Science.gov

Sample records for atmospheric turbulence

  1. Superstatistics and atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, S.; Rapisarda, A.

    2005-08-01

    In this very short contribution we summarize some recent results on wind velocity data recorded at Florence airport. In particular we show that one can describe this example of atmospheric turbulence by means of the superstatistics approach proposed by Beck and Cohen (2003). The latter justifies the successful application of Tsallis generalized statistics in different fields, and more specifically in turbulence experiments.

  2. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Harold N.

    1987-01-01

    Various types of atmospheric turbulence measurements are addressed for the purpose of stimulating discussion relative to available data. An outline of these various types of measurements are discussed. Some specific results of detailed characterization studies made at NASA Langley are emphasized. The most recent reports on statistics of turbulence encounters for various types of aircraft operations are summarized. Special severe encounter studies and reference to remote sensing are also included. Wind shear is considered to be a special topic and is not covered.

  3. The problem of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.; HILL; MERRYFIELD; GOUGH

    1984-01-01

    All ground-based observations of the solar five-minute oscillations are affected by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere that leads to substantial refractive index variations. The turbulent motions serve to mix an air mass that is thermally stratified in the vertical, thereby producing intermittent thermal fluctuations over a wide range of heights in the atmosphere. These thermal structures yield refractive index changes that deflect the light path in a complicated way, producing intricate variations of amplitude and phase in what might have started out as simple plane waves. Since the fluid turbulence is statistical in nature, so too is the optical turbulence which is an integral measure of the refractive index changes along the light travel path. All of this produces what is usually called atmospheric seeing, which consists of image motion, blurring and distortion across the field of view. The effects of atmospheric seeing upon observations of five-minute oscillations carried out from the ground were assessed. This will help to provide a baseline estimate of the scienctific benefits that might accrue if one were able to observe the same oscillations from a space observatory unfettered by seeing effects.

  4. Review on atmospheric turbulence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-07-01

    In the past years, intensive Site Characterization campaigns have been performed to chose the sites for the future giant ELTs. Various atmospheric turbulence profilers with different resolution and sensed altitude ranges have been used, as well as climatological tools and satellite data analysis. Mixing long term statistics at low altitude resolution with high resolution data collected during short term campaigns allows to produce the reference profiles as input to the Adaptive Optics instrument performance estimators. In this paper I will perform a brief review of the principal and most used instruments and tools in order to give to the reader a panorama of the work and the efforts to monitor the atmospheric turbulence for astronomical purposes.

  5. Wavelet analysis of atmospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    After a brief review of the elementary properties of Fourier Transforms, the Wavelet Transform is defined in Part I. Basic results are given for admissable wavelets. The Multiresolution Analysis, or MRA (a mathematical structure which unifies a large class of wavelets with Quadrature Mirror Filters) is then introduced. Some fundamental aspects of wavelet design are then explored. The Discrete Wavelet Transform is discussed and, in the context of an MRA, is seen to supply a Fast Wavelet Transform which competes with the Fast Fourier Transform for efficiency. In Part II, the Wavelet Transform is developed in terms of the scale number variable s instead of the scale length variable a where a = 1/s. Basic results such as the admissibility condition, conservation of energy, and the reconstruction theorem are proven in this context. After reviewing some motivation for the usual Fourier power spectrum, a definition is given for the wavelet power spectrum. This `spectral density` is then intepreted in the context of spectral estimation theory. Parseval`s theorem for Wavelets then leads naturally to the Wavelet Cross Spectrum, Wavelet Cospectrum, and Wavelet Quadrature Spectrum. Wavelet Transforms are then applied in Part III to the analysis of atmospheric turbulence. Data collected over the ocean is examined in the wavelet transform domain for underlying structure. A brief overview of atmospheric turbulence is provided. Then the overall method of applying Wavelet Transform techniques to time series data is described. A trace study is included, showing some of the aspects of choosing the computational algorithm, and selection of a specific analyzing wavelet. A model for generating synthetic turbulence data is developed, and seen to yield useful results in comparing with real data for structural transitions. Results from the theory of Wavelet Spectral Estimation and Wavelength Cross-Transforms are applied to studying the momentum transport and the heat flux.

  6. Atmospheric turbulence MTF for infrared optical waves' propagation through marine atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2014-07-01

    Infrared optical wave's propagation in marine environment is particularly challenging, not only for scattering and absorption due to high humidity, but also for a different behavior of atmospheric turbulence with respect to terrestrial propagation. In this paper, the marine atmospheric turbulence modulation transfer functions (MTF), which describes the degrading effects of marine atmospheric turbulence on an optical imaging system, is investigated in detail both analytically and numerically. New analytic expressions of the MTF are derived for plane and spherical waves under marine atmospheric turbulence, and they consider physically the influences of finite turbulence inner and outer scales. The final results indicate that, the marine atmospheric turbulence brings more degrading effects on the imaging system than the terrestrial atmospheric turbulence.

  7. New Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Shuttle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Campbell, C. W.; Doubleday, M. K.; Johnson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    An updated NASA atmospheric turbulence model, from 0 to 200 km altitude, which was developed to be more realistic and less conservative when applied to space shuttle reentry engineering simulation studies involving control system fuel expenditures is presented. The prior model used extreme turbulence (3 sigma) for all altitudes, whereas in reality severe turbulence is patchy within quiescent atmospheric zones. The updated turublence model presented is designed to be more realistic. The prior turbulence statistics (sigma and L) were updated and were modeled accordingly.

  8. Airplane wing vibrations due to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastel, R. L.; Caruthers, J. E.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude of error introduced due to wing vibration when measuring atmospheric turbulence with a wind probe mounted at the wing tip was studied. It was also determined whether accelerometers mounted on the wing tip are needed to correct this error. A spectrum analysis approach is used to determine the error. Estimates of the B-57 wing characteristics are used to simulate the airplane wing, and von Karman's cross spectrum function is used to simulate atmospheric turbulence. It was found that wing vibration introduces large error in measured spectra of turbulence in the frequency's range close to the natural frequencies of the wing.

  9. Laser Doppler systems in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    The loss of heterodyne signal power for the Marshall Space Flight Center laser Doppler system due to the random changes in the atmospheric index of refraction is investigated. The current status in the physics of low energy laser propagation through turbulent atmosphere is presented. The analysis and approximate evaluation of the loss of the heterodyne signal power due to the atmospheric absorption, scattering, and turbulence are estimated for the conditions of the January 1973 flight tests. Theoretical and experimental signal to noise values are compared. Maximum and minimum values of the atmospheric attenuation over a two way path of 20 km range are calculated as a function of altitude using models of atmosphere, aerosol concentration, and turbulence.

  10. Impact of Atmospheric Turbulence on Beam Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Harper, Warren W.; William E Thompson & Richard L Brunson

    2004-09-08

    A trailer-based sensor system has been developed for remote chemical sensing applications. The detection scheme utilizes quantum cascade lasers operating in the long-wave infrared. It has been determined that atmospheric turbulence is the dominating noise source for this system. For this application, horizontal path lengths vary from several hundred meters to several kilometers resulting in weak to moderate to strong turbulence conditions.

  11. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  12. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  13. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  14. Atmospheric Turbulence Simulations with Spatial Light Modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, R.; Kanaan, A.; Mello, A. T.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence in the optical path of incoming stellar light transforms a plane wavefront into a distorted wavefront. This leads to loss of resolution achievable in a telescope. The correction of these distortions is the goal of adaptive optics. We are designing an experiment to recreate the effects of turbulence on an optical bench. This experiment aims to reproduce the effects observed in an artificial sodium laser star when viewed by a 30m class telescope. The edge of such large telescopes see the sodium artificial star as an elongated rather than a circle. In the bench experiment the turbulence distortions are achieved by directing the light beam through a glass plate whose surface is etched to imitate the phase distortions caused by the atmosphere, this plate is called a phase screen. Phase screens are made much bigger than the incident beam of light and we move this phase plate to simulate the effect of a changing atmosphere. To test new turbulence patterns one needs several different phase screens, which are expensive and hard to make. Our work involves computing numerical simulations of turbulence and testing algorithms to correct the phase distortion.We would then like to test these algorithms on our bench before testing on the telescope. To make these tests more realistic we would like to apply the same simulated turbulence patterns to our phase screen. This is almost impossible to do with phase screens, therefore we are planning to replace phase screens with spatial phase modulators that can be programmed to introduce a phase shift to the incident light at a time resolution of milliseconds. Integration of spatial phase modulators in optical benches as phase screens will allow for much more flexible experiments permitting a perfect correlation between the numerical simulations and the physical experiments.

  15. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  16. SNOHATS: Stratified atmospheric turbulence over snow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, M. B.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Huwald, H.; Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.

    2006-12-01

    Stably stratified flows present particular challenges for both experimental and numerical studies of the atmosphere and its interaction with the underlying surfaces. Turbulence damping and gravity waves are just two examples of stable flow features that complicate the application of turbulence similarity theories and the formulation of effective turbulence models for subgrid-scales in Large Eddy Simulation (LES). To address these concerns, a field study (SNOHATS) was held at the extensive "Plaine-Morte" glacier in the Swiss Alps (3000 m) from February to April 2006. The snow covered surface is constantly colder than the air guaranteeing stable conditions over long periods. Two horizontal arrays of vertically separated 3D sonic anemometers were deployed. This setup was specifically designed to measure subgrid scale fluxes (upwind uninterrupted fetch of 2 km) and then to assess the success of various models in reproducing these fluxes. We first study the influence of stratification on the spectra and co-spectra of velocity and temperature. Then, we compare dissipation computed using the second order and third order structure functions to the SGS dissipation. Subsequently, the eddy viscosity subgrid scale model is assessed for LES of stably stratified atmospheric flows. Specifically, we measure the Smagorinsky coefficient and the SGS turbulent Prandtl number by matching measured and modeled dissipation rates. Finally, we present the dependence of these coefficients on stability, height above the ground, filter size, and strain rates. Results are compared to previously reported data for stable flows over soil surfaces (HATS, Kleissl et al., 2004; Horst et al., 2004).

  17. Atmospheric turbulence effects on aircraft noise propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapkis, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The Brown and Clifford model for the apparent sound attenuation cuased by atmospheric turbulence was reviewed and extended. Calculations, based on the model, were made for the predicted sound attenuation for a tower-mounted loudspeaker-type sound source and for an airplane sound source. The important parameters in the model are identified and discussed. A model for sound fluctuations is also presented and a practical experimental program to validate the models described.

  18. Atmospheric turbulence measurements at Ali Observatory, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyong; Yao, Yongqiang; Vernin, Jean; Chadid, Merieme; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Hongshuai; Yin, Jia; Giordano, Christophe; Qian, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    The atmospheric turbulence characteristics are important to evaluate the quality of ground-based astronomical observatory. In order to characterize Ali observatory, Tibet. we have developed a single star Scidar (SSS) system, which is able to continuously monitor the vertical profiles of both optical turbulence and wind speed. The main SSS configuration includes a 40cm telescope and a CCD camera for fast sampling the star scintillation pattern. The SSS technique analyzes the scintillation patterns in real time, by computing the spatial auto-correlation and at least two cross-correlation images, and retrieves both C2 n (h) and V (h) vertical profiles from the ground up to 30km. This paper presents the first turbulence measurements with SSS at Ali observatory in October, 2011. We have successfully obtained the profiles of optical turbulence and wind speed, as well as the key parameters for adaptive optics, such as seeing, coherence time, and isoplanatic angle. The favourable results indicate that Ali observatory can be an excellent astronomical observatory.

  19. Parallel Computatinal Technology for Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Randy X.

    1997-08-01

    Desktop Atmospheric Turbulence Diffussion Modeling System (DATDMS) is used by analysts with varied backgrounds for performing air quality assessment and emergency response activities. This modeling system must be robust, well documented, have minimal and well controlled user inputs, and have clear outputs. Existing coarse-grained parallel computers can provide significant increases in computation speed in desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling without considerable increases in hardware cost. This increased speed will allow for significant improvements to be made in the scientific foundations of these applied models, in the form of more advanced diffusion schemes and better representation of the wind and turbulence fields. This is especially attractive for emergency response applications where speed and accuracy are of utmost importance. This presentation describes one particular application of coarse-grained parallel computer technology to a desktop complex terrain atmospheric dispersion modeling system. By comparing performance characteristics of the coarse-grained parallel version of the model with the single-processor version, we will demonstrate that applying coarse-grained parallel computer technology to desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling systems will allow us to address critical issues facing future requirements of this class of dispersion models.

  20. Analysis of non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence effects on infrared imaging by atmospheric turbulence MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bindang; Cao, Lei; Cui, Linyan; Bai, Xiangzhi; Cao, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Fugen

    2013-07-01

    The atmospheric turbulence modulation transfer functions (MTF) can be used to describe the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence on an optical imaging system. In this study, new expressions of long exposure atmospheric turbulence MTF are derived with the generalized atmospheric spectral model for optical waves propagating through non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence with horizontal path. They consider the finite turbulence inner and outer scales, and have a general spectral power law value in the range of 3 to 4 instead of the standard power law value of 11/3. Numerical calculations are conducted to analyze the influence of non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence on the infrared imaging in term of atmospheric turbulence MTF, and results show that the non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence produces less effect on the far infrared imaging.

  1. Gaussian entanglement in the turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohmann, M.; Semenov, A. A.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2016-07-01

    We provide a rigorous treatment of the entanglement properties of two-mode Gaussian states in atmospheric channels by deriving and analyzing the input-output relations for the corresponding entanglement test. A key feature of such turbulent channels is a nontrivial dependence of the transmitted continuous-variable entanglement on coherent displacements of the quantum state of the input field. Remarkably, this allows one to optimize the entanglement certification by modifying local coherent amplitudes using a finite, but optimal amount of squeezing. In addition, we propose a protocol which, in principle, renders it possible to transfer the Gaussian entanglement through any turbulent channel over arbitrary distances. Therefore, our approach provides the theoretical foundation for advanced applications of Gaussian entanglement in free-space quantum communication.

  2. Rotor noise due to atmospheric turbulence ingestion. I - Fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    In the present analytical procedure for the prediction of helicopter rotor noise generation due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence, different models for turbulence fluid mechanics and the ingestion process are combined. The mean flow and turbulence statistics associated with the atmospheric boundary layer are modeled with attention to the effects of atmospheric stability length, windspeed, and altitude. The turbulence field can be modeled as isotropic, locally stationary, and homogeneous. For large mean flow contraction ratios, accurate predictions of turbulence vorticity components at the rotor face requires the incorporation of the differential drift of fluid particles on adjacent streamlines.

  3. Atmospheric turbulence simulation techniques with application to flight analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. T.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical modeling of atmospheric turbulence is discussed. The statistical properties of atmospheric turbulence, in particular the probability distribution, the spectra, and the coherence are reviewed. Different atmospheric turbulence simulation models are investigated, and appropriate statistical analyses are carried out to verify their validity. The models for simulation are incorporated into a computer model of aircraft flight dynamics. Statistical results of computer simulated landings for an aircraft having characteristics of a DC-8 are reported for the different turbulence simulation techniques. The significance of various degrees of sophistication in the turbulence simulation techniques on the landing performance of the aircraft is discussed.

  4. Equilibration of an Atmosphere by Geostrophic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Malte F.

    A major question for climate studies is to quantify the role of turbulent eddy fluxes in maintaining the observed atmospheric mean state. It has been argued that eddy fluxes keep the mid-latitude atmosphere in a state that is marginally critical to the deepest mode of baroclinic instability, which provide's a powerful constraint on the response of the atmosphere to changes in external forcing. A similar criterion does, however not hold in the Southern Ocean, a region whose dynamics are otherwise very similar to the mid-latitude atmosphere. This thesis resolves this apparent contradiction, using a combination of theoretical considerations and eddy-resolving numerical simulations. It is shown that the adjustment of the extra-tropical troposphere to states of marginal criticality does not follow from a fundamental constraint, but is rather the result of the particular parameters characterizing Earth's troposphere. Both marginally critical and strongly supercritical zonal mean flows can be obtained in planetary atmospheres if external parameters are varied. We argue that changes in the equilibrated mean state over a wide range of simulations can better be understood in terms of a balance between the diabatic forcing and the eddy driven overturning circulation. Using a diffusive closure for the eddy flux of potential vorticity, we can relate the eddy-driven overturning transport to properties of the mean flow, and derive scaling relations for both the baroclinicity and vertical stratification of the equilibrated state. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  5. Turbulence effects in radio occultation studies of atmospheric scale heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric scale heights derived from radio occultation measurements of a turbulent planetary atmosphere would be accurate if the average angle of refraction through the turbulent atmosphere were equal to the refraction angle for the corresponding quiescent atmosphere. These two angles are not equal (although their difference may not be large enough to cause significant error). If necessary, it should be possible to correct for the systematic error introduced by this inequality by using measurements of signal spectra to determine characteristics of the turbulence. Sensitive dual-frequency measurements could help define the effects of turbulence in future radio occultation experiments. It does not appear that the angular offset due to turbulence has been important in past experiments, although it may become significant and require corrective analysis when improved equipment is used to probe deep into turbulent atmospheres with greater measurement precision.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices: Atmospheric Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kao, C.-T.

    1997-01-01

    Crow instability can develop in most atmospheric turbulence levels, however, the ring vortices may not form in extremely strong turbulence cases due to strong dissipation of the vortices. It appears that strong turbulence tends to accelerate the occurrences of Crow instability. The wavelength of the most unstable mode is estimated to be about 5b(sub 0), which is less than the theoretical value of 8.6b(sub 0) (Crow, 1970) and may be due to limited domain size and highly nonlinear turbulent flow characteristics. Three-dimensional turbulence can decay wake vortices more rapidly. Axial velocity may be developed by vertical distortion of a vortex pair due to Crow instability or large turbulent eddy motion. More experiments with various non-dimensional turbulence levels are necessary to get useful statistics of wake vortex behavior due to turbulence. Need to investigate larger turbulence length scale effects by enlarging domain size or using grid nesting.

  7. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  8. Effects of ingested atmospheric turbulence on measured tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Mosher, Marianne; Hagen, Martin J.; George, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. Turbulence ingestion noise is found to be the dominant noise mechanism at locations near the rotor axis. At these locations, the sound radiated by the hovering rotor increases with both increasing atmospheric wind speed and ingested rms turbulent velocity.

  9. Calculation of turbulence effects in an upward-refracting atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Kenneth E.; di, Xiao; Raspet, Richard

    1990-06-01

    The effect of atmospheric turbulence on sound propagation was investigated for both nonrefractive and refractive atmospheres, using the parabolic equation method of Gilbert and White (1989) in conjunction with a two-dimensional atmospheric turbulence model. The calculations for a nonrefractive atmosphere gave good agreement with experimental data and with Daigle's (1979) theory, while calculations for an upward-refractive atmosphere gave reasonable agreement with the data of Weiner and Keast (1959). It is concluded that, for a receiver deep in a shadow zone and for frequencies greater than a few hundred hertz, the measured sound-pressure level is due almost entirely to the sound scattered into the shadow zone by atmospheric turbulence. Consequently, for upward refraction and frequencies above a few hundred hertz, turbulence must be included in long-range propagation calculations.

  10. Causes of non-Kolmogorov turbulence in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lukin, V P; Nosov, E V; Nosov, V V; Torgaev, A V

    2016-04-20

    In the present work, we briefly describe a model for atmospheric turbulence energy on the basis of experimental data obtained in Siberia. A series of new studies is considered and the results of our long-term experimental observations are summarized. The results of these studies form the basis for an explanation of some effects in interactions between optical waves and atmospheric turbulence. Our numerous experimental results point to the possible generation of so-called coherent turbulence in the atmosphere. When analyzing the problem, we proceeded based on our own experimental data and comprehension that the coherent turbulence is a result of the action of self-organizing nonlinear processes, which run in continuous media, including atmospheric air. The experimental data confirmed the effect of attenuation of light fluctuations in coherent turbulence. PMID:27140124

  11. Hazardous Levels of Commercial Aircraft Response to Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ray C.; Ye, Cun-En; Lan, C. Edward; Guan, Wen-Lin

    Jet commercial aircraft in flight are frequently subject to atmospheric turbulence resulting in rapidly varying aerodynamic and flight dynamic characteristics. These varying characteristics not only pose threats to flight safety, but also may cause structural damages and reduce fatigue life. The sudden plunging motion in severe turbulence is the major reason to cause the flight injuries. To express the turbulence intensities as the hazardous levels, the root-mean-square g-load, usually for structural load, has been examined in the past twenty years. The present study is to examine alternative ideas to express the hazardous levels of sudden plunging motion in atmospheric turbulence. The flying-quality parameters of the plunging mode and integrated turbulence-induced downwash will be proposed as more reliable parameters for the turbulence hazard levels.

  12. Entropy studies on beam distortion by atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C.

    2015-09-01

    When a beam propagates through atmospheric turbulence over a known distance, the target beam profile deviates from the projected profile of the beam on the receiver. Intuitively, the unwanted distortion provides information about the atmospheric turbulence. This information is crucial for guiding adaptive optic systems and improving beam propagation results. In this paper, we propose an entropy study based on the image from a plenoptic sensor to provide a measure of information content of atmospheric turbulence. In general, lower levels of atmospheric turbulence will have a smaller information size while higher levels of atmospheric turbulence will cause significant expansion of the information size, which may exceed the maximum capacity of a sensing system and jeopardize the reliability of an AO system. Therefore, the entropy function can be used to analyze the turbulence distortion and evaluate performance of AO systems. In fact, it serves as a metric that can tell the improvement of beam correction in each iteration step. In addition, it points out the limitation of an AO system at optimized correction as well as the minimum information needed for wavefront sensing to achieve certain levels of correction. In this paper, we will demonstrate the definition of the entropy function and how it is related to evaluating information (randomness) carried by atmospheric turbulence.

  13. Using ground-based GPS to characterize atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, T.; Davis, J. L.; Hill, E. M.

    2009-08-01

    A new method for measuring and studying atmospheric turbulence is presented. The method uses data from a local network of GPS receivers. The GPS data are processed in a way that assures that the estimated zenith total delays (ZTD) contain the effects of atmospheric turbulence present in the GPS observations. The turbulence is characterized using the spatial structure function for the atmospheric zenith total delay. The structure function is modeled by an expression with unknown parameters which contains information about the turbulence. The unknown parameters are solved by a fit to the observed ZTD variations. We apply the method to GPS data from the Yucca Mountain network, Nevada, USA. The results show that the magnitude of the turbulent variations in that region have a strong seasonal dependence, with much larger variations in summer compared to winter.

  14. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  15. Scattering of sonic booms by anisotropic turbulence in the atmosphere

    PubMed

    Kelly; Raspet; Bass

    2000-06-01

    An earlier paper [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 3412-3417 (1995)] reported on the comparison of rise times and overpressures of sonic booms calculated with a scattering center model of turbulence to measurements of sonic boom propagation through a well-characterized turbulent layer under moderately turbulent conditions. This detailed simulation used spherically symmetric scatterers to calculate the percentage of occurrence histograms of received overpressures and rise times. In this paper the calculation is extended to include distorted ellipsoidal turbules as scatterers and more accurately incorporates the meteorological data into a determination of the number of scatterers per unit volume. The scattering center calculation overpredicts the shifts in rise times for weak turbulence, and still underpredicts the shift under more turbulent conditions. This indicates that a single-scatter center-based model cannot completely describe sonic boom propagation through atmospheric turbulence. PMID:10875351

  16. Atmospheric turbulence correction using digital holographic detection: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Marron, Joseph C; Kendrick, Richard L; Seldomridge, Nathan; Grow, Taylor D; Höft, Thomas A

    2009-07-01

    The performance of long distance imaging systems is typically degraded by phase errors imparted by atmospheric turbulence. In this paper we apply coherent imaging methods to determine, and remove, these phase errors by digitally processing coherent recordings of the image data. In this manner we are able to remove the effects of atmospheric turbulence without needing a conventional adaptive optical system. Digital holographic detection is used to record the coherent, complex-valued, optical field for a series of atmospheric and object realizations. Correction of atmospheric phase errors is then based on maximizing an image sharpness metric to determine the aberrations present and correct the underlying image. Experimental results that demonstrate image recovery in the presence of turbulence are presented. Results obtained with severe turbulence that gives rise to anisoplanatism are also presented. PMID:19582079

  17. Performance of wind turbines in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundar, R. M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of atmospheric turbulence on the power fluctuations of large wind turbines was studied. The significance of spatial non-uniformities of the wind is emphasized. The turbulent wind with correlation in time and space is simulated on the computer by Shinozukas method. The wind turbulence is modelled according to the Davenport spectrum with an exponential spatial correlation function. The rotor aerodynamics is modelled by simple blade element theory. Comparison of the spectrum of power output signal between 1-D and 3-D turbulence, shows the significant power fluctuations centered around the blade passage frequency.

