. Monitoring was conducted in six (two urban, two suburban, one rural and the industrial sites) of the seven sampling sites during January and February (winter) and in four (two urban, one rural, and the industrial sites) of the sampling locations during September (summer) of 1998. In the three suburban sampling stations, mean TGM concentrations during the winter sampling period were 8.6, 10.7, and 6.2 ng/m3, respectively. In the two urban sampling locations mean TGM concentrations during winter and summer sampling periods were 24.7, 8.3, 10, and 12.7 ng/m3, respectively. In the suburban-industrial and the two rural sampling locations, mean mercury concentrations ranged from 3.1-5.3 ng/m3 in winter to 4.1-7.7 ng/m3 in summer sampling periods. In the Tiananmen Square (urban), and Shijingshan (suburban) sampling locations the mean TGM concentrations during the summer sampling period were higher than winter concentrations, which may have been caused by evaporation of soil-bound mercury in warm periods. Continuous meteorological data were available at one of the suburban sites, which allowed the observation of mercury concentration variations associated with some weather parameters. It was found that there was a moderate negative correlation between the wind speed and the TGM concentration at this suburban sampling location. It was also found that during the sampling period at the same site, the quantity of TGM transported to or from the sampling site was mainly influenced by the duration and frequency of wind occurrence from certain directions. PMID:12137064

  16. Atmospheric monitoring at the site of the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriano, Ghedina; Marco, Pedani; de Gurtubai Albar, Garcia

    2015-03-01

    For more than 20 years, the atmosphere above the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and its surroundings at the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory have been monitored. From the first instruments installed in the early `90s to characterize and show the quality of the sky at the chosen site (particularly the Automatic Weather Station and the DIMM) we evolved into the actual set up of remote sensing devices. They are as a fundamental aid for the telescope, in particular for its safety and the optimization of the scientific throughput. We will resume here the lessons learned, some results and the new choices for monitoring the atmosphere at the TNG.

  17. Site selection criteria for the optical atmospheric visibility monitoring telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, K.

    1989-01-01

    A description of each of the criteria used to decide where to locate the Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) telescope systems is given, along with a weighting factor for each of them. These criteria include low probability of clouds, fog, smog, haze, low scattering, low turbulence, availability of security and maintenance, and suitability of a site for a potential optical reception station. They will be used to determine which three of several sites under consideration will be used for monitoring visibility through the atmosphere as it applies to an optical ground-based receiving network as may be used in NASA space missions in decades to come.

  18. Atmospheric transport of persistent pollutants governs uptake by holarctic terrestrial biota

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, P.; Okla, L.; Woin, Per )

    1990-10-01

    The atmospheric deposition of PCBs, DDT, and lindane, governed uptake in terrestrial biota in the Scandinavian peninsula. Mammalian herbivores and predators as well as predatory insects contained higher levels of pollutants at locations where the fallout load was high than at stations where atmospheric deposition was lower, and the two variables were significantly correlated.

  19. Two-filter monitor for atmospheric 222Rn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schery, S. D.; Gaeddert, D. H.; Wilkening, M. H.

    1980-03-01

    A two-filter, continuous monitor has been developed for atmospheric 222Rn. Features include a sensitivity of better than 0.01 pCi/l, a high specificity for 222Rn, and immediate start up capability. The monitor has been computer modeled to facilitate calibration and selection of operating parameters. The filters are stationary and require no moving parts for control. Field trials indicate high reliability and maintenance-free operation for periods of a week and longer.

  20. FT-IR remote sensing of atmospheric species: Application to global change and air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution, the author describes two applications of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to the monitoring of atmospheric compounds. Firstly, the author reports FTIR solar spectroscopy measurements carried out at ground level at NCAR and on airplanes employing a spectrometer of 0.06 cm{sup -1} resolution. Sample atmospheric spectra and fitting examples are presented for key species relevant to stratospheric chemistry and global change: ozone (O{sub 3}), a chlorofluorocarbon (CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), a greenhouse gas (N{sub 2}O), HCl, NO and HNO{sub 3}. Secondly, the author briefly describes urban air pollution measurements at an intersection with heavy traffic in Tucson, AZ. Two FTIR spectrometers of 1 cm{sup -1} resolution were employed to carry out long-path open-path measurements of the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio and SF{sub 6}. Two FEAT and two LPUV instruments were employed for ancillary measurements of CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements of CO at two heights and a comparison of CO/CO{sub 2} ratios obtained by FEAT exhaust emission and FTIR ambient air measurements are reported.

  1. Monitoring Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS). Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Performance tests on an electro-optical model of an infrared sensor for remote measurements of trace atmospheric gases are detailed; the instrument utilized a sample of the gas to be measured as spectral filter. Also reported is the development of radiometric calibration equipment that determines responses to simulated pollution effects. Results show excellent agreement with theoretical performance predictions with the exception of nonuniform radiance responses. Balance stability to an accuracy better than the rms noise level was demonstrated for the EOM in both the NH3 and CO modes for a period of two days under laboratory conditions. Flight test results show that the temperature range of the absorption cell is restricted to 255 K or higher.

  2. Low level atmospheric sulfur dioxide pollution and childhood asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, R.Y.; Li, C.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Quarterly analysis (1983-1987) of childhood asthma in Hong Kong from 13,620 hospitalization episodes in relation to levels of pollutants (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, NO, O{sub 3}, TSP, and RSP) revealed a seasonal pattern of attack rates that correlates inversely with exposure to sulfur dioxide (r = -.52, P less than .05). The same cannot be found with other pollutants. Many factors may contribute to the seasonal variation of asthma attacks. We speculate that prolonged exposure (in terms of months) to low level SO{sub 2} is one factor that might induce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity and predispose to episodes of asthma.

  3. Evaluation of satellites and remote sensors for atmospheric pollution measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, J.; Eldridge, R.; Friedman, E.; Keitz, E.

