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Sample records for atmospheric water vapour

  1. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Water Vapour by Pressure Modulation Radiometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G. R.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) was a limb-sounding satellite experiment which used the technique of pressure modulation radiometry to measure the temperature and constituent distributions in the middle atmosphere. Two channels in the SAMS were devoted to the detection of water vapour, but the analysis of these data have produced unexpectedly high mixing ratios in the region of the stratopause. This thesis describes an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between theory and experiment by a laboratory investigation of the pressure modulation of water vapour. The central role of water vapour in the physics and chemistry of the middle atmosphere and previous attempts to measure its abundance are discussed. It is shown that the intercomparison of humidity sensing instruments has not produced a consensus and that the accuracy of the reported measurements is therefore in question. The SAMS water vapour channels are described and the need is shown for a laboratory transmission experiment. The pressure modulation technique is described in chapter 2 and a mathematical formulation is given. The constraints due to contaminant signals and harmonic contributions are considered and the use of the square wave chopping approximation in the interpretation of the measurements is discussed. In chapter 3, the spectroscopy of the H _2O rotation band is considered and it is shown that there are large uncertainties in most aspects of the problem due to the lack of spectroscopic measurements in this spectral region. In particular, the shapes of the collision broadened line wings under both self and foreign broadened conditions are poorly determined, a situation which is especially problematic for pressure modulation radiometry. The pressure modulation of water vapour is investigated in chapter 4 and it is shown by direct measurement of the pressure cycle that the linear model used by previous

  2. Modelling the budget of middle atmospheric water vapour isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, A.; Franz, P.; Bechtel, C.; Groo, J.-U.; Rckmann, T.

    2006-06-01

    A one-dimensional chemistry model is applied to study the stable hydrogen (D) and stable oxygen isotope (17O, 18O) composition of water vapour in stratosphere and mesosphere. In the troposphere, this isotope composition is determined by "physical'' fractionation effects, that are phase changes (e.g. during cloud formation), diffusion processes (e.g. during evaporation from the ocean), and mixing of air masses. Due to these processes water vapour entering the stratosphere first shows isotope depletions in D/H relative to ocean water, which are ~5 times of those in 18O/16O, and secondly is mass-dependently fractionated (MDF), i.e. changes in the isotope ratio 17O/16O are ~0.52 times of those of 18O/16O. In contrast, in the stratosphere and mesosphere "chemical'' fractionation mechanisms, that are the production of HO due to the oxidation of methane, re-cycling of H2O via the HOx family, and isotope exchange reactions considerably enhance the isotope ratios in the water vapour imported from the troposphere. The model reasonably predicts overall enhancements of the stable isotope ratios in H2O by up to ~25% for D/H, ~8.5% for 17O/16O, and ~14% for 18O/16O in the mesosphere relative to the tropopause values. The 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios in H2O are shown to be a measure of the relative fractions of HOx that receive the O atom either from the reservoirs O2 or O3. Throughout the middle atmosphere, MDF O2 is the major donator of oxygen atoms incorporated in OH and HO2 and thus in H2O. In the stratosphere the known mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signal in O3 is in a first step transferred to the NOx family and only in a second step to HOx and H2O. In contrast to CO2, O(1D) only plays a minor role in this MIF transfer. The major uncertainty in our calculation arises from poorly quantified isotope exchange reaction rate coefficients and kinetic isotope fractionation factors.

  3. Atmospheric water vapour and cloud water: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, E.

    Hydro-meteorological parameters i.e. precipitable water, cloud water and ice content, and precipitation are most variable parameters in the atmosphere. This is the main reason why representative direct measurements of these properties are hardly available. Remote sensing with satellite-borne instruments in particular in the microwave spectral range is a way out of this dilemma. A number of algorithms has been developed. The different methods how to proceed in the development of such algorithms are discussed. Verification of the retrieved products in particular the liquid water path is a great problem, a few ideas will be discussed. Results will be shown for the total precipitable water W and liquid water path LWP over the Atlantic Ocean for different time scales. The structure of the W field is very similar for the same month in different years. But LWP is very variable, even for monthly means (October 1987 and 1989) the differences can be larger than 0.1 kg/m^2.

  4. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapour isotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The isotopic fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour (H2O) between the atmosphere and terrestrial plants provide powerful constraints on carbon sequestration on land 1-2, changes in vegetation cover 3 and the Earth’s Dole effect 4. Past studies, relying mainly on leaf-scale observations, hav...

  5. The isotope composition of water vapour: A powerful tool to study transport and chemistry of middle atmospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Ch.; Zahn, A.

    2003-07-01

    A one-dimensional chemistry model is applied to study the stable hydrogen (D) and stable oxygen isotope (17O, 18O) composition of water vapour in stratosphere and mesosphere. The stable isotope ratios of tropospheric H2O are determined by "physical'' fractionation effects, i.e. phase changes, diffusion processes, and mixing of air masses. Due to these processes water vapour entering the stratosphere (i) is mass-dependently fractionated (MDF), i.e. shifts in the isotope ratio 17O/16O are ~0.52 times of those of 18O/16O and (ii) shows isotope shifts in D/H, which are ~5 times of those in 18O/16O. In stratosphere and mesosphere "chemical'' fractionation, that are the oxidation of methane, re-cycling of H2O via the HOx family, and isotope exchange reactions are shown to considerably enhance the isotope ratios in the imported tropospheric H2O. Enrichments relative to the isotope ratios at the tropopause are used to derive the partitioning of tropospheric (unmodified), re-cycled and in situ generated H2O. The model reasonably predicts overall increases of the stable isotope ratios in H2O by ~23% for D/H, ~8.5% for 17O/16O, and ~14% for 18O/16O. The17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios in H2O are shown to be a measure of the partitioning of HOx that receives its O atom either from the reservoirs O2 or O3. In the entire middle atmosphere, MDF O2 is the major donator of oxygen atoms incorporated in OH and HO2 and thus in H2O. It is demonstrated that in the stratosphere mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in O3 in a first step is transferred to the NOx family and only in a second step to HOx and H2O. In contrast to CO2, O(1D) only plays a minor role in this MIF transfer. The major uncertainty in our calculation arises from the many badly quantified isotope exchange reactions and kinetic isotope fractionation factors.

  6. Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet.

    PubMed

    Fraine, Jonathan; Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-09-25

    Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core. PMID:25254473

  7. Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraine, Jonathan; Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-09-01

    Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core.

  8. The uncertainty of the atmospheric integrated water vapour estimated from GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, T.; Wang, J.; Elgered, G.; Dick, G.; Wickert, J.; Bradke, M.; Sommer, M.; Querel, R.; Smale, D.

    2016-01-01

    Within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN) there is a need for an assessment of the uncertainty in the integrated water vapour (IWV) in the atmosphere estimated from ground-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observations. All relevant error sources in GNSS-derived IWV are therefore essential to be investigated. We present two approaches, a statistical and a theoretical analysis, for the assessment of the uncertainty of the IWV. The method is valuable for all applications of GNSS IWV data in atmospheric research and weather forecast. It will be implemented to the GNSS IWV data stream for GRUAN in order to assign a specific uncertainty to each data point. In addition, specific recommendations are made to GRUAN on hardware, software, and data processing practices to minimise the IWV uncertainty. By combining the uncertainties associated with the input variables in the estimations of the IWV, we calculated the IWV uncertainties for several GRUAN sites with different weather conditions. The results show a similar relative importance of all uncertainty contributions where the uncertainties in the zenith total delay (ZTD) dominate the error budget of the IWV, contributing over 75 % of the total IWV uncertainty. The impact of the uncertainty associated with the conversion factor between the IWV and the zenith wet delay (ZWD) is proportional to the amount of water vapour and increases slightly for moist weather conditions. The GRUAN GNSS IWV uncertainty data will provide a quantified confidence to be used for the validation of other measurement techniques.

  9. Rotationally resolved water dimer spectra in atmospheric air and pure water vapour in the 188-258 GHz range.

    PubMed

    Serov, E A; Koshelev, M A; Odintsova, T A; Parshin, V V; Tretyakov, M Yu

    2014-12-21

    New experimental results regarding "warm" water dimer spectra under equilibrium conditions are presented. An almost equidistant series of six peaks corresponding to the merged individual lines of the bound dimer with consecutive rotational quantum numbers is studied in the 188-258 GHz frequency range in water vapour over a broad range of pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's atmosphere. The series is a continuation of the sequence detected earlier at lower frequencies at room temperature. The signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra allowed investigating their evolution, when water vapour was diluted by atmospheric air with partial pressure from 0 up to 540 Torr. Analysis of the obtained spectra permitted determining the dimerization constant as well as the hydrogen bond dissociation energy and the dimer spectral parameters, including the average coefficient of collisional broadening of individual lines by water vapour and air. The manifestation of metastable states of the dimer in the observed spectra is assessed. The contribution of three possible pair states of water molecules to the second virial coefficient is evaluated over the broad range of temperatures. The work supports the significant role of the water dimer in atmospheric absorption and related processes. PMID:25363156

  10. The uncertainty of the atmospheric integrated water vapour estimated from GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, T.; Wang, J.; Elgered, G.; Dick, G.; Wickert, J.; Bradke, M.; Sommer, M.

    2015-08-01

    Within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) there is a need for an assessment of the uncertainty in the Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) in the atmosphere estimated from ground-based GNSS observations. All relevant error sources in GNSS-derived IWV is therefore essential to be investigated. We present two approaches, a statistical and a theoretical analysis, for the assessment of the uncertainty of the IWV. It will be implemented to the GNSS IWV data stream for GRUAN in order to obtain a specific uncertainty for each data point. In addition, specific recommendations are made to GRUAN on hardware, software, and data processing practices to minimize the IWV uncertainty. By combining the uncertainties associated with the input variables in the estimations of the IWV, we calculated the IWV uncertainties for several GRUAN sites with different weather conditions. The results show a similar relative importance of all uncertainty contributions where the uncertainties in the Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) dominate the error budget of the IWV contributing with over 75 % to the total IWV uncertainty. The impact of the uncertainty associated with the conversion factor between the IWV and the Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD) is proportional to the amount of water vapour and increases slightly for moist weather conditions. The GRUAN GNSS IWV uncertainty data will provide a quantified confidence to be used for the validation of other measurement techniques, taking the uncertainty into account from diurnal to decadal time scales.