  18. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of contrails in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot, J.; Paoli, R.; Thouron, O.; Cariolle, D.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. This is the first paper where fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The initial flow-field is composed by the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail decent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex break-up dominates over background turbulence at the end of the vortex regime and dominates the mixing with ambient air. This results in global microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are be slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, the background humidity and temperature have a first order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent and ongoing studies in the literature.

  20. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-05-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  1. Turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, Ronald L.

    1990-05-01

    This conference addressed recent theoretical advancements of turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Activities were centered on the technical sessions of the conference. Sessions addressed clouds and the marine atmospheric boundary layer, field experimental techniques, physical and numerical simulations, transport and diffusion, surface properties, general boundary layer, stratified turbulence and turbulence in complex terrain. A jointly authored poster on an evaluation of the ARAC emergency response models with and without on-site sound detection and ranging systems (sodars) which measure vertical wind profiles was presented. Several scientists commented on our work and some requested further information. In addition, there was a workshop on dispersion around groups of buildings and a tour of Riso National Laboratory. Developments relevant to our work included work on dispersion model evaluation, especially using Monte Carlo random walk techniques, parameterizations of mixing height and turbulence from remote sensing systems such as sodars and radars, and measurements and parameterizations of enhanced turbulence around groups of buildings.

  2. Turbulence structures in wind turbine wake: Effects of atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence structure in the wake behind full-scale horizontal-axis WT under the influence of realistic atmospheric turbulent flow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of turbine wake. Turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the WT, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer. NSF CBET Energy for Sustainability.

  3. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2012-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5-MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  4. Extracting atmospheric turbulence and aerosol characteristics from passive imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Wayne, D.; McBryde, K.; Cauble, G.

    2013-09-01

    Obtaining accurate, precise and timely information about the local atmospheric turbulence and extinction conditions and aerosol/particulate content remains a difficult problem with incomplete solutions. It has important applications in areas such as optical and IR free-space communications, imaging systems performance, and the propagation of directed energy. The capability to utilize passive imaging data to extract parameters characterizing atmospheric turbulence and aerosol/particulate conditions would represent a valuable addition to the current piecemeal toolset for atmospheric sensing. Our research investigates an application of fundamental results from optical turbulence theory and aerosol extinction theory combined with recent advances in image-quality-metrics (IQM) and image-quality-assessment (IQA) methods. We have developed an algorithm which extracts important parameters used for characterizing atmospheric turbulence and extinction along the propagation channel, such as the refractive-index structure parameter C2n , the Fried atmospheric coherence width r0 , and the atmospheric extinction coefficient βext , from passive image data. We will analyze the algorithm performance using simulations based on modeling with turbulence modulation transfer functions. An experimental field campaign was organized and data were collected from passive imaging through turbulence of Siemens star resolution targets over several short littoral paths in Point Loma, San Diego, under conditions various turbulence intensities. We present initial results of the algorithm's effectiveness using this field data and compare against measurements taken concurrently with other standard atmospheric characterization equipment. We also discuss some of the challenges encountered with the algorithm, tasks currently in progress, and approaches planned for improving the performance in the near future.

  5. Atmospheric Quantum Channels with Weak and Strong Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Vasylyev, D; Semenov, A A; Vogel, W

    2016-08-26

    The free-space transfer of high-fidelity optical signals between remote locations has many applications, including both classical and quantum communication, precision navigation, clock synchronization, etc. The physical processes that contribute to signal fading and loss need to be carefully analyzed in the theory of light propagation through the atmospheric turbulence. Here we derive the probability distribution for the atmospheric transmittance including beam wandering, beam shape deformation, and beam-broadening effects. Our model, referred to as the elliptic beam approximation, applies to weak, weak-to-moderate, and strong turbulence and hence to the most important regimes in atmospheric communication scenarios. PMID:27610835

  6. Optical measurements of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.

    The light scattering on the turbulence inhomogeneities of the atmosphere is the one of the main mechanism of distortion of the received optical signal. The random spacetime changes of the atmospheric refractive index lead to distortion of the optical beam structure, the fluctuations of the intensity and phase of the optical wave are manifested, in particular, in blurring, shivering and flickering of the source images, as well as in the turbulent extinction of the mean received power of the signal. Several models are compared with measurements of atmospheric parameters.

  7. Hyperspectral Image Turbulence Measurements of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Sarah E.; West, Leanne L.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Kireev, Stanislav; Smith, William L., Sr.; Burdette, Edward M.; Daniels, Taumi; Cornman, Larry

    2012-01-01

    A Forward Looking Interferometer (FLI) sensor has the potential to be used as a means of detecting aviation hazards in flight. One of these hazards is mountain wave turbulence. The results from a data acquisition activity at the University of Colorado s Mountain Research Station will be presented here. Hyperspectral datacubes from a Telops Hyper-Cam are being studied to determine if evidence of a turbulent event can be identified in the data. These data are then being compared with D&P TurboFT data, which are collected at a much higher time resolution and broader spectrum.

  8. On the application of Rice's exceedance statistics to atmospheric turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Discrepancies produced by the application of Rice's exceedance statistics to atmospheric turbulence are examined. First- and second-order densities from several data sources have been measured for this purpose. Particular care was paid to each selection of turbulence that provides stationary mean and variance over the entire segment. Results show that even for a stationary segment of turbulence, the process is still highly non-Gaussian, in spite of a Gaussian appearance for its first-order distribution. Data also indicate strongly non-Gaussian second-order distributions. It is therefore concluded that even stationary atmospheric turbulence with a normal first-order distribution cannot be considered a Gaussian process, and consequently the application of Rice's exceedance statistics should be approached with caution.

  9. An investigation of turbulent transport in the extreme lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koper, C. A., Jr.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1975-01-01

    A model in which the Lagrangian autocorrelation is expressed by a domain integral over a set of usual Eulerian autocorrelations acquired concurrently at all points within a turbulence box is proposed along with a method for ascertaining the statistical stationarity of turbulent velocity by creating an equivalent ensemble to investigate the flow in the extreme lower atmosphere. Simultaneous measurements of turbulent velocity on a turbulence line along the wake axis were carried out utilizing a longitudinal array of five hot-wire anemometers remotely operated. The stationarity test revealed that the turbulent velocity is approximated as a realization of a weakly self-stationary random process. Based on the Lagrangian autocorrelation it is found that: (1) large diffusion time predominated; (2) ratios of Lagrangian to Eulerian time and spatial scales were smaller than unity; and, (3) short and long diffusion time scales and diffusion spatial scales were constrained within their Eulerian counterparts.

  10. Coherent laser radar performance for general atmospheric refractive turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod G.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A general theory for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a coherent detection laser radar is developed using the path-integral formulation (Fresnel approximation), which is valid for any typical path-integrated atmospheric refractive turbulence. The principal effects of refractive turbulence are discussed, and analytical expressions are presented for the case of untruncated Gaussians for the transmitted field, local oscillator field, and transmitter/receiver optics. The physical mechanisms that reduce heterodyne efficiency are identified.

  11. ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE AND POLLUTANT DISPERSION NEAR ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objectives of this investigation are: (1) to determine the time and space scales of the eddies generated by the traffic, (2) to study the effects of traffic-induced turbulence on the near-field dispersion of pollutants, (3) to evaluate several commonly used highway air ...

  12. Atmospheric turbulence parameters for modeling wind turbine dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. E.; Thresher, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A model which can be used to predict the response of wind turbines to atmospheric turbulence is given. The model was developed using linearized aerodynamics for a three-bladed rotor and accounts for three turbulent velocity components as well as velocity gradients across the rotor disk. Typical response power spectral densities are shown. The system response depends critically on three wind and turbulence parameters, and models are presented to predict desired response statistics. An equation error method, which can be used to estimate the required parameters from field data, is also presented.

  13. Why turbulence sustains in supercritically stratified free atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    It is widely believed that in very stable stratifications, at Richardson numbers (Ri) exceeding critical value Ric ˜ 0.25 turbulence decays and flow becomes laminar. This is so at low Reynolds numbers (Re), e.g., in lab experiments; but this is not true in very-high-Re geophysical flows. Free atmosphere and deep ocean are turbulent in spite of strongly supercritical stratifications: 1 << Ri < 103. Until recently, this paradox remained unexplained. The Energy- and Flux-Budget (EFB) turbulence-closure (Zilitinkevich et al., 2013) has disclosed the following turbulence self-control mechanisms. Until recently, the role of negative buoyancy flux, Fb > 0, in turbulence energetics was treated in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation and understood as just consumption of TKE by the buoyancy forces. This has led to the conclusion that sufficiently strong static stability causes the negative buoyancy flux sufficiently strong to exceed the TKE generation rate and thus to kill turbulence. However, considering TKE equation together with budget equation for turbulent potential energy (TPE proportional to the squared buoyancy fluctuations) shows that the role of Fb in turbulence energetics is nothing but conversion of TKE into TPE (Fb just quantifies the rate of this conversion); so that Fb does not affect total turbulent energy (TTE = TKE + TPE). Moreover, as follows from the buoyancy-flux budget equation, TPE generates positive (directed upward) buoyancy flux irrespective of the sign of the buoyancy gradient. Indeed, the warmer fluid particles (with positive buoyancy fluctuation) rise up, whereas the cooler particles sink down, so that both contribute to the positive buoyancy flux opposing to the usual, negative flux generated by mean buoyancy gradient. In this context, strengthening the negative buoyancy flux leads to decreasing TKE and increasing TPE. The latter enhances the counter-gradient share of the total flux, thus reduces |Fb| and, eventually

  14. Characteristics of turbulent structures in the unstable atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schols, J. L. J.; Jansen, A. E.; Krom, J. G.

    1985-10-01

    An atmospheric surface-layer (ASL) experiment conducted at a meteorological site in the Oostelijk-Flevoland polder of the Netherlands is described. Turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity, air temperature and static pressure were measured, using three 10 m towers. Simultaneous turbulent signals at several heights on the towers were used to investigate the properties of the turbulent structures which contribute most significantly to the turbulent vertical transports in the unstable ASL. These turbulent structures produce between 30 and 50% of the mean turbulent vertical transport of horizontal alongwind momentum and they contribute to between 40 and 50% of the mean turbulent vertical heat transport; in both cases this occurs during 15 to 20% of the total observation time. The translation speed of the turbulent structures equals the wind speed averaged over the depth of the ASL, which scales on the surface friction velocity. The inclination angle of the temperature interface at the upstream edge of the turbulent structures to the surface is significantly smaller than that of the internal shear layer, which is associated with the temperature interface. The turbulent structures in the unstable ASL are determined by a large-scale temperature field: Convective motions, which encompass the whole depth of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), penetrate into the ASL. The curvature of the vertical profile of mean horizontal alongwind velocity forces the alignment of the convective cells in the flow direction (Kuettner, 1971), which have an average length of several hundreds of metres and an average width of a few tens of metres. This mechanism leads to the formation of turbulent structures, which extend throughout the depth of the ASL.

  15. Characterization, parameter estimation, and aircraft response statistics of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    A nonGaussian three component model of atmospheric turbulence is postulated that accounts for readily observable features of turbulence velocity records, their autocorrelation functions, and their spectra. Methods for computing probability density functions and mean exceedance rates of a generic aircraft response variable are developed using nonGaussian turbulence characterizations readily extracted from velocity recordings. A maximum likelihood method is developed for optimal estimation of the integral scale and intensity of records possessing von Karman transverse of longitudinal spectra. Formulas for the variances of such parameter estimates are developed. The maximum likelihood and least-square approaches are combined to yield a method for estimating the autocorrelation function parameters of a two component model for turbulence.

  16. Irradiance scintillation index on slant atmospheric turbulence: simple approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayed, Heba A.; El Aziz, Ahmed Abd; Aly, Asmaa M.; Aly, Moustafa H.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulence plays an important role in investigating the irradiance scintillation index (SI) for a free-space optical wave propagating through atmospheric turbulence. The Hufnagel-Valley model is used in most studies, where the SI of the slant path is obtained using numerical analysis. A polynomial is proposed for the refractive index structure parameter, on which a closed form is derived for the irradiance SI of a spherical optical wave propagating through a slant atmospheric turbulence. This is used to study signal-to-noise ratio and bit error rate for system performance evaluation. The obtained results demonstrate the simplicity of using the derived closed form of SI compared to statistical methods. The derived expression takes less computational time for SI, which reflects positively on the system performance, which is an essential issue in vehicular mobile applications, in particular.

  17. Atmospheric turbulence optical model (ATOM) based on fractal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Scoggins, Jim; Carroll, Marvin P.

    1994-06-01

    An Atmospheric Turbulence Optical Model (ATOM) is presented that used cellular automata (CA) rules as the basis for modeling synthetic phase sheets. This method allows image fracture, scintillation and blur to be correctly models using the principle of convolution with a complex kernel derived from CA rules interaction. The model takes into account the changing distribution of turbules from micro-turbule domination at low altitudes to macro-domination at high altitudes. The wavelength of propagating images (such as a coherent laser beam) and the range are taken into account. The ATOM model is written in standard FORTRAN 77 and enables high-speed in-line calculation of atmospheric effects to be performed without resorting to computationally intensive solutions of Navier Stokes equations or Cn2 profiles.

  18. Inflight data collection for ride quality and atmospheric turbulence research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadlec, P. W.; Buckman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A flight test program to investigate the effects of atmospheric turbulence on passenger ride quality in large, wide-body commercial aircraft was conducted. Data were collected on a series of flight on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Atmospheric and aircraft performance data were obtained from special sensors, as well as conventional instruments and avionics systems normally available. Visual observations of meteorlogical conditions encountered were manually recorded during the flights.

  19. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aerospace Vehicles: Fractional Order Fit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An improved model for simulating atmospheric disturbances is disclosed. A scale Kolmogorov spectral may be scaled to convert the Kolmogorov spectral into a finite energy von Karman spectral and a fractional order pole-zero transfer function (TF) may be derived from the von Karman spectral. Fractional order atmospheric turbulence may be approximated with an integer order pole-zero TF fit, and the approximation may be stored in memory.

  20. Characterising atmospheric optical turbulence using stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Butterley, Tim; Föhring, Dora; Wilson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Stereo-SCIDAR (SCIntillation Detection and Ranging) is a development to the well known SCIDAR method for characterisation of the Earth's atmospheric optical turbulence. Here we present some interesting capabilities, comparisons and results from a recent campaign on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma.

  1. Atmospheric Turbulence Relative to Aviation, Missile, and Space Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Dennis W. (Editor); Frost, Walter (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to bring together various disciplines of the aviation, missile, and space programs involved in predicting, measuring, modeling, and understanding the processes of atmospheric turbulence. Working committees re-examined the current state of knowledge, identified present and future needs, and documented and prioritized integrated and cooperative research programs.

  2. Statistical analysis of low level atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tieleman, H. W.; Chen, W. W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The statistical properties of low-level wind-turbulence data were obtained with the model 1080 total vector anemometer and the model 1296 dual split-film anemometer, both manufactured by Thermo Systems Incorporated. The data obtained from the above fast-response probes were compared with the results obtained from a pair of Gill propeller anemometers. The digitized time series representing the three velocity components and the temperature were each divided into a number of blocks, the length of which depended on the lowest frequency of interest and also on the storage capacity of the available computer. A moving-average and differencing high-pass filter was used to remove the trend and the low frequency components in the time series. The calculated results for each of the anemometers used are represented in graphical or tabulated form.

  3. The theoretical model of atmospheric turbulence spectrum in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shida; Liu, Shikuo; Xin, Guojun; Liang, Fuming

    1994-12-01

    It is shown that the slope of energy spectrum obtained from the velocity solution of Kdv—Burgers equation lies between —5/3 and—2 in the dilogarithmic coordinates paper. The spectrum is very close to one of Kolmogorov's isotropic turbulence and Frisch's intermittent turbulence in inertial region. In this paper, the Kdv-Burgers equation to describe atmospheric boundary layer turbulence is obtained. In the equation, the 1 / R e corresponds to dissipative coefficient v, R /2 t to dispersive coefficient β, then ( v/2 β)2 corresponds to 1 / R 2 e • Ri. We prove that the wave number corresponding to maximum energy spectrum S(k) decreases with the decrease of stability (i.e., the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 in eddy—containing region. And the spectrim amplitude decreases with the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 (i.e., the decrease of stability). These results are consistent with actual turbulence spectrum of atmospheric surface layer from turbulence data.

  4. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  5. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  6. Programmable simulator for beam propagation in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Rickenstorff, Carolina; Rodrigo, José A; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-05-01

    The study of light propagation though the atmosphere is crucial in different areas such as astronomy, free-space communications, remote sensing, etc. Since outdoors experiments are expensive and difficult to reproduce it is important to develop realistic numerical and experimental simulations. It has been demonstrated that spatial light modulators (SLMs) are well-suited for simulating different turbulent conditions in the laboratory. Here, we present a programmable experimental setup based on liquid crystal SLMs for simulation and analysis of the beam propagation through weak turbulent atmosphere. The simulator allows changing the propagation distances and atmospheric conditions without the need of moving optical elements. Its performance is tested for Gaussian and vortex beams. PMID:27137610

  7. Atmospheric turbulence and sensor system effects on biometric algorithm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Leonard, Kevin R.; Byrd, Kenneth A.; Potvin, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Biometric technologies composed of electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensor systems and advanced matching algorithms are being used in various force protection/security and tactical surveillance applications. To date, most of these sensor systems have been widely used in controlled conditions with varying success (e.g., short range, uniform illumination, cooperative subjects). However the limiting conditions of such systems have yet to be fully studied for long range applications and degraded imaging environments. Biometric technologies used for long range applications will invariably suffer from the effects of atmospheric turbulence degradation. Atmospheric turbulence causes blur, distortion and intensity fluctuations that can severely degrade image quality of electro-optic and thermal imaging systems and, for the case of biometrics technology, translate to poor matching algorithm performance. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of atmospheric turbulence and sensor resolution on biometric matching algorithm performance. We use a subset of the Facial Recognition Technology (FERET) database and a commercial algorithm to analyze facial recognition performance on turbulence degraded facial images. The goal of this work is to understand the feasibility of long-range facial recognition in degraded imaging conditions, and the utility of camera parameter trade studies to enable the design of the next generation biometrics sensor systems.

  8. A computer-based simulator of the atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyaev, Petr A.

    2015-11-01

    Computer software for modeling the atmospheric turbulence is developed on the basis of a time-varying random medium simulation algorithm and a split-step Fourier transform method for solving a wave propagation equation. A judicious choice of the simulator parameters, like the velocity of the evolution and motion of the medium, turbulence spectrum and scales, enables different effects of a random medium on the optical wavefront to be simulated. The implementation of the simulation software is shown to be simple and efficient due to parallel programming functions from the MKL Intel ® Parallel Studio libraries.

  9. Scattering of coherent sound waves by atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.; Liu, C. H.; Maestrello, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study of the propagation of coherent sound waves through an atmosphere containing both mean and fluctuating flow variables is presented. The general flow problem is formulated as a time-dependent wave propagation in a half-space containing the turbulent medium. The coherent acoustic waves are analyzed by a smoothing technique, assuming that mean flow variables vary with the height only. The general equations for the coherent waves are derived, and then applied to two special cases, corresponding to uniform and shear mean flow, respectively. The results show that mean shear and turbulence introduce pronounced effects on the propagation of coherent acoustic disturbances.

  10. Restoring atmospheric-turbulence-degraded images.

    PubMed

    Furhad, Md Hasan; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Image data experiences geometric distortions and spatial-temporal varying blur due to the strong effects of random spatial and temporal variations in the optical refractive index of the communication path. Simultaneously removing these effects from an image is a challenging task. An efficient approach is proposed in this paper to address this problem. The approach consists of four steps. First, a frame selection strategy is employed by proposing an unsupervised k-means clustering technique. Second, a B-spline-based nonrigid image registration is carried out to suppress geometric distortions. Third, a spatiotemporal kernel regression is proposed by introducing the local sharp patch concept to fuse the registered frame sequences into an image. Finally, a blind deconvolution technique is employed to deblur the fused image. Experiments are carried out with synthetic and real-world turbulence-degraded data by implementing the proposed method and two recently reported methods. The proposed method demonstrates significant improvement over the two reported methods in terms of alleviating blur and distortions, as well as improving visual quality. PMID:27409194

  11. Scattering from a rough surface in presence of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Santasri; Hyde, Milo W.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    A Gaussian Schell Model (GSM) might be a convenient way to model extended beacons created on diffuse targets. Earlier, we used a full wave computational technique called the Method of Moments (MoM) to evaluate the scattered field from a rough impedance surface in vacuum. The MoM model showed several deviations from GSM. The present work uses a simulation approach based on physical optics approximation to study the scattering behavior in presence of atmospheric turbulence. A fully coherent beam is propagated through weak turbulence and is incident on the rough surface. The light scattered from the rough surface is again propagated through turbulence back to the source plane and the properties of the scattered radiation are studied through numerical simulations. The simulation results are compared with a GSM.

  12. Higher order correlation beams in atmosphere under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, H; Monken, C H

    2016-02-01

    Higher order correlation beams, that is, two-photon beams obtained from the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by Hermite-Gauss or Laguerre-Gauss beams of any order, can be used to encode information in many modes, opening the possibility of quantum communication with large alphabets. In this paper we calculate, analytically, the fourth-order correlation function for the Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss coherent and partially coherent correlation beams propagating through a strong turbulent medium. We show that fourth-order correlation functions for correlation beams have, under certain conditions, expressions similar to those of intensities of classical beams and are degraded by turbulence in a similar way as the classical beams. Our results can be useful in establishing limits for the use of two-photon beams in quantum communications with larger alphabets under atmospheric turbulence. PMID:26906808

  13. Atmospheric waves and the nature of buoyancy turbulence in the context of the waves VS 2D-turbulence debate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewan, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of how to empirically distinguish between velocity fluctuations due to turbulence and those due to atmospheric waves is addressed. The physical differences between waves and turbulence are reviewed. New theoretical ideas on the subject of bouyancy range turbulence are presented. A unique scale K sub B is given that allows one to differentiate between waves and turbulence for the special case of theta = 0 (i.e., horizontal propagating waves).

  14. Modeling atmospheric turbulence effects on ground-based telescope systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flatte, S.M.; Bradford, L.W.; Max, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    Bester et al. report measurements of atmospheric fluctuations made with the Infrared Spatial Interferometer, which indicated behavior not in accord with the standard Kolmogorov model with only a single constant wind velocity. The numerical simulations use relatively complex models of the atmosphere to investigate both Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov models. The authors find that the measurements of Bester et al. for light passing through the upper atmosphere are within the limits of behavior for Kolmogorov models, but often only if the outer scale of turbulent fluctuations is between 15 to 100 meters. The possibility that the measured behavior might be non-Kolmogorov is not excluded. They also examine measurements made along short paths in the surface boundary layer, where some measurements of Bester et al. showed variations in the atmospheric fluctuations with seeing conditions which appeared to be non-Kolmogorov. These variations can perhaps be explained by standard models, but require that seeing improve with increasing wind speed in the surface layer. They discuss some other measurements which lend some support to that idea. However, they cannot exclude non-Kolmogorov behavior. They find that meteorological data is needed concurrent with astronomical observations, to help constrain the models. The size of the outer scale, the wind velocity profile and the turbulence spectrum are important to the ultimate capabilities of interferometers and other systems with adaptive optics.