    1976-01-01

    An approach to the development of a prioritized list of scientific goals in atmospheric research is provided. The results of the analysis are used to estimate the contribution of various spacecraft/remote sensor combinations for each of several important constituents of the stratosphere. The evaluation of the combinations includes both single-instrument and multiple-instrument payloads. Attention was turned to the physical and chemical features of the atmosphere as well as the performance capability of a number of atmospheric remote sensors. In addition, various orbit considerations were reviewed along with detailed information on stratospheric aerosols and the impact of spacecraft environment on the operation of the sensors.

  4. Pollution monitoring in Southeast Asia using biomarkers in the mytilid mussel Perna viridis (Mytilidae: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S; Lam, P K S

    2005-01-01

    Mytilid mussels have been extensively used in marine pollution monitoring programmes in temperate regions of the world although widespread subtropical representatives such as Perna viridis have only comparatively recently been utilised to monitor the sublethal effects of pollution in Southeast Asia. P. viridis is considered a subtropical equivalent of the temperate Mytilus sp. and has considerable potential for pollution monitoring throughout its geographical range. This paper reviews the current status of biomarkers in P. viridis and provides some recommendations on biological-effects monitoring to facilitate the assessment of coastal pollution in Southeast Asia. PMID:15607786

  5. Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring Using Digital Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Jiun-Jian; Lian, Ssu-Bin; Huang, Yung-Fa; Chen, Rung-Ching

    Atmospheric visibility is a standard of human visual perception of the environment. It is also directly associated with air quality, polluted species and climate. The influence of urban atmospheric visibility affects not only human health but also traffic safety and human life quality. Visibility is traditionally defined as the maximum distance at which a selected target can be recognized. To replace the traditional measurement for atmospheric visibility, digital image processing schemes provide good visibility data, established by numerical index. The performance of these techniques is defined by the correlation between the observed visual range and the obtained index. Since performance is affected by non-uniform illumination, this paper proposes a new procedure to estimate the visibility index with a sharpening method. The experimental results show that the proposed procedure obtains a better correlation coefficient than previous schemes.

  6. RESIDENCE TIME OF ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTANTS AND LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lagrangian trajectory model which is suitable for the study of long-range transport of pollutants, is developed. The computer program is capable of calculating trajectories over the region of the U.S. using routine sounding data. The output consists of tables of locations of ...

  7. Export of arsenic from forested catchments under easing atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Lucie Erbanova; Martin Novak; Daniela Fottova; Barbora Dousova

    2008-10-01

    Massive lignite burning in Central European power plants peaked in the 1980s. Dissolved arsenic in runoff from upland forest ecosystems is one of the ecotoxicological risks resulting from power plant emissions. Maxima in As concentrations in runoff from four forest catchments have increased 2-5 times between 1995 and 2006, and approach the drinking water limit (10 {mu}g L{sup -1}). To assess the fate of anthropogenic As, we constructed input/output mass balances for three polluted and one relatively unpolluted forest catchment in the Czech Republic, and evaluated the pool size of soil As. The observation period was 11 years, and the sites spanned a 6-fold As pollution gradient. Two of the polluted sites exhibit large net As export via runoff solutes (mean of 4-5 g As ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} for the 11-year period; up to 28 g As ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in 2005). This contrasts with previous studies which concluded that forest catchments are a net sink for atmogenic arsenic both at times of increasing and decreasing pollution. The amount of exported As is not correlated with the total As soil pool size, which is over 78% geogenic in origin, but correlates closely with water fluxes via runoff. Net arsenic release is caused by an interplay of hydrological conditions and retreating acidification which may mobilize arsenic by competitive ligand exchange. The effects of droughts and other aspects of climate change on subsequent As release from soil were not investigated. Between-site comparisons indicate that most pollutant As may be released from humus. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Method for protecting plant life from acidic atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, A.D.

    1986-10-14

    A method is described for treating a stand of coniferous trees growing by natural processes and exposed to an atmosphere containing inorganic nitric acid or nitrate compounds to improve the resistance of the trees to damage by acid rain. The method consists of foliarly applying at least one sugar selected from the group consisting of monosaccharides and disaccharides to the coniferous trees naturally growing in the stand exposed to the atmosphere.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN INSTANTANEOUS ATMOSPHERIC CORROSION RATE MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research program has been carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) has been developed and evaluated, and equipment has been constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first tas...

  10. Development of the atmospheric volcanic monitoring system in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G. N.; Bjornsson, H.; Arason, P.; von Löwis, S.; Sigurøsson, G. S.; Karlsdóttir, S.

    2012-04-01

    The development of the atmospheric volcanic plume monitoring system has escalated since the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. Radars provide a near-real time capability to observe volcanic eruptions both day and night. At high latitudes this is important, over the darkest periods of winter when radar and satellite images are the only means of measurements. Also weather conditions can be such at any time of the year that they obscure observations from survey flights and even from satellites. Prior to and during the 39 days eruption in 2010 only one operational radar was installed in Iceland, the fixed C-band radar at Keflavík International Airport. The main purpose of this radar is weather monitoring but it can simultaneously be used for volcanic plume monitoring within a radius of 480 km. The radar has been used for plume monitoring since 1991 when an eruption started in Hekla, only a few days after the installation of the radar. Since November 2010 a X-band dual polarization radar has been on loan from the Italian Civil Protection Agency to the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) and during the eruption in Grímsvötn in 2011 the combined system, together with visual observations, gave a good picture of the eruption. Also, in cooperation with the UK National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) a Lidar has been operating in South-Iceland since May 2011. The Lidar was moved to Keflavík airport during the Grímsvötn eruption to monitor the atmosphere above the airport and assist in decision making regarding openings and closures of the airport. In 2012 a second fixed position C-band weather radar will be installed in East-Iceland. This means that the geophysically active region in both south and northeast of Iceland will be covered. In addition, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has financed two X-band mobile radars to be installed and used in Iceland, solely for volcanic plume monitoring, with the first one becoming operational in

  11. The atmospheric monitoring system of the JEM-EUSO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The JEM-EUSO telescope will detect Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) from space, detecting the UV Fluorescence Light produced by Extensive Air Showers (EAS) induced by the interaction of the cosmic rays with the earth's atmosphere. The capability to reconstruct the properties of the primary cosmic ray depends on the accurate measurement of the atmospheric conditions in the region of EAS development. The Atmospheric Monitoring (AM) system of JEM-EUSO will host a LIDAR, operating in the UV band, and an Infrared camera to monitor the cloud cover in the JEM-EUSO Field of View, in order to be sensitive to clouds with an optical depth τ ≥ 0.15 and to measure the cloud top altitude with an accuracy of 500 m and an altitude resolution of 500 m.