  11. A rapid method for the sampling of atmospheric water vapour for isotopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Leon I; Yakir, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture is widely applied in the environmental sciences. Traditional methods for obtaining isotopic compositional data from ambient moisture have required complicated sampling procedures, expensive and sophisticated distillation lines, hazardous consumables, and lengthy treatments prior to analysis. Newer laser-based techniques are expensive and usually not suitable for large-scale field campaigns, especially in cases where access to mains power is not feasible or high spatial coverage is required. Here we outline the construction and usage of a novel vapour-sampling system based on a battery-operated Stirling cycle cooler, which is simple to operate, does not require any consumables, or post-collection distillation, and is light-weight and highly portable. We demonstrate the ability of this system to reproduce delta(18)O isotopic compositions of ambient water vapour, with samples taken simultaneously by a traditional cryogenic collection technique. Samples were collected over 1 h directly into autosampler vials and were analysed by mass spectrometry after pyrolysis of 1 microL aliquots to CO. This yielded an average error of < +/-0.5 per thousand, approximately equal to the signal-to-noise ratio of traditional approaches. This new system provides a rapid and reliable alternative to conventional cryogenic techniques, particularly in cases requiring high sample throughput or where access to distillation lines, slurry maintenance or mains power is not feasible. PMID:19960497

  12. NRT Atmospheric Water Vapour Retrieval on the Area of Poland at IGG WUELS AC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplon, Jan; Bosy, Jaroslaw; Sierny, Jan; Hadas, Tomasz; Rohm, Witold; Wilgan, Karina; Ryczywolski, Marcin; Oruba, Artur; Kroszczynski, Krzysztof

    2013-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are designed for positioning, navigation and amongst other possible applications it can also be used to derive information about the state of the atmosphere. Continuous observations from GNSS receivers provide an excellent tool for studying the neutral atmosphere, currently in near real-time. The Near Real-Time (NRT) neutral atmosphere and water vapour distribution models are currently obtained with high resolution from Ground Base Augmentation Systems (GBAS), where reference stations are equipped with GNSS and meteorological sensors. The Poland territory is covered by dense network of GNSS stations in the frame of GBAS system called ASG-EUPOS (www.asgeupos.pl). This system was established in year 2008 by the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in the frame of the EUPOS project (www.eupos.org) for providing positioning services. The GNSS data are available from 130 reference stations located in Poland and neighbour countries. The ground meteorological observations in the area of Poland and neighbour countries are available from ASG-EUPOS stations included in EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations, airports meteorological stations (METAR messages stations), and stations managed by national Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (SYNOP messages stations). Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics (IGG) of Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences had created permanent NRT service of ZTD (Zenith Total Delay) estimation for the area of Poland from GPS observations called IGGHZG. The first part of the paper presents the methodology of NRT GNSS data processing for ASG-EUPOS stations for ZTD estimation and its comparison to the results coming from EPN ACs and Military University of Technology in Warsaw AC (MUT AC). Second part covers the procedure of IWV (atmospheric Integrated Water Vapour content) estimation at IGG from IGGHZG product and ZHD (Zenith Hydrostatic Delay) derived from Saastamoinen formula (1972

  13. The summer 2012 Greenland heat wave: monitoring water vapour isotopic composition along an atmospheric river event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Sodemann, Harald; Lacour, Jean-Lionel; Risi, Camille; Werner, Martin; Clerbaux, Cathy; Fettweis, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    In July 2012, an extreme warm event occurred in Greenland, leading to surface melt over almost all the ice sheet. This event was recorded in the isotopic composition of water vapour measured by the IASI satellite along the transport pathway and at two sites where continuous in situ surface vapour isotopic measurements were conducted, situated at a coastal station of South Greenland (Ivittuut) and further North on top of the ice sheet (NEEM, NW Greenland). These observations allowed us to monitor the isotopic composition of the air mass at different stages of its advection towards Greenland, which can inform on processes along this trajectory, such as cloud properties and moisture sources. In addition, two simulations of this event, using the atmospheric general circulation models LMDZiso and ECHAM5wiso equipped with water stable isotopes and nudged towards large scale wind fields, are investigated. Furthermore, a regional high-resolution model was used to study the moisture transport to Greenland during this event using tagged water tracers of the North Atlantic ocean and coastal land evaporation. Using moisture source diagnostic based on the Lagrangian particle dispersion model Flexpart, we show that this 2012 heat wave event corresponds to moisture sources located over the subtropical Atlantic Ocean, where intense evaporation was caused by dry air masses associated with the US intense summer drought. This moisture was then advected northward along a narrow band, due to a very stationary surface cyclone southwest of Greenland, reached southern Greenland and Ivittuut coastal station on July 9th, travelled along the west coast of Greenland, continued eastwards above the ice sheet and arrived above the NEEM deep drilling camp on July 11th. Surface isotopic observations during the event show larger variations at NEEM than in Ivittuut, strongly reducing the isotopic and deuterium excess latitudinal gradient usually observed between South and North Greenland. This

  14. The impact of microwave absorber and radome geometries on GNSS measurements of station coordinates and atmospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, T.; Elgered, G.; Johansson, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used microwave absorbing material in different geometries around ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) antennas in order to mitigate multipath effects on the estimates of station coordinates and atmospheric water vapour. The influence of a hemispheric radome - of the same type as in the Swedish GPS network SWEPOS - was also investigated. Two GNSS stations at the Onsala Space Observatory were used forming a 12 m baseline. GPS data from October 2008 to November 2009 were analyzed by the GIPSY/OASIS II software using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing strategy for five different elevation cutoff angles from 5° to 25°. We found that the use of the absorbing material decreases the offset in the estimated vertical component of the baseline from ˜27 mm to ˜4 mm when the elevation cutoff angle varies from 5° to 20°. The horizontal components are much less affected. The corresponding offset in the estimates of the atmospheric Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) decreases from ˜1.6 kg/m2 to ˜0.3 kg/m2. Changes less than 5 mm in the offsets in the vertical component of the baseline are seen for all five elevation cutoff angle solutions when the antenna was covered by a hemispheric radome. Using the radome affects the IWV estimates less than 0.4 kg/m2 for all different solutions. IWV comparisons between a Water Vapour Radiometer (WVR) and the GPS data give consistent results.

  15. Variability of winter-time middle atmospheric water vapour over the Arctic as observed with a ground-based microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschanz, Brigitte; Kivi, Rigel; Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2014-05-01

    Middle atmospheric water vapour has a long chemical lifetime and can therefore be used as a tracer for dynamics. The ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C is designed for the use on campaigns and measures profiles of water vapour in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and thus provides valuable data for the investigation of atmospheric processes. It has been operational for five years and has successfully participated in measurement campaigns under various climatic conditions in Germany, Switzerland, California, Finland and on la Réunion. The temporal resolution of the obtained water vapour profiles approximately 2 hours depending on tropospheric conditions. During two campaigns from January to June 2010 and from July 2011 to April 2013 in Sodankylä, Finland, MIAWARA-C monitored time series of polar middle atmospheric water vapour for three winters with three Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSW) occurring in early 2010, 2012 and 2013. The obtained time series are used to study the effects of the three SSWs on middle-atmospheric water vapour. During an SSW, humid mid- to low-latitude air is transported towards the polar region resulting in a fast increase in water vapour. The descent of water vapour after the SSW allows the estimation of the descent rate over the polar region as the normal wintertime circulation reforms. Results from the three SSWs are compared. The ground-based water vapour data is combined with sonde data of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and ground-based microwave wind measurements for one winter in order to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamics in the polar winter atmosphere.

  16. Comparison of atmospheric water vapour content with GNSS, Radiosonde, Microwave radiometer, and Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, D.; Park, K.

    2012-12-01

    The increased amount of saturated water vapor due to the Earth's temperature rise frequently causes abnormal meteorological phenomena such as local severe rainfall in Korea. The National Institute of Meteorological Research of Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) conducted observation experiments using a variety of water-vapor measuring equipments to improve the accuracy of weather forecasts and accurately measure the precipitable water vapor in the atmosphere. Equipments used were GNSS, water vapor radiometers (WVR), radiosonde, and LiDAR. For GNSS measurements we used two receivers that can collect not only GPS but also GLONASS signals: Trimble NetR5 and Septentrio PolaRx4. The two WVR makers are Raidometrics and RPG. For radiosonde observations, KMA launched Vaisala GPSondes every 6 hours during the experiment period. The LiDAR system was made locally by Hanbat University in Daejeon. Thus, we could obtain collocation experiment results from 6 different kinds of water vapor measurement and analyze the characteristics of each device.

  17. Temporal evolution of temperature and OH density produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in water vapour at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainct, F. P.; Lacoste, D. A.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Odic, E.; Laux, C. O.

    2014-02-01

    We report on an experimental study of the temporal evolution of OH density and gas temperature in spark discharges created by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in pure water vapour at 475 K and atmospheric pressure. The plasma was generated by 20 kV, 20 ns pulses, at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The temperature was measured during the discharge by optical emission spectroscopy of the second positive system of N2, and between two discharges by two-colour OH-planar laser induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) using two pairs of rotational transitions. Between two successive discharges, the relative density of OH was measured by OH-PLIF and was found to decay very slowly, with a 1/e decay time of about 50 µs. With the use of a chemical kinetics model, the OH density was placed on an absolute scale.