  15. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, A.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Puczylowski, J.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales.

  16. Turbulence effects on concentration statistics in the atmospheric surface layer

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, C.; Bowers, J.; Yee, E.; Klewicki, J.; Metzger, M.

    1996-12-31

    The dispersion of windborne material released near the earth`s surface is strongly influenced by this impenetrable boundary, which inhibits downward mixing and creates sharp vertical gradients in wind, temperature, turbulence. These strong gradients and the continuous creation of turbulence at the surface cause a rapid evolution of the vertical concentration structure for material released into the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). Recent developments in fast-response instrumentation and an increased realization of potential hazards from the release of common industrial chemicals into the ASL have led to a series of tripartite (US, UK, Canada) field experiments at the US Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. This paper contains a preliminary analysis of the data from the most recent follow-on experiments, which included measurements of the vertical profiles of mean and peak concentrations.

  17. Development and application of a non-Gaussian atmospheric turbulence model for use in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, P. M.; Campbell, G. S.; Ganzer, V. M.; Joppa, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for generating time histories which model the frequency content and certain non-Gaussian probability characteristics of atmospheric turbulence including the large gusts and patchy nature of turbulence. Methods for time histories using either analog or digital computation are described. A STOL airplane was programmed into a 6-degree-of-freedom flight simulator, and turbulence time histories from several atmospheric turbulence models were introduced. The pilots' reactions are described.

  18. Turbulence in a convective marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Atlas, D.; Yeh, E.-N.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and kinetic energy budget of turbulence in the convective marine atmospheric boundary layer as observed by aircraft during a cold air outbreak have been studied using mixed layer scaling. The results are significantly different from those of previous studies under conditions closer to free convection. The normalized turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport are about twice those found during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX). This implies that for a given surface heating the present case is dynamically more active. The difference is mainly due to the greater importance of wind shear in the present case. This case is closer to the roll vortex regime, whereas AMTEX observed mesoscale cellular convection which is closer to free convection. Shear generation is found to provide a significant energy source, in addition to buoyancy production, to maintain a larger normalized turbulent kinetic energy and to balance a larger normalized dissipation. The interaction between turbulent pressure and divergence (i.e., pressure scrambling) is also found to transfer energy from the vertical to the horizontal components, and is expected to be stronger in roll vortices than in m esoscale cells. The sensible heat flux is found to fit well with a linear vertical profile in a clear or subcloud planetary boundary layer (PBL), in good agreement with the results of Lenschow et al., (1980). The heat flux ratio between the PBL top and the surface, derived from the linear fitted curve, is approximately -0.14, in good agreement with that derived from the lidar data for the same case. Near the PBL top, the heat flux profiles are consistent with those of Deardoff (1979) and Deardorff et al. (1980).

  19. Stratified turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindborg, E.

    2006-12-01

    A number of theoretical, observational and numerical studies have been performed by the author in order to understand the mesoscale (wave lengths of 1 - 500 km) wave number energy spectra in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In an observational study some years ago (Cho &Lindborg 2001) it was shown that there is downscale energy cascade in this range of scales, contrary to what has been commonly beleived. In two recent studies (Lindborg 2005; 2006 a) a set of numerical highly resolved box-simulations were carried out of strongly stratified flows. It was demonstrated that the forward energy cascade is a general property of the Boussinesq equations in the limit of strong stratification, provided that the Rossby number is of order unity or larger. These simulations indicated that the mesoscale spectra may be produced by a special type of motion which we call stratified turbulence. The characterisic features of stratified turbulence are extremely elongated flow structures controlled by strong stratification and strongly nonlinear interactions and these flow structures undergo a forward energy cascade. A recent data analysis (Lindborg 2006 b) of velocity structure functions measured in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in a previous study (Lindborg 1999), shows that the vortical and wave components of stratified turbulence are of the same order of magnitude with the vortical component generally a little bit larger. This is in accordance with the results from the numerical simulations. In this contribution the recent developments of the concept of stratified turbulence are presented. Moreover, it is also suggested that stratified turbulence may be generally present in the interiour of the ocean, at scales whose dynamics are traditionally though to be dominated by internal gravity waves. A number of oceanic field studies reported in the litterature are referenced to support this suggestion. References: Lindborg 1999 Can the atmospheric energy

  20. Theoretical comparison of subgrid turbulence in the atmosphere and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsios, V.; Frederiksen, J. S.; Zidikheri, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the massive disparity between the largest and smallest eddies in the atmosphere and ocean, it is not possible to simulate these flows by explicitly resolving all scales on a computational grid. Instead the large scales are explicitly resolved, and the interactions between the unresolved subgrid turbulence and large resolved scales are parameterised. If these interactions are not properly represented then an increase in resolution will not necessarily improve the accuracy of the large scales. This has been a significant and long standing problem since the earliest climate simulations. Historically subgrid models for the atmosphere and ocean have been developed in isolation, with the structure of each motivated by different physical phenomena. Here we solve the turbulence closure problem by determining the parameterisation coefficients (eddy viscosities) from the subgrid statistics of high resolution quasi-geostrophic atmospheric and oceanic simulations. These subgrid coefficients are characterised into a set of simple unifying scaling laws, for truncations made within the enstrophy cascading inertial range. The ocean additionally has an inverse energy cascading range, within which the subgrid model coefficients have alternative scaling properties. Simulations adopting these scaling laws are shown to reproduce the statistics of the reference benchmark simulations across resolved scales, with orders of magnitude improvement in computational efficiency. This reduction in both resolution dependence and computational effort will improve the efficiency and accuracy of geophysical research and operational activities that require data generated by general circulation models, including: weather, seasonal and climate prediction; transport studies; and understanding natural variability and extreme events.

  1. Atmospheric turbulence mitigation using complex wavelet-based fusion.

    PubMed

    Anantrasirichai, Nantheera; Achim, Alin; Kingsbury, Nick G; Bull, David R

    2013-06-01

    Restoring a scene distorted by atmospheric turbulence is a challenging problem in video surveillance. The effect, caused by random, spatially varying, perturbations, makes a model-based solution difficult and in most cases, impractical. In this paper, we propose a novel method for mitigating the effects of atmospheric distortion on observed images, particularly airborne turbulence which can severely degrade a region of interest (ROI). In order to extract accurate detail about objects behind the distorting layer, a simple and efficient frame selection method is proposed to select informative ROIs only from good-quality frames. The ROIs in each frame are then registered to further reduce offsets and distortions. We solve the space-varying distortion problem using region-level fusion based on the dual tree complex wavelet transform. Finally, contrast enhancement is applied. We further propose a learning-based metric specifically for image quality assessment in the presence of atmospheric distortion. This is capable of estimating quality in both full- and no-reference scenarios. The proposed method is shown to significantly outperform existing methods, providing enhanced situational awareness in a range of surveillance scenarios. PMID:23475359

  2. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  3. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  4. Correlation of atmospheric optical turbulence and meteorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaucher, Gail M. Tirrell

    1989-06-01

    The correlation of meteorological events such as the jet stream, gravity waves and boundary layer circulation with the optical turbulence parameters, the transverse coherence length r sub o and the isoplanatic angle is essential for interpreting and forecasting imaging and laser systems performance. In support of the United States Air Force Relay Mirror Experiment, the Naval Postgraduate School performed a series of six site characterization measurements near Kihei, Maui, during August 1987 to July 1988. Spatial and temporal summaries of atmospheric events corresponding to the optical remote sensor data are presented using meteorological data from the National Weather Service Radiosonde Observation stations, synoptic charts, GOES-WEST infrared satellite images, and four Kihei, Maui rawinsonde datasets. To quantify the correlation between optical turbulence measurements and meteorological phenomena, four methods of calculating C square (T) from rawinsonde data were investigated. Results show that existing rawinsonde systems are inadequate for direct C square (T) calculation. However, moderate improvements in the vertical resolution, the temperature resolution and probe response time, will allow direct calculations of optical turbulence parameters from rawinsonde data.

  5. Compensating image degradation due to atmospheric turbulence in anisoplanatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Claudia S.

    2009-05-01

    In imaging applications the prevalent effects of atmospheric turbulence comprise image dancing and image blurring. Suggestions from the field of image processing to compensate for these turbulence effects and restore degraded imagery include Motion-Compensated Averaging (MCA) for image sequences. In isoplanatic conditions, such an averaged image can be considered as a non-distorted image that has been blurred by an unknown Point Spread Function (PSF) of the same size as the pixel motions due to the turbulence and a blind deconvolution algorithm can be employed for the final image restoration. However, when imaging over a long horizontal path close to the ground, conditions are likely to be anisoplanatic and image dancing will effect local image displacements between consecutive frames rather than global shifts only. Therefore, in this paper, a locally operating variant of the MCA-procedure is proposed, utilizing Block Matching (BM) in order to identify and re-arrange uniformly displaced image parts. For the final restoration a multistage blind deconvolution algorithm is used and the corresponding deconvolution results are presented and evaluated.

  6. Two-color correlation between intensity fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meilan; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between intensity fluctuations generated by two varying wavelengths through a turbulent medium is investigated, where the influences arising from source correlation and perturbation of atmosphere are mainly emphasized. It is demonstrated that the correlation between intensity fluctuations can be enhanced or reduced by modulating the difference of two incident wavelengths. For shorter wavelength, the correlation between intensity fluctuations is stronger at the far field. In addition, in the case of single wavelength, a relationship λ1z1 =λ2z2 =λnzn holding in free space could be found, from which the distance where the peak value occurs may be inferred. However, it can be destroyed by increasing the strength of atmosphere.

  7. Is 2-D turbulence relevant in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; Schertzer, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Starting with (Taylor, 1935), the paradigm of isotropic (and scaling!) turbulence was developed initially for laboratory applications, but following (Kolmogorov, 1941), three dimensional isotropic turbulence was progressively applied to the atmosphere. Since the atmosphere is strongly stratified, a single wide scale range model which is both isotropic and scaling is not possible so that theorists had to immediately choose between the two symmetries: isotropy or scale invariance. Following the development of models of two dimensional isotropic turbulence ((Fjortoft, 1953), but especially (Kraichnan, 1967) and (Charney, 1971)), the mainstream choice was to first make the convenient assumption of isotropy and to drop wide range scale invariance. Starting at the end of the 1970's this "isotropy primary" (IP) paradigm has lead to a series of increasingly complex isotropic 2D/isotropic 3D models of atmospheric dynamics which continue to dominate the theoretical landscape. Justifications for IP approaches have focused almost exclusively on the horizontal statistics of the horizontal wind in both numerical models and analyses and from aircraft campaigns, especially the highly cited GASP (Nastrom and Gage, 1983), (Gage and Nastrom, 1986; Nastrom and Gage, 1985) and MOZAIC (Cho and Lindborg, 2001) experiments. Since understanding the anisotropy clearly requires comparisons between horizontal and vertical statistics/structures this focus has been unfortunate. Over the same thirty year period that 2D/3D isotropic models were being elaborated, evidence slowly accumulated in favour of the opposite theoretical choice: to drop the isotropy assumption but to retain wide range scaling. The models in the alternative paradigm are scaling but strongly anisotropic with vertical sections of structures becoming increasingly stratified at larger and larger scales albeit in a power law manner; we collectively refer to these as "SP" for "scaling primary" approaches. Early authors explicitly

  8. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  9. Is 2-D turbulence relevant in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; Schertzer, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Starting with (Taylor, 1935), the paradigm of isotropic (and scaling!) turbulence was developed initially for laboratory applications, but following (Kolmogorov, 1941), three dimensional isotropic turbulence was progressively applied to the atmosphere. Since the atmosphere is strongly stratified, a single wide scale range model which is both isotropic and scaling is not possible so that theorists had to immediately choose between the two symmetries: isotropy or scale invariance. Following the development of models of two dimensional isotropic turbulence ((Fjortoft, 1953), but especially (Kraichnan, 1967) and (Charney, 1971)), the mainstream choice was to first make the convenient assumption of isotropy and to drop wide range scale invariance. Starting at the end of the 1970's this "isotropy primary" (IP) paradigm has lead to a series of increasingly complex isotropic 2D/isotropic 3D models of atmospheric dynamics which continue to dominate the theoretical landscape. Justifications for IP approaches have focused almost exclusively on the horizontal statistics of the horizontal wind in both numerical models and analyses and from aircraft campaigns, especially the highly cited GASP (Nastrom and Gage, 1983), (Gage and Nastrom, 1986; Nastrom and Gage, 1985) and MOZAIC (Cho and Lindborg, 2001) experiments. Since understanding the anisotropy clearly requires comparisons between horizontal and vertical statistics/structures this focus has been unfortunate. Over the same thirty year period that 2D/3D isotropic models were being elaborated, evidence slowly accumulated in favour of the opposite theoretical choice: to drop the isotropy assumption but to retain wide range scaling. The models in the alternative paradigm are scaling but strongly anisotropic with vertical sections of structures becoming increasingly stratified at larger and larger scales albeit in a power law manner; we collectively refer to these as "SP" for "scaling primary" approaches. Early authors explicitly

  10. Turbulent atmospheric flow over a backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.; Frost, W.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of atmospheric shear layer separation over a man-made structure such as a building (modeled as a backward-facing step) has been analyzed theoretically by (1) solving the two-dimensional equations of motion in the two variables, stream function and vorticity, and by (2) employing an approximate integral technique. Boundary conditions for the undisturbed flow are that of the turbulent atmospheric shear flow over a rough terrain. In the first approach a two-equation model of turbulence was used. In the second approach an approximate technique was utilized in an attempt to describe the details of the flow in the recirculation zone behind the step. The results predict velocity profiles in sufficient detail that the presence of the corner eddy in the region of negative surface pressure gradient is evident. The magnitude of the reversed flow velocity in the recirculation eddy has been found to agree with that found from experiments. Also, a surface eddy viscosity distribution has been an outgrowth of the method which realistically follows the magnitude of the surface pressure gradient distribution as found experimentally.

  11. Turbulent flux events in a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Roddam; Kumar, S Rudra; Prabhu, A; Kailas, S V

    2007-03-15

    We propose here a novel method of analysing turbulent momentum flux signals. The data for the analysis come from a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer and are taken at a height of 4m above ground corresponding to 1.1 x 10(5) wall units, within the log layer for the mean velocity. The method of analysis involves examining the instantaneous flux profiles that exceed a given threshold, for which an optimum value is found to be 1 s.d. of the flux signal. It is found feasible to identify normalized flux variation signatures separately for positive and negative 'flux events'-the sign being determined by that of the flux itself. Using these signatures, the flux signal is transformed to one of events characterized by the time of occurrence, duration and intensity. It is also found that both the average duration and the average time-interval between successive events are of order 1s, about four orders of magnitude higher than a wall unit in time. This episodic description of the turbulence flux in the time domain enables us to identify separately productive, counter-productive and idle periods (accounting, respectively, for 36, 15 and 49% of the time), taking as criterion the generation of the momentum flux. A 'burstiness' index of 0.72 is found for the data. Comparison with laboratory data indicates higher (/lower) ejection (/sweep) quadrant occupancy but lower (/higher) contributions to flux from the ejection (/sweep) quadrant at the high Reynolds numbers of the atmospheric boundary layer. Possible connections with the concept of active and passive motion in a turbulent boundary layer are briefly discussed. PMID:17244581

  12. Noise produced by turbulent flow into a rotor: Users manual for atmospheric turbulence prediction and mean flow and turbulence contraction prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Caplin, B.

    1989-01-01

    A users manual for a computer program for predicting atmospheric turbulence and mean flow and turbulence contraction as part of a noise prediction scheme for nonisotropic turbulence ingestion noise in helicopters is described. Included are descriptions of the various program modules and subroutines, their function, programming structure, and the required input and output variables. This routine is incorporated as one module of NASA's ROTONET helicopter noise prediction program.

  13. Analytical investigation of fan tone noise due to ingested atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganz, U. W.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence involved in the fan noise generation is evaluated with an existing model for the atmospheric turbulence and an extended version of an existing model concerned with the effects of a flow contraction on convected turbulence. Fan tone noise due to ingested atmospheric turbulence is evaluated with existing fan noise models. The results indicate that the difference in fan narrowband noise due to atmospheric turbulence between static and flight landing approach conditions is in the order of 30 dB. It is concluded that fan noise due to atmospheric turbulence is insignificant in flight conditions for the fans used in the current high bypass ratio engines. The difference in fan narrowband noise between the two conditions is primarily due to the low intensity of the turbulence involved in fan noise generation in flight conditions. Fan noise due to atmospheric turbulence in static conditions should be reduced below the flight fan broadband noise levels which is best achieved with a reduction in the intensity of the fan inflow turbulence. Such a reduction can be obtained with the use of an inflow control device, low wind velocities, small surface roughness in the test stand environment, and large engine axis height above the ground. Peak sound power levels for fan tone noise due to ingested turbulence occur for transverse integral scales in the order of 25% of the rotor blade spacing in the fan tip region.

  14. Investigation of elliptical vortex beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taozheng

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, due to the high stability and privacy of vortex beam, the optical vortex became the hot spot in research of atmospheric optical transmission .We numerically investigate the propagation of vector elliptical vortex beams in turbulent atmosphere. Numerical simulations are realized with random phase screen. To simulate the vortex beam transport processes in the atmospheric turbulence. Using numerical simulation method to study in the atmospheric turbulence vortex beam transmission characteristics (light intensity, phase, polarization, etc.) Our simulation results show that, vortex beam in the atmospheric transmission distortion is small, make elliptic vortex beam for space communications is a promising strategy.

  15. Spanwise measurements of vertical components of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, Robert K.

    1990-01-01

    Correlation and spectrum magnitude estimates are computed for vertical gust velocity measurements at the nose and wing tips of a NASA B-57B aircraft for six level flight, low speed and low altitude runs and are compared with those of the von Karman atmospheric turbulence model extended for spanwise relationships. The distance between the wing tips was 62.6 ft. Airspeeds ranged from about 330 to 400 ft/sec, heights above the ground ranged from near ground level to about 5250 ft. and gust velocity standard deviations ranged from 4.10 to 8.86 ft/sec. Integral scale lengths, determined by matching measured autocorrelation estimates with those of the model, ranged from 410 to 2050 ft. Digital signals derived from piezoelectric sensors provided continuous pressure and airspeed measurements. Some directional acceleration sensitivity of the sensors was eliminated by sensor orientation, and their performance was spectrally verified for the higher frequencies with supplemental onboard piezoresistive sensors. The model appeared to satisfactorily predict the trends of the measured cross-correlations and cross-spectrum magnitudes, particularly between the nose and wing tips. However, the measured magnitude estimates of the cross-spectra between the wing tips exceeded the predicted levels at the higher frequencies. Causes for the additional power across the wing tips were investigated. Vertical gust velocity components evaluated along and lateral to the flight path implied that the frozen-turbulence-field assumption is a suitable approximation.

  16. Coherent light backscattering by refractive turbulence in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopilevich, Yurij I.

    1994-12-01

    A sharp peak is shown theoretically to exist in angular distribution of light scattered by a layer of ran- dom medium with weak refractive index fluctuations in the vicinity of backward direction. The peak width may be estimated by the ratio of incident radiation wavelength and the turbulence correlation scale. The effect is found to be formed by coherent addition of contributions from elementary layers, and may be considered as an analogue to 'weak photon localisation' phenomena in random media. When the width of scattering layer is large enough compared with the correlation scale of refractive index inhomogeneities, the differential scattering cross-section is composed by the 'coherent' component and 'incoherent' one, obtained earlier by V. I. Tatarski. In the case of visible or IR radiation (in contrast to microwaves) the 'coherent' constituent determines the scattering for large angles close to 180 deg. Quantitative estimates show the backscattering by turbulent layers in atmosphere to produce noticeable contributions to signal registered in remote sensing monostatic lidar experiments, and thus the effect under consideration has to be taken into account when interpretation of laser remote sounding data is carried out.

  17. Investigation of the influence of atmospheric stability and turbulence on land-atmosphere exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osibanjo, O.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes are exchanged between the surface of the earth and the atmosphere and impact weather, climate, and air quality. The radiation from the sun triggers the surface-atmosphere interaction during the day as heat is transmitted to the surface and the surface heats the air directly above generating wind (i.e., thermal turbulence) that transports heat, moisture, and momentum in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This process is impacted by greenhouse gasses (i.e., water vapor, carbon dioxide and other trace gases) that absorb heat emitted by the earth's surface. The concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gasses are increasing leading to changes in ABL dynamics as a result of the changing surface energy balance. The ABL processes are important to characterize because they are difficult to parameterize in global and regional scale atmospheric models. Empirical data can be collected using eddy covariance micrometeorological methods to measure turbulent fluxes (e.g., sensible heat, moisture, and CO2) and quantify the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. The objective of this work is to calculate surface fluxes using observational data collected during one week in September 2014 from a monitoring site in Echo, Oregon. The site is located in the Columbia Basin with rolling terrain, irrigated farmland, and over 100 wind turbines. The 10m tower was placed in a small valley depression to isolate nighttime cold air pools. This work will present observations of momentum, sensible heat, moisture, and carbon dioxide fluxes from data collected at a sampling frequency of 10Hz at four heights. Atmospheric stability is determined using Monin-Obukov length and flux Richardson number, and the impact of stability on surface-atmosphere exchange is investigated. This work will provide a better understanding of surface fluxes and mixing, particularly during stable ABL periods, and the results can be used to compare with numerical models.

  18. Random bits, true and unbiased, from atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Davide G; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Random numbers represent a fundamental ingredient for secure communications and numerical simulation as well as to games and in general to Information Science. Physical processes with intrinsic unpredictability may be exploited to generate genuine random numbers. The optical propagation in strong atmospheric turbulence is here taken to this purpose, by observing a laser beam after a 143 km free-space path. In addition, we developed an algorithm to extract the randomness of the beam images at the receiver without post-processing. The numbers passed very selective randomness tests for qualification as genuine random numbers. The extracting algorithm can be easily generalized to random images generated by different physical processes. PMID:24976499

  19. Daily Variation Analysis of Atmospheric Turbulence from Inland to Open Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S. Y.; Li, X. B.; Li, Y. J.; Zhu, W. Y.; Kang, D. Y.; Fan, C. Y.; Weng, N. Q.

    2016-02-01

    Random fluctuation of turbulence brings random fluctuation of refractive index, which makes atmosphere become a random fluctuation medium and destroys the coherence of light wave especially laser transferring in it. Exploration of atmospheric turbulence is essentially investigation of atmospheric refractive index. The atmospheric structure constant of refractive index is a basic parameter of expressing atmospheric turbulence, and was measured using HTP-2 micro-thermal meter at different areas from inland to open sea. It is analysed that the relation of atmospheric structure constant of refractive index with corresponding temperature and wind speed. The conclusion of turbulence and main influencing factors is to deepen the research in atmospheric optical transmission, and to provide data support for the siting of ship board photoelectric systems.

  20. Characteristics of turbulence driven atmospheric blur over coastal water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Schwering, Piet B. W.; Benoist, Koen W.; Gunter, Willem H.; Vrahimis, George; October, Faith J.