  12. FRAM telescope - monitoring of atmospheric extinction and variable star photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurysek, J.; Honkova, K.; Masek, M.

    2015-02-01

    The FRAM (F/(Ph)otometric Robotic Atmospheric Monitor) telescope is a part of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) located near town Malargüe in Argentina. The main task of the FRAM telescope is the continuous night - time monitoring of the atmospheric extinction and its wavelength dependence. The current methodology of the measurement of a atmospheric extinction and for instrumentation properties also allows simultaneous observation of other interesting astronomical targets. The current observations of the FRAM telescope are focused on the photometry of eclipsing binaries, positional refinement of minor bodies of the Solar system and observations of optical counterparts of gamma ray bursts. In this contribution, we briefly describe the main purpose of the FRAM telescope for the PAO and we also present its current astrono mical observing program.

  13. Monitoring atmospheric particulate matter through cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jonathan E; Smith, Benjamin W; Winefordner, James D

    2002-05-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was explored as a means to measure atmospheric optical extinction. Ambient air was sampled through a window on the campus of the University of Florida and transported to a ring-down cell fashioned from standard stainless steel vacuum components. When a copper vapor laser operating at 10 kHz is employed, this arrangement allowed for nearly continuous monitoring of atmospheric extinction at 510 and 578 nm. We have characterized the system performance in terms of detection limit and dynamic range and also monitored a change in atmospheric extinction during a nearby wildfire and fireworks exhibition. The sensitivity and compatibility with automation of the technique renders it useful as a laboratory-based measurement of airborne particulate matter. PMID:12033292

  14. [Monitoring of organic pollutants in river based on polarimetric SAR].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiong; Jia, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jian; Chen, Yu-Rong

    2010-09-01

    The rivers with the distinct gradient of water quality in the southern region of China were selected as a case study. The objective of this study was to develop the monitoring and evaluating technology of the water quality based on C-band polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR). The random rough surface scattering model to describe the electromagnetic scattering characteristics of polluted water was briefly introduced. The potential effect of organic pollutants to the scattering model and backscattering coefficient were explored. The simultaneously obtained POLSAR data and the measured water quality indexes were analyzed. By comparing the POLSAR data and the water quality indexes, it could be observed that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was in proportional to the ratio between HH and VV backscattering coefficients, which matched the analysis based on electromagnetic scattering theory. A fitting model was proposed to retrieve the chemical oxygen demand by ratio between HH and VV channel backscattering coefficients using least square method, with the fit coefficient of 0.90. In this study, the model using the ratio between HH and VV backscattering coefficients was established, which was mainly based on the analysis of experimental results, and was also supported by theoretical interpretation. PMID:21072918

  15. Global Monitoring of Air Pollution Using Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The MODIS sensor onboard EOS-Terra satellite provides not only daily global coverage but also high spectral (36 channels from 0.41 to 14 microns wavelength) and spatial (250m, 500m and 1km) resolution measurements. A similar MODIS instrument will be also configured into EOS-Aqua satellite to be launched soon. Using the complementary EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua sun-synchronous orbits (10:30 AM and 1:30 PM equator-crossing time respectively), it enables us also to study the diurnal changes of the Earth system. It is unprecedented for the derivation of aerosol properties with such high spatial resolution and daily global converge. Aerosol optical depth and other aerosol properties, e.g., Angstrom coefficient over land and particle size over ocean, are derived as standard products at a spatial resolution of 10 x 10 sq km. The high resolution results are found surprisingly useful in detecting aerosols in both urban and rural regions as a result of urban/industrial pollution and biomass burning. For long-lived aerosols, the ability to monitoring the evolution of these aerosol events could help us to establish an system of air quality especially for highly populated areas. Aerosol scenarios with city pollution and biomass burning will be presented. Also presented are the method used in the derivation of aerosol optical properties and preliminary results will be presented, and issue as well as obstacles in validating aerosol optical depth with AERONET ground-based observations.

  16. Source apportionment of gaseous atmospheric pollutants by means of an absolute principal component scores (APCS) receptor model.

    PubMed

    Bruno, P; Caselli, M; de Gennaro, G; Traini, A

    2001-12-01

    A multivariate statistical method has been applied to apportion the atmospheric pollutant concentrations measured by automatic gas analyzers placed on a mobile laboratory for air quality monitoring in Taranto (Italy). In particular, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) followed by Absolute Principal Component Scores (APCS) technique was performed to identify the number of emission sources and their contribution to measured concentrations of CO, NOx, benzene toluene m+p-Xylene (BTX). This procedure singled out two different sources that explain about 85% of collected data variance. PMID:11798109

  17. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) - Status and Potential Science Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, to launch between 2019 and 2021. It measures atmospheric pollution from Mexico City and Cuba to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly at high spatial resolution, ~ 10 km2. It measures the key elements of air pollution chemistry. Geostationary (GEO) measurements capture the variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry at sub-urban scale to improve emission inventories, monitor population exposure, and enable emission-control strategies. TEMPO measures the UV/visible spectra to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2 CO, C2 H2 O2, H2 O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. It tracks aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products. TEMPO is the North American component of the global geostationary constellation for pollution monitoring, with the European Sentinel-4 and the Korean GEMS. TEMPO studies may include: Solar-induced fluorescence from chlorophyll over land and in the ocean to study tropical dynamics, primary productivity, carbon uptake, to detect red tides, and to study phytoplankton; Measurements of stratospheric intrusions that cause air quality exceedances; Measurements at peaks in vehicle travel to capture the variability in emissions from mobile sources; Measurements of thunderstorm activity, including outflow regions to better quantify lightning NOx and O3 production; Cropland measurements follow the temporal evolution of emissions after fertilizer application and from rain-induced emissions from semi-arid soils; Measurements investigate the chemical processing of primary fire emissions and the secondary formation of VOCs and ozone; Measurements examine ocean halogen emissions and their impact on the oxidizing capacity of coastal environments; Spectra of nighttime lights are markers for human activity, energy conservation, and compliance with outdoor lighting standards intended to reduce light pollution.