  18. Systematic trend of water vapour absorption in red giant atmospheres revealed by high resolution TEXES 12 μm spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Lambert, J.; Farzone, M.; Richter, M. J.; Josselin, E.; Harper, G. M.; Eriksson, K.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The structures of the outer atmospheres of red giants are very complex. Recent interpretations of a range of different observations have led to contradictory views of these regions. It is clear, however, that classical model photospheres are inadequate to describe the nature of the outer atmospheres. The notion of large optically thick molecular spheres around the stars (MOLspheres) has been invoked in order to explain spectro-interferometric observations and low- and high-resolution spectra. On the other hand high-resolution spectra in the mid-IR do not easily fit into this picture because they rule out any large sphere of water vapour in LTE surrounding red giants. Aims: In order to approach a unified scenario for these outer regions of red giants, more empirical evidence from different diagnostics are needed. Our aim here is to investigate high-resolution, mid-IR spectra for a range of red giants, spanning spectral types from early K to mid M. We want to study how the pure rotational lines of water vapour change with effective temperature, and whether we can find common properties that can put new constraints on the modelling of these regions, so that we can gain new insights. Methods: We have recorded mid-IR spectra at 12.2 - 12.4 μm at high spectral resolution of ten well-studied bright red giants, with TEXES mounted on the IRTF on Mauna Kea. These stars span effective temperatures from 3450 K to 4850 K. Results: We find that all red giants in our study cooler than 4300 K, spanning a wide range of effective temperatures (down to 3450 K), show water absorption lines stronger than expected and none are detected in emission, in line with what has been previously observed for a few stars. The strengths of the lines vary smoothly with spectral type. We identify several spectral features in the wavelength region that are undoubtedly formed in the photosphere. From a study of water-line ratios of the stars, we find that the excitation temperatures, in the

  19. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE. PMID:27593468

  20. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kivi, R.; Karpechko, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry climate model simulation covering years 1990-2013 is compared to observations (satellite and frostpoint hygrometer soundings) and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. According to observations and the simulations the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere started to increase after year 2006, but around 2011 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that the increase in water vapour during 2006-2011 (at 56 hPa) is mostly explained by transport related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The water vapour trend in the stratosphere may have contributed to increased ICE PSC occurrence. The increase of water vapour in the precense of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ICE PSCs in the Arctic vortex. The polar vortex was unusually cold in early 2010 and allowed large scale formation of the polar stratospheric clouds. The cold pool in the stratosphere over the Northern polar latitudes was large and stable and a large scale persistent dehydration was observed. Polar stratospheric ice clouds and dehydration were observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign. The observed changes in water vapour were reproduced by the model. Both the observed and simulated decrease of the water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  1. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  2. Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; Yung, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

  3. Water Vapour Mixing Ratio Measurements in Potenza in the Frame of the International Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change - NDACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Benedetto; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Stelitano, Dario; Mancini, Ignazio

    2016-06-01

    In November 2012 the University of BASILicata Raman Lidar system (BASIL) was approved to enter the International Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). This network includes more than 70 high-quality, remote-sensing research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the upper troposphere and stratosphere and for assessing the impact of stratosphere changes on the underlying troposphere and on global climate. As part of this network, more than thirty groundbased Lidars deployed worldwide are routinely operated to monitor atmospheric ozone, temperature, aerosols, water vapour, and polar stratospheric clouds. In the frame of NDACC, BASIL performs measurements on a routine basis each Thursday, typically from local noon to midnight, covering a large portion of the daily cycle. Measurements from BASIL are included in the NDACC database both in terms of water vapour mixing ratio and temperature. This paper illustrates some measurement examples from BASIL, with a specific focus on water vapour measurements, with the goal to try and characterize the system performances.

  4. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10‑3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10‑27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  5. Electron Transport in Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2015-09-01

    Sets of electron collision cross sections for water vapour previously reported are examined by comparing calculated electron swarm parameters with measured parameters. Further, reliable cross section set of water vapour is estimated by the electron swarm method using Monte Carlo simulation to ensure the accuracy of the swarm parameter calculation. The values of an electron drift velocity, a longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and an effective ionisation coefficient calculated from Yousfi and Benabdessadok's set and those calculated from Itikawa and Mason's set do not necessarily agree with measured data. A new cross section set of water vapour, which consists of three kinds of rotational excitation, two kinds of vibrational excitation, three kinds of electron attachment, twenty-six kinds of electronic excitation, and six kinds of ionisation cross sections, and an elastic collision cross section, is estimated, and an anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collision is considered. The swarm parameters calculated from the estimated cross section set is in good agreement with measured data in a wide range of reduced electric field.

  6. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-02-01

    Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals of the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and the land-atmosphere

  7. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using two commercial laser-based spectrometers: an instrument characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-07-01

    Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments, we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and

  8. A water vapour monitor at Paranal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Rose, Thomas; Chacón, Arlette; Cuevas, Omar; Czekala, Harald; Hanuschik, Reinhard; Momany, Yazan; Navarrete, Julio; Querel, Richard R.; Smette, Alain; van den Ancker, Mario E.; Cure, Michel; Naylor, David A.

    2012-09-01

    We present the performance characteristics of a water vapour monitor that has been permanently deployed at ESO's Paranal observatory as a part of the VISIR upgrade project. After a careful analysis of the requirements and an open call for tender, the Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling microwave radiometer (LHATPRO), manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), has been selected. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ~2.5 mm). The unit comprises the above humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared radiometer (~10 μm) for cloud detection. The instrument has been commissioned during a 2.5 week period in Oct/Nov 2011, by comparing its measurements of PWV and atmospheric profiles with the ones obtained by 22 radiosonde balloons. In parallel an IR radiometer (Univ. Lethbridge) has been operated, and various observations with ESO facility spectrographs have been taken. The RPG radiometer has been validated across the range 0.5 - 9 mm demonstrating an accuracy of better than 0.1 mm. The saturation limit of the radiometer is about 20 mm. Currently, the radiometer is being integrated into the Paranal infrastructure to serve as a high time-resolution monitor in support of VLT science operations. The water vapour radiometer's ability to provide high precision, high time resolution information on this important aspect of the atmosphere will be most useful for conducting IR observations with the VLT under optimal conditions.

  9. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, Tobias; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60 deg S and 60 deg N and 15 to 30 km, and covering the years 1992 to 2012, was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  10. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, T.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60° S and 60° N and 15 to 30 km and covering the years 1992 to 2012 was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  11. Contributions of evaporation, isotopic non-steady state transpiration and atmospheric mixing on the delta18O of water vapour in Pacific Northwest coniferous forests.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Ehleringer, James R; Bond, Barbara J; Paw U, Kyaw Tha

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the 2H and 18O of atmospheric water vapour provide information for integrating aspects of gas exchange within forest canopies. In this study, we show that diurnal fluctuations in the oxygen isotope ratio (delta 18O) as high as 4% per hundred were observed for water vapour (delta (18)Ovp) above and within an old-growth coniferous forest in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Values of delta 18Ovp decreased in the morning, reached a minimum at midday, and recovered to early-morning values in the late afternoon, creating a nearly symmetrical diurnal pattern for two consecutive summer days. A mass balance budget was derived and assessed for the 18O of canopy water vapour over a 2-d period by considering the 18O-isoflux of canopy transpiration, soil evaporation and the air entering the canopy column. The budget was used to address two questions: (1) do delta 18O values of canopy water vapour reflect the biospheric influence, or are such signals swamped by atmospheric mixing? and (2) what mechanisms drive temporal variations of delta 18Ovp? Model calculations show that the entry of air into the canopy column resulted in an isotopically depleted 18O-isoflux in the morning of day 1, causing values of delta 18Ovp, to decrease. An isotopically enriched 18O-isoflux resulting from transpiration then offset this decreased delta 18Ovp later during the day. Contributions of 18O-isoflux from soil evaporation were relatively small on day 1 but were more significant on day 2, despite the small H2(16)O fluxes. From measurements of leaf water volume and sapflux, we determined the turnover time of leaf water in the needles of Douglas-fir trees as approximately 11 h at midday. Such an extended turnover time suggests that transpiration may not have occurred at the commonly assumed isotopic steady state. We tested a non-steady state model for predicting delta 18O of leaf water. Our model calculations show that assuming isotopic steady state increased isoflux of

  12. An investigation into the optimum thickness of titanium dioxide thin films synthesized by using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition for use in photocatalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hyett, Geoffrey; Darr, Jawwad A; Mills, Andrew; Parkin, Ivan P

    2010-09-10

    Twenty eight films of titanium dioxide of varying thickness were synthesised by using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of titanium(IV) chloride and ethyl acetate onto glass and titanium substrates. Fixed reaction conditions at a substrate temperature of 660 °C were used for all depositions, with varying deposition times of 5-60 seconds used to control the thickness of the samples. A sacrificial electron acceptor system composed of alkaline sodium persulfate was used to determine the rate at which these films could photo-oxidise water in the presence of 365 nm light. The results of this work showed that the optimum thickness for CVD films on titanium substrates for the purposes of water oxidation was ≈200 nm, and that a platinum coating on the reverse of such samples leads to a five-fold increase in the observed rate of water oxidation. PMID:20645333

  13. Emission, absorption and group delay of microwaves in the atmosphere in relation to water vapour content over the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. K.; Gupta, A. K. D.; Karmakar, P. K.; Barman, S. D.; Bhattacharya, A. B.; Purkait, N.; Gupta, M. K. D.; Sehra, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of satellite communication for global coverage has apparently indicated a renewed interest in the studies of radio wave propagation through the atmosphere, in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. The extensive measurements of atmosphere constituents, dynamics and radio meterological parameters during the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) have opened up further the possibilities of studying tropospheric radio wave propagation parameters, relevant to Earth/space link design. The three basic parameters of significance to radio propagation are thermal emission, absorption and group delay of the atmosphere, all of which are controlled largely by the water vapor content in the atmosphere, particular at microwave bands. As good emitters are also good absorbers, the atmospheric emission as well as the absorption attains a maximum at the frequency of 22.235 GHz, which is the peak of the water vapor line. The group delay is practically independent of frequency in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. However, all three parameters exhibit a similar seasonal dependence originating presumably from the seasonal dependence of the water vapor content. Some of the interesting results obtained from analyses of radiosonde data over the Indian subcontinent collected by the India Meteorological Department is presented.