    2014-10-01

    For users of Electro-Optical (EO) sensors at sea, knowledge on their resolution is of key operational importance for the prediction of the obtainable classification ranges. Small targets may be located at ranges of 20 km and more and the present day sensor pixel size may be as small as 10 μrad. In this type of scenarios, sensor resolution will be limited by blur, generated by atmospheric turbulence, easily being greater than 30 μrad (at 20 km range). Predictions of the blur size are generally based upon the theory, developed by Fried [1]. In this theory, the turbulence strength is characterized by the structure parameter for the refractive index Cn 2, of which data are assumed to be available from secondary instruments. The theory predicts the atmospheric Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), which can be incorporated into the total system MTF, used in range performance predictions, as described by Holst [2]. Validation of blur predictions by measurements is a complex effort due to the rapid variations of the blur with time and the problems associated with the simultaneous acquisition of proper Cn 2 data. During the FATMOSE trial, carried out over a range of 15.7 km in the False Bay near Simon's Town (South Africa) from November 2009 to October 2010, these data were collected in a large variety of atmospheric conditions [3]. In stead of the atmospheric MTF, the horizontal and vertical line spread function (LSF) was measured with a camera with 5 μrad resolution. Various methods for the determination of the LSF and the associated problems are discussed in the paper. The width of the LSF is via its Fourier transform directly related to the MTF. Cn 2 data were collected with a standard BLS scintillometer over a nearby range. Additional Cn 2 data were obtained via conversion of the scintillation data from the same camera and from a high speed transmissometer, collecting data over the same range. Comparisons between blur and Beam Wander predictions and measurements from

  1. On the spectral theory of turbulence and atmospheric dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Shoaib

    A new theoretical model has been developed to predict the transport of atmospheric pollutants as they disperse in the environment. The proposed model is the first successful effort to theoretically predict the dispersion coefficient under all six Pasquill stability classes. This new approach is based on the spectral theory of turbulence and Higbie's penetration theory. It is assumed that the fundamental mechanism of mass transfer under the influence of turbulence is similar to the process of molecular diffusion: i.e., the turbulent dispersion coefficient is dependent on the molecular properties. It is also assumed that the rate of diffusion is related to the rate of energy dissipation in the flow field. During this investigation it was realized that there are at least two independent time scales that require consideration in turbulent diffusion modeling. The smaller of the two, the dissipative time scale, is related to the rate of energy dissipation and hence the state of turbulence. On the other hand, a much larger dispersive time scale determined by the size of the largest eddy also plays a critical role in the phenomenon of dispersion. The Penetration Theory is used to obtain an expression for the mass transfer coefficient that is used in conjunction with a dispersive time scale to obtain a final expression for the dispersion coefficient. The dispersive time scale used in this development is based on Gifford's time-dependent velocity autocorrelation function. Therefore, the final expression for the dispersion coefficient contains the two time scales and the molecular diffusivity. In support of Gifford's conclusion, this research has also found that the dispersive time scale is of the same order of magnitude as the Coriolis parameter. The dissipative time scale is the only parameter in the model that requires adjustment to account for the change in atmospheric stability. The new model demonstrates the variability in the diffusion characteristics of various gases

  2. The study of turbulence and optical instability in stably stratified Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovadlo, P. G.; Shihovtsev, A. Y.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that atmospheric turbulence is not suppressed completely in strongly stably stratified conditions when Richardson's number exceeds its critical value. It is worth to note that airflow is laminar according classical ideas of the turbulence theory when Richardson's number values are supercritical. It is shown that in the stably stratified atmospheric surface layer under conditions of large vertical temperature gradients and low wind speeds, atmospheric turbulence is often characterized by intermittent structure and in some parts of space intensity of fluctuations can reach high values. The results of experimental investigations of optical instability conducted out along the horizontal path in the stably stratified atmospheric surface layer are discussed.

  3. BER of Gaussian beam propagation in non-Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere on slant path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-ke; Chen, Yuan; Hou, Jie; Chen, Hui

    2013-08-01

    The propagation characteristic of a Gaussian beam through turbulent atmosphere have been studied in the past several years. The main advantage of Gaussian beam wave model is that the infinite plant wave and a spherical wave are being included. Non-Kolmogorov spectrum can describe generalized turbulent atmosphere environment. The propagation properties of Gaussian beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere described by non-Kolmogorov spectrum are studied on slant path. The scintillation index is analyzed with the Gaussian beam of different turbulent strength, zenith angle, φ , and the spectral exponent, α, of non-Kolmogorov, respectively. The effect of the turbulent structure constant on the ground on sicntillation is notable. The scintillation index reduces remarkably with zenith angle and structure parameter decrease. At weak turbulenc, scintillation index increases as spectral exponent decreases. The bit error rate (BER) of a Gaussian beam propagating in non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence channel is estimated on Earth-space slant path. By comparing the effect of the spectral power with the structure constant on BER at moderate and strong turbulence, the effect of the spectral power change on BER is small. With turbulence weakening , at the order of 10-15m-2/3 , the relative effect of the spectral power on BER is gradually increase. Hence, at the small structure constant on the ground, or weak turbulence, the effect of the turbulent spectral power on BER is required to take into account.

  4. Atmospheric Lagrangian coherent structures considering unresolved turbulence and forecast uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Ross, Shane D.

    2015-05-01

    To obtain more realistic approximations of atmospheric Lagrangian coherent structures, the material surfaces which form a template for the Lagrangian transport, two concepts are considered. First, the effect of unresolved turbulent motion due to finite spatiotemporal resolution of velocity field data is studied and the resulting qualitative changes on the FTLE field and LCSs are observed. Stochastic simulations show that these changes depend on the probabilistic distribution of position of released virtual particles after backward or forward time integration. We find that even with diffusion included, the LCSs play a role in structuring and bifurcating the probability distribution. Second, the uncertainty of the forecast FTLE fields is analyzed using ensemble forecasting. Unavoidable errors of the forecast velocity data due to the chaotic dynamics of the atmosphere is the salient reason for errors of the flow maps from which the FTLE fields are determined. The common practice for uncertainty analysis is to apply ensemble forecasting and here this approach is extended to FTLE field calculations. Previous work has shown an association between LCS passage and fluctuations in microbial populations and we find that ensemble FTLE forecasts are sufficient to predict such passages one day ahead of time with an accuracy of about 2 h.

  5. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on optical measurement: a case report and review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linshen; Shang, Yang; Fu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    When videogammetry (optical measurement) was carried outdoor or under cruel indoor circumstance, the results would be inevitably affected by the atmosphere turbulence. As a result, the precision of surveying was destroyed. The field of air turbulence's impact on optical measurement was neglected by scholars for a long time, the achievements massed about laser optics and optical communications. The mostly adapted method was noise filtration when the pixel wandering could not be rejected in engineering application, which got little improvement on usual conditions. The principle of influence under atmospheric turbulence on optical measurement is presented in this paper. And experiments data and applications are carried out to announce the impact of atmospheric turbulence. Combining with relevant researches, some essential issues and expectations of the atmospheric turbulence research are proposed.

  6. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based FSO system with use of realistic link model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Yu, Zhongyuan; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based free-space optical (FSO) communication by using the Pump turbulence spectrum model which accurately characterizes the realistic FSO link. A comprehensive comparison is made between the Pump and Kolmogorov spectrum models with respect to the turbulence impact. The calculated results show that obtained turbulence-induced crosstalk is lower, which means that a higher channel capacity is projected when the realistic Pump spectrum is used instead of the Kolmogorov spectrum. We believe that our results prove that performance of practical OAM-based FSO is better than one predicted by using the original Kolmogorov turbulence model.

  7. Non-Markovian evolution of photonic quantum states in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Filippus S.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the spatial degrees of freedom of a photon propagating through atmospheric turbulence is treated as a non-Markovian process. Here, we derive and solve the evolution equation for this process. The turbulent medium is modeled by a sequence of multiple phase screens for general turbulence conditions. The non-Markovian perspective leads to a second-order differential equation with respect to the propagation distance. The solution for this differential equation is obtained with the aid of a perturbative analysis, assuming the turbulence is relatively weak. We also provide another solution for more general turbulence strengths, but where we introduce a simplification to the differential equation.

  8. The Saharan atmospheric boundary layer: Turbulence, stratification and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Parker, Douglas J.; Marsham, John H.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Mcquaid, James B.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution large-eddy model simulations, combined with aircraft and radiosonde observations from the Fennec observational campaign are used to describe the vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL). The SABL, probably the deepest dry convective boundary layer on Earth, is crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust, heat, water and momentum in the Sahara, with significant implications for the large-scale Saharan heat low and West African monsoon systems. The daytime SABL has a unique structure, with an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, capped by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion and a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations were initialized with radiosonde data and driven by surface heat flux observations from Fennec supersite-1 at Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria. Aircraft observations are used to validate the processes of interest identified in the model, as well as providing unprecedented detail of the turbulent characteristics of the SABL. Regular radiosondes from BBM during June 2011 are used to generate a climatology of the day-time SABL structure, providing further evidence that the processes identified with the LEM are recurrent features of the real SABL. The model is shown to reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and different tracers are used to illustrate the penetration of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above as well as mixing processes internal to the residual layer. Despite the homogeneous surface fluxes and tracer initialization, the large characteristic length-scale of the turbulent eddies leads to large horizontal changes in boundary layer depth (which control the formation of clouds) and significant heterogeneity in tracer

  9. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on detecting performance of all-day star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Wang, Hu; Shen, Yang; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    All-day star sensor makes it possible to observe stars in all-day time in the atmosphere. But the detecting performance is influenced by atmospheric turbulence. According to the characteristic of turbulence in long-exposure model, the modulation transfer function, point spread function and encircled power of the imaging system have been analyzed. Combined with typical star sensor optical system, the signal to noise ratio and the detectable stellar magnitude limit affected by turbulence have been calculated. The result shows the ratio of aperture diameter to atmospheric coherence length is main basis for the evaluation of the impact of turbulence. In condition of medium turbulence in day time, signal to noise ratio of the star sensor with diameter 120mm will drop about 4dB at most in typical work environment, and the detectable stellar limit will drop 1 magnitude.

  10. Atmospheric turbulence power spectral measurements to long wavelengths for several meteorological conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhyne, R. H.; Murrow, H. N.; Sidwell, K.

    1976-01-01

    Use of power spectral design techniques for supersonic transports requires accurate definition of atmospheric turbulence in the long wavelength region below the knee of the power spectral density function curve. Examples are given of data obtained from a current turbulence flight sampling program. These samples are categorized as (1) convective, (2) wind shear, (3) rotor, and (4) mountain-wave turbulence. Time histories, altitudes, root-mean-square values, statistical degrees of freedom, power spectra, and integral scale values are shown and discussed.

  11. Why turbulence dominates the atmosphere and hydrosphere? (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    It is widely recognised that in very stable stratifications, at Richardson numbers (Ri) exceeding the critical value Ric ~ 0.25, turbulence inevitably decays and the flow becomes laminar. This is so, indeed, in the low-Reynolds-number (Re) flows, e.g., in some laboratory experiments; but this is by no means always the case. Air flows in the free atmosphere and water currents in deep ocean are almost always turbulent in spite of the strongly supercritical stratifications, with typical values of Ri varying in the interval 10 < Ri < 102. Until recently, this paradox has remained unexplained. We demonstrate that the key mechanism of the seemingly paradoxical self-preservation of the very-high-Re geophysical turbulence as a loop including (i) conversion of the turbulent kinetic unto potential energy and (ii) self-control of the negative (down-gradient) turbulent heat flux through efficient generation of the positive (counter-gradient) heat transfer by the turbulent potential energy (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013). Thanks to this loop, turbulence is maintained in supercritical stratifications and, moreover, at Ri > Ric the familiar 'strong-mixing turbulence' regime, typical of boundary-layer flows and characterised by the practically invariable turbulent Prandtl number PrT ~ 1 (the so-called 'Reynolds analogy'), gives way to a previously unknown 'wave-like turbulence' regime, wherein PrT sharply increases with increasing Ri (rather than to the laminar regime as is often the case in lab experiments). It is precisely the wave-like turbulence that dominates the free flows in the atmosphere and ocean. Modellers have long been aware that the turbulent heat transfer in the free atmosphere/ocean is much weaker than the momentum transfer. Our theory gives authentic formulation for this heuristic rule and provides physically grounded method for modelling geophysical turbulence up to very stable startifications.

  12. Analysis of atmospheric turbulence in the upper layers of sea fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongping; Zheng, Yunxia

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence plays a vital role in the formation and dissipation of fog. However, studies of such turbulence are typically limited to observations with ultrasonic anemometers less than 100 m above ground. Thus, the turbulence characteristics of upper fog layers are poorly known. In this paper, we present 4-layers of data, measured by ultrasonic anemometers on a wind tower about 400 m above the sea surface; we use these data to characterize atmospheric turbulence atop a heavy sea fog. Large differences in turbulence during the sea fog episode were recorded. Results showed that the kinetic energy, momentum flux, and sensible heat flux of turbulence increased rapidly during the onset of fog. After onset, high turbulence was observed within the uppermost fog layer. As long as this turbulence did not exceed a critical threshold, it was crucial to enhancing the cooling rate, and maintaining the fog. Vertical momentum flux and sensible heat flux generated by this turbulence weakened wind speed and decreased air temperature during the fog. Towards the end of the fog episode, the vertical distribution of sensible heat flux reversed, contributing to a downward momentum flux in all upper layers. Spatial and temporal scales of the turbulence eddy were greater before and after the fog, than during the fog episode. Turbulence energy was greatest in upper levels, around 430 m and 450 m above mean sea level (AMSL), than in lower levels of the fog (390 m and 410 m AMSL); turbulence energy peaked along the mean wind direction. Our results show that the status of turbulence was complicated within the fog; turbulence caused fluxes of momentum and sensible heat atop the fog layer, affecting the underlying fog by decreasing or increasing average wind speed, as well as promoting or demoting air temperature stratification.

  13. Ring dislocation of a coherence of vortex Bessel beams in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2014-11-01

    Researches of coherent properties of the vortex Bessel optical beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere are theoretically developed. The degree of coherence of vortex Bessel optical beams depending on beam parameters (crosssection wave number and a topological charge) and characteristics of turbulent atmosphere is in details analysed. It is shown, that at low levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel optical beam essentially depends on value of a topological charge of a beam. In the central part of a two-dimensional field of degree of coherence the ring dislocations, which number of rings to equally value of a topological charge of a vortex optical beam, is formed. At high levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel beam decreases much faster, than it takes place for the fundamental Bessel beam. And, speed of decrease essentially increases in process of growth of value of a topological charge of a beam.

  14. Formation of a ring dislocation of a coherence of a vortex optical beam in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2013-12-01

    Researches of coherent properties of the vortex Bessel optical beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere are theoretically developed. The degree of coherence of vortex Bessel optical beams depending on beam parameters (crosssection wave number and a topological charge) and characteristics of turbulent atmosphere is in details analysed. It is shown, that at low levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of an vortex Bessel optical beam essentially depends on value of a topological charge of a beam. In the central part of a two-dimensional field of degree of coherence the ring dislocations, which number of rings to equally value of a topological charge of a vortex optical beam, is formed. At high levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel beam decreases much faster, than it takes place for the fundamental Bessel beam. And, speed of decrease essentially increases in process of growth of value of a topological charge of a beam.

  15. Effects of turbulence in the atmosphere of Venus on Pioneer Venus radio, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Kendall, W.; Ishimaru, A.; Berwin, R.

    1973-01-01

    The prediction of the turbulence effects in the Venus atmosphere on Pioneer Venus radio was investigated. A careful investigation based on a theoretical and experimental study of the power spectrum of the Mariner 5 amplitude fluctuations is carried out and the results contribute considerably to our scientific knowledge of turbulence in the atmosphere of Venus. Fully developed turbulence is seen to exist predominantly in the altitude range of 41 - 49 km. This result is consistent with the high wind shear and wind velocities observed by Venera 4 for altitudes higher than 40 km. The outer scale size of turbulence is on the order of 100 m, the structure constant for the dayside atmosphere 3.9 x 10 to the -7 power m to the -1/3rd power, and that for the nightside atmosphere 2.9 x 10 to the -7 power m to the -1/3rd power.

  16. Statistical properties of visible and infrared beams retroreflected through a turbulent atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkine, M.; Bensimon, D.; Englander, A.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical properties of HeNe and CO/sub 2/ laser beams retroreflected through a turbulent atmosphere are investigated experimentally for round paths of 1 km and 12 km. Both heterodyne and direct detection are used.

  17. Study on the characteristics of different infrared transmission in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Jing-yuan; Xu, Zhi-yong; Chang, Shuai; Zhao, Ji-yong; Chen, Yi-wang; Wang, Rong; Wei, Yi-mei

    2015-10-01

    It is known theoretically that the long wavelength infrared has better performance when transmitting in atmospheric turbulence. In order to evaluate the influence of the atmospheric turbulence quantificationally, the characteristics of different infrareds transmission in atmospheric turbulence are simulated and studied. A series of time relevant phase screens of atmospheric turbulence are simulated based on Fourier transform method proposed by McGlamery. Wind speed and direction are introduced in the meantime. Wavefront distortion, image spot dancing and spreading, receive loss of different wavelengths (0.85μm, 3.6μm, 10.6μm) are simulated respectively and compared to each other. The results show that the performances of long wavelength infrared (10.6μm) are the best, mid wavelength infrared (3.6μm) takes the second place and short wavelength infrared (0.85μm) is the worst.

  18. A Study of Atmospheric Turbulence Effects on Dust Emission Using Field Data and One-Dimensional Stochastic Turbulence Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Freire, L.; Chamecki, M.; Kok, J. F.; Martin, R. L.; Samaddar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil dust corresponds to the majority of aerosol particles in the atmosphere, and it plays an important role in radiative transfer and cloud formation, therefore impacting air quality, weather and climate. Dust is primarily emitted by the high-energy impact of larger, less cohesive particles on the soil surface, a process called saltation. Usually, the horizontal saltation flux is modeled as a function of the wind friction velocity, and the dust vertical emission flux is assumed to be a fraction of the saltation flux. In this study, field data collected over sand dunes and a reduced complexity numerical model of turbulence are combined to investigate the interaction between atmospheric turbulence and the process of dust emission. Simultaneous measurements of turbulence from six levels (from 0.5 to 9 meters above ground), dust concentration from four levels (from 0.75 to 6.5 meters) and sand saltation particle counters from nine levels (from 7 to 47 centimeters) are used. A one-dimensional stochastic turbulence model that simulates the time evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer column is used to evaluate different parameterizations of the saltation process as a function of the wind shear on the vertical profiles of dust concentration. The diurnal evolution of dust concentration profiles is then compared with field measurements. The saltation flux data is also used to evaluate the models and to estimate the dust flux directly. Effects of particle size, atmospheric stability and threshold wind speed on dust concentration are also investigated.

  19. Internal gravity wave-atmospheric wind interaction - A cause of clear air turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekofske, K.; Liu, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    The interaction between an internal gravity wave (IGW) and a vertical wind shear is discussed as a possible cause in the production of clear air turbulence in the free atmosphere. It is shown that under certain typical condition the interaction of an IGW with a background wind shear near a critical level provides a mechanism for depositing sufficient momentum in certain regions of the atmosphere to significantly increase the local mean wind shear and to lead to the production of turbulence.

  20. Development and application of an atmospheric turbulence model for use in flight simulators in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Joshi, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of simulated turbulence on aircraft handling qualities was investigated. Pilot opinion of the handling qualities of a light general aviation aircraft were evaluated in a motion-base simulator using a simulated turbulence environment. A realistic representation of turbulence disturbances is described in terms of rms intensity and scale length and their random variations with time. The time histories generated by the proposed turbulence models showed characteristics which appear to be more similar to real turbulence than the frequently-used Gaussian turbulence model. In addition, the proposed turbulence models can flexibly accommodate changes in atmospheric conditions and be easily implemented in flight simulator studies. Six turbulence time histories, including the conventional Gaussian model, were used in an IFR-tracking task. The realism of each of the turbulence models and the handling qualities of the simulated airplane were evaluated. Analysis of pilot opinions shows that at approximately the same rms intensities of turbulence, the handling quality ratings transit from the satisfactory level, for the simple Gaussian model, to an unacceptable level for more realistic and compositely structured turbulence models.

  1. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  2. Theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Two dimensional geostrophic turbulence driven by a random force is investigated. Based on the Liouville equation, which simulates the primitive hydrodynamical equations, a group-kinetic theory of turbulence is developed and the kinetic equation of the scaled singlet distribution is derived. The kinetic equation is transformed into an equation of spectral balance in the equilibrium and non-equilibrium states. Comparison is made between the propagators and the Green's functions in the case of the non-asymptotic quasi-linear equation to prove the equivalence of both kinds of approximations used to describe perturbed trajectories of plasma turbulence. The microdynamical state of fluid turbulence is described by a hydrodynamical system and transformed into a master equation analogous to the Vlasov equation for plasma turbulence. The spectral balance for the velocity fluctuations of individual components shows that the scaled pressure strain correlation and the cascade transfer are two transport functions that play the most important roles.

  3. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO2 lidar.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D H; Walters, D L; Mackerrow, E P; Schmitt, M J; Quick, C R; Porch, W M; Petrin, R R

    2000-04-20

    Laser speckle can influence lidar measurements from a diffuse hard target. Atmospheric optical turbulence will also affect the lidar return signal. We present a numerical simulation that models the propagation of a lidar beam and accounts for both reflective speckle and atmospheric turbulence effects. Our simulation is based on implementing a Huygens-Fresnel approximation to laser propagation. A series of phase screens, with the appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics, are used to simulate the effect of atmospheric turbulence. A single random phase screen is used to simulate scattering of the entire beam from a rough surface. We compare the output of our numerical model with separate CO(2) lidar measurements of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle. We also compare the output of our model with separate analytical predictions for atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle. Good agreement was found between the model and the experimental data. Good agreement was also found with analytical predictions. Finally, we present results of a simulation of the combined effects on a finite-aperture lidar system that are qualitatively consistent with previous experimental observations of increasing rms noise with increasing turbulence level. PMID:18345082

  4. A new wind vane for the measurement of atmospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J.; Heverly, M.

    1997-02-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Met One Instruments, Incorporated (Met One) and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) was created to develop a new wind vane that more accurately measures atmospheric turbulence. Through a process that had several phases, Met One created a prototype vane that was designed to attach to the existing Model 1585 Bi-Directional Wind Vane instrument structure. The prototype contained over 20% less mass to enhance responsiveness, which was also increased through the use of a teardrop-shaped fin structure. The prototype vane can be readily manufactured for commercial retail. Tests in wind tunnel of Building 735-7A, the Meteorological Engineering Facility, indicated that the new vane has a superior starting threshold of less than 0.14 meter per second, a delay distance of 0.72 meter, and a damping ratio of 0.4. The relative accuracy of less than one degree is unchanged from the previous design. The vane bias was acceptable at 0.8 degree for the horizontal wind angle, but was slightly high at 1.4 degree for the verticle wind angle. The high value of the verticle wind angle bias can most likely be reduced to the desired less than one degree value with standard manufacturing production techniques. The durability of the prototype vane was not tested in the field but is expected to be slightly less due to the use of hollow rather than foam-filled fins. However, the loss of some durability is more than compensated with increased sensitivity at low wind speeds. Field testing of the prototype is required to test for adequacy of durability.

  5. Modification of atmospheric extinction coefficient of non-line-of-sight ultraviolet communication under weak turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bifeng; Wang, Hongxing; Wu, Xiaojun; Song, Bo; Hu, Hao

    2015-03-01

    A calculation method of scintillation attenuation (SA) for non-line-of-sight (NLOS) ultraviolet (UV) communication is proposed on the basis of weak turbulence theory. To improve the channel model under turbulent environment, the atmospheric extinction coefficient in combination with UV single-scatter approximation model is modified based on SA. The in-depth analysis and interesting conclusion of atmospheric extinction coefficient named the turbulence coefficient versus different factors, including refractive-index structure parameter at the ground with measurement data, transceiver range and transceiver apex angles, are conducted.