  18. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 12: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Twelve papers dealing with the meteorological aspects of air pollution were translated. These papers were initially presented at an international symposium held in Leningrad during July 1968. The papers are: Status and prospective development of meteorological studies of atmospheric pollution, Effect of the stability of the atmosphere on the…

  19. Detection of atmospheric pollutants by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Miruna; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Staicu, Angela

    1998-07-01

    Pulsed laser photoacoustic detection of NO2 and SO2 is reported. The laser source is a pulsed molecular nitrogen laser emitting at 337.1 nm. The average energy per pulse is about 350 (mu) J and the pulse duration 10 nsec. For detection we used a piezoelectric transducer (TUSIM-N.I.M.P., resonance frequency 4 MHz) and an electret condenser microphone (Trevi EM 27). The photoacoustic cell was a nonresonant one, with a cylindrical shape. The laser beam was centered along the cylinder axis. Linear dependence of the photoacoustic signal on pollutant pressure was obtained. This linearity is in a good agreement with theoretical considerations. The photoacoustic signal was measured for pollutants pressure between 1 torr and 100 torr for NO2 and between 35 torr and 100 torr for SO2.

  20. Effects of atmospheric pollutants on forests, wetlands, and agricultural ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Meema, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book reports on the knowledge of the sensitivities and responses of forests, wetlands and crops to airborne pollutants. Pollutants examined include: acidic depositions, heavy metal particulates, sulphur dioxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, acid fogs, and mixtures of these. Various types of ecosystem stresses and physiological mechanisms pertinent to acid deposition are also discussed. Related subjects, such as the effects of ethylene on vegetation, the physiology of drought in trees, the ability of soils to generate acidity naturally, the role of Sphagnum moss in natural peatland acidity, the use of lichens as indicators of changing air quality, and the magnitude of natural emissions of reduced sulphur gases from tropical rainforests and temperate deciduous forests, are covered.

  1. Inorganic nitrogenous air pollutants, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and their potential ecological impacts in remote areas of western North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M. E.; Fraczek, W.; Johnson, R.; Allen, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous inorganic nitrogenous (N) air pollutants plays an important role in total atmospheric N deposition and its ecological effects in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Passive samplers and denuder/ filter pack systems have been used for determining ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitric acid vapor (HNO3) in the topographically complex remote areas of the western United States and Canada. Concentrations of the measured pollutants varied significantly between the monitoring areas. Highest NH3, NO2 and HNO3 levels occurred in southern California areas downwind of the Los Angeles Basin and in the western Sierra Nevada impacted by emissions from the California Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay area. Strong spatial gradients of N pollutants were also present in southeastern Alaska due to cruise ship emissions and in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region in Canada affected by oil exploitation. Distribution of these pollutants has been depicted by maps generated by several geostatistical methodologies within the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst (ESRI, USA). Such maps help to understand spatial and temporal changes of air pollutants caused by various anthropogenic activities and locally-generated vs. long range-transported air pollutants. Pollution distribution maps for individual N species and gaseous inorganic reactive nitrogen (Nr) have been developed for the southern portion of the Sierra Nevada, Lake Tahoe Basin, San Bernardino Mountains, Joshua Tree National Park and the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The N air pollution data have been utilized for estimates of dry and total N deposition by a GIS-based inferential method specifically developed for understanding potential ecological impacts in arid and semi-arid areas. The method is based on spatial and temporal distribution of concentrations of major drivers of N dry deposition, their surface deposition velocities and stomatal conductance values

  2. Monitoring of 1300 organic micro-pollutants in surface waters from Tianjin, North China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingxiao; Kadokami, Kiwao; Wang, Shaopo; Duong, Hanh Thi; Chau, Hong Thi Cam

    2015-03-01

    In spite of the quantities and species of chemicals dramatically increased with rapid economic growth in China in the last decade, the focus of environmental research was mainly on limited number of priority pollutants. Therefore, to elucidate environmental pollution by organic micro-pollutants, this work was conducted as the first systematic survey on the occurrence of 1300 substances in 20 surface water samples of Tianjin, North China, selected as a representative area of China. The results showed the presence of 227 chemicals. The most relevant compounds in terms of frequency of detection and median concentration were bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (100%; 0.26μgL(-1)), siduron (100%; 0.20μgL(-1)), lidocaine (100%; 96ngL(-1)), antipyrine (100%; 76ngL(-1)), caffeine (95%; 0.28μgL(-1)), cotinine (95%; 0.20μgL(-1)), phenanthrene (95%; 0.17μgL(-1)), metformin (90%; 0.61μgL(-1)), diethyl phthalate (90%; 0.19μgL(-1)), quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (90%; 0.14μgL(-1)), 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole (85%; 0.11μgL(-1)) and anthraquinone (85%; 54ngL(-1)). Cluster analysis discriminated three highly polluted sites from others based on data similarity. Principle component analysis identified four factors, corresponding to industrial wastewater, domestic discharge, tire production and atmospheric deposition, accounting for 78% of the total variance in the water monitoring data set. This work provides a wide reconnaissance on broad spectrum of organic micro-contaminants in surface waters in China, which indicates that the aquatic environment in China has been polluted by a large number of chemicals. PMID:25479805

  3. Study of atmospheric dynamics and pollution in the coastal area of English Channel using clustering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmenten, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The problem of atmospheric contamination by principal air pollutants was considered in the industrialized coastal region of English Channel in Dunkirk influenced by north European metropolitan areas. MESO-NH nested models were used for the simulation of the local atmospheric dynamics and the online calculation of Lagrangian backward trajectories with 15-minute temporal resolution and the horizontal resolution down to 500 m. The one-month mesoscale numerical simulation was coupled with local pollution measurements of volatile organic components, particulate matter, ozone, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Principal atmospheric pathways were determined by clustering technique applied to backward trajectories simulated. Six clusters were obtained which describe local atmospheric dynamics, four winds blowing through the English Channel, one coming from the south, and the biggest cluster with small wind speeds. This last cluster includes mostly sea breeze events. The analysis of meteorological data and pollution measurements allows relating the principal atmospheric pathways with local air contamination events. It was shown that contamination events are mostly connected with a channelling of pollution from local sources and low-turbulent states of the local atmosphere.