  14. EDITORIAL Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-11-01

    Metal vapour has a significant, and in some cases dominant, influence in many applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas, including arc welding, circuit interruption and mineral processing. While the influence of metal vapour has long been recognized, it is only recently that diagnostic and computational tools have been sufficiently well-developed to allow this influence to be more thoroughly examined and understood. Some unexpected findings have resulted: for example, that the presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding leads to local minima in the temperature and current density in the centre of the arc. It has become clear that the presence of metal vapour, as well as having intrinsic scientific interest, plays an important role in determining the values of critical parameters in industrial applications, such as the weld penetration in arc welding and the extinction time in circuit breakers. In gas-tungsten arc welding, metal vapour concentrations are formed by evaporation of the weld pool, and are relatively low, typically at most a few per cent. Moreover, the convective flow of the plasma near the weld pool tends to direct the metal vapour plume radially outwards. In gas-metal arc welding, in contrast, metal vapour concentrations can reach over 50%. In this case, the metal vapour is produced mainly by evaporation of the wire electrode, and the strong downwards convective flow below the electrode concentrates the metal vapour in the central region of the arc. The very different metal concentrations and distributions in the two welding processes mean that the metal vapour has markedly different influences on the arc. In gas-tungsten arc welding, the current density distribution is broadened near the weld pool by the influence of the metal vapour on the electrical conductivity of the plasma, and the arc voltage is decreased. In contrast, in gas-metal arc welding, the arc centre is cooled by increased radiative emission and the arc voltage is increased. In

  15. Global trends and variability in integrated water vapour from ground-based GPS data and atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Olivier; Parracho, Ana; Bastin, Sophie; Hourdin, Frededic; Mellul, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    A high-quality, consistent, global, long-term dataset of integrated water vapour (IWV) was produced from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements at more than 400 sites over the globe among which 120 sites have more than 15 years of data. The GPS delay data were converted to IWV using surface pressure and weighted mean temperature estimates from ERA-Interim reanalysis. A two-step screening method was developed to detect and remove outliers in the IWV data. It is based on: 1) GPS data processing information and delay formal errors, and 2) intercomparison with ERA-Interim reanalysis data. The GPS IWV data are also homogenized to correct for offsets due to instrumental changes and other unknown factors. The differential homogenization method uses ERA-Interim IWV as a reference. The resulting GPS data are used to document the mean distribution, the global trends and the variability of IWV over the period 1995-2010, and are analysed in coherence with precipitation and surface temperature data (from observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis). These data are also used to assess global climate model simulations extracted from the IPCC AR5 archive. Large coherent spatial patterns of moistening and drying are evidenced but significant discrepancies are also seen between GPS measurements, reanalysis and climate models in various regions. In terms of variability, the monthly mean anomalies are intercompared. The temporal correlation between GPS and the climate model simulations is overall quite small but the spatial variation of the magnitude of the anomalies is globally well simulated. GPS IWV data prove to be useful to validate global climate model simulations and highlight deficiencies in their representation of the water cycle.

  16. Multi-scale analysis of the impact of increased spatial resolution of soil moisture and atmospheric water vapour on convective precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, S.; Schaedler, G.; Kalthoff, N.

    2010-09-01

    The distribution of water vapour in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and its development over time is one of the most important factors affecting precipitation processes. Despite the dense radiosonde network deployed during the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS), the high spatial variability of the water vapour field was not well resolved with respect to the detection of the initiation of convection. The first part of this investigation focuses on the impact of an increased resolution of the thermodynamics and dynamics of the PBL on the detection of the initiation of convection. The high spatial resolution was obtained using the synergy effect of data from the networks of radiosondes, automatic weather stations, synoptic stations, and especially Global Positioning Systems (GPSs). A method is introduced to combine GPS and radiosonde data to obtain a higher resolution representation of atmospheric water vapour. The gained spatial resolution successfully improved the representations of the areas where deep convection likelihood was high. Location and timing of the initiation of convection were critically influenced by the structure of the humidity field in the boundary-layer. The availability of moisture for precipitation is controlled by a number of processes including land surface processes, the latter are strongly influenced by spatially variable fields of soil moisture (SM) and land use. Therefore, an improved representation of both fields in regional model systems can be expected to produce better agreement between modelled and measured surface energy fluxes, boundary layer structure and precipitation. SM is currently one of the least assessed quantities with almost no data from operational monitoring networks available. However, during COPS an innovative measurement approach using a very high number of different SM sensors was introduced. The network consisted of newly developed low-cost SM sensors installed at 43 stations. Each

  17. Intercomparison of TCCON and MUSICA Water Vapour Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D.; Strong, K.; Deutscher, N. M.; Schneider, M.; Blumenstock, T.; Robinson, J.; Notholt, J.; Sherlock, V.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Barthlott, S.; García, O. E.; Smale, D.; Palm, M.; Jones, N. B.; Hase, F.; Kivi, R.; Ramos, Y. G.; Yoshimura, K.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gómez-Peláez, Á. J.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Warneke, T.; Dohe, S.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present an intercomparison between the water vapour products from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA), two datasets from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometers with good global representation. Where possible, comparisons to radiosondes are also included. The near-infrared TCCON measurements are optimized to provide precise monitoring of greenhouse gases for carbon cycle studies; however, TCCON's retrievals also produce water vapour products. The mid-infrared MUSICA products result from retrievals optimized to give precise and accurate information about H2O, HDO, and δD. The MUSICA water vapour products have been validated by extensive intercomparisons with H2O and δD in-situ measurements made from ground, radiosonde, and aircraft (Schneider et al. 2012, 2014), as well as by intercomparisons with satellite-based H2O and δD remote sensing measurements (Wiegele et al., 2014). This dataset provides a valuable reference point for other measurements of water vapour. This study is motivated by the limited intercomparisons performed for TCCON water vapour products and limited characterisation of their uncertainties. We compare MUSICA and TCCON products to assess the potential for TCCON measurements to contribute to studies of the water cycle, water vapour's role in climate and use as a tracer for atmospheric dynamics, and to evaluate the performance of climate models. The TCCON and MUSICA products result from measurements taken using the same FTIR instruments, enabling a comparison with constant instrumentation. The retrieval techniques differ, however, in their method and a priori information. We assess the impact of these differences and characterize the comparability of the TCCON and MUSICA datasets.

  18. Multispecies transmitter for DIAL sensing of atmospheric water vapour, methane and carbon dioxide in the 2 μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammez, Dominique; Cadiou, Erwan; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Gorju, Guillaume; Pelon, Jacques; Lefebvre, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Integrated-path differential absorption lidar (IPDIAL) is an attractive technique to monitor greenhouse gases from space. For that purpose, suitable absorption lines have been identified as good candidates around 2.05 μm for CO2, 2.29 μm for CH4, and 2.06 μm for H2O. In this context, we have developed a high energy transmitter around 2 μm based on frequency conversion in a nested cavity doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) followed by high energy parametric amplification. This master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architecture enables the generation of tunable single-frequency high energy nanosecond pulses (tens of mJ) suitable for atmospheric DIAL applications. Moreover, taking advantage of the wide spectral coverage capability of the NesCOPO, we demonstrate the potential for this single emitter to address the aforementioned spectral lines, without the use of additional seeding devices. The emitter provides energies up to 20 mJ for the signal waves in the vicinity of CO2 and H2O lines, and 16 mJ at 2290 nm for the CH4 line. By implementing a control loop based on a wavemeter frequency measurement, the signal fluctuations can be maintained below 1 MHz rms for 10 s averaging time. Finally, from optical heterodyne analysis of the beat note between our emitter and a stabilized laser diode, the optical parametric source linewidth was estimated to be better than 60 MHz (Full width at half maximum).

  19. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  20. A new portable generator to dynamically produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for VOCs and water vapour at atmospheric concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Pascale, Céline; Ackermann, Andreas; Leuenberger, Daiana; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the KEY-VOCs and AtmoChem-ECV projects, we are currently developing new facilities to dynamically generate reference gas mixtures for a variety of reactive compounds, at concentrations measured in the atmosphere and in a SI-traceable way (i.e. the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to SI-units). Here we present the realisation of such standards for water vapour in the range 1-10 μmol/mol and for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as limonene, alpha-pinene, MVK, MEK, in the nmol/mol range. The matrix gas can be nitrogen or synthetic air. Further development in gas purification techniques could make possible to use purified atmospheric air as carrier gas. The method is based on permeation and dynamic dilution: one permeator containing a pure substance (either water, limonene, MVK, MEK or α-pinene) is kept into a permeation chamber with a constant gas flow. The mass loss is precisely calibrated using a magnetic suspension balance. The carrier gas is purified beforehand from the compounds of interest to the required level, using commercially available purification cartridges. This primary mixture is then diluted to reach the required amount of substance fraction. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers which makes the production process flexible and easily adaptable to generate the required concentration. All parts in contact with the gas mixture are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. Two setups are currently developed: one already built and fixed in our laboratory in Bern as well as a portable generator that is still under construction and that could be used anywhere in the field. The permeation chamber of the portable generator has multiple individual cells allowing the generation of mixtures up to 5 different components if needed. Moreover the presented technique can be adapted and applied to a large variety of molecules (e.g., NO2, BTEX, CFCs

  1. On the vapour trail of an atmospheric imprint in insects.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, M D Farnon; Northfield, Roger G W; Mejia-Chang, Monica; Griffiths, Howard

    2011-08-23

    Terrestrial arthropods, at constant risk from desiccation, are highly sensitive to atmospheric temperature and humidity. A physiological marker of these abiotic conditions could highlight phenotypic adaptations, indicate niche partitioning, and predict responses to climate change for a group representing three-quarters of the Earth's animal species. We show that the (18)O composition of insect haemolymph is such a measure, providing a dynamic and quantitatively predictable signal for respiratory gas exchange and inputs from atmospheric humidity. Using American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) under defined experimental conditions, we show that insects respiring at low humidity demonstrate the expected enrichment in the (18)O composition of haemolymph because of evaporation. At high humidity, however, diffusional influx of atmospheric water vapour into the animal forces haemolymph to become depleted in (18)O. Additionally, using cockroaches sampled from natural habitats, we show that the haemolymph (18)O signature is transferred to the organic material of the insect's exoskeleton. Insect cuticle, therefore, exhibits the mean atmospheric conditions surrounding the animals prior to moulting. This discovery will help to define the climatic tolerances of species and their habitat preferences, and offers a means of quantifying the balance between niche partitioning and 'neutral' processes in shaping complex tropical forest communities. PMID:21325310

  2. On the vapour trail of an atmospheric imprint in insects

    PubMed Central

    Ellwood, M. D. Farnon; Northfield, Roger G. W.; Mejia-Chang, Monica; Griffiths, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial arthropods, at constant risk from desiccation, are highly sensitive to atmospheric temperature and humidity. A physiological marker of these abiotic conditions could highlight phenotypic adaptations, indicate niche partitioning, and predict responses to climate change for a group representing three-quarters of the Earth's animal species. We show that the 18O composition of insect haemolymph is such a measure, providing a dynamic and quantitatively predictable signal for respiratory gas exchange and inputs from atmospheric humidity. Using American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) under defined experimental conditions, we show that insects respiring at low humidity demonstrate the expected enrichment in the 18O composition of haemolymph because of evaporation. At high humidity, however, diffusional influx of atmospheric water vapour into the animal forces haemolymph to become depleted in 18O. Additionally, using cockroaches sampled from natural habitats, we show that the haemolymph 18O signature is transferred to the organic material of the insect's exoskeleton. Insect cuticle, therefore, exhibits the mean atmospheric conditions surrounding the animals prior to moulting. This discovery will help to define the climatic tolerances of species and their habitat preferences, and offers a means of quantifying the balance between niche partitioning and ‘neutral’ processes in shaping complex tropical forest communities. PMID:21325310

  3. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided over as many as fifteen days and survived the interference by strong Canadian fires. These results impose a challenge on atmospheric modelling that grossly overestimates free-tropospheric mixing.