  6. Effect of turbulent atmosphere on the on-axis average intensity of Pearcey–Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Boufalah; L, Dalil-Essakali; H, Nebdi; A, Belafhal

    2016-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of the Pearcey–Gaussian (PG) beam in turbulent atmosphere are investigated in this paper. The Pearcey beam is a new kind of paraxial beam, based on the Pearcey function of catastrophe theory, which describes diffraction about a cusp caustic. By using the extended Huygens–Fresnel integral formula in the paraxial approximation and the Rytov theory, an analytical expression of axial intensity for the considered beam family is derived. Some numerical results for PG beam propagating in atmospheric turbulence are given by studying the influences of some factors, including incident beam parameters and turbulence strengths.

  7. Stellar occultations by turbulent planetary atmospheres. I - A heuristic scattering model. II - The Beta Scorpii events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of atmospheric turbulence on stellar-occultation inversion procedures are investigated using a heuristic scattering model that is believed to reproduce the essential features of turbulence. A quantitative estimate is made of the size of the error in deducing the mean refractivity profile of a planetary atmosphere, taking into account constant as well as exponential scattering. It is shown that ordinary turbulence has no important effect on the average intensity profile in a stellar occultation but could have an important instantaneous effect. A critical examination of possible manifestations of turbulent scattering during occultations of Beta Sco by Jupiter indicates that all observed phenomena during these events can be understood in terms of scintillations produced by turbulence.

  8. The performance of heterodyne detection system for partially coherent beams in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengqiang, Li; Tingfeng, Wang; Heyong, Zhang; Jingjiang, Xie; Lisheng, Liu; Shuai, Zhao; Jin, Guo

    2015-12-01

    The performance of heterodyne system is discussed for partially coherent beams in turbulent atmosphere by introducing turbulence spectrum of refractive-index fluctuations. Several analytic formulae for the heterodyne detection system using the partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beam are presented. Based on Tatarskii spectrum model, some numerical results are given for the variation in the heterodyne efficiency with the misalignment angle, detector diameter, turbulence conditions, and parameters of the overlapping beams. According to the numerical results, we find that the turbulent atmosphere degrades the heterodyne efficiency significantly, and the variation in heterodyne efficiency is even slower against the misalignment angle in turbulence. For the deterministic received signal and the detector, the performance of the heterodyne detection can be adjusted by controlling the local oscillator signal parameters.

  9. Influence of non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence on the beam quality of vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Wang, Weiwei; Duan, Meiling; Wei, Jinlin

    2016-09-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function (WDF), the analytical expressions for the propagation factors (M2-factors) and Strehl ratio SR of the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams and GSM non-vortex beams propagation through non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence are derived, and used to study the influence of non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence on beam quality of the GSM vortex beams. It is shown that the smaller the generalized structure constant and the outer scale of turbulence are, and the bigger the inner scale of turbulence is, the smaller the normalized propagation factor is, the bigger the Strehl ratio is, and the better the beam quality of GSM vortex beams in atmospheric turbulence is. The variation of beam quality with the generalized exponent α is nonmonotonic, when α = 3.11, the beam quality of the GSM vortex beams is the poorest through non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. GSM vortex beams is less affected by turbulence than GSM non-vortex beams under certain condition, and will be useful in long-distance free-space optical communications. PMID:27607647

  10. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  11. Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Limitations of the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald; LeMone, Margaret; Mahrt, Larry

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment are further analyzed for both day- and nighttime as a follow-on to the investigation of the nighttime turbulence in Sun et al. (2012). The behavior of momentum and heat fluxes is investigated as functions of wind speed and the bulk temperature difference between observation heights and the surface. Vertical variations of momentum and heat flux at a given height z are correlated and are explained in terms of the energy and heat balance in a layer above the ground surface in which the surface heating/cooling and momentum sink need to be included. In addition, the surface also plays an important role in constraining the size of the dominant turbulent eddies, which is directly related to turbulence strength and the length scale of turbulence generation. The turbulence generation is not related to local vertical gradients especially under neutral condition as assumed in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on the observed relationships between momentum and heat fluxes, a new bulk formula for turbulence parameterization is developed to mainly examine the above-mentioned surface effects on vertical variation of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. The new understanding of the observed relationships between these turbulent variables and mean variables explains the observed nighttime turbulence regime change observed in Sun et al. (2012) as well as the daytime momentum and heat flux variations with height up to the maximum observation height of 55 m.

  12. Lidar sounding of the optical parameter of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvich, A. S.; Fortus, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a lidar intended for clear air turbulence (CAT) positioning on the basis of the backscatter enhancement (BSE) effect is analyzed using a turbulence model with a power-law spectrum. Systematic distortions occurring due to a need to regularize the lidar positioning problem solution are estimated. It is shown that the effect of molecular viscosity of air on the positioning result can be neglected if the wave parameter, which characterizes the diffraction manifestation, is higher than 3. This corresponds to sounding ranges of more than 1 km for optical or UV lidars. The analysis results show that the BSE lidar positioning accuracy weakly depends on the exponent in the turbulence spectrum in regions of severe turbulence. The results can justify a physical experiment for the design of an aircraft system for the lidar detection of CAT regions ahead of the flight course.

  13. Theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cascade transfer which is the only function to describe the mode coupling as the result of the nonlinear hydrodynamic state of turbulence is discussed. A kinetic theory combined with a scaling procedure was developed. The transfer function governs the non-linear mode coupling in strong turbulence. The master equation is consistent with the hydrodynamical system that describes the microdynamic state of turbulence and has the advantages to be homogeneous and have fewer nonlinear terms. The modes are scaled into groups to decipher the governing transport processes and statistical characteristics. An equation of vorticity transport describes the microdynamic state of two dimensional, isotropic and homogeneous, geostrophic turbulence. The equation of evolution of the macrovorticity is derived from group scaling in the form of the Fokker-Planck equation with memory. The microdynamic state of turbulence is transformed into the Liouville equation to derive the kinetic equation of the singlet distribution in turbulence. The collision integral contains a memory, which is analyzed with pair collision and the multiple collision. Two other kinetic equations are developed in parallel for the propagator and the transition probability for the interaction among the groups.

  14. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, David R.; Moore, Kathleen E.; Cabral, Osvaldo M. R.; Scolar, Jose; Manzi, Antonio

    1990-01-01

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. Simple empirical relations that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented both as statistical averages and as a series of case studies. These convective processes during the rainy season are shown to alter the diurnal course of turbulent fluxes. In wake of giant coastal systems, no significant heat or moisture fluxes occur for up to a day after the event. Radar data is used to demonstrate that even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during mid-day. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum is well described by dry CBL similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain.

  15. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, David R.; Moore, Kathleen E.; Cabral, Osvaldo M. R.; Scolar, Jose; Manzi, Antonio O.; Deabreusa, Leonardo D.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. Simple empirical relations that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented both as statistical averages and as a series of case studies. These convective processes during the rainy season are shown to alter the diurnal course of turbulent fluxes. In wake of giant coastal systems, no significant heat or moisture fluxes occur for up to a day after the event. Radar data is used to demonstrate that even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during mid-day. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum is well described by dry CBL similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  17. Comment on "Heterodyne Lidar Returns in the Turbulent Atmosphere: Performance Evaluation of Simulated Systems"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    The explanation for the difference between simulation and the zero-order theory for heterodyne lidar returns in a turbulent atmosphere proposed by Belmonte and Rye is incorrect. The theoretical expansion is not developed under a square- law-structure function approximation (random wedge atmosphere). Agreement between the simulations and the zero-order term of the theoretical expansion is produced for the limit of statistically independent paths (bi-static operation with large transmitter-receiver separation) when the simulations correctly include the large-scale gradients of the turbulent atmosphere.

  18. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on the properties of specular and antispecular beams.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaotao; Guo, Mengwen; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-08-20

    A class of optical fields with specular or antispecular properties can be generated by a Gaussian Schell-model beam passing through a wavefront-folding interferometer. Based on the generalized diffraction integral formula, an analytical expression for the cross-spectral density function of such fields propagating through non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence is derived. It is revealed that the specular and antispecular properties of the beams always maintain during propagation in free space. However, the specularity and antispecularity properties of the beams become different in atmosphere, since they are quickly destroyed by the atmospheric turbulence. PMID:27557000

  19. Automatic parameter estimation for atmospheric turbulence mitigation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Paolini, Aaron; Kelmelis, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Several image processing techniques for turbulence mitigation have been shown to be effective under a wide range of long-range capture conditions; however, complex, dynamic scenes have often required manual interaction with the algorithm's underlying parameters to achieve optimal results. While this level of interaction is sustainable in some workflows, in-field determination of ideal processing parameters greatly diminishes usefulness for many operators. Additionally, some use cases, such as those that rely on unmanned collection, lack human-in-the-loop usage. To address this shortcoming, we have extended a well-known turbulence mitigation algorithm based on bispectral averaging with a number of techniques to greatly reduce (and often eliminate) the need for operator interaction. Automations were made in the areas of turbulence strength estimation (Fried's parameter), as well as the determination of optimal local averaging windows to balance turbulence mitigation and the preservation of dynamic scene content (non-turbulent motions). These modifications deliver a level of enhancement quality that approaches that of manual interaction, without the need for operator interaction. As a consequence, the range of operational scenarios where this technology is of benefit has been significantly expanded.

  20. Analysis of low altitude atmospheric turbulence data measured in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, V. M.; Joppa, R. G.; Vanderwees, G.

    1977-01-01

    All three components of turbulence were measured simultaneously in flight at each wing tip of a Beech D-18 aircraft. The flights were conducted at low altitude, 30.5 - 61.0 meters (100-200 ft.), over water in the presence of wind driven turbulence. Statistical properties of flight measured turbulence were compared with Gaussian and non-Gaussian turbulence models. Spatial characteristics of the turbulence were analyzed using the data from flight perpendicular and parallel to the wind. The probability density distributions of the vertical gusts show distinctly non-Gaussian characteristics. The distributions of the longitudinal and lateral gusts are generally Gaussian. The power spectra compare in the inertial subrange at some points better with the Dryden spectrum, while at other points the von Karman spectrum is a better approximation. In the low frequency range the data show peaks or dips in the power spectral density. The cross between vertical gusts in the direction of the mean wind were compared with a matched non-Gaussian model. The real component of the cross spectrum is in general close to the non-Gaussian model. The imaginary component, however, indicated a larger phase shift between these two gust components than was found in previous research.

  1. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  2. Strong scintillations of pulsed Laguerrian beams in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, Viktor A; Gerasimova, Liliya O

    2016-08-22

    Turbulent fluctuations of the energy density of broadband pulsed Laguerre-Gaussian beams are studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It is shown that in the regime of strong scintillations, the relative variance of energy density of the pulsed beams can take values smaller than unity, in contrast to the strong scintillation index of the continuous-wave beams, which tends to unity with increasing the turbulence strength. The level of residual spatial correlation of the energy density of pulsed beams exceeds that for the continuous-wave beams. It increases with shortening of the pulse duration and increasing of the refractive turbulence strength. PMID:27557206

  3. Modelling atmospheric turbulence effects on ground-based telescope systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, L.W.; Flatte, S.M.; Max, C.E.

    1993-09-30

    Questions still exist concerning the appropriate model for turbulence- induced phase fluctuations seen in ground-based telescopes. Bester et al. used a particular observable (slope of the Allan variance) with an infrared interferometer in an attempt to distinguish models. The authors have calculated that observable for Kolmogorov and {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} models with a variety of outer scales and altitude-dependent turbulence and wind velocity. The authors have found that clear distinction between models requires good data on the vertical distribution of wind and turbulence. Furthermore, measurements at time separations of order 60 s are necessary to distinguish the {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} model from the Kolmogorov model.

  4. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  5. Integral momenta of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Igor P

    2016-04-20

    The orbital angular momentum of vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere is studied theoretically. The field of an optical beam is determined through the solution of the paraxial wave equation for a randomly inhomogeneous medium with fluctuations of the refraction index of the turbulent atmosphere. Peculiarities in the behavior of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam at the receiver (or transmitter) are examined. The dependence of the total power of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam on optical beam parameters, namely, the transverse wave number of optical radiation, amplitude factor radius, and, especially, topological charge of the optical beam, is analyzed in detail. It turns out that the mean value of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam remains constant during propagation in the turbulent atmosphere. It is shown that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere calculated with the "mean-intensity" approximation is equal to zero identically. Thus, it is possible to declare confidently that the variance of fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of the vortex Bessel-Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere is not very large. PMID:27140133

  6. Note: A balloon-borne accelerometer technique for measuring atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlton, Graeme J.; Giles Harrison, R.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Williams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    A weather balloon and its suspended instrument package behave like a pendulum with a moving pivot. This dynamical system is exploited here for the detection of atmospheric turbulence. By adding an accelerometer to the instrument package, the size of the swings induced by atmospheric turbulence can be measured. In test flights, strong turbulence has induced accelerations greater than 5g, where g = 9.81 m s-2. Calibration of the accelerometer data with a vertically orientated lidar has allowed eddy dissipation rate values of between 10-3 and 10-2 m2 s-3 to be derived from the accelerometer data. The novel use of a whole weather balloon and its adapted instrument package can be used as a new instrument to make standardized in situ measurements of turbulence.

  7. Performance characteristics of a scanning laser imaging system through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nairat, Mazen; Voelz, David

    2012-10-01

    The transverse angular (spatial) imaging performance of a laser imaging system through atmospheric turbulence is characterized and described in a practical sense. The system is assumed to scan a far-field scene with a collimated Gaussian beam truncated by a circular aperture and a single channel receiver records the returns. The system point spread function is defined as the average beam profile at the scene and the half-angle beam spread is used to characterize the point spread function. A system modulation transfer function is defined that includes the effects of beam diffraction and turbulence. Spatial sampling of the scene is also considered. A normalized resolution metric (Strehl ratio) is applied to investigate the effects of sampling, beam size, turbulence, and beam truncation. The analysis indicates that resolution will be reduced by more than 90% in homogenous turbulence when the beam waist size is on the order of the atmospheric coherence length. Consistency with conventional imaging performance is discussed.

  8. Shannon capacities and error-correction codes for optical atmospheric turbulent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2005-09-01

    Feature Issue on Optical Wireless Communications (OWC) The propagation of an on-off keying modulated optical signal through an optical atmospheric turbulent channel is considered. The intensity fluctuations of the signal observed at the receiver are modeled using a gamma-gamma distribution. The capacity of this channel is determined for a wide range of turbulence conditions. For a zero inner scale, the capacity decreases monotonically as the turbulence strengthens. For non-zero inner scale, the capacity is not monotonic with turbulence strength. Two error-correction schemes, based on low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, are investigated as a means to improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance of the system. Very large coding gains--ranging from 5.5 to 14 dB, depending on the turbulence conditions--are obtained by these LDPC codes compared with Reed-Solomon error-correction codes of similar rates and lengths.

  9. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  10. Turbulence strength estimation and super-resolution from an arbitrary set of atmospherically degraded images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamek, Steve; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2006-08-01

    In remote sensing, atmospheric turbulence and aerosols limit the image quality. For many practical cases turbulence is shown to be dominant, especially for horizontal close-to-earth imaging in hot environments. In a horizontal long-range imaging it is usually impractical to measure path-averaged refractive index structure constant C n2 (which characterizes the turbulence strength) with conventional equipment. In this paper we propose a method for estimation of C n2 based just on the available recorded turbulence-degraded image sequence. The method exploits the turbulence-induced image "dancing". C n2 is extracted from the estimated image shifts variance. Experimental comparison with C n2 measurements using a scintillometer shows reliable estimation results. We also estimate image motion with sub-pixel accuracy for the purpose of obtaining a high-resolution image by applying a simple super-resolution procedure. Results of super-resolution for real imagery are presented.

  11. The nature of large-scale turbulence in the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The energetics and spectral characteristis of quasi-geostrophic turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere are examined using sequences of Voyager images and infrared temperature soundings. Using global wind measurements momentum transports associated with zonally symmetric stresses and turbulent stresses are quantified. Though a strong up-gradient flux of momentum by eddies was observed, measurements do not preclude the possibility that symmetric stresses play a critical role in maintaining the mean zonal circulation. Strong correlation between the observed meridional distribution of eddy-scale kinetic energy and available potential energy suggests coupling between the observed cloudtop turbulent motions and the upper tropospheric thermodynamics. An Oort energy budget for Jupiter's upper troposphere is formulated.

  12. Effects of turbulent dispersion of atmospheric balance motions of planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shikuo; Huang, Wei; Rong, Pingping

    1992-06-01

    New Reynolds’ mean momentum equations including both turbulent viscosity and dispersion are used to analyze atmospheric balance motions of the planetary boundary layer. It is pointed out that turbulent dispersion with γ 0 will increase depth of Ekman layer, reduce wind velocity in Ekman layer and produce a more satisfactory Ekman spiral lines fit the observed wind hodograph. The wind profile in the surface layer including turbulent dispersion is still logarithmic but the von Karman constant k is replaced by k 1 = √ 1 — k/2, the wind increases a little more rapidly with height.

  13. New Methods for Applying Statistical State Dynamics to Problems in Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, B.; Ioannou, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Adopting the perspective of statistical state dynamics (SSD) has led to a number of recent advances inunderstanding and simulating atmospheric turbulence at both boundary layer and planetary scale. Traditionally, realizations have been used to study turbulence and if a statistical quantity was needed it was obtained by averaging. However, it is now becomimg more widely appreciated that there are important advantages to studying the statistical state dynamics (SSD) directly. In turbulent systems statistical quantities are often the most useful and the advantage of obtaining these quantities directly as state variables is obvious. Moreover, quantities such as the probability density function (pdf) are often difficult to obtain accurately by sampling state trajectories. In the event that the pdf is itself time dependent or even chaotic, as is the case in the turbulence of the planetary boundary layer, the pdf can only be obtained as a state variable. However, perhaps the greatest advantage of the SSD approach is that it reveals directly the essential cooperative mechanisms of interaction among spatial and temporal scales that underly the turbulent state. In order to exploit these advantages of the SSD approach to geophysical turbulence, new analytical and computational methods are being developed. Example problems in atmospheric turbulence will be presented in which these new SSD analysis and computational methods are used.

  14. Scattering of sound by atmospheric turbulence predictions in a refractive shadow zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Walton E.; Bass, Henry E.; Raspet, Richard; Gilbert, Kenneth E.

    1990-01-01

    According to ray theory, regions exist in an upward refracting atmosphere where no sound should be present. Experiments show, however, that appreciable sound levels penetrate these so-called shadow zones. Two mechanisms contribute to sound in the shadow zone: diffraction and turbulent scattering of sound. Diffractive effects can be pronounced at lower frequencies but are small at high frequencies. In the short wavelength limit, then, scattering due to turbulence should be the predominant mechanism involved in producing the sound levels measured in shadow zones. No existing analytical method includes turbulence effects in the prediction of sound pressure levels in upward refractive shadow zones. In order to obtain quantitative average sound pressure level predictions, a numerical simulation of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on sound propagation is performed. The simulation is based on scattering from randomly distributed scattering centers ('turbules'). Sound pressure levels are computed for many realizations of a turbulent atmosphere. Predictions from the numerical simulation are compared with existing theories and experimental data.

  15. Effect of the atmospheric turbulence on a special correlated radially polarized beam on propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yan; Wei, Cun; Zhang, Yongtao; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2015-11-01

    A special correlated radially polarized beam (Phys. Rev. A 89, 013801, 2014) was introduced and demonstrated in experiment recently. In this paper, we investigate the statistical properties of a special correlated radially polarized (SCRP) beam in atmospheric turbulence. Analytical formulas for the average intensity distribution (AID), degree of polarization (DOP) and degree of coherence (DOC) are derived by adopting a beam coherence-polarization (BCP) matrix. With the help of the derived formulas, the evolutions of the AID, DOP and DOC of the SCRP beam in turbulent atmosphere are illustrated through numerical examples in detail, and the results are compared to those of a partially coherent radially polarized (PCRP) beam under equivalent condition. It reveals that the propagation properties of the SCRP beam is much different from those of the PCRP beam in atmosphere, and closely related to the strength of the turbulence and the beam parameters.

  16. Numerical simulation research on sodium laser beacon imagings through the atmosphere turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangyuan; Qian, Xianmei; Zhang, Suimeng; Zhao, Minfu; Cui, Chaolong; Huang, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relative intensity distributions of Sodium Laser Beacon (SLB) and analysis of the on-axis imaging of incoherent light, considering the effects of atmospheric turbulence and the changes of telescope receiving diameter on the short-exposure SLB imagings on the focal plane, imagings of an extended source SLB are simulated under the three atmospheric turbulence models. Results indicate that sharpness and peak strehl ratio of SLB imagings increase but sharpness radius decrease with the decrease of atmosphere turbulence strengths. Moreover, the changes of telescope diameter from 3.0m to 1.5m cause the decrease of sharpness and peak strehl ratio but the increase of sharpness radius.

  17. Design and implementation of flexible laboratory system for beam propagation study through weak atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickenstorff, Carolina; Rodrigo, Jóse A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Different applications such as astronomy, remote optical sensing and free space optical communications, among others, require both numerical and laboratory experimental simulations of beam propagation through turbulent atmosphere prior to an outdoor test. While rotating phase plates or hot chambers can be applied to such studies, they do not allow changing the atmospheric conditions and the propagation distance in situ. In contrast, the spatial light modulators (SLMs) are a flexible alternative for experimental turbulence simulation. In this work we consider an experimental setup comprising two SLMs for studying laser beam propagation in weak atmospheric turbulence. The changes of atmospheric conditions and propagation distances are properly achieved by the adjustment of the phase screens and the focal distances of digital lenses implemented in both SLMs. The proposed system can be completely automatized and all its elements are in fixed positions avoiding mechanical misalignment. Its design, propagation distance and atmospheric condition adjustment are provided. The setup performance is verified by numerical simulation of Gaussian beam propagation in the weak turbulence regime. The obtained parameters: scintillation index, beam wander and spreading are compared to their theoretical counterparts for different propagation distances and atmospheric conditions.

  18. Cross-frequency coherence and pulse propagation in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Wilson, D Keith; Collier, Sandra L; Cain, Jericho E; Cheinet, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Cross-frequency coherence of acoustic signals in a turbulent atmosphere is an important consideration for source localization with acoustic sensor arrays and for remote sensing of the atmosphere with sodars and tomography techniques. This paper takes as a starting point recently derived, closed-form equations for the spatial-temporal correlation function of a broadband acoustic signal propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with coupled spatial-temporal fluctuations in temperature and wind velocity. This theory is employed to calculate, based on the Rytov approximation, the two-point, two-time, two-frequency mutual coherence function of plane and spherical waves in the weak scattering regime. The cross-frequency coherence for these waveforms is then obtained and compared with that in the geometrical acoustics approximation. The coherence bandwidth is calculated and analyzed for typical meteorological regimes of the atmospheric surface layer and parameters of sound propagation. The results obtained are compared with available experimental data. The cross-frequency coherence is also used to study the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the mean intensity of an acoustic pulse propagating in a turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27475189

  19. Algorithm for Simulating Atmospheric Turbulence and Aeroelastic Effects on Simulator Motion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercole, Anthony V.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces high frequency accelerations in aircraft, typically greater than the response to pilot input. Motion system equipped flight simulators must present cues representative of the aircraft response to turbulence in order to maintain the integrity of the simulation. Currently, turbulence motion cueing produced by flight simulator motion systems has been less than satisfactory because the turbulence profiles have been attenuated by the motion cueing algorithms. This report presents a new turbulence motion cueing algorithm, referred to as the augmented turbulence channel. Like the previous turbulence algorithms, the output of the channel only augments the vertical degree of freedom of motion. This algorithm employs a parallel aircraft model and an optional high bandwidth cueing filter. Simulation of aeroelastic effects is also an area where frequency content must be preserved by the cueing algorithm. The current aeroelastic implementation uses a similar secondary channel that supplements the primary motion cue. Two studies were conducted using the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator and Cockpit Motion Facility to evaluate the effect of the turbulence channel and aeroelastic model on pilot control input. Results indicate that the pilot is better correlated with the aircraft response, when the augmented channel is in place.