  4. Status of the first NASA EV-I Project, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (2 km N/S × 4.5 km E/W at the center of its field of regard). The status of TEMPO including progress in instrument definition and implementation of the ground system will be presented. TEMPO provides a minimally-redundant measurement suite that includes all key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO will be delivered in 2017 for integration onto a NASA-selected GEO host spacecraft for launch as early as 2018. It will provide the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. Additional gases not central to air quality, including BrO, OClO, and IO will also be measured. TEMPO and its Asian (GEMS) and European (Sentinel-4) constellation partners make the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, building on the heritage of six spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed

  5. Epiphytic lichen diversity on dead and dying conifers under different levels of atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus

    2005-05-01

    Based on literature data, epiphytic lichen abundance was comparably studied in montane woodlands on healthy versus dead or dying conifers of Europe and North America in areas with different levels of atmospheric pollution. Study sites comprised Picea abies forests in the Harz Mountains and in the northern Alps, Germany, Picea rubens-Abies balsamea forests on Whiteface Mountain, Adirondacks, New York, U.S.A. and Picea engelmannii-Abies lasiocarpa forests in the Salish Mountains, Montana, U.S.A. Detrended correspondence analysis showed that epiphytic lichen vegetation differed more between healthy and dead or dying trees at high- versus low-polluted sites. This is attributed to greater differences in chemical habitat conditions between trees of different vitality in highly polluted areas. Based on these results, a hypothetical model of relative importance of site factors for small-scale variation of epiphytic lichen abundance versus atmospheric pollutant load is discussed. PMID:15701398

  6. Is atmospheric phosphorus pollution altering global alpine Lake stoichiometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahney, Janice; Mahowald, Natalie; Ward, Daniel S.; Ballantyne, Ashley P.; Neff, Jason C.

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic activities have significantly altered atmospheric chemistry and changed the global mobility of key macronutrients. Here we show that contemporary global patterns in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) emissions drive large hemispheric variation in precipitation chemistry. These global patterns of nutrient emission and deposition (N:P) are in turn closely reflected in the water chemistry of naturally oligotrophic lakes (r2 = 0.81, p < 0.0001). Observed increases in anthropogenic N deposition play a role in nutrient concentrations (r2 = 0.20, p < 0.05) however, atmospheric deposition of P appears to be major contributor to this pattern (r2 = 0.65, p < 0.0001). Atmospheric simulations indicate a global increase in P deposition by 1.4 times the preindustrial rate largely due to increased dust and biomass burning emissions. Although changes in the mass flux of global P deposition are smaller than for N, the impacts on primary productivity may be greater because, on average, one unit of increased P deposition has 16 times the influence of one unit of N deposition. These stoichiometric considerations, combined with the evidence presented here, suggest that increases in P deposition may be a major driver of alpine Lake trophic status, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. These results underscore the need for the broader scientific community to consider the impact of atmospheric phosphorus deposition on the water quality of naturally oligotrophic lakes.

  7. Biomagnetic monitoring of traffic air pollution in Toulouse (France) using magnetic properties of tree bark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macouin, M.; Rousse, S.; Brulfert, F.; Durand, M.; Feida, N.; Durand, X.; Becaud, L.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic properties of various atmospheric samples represent rapid and economic proxies in the pollution studies based on their strong linkage to heavy metals and/or volatile organic carbons. We report a biomonitoring study of air pollution in Toulouse (France) based on the magnetic properties of tree (Platanus acerifolia) bark. More than 250 bark samples were taken at different areas of the city. Both mass specific magnetic susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) at 1 Tesla display relationships with the traffic intensity and the distance to the road. Urban roadside tree bark exhibit significant enhancement in their values of susceptibility and IRM reflecting surface accumulation of particulate pollutants, compared with tree growing at lower traffic sites. To estimate the deposition time and accumulation on bark, we have deposited 20 "clean" bark samples from low traffic area with susceptibility inferior to 10 SI, near the city ring road. Samples were then collected during three months. Samples were imparted a 1 Tesla IRM both prior the deposition and after the resampling. Results are useful to apprehend the process of magnetic particulates accumulation and to evaluate the potential of tree bark for the air quality monitoring.

  8. Appropriate line profiles for radiation modeling in the detection of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption by Lorentz, Doppler, and Voight lines are compared for a range of atmospheric parameters. It is found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the use of the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voight) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. A brief review of band models, to approximate the absorption over certain frequency interval, is presented. Expressions for total radiative energy emergent from the atmosphere are given which, with appropriate line or band models, can be used to reduce the data obtained from radiation measurement by an instrument mounted on an aircraft or a satellite. By employing the inversion procedure, the concentration of atmospheric pollutants can be obtained from the measured data.

  9. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Eighteenth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, R.G.; Bartlett, J.D.; Bowersox, V.C.; Gatz, D.F.; Naiman, D.Q.; Peden, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.K.; Stensland, G.J.