  4. Water vapour correction of the daily 1 km AVHRR global land dataset: Part I validation and use of the Water Vapour input field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Lloyd, D.; Meyer, D.J.; Baltzer, T. T.; Piraina, P.

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric correction algorithm developed for the 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global land dataset was modified to include a near real-time total column water vapour data input field to account for the natural variability of atmospheric water vapour. The real-time data input field used for this study is the Television and Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Pathfinder A global total column water vapour dataset. It was validated prior to its use in the AVHRR atmospheric correction process using two North American AVHRR scenes, namely 13 June and 28 November 1996. The validation results are consistent with those reported by others and entail a comparison between TOVS, radiosonde, experimental sounding, microwave radiometer, and data from a hand-held sunphotometer. The use of this data layer as input to the AVHRR atmospheric correction process is discussed.

  5. The Water Vapour Radiometer at Effelsberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. L.; Teuber, U.; Keller, R.

    We have installed a scanning 18 GHz to 26 GHz water vapour radiometer on the focus cabin of the Effelsberg 100 m telescope for tropospheric phase, delay and opacity correction during high-frequency VLBI observations. It is based on the design by Tahmoush & Rogers (2000) but with noise injection for calibration, weather-proof housing, and temperature stabilization. The radiometer is delivering data into an archive since July 2003, from which they are available for download. The data will be delivered automatically to PIs of EVN experiments in a calibration table attached by the EVN calibration pipeline. This paper describes the radiometer and its performance.

  6. Precipitable water vapour over La Silla Paranal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, F.

    2011-11-01

    In support of characterization of potential sites for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the Institute for Space Imaging Science (ISIS) and the astrometeorology group of the Universidad Valparaiso have jointly established an improved understanding of atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV) above ESO's La Silla Paranal Observatory. To this end we have statistically analysed 8 years worth of high resolution spectra taken with VLT-UVES to reconstruct the PWV history above Paranal. For Silla data from FEROS covering about 5 years have been used. In the analysis a radiative transfer model of Earth's atmosphere (BTRAM) developed by ISIS has been employed. In order to better understand the systematics involved three dedicated campaigns were conducted in May, August and November 2009 during which several instruments and methods were validated with respect to balloon-borne radiosondes, the established standard in atmospheric research. After correction for systematic effects a median PWV of 2.4 mm is found for Paranal whereas the value for La Silla is 3.7 mm. The results of the study were submitted to the E-ELT site selection advisory committee late in 2009. Valuable lessons for observatory operations have been learned and ESO is planning to permanently deploy a water vapour monitor on Paranal as part of the VISIR upgrade project. For the E-ELT we find that a stand-alone high time resolution PWV monitor will be essential for optimizing the scientific output.

  7. Electron swarm parameters in water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Date, H.; Shimozuma, M.

    2007-04-01

    Electron swarm parameters, such as the drift velocity and the ionization coefficient, in water vapour have been measured for relatively wide ranges in reduced electric fields (E/N) at room temperature. The drift velocity (Wm) was obtained based upon the arrival-time spectra of electrons by using a double-shutter drift tube for the E/N from 60 to 1000 Td, while the first and second ionization coefficients (α and γ) were determined by the steady-state Townsend method from 50 to 3000 Td. A comparison between the results and other data in the literature shows that our results for both the drift velocity and the effective ionization coefficient are lower than those of the other data in the above ranges.

  8. A solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, T.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2015-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from HALOE and MIPAS data between 60° S and 60° N and 15 to 30 km and covering the years 1992 to 2012 was analyzed by multivariate linear regression including an 11 year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy positive water wapour trends in the lowermost stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal generated at the tropical tropopause is imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air is also governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can solve the water vapour conundrum of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances at constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  9. GPS tomographic experiment on water vapour dynamics in the troposphere over Lisbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Pedro; Catalao, Joao; Miranda, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of the water vapour variability on the atmosphere remains a difficult task, affecting the weather prediction. Coarse water vapour resolution measurements in space and time affect the numerical weather prediction solution models causing artifacts in the prediction of severe weather phenomena. The GNSS atmospheric processing has been developed in the past years providing integrated water vapour estimates comparable with the meteorological sensor measurements, with studies registering 1 to 2 kg/m2 bias, but lack a vertical determination of the atmospheric processes. The GNSS tomography in the troposphere is one of the most promising techniques for sensing the three-dimensional water vapour state of the atmosphere. The determination of the integrated water vapour profile by means of the widely accepted GNSS meteorology techniques, allows the reconstruction of several slant path delay rays in the satellite line of view, providing an opportunity to sense the troposphere at tree-dimensions plus time. The tomographic system can estimate an image solution of the water vapour but impositions have to be introduced to the system of equations inversion because of the non-optimal GNSS observation geometry. Application of this technique on atmospheric processes like large convective precipitation or mesoscale water vapour circulation have been able to describe its local dynamic vertical variation. A 3D tomographic experiment was developed over an area of 60x60 km2 around Lisbon (Portugal). The GNSS network available composed by 9 receivers was used for an experiment of densification of the permanent network using 8 temporarily installed GPS receivers (totalling 17 stations). This study was performed during several weeks in July 2013, where a radiosonde campaign was also held in order to validate the tomographic inversion solution. 2D integrated water vapour maps directly obtained from the GNSS processing were also evaluated and local coastal breeze circulation

  10. Calibration of the Purple Crow Lidar vibrational Raman water-vapour mixing ratio and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argall, P. S.; Sica, R. J.; Bryant, C. R.; Algara-Siller, M.; Schijns, H.

    2007-02-01

    Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) measurements of the vibrational Raman-shifted backscatter from water vapour and nitrogen molecules allows height profiles of the water-vapour mixing ratio to be measured from 500 m up into the lower stratosphere. In addition, the Raman nitrogen measurements allow the determination of temperature profiles from about 10 to 40 km altitude. However, external calibration of these measurements is necessary to compensate for instrumental effects, uncertainties in our knowledge of the relevant molecular cross sections, and atmospheric transmission. A comparison of the PCL-derived water-vapour concentration and temperature profiles with routine radiosonde measurements from Detroit and Buffalo on 37 and 141 nights, respectively, was undertaken to provide this calibration. The calibration is then applied to the measurements and monthly mean-temperature and water-vapour profiles are determined.

  11. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability. PMID:24504355

  12. A review of water recovery by vapour permeation through membranes.

    PubMed

    Bolto, Brian; Hoang, Manh; Xie, Zongli

    2012-02-01

    In vapour permeation the feed is a vapour, not a liquid as in pervaporation. The process employs a polymeric membrane as a semi-permeable barrier between the feed side under high pressure and the permeate side under low pressure. Separation is achieved by the different degrees to which components are dissolved in and diffuse through the membrane, the system working according to a solution-diffusion mechanism. The materials used in the membrane depend upon the types of compounds being separated, so water transport is favoured by hydrophilic material, whether organic or inorganic. The process is used for the dehydration of natural gas and various organic solvents, notably alcohol as biofuel, as well as the removal of water from air and its recovery from waste steam. Waste steam can be found in almost every plant/factory where steam is used. It is frequently contaminated and cannot be reused. Discharging the spent steam to the atmosphere is a serious energy loss and environmental issue. Recycling the steam can significantly improve the overall energy efficiency of an industry, which is responsible for massive CO(2) emissions. Steam separation at high fluxes and temperatures has been accomplished with a composite poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane containing silica nanoparticles, and also, less efficiently, with an inorganic zeolite membrane. PMID:22100055

  13. The millennium water vapour drop in chemistry-climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkop, Sabine; Dameris, Martin; Jöckel, Patrick; Garny, Hella; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the abrupt and severe water vapour decline in the stratosphere beginning in the year 2000 (the "millennium water vapour drop") and other similarly strong stratospheric water vapour reductions by means of various simulations with the state-of-the-art Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model). The model simulations differ with respect to the prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and whether nudging is applied or not. The CCM EMAC is able to most closely reproduce the signature and pattern of the water vapour drop in agreement with those derived from satellite observations if the model is nudged. Model results confirm that this extraordinary water vapour decline is particularly obvious in the tropical lower stratosphere and is related to a large decrease in cold point temperature. The drop signal propagates under dilution to the higher stratosphere and to the poles via the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). We found that the driving forces for this significant decline in water vapour mixing ratios are tropical sea surface temperature (SST) changes due to a coincidence with a preceding strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation event (1997/1998) followed by a strong La Niña event (1999/2000) and supported by the change of the westerly to the easterly phase of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in 2000. Correct (observed) SSTs are important for triggering the strong decline in water vapour. There are indications that, at least partly, SSTs contribute to the long period of low water vapour values from 2001 to 2006. For this period, the specific dynamical state of the atmosphere (overall atmospheric large-scale wind and temperature distribution) is important as well, as it causes the observed persistent low cold point temperatures. These are induced by a period of increased upwelling, which, however, has no corresponding pronounced signature in SSTs anomalies in the tropics. Our free

  14. Precipitable Water Vapour at the ESO Observatories: The Skill of the Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, M.; Kerber, F.; De Breuck, C.

    2013-06-01

    Atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV) above an observatory is a crucial parameter for the success and quality of submillimetre and mid-infrared science observations. High precision water vapour radiometers are deployed at the ESO observatories on Paranal (VLT) and Chajnantor (APEX and ALMA), providing continuous high time-resolution measurements of PWV. These data have been used to compare the actual conditions with the forecast delivered by the publicly available Global Forecast System provided by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The quality of these predictions has now reached a level at which it can contribute to optimising science operations.