  20. A qualitative assessment of a random process proposed as an atmospheric turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, K.

    1977-01-01

    A random process is formed by the product of two Gaussian processes and the sum of that product with a third Gaussian process. The resulting total random process is interpreted as the sum of an amplitude modulated process and a slowly varying, random mean value. The properties of the process are examined, including an interpretation of the process in terms of the physical structure of atmospheric motions. The inclusion of the mean value variation gives an improved representation of the properties of atmospheric motions, since the resulting process can account for the differences in the statistical properties of atmospheric velocity components and their gradients. The application of the process to atmospheric turbulence problems, including the response of aircraft dynamic systems, is examined. The effects of the mean value variation upon aircraft loads are small in most cases, but can be important in the measurement and interpretation of atmospheric turbulence data.

  1. THE MECHANICAL GREENHOUSE: BURIAL OF HEAT BY TURBULENCE IN HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2010-10-01

    The intense irradiation received by hot Jupiters suppresses convection in the outer layers of their atmospheres and lowers their cooling rates. 'Inflated' hot Jupiters, i.e., those with anomalously large transit radii, require additional sources of heat or suppressed cooling. We consider the effect of forced turbulent mixing in the radiative layer, which could be driven by atmospheric circulation or by another mechanism. Due to stable stratification in the atmosphere, forced turbulence drives a downward flux of heat. Weak turbulent mixing slows the cooling rate by this process, as if the planet were irradiated more intensely. Stronger turbulent mixing buries heat into the convective interior, provided the turbulence extends to the radiative-convective boundary. This inflates the planet until a balance is reached between the heat buried into and radiated from the interior. We also include the direct injection of heat due to the dissipation of turbulence or other effects. Such heating is already known to slow planetary cooling. We find that dissipation also enhances heat burial from mixing by lowering the threshold for turbulent mixing to drive heat into the interior. Strong turbulent mixing of heavy molecular species such as TiO may be necessary to explain stratospheric thermal inversions. We show that the amount of mixing required to loft TiO may overinflate the planet by our mechanism. This possible refutation of the TiO hypothesis deserves further study. Our inflation mechanism requires a deep stratified layer that only exists when the absorbed stellar flux greatly exceeds the intrinsic emitted flux. Thus, it would be less effective for more luminous brown dwarfs and for longer period gas giants, including Jupiter and Saturn.

  2. Average capacity for PCB propagation in atmospheric turbulence on Earth-space path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-ke; Hou, Jie; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Hui

    2013-08-01

    In order to analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence along Earth-space path on the performance of laser communication system, the change of Kolmogorov spectrum with altitude is taken into account on the basis of the relation of turbulence structure constant with altitude. The scintillation index under the condition of the different coherent degree for optical source are discussed from weak to strong turbulence regime for a partially coherent Gaussian beam (PCB) propagating through turbulent atmosphere. The relation of the scintillation index with elevation is analyzed on Earth-space path. The expressions for the Log-normal and the Gamma-Gamma turbulence channel of irradiance fluctuations are given. The mathematical expression for the evaluation of the average capacity is shown for a Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere channel. The average capacity of a PCB is calculated under the condition of different coherent length, aperture, on the horizontal and Earth-space path, respectively. The results of scintillation index show that the difference among plane, spherical, and beam wave are obvious from weak to moderate turbulence regime, at strong regime, the results tend to saturation. The degradation of optical source coherence causes scintillation depression at weak turbulence regime. At moderate regime, the scintillation is little increase. The effect of source partially coherence on scintillation is disappear at stronger regime. Based on the Log-normal model in weak turbulent fade channel and the Gamma-Gamma model from weak to strong turbulence fade channel, the average capacities for different initial Gaussian beam radius, partially coherent degree beam are estimated, respectively. The results show that at weak turbulence, the difference between the capacities by Log-normal and Gamma-Gamma distribution is small, and from moderate to strong regime, the difference is gradually increase. At weak regime, the average capacity of partially coherent beam is greater than the

  3. Response of a rigid aircraft to nonstationary atmospheric turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, J. M.; Steiner, R.

    1973-01-01

    The plunging response of an aircraft to a type of nonstationary turbulent excitation is considered. The latter consists of stationary Gaussian noise modulated by a well-defined envelope function. The intent of the investigation is to model the excitation experienced by an airplane flying through turbulence of varying intensity and to examine the influence of intensity variations on exceedance frequencies of the gust velocity and the airplane's plunging velocity and acceleration. One analytical advantage of the proposed model is that the Gaussian assumption for the gust excitation is retained. The analysis described herein is developed in terms of an envelope function of arbitrary form; however, numerical calculations are limited to the case of harmonic modulation.

  4. Performance analysis of coherent wireless optical communications with atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingbo; Song, Xuegui; Cheng, Julian; Holzman, Jonathan F

    2012-03-12

    Coherent wireless optical communication systems with heterodyne detection are analyzed for binary phase-shift keying (BPSK), differential PSK (DPSK), and M-ary PSK over Gamma-Gamma turbulence channels. Closed-form error rate expressions are derived using a series expansion approach. It is shown that, in the special case of K-distributed turbulence channel, the DPSK incurs a 3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty compared to BPSK in the large SNR regime. The outage probability is also obtained, and a detailed outage truncation error analysis is presented and used to assess the accuracy in system performance estimation. It is shown that our series error rate expressions are simple to use and highly accurate for practical system performance estimation. PMID:22418534

  5. The propagation characteristics of the conical hollow beams in the turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Dong; Jin-Qi, He; Shu-Tao, Li; Xi-He, Zhang; Guang-Yong, Jin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, by using the Collins formula and the Rytov method, the model used to descript the propagation properties of the conical hollow beams(CHBs) in the turbulent atmosphere is firstly constructed and the simulation is made by the numerical method. The results show that the initial transmission angle has important influence on the propagation properties. Beside these, the index structure constant and the order number also can influence the transverse intensity distribution. So according to the model, the intensity distribution of the conical hollow beams in the turbulent atmosphere can be controlled by adjusting these parameters.

  6. Implications for high speed research: The relationship between sonic boom signature distortion and atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Gionfriddo, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study there were two primary tasks. The first was to develop an algorithm for quantifying the distortion in a sonic boom. Such an algorithm should be somewhat automatic, with minimal human intervention. Once the algorithm was developed, it was used to test the hypothesis that the cause of a sonic boom distortion was due to atmospheric turbulence. This hypothesis testing was the second task. Using readily available sonic boom data, we statistically tested whether there was a correlation between the sonic boom distortion and the distance a boom traveled through atmospheric turbulence.

  7. Using an incoherent target return to adaptively focus through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W; Palastro, J P; Wu, C; Davis, C C

    2016-03-15

    A laser beam propagating to a remote target through atmospheric turbulence acquires intensity fluctuations. If the target is cooperative and provides a coherent return beam, the phase measured near the beam transmitter and adaptive optics, in principle, can correct these fluctuations. Generally, however, the target is uncooperative. In this case, we show that an incoherent return from the target can be used instead. Using the principle of reciprocity, we derive a novel relation between the field at the target and the returned field at a detector. We simulate an adaptive optics system that utilizes this relation to focus a beam through atmospheric turbulence onto a rough surface. PMID:26977694

  8. Large-eddy simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Thouron, Odile; Picot, Joris; Cariolle, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Contrails are ice clouds that form by condensation of water vapor exhaust from aircraft engines and develop further in the wake as they are entrained by the airplane trailing vortices. When contrails spread to form cirrus clouds, they can persist for hours and become almost indistinguishable from natural cirrus. This talk focuses on the role of atmospheric turbulence in determining the characteristics of these ``contrail cirrus.'' Large-eddy simulations are carried out using the atmospheric model Meso-NH with the goal of identifying the processes driving the contrail-to-cirrus transition as a function of contrail age. To that end, the effects of atmospheric turbulence, microphysics, and radiative transfer are analyzed separately. Turbulent fields are first generated by means of a stochastic forcing technique that reproduces the atmospheric conditions encountered in the upper troposphere. Contrails generated by a model aircraft are then inserted on the top of these fields. Finally, ice microphysics and radiative transfer are activated to find out on which spatial and temporal scales the vertical motion prevails over the essentially horizontal motion induced by atmospheric turbulent diffusion.

  9. Imaging through atmospheric turbulence for laser based C-RAM systems: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buske, Ivo; Riede, Wolfgang; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    High Energy Laser weapons (HEL) have unique attributes which distinguish them from limitations of kinetic energy weapons. HEL weapons engagement process typical starts with identifying the target and selecting the aim point on the target through a high magnification telescope. One scenario for such a HEL system is the countermeasure against rockets, artillery or mortar (RAM) objects to protect ships, camps or other infrastructure from terrorist attacks. For target identification and especially to resolve the aim point it is significant to ensure high resolution imaging of RAM objects. During the whole ballistic flight phase the knowledge about the expectable imaging quality is important to estimate and evaluate the countermeasure system performance. Hereby image quality is mainly influenced by unavoidable atmospheric turbulence. Analytical calculations have been taken to analyze and evaluate image quality parameters during an approaching RAM object. In general, Kolmogorov turbulence theory was implemented to determine atmospheric coherence length and isoplanatic angle. The image acquisition is distinguishing between long and short exposure times to characterize tip/tilt image shift and the impact of high order turbulence fluctuations. Two different observer positions are considered to show the influence of the selected sensor site. Furthermore two different turbulence strengths are investigated to point out the effect of climate or weather condition. It is well known that atmospheric turbulence degenerates image sharpness and creates blurred images. Investigations are done to estimate the effectiveness of simple tip/tilt systems or low order adaptive optics for laser based C-RAM systems.

  10. Profiles of the daytime atmospheric turbulence above Big Bear solar observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer, A.; Gorceix, N.; Marino, J.; Cao, W.; Goode, P. R.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Space weather has become acutely critical for today's global communication networks. To understand its driving forces we need to observe the Sun with high angular-resolution, and within large fields-of-view, i.e. with multi-conjugate adaptive optics correction. Aims: The design of a multi-conjugate adaptive optical system requires the knowledge of the altitude distribution of atmospheric turbulence. We have therefore measured daytime turbulence profiles above the New Solar Telescope (NST), on Big Bear Lake. Methods: To this purpose, a wide-field wavefront sensor was installed behind the NST. The variation of the wavefront distortions with angular direction allows the reconstruction of the distribution of turbulence. Results: The turbulence is found to have three origins: 1. a ground layer (<500 m) that contains 55-65% of the turbulence, 2. a boundary layer between 1-7 km comprises 30-40% of the turbulent energy, 3. and the remaining ~5% are generated in the tropopause, which is above 12 km in summer and between 8 and 12 km in winter. Conclusions: A multi-conjugate adaptive optical system should thus aim at correcting the ground turbulence, the center of the boundary layer at roughly 3 km altitude and, eventually, the upper boundary layer around 6 km altitude.

  11. Fluctuations of spherical waves in a turbulent atmosphere: effect of the axisymmetric approximation in computational methods.

    PubMed

    Salomons, E M

    2000-10-01

    The validity of the axisymmetric parabolic-equation (PE) method for line-of-sight sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere is investigated. The axisymmetric PE method is a finite-difference method for solving a 2D parabolic wave equation, which follows from the 3D wave equation by the assumption of axial symmetry around the vertical axis through the source. It is found that this axisymmetric approximation has a considerable spurious effect on the fluctuations of the sound field. This is concluded from analytical expressions for the log-amplitude and phase variances, derived both for isotropic turbulence and for axisymmetric turbulence. The expressions for axisymmetric turbulence are compared with the results of numerical computations with the PE method. PMID:11051480

  12. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  13. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  14. Evidence for supersonic turbulence in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Emerich, C; Jaffel, L B; Clarke, J T; Prangé, R; Gladstone, G R; Sommeria, J; Ballester, G

    1996-08-23

    Spectra of the hydrogen Lyman alpha (Ly-alpha) emission line profiles of the jovian dayglow, obtained by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, appear complex and variable on time scales of a few minutes. Dramatic changes occur in the Ly-alpha bulge region at low latitudes, where the line profiles exhibit structures that correspond to supersonic velocities of the order of several to tens of kilometers per second. This behavior, unexpected in a planetary atmosphere, is evidence for the particularly stormy jovian upper atmosphere, not unlike a star's atmosphere. PMID:8688090

  15. Theoretical and experimental studies of polarization fluctuations over atmospheric turbulent channels for wireless optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankun; Ding, Shengli; Zhai, Huili; Dang, Anhong

    2014-12-29

    In wireless optical communications (WOC), polarization multiplexing systems and coherent polarization systems have excellent performance and wide applications, while its state of polarization affected by atmospheric turbulence is not clearly understood. This paper focuses on the polarization fluctuations caused by atmospheric turbulence in a WOC link. Firstly, the relationship between the polarization fluctuations and the index of refraction structure parameter is introduced and the distribution of received polarization angle is obtained through theoretical derivations. Then, turbulent conditions are adjusted and measured elaborately in a wide range of scintillation indexes (SI). As a result, the root-mean-square (RMS) variation and probability distribution function (PDF) of polarization angle conforms closely to that of theoretical model. PMID:25607210

  16. Reciprocal path imaging: A technique for the mitigation of image degradation due to atmospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kotha, A.; Harvey, J.E.; Phillips, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    A naturally-occurring, conjugate-wave phenomenon in mono-static laser imaging applications is caused by reciprocal scattering paths which experience identical phase delays during the double passage of an electromagnetic wave through a random phase screen or turbulent medium. This ``opposition effect`` or ``enhanced backscatter`` phenomenon is known to be caused by constructive interference between reciprocal multiple scattering paths. Reciprocal path imaging (RPI) is an attempt to exploit this phenomenon for obtaining diffraction-limited images of extended objects obscured by a random phase screen or turbulent atmosphere. The authors report upon their current effort to investigate RPI with sparse array receivers and its potential as a mechanism for achieving high-resolution imaging through a turbulent atmosphere without the use of adaptive optics for image compensation. Preliminary work is reviewed and several RPI concepts to be evaluated in the laboratory are discussed.

  17. Extension of a Kolmogorov Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Time-Based Simulation Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMinn, John D.

    1997-01-01

    The development of any super/hypersonic aircraft requires the interaction of a wide variety of technical disciplines to maximize vehicle performance. For flight and engine control system design and development on this class of vehicle, realistic mathematical simulation models of atmospheric turbulence, including winds and the varying thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere, are needed. A model which has been tentatively selected by a government/industry group of flight and engine/inlet controls representatives working on the High Speed Civil Transport is one based on the Kolmogorov spectrum function. This report compares the Dryden and Kolmogorov turbulence forms, and describes enhancements that add functionality to the selected Kolmogorov model. These added features are: an altitude variation of the eddy dissipation rate based on Dryden data, the mapping of the eddy dissipation rate database onto a regular latitude and longitude grid, a method to account for flight at large vehicle attitude angles, and a procedure for transitioning smoothly across turbulence segments.

  18. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  19. Experimental investigation into infrasonic emissions from atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Shams, Qamar A; Zuckerwar, Allan J; Burkett, Cecil G; Weistroffer, George R; Hugo, Derek R

    2013-03-01

    Clear air turbulence (CAT) is the leading cause of in-flight injuries and in severe cases can result in fatalities. The purpose of this work is to design and develop an infrasonic array network for early warning of clear air turbulence. The infrasonic system consists of an infrasonic three-microphone array, compact windscreens, and data management system. Past experimental efforts to detect acoustic emissions from CAT have been limited. An array of three infrasonic microphones, operating in the field at NASA Langley Research Center, on several occasions received signals interpreted as infrasonic emissions from CAT. Following comparison with current lidar and other past methods, the principle of operation, the experimental methods, and experimental data are presented for case studies and confirmed by pilot reports. The power spectral density of the received signals was found to fit a power law having an exponent of -6 to -7, which is found to be characteristics of infrasonic emissions from CAT, in contrast to findings of the past. PMID:23464000

  20. ACTIVE TURBULENCE AND SCALAR TRANSPORT NEAR THE FOREST-ATMOSPHERE INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turbulent velocity, temperature, water vapor concentration, and other scalars were measured at the canopy-atmosphere interface of a 13–14-m-tall uniform pine forest and a 33-m-tall nonuniform hardwood forest. These measurements were used to investigate whether the mixing la...

  1. Wind profile recovery from intensity fluctuations of a laser beam reflected in a turbulent atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Banakh, V A; Marakasov, D A

    2008-04-30

    An algorithm for the wind profile recovery from spatiotemporal spectra of a laser beam reflected in a turbulent atmosphere is presented. The cases of a spherical wave incident on a diffuse reflector of finite size and a spatially limited beam reflected from an infinite random surface are considered. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. The effects of atmospheric turbulence on a quadrotor heavy lift airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Jex, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The response of a quadrotor heavy lift airship to atmospheric turbulence is evaluated using a four-point input model. Results show interaction between gust inputs and the characteristic modes of the vehicle's response. Example loop closures demonstrate tradeoffs between response regulation and structural loads. Vehicle responses to a tuned discrete wave front compare favorably with the linear results and illustrate characteristic HLA motion.

  3. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence compensation through piston-only phase control of a laser phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Jack E.; Van Zandt, Noah; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    Beam propagation from a laser phased array system through the turbulent atmosphere is simulated and the ability of such a system to compensate for the atmosphere via piston-only phase control of the sub-apertures is evaluated. Directed energy (DE) applications demand more power than most lasers can produce, consequently many schemes for high power involve combining the beams from many smaller lasers into one. When many smaller lasers are combined into a phased array, phase control of the individual sub-apertures will be necessary to create a high-quality beam. Phase control of these sub-apertures could then be used to do more, such as focus, steer, and compensate for atmospheric turbulence. Atmospheric turbulence is well known to degrade the performance of both imaging systems and laser systems. Adaptive optics can be used to mitigate this degradation. Adaptive optics ordinarily involves a deformable mirror, but with phase control on each sub-aperture the need for a deformable mirror is eliminated. The simulation conducted here evaluates performance gain for a 127 element phased array in a hexagonal pattern with piston-only phase control on each element over an uncompensated array for varying levels of atmospheric turbulence. While most simulations were carried out against a 10 km tactical scenario, the turbulence profile was adjusted so performance could be evaluated as a function of the Fried Parameter (r0) and the log-amplitude variance somewhat independently. This approach is demonstrated to be generally effective with the largest percentage improvement occurring when r0 is close to the sub-aperture diameter.

  4. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  5. The status of military specifications with regard to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, David J.; Heffley, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    The features of atmospheric disturbances that are significant to aircraft flying qualities are discussed. Next follows a survey of proposed models. Lastly, there is a discussion of the content and application of the model contained in the current flying qualities specification and the forthcoming MIL-Standard.

  6. Dynamics of the gas flow turbulent front in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X.; Ghasemi, M.; Xu, H.; Hasnain, Q.; Wu, S.; Tu, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, dynamic characterizations of the turbulent flow field in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are investigated by focusing on the effect of different APPJ parameters, such as gas flow rate, applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and time duration of the pulse. We utilize Schlieren photography and photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as a signal triggering of an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) and also a high speed camera to examine the formation of the turbulent front and its dynamics. The results reveal that the turbulent front will appear earlier and closer to the tube nozzle by increasing the gas flow rate or the applied voltage amplitude. However, the pulse time duration and repetition frequency cannot change the dynamics and formation of the turbulent front. Further investigation shows that every pulse can excite one turbulent front which is created in a specific position in a laminar region and propagates downstream. It seems that the dominating mechanisms responsible for the formation of turbulent fronts in plasma jets might not be ion momentum transfer.

  7. Sound-wave coherence in atmospheric turbulence with intrinsic and global intermittency.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D Keith; Ostashev, Vladimir E; Goedecke, George H

    2008-08-01

    The coherence function of sound waves propagating through an intermittently turbulent atmosphere is calculated theoretically. Intermittency mechanisms due to both the turbulent energy cascade (intrinsic intermittency) and spatially uneven production (global intermittency) are modeled using ensembles of quasiwavelets (QWs), which are analogous to turbulent eddies. The intrinsic intermittency is associated with decreasing spatial density (packing fraction) of the QWs with decreasing size. Global intermittency is introduced by allowing the local strength of the turbulence, as manifested by the amplitudes of the QWs, to vary in space according to superimposed Markov processes. The resulting turbulence spectrum is then used to evaluate the coherence function of a plane sound wave undergoing line-of-sight propagation. Predictions are made by a general simulation method and by an analytical derivation valid in the limit of Gaussian fluctuations in signal phase. It is shown that the average coherence function increases as a result of both intrinsic and global intermittency. When global intermittency is very strong, signal phase fluctuations become highly non-Gaussian and the average coherence is dominated by episodes with weak turbulence. PMID:18681567

  8. Variability of the atmospheric turbulence in the region lake of Baykal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botygina, N. N.; Kopylov, E. A.; Lukin, V. P.; Kovadlo, P. G.; Shihovcev, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The estimations of the fried parameter according to micrometeorological and optical measurements in the atmospheric surface layer in the area of lake Baikal, Baikal astrophysical Observatory. According to the archive of NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data obtained vertical distribution of temperature pulsations, and revealed the most pronounced atmospheric layers with high turbulence. A comparison of astronomical conditions vision in winter and in summer. By the registration of optical radiation of the Sun with telescopes, ground-based there is a need to compensate for the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Atmospheric turbulence reduces the angular resolution of the observed objects and distorts the structure of the obtained images. To improve image quality, and ideally closer to angular resolution, limited only by diffraction, it is necessary to implement and use adaptive optics system. The specificity of image correction using adaptive optics is that it is necessary not only to compensate for the random jitter of the image as a whole, but also adjust the geometry of the individual parts of the image. Evaluation of atmospheric radius of coherence (Fried parameter) are of interest not only for site-testing research space, but also are the basis for the efficient operation of adaptive optical systems 1 .

  9. Response properties of atmospheric turbulence measurement instruments using Russian research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunin, M. A.; Hiyama, T.

    2004-11-01

    Instruments that measure atmospheric turbulence for the estimation of turbulent fluxes of heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide were tested in the laboratory and during in-flight conditions aboard a Russian research Ilyushin-18 aircraft. The response characteristics of the aircraft turbulence sensors were first tested to decrease measurement errors for turbulent heat transfer and fluxes, including water vapour flux, before being installed on the Ilyushin-18 aircraft that was used in joint Russian-Japanese atmospheric boundary-layer research. The results show that the atmospheric turbulence measured in a frequency range of 0.01 to 10 Hz yielded proper estimates of fluxes. Errors in measurements of the turbulence made from the aircraft were also analysed. Aerodynamic distortions linked to the aircraft's body and propellers were determined from flight test experiments. Time lags between vertical wind speed fluctuations and air temperature fluctuations measured by the aircraft thermometer, and those between vertical wind speed fluctuations and air humidity fluctuations measured by an ultraviolet hygrometer (open-path system) and an infrared hygrometer (closed-path system) were estimated. The vertical wind speed and air temperature sensor measurements showed no time lag, but a time lag of 0.6 s occurred between vertical wind speed and ultraviolet hygrometer measurements. The time lag between vertical wind speed and the infrared hygrometer measurements depended on flight conditions due to air pumping load, and had to be defined for each sampling leg. Accounting for the time lag was critical for water vapour flux measurements and helped to eliminate large systematic errors.