    1980-07-01

    The analysis of aerosol samples obtained in rural east-central Illinois reveals a seasonal maximum in SO/sub 4/ during May to July and a similar pattern for NH/sub 4/. The annual median SO/sub 4/ is about 1 to 1.5 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. In contrast to these ions, NO/sub 3/ displays highest values in the cold season. Soil-related species (Ca, K) seem to maximize in relation to farm tillage and harvesting practices. The NO/sub 3/ in recent precipitation samples over the northeast US increased between 1 and 2 times the values observed in the mid-1950's. A case study from SCORE-78 suggests that all ion concentrations analyzed from sequentially collected samples decreased from the onset of rain to a minimum corresponding to the heaviest rain rates. Four groups of elements in 10 event rain samples were identified using factor analysis. The groups include soluble and insoluble crustal elements, soluble pollutant metals and sulfate, and insoluble pollutant metals. Utilizing the factor analysis approach, the St. Louis METROMEX precipitation chemistry data showed that the SO/sub 4/ deposition patterns group consistently with those of other soluble pollutants. Additional factor analysis efforts on the St. Louis rainwater data set revealed that soluble and insoluble concentrations of a given element have different deposition patterns suggesting that scavenging and/or precipitation formation processes dictate the patterns. An approach to managing the vast data base of rain chemistry used in the above studies is described. The software also examines the data for certain aspects of quality assurance. The procedures used to analyze ambient air filter samples are discussed.

  10. Means of atmospheric air pollution reduction during drilling wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkitsa, L.; Yatsyshyn, T.; Lyakh, M.; Sydorenko, O.

    2016-08-01

    The process of drilling oil and gas wells is the source of air pollution through drilling mud evaporation containing hazardous chemical substances. The constructive solution for cleaning device of downhole tool that contains elements covering tube and clean the surface from the mud in the process of rising from the well is offered. Inside the device is filled with magnetic fluid containing the substance neutralizing hazardous substances. The use of the equipment proposed will make it possible to avoid penetration of harmful substances into the environment and to escape the harmful effects of aggressive substances for staff health and increase rig's fire safety.

  11. Clean Air Slots Amid Dense Atmospheric Pollution in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2003-01-01

    During the flights of the University of Washington's Convair-580 in the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) in southern Africa, a phenomenon was observed that has not been reported previously. This was the occurrence of thin layers of remarkably clean air, sandwiched between heavily polluted air, which persisted for many hours during the day. Photographs are shown of these clean air slots (CAS), and particle concentrations and light scattering coefficients in and around such slot are presented. An explanation is proposed for the propensity of CAS to form in southern Africa during the dry season.

  12. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants? 60.1720 Section 60.1720 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants? (a) You must install,...

  13. Worldwide monitoring of VLF-LF propagation and atmospheric noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomko, A. A.; Hepner, T.

    2001-03-01

    A joint effort is underway between The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and the Space and Naval Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center, San Diego, to deploy monitoring equipment capable of characterizing worldwide VLF-LF radio wave propagation and atmospheric noise levels. The monitoring equipment consists of a PC-based spectrum analyzer and orthogonal ferrite core magnetic loop antennas. The analyzer performs continuous measurements of the radio spectrum from 12 to 62 kHz and records time histories of VLF-LF signals (equivalent vertical electric field strength), noise amplitude probability distribution, noise impulsiveness, and average noise field strength. Data are downloaded via the Internet to a central database server. The Internet connection also provides for system reconfiguration and clock synchronization. Data collected by the monitoring network will be used to improve communication coverage forecasts and to analyze transient and long-term propagation effects. This paper provides an overview of the monitoring network and samples of data collected by it.

  14. Atmosphere and water quality monitoring on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, William

    1990-01-01

    In Space Station Freedom air and water will be supplied in closed loop systems. The monitoring of air and water qualities will ensure the crew health for the long mission duration. The Atmosphere Composition Monitor consists of the following major instruments: (1) a single focusing mass spectrometer to monitor major air constituents and control the oxygen/nitrogen addition for the Space Station; (2) a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to detect trace contaminants; (3) a non-dispersive infrared spectrometer to determine carbon monoxide concentration; and (4) a laser particle counter for measuring particulates in the air. An overview of the design and development concepts for the air and water quality monitors is presented.

  15. Effect of typhoon on atmospheric aerosol particle pollutants accumulation over Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinpei; Chen, Liqi; Lin, Qi; Zhao, Shuhui; Zhang, Miming

    2016-09-01

    Great influence of typhoon on air quality has been confirmed, however, rare data especially high time resolved aerosol particle data could be used to establish the behavior of typhoon on air pollution. A single particle aerosol spectrometer (SPAMS) was employed to characterize the particles with particle number count in high time resolution for two typhoons of Soulik (2013) and Soudelor (2015) with similar tracks. Three periods with five events were classified during the whole observation time, including pre - typhoon (event 1 and event 2), typhoon (event 3 and event 4) and post - typhoon (event 5) based on the meteorological parameters and particle pollutant properties. First pollutant group appeared during pre-typhoon (event 2) with high relative contributions of V - Ni rich particles. Pollution from the ship emissions and accumulated by local processes with stagnant meteorological atmosphere dominated the formation of the pollutant group before typhoon. The second pollutant group was present during typhoon (event 3), while typhoon began to change the local wind direction and increase wind speed. Particle number count reached up to the maximum value. High relative contributions of V - Ni rich and dust particles with low value of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) was observed during this period, indicating that the pollutant group was governed by the combined effect of local pollutant emissions and long-term transports. The analysis of this study sheds a deep insight into understand the relationship between the air pollution and typhoon. PMID:27295441

  16. Supplemental mathematical formulations, Atmospheric pathway: The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G.; Buck, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is an integrated software implementation of physics-based fate and transport models for health and environmental risk assessments of both radioactive and hazardous pollutants. This atmospheric component report is one of a series of formulation reports that document the MEPAS mathematical models. MEPAS is a ``multimedia`` model; pollutant transport is modeled within, through, and between multiple media (air, soil, groundwater, and surface water). The estimated concentrations in the various media are used to compute exposures and impacts to the environment, to maximum individuals, and to populations.

  17. Agriculture Crop Burning in Northwestern India and Its Impact on Atmospheric Pollution and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Chauhan, A.; Gonzalez Abad, G.