  15. Observations and recent evolution of stratospheric water vapour isotopologues derived from satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Joachim; Jones, Ashley; Lossow, Stefan; Murtagh, Donal

    Water vapour, a strong greenhouse gas and source gas of the HOx family, plays an essential role for dynamics and chemistry of the middle atmosphere. Global measurements of isotopologues of water vapour have been made by the Odin Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) during nearly nine years since 2001. The long-term evolution of stratospheric water vapour has been studied by extending the historical satellite time-series from SAGE and HALOE, available until 2005, to present day by using data from Odin and other more recently launched satellites (Envisat, ACE). The recent evolution and variability of the water vapour isotopologues H2O-17, H2O-18, and HDO, as well as related trace gases and temperature has also been analysed and results of this study will be presented. Comparison and combination of various stratospheric water vapour time-series moreover provides a critical test of the quality of the different new satellite water vapour data sets. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by Sweden (SNSB), Canada (CSA), Fin-land (TEKES), and France (CNES), with support by the 3rd party mission programme of the European Space Agency (ESA).

  16. Contributions of Organic Vapours to Atmospheric Nanoparticle Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Xu, W.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zhang, R.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles alter radiative balance of the earth-atmosphere system, impact the regional and global climate, and pose negative effects on human health. Aerosol nucleation events have been frequently observed under various tropospheric conditions and account for a major fraction of the total aerosol population. Although a number of studies suggest that organics are involved in both new particle formation and their subsequent growth, the fundamental chemical processes responsible for organic vapours’ contribution remain poorly understood. This work will focus on laboratory studies on the role of various organic vapours in sulphuric acid nanoparticles growth. Sulfuric acid nanoparticles of 4-20 nm diameter size are generated from homogeneous binary nucleation of H2SO4 and H2O vapors in a laminar flow reactor. The growth factor of H2SO4 nanoparticles exposed to organics including methyglyoxal, ethanol, 1-butanol, 1-heptanol, 1-decanol, and cis-pinonic acid is measured using a nano-tandem differential mobility analyzer (nano-TDMA). Also studied is the potential synergistic effect in the presence of two or more organic vapours to which sulphuric acid nanoparticles are exposed. The chemical compositions of H2SO4 particles exposed to the organics are analyzed by a thermal desorption-ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (TD-ID-CIMS), and the spectroscopic evolution of functional groups in H2SO4 particles of ~40 nm diameter size, deposited on ZnSe crystal and subsequently exposed to organics, is studied using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR). The combined techniques are used to elucidate the key factors in controlling atmospheric nanoparticle growth.

  17. Ground-based near-infrared observations of water vapour in the Venus troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Sarah; Bailey, Jeremy; Crisp, David; Meadows, Vikki

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of water vapour in the Venus troposphere obtained by modelling specific water vapour absorption bands within the 1.18 μm window. We compare the results with the normal technique of obtaining the abundance by matching the peak of the 1.18 μm window. Ground-based infrared imaging spectroscopy of the night side of Venus was obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope and IRIS2 instrument with a spectral resolving power of R ˜ 2400. The spectra have been fitted with modelled spectra simulated using the radiative transfer model VSTAR. We find a best fit abundance of 31 ppmv (-6 +9 ppmv), which is in agreement with recent results by Bézard et al. (Bézard, B., Fedorova, A., Bertaux, J.-L., Rodin, A., Korablev, O. [2011]. Icarus, 216, 173-183) using VEX/SPICAV (R ˜ 1700) and contrary to prior results by Bézard et al. (Bézard, B., de Bergh, C., Crisp, D., Maillard, J.P. [1990]. Nature, 345, 508-511) of 44 ppmv (±9 ppmv) using VEX/VIRTIS-M (R ˜ 200) data analyses. Comparison studies are made between water vapour abundances determined from the peak of the 1.18 μm window and abundances determined from different water vapour absorption features within the near infrared window. We find that water vapour abundances determined over the peak of the 1. 18 μm window results in plots with less scatter than those of the individual water vapour features and that analyses conducted over some individual water vapour features are more sensitive to variation in water vapour than those over the peak of the 1. 18 μm window. No evidence for horizontal spatial variations across the night side of the disk are found within the limits of our data with the exception of a possible small decrease in water vapour from the equator to the north pole. We present spectral ratios that show water vapour absorption from within the lowest 4 km of the Venus atmosphere only, and discuss the possible existence of a decreasing water vapour concentration towards the surface.

  18. Continuous measurements of isotopic composition of water vapour on the East Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Mathieu; Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Genthon, Christophe; Kerstel, Erik; Kassi, Samir; Arnaud, Laurent; Picard, Ghislain; Prie, Frederic; Cattani, Olivier; Steen-Larsen, Hans-Christian; Vignon, Etienne; Cermak, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Water stable isotopes in central Antarctic ice cores are critical to quantify past temperature changes. Accurate temperature reconstructions require one to understand the processes controlling surface snow isotopic composition. Isotopic fractionation processes occurring in the atmosphere and controlling snowfall isotopic composition are well understood theoretically and implemented in atmospheric models. However, post-deposition processes are poorly documented and understood. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum between surface water vapour, precipitation, surface snow and buried snow. Here, we target the isotopic composition of water vapour at Concordia Station, where the oldest EPICA Dome C ice cores have been retrieved. While snowfall and surface snow sampling is routinely performed, accurate measurements of surface water vapour are challenging in such cold and dry conditions. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed at Concordia, allowing continuous, in situ measurements for 1 month in December 2014-January 2015. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with laboratory measurements of discrete samples trapped using cryogenic sampling validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. We observe very large diurnal cycles in isotopic composition well correlated with temperature diurnal cycles. Identification of different behaviours of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated with turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction. Even if the vapour isotopic composition seems to be, at least part of the time, at equilibrium with the local snow, the slope of δD against δ18O prevents us from identifying a unique origin leading

  19. Atmospheric pressure vapour phase decomposition: a proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Cinosi, Amedeo; Andriollo, Nunzio; Tibaldi, Francesca; Monticelli, Damiano

    2012-11-15

    In the present work we demonstrated that the digestion of difficult matrices (high boiling petrochemical fractions and distillation bottoms) can be achieved by oxidation with nitric acid vapours at atmospheric pressure employing simple laboratory glassware. The application of this procedure as a digestion method prior to Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is presented, although the employment of other detection techniques may be foreseen. The method ensured a fast, less than half an hour, treatment time and detection limits in the range 20-100 μg/kg for As, Bi, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn, whereas higher values were obtained for Ba, Ca, K, P, Rh, Ti and V (0.3-3 mg/kg). The potentialities and limitations of this procedure were discussed: the application to a broad range of matrices may be foreseen. PMID:23158304

  20. A preliminary zonal mean climatology of water vapour in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Rind, D.; Russell, J. M.; Harries, J. E.

    The Microwave Limb Sounder on the UARS satellite measures water vapour concentration in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Water vapour profiles are retrieved from radiance measurements using a version of the optimal estimation algorithm. This requires an a priori profile which is obtained from a climatology. The MLS retrieval currently uses the standard UARS pre-launch climatology, which contains water vapour based on a 2-D model constrained to LIMS data in the stratosphere. This climatology has several defects which affect the ability of MLS to retrieve water vapour. This paper presents a new climatology constructed from the HALOE (HALogen Occultation Experiment) and SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) data, which have become available recently. The new climatology is more realistic in several ways, particularly in the mesosphere and near the tropopause. It is proving to be an improvement as an a priori for MLS retrievals and might also have other uses. The paper will present the climatology, show how it was constructed, and compare it to the UARS pre-launch climatology and to various other data. As it stands, this climatology is not suitable for a reference atmosphere, but it is an improvement on CIRA part III in some way simply because it contains more accurate data and shows a number of new features. Suggestions are made for constructing an improved reference climatology for middle atmosphere water vapour.

  1. The millennium water vapour drop in chemistry-climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkop, S.; Dameris, M.; Jöckel, P.; Garny, H.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the abrupt and severe water vapour decline in the stratosphere beginning in year 2000 (the "millennium water vapour drop") and other similar stratospheric water vapour drops by means of various simulations with the state-of-the-art Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model). The CCM EMAC is able to reproduce the signature and pattern of the water vapour disturbances in agreement with those derived from satellite observations. Model data confirm that this extraordinary water vapour decline is in particular obvious in the tropical lower stratosphere. The starting point of the severe water vapour drop is identified in the tropical lower stratosphere and the start date is found to be in the early days of 2000. We show that the driving forces for this significant drop in water vapour mixing ratios are tropical sea surface temperature changes due to a preceding strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation event (1997/98), which was followed by a La Niña and supported by the prevailing western phase of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) at that time. This constellation of ENSO and QBO obviously lead to the outstanding anomalies in meteorological quantities which are identified in the equatorial atmosphere: (a) a distinct warming (up to 1 K) of the tropical upper troposphere (200 to 120 hPa) beginning in mid-1997 and lasting for about one and a half years, (b) a strong warming (up to 2.5 K) of the tropical lower stratosphere (100 to 50 hPa), beginning in early 1999 and ending in early 2000, and (c) a significantly enhanced upwelling at the tropopause in the late 1990s and an obviously reduced upwelling around the year 2000 followed by a period of enhanced upwelling again. These dynamically induced changes are unambiguously connected to the stratospheric water vapour anomaly. Similarly strong water vapour reductions are also found in other years, and seem to be a~typical feature after strong

  2. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  3. Water vapour variability in the high-latitude upper troposphere - Part 2: Impact of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioris, Christopher E.; Zou, Jason; McElroy, C. Thomas; Boone, Chris D.; Sheese, Patrick E.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of volcanic eruptions on water vapour in the high-latitude upper troposphere is studied using deseasonalized time series based on observations by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) water vapour sensors, namely MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). The two eruptions with the greatest impact on the high-latitude upper troposphere during the time frame of this satellite-based remote sensing mission are chosen. The Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic eruption in June 2011 was the most explosive in the past 24 years and is shown to be able to account for the observed (50 ± 12) % increase in water vapour in the southern high-latitude upper troposphere in July 2011 after a minor adjustment for the simultaneous influence of the Antarctic oscillation. Eyjafjallajökull erupted in the spring of 2010, increasing water vapour in the upper troposphere at northern high latitudes significantly for a period of ˜ 1 month. These findings imply that extratropical volcanic eruptions in windy environments can lead to significant perturbations to high-latitude upper tropospheric humidity mostly due to entrainment of lower tropospheric moisture by wind-blown plumes. The Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption must be taken into account to properly determine the magnitude of the trend in southern high-latitude upper tropospheric water vapour over the last decade.