  10. Target-in-the-loop remote sensing of laser beam and atmospheric turbulence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Mikhail A; Lachinova, Svetlana L; Majumdar, Arun K

    2016-07-01

    A new target-in-the-loop (TIL) atmospheric sensing concept for in situ remote measurements of major laser beam characteristics and atmospheric turbulence parameters is proposed and analyzed numerically. The technique is based on utilization of an integral relationship between complex amplitudes of the counterpropagating optical waves known as overlapping integral or interference metric, whose value is preserved along the propagation path. It is shown that the interference metric can be directly measured using the proposed TIL sensing system composed of a single-mode fiber-based optical transceiver and a remotely located retro-target. The measured signal allows retrieval of key beam and atmospheric turbulence characteristics including scintillation index and the path-integrated refractive index structure parameter. PMID:27409206

  11. The upper atmosphere of Uranus - A critical test of isotropic turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Elliot, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Nicholson, P.; Matthews, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of the August 15, 1980, Uranus occultation of KM 12, obtained from Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory, European Southern Observatory, and Cerro Las Campanas Observatory, are used to compare the atmospheric structure at points separated by approximately 140 km along the planetary limb. The results reveal striking, but by no means perfect correlation of the light curves, ruling out isotropic turbulence as the cause of the light curve spikes. The atmosphere is strongly layered, and any acceptable turbulence model must accommodate the axial ratios of greater than about 60 which are observed. The mean temperature of the atmosphere is 150 plus or minus 15 K for the region near number density 10 to the 14th per cu cm. Derived temperature variations of vertical scale approximately 130 km and amplitude plus or minus 5 K are in agreement for all stations, and correlated spikes correspond to low-amplitude temperature variations with a vertical scale of several kilometers.

  12. Research on diversity receive technology for wireless optical communication using PPM in weak turbulence atmosphere channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2014-09-01

    In order to mitigate atmospheric turbulence, the free space optical (FSO) system model with spatial diversity is analyzed based on intensity detection pulse position modulation (PPM) in the weak turbulence atmosphere. The slot error rate (SER) calculating formula of the system without diversity is derived under pulse position modulation firstly. Then as a benchmark, independent of identical distribution, the average slot error rates of the three linear combining technologies, which are the maximal ratio combining (MRC), equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SelC), are compared. Simulation results show that the performance of system is the best improved by MRC, followed by EGC, and is poor by SelC, but SelC is simpler and more convenient. Spatial diversity is efficient to improve the performance and has strong ability on resistance to atmospheric channel decline. The above scheme is more suitable for optical wireless communication systems.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of turbulence in the free atmosphere and behind aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Dürbeck, T.; Gerz, T.

    1997-02-01

    The method of large-eddy simulation has been used for a wide variety of atmospheric flow problems. This paper gives an overview on recent applications of this method to turbulence in the free atmosphere under stably stratified conditions. In particular, flows in the wake of aircraft are studied in light of the potential impact of aircraft exhausts on the chemical and climatological state of the atmosphere. It is shown that different profiles of heat and moisture in the initial conditions of a jet representing engine exhaust gases may cause larger water saturation and hence earlier contrail formation than assumed up to now. The instability of trailing vortices in the wake of an aircraft is simulated up to the fully turbulent regime. The vertical diffusivity of aircraft exhaust is large in the vortex regime and much smaller than horizontal diffusivities in the later diffusion regime. The three-dimensional formation of a critical layer and breaking of gravity waves is simulated.

  14. Use of a moiré deflectometer on a telescope for atmospheric turbulence measurements.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Saifollah

    2010-05-01

    An instrument has been built for the study of the atmospheric turbulence by measuring the fluctuation of the angle of arrival across a telescope aperture using moiré deflectometry. A slightly divergent laser beam passes through a turbulent ground level atmosphere and enters the telescope aperture. The laser beam is recollimated behind the telescope's focal point by means of a collimator. The collimated beam passes through a moiré deflectometer. The fluctuating self-image of the first grating is formed on the second grating of the moiré deflectometer and fluctuating moiré fringes are formed. Using moiré fringe fluctuations we have calculated the fluctuations of the angle of arrival, the Fried's parameter r(0), and the atmospheric refractive index structure constant. Because of the magnifications of the telescope and moiré deflectometry, the precision of the technique can potentially be 1 order of magnitude more precise than previous methods. PMID:20436606

  15. Higher-order laser beam scintillation in weakly turbulent marine atmospheric medium.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-04-01

    The atmosphere above the sea or ocean, known as the marine atmosphere, affects optical waves propagating through it in a different manner than the atmosphere above land. Like other system design parameters, intensity fluctuations of laser light propagating in marine atmosphere, quantified by the scintillation index, also show different variations. The on-axis scintillations of higher-order laser beams are formulated and evaluated when such excitations are employed in a weakly turbulent marine atmospheric medium. Variations of the scintillation index with respect to the changes in the Gaussian beam size of the higher-order mode, link length, wavelength, and structure constant are reported. Our results can be used in the design of an optical wireless communication link design operating in marine atmospheres. PMID:27140788

  16. Influence of thermal deformations of resonators on propagation properties of laser annular beams through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yufeng; Peng, Fang; Han, Junpeng

    2013-02-01

    Based on the laser field from a positive confocal unstable resonator, considering the influence of thermal distortion of the internal resonator mirror on the annular beam, the propagation characteristics of the annular beam through turbulent atmosphere are investigated by means of the fast Fourier transform algorithm (FFT). The intensity distributions of the output laser far-field are obtained to analyze the propagation characteristics of laser annular beam through the turbulent atmosphere, which is a function about different propagation distances. The results show that the peak intensity of the laser pattern becomes depressed and the spread of the far field diagram patterns is broadened under the increasing of the transmission distance and the thermal distortion of the laser resonator. β-parameter and strehl ratio are introduced to estimate the annular beam quality characteristics. It is found that the annular beam through strong turbulence influences much less obviously than the annular beam through weak turbulence on the quality characteristics with thermal distortion. In the same atmospheric conditions with a certain distance, the greater the mirror thermal distortion is, the worse the annular beam quality characteristics is.

  17. A study of key features of the RAE atmospheric turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, W. F.; Heffley, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complex atmospheric turbulence model for use in aircraft simulation is analyzed in terms of its temporal, spectral, and statistical characteristics. First, a direct comparison was made between cases of the RAE model and the more conventional Dryden turbulence model. Next the control parameters of the RAE model were systematically varied and the effects noted. The RAE model was found to possess a high degree of flexibility in its characteristics, but the individual control parameters are cross-coupled in terms of their effect on various measures of intensity, bandwidth, and probability distribution.

  18. The effects of atmospheric turbulence on precision optical measurements used for antenna-pointing compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N.

    1989-01-01

    Blind pointing of the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-meter antennas can be improved if distortions of the antenna structure caused by unpredictable environmental loads can be measured in real-time, and the resulting boresight shifts evaluated and incorporated into the pointing control loops. The measurement configuration of a proposed pointing compensation system includes an optical range sensor that measures distances to selected points on the antenna surface. The effect of atmospheric turbulence on the accuracy of optical distance measurements and a method to make in-situ determinations of turbulence-induced measurement errors are discussed.

  19. Statistics of some atmospheric turbulence records relevant to aircraft response calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.; Fischer, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Methods for characterizing atmospheric turbulence are described. The methods illustrated include maximum likelihood estimation of the integral scale and intensity of records obeying the von Karman transverse power spectral form, constrained least-squares estimation of the parameters of a parametric representation of autocorrelation functions, estimation of the power spectra density of the instantaneous variance of a record with temporally fluctuating variance, and estimation of the probability density functions of various turbulence components. Descriptions of the computer programs used in the computations are given, and a full listing of these programs is included.

  20. Atmospheric turbulence in complex terrain: Verifying numerical model results with observations by remote-sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P. W.

    2009-03-01

    The Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is situated in an area of complex terrain. Turbulent flow due to terrain disruption could occur in the vicinity of HKIA when winds from east to southwest climb over Lantau Island, a mountainous island to the south of the airport. Low-level turbulence is an aviation hazard to the aircraft flying into and out of HKIA. It is closely monitored using remote-sensing instruments including Doppler LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) systems and wind profilers in the airport area. Forecasting of low-level turbulence by numerical weather prediction models would be useful in the provision of timely turbulence warnings to the pilots. The feasibility of forecasting eddy dissipation rate (EDR), a measure of turbulence intensity adopted in the international civil aviation community, is studied in this paper using the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS). Super-high resolution simulation (within the regime of large eddy simulation) is performed with a horizontal grid size down to 50 m for some typical cases of turbulent airflow at HKIA, such as spring-time easterly winds in a stable boundary layer and gale-force southeasterly winds associated with a typhoon. Sensitivity of the simulation results with respect to the choice of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) parameterization scheme in RAMS is also examined. RAMS simulation with Deardorff (1980) TKE scheme is found to give the best result in comparison with actual EDR observations. It has the potential for real-time forecasting of low-level turbulence in short-term aviation applications (viz. for the next several hours).

  1. Reciprocity-enhanced optical communication through atmospheric turbulence - part II: communication architectures and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puryear, Andrew L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Parenti, Ronald R.

    2012-10-01

    Free-space optical communication provides rapidly deployable, dynamic communication links that are capable of very high data rates compared with those of radio-frequency systems. As such, free-space optical communication is ideal for mobile platforms, for platforms that require the additional security afforded by the narrow divergence of a laser beam, and for systems that must be deployed in a relatively short time frame. In clear-weather conditions the data rate and utility of free-space optical communication links are primarily limited by fading caused by micro-scale atmospheric temperature variations that create parts-per-million refractive-index fluctuations known as atmospheric turbulence. Typical communication techniques to overcome turbulence-induced fading, such as interleavers with sophisticated codes, lose viability as the data rate is driven higher or the delay requirement is driven lower. This paper, along with its companion [J. H. Shapiro and A. Puryear, "Reciprocity-Enhanced Optical Communication through Atmospheric Turbulence-Part I: Reciprocity Proofs and Far-Field Power Transfer"], present communication systems and techniques that exploit atmospheric reciprocity to overcome turbulence which are viable for high data rate and low delay requirement systems. Part I proves that reciprocity is exhibited under rather general conditions, and derives the optimal power-transfer phase compensation for far-field operation. The Part II paper presents capacity-achieving architectures that exploit reciprocity to overcome the complexity and delay issues that limit state-of-the art free-space optical communications. Further, this paper uses theoretical turbulence models to determine the performance—delay, throughput, and complexity—of the proposed architectures.

  2. Interaction of the sonic boom with atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusak, Zvi; Cole, Julian D.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical research was carried out to study the effect of free-stream turbulence on sonic boom pressure fields. A new transonic small-disturbance model to analyze the interactions of random disturbances with a weak shock was developed. The model equation has an extended form of the classic small-disturbance equation for unsteady transonic aerodynamics. An alternative approach shows that the pressure field may be described by an equation that has an extended form of the classic nonlinear acoustics equation that describes the propagation of sound beams with narrow angular spectrum. The model shows that diffraction effects, nonlinear steepening effects, focusing and caustic effects and random induced vorticity fluctuations interact simultaneously to determine the development of the shock wave in space and time and the pressure field behind it. A finite-difference algorithm to solve the mixed type elliptic-hyperbolic flows around the shock wave was also developed. Numerical calculations of shock wave interactions with various deterministic and random fluctuations will be presented in a future report.

  3. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  4. Statistical analysis of atmospheric turbulence about a simulated block building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steely, S. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An array of towers instrumented to measure the three components of wind speed was used to study atmospheric flow about a simulated block building. Two-point spacetime correlations of the longitudinal velocity component were computed along with two-point spatial correlations. These correlations are in good agreement with fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics. The two-point spatial correlations computed directly were compared with correlations predicted by Taylor's hypothesis and excellent agreement was obtained at the higher levels which were out of the building influence. The correlations fall off significantly in the building wake but recover beyond the wake to essentially the same values in the undisturbed, higher regions.

  5. VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine) stochastic loads produced by atmospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). A principal source of blade fatigue is thought to be the stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence. This paper discusses the development of a model for the simulation of these stochastic loads, given the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties. A Double-Multiple-Streamtube analysis is employed, which includes the effects of wind shear. Reynolds number variations, different airfoil sections and chord lengths along the blade span, and an empirical model for dynamic stall effects. Calculations are presented for the VAWT 34-m Test Bed currently being assembled at Bushland, Texas. Time histories of the loads, as well as their Fourier spectra, are presented and discussed. An unexpected finding is that the average output power is predicted to be more sensitive to turbulence level than had previously been thought. 24 refs., 11 figs.

  6. SWIR sky glow imaging for detection of turbulence in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David; Nolasco, Rudy; Allen, Jeff; Myers, Mike; Gonglewski, John; Fertig, Gregory; Burns, Dennis; Mons, Ishan

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band between 0.9 and 1.7 μm wave length. This has been demonstrated as an effective illumination source for night time imaging applications. It addition it has been shown that observation of the spatial and temporal variations of the illumination can be used to characterize atmospheric tidal wave actions in the sky glow region. These spatiotemporal variations manifest themselves as traveling wave patterns whose period and velocity are related to the wind velocity at 85 km as well as the turbulence induced by atmospheric vertical instabilities. Ground to space observation systems especially those employing adaptive optics are adversely affected by high altitude turbulence and winds. In this paper we propose the use of sky glow observations to predict and characterize image system degradation due to upper atmosphere turbulence.

  7. Remote sensing of the turbulence characteristics of a planetary atmosphere by radio occultation of a space probe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Ishimaru, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of small-scale turbulence on radio waves propagating through a planetary atmosphere. The analysis provides a technique for inferring the turbulence characteristics of a planetary atmosphere from the radio signals received from a spacecraft as it is occulted by the planet. The planetary turbulence is assumed to be localized and smoothly varying, with the structure constant varying exponentially with altitude. Rytov's method is used to derive the variance of log-amplitude and phase fluctuations of a wave propagating through the atmosphere.

  8. Recovery of image distorted by turbulent atmosphere using phase-conjugate image generated by difference frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xingquan; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate dynamic recovery of blurred images caused by atmospheric turbulence. In particular, using a phase-conjugate wave generated by a second-order nonlinear crystal or composite, we restore the original quality of the image after the optical radiation forming the image propagates through the turbulent atmosphere. One of the key elements for our experiment is a rotating phase plate being placed in the beam path for simulating turbulent atmosphere. Using the nonlinear composite, we demonstrate that the image recovery is insensitive to the polarization of the optical radiation forming the image.

  9. Recovery of image distorted by turbulent atmosphere using phase-conjugate image generated by difference frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Xingquan; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate dynamic recovery of blurred images caused by atmospheric turbulence. In particular, using a phase-conjugate wave generated by a second-order nonlinear crystal or composite, we restore the original quality of the image after the optical radiation forming the image propagates through the turbulent atmosphere. One of the key elements for our experiment is a rotating phase plate being placed in the beam path for simulating turbulent atmosphere. Using the nonlinear composite, we demonstrate that the image recovery is insensitive to the polarization of the optical radiation forming the image.

  10. Near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Tariq; Zeller, John; Magee, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Currently there are extensive modeling and measurement capabilities for the region extending from 100 ft above sea surface to space, but few such capabilities exist for the region extending up to 10 ft above the sea surface. By measuring and characterizing conditions in the marine boundary layer existing below 30 ft above the sea surface such as turbulence and extinction, the optical communication capabilities of maritime vessels when operating at or near the surface may be extended and enhanced. Key physical parameters such as absorption, scattering, and turbulence strength (Cn 2) along the propagation path have a degree of variability on meteorological conditions as well optical wavelength. Modeling of the atmospheric environment is thus critical in order to generate a good understanding of optical propagation through the atmosphere. NUWC is utilizing software provided by MZA to model Cn 2 and resultant beam propagation characteristics through the near-marine boundary layer. We are developing the capability of near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurements and modeling as well as optical laser link testing at outdoor test sites. Measurements are performed with optical laser links (e.g., bit rate error), scintillometer, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) cameras, while turbulence and propagation modeling is achieved using MODTRAN5, ATMTools, NSLOT, LEEDR, and WaveTrain modeling and simulation code. By better understanding the effects of turbulence on optical transmission in the near-marine boundary layer through modeling and experimental measurements, measures can be implemented to reduce the bit error rate and increase data throughput, enabling more efficient and accurate communication link capabilities.

  11. Turbulent Transport Mechanics at the Forest-Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, Gabriel

    1999-11-01

    A new method is developed to estimate momentum and scalar sources and sinks from measured mean concentration profiles within forested canopies (termed as the "Inverse" problem). The method combines many of the practical advantages of a previously proposed Lagrangian Localized Near Field theory and higher order Eulerian closure principles. Particularly, this "hybrid" method successfully combines the essential physics of closure modeling and the robustness of the regression source inversion developed for the Localized Near Field theory. The method is tested using measured mean CO2 concentration and eddy-covariance fluxes collected in a 15 year-old pine forest for a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions and using temperature and sensible heat flux measurements collected in a wind tunnel for a planar heat source. It is demonstrated that the newly proposed method is well suited for routine source and flux distribution inferences within the canopy.

  12. A method of generating atmospheric turbulence with a liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.; Santiago, Freddie; Martinez, Ty; Andrews, Jonathan R.; Restaino, Sergio R.; Corley, Melissa; Teare, Scott W.; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2010-08-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a new method for generating atmospheric turbulence and a testbed that simulates its aberrations far more inexpensively and with greater fidelity using a Liquid Crystal (LC) Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) than many other methods. This system allows the simulation of atmospheric seeing conditions ranging from very poor to very good and different algorithms may be easily employed on the device for comparison. These simulations can be dynamically generated and modified very quickly and easily. In addition, many models for simulating turbulence often neglect temporal transitions along with different seeing conditions. Using the statistically independent set of Karhunen-Loeve polynomials in conjunction with Kolmogorov statistics in this model provides an accurate spatial and temporal model for simulating turbulence. An added benefit to using a LC SLM is its low cost; and multiple devices can be used to simulate multiple layers of turbulence in a laboratory environment. Current testing with using multiple LC SLMs is under investigation at the Naval Research Laboratory and the Naval Postgraduate School.

  13. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30" FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1" FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed. PMID:26906859

  14. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence: three-layer altitude model.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Arkadi; Golbraikh, Ephim; Kopeika, Norman S

    2008-12-01

    Turbulence properties of communication links (optical and microwave) in terms of log-amplitude variance are studied on the basis of a three-layer model of refractive index fluctuation spectrum in the free atmosphere. We suggest a model of turbulence spectra (Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov) changing with altitude on the basis of obtained experimental and theoretical data for turbulence profile in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. PMID:19037366

  15. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence: three-layer altitude model

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberman, Arkadi; Golbraikh, Ephim; Kopeika, Norman S

    2008-12-01

    Turbulence properties of communication links (optical and microwave) in terms of log-amplitude variance are studied on the basis of a three-layer model of refractive index fluctuation spectrum in the free atmosphere. We suggest a model of turbulence spectra (Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov) changing with altitude on the basis of obtained experimental and theoretical data for turbulence profile in the troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  16. Measurement simulation of spatial coherence and density degree by turbulence of aerosol and CO II in atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayama, Hiroshi; Li, Wei

    2006-09-01

    Atmopheric turbulence is one of the important correction factors to evaluate the earth's surface using a sinsor on a satellite. CO II and aerosol are selected as factors of turbulence. The effects of turbulence caused by CO II and aerosol on the light reflected from the earth's surface are estimated by measuring the degradation of spatial coherence of light in a chamber in which atmospheric turbulence is generated. Dry ice is used to generate carbon dioxide gas. degradation of spatial coherence is measured in relation to the increase of CO II. Turbulence caused by aerosol is measured by density of smoke cigarettes. The spatial coherence of light in the chamber degrades in relation to the increase of aerosol and as a result the turbulence increases. The relation between the turbulence and the degree of spatial coherence is explained in a formula.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  18. Beam wander of J 0- and I 0-Bessel Gaussian beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çil, C. Z.; Eyyuboğlu, H. T.; Baykal, Y.; Korotkova, O.; Cai, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Root mean square (rms) beam wander of J 0-Bessel Gaussian and I 0-Bessel Gaussian beams, normalized by the rms beam wander of the fundamental Gaussian beam, is evaluated in atmospheric turbulence. Our formulation is based on the first and the second statistical moments obtained from the Rytov series. It is found that after propagating in atmospheric turbulence, the collimated J 0-Bessel Gaussian and the I 0-Bessel Gaussian beams have smaller rms beam wander than that of the Gaussian beam, regardless of the choice of Bessel width parameter. However, the extent of such an advantage depends on the chosen width parameter, Gaussian source size, propagation distance and the wavelength. Focusing at finite distances of the considered beams causes the rms beam wander to decrease sharply at the propagation distances equal to the focusing parameter.

  19. Determining beam properties at an inaccessible plane using the reciprocity of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W.; Wu, C.; Davis, C. C.

    2015-09-01

    A turbulent, atmospheric channel can be considered to be reciprocal at any one instance in time. Reciprocity is a powerful property that can be used to compensate for the distortions caused by turbulence such as beam scintillation, spreading, and wander. Here we investigate the use of reciprocity in instances where a beam is propagated to an uncooperative target. Theoretical work [V. P. Lukin and M. I. Charnotskii , Sov. J. Quantum Electron., 12(5), 602 (1982)] has shown that reciprocity principles indicate that properties of the beam incident on a target fluctuate synchronously with the intensity distribution scattered from the target. Here we extend this purely analytical treatment using phase screen simulations. We show that there exists a correlation between the intensity imaged by the receiver and the field incident on the target. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the intensity at a specific location could be used to drive an adaptive optics system that corrects for atmospheric phase distortions.

  20. Slant path average intensity of finite optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Gaogang

    2006-10-01

    The average intensity of finite laser beam propagating through turbulent atmosphere is calculated from the extended Huygens Fresnel principle. Formulas are presented for the slant path average intensity from an arbitrarily truncated Gaussian beam. The new expressions are derived from the modified von Karman spectrum for refractive-index fluctuations, quadratic approximation of the structure function, and Gaussian approximation for the product of Gaussian function and Bessel function. It is shown that the form of average intensity is not a Gaussian function but a polynomial of the power of the binomial function, Gaussian function, and the incomplete gamma function. The results also show that the mean irradiance of a finite optical beam propagating in slant path turbulent atmosphere not only depends on the effective beam radius at the transmitting aperture plane, propagation distance, and long-term lateral coherence length of spherical wave, but also on the radius of emit aperture.

  1. Scintillation and aperture averaging for Gaussian beams through non-Kolmogorov maritime atmospheric turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-12-14

    Analytic expression of the receiver-aperture-averaged scintillation index (SI) was derived for Gaussian-beam waves propagating through non-Kolmogorov maritime atmospheric environment by establishing a generalized maritime atmospheric spectrum model. The error performance of an intensity-modulated and direct-detection (IM/DD) free-space optical (FSO) system was investigated using the derived SI and log-normal distribution. The combined effects of non-Kolmogorov power-law exponent, turbulence inner scale, structure parameter, propagation distance, receiver aperture, and wavelength were also evaluated. Results show that inner scale and power-law exponent obviously affect SI. Large wavelength and receiver aperture can mitigate the effects of turbulence. The proposed model can be evaluated ship-to-ship/shore FSO system performance. PMID:26699050

  2. Scintillation statistics caused by atmospheric turbulence and speckle in satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Iyer, R. S.; Taylor, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    We study the statistics of scintillation at the ground-based receiver for the earth-space-earth retroreflector configuration of satellite laser ranging. These statistics are governed by the joint effects of atmospheric turbulence and speckle produced by the retroreflector array. An expression for the probability density function of scintillation is obtained and evaluated numerically. Comparison of the normalized variance of scintillation calculated by using this function shows good agreement with results obtained by other methods.

  3. Propagation properties of partially coherent four-petal Gaussian vortex beams in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dajun; Wang, Yaochuan; Yin, Hongming

    2016-04-01

    The partially coherent four-petal Gaussian vortex beam is introduced and described by analytical expressions. The analytical propagation equation for partially coherent four-petal Gaussian vortex beam in turbulent atmosphere is derived by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral formula. The influences of refraction index structure, beam order n, topological charge M and the coherence length on the average intensity distributions of beam are investigated by numerical examples.