    2014-12-01

    Crop burning season, over northern India, occurs during October-November and April-May after harvesting season. The mechanized harvesting started in 1986, and every year crop residues are burnt in the northwestern parts of India. During post-monsoon season, October - November, the boundary layer is shallow; as a result the crop burning greatly impacts the regional air quality and climate of the northern parts of south Asia. Due to intense burning episodes, heavy smoke pollution-laden plumes are transported all along the Indo-Gangetic basin in the northern parts of India, depending upon diurnal changes in the wind patterns. We find that, in general, the dominant westerly winds transport the plumes and emissions far away from the source region up to the eastern parts of Indo-Gangetic basin, further dispersing over central India to the south. We use retrievals of formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide and Aerosol Index from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA Aura satellite together with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard NASA Terra and Aqua fire counts to assess the seasonal variation and geographical extent of the emissions due to burning of crop residues. In addition, our results, based on satellite measurements, indicate that the smoke plumes and biomass burning emissions are also transported over the Himalayan region and beyond, resulting in enhanced concentrations of aerosol loading and trace gases. Overall, our findings suggest that, during post-monsoon season, crop burning smoke plumes and emissions are the main cause of poor air quality, high atmospheric pollution and dense haze/smog, especially in the Indo-Gangetic basin.

  18. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  19. Pollution monitoring using bees: a new service provided by honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Thomas, J.M.; Simpson, J.C.; Bishop, M.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives are to provide a tool for assessing pollutant distributions and the effects of pollutants on living systems. The potential of bees as pollution monitors was studied by examining bees exposed to toxic metals near a smelter in Montana and bees in the area surrounding a hazardous waste disposal site near Puget Sound, Washington. Levels of toxic metals in the bees and brood survival were examined. It was concluded bees were, indeed, suitable indicators of pollution levels. (ACR)

  20. Major Constituents Analysis for the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrake, Lukas; Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Madzunkov, Stojan; Macaskill, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) can provide a means for monitoring the air within enclosed environments such as the International Space Station, the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), a Lunar habitat, or another vehicle traveling to Mars. The software processes a sum total spectra (counts vs. mass channel) with the intention of computing abundance ratios for N2, O2, CO2, Ar2, and H2O. A brute-force powerset expansion compares a library of expected mass lines with those found within the data. Least squares error is combined with a penalty term for using small peaks.

  1. ATMOSUV-CanSat (Atmospheric Thunderstorms's Monitor Optical Signal & UV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, David; Navarro-González, Javier; Carrió, Fernando; Blay, Pere; Espinós, Héctor; Connell, Paul; Eyles, Chris; Reglero, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    The ATMOSUV-CanSat is a small instrument aimed to study the Optical and UV signal in a TGF (Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash) process, as a complementary ground monitor facility in the study of thunderstorms at high altitude in the atmosphere. The main goal is to take complementary data to that of the MXGS/ASIM (Modular X-ray and Gamma-ray Sensor in the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor) mission, taken from the ISS (International Space Station). The detector is planed to be launch in a baloon during severe thunderstorms and take measurements of air conditions and to perform fast imaging with high temporal accuracy. We expect to measure UV emision, optical signal, temperature, presure, and accurate 3D location, with FPGA controlled high velocity imaging devices and sensors.

  2. Micro sensor node for air pollutant monitoring: hardware and software issues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sukwon; Kim, Nakyoung; Cha, Hojung; Ha, Rhan

    2009-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with various gas sensors have been actively used for air quality monitoring. Previous studies have typically explored system issues that include middleware or networking performance, but most research has barely considered the details of the hardware and software of the sensor node itself. In this paper, we focus on the design and implementation of a sensor board for air pollutant monitoring applications. Several hardware and software issues are discussed to explore the possibilities of a practical WSN-based air pollution monitoring system. Through extensive experiments and evaluation, we have determined the various characteristics of the gas sensors and their practical implications for air pollutant monitoring systems. PMID:22408489

  3. Micro Sensor Node for Air Pollutant Monitoring: Hardware and Software Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sukwon; Kim, Nakyoung; Cha, Hojung; Ha, Rhan

    2009-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with various gas sensors have been actively used for air quality monitoring. Previous studies have typically explored system issues that include middleware or networking performance, but most research has barely considered the details of the hardware and software of the sensor node itself. In this paper, we focus on the design and implementation of a sensor board for air pollutant monitoring applications. Several hardware and software issues are discussed to explore the possibilities of a practical WSN-based air pollution monitoring system. Through extensive experiments and evaluation, we have determined the various characteristics of the gas sensors and their practical implications for air pollutant monitoring systems. PMID:22408489

  4. Sources of Atmospheric Pollutants Impacting Air and Water Quality in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, A. W.; Cahill, T. A.; Gillies, J.; Kuhns, H.

    2008-12-01

    Starting in the second half of the 20th century, decline in Lake Tahoe's water clarity and degradation in the basin's air quality have become major concerns due to its unique scenic features. Gaseous and particulate nitrogen (N) and particulate phosphorus (P) loading via direct atmospheric deposition and sediment transport to the lake have also been implicated as responsible for its eutrophication and decline in water clarity. Estimates suggest that atmospheric N deposition contributes 55% of the total N loading to the lake, while atmospheric P deposition contributes 15% of the total P loading. In order to improve both air quality and, as a consequence, water quality, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the sources of the atmospheric pollutants. Once this is accomplished, it is possible to implement cost-effective strategies to reduce this impact. This paper summarizes the findings of a series of studies performed to determine the levels and sources of ambient air pollutants in the basin. Projects have included the development of a Tahoe-specific emissions inventory, long-term measurements of road dust resuspension, modeling to determine the fraction of pollutants coming from in-basin vs. out-of-basin sources, particulate source apportionment, and estimates of nitric acid deposition. These studies found that the pollutants most closely connected to the decline in water quality come largely from within basin sources, as opposed to those coming from the Central Valley and upwind urban areas of California. These results indicate regulators need to control pollutant emissions within the Tahoe basin in order to reduce the impact of atmospheric pollutants on both air and water quality.