  4. The water vapour radiometer of Paranal: homogeneity of precipitable water vapour from two years of operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, Richard R.; Neureiter, Bianca

    2015-04-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ∼2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (∼10 μm) for cloud detection. We present a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 24 months of PWV observations. The question we tried to address was whether PWV is homogeneous enough across the sky such that service mode observations with the VLT can routinely be conducted with a user-provided constraint for PWV measured at zenith. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5° elevation with a median variation of 0.07 mm (rms). The homogeneity is a function of the absolute PWV but the relative variation is fairly constant at 2 to 3% (rms). Such variations will not be a significant issue for analysis of astronomical data. Users at ESO can specify PWV - measured at zenith - as an ambient constraint in service mode to enable, for instance, very demanding observations in the infrared. We conclude that in general it will not be necessary to add another observing constraint for PWV homogeneity to ensure integrity of observations. For demanding observations requiring very low PWV, where the relative variation is higher, the optimum support could be provided by observing with the LHATPRO in the same line-of-sight simultaneously. Such a mode of operations has already been tested but will have to be justified in terms of scientific gain before implementation can be considered. We plan to extend our analysis of PWV variations covering a larger parameters space

  5. One year observation of water vapour isotopic composition at Ivittuut, Southern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Delmotte, Marc; Cattani, Olivier; Sodemann, Harald; Risi, Camille

    2013-04-01

    In September 2011, an automatic continuous water vapour isotopic composition monitoring instrument has been installed in the atmospheric station of Ivittuut (61.21° N, 48.17° W), southern Greenland. Precipitation has been regularly sampled on site at event to weekly scales and analysed in our laboratory for isotopic composition. Meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction) and atmospheric composition (CO2, CH4, Atmospheric Potential Oxygen) are also continuously monitored at Ivittuut. The meteorological context of our observation period will be assessed by comparison with the local climatology. The water vapour analyser is a Picarro Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS, model L2120i). It is automatically and regularly calibrated on the VSMOW scale using measurements of the isotopic composition of vaporized reference water standards using the Picarro Syringe Delivery Module (SDM). As measurements are sensitive to humidity level, an experimentally estimated calibration response function is used to correct our isotopic measurements. After data treatment, successive isotopic measurements of reference waters have a standard deviation of around 0.35 per mil for δ18O and 2.3 per mil for δD. Our instrumentation protocol and data quality control method will be presented, together with our one year δ18O, δD and d-excess measurements in water vapour and precipitation. The relationship between surface water vapour isotopic composition and precipitation isotopic composition will be investigated based on a distillation model. Specific difficulties linked to our low maintenance remote station will also be discussed. The processes responsible for the synoptic variability of Ivittuut water vapour isotopic composition will be investigated by comparing our observational dataset with (i) atmospheric back-trajectories and (ii) results from an isotopically-enabled atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM

  6. Variations in mid tropospheric carbon dioxide, temperature and water vapour using satellite data during 2003-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaka, Surendra

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation global, hemispherical and regional (India) variations in carbon dioxide, temperature and water vapour and their association is analysed using mid-tropospheric (300-500 hPa) Atmospheric Infra-red Sounder (AIRS) data for a period of 9 years (2003-2011). Mid-tropospheric carbon dioxide is observed to rise from ~372.61 ppm to ~392.94 ppm over the globe and 373.38 ppm to 392.48 ppm over India from 2003 to 2011. However no significant changes are observed in mid-tropospheric temperature and water vapour variations for the same period. De-trended data of temperature and water vapour shows a high correlation between them, but no significant correlation was observed between temperature and carbon dioxide over the studied regions. The absence of immediate co-relation between temperature and carbon dioxide is the evidence that rise in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will not imply more absorption over the earth surface. This may be explained because of the absorbing effect of carbon dioxide which is very small as compared to water vapour. The role of water vapour is reinforced because unlike carbon dioxide, water vapour in the atmosphere is changing in tune with temperature.

  7. All-sky homogeneity of precipitable water vapour over Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querel, Richard R.; Kerber, Florian

    2014-08-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ~2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (~10 μm) for cloud detection. We present, for the first time, a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 21 months of periodic (every 6 hours) all-sky scans from the radiometer. These data provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric conditions relevant for astronomical observations, particularly in the infrared. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5° elevation with a median variation of 0.32 mm (peak to valley) or 0.07 mm (rms). The homogeneity is a function of the absolute PWV but the relative variation is fairly constant at 10-15% (peak to valley) and 3% (rms). Such variations will not be a significant issue for analysis of astronomical data. Users at ESO can specify PWV - measured at zenith - as an ambient constraint in service mode to enable, for instance, very demanding observations in the infrared that can only be conducted during periods of very good atmospheric transmission and hence low PWV. We conclude that in general it will not be necessary to add another observing constraint for PWV homogeneity to ensure integrity of observations. For demanding observations requiring very low PWV, where the relative variation is higher, the optimum support could be provided by observing with the LHATPRO in the same line-of-sight simultaneously. Such a mode of operations has already been tested but will have to be

  8. Enhanced water vapour flow in silica microchannels and interdiffusive water vapour flow through anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenwen; McKenzie, David R.

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced liquid water flows through carbon nanotubes reinvigorated the study of moisture permeation through membranes and micro- and nano-channels. The study of water vapour through micro-and nano-channels has been neglected even though water vapour is as important as liquid water for industry, especially for encapsulation of electronic devices. Here we measure moisture flow rates in silica microchannels and interdiffusive water vapour flows in anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membrane channels for the first time. We construct theory for the flow rates of the dominant modes of water transport through four previously defined standard configurations and benchmark it against our new measurements. The findings show that measurements of leak behaviour made using other molecules, such as helium, are not reliable. Single phase water vapour flow is overestimated by a helium measurement, while Washburn or capillary flow is underestimated or for all channels when boundary slip applies, to an extent that depends on the slip length for the liquid phase flows.

  9. Water vapour variability in the high-latitude upper troposphere - Part 2: Impact of volcanic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioris, C. E.; Zou, J.; McElroy, C. T.; Boone, C. D.; Sheese, P. E.; Bernath, P. F.

    2015-09-01

    The impact of volcanic eruptions on water vapour in the region of the high latitude tropopause is studied using deseasonalized time series based on observations by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) water vapour sensors, namely MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). The three eruptions with the greatest impact on the high latitude upper troposphere during the time frame of this satellite-based remote sensing mission are chosen. The Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic eruption in June 2011 was the most explosive eruption in the past 24 years and resulted in an observed (50 ± 12) % increase in water vapour in the southern high-latitude upper troposphere in July 2011 that persisted into September 2011. A pair of Northern Hemisphere volcanoes, namely Eyjafjallajökull and Nabro, erupted in 2010 and 2011 respectively, increasing water vapour in the upper troposphere at northern high latitudes significantly for a period of ~ 3 months following each eruption. Both had a volcanic explosivity index of 4. Nabro led to a statistically significant increase of ~ 1 ppm in lower stratospheric (13.5-15.5 km) water vapour at northern high-latitudes (60-90° N) in September 2011, when the brunt of its plume arrived in the Arctic. These findings imply that steam emitted into the high-latitude, upper troposphere during volcanic eruptions must be taken into account to properly determine the magnitude of the trend in water vapour over the last decade.

  10. Breakdown and dc discharge in low-pressure water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoš, J.; Škoro, N.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report studies of basic properties of breakdown, low-current Townsend discharge and high-current discharge regimes in water vapour. Paschen curves and the corresponding distributions of emission intensities at low current were recorded in the range of pd (pressure x electrode gap) from 0.1 to 10 Torrcm covering the region of Paschen minimum. From the experimental profiles we obtained effective ionization coefficient of water vapour for the E/N range 650 Td-7 kTd and fitted the results by using the extended Townsend analytical formula. Using the obtained ionization coefficient, we calculated the effective yield of secondary electrons from the copper cathode. Results of the measurements of Volt-Ampere characteristics in water vapour were presented together with the images of the axial structure of the discharge in a wide range of discharge currents for two pd values. Recorded profiles showed development of the spatial structure of the discharge in different operating regimes. We were able to identify conditions where processes induced by heavy particles, probably fast hydrogen atoms, are dominant in inducing emission from the discharge. Finally, standard scaling laws were tested for low current and glow discharges in water vapour.

  11. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nadine; Schröder, Marc; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Stengel, Martin; ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m2 for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m2 for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  12. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, M.; Brinkop, S.; Jöckel, P.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have significant impact on the earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes also the stratosphere is influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the EMAC model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour after the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as important sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on the tropospheric water vapour and ENSO are evident.

  13. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-10

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  14. Land cover change and water vapour flows: learning from Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Line; Dunlop, Michael; Foran, Barney

    2003-01-01

    Australia is faced with large-scale dryland salinization problems, largely as a consequence of the clearing of native vegetation for cropland and grassland. We estimate the change in continental water vapour flow (evapotranspiration) of Australia during the past 200 years. During this period there has been a substantial decrease in woody vegetation and a corresponding increase in croplands and grasslands. The shift in land use has caused a ca. 10% decrease in water vapour flows from the continent. This reduction corresponds to an annual freshwater flow of almost 340 km(3). The society-induced alteration of freshwater flows is estimated at more than 15 times the volume of run-off freshwater that is diverted and actively managed in the Australian society. These substantial water vapour flow alterations were previously not addressed in water management but are now causing serious impacts on the Australian society and local economies. Global and continental freshwater assessments and policy often neglects the interplay between freshwater flows and landscape dynamics. Freshwater issues on both regional and global levels must be rethought and the interplay between terrestrial ecosystems and freshwater better incorporated in freshwater and ecosystem management. PMID:14728792

  15. Mesoscale modelling of water vapour in the tropical UTLS: two case studies from the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Durry, G.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Rivière, E. D.; Pirre, M.