  4. A method for the analysis of nonlinearities in aircraft dynamic response to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, K.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical method is developed which combines the equivalent linearization technique for the analysis of the response of nonlinear dynamic systems with the amplitude modulated random process (Press model) for atmospheric turbulence. The method is initially applied to a bilinear spring system. The analysis of the response shows good agreement with exact results obtained by the Fokker-Planck equation. The method is then applied to an example of control-surface displacement limiting in an aircraft with a pitch-hold autopilot.

  5. Investigating the intermittency of turbulence in the stable atmospheric boundary layer - a field data and stochastic modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, N.; Von Larcher, T. G.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Klein, R.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Intermittent turbulence is a common feature of stably stratified atmospheric flows, yet its modeling is still problematic. Mesoscale motions such as gravity waves, Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities or density currents may trigger intermittent turbulence and greatly complicate the modeling and measurements of the stable boundary layer (SBL). In this study we investigate the intermittency of turbulence in very stable conditions by applying new statistical analysis tools to the existing SnoHATS dataset, collected in Switzerland over the Glacier de la Plaine Morte in 2006. These tools could then be used to develop stochastic parameterization for the SBL for use in weather or climate models. The SnoHATS dataset includes measurements of atmospheric turbulence collected by horizontal arrays of sonic anemometers. This study applies timeseries analysis tools developed for meteorological data to analyze the SnoHATS dataset with a new perspective. Turbulence in very stable conditions exhibits intermittency, and there is interplay between larger scale atmospheric flow features (at the so-called submesoscales) and onset of turbulence. We investigate the use of statistical tools such as hidden Markov models (HMM) and nonstationary multivariate autoregressive factor models (VARX) as a way to define the interactions between lower frequency modes and turbulence modes. The statistical techniques allow for separation of the data according to metastable states, such as quiet and turbulent periods in the stratified atmosphere.

  6. Study of air-pollution mixing heights and atmospheric turbulence over New York City - data report

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Henderson, C.; Volk, T.; Hoffert, M.I.

    1982-08-01

    A major factor that affects the variation of ground-level concentration of air pollutants such as particulates, sulfur oxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and photochemical oxidants is the mixing height in the earth's atmosphere close to the surface. This is the layer within which processes associated with the atmospheric turbulence generated by the surface roughness and heating dominate. In order to investigate the variation of this mixing height and associated turbulence over New York City, an experiment was performed over the Barney building of New York University located in lower Manhattan. The mixing height was measured continuously with an acoustic sounder for 10 days from the roof of the Barney building estimated to be 50m above the street level. Several meteorological instruments were used on a 16m tower located on the roof of this building to study other atmospheric variables in the mixed layer. A description is given of the instruments and the data acquisition system used in the experiment. The data reveal significant heights of the mixed layer (200 to 400m) during nocturnal conditions which are probably due to urban heat island effects. Horizontal turbulence levels vary between 10 and 20 percent.

  7. A non-gaussian model of continuous atmospheric turbulence for use in aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, P. M.; Joppa, R. G.; Ganzer, V. M.

    1976-01-01

    A non-Gaussian model of atmospheric turbulence is presented and analyzed. The model is restricted to the regions of the atmosphere where the turbulence is steady or continuous, and the assumptions of homogeneity and stationarity are justified. Also spatial distribution of turbulence is neglected, so the model consists of three independent, stationary stochastic processes which represent the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal gust components. The non-Gaussian and Gaussian models are compared with experimental data, and it is shown that the Gaussian model underestimates the number of high velocity gusts which occur in the atmosphere, while the non-Gaussian model can be adjusted to match the observed high velocity gusts more satisfactorily. Application of the proposed model to aircraft response is investigated, with particular attention to the response power spectral density, the probability distribution, and the level crossing frequency. A numerical example is presented which illustrates the application of the non-Gaussian model to the study of an aircraft autopilot system. Listings and sample results of a number of computer programs used in working with the model are included.

  8. Study of optimum methods of optical communication. [accounting for the effects of the turbulent atmosphere and quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Abstracts are reported relating to the techniques used in the research concerning optical transmission of information. Communication through the turbulent atmosphere, quantum mechanics, and quantum communication theory are discussed along with the results.

  9. Using an atmospheric turbulence model for the stochastic model of geodetic VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsig, Sebastian; Artz, Thomas; Iddink, Andreas; Nothnagel, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Space-geodetic techniques at radio wavelength, such as global navigation satellite systems and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), suffer from refractivity of the Earth's atmosphere. These highly dynamic processes, particularly refractivity variations in the neutral atmosphere, contribute considerably to the error budget of these space-geodetic techniques. Here, microscale fluctuations in refractivity lead to elevation-dependent uncertainties and induce physical correlations between the observations. However, up to now such correlations are not considered routinely in the stochastic model of space-geodetic observations, which leads to very optimistic standard deviations of the derived target parameters, such as Earth orientation parameters and station positions. In this study, the standard stochastic model of VLBI observations, which only includes, almost exclusively, the uncertainties from the VLBI correlation process, is now augmented by a variance-covariance matrix derived from an atmospheric turbulence model. Thus, atmospheric refractivity fluctuations in space and time can be quantified. One of the main objectives is to realize a suitable stochastic model of VLBI observations in an operational way. In order to validate the new approach, the turbulence model is applied to several VLBI observation campaigns consisting of different network geometries leading the path for the next-generation VLBI campaigns. It is shown that the stochastic model of VLBI observations can be improved by using high-frequency atmospheric variations and, thus, refining the stochastic model leads to far more realistic standard deviations of the target parameters. The baseline length repeatabilities as a general measure of accuracy of baseline length determinations improve for the turbulence-based solution. Further, this method is well suited for routine VLBI data analysis with limited computational costs.

  10. Turbulence in wind turbine wakes under different atmospheric conditions from static and scanning Doppler LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, Valerie; Reuder, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Wake characteristics are of great importance for wind park performances and turbine loads. Wind tunnel experiments helped to validate wake model simulations under neutral atmospheric conditions. However, recent studies show strongest wake characteristics and power losses in stable atmospheric conditions. Considering all three occurring atmospheric conditions this study presents a turbulence analysis of wind turbine wake flows measured by static and scanning Doppler LiDARs at the coast of the Netherlands. We use data collected by three Windcubes v1, a scanning Windcube 100S and sonic anemometers during the Wind Turbine Wake Experiment - Wieringermeer (WINTWEX-W). Turbulence parameters such as Turbulence Intensity (TI) and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) are retrieved from the collected raw data. Results show highest turbulence on the flanks of the wake where strong wind shear dominates. On average the spatial turbulence distribution becomes more homogeneous with conical areas of enhanced TI. Highest turbulence and strongest wind deficits occur during stable weather conditions. Despite the ongoing research on the reliability of turbulence retrievals of Doppler LiDAR data, the results are consistent with sonic anemometer measurements and show promising opportunities for a qualitative study of wake characteristics such as wake strength and wake peak frequencies.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of contrail evolution in the vortex phase and its interaction with atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot, J.; Paoli, R.; Thouron, O.; Cariolle, D.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. In this paper, fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The initial flow field is composed of the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail descent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex breakup dominates over background turbulence until the end of the vortex regime and controls the mixing with ambient air. This results in mean microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. However, the background humidity and temperature have a first-order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent studies.

  12. A nonlinear OPC technique for laser beam control in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Khizhnyak, A.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.; DeSandre, L.; Hafizi, B.

    2013-05-01

    A viable beam control technique is critical for effective laser beam transmission through turbulent atmosphere. Most of the established approaches require information on the impact of perturbations on wavefront propagated waves. Such information can be acquired by measuring the characteristics of the target-scattered light arriving from a small, preferably diffraction-limited, beacon. This paper discusses an innovative beam control approach that can support formation of a tight laser beacon in deep turbulence conditions. The technique employs Brillouin enhanced fourwave mixing (BEFWM) to generate a localized beacon spot on a remote image-resolved target. Formation of the tight beacon doesn't require a wavefront sensor, AO system, or predictive feedback algorithm. Unlike conventional adaptive optics methods which allow wavefront conjugation, the proposed total field conjugation technique is critical for beam control in the presence of strong turbulence and can be achieved by using this non-linear BEFWM technique. The phase information retrieved from the established beacon beam can then be used in conjunction with an AO system to propagate laser beams in deep turbulence.

  13. Quantum polarization fluctuations of an Airy beam in turbulent atmosphere in a slant path.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Zhang, Licheng

    2016-07-01

    Polarization of light has many applications in quantum information processing, including quantum teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate the polarization fluctuations of Airy beams propagating in a slant turbulent channel under the "few-photon" limit. Using the quantum Stokes parameters and the quantum degree of polarization, we demonstrate that the degree of polarization of Airy beams increases significantly with the large number of the detection photons, and a higher photon-number level can retain the stability of polarization. Numerical simulations show that the longer propagation distance and the stronger turbulence will lead to less oscillatory behaviors and a decrease in the polarization degree of Airy beams, but a bigger exponential truncation factor will cause an increase in the polarization degree of Airy beams. In contrast with Gaussian beams, the degree of polarization of Airy beams is less affected by atmospheric turbulence and propagation distance under the same conditions, which means that Airy beams possess a resilient ability against turbulence-induced perturbations. These results indicate that Airy beams have great potential for applications in long-distance free-space optical communications to improve the performance of a polarization-encoded free-space quantum communication system. PMID:27409692

  14. Digital holography wave-front sensing in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence and thermal blooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Mark F.; Dragulin, Ivan V.; Cargill, Daniel S.; Steinbock, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Digital holography wave-front sensing in the off-axis image plane recording geometry shows distinct potential for directed-energy and remote-sensing applications. For instance, digital holographic detection provides access to the amplitude and wrapped phase associated with an optical field. From the wrapped phase, one can estimate the atmospheric aberrations present and perform adaptive-optics compensation and high-resolution imaging. This paper develops wave-optics simulations which explore the estimation accuracy of digital holography wave-front sensing in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence and thermal blooming. Specifically, this paper models spherical-wave propagation through varying atmospheric conditions along a horizontal propagation path and formulates the field-estimated Strehl ratio as a function of the image-plane sampling, the coherence diameter, the log-amplitude variance, and the distortion number. Such results will allow one to assess the number of pixels needed in a detector array when using digital holographic detection in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence and thermal blooming.

  15. Long-term measurements of atmospheric point-spread functions over littoral waters as determined by atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Schwering, Piet B. W.; Benoist, Koen W.; Gunter, Willem H.; Vrahimis, George; October, Faith J.

    2012-06-01

    During the FATMOSE trial, held over the False Bay, South Africa) from November 2009 until October 2010, day and night (24/7) high resolution images were collected of point sources at a range of 15.7 km. Simultaneously, data were collected on atmospheric parameters, as relevant for the turbulence conditions: air- and sea temperature, windspeed, relative humidity and the structure parameter for refractive index: Cn 2. The data provide statistical information on the mean value and the variance of the atmospheric point spread function and the associated modulation transfer function during series of consecutive frames. This information allows the prediction of the range performance for a given sensor, target and atmospheric condition, which is of great importance for the user of optical sensors in related operational areas and for the developers of image processing algorithms. In addition the occurrence of "lucky shots" in series of frames is investigated: occasional frames with locally small blur spots. The simultaneously measured short exposure blur and the beam wander are compared with simultaneously collected scintillation data along the same path and the Cn 2 data from a locally installed scintillometer. By using two vertically separated sources, the correlation is determined between the beam wander in their images, providing information on the spatial extension of the atmospheric turbulence (eddy size). Examples are shown of the appearance of the blur spot, including skewness and astigmatism effects, which manifest themselves in the third moment of the spot and its distortion. An example is given of an experiment for determining the range performance for a given camera and a bar target on an outgoing boat in the False Bay.

  16. Amplitude Scintillation due to Atmospheric Turbulence for the Deep Space Network Ka-Band Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wheelon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Fast amplitude variations due to atmospheric scintillation are the main concerns for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Ka-band downlink under clear weather conditions. A theoretical study of the amplitude scintillation variances for a finite aperture antenna is presented. Amplitude variances for weak scattering scenarios are examined using turbulence theory to describe atmospheric irregularities. We first apply the Kolmogorov turbulent spectrum to a point receiver for three different turbulent profile models, especially for an exponential model varying with altitude. These analytic solutions then are extended to a receiver with a finite aperture antenna for the three profile models. Smoothing effects of antenna aperture are expressed by gain factors. A group of scaling factor relations is derived to show the dependences of amplitude variances on signal wavelength, antenna size, and elevation angle. Finally, we use these analytic solutions to estimate the scintillation intensity for a DSN Goldstone 34-m receiving station. We find that the (rms) amplitude fluctuation is 0.13 dB at 20-deg elevation angle for an exponential model, while the fluctuation is 0.05 dB at 90 deg. These results will aid us in telecommunication system design and signal-fading prediction. They also provide a theoretical basis for further comparison with other measurements at Ka-band.

  17. 500  Gb/s free-space optical transmission over strong atmospheric turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhen; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-07-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-spectral-efficiency, large-capacity, featured free-space-optical (FSO) transmission system by using low-density, parity-check (LDPC) coded quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) combined with orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing. The strong atmospheric turbulence channel is emulated by two spatial light modulators on which four randomly generated azimuthal phase patterns yielding the Andrews spectrum are recorded. The validity of such an approach is verified by reproducing the intensity distribution and irradiance correlation function (ICF) from the full-scale simulator. Excellent agreement of experimental, numerical, and analytical results is found. To reduce the phase distortion induced by the turbulence emulator, the inexpensive wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (AO) is used. To deal with remaining channel impairments, a large-girth LDPC code is used. To further improve the aggregate data rate, the OAM multiplexing is combined with WDM, and 500 Gb/s optical transmission over the strong atmospheric turbulence channels is demonstrated. PMID:27420516

  18. Research on theory and technology for improving optical receiver efficiency in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bie, Rui; Yuan, Xiuhua; Zhao, Ming

    2009-08-01

    FSO has some significant advantages such as bandwidths, high-data-rate of transfer and less mass, power and volume, and no regulatory restrictions for using frequencies and bandwidths. Atmospheric turbulence is an important factor that constrains the performance of FSO; most of researchers have always been in search of methods to solve this problem. In recent years, the principle and technology of adaptive optics (AO) have been applied to eliminate the influences of turbulent atmosphere. But for a long time, efforts in the traditional AO methods focus on compensating the turbulence on the pupil plane of imaging system, ignoring the differences between the imaging system and FSO. This paper presents a novel space optical receiver that adjusts the wavefront in the rear focal plane of a lens. It is different from common AO technology that system takes the maximum light energy coupled into a fiber as the estimate parameter for reconfiguration wavefront, according to demands for FSO, and realizes a high-speed wavefront compensation receiver without wavefront sensor. Based on these theories, some simulation analysis is implemented and results are compared with traditional AO, it shows that our technique has the better performances than that of general AO. Finally, the farther work and potential application on FSO are discussed in this paper.

  19. Computational ghost imaging with higher-order cosh-Gaussian modulated incoherent sources in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chun-Ling; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Zhi-Min

    2015-10-01

    We show that the resolution of the computational ghost imaging (CGI) system through atmospheric turbulence can be significantly improved by modulating a coherent source with high-order cosh-Gaussian functions. The analytical formula for the CGI system with a higher-order cosh-Gaussian source in turbulent atmosphere is derived and can be viewed as the original object convoluted a point-spread function (PSF). The imaging quality is mainly determined by the size of the PSF, which is closely related to the source parameters of the higher-order cosh-Gaussian beam, the turbulent strength and the propagation distance. Numerical examples are given to clearly see the effects of the above system parameters on the PSF and the quality of the CGI system. Compared with the widely used Gaussian source, it is found that the resolution of CGI can be obviously enhanced by properly adjusting the parameters of the higher-order cosh-Gaussian sources. Thus this kind of shaped source can be used to improve the imaging resolution and may be helpful to the CGI real applications.

  20. Atmospheric Stability & Turbulence from Temperature Profiles over Sicily During Summer 2002 & 2003 HASI Balloon Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Angrilli, F.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretation of the temperature measurements data retrieved during the balloon campaigns (in 2002 and in 2003) for testing HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument), launched from the Italian Space Agency Base in Trapani (Sicily), are presented. Both ascending and descending phases are analysed; data reveal interesting features near the tropopause (present in the region between 11km-14km), where temperature cooling can be related to layers with strong winds (2002 flight); in the troposphere a multistratified structure of the temperature field is observed and discussed (particularly in the 2003 flight) Finally, stability and turbulence of the atmosphere are analysed; the buoyancy N2 parameters for both the flights show lowers value respect to standard tropospheric values corresponding to a lower stability of the atmosphere; still there is a higher stability above the tropopause. The energy spectrum of temperature data is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory: the characteristic k(sup -5/3) behaviour is reproduced.

  1. Active laser radar systems with stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yangjian; Korotkova, Olga; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Baykal, Yahya

    2008-09-29

    Propagation of stochastic electromagnetic beams through paraxial ABCD optical systems operating through turbulent atmosphere is investigated with the help of the ABCD matrices and the generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral. In particular, the analytic formula is derived for the cross-spectral density matrix of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam. We applied our analysis for the ABCD system with a single lens located on the propagation path, representing, in a particular case, the unfolded double-pass propagation scenario of active laser radar. Through a number of numerical examples we investigated the effect of local turbulence strength and lens' parameters on spectral, coherence and polarization properties of the EGSM beam. PMID:18825220

  2. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density. PMID:25321700

  3. Free-space to few-mode-fiber coupling under atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Donghao; Li, Yan; Chen, Erhu; Li, Beibei; Kong, Deming; Li, Wei; Wu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    High speed free space optical communication (FSOC) has taken advantages of components developed for fiber-optic communication systems. Recently, with the rapid development of few-mode-fiber based fiber communication systems, few-mode-fiber components might further promote their applications in FSOC system. The coupling efficiency between free space optical beam and few-mode fibers under atmospheric turbulence effect are investigated in this paper. Both simulation and experimental results show that, compared with single-mode fiber, the coupling efficiencies for a 2-mode fiber and a 4-mode fiber are improved by ~4 dB and ~7 dB respectively in the presence of medium moderate and strong turbulence. Compared with single-mode fiber, the relative standard deviation of received power is restrained by 51% and 66% respectively with a 4-mode and 2-mode fiber. PMID:27505836

  4. The Analyses of Turbulence Characteristics in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Zhang, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulent characteristics in the atmospheric surface layer are investigated using a data-driven method, Hilbert spectral analysis. The results from empirical mode decomposition display a set of intrinsic mode functions whose characteristic scales suggest a dyadic filter-bank property. It can be concluded from the joint probability density function of the intrinsic mode functions that the turbulent properties are totally different under different stratifications: the amplitudes (or energies) are arranged according to the stability parameter [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] for stable conditions, but tend to cluster randomly for unstable cases. The intermittency analyses reveal that second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display a power-law behaviour in the inertial subrange, and that the scaling exponent functions deviate from the theoretical values due to the strong intermittency in the stable boundary layer.

  5. The Analyses of Turbulence Characteristics in the Atmospheric Surface Layer using Arbitrary-order Hilbert Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent characteristics in the atmospheric surface layer are investigated using a data-driven method, Hilbert spectral analysis. The results from empirical mode decomposition display a set of intrinsic mode functions whose characteristic scales suggest a dyadic filter-bank property. It can be concluded from the joint probability density function of the intrinsic mode functions that the turbulent properties are totally different under different stratifications: the amplitudes (or energies) are arranged according to the stability parameter z/L for stable conditions, but tend to cluster randomly for unstable cases. The intermittency analyses reveal that second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display a power-law behaviour in the inertial subrange, and that the scaling exponent functions present deviation, from the theoretical values due to the strong intermittency in the stable boundary layer.

  6. Effects of turbulence on average refraction angles in occultations by planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Haugstad, B. S.

    1978-01-01

    Four separable effects of atmospheric turbulence on average refraction angles in occultation experiments are derived from a simplified analysis, and related to more general formulations by B. S. Haugstad. The major contributors are shown to be due to gradients in height of the strength of the turbulence, and the sense of the resulting changes in refraction angles is explained in terms of Fermat's principle. Because the results of analyses of such gradient effects by W. B. Hubbard and J. R. Jokipii are expressed in other ways, a special effort is made to compare all of the predictions on a common basis. We conclude that there are fundamental differences, and use arguments based on energy conservation and Fermat's principle to help characterize the discrepancies.

  7. A mathematical examination of the press model for atmospheric turbulence. [aircraft design/random processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, K.

    1975-01-01

    The random process used to model atmospheric turbulence in aircraft response problems is examined. The first, second, and higher order probability density and characteristic functions were developed. The concepts of the Press model lead to an approximate procedure for the analysis of the response of linear dynamic systems to a class of non-Gaussian random processes. The Press model accounts for both the Gaussian and non-Gaussian forms of measured turbulence data. The nonstationary aspects of measured data are explicitly described by the transition properties of the random process. The effects of the distribution of the intensity process upon calculated exceedances are examined. It is concluded that the press model with a Gaussian intensity distribution gives a conservative prediction of limit load values.

  8. Dynamic Turbulence Modelling in Large-eddy Simulations of the Cloud-topped Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Mansour, N. N.; Ackerman, A. S.; Stevens, D. E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of large eddy simulation, or LES, to study the atmospheric boundary layer dates back to the early 1970s when Deardor (1972) used a three-dimensional simulation to determine velocity and temperature scales in the convective boundary layer. In 1974 he applied LES to the problem of mixing layer entrainment (Deardor 1974) and in 1980 to the cloud-topped boundary layer (Deardor 1980b). Since that time the LES approach has been applied to atmospheric boundary layer problems by numerous authors. While LES has been shown to be relatively robust for simple cases such as a clear, convective boundary layer (Mason 1989), simulation of the cloud-topped boundary layer has proved more of a challenge. The combination of small length scales and anisotropic turbulence coupled with cloud microphysics and radiation effects places a heavy burden on the turbulence model, especially in the cloud-top region. Consequently, over the past few decades considerable effort has been devoted to developing turbulence models that are better able to parameterize these processes. Much of this work has involved taking parameterizations developed for neutral boundary layers and deriving corrections to account for buoyancy effects associated with the background stratification and local buoyancy sources due to radiative and latent heat transfer within the cloud (see Lilly 1962; Deardor 1980a; Mason 1989; MacVean & Mason 1990, for example). In this paper we hope to contribute to this effort by presenting a number of turbulence models in which the model coefficients are calculated dynamically during the simulation rather than being prescribed a priori.

  9. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  10. Turbulent Energy Spectra and Cospectra of Momentum and Heat Fluxes in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Katul, Gabriel G.; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2015-10-01

    The turbulent energy spectra and cospectra of momentum and sensible heat fluxes are examined theoretically and experimentally with increasing flux Richardson number () in the stable atmospheric surface layer. A cospectral budget model, previously used to explain the bulk relation between the turbulent Prandtl number () and the gradient Richardson number () as well as the relation between and , is employed to interpret field measurements over a lake and a glacier. The shapes of the vertical velocity and temperature spectra, needed for closing the cospectral budget model, are first examined with increasing . In addition, the wavenumber-dependent relaxation time scales for momentum and heat fluxes are inferred from the cospectral budgets and investigated. Using experimental data and proposed extensions to the cospectral budget model, the existence of a `' power-law scaling in the temperature spectra but its absence from the vertical velocity spectra is shown to reduce the magnitude of the maximum flux Richardson number (), which is commonly inferred from the Rf- Ri relation when becomes very large (idealized with ). Moreover, dissimilarity in relaxation time scales between momentum and heat fluxes, also affected by the existence of the `' power-law scaling in the temperature spectra, leads to under near-neutral conditions. It is further shown that the production rate of turbulent kinetic energy decreases more rapidly than that of turbulent potential energy as , which explains the observed disappearance of the inertial subrange in the vertical velocity spectra at a smaller as compared to its counterpart in the temperature spectra. These results further demonstrate novel linkages between the scale-wise turbulent kinetic energy and potential energy distributions and macroscopic relations such as stability correction functions to the mean flow and the - Ri relation.