  5. Biomagnetic monitoring of industry-derived particulate pollution.

    PubMed

    Hansard, R; Maher, B A; Kinnersley, R

    2011-06-01

    Clear association exists between ambient PM₁₀ concentrations and adverse health outcomes. However, determination of the strength of associations between exposure and illness is limited by low spatial-resolution of particulate concentration measurements. Conventional fixed monitoring stations provide high temporal-resolution data, but cannot capture fine-scale spatial variations. Here we examine the utility of biomagnetic monitoring for spatial mapping of PM₁₀ concentrations around a major industrial site. We combine leaf magnetic measurements with co-located PM₁₀ measurements to achieve inter-calibration. Comparison of the leaf-calculated and measured PM₁₀ concentrations with PM₁₀ predictions from a widely-used atmospheric dispersion model indicates that modelling of stack emissions alone substantially under-predicts ambient PM₁₀ concentrations in parts of the study area. Some of this discrepancy might be attributable to fugitive emissions from the industrial site. The composition of the magnetic particulates from vehicle and industry-derived sources differ, indicating the potential of magnetic techniques for source attribution. PMID:21450382

  6. Using KML to Visualize 4-D Atmospheric Carbon Monitoring Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    Concentrations of carbon in the atmosphere have increased dramatically in the last half century. Scientists seek to understand why the atmospheric concentrations are increasing, so that they can forecast how the concentrations may increase in the future and affect climate change. One method that scientists use to understand the carbon cycle is to monitor the concentration of carbon dioxide and other gasses at select locations around the world. These measurements provide information on the carbon exchange (or fluxes) between the atmosphere and land/ocean surface at upwind locations, but interpreting these data is difficult due to the spatial and temporal variability of the fluxes and the wind fields. Virtual globe applications offer a powerful way to visualize and understand what information on carbon flux is provided by these measurements. This presentation will give an overview of a data system, based on open source geospatial technologies, that creates KML documents of 3-D spatially and temporally tagged objects that help to explain atmospheric carbon monitoring. An output from this data system was selected as a winner in the Google for Educators KML in Research Competition. Visualization of the sensitivity of measurements at two NOAA Tall Tower locations to carbon flux at upwind locations.

  7. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  8. Atmospheric depositions of persistent pollutants: methodological aspects and values from case studies.

    PubMed

    Settimo, Gaetano; Viviano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Deposition monitoring, already in use by government control organizations of various countries, contributes to an important increase in experimental knowledge on pollutant deposition fluxes, on their environmental fate and on the possible effects on human health.At the European level, the necessity to consider with extreme attention the environmental contamination due to deposition, has brought to adopt a series of legislative measures and recommendations; this has contributed to set up environmental surveillance systems and monitoring campaigns for a series of pollutants which may accumulate in the environment as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and for metals.More recently, with DL.vo 155/2010, the necessity to consider, in the development of monitoring stations, the possibility to detect also data on deposition rates which represent a non-direct exposure of the population through the food chain. For sampling the Decree considers only two types of depositions: for total deposition (bulk and Bergerhoff) and wet only deposition. PMID:26783216

  9. A Great Lakes Atmospheric Mercury Monitoring network: Evaluation and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risch, Martin R.; Kenski, Donna M.; Gay, David A.

    2014-03-01

    As many as 51 mercury (Hg) wet-deposition-monitoring sites from 4 networks were operated in 8 USA states and Ontario, Canada in the North American Great Lakes Region from 1996 to 2010. By 2013, 20 of those sites were no longer in operation and approximately half the geographic area of the Region was represented by a single Hg-monitoring site. In response, a Great Lakes Atmospheric Mercury Monitoring (GLAMM) network is needed as a framework for regional collaboration in Hg-deposition monitoring. The purpose of the GLAMM network is to detect changes in regional atmospheric Hg deposition related to changes in Hg emissions. An optimized design for the network was determined to be a minimum of 21 sites in a representative and approximately uniform geographic distribution. A majority of the active and historic Hg-monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Region are part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) in North America and the GLAMM network is planned to be part of the MDN. To determine an optimized network design, active and historic Hg-monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Region were evaluated with a rating system of 21 factors that included characteristics of the monitoring locations and interpretations of Hg data. Monitoring sites were rated according to the number of Hg emissions sources and annual Hg emissions in a geographic polygon centered on each site. Hg-monitoring data from the sites were analyzed for long-term averages in weekly Hg concentrations in precipitation and weekly Hg-wet deposition, and on significant temporal trends in Hg concentrations and Hg deposition. A cluster analysis method was used to group sites with similar variability in their Hg data in order to identify sites that were unique for explaining Hg data variability in the Region. The network design included locations in protected natural areas, urban areas, Great Lakes watersheds, and in proximity to areas with a high density of annual Hg

  10. A Great Lakes atmospheric mercury monitoring network: evaluation and design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risch, Martin R.; Kenski, Donna M.; Gay; David, A.

    2014-01-01

    As many as 51 mercury (Hg) wet-deposition-monitoring sites from 4 networks were operated in 8 USA states and Ontario, Canada in the North American Great Lakes Region from 1996 to 2010. By 2013, 20 of those sites were no longer in operation and approximately half the geographic area of the Region was represented by a single Hg-monitoring site. In response, a Great Lakes Atmospheric Mercury Monitoring (GLAMM) network is needed as a framework for regional collaboration in Hg-deposition monitoring. The purpose of the GLAMM network is to detect changes in regional atmospheric Hg deposition related to changes in Hg emissions. An optimized design for the network was determined to be a minimum of 21 sites in a representative and approximately uniform geographic distribution. A majority of the active and historic Hg-monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Region are part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) in North America and the GLAMM network is planned to be part of the MDN. To determine an optimized network design, active and historic Hg-monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Region were evaluated with a rating system of 21 factors that included characteristics of the monitoring locations and interpretations of Hg data. Monitoring sites were rated according to the number of Hg emissions sources and annual Hg emissions in a geographic polygon centered on each site. Hg-monitoring data from the sites were analyzed for long-term averages in weekly Hg concentrations in precipitation and weekly Hg-wet deposition, and on significant temporal trends in Hg concentrations and Hg deposition. A cluster analysis method was used to group sites with similar variability in their Hg data in order to identify sites that were unique for explaining Hg data variability in the Region. The network design included locations in protected natural areas, urban areas, Great Lakes watersheds, and in proximity to areas with a high density of annual Hg