    2007-03-01

    In this study, we evaluate the ability of the BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) mesoscale model compared to ECMWF global analysis to simulate the observed vertical variations of water vapour in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The observations are balloon-borne measurements of water vapour mixing ratio and temperature from micro-SDLA (Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer) instrument. Data from two balloon flights performed during the 2004 HIBISCUS field campaign are used to compare with the mesoscale simulations and to the ECMWF analysis. The observations exhibit fine scale vertical structures of water vapour of a few hundred meters height. The ECMWF vertical resolution (~1 km) is too coarse to capture these vertical structures in the UTLS. With a vertical resolution similar to ECMWF, the mesoscale model performs better than ECMWF analysis for water vapour in the upper troposphere and similarly or slightly worse for temperature. The BRAMS model with 250 m vertical resolution is able to capture more of the observed fine scale vertical variations of water vapour compared to runs with a coarser vertical resolution. This is mainly related to: (i) the enhanced vertical resolution in the UTLS and (ii) to the more detailed microphysical parameterization providing ice supersaturations as in the observations. In near saturated or supersaturated layers, the mesoscale model predicted relative humidity with respect to ice saturation is close to observations provided that the temperature profile is realistic. For temperature, the ECMWF analysis gives good results partly attributed to data assimilation. The analysis of the mesoscale model results showed that the vertical variations of the water vapour profile depends on the dynamics in unsaturated layer while the microphysical processes play a major role in saturated/supersaturated layers. In the lower stratosphere, the ECMWF model and the BRAMS model give very similar water vapour

  16. Study and mitigation of calibration error sources in a water vapour Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Leslie; Bock, Olivier; Bosser, Pierre; Thom, Christian; Pelon, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of water vapour throughout the atmosphere is important for many scientific applications (weather forecasting, climate research, calibration of GNSS altimetry measurements). Measuring water vapour remains a technical challenge because of its high variability in space and time. The major issues are achieving long-term stability (e.g., for climate trends monitoring) and high accuracy (e.g. for calibration/validation applications). LAREG and LOEMI at Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière (IGN) have developed a mobile scanning water vapour Raman lidar in collaboration with LATMOS at CNRS. This system aims at providing high accuracy water vapour measurements throughout the troposphere for calibrating GNSS wet delay signals and thus improving vertical positioning. Current developments aim at improving the calibration method and long term stability of the system to allow the Raman lidar to be used as a reference instrument. The IGN-LATMOS lidar was deployed in the DEMEVAP (Development of Methodologies for Water Vapour Measurement) campaign that took place in 2011 at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. The goals of DEMEVAP were to inter-compare different water vapour sounding techniques (lidars, operational and research radiosondes, GPS,…) and to study various calibration methods for the Raman lidar. A significant decrease of the signals and of the calibration constants of the IGN-LATMOS Raman lidar has been noticed all along the campaign. This led us to study the likely sources of uncertainty and drifts in each part of the instrument: emission, reception and detection. We inventoried several error sources as well as instability sources. The impact of the temperature dependence of the Raman lines on the filter transmission or the fluorescence in the fibre, are examples of the error sources. We investigated each error source and each instability source (uncontrolled laser beam jitter, temporal fluctuations of the photomultiplier

  17. A new test method for measuring the water vapour permeability of fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianhua; Qian, Xiaoming

    2007-09-01

    The water vapour permeability of textile fabrics is a critical determinant of wearer comfort. Existing test methods are either time consuming or require large amounts of material. A new test apparatus was developed for characterizing the water vapour permeability of fabrics. An aluminium cylinder covered with waterproof and vapour permeable PTFE laminate is used for generating water vapour source on one side of the sample. A dry nitrogen sweep gas stream is used to carry water vapour away. The calculation of the rate of water vapour transmission across the fabric is based on the measurement of the relative humidity of the outgoing nitrogen stream. This new measuring apparatus offers a short test time and calls for a small sample size. The comparison measurements show that the test results correlated well with those obtained from ISO 11092 and ASTM E96. Therefore, this test method provides a new technique to accurately and precisely characterize the water vapour transport properties of fabrics.

  18. The CM SAF ATOVS tropospheric water vapour and temperature data record: overview of methodology and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courcoux, N.; Schröder, M.

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the reprocessed Advanced Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS)-N Operational Vertical Sounder (ATOVS) tropospheric water vapour and temperature data record has been released by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF). ATOVS observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA)-15 through NOAA-19 and EUMETSAT's Meteorological operational (Metop-A) satellites have been consistently reprocessed to generate 13 years (1999-2011) of global water vapour and temperature daily and monthly means with a spatial resolution of 90 km × 90 km. After pre-processing, an optimal estimation scheme has been applied to the observations to simultaneously infer temperature and water vapour profiles. In a post-processing step an objective interpolation method (Kriging) has been applied to allow for gap filling. The product suite includes total precipitable water vapour (TPW), layer integrated water vapour (LPW) and layer mean temperature for five tropospheric layers, as well as specific humidity and temperature at six tropospheric levels and is referenced under doi:10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/WVT_ATOVS/V001. To our knowledge this is the first time that the ATOVS record (1998-now) has been consistently reprocessed (1999-2011) to retrieve water vapour and temperature products. TPW and LPW products were compared to corresponding products from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Upper-Air Network (GUAN) radiosonde observations and from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) version 5 satellite data record. The TPW shows a good agreement with the GUAN radiosonde data: average bias and root mean square error (RMSE) are -0.2 and 3.3 kg m-2, respectively. The maximum absolute (relative) bias and RMSE values decrease (increase) strongly with height. While the RMSE relative to AIRS is

  19. Pan-derived isotopic composition of atmospheric vapour in a Mediterranean wetland (Rhône River Delta, France).

    PubMed

    Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Cartapanis, Olivier; Radakovitch, Olivier; Sonzogni, Corinne; Pichaud, Marc

    2010-03-01

    A continuous record of atmospheric vapour isotopic composition (delta(A)) can be derived from the isotope mass balance of a water body submitted to natural evaporation. In this paper, we present preliminary results of the application of this method to a drying evaporation pan, located in a Mediterranean wetland, during a two-month summer period. Results seem consistent with few atmospheric vapour data based on the assumption of isotopic equilibrium with precipitation, but we observed a shift between pan-derived delta(A) and the composition of vapour samples collected by cold trapping. These results suggest that further investigations are necessary to evaluate the effect of diurnal variations of atmospheric conditions on the applicability of the pan-evaporation method, and on the representative of grab atmospheric samples. We also propose a sensitivity analysis for evaluating the impact of the different measured components on delta(A) calculation, and show an improvement in the method efficiency as the pan is drying. PMID:20099185

  20. Multi-sensor Calibration and Validation of the NASA-ALVICE and UWO-PCL NDACC Water Vapour Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, R.; Sica, R. J.; Argall, S.; Whiteman, D.; Walker, M.; Rodrigues, P.; McCullough, E. M.; Cadriola, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) has recently participated in a water vapour validation campaign with the NASA/GSFC Atmospheric Laboratory for Validation Inter-agency Collaboration and Education (ALVICE) Lidar. The purpose of this calibration exercise is to ensure that water vapour measurements, submitted to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) data base, are of sufficient quality for use in detecting long term changes in water vapour mixing ratio, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The field campaign took place at the University of Western Ontario Environmental Research Field Station, near London, Ontario, Canada, from May 23rd to June 10th 2012 and resulted in 57 hours of measurements taken over 12 clear nights. On each night a minimum of one RS92 radiosonde was launched. In addition, 3 cryogenic frost-point hygrometer (CFH) sondes were launched on clear nights over the course of the campaign. Measurements were obtained from near the surface up to ~20 km by both lidar systems, the radiosondes, and the CFH balloons. These measurements will be used to calibrate profiles of water vapour mixing ratio by the newly relocated PCL. Initial comparisons between the sondes and lidars will be presented as well as derived corrections for the retrieval of water vapour mixing ratio in both the troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  1. Water vapour jets inside the plume of gas leaving Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C J; Esposito, L W; Stewart, A I F; Meinke, B; Wallis, B; Colwell, J E; Hendrix, A R; Larsen, K; Pryor, W; Tian, F

    2008-11-27

    A plume of water vapour escapes from fissures crossing the south polar region of the Saturnian moon Enceladus. Tidal deformation of a thin surface crust above an internal ocean could result in tensile and compressive stresses that would affect the width of the fissures; therefore, the quantity of water vapour released at different locations in Enceladus' eccentric orbit is a crucial measurement of tidal control of venting. Here we report observations of an occultation of a star by the plume on 24 October 2007 that revealed four high-density gas jets superimposed on the background plume. The gas jet positions coincide with those of dust jets reported elsewhere inside the plume. The maximum water column density in the plume is about twice the density reported earlier. The density ratio does not agree with predictions-we should have seen less water than was observed in 2005. The ratio of the jets' bulk vertical velocities to their thermal velocities is 1.5 +/- 0.2, which supports the hypothesis that the source of the plume is liquid water, with gas accelerated to supersonic velocity in nozzle-like channels. PMID:19037310

  2. A microwave satellite water vapour column retrieval for polar winter conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perro, Christopher; Lesins, Glen; Duck, Thomas J.; Cadeddu, Maria

    2016-05-01

    A new microwave satellite water vapour retrieval for the polar winter atmosphere is presented. The retrieval builds on the work of Miao et al. (2001) and Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), employing auxiliary information for atmospheric conditions and numerical optimization. It was tested using simulated and actual measurements from the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) satellite instruments. Ground truth was provided by the G-band vapour radiometer (GVR) at Barrow, Alaska. For water vapour columns less than 6 kg m-2, comparisons between the retrieval and GVR result in a root mean square (RMS) deviation of 0.39 kg m-2 and a systematic bias of 0.08 kg m-2. These results are compared with RMS deviations and biases at Barrow for the retrieval of Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), the AIRS and MIRS satellite data products, and the ERA-Interim, NCEP, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses. When applied to MHS measurements, the new retrieval produces a smaller RMS deviation and bias than for the earlier retrieval and satellite data products. The RMS deviations for the new retrieval were comparable to those for the ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses; however, the MHS retrievals have much finer horizontal resolution (15 km at nadir) and reveal more structure. The new retrieval can be used to obtain pan-Arctic maps of water vapour columns of unprecedented quality. It may also be applied to measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave/Temperature 2 (SSM/T2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit B (AMSU-B), Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS), Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and Chinese MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) instruments.

  3. Intercomparison of in-situ and remote sensing δD signals in tropospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Matthias; González, Yenny; Dyroff, Christoph; Christner, Emanuel; García, Omaira; Wiegele, Andreas; Andrey, Javier; Barthlott, Sabine; Blumenstock, Thomas; Guirado, Carmen; Hase, Frank; Ramos, Ramon; Rodríguez, Sergio; Sepúveda, Eliezer

    2014-05-01

    The main mission of the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) is the generation of a quasi-global tropospheric water vapour isototopologue dataset of a good and well-documented quality. We present a first empirical validation of MUSICA's remote sensing δD products (ground-based FTIR within NDACC, Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, and space-based with IASI, Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, flown on METOP). As reference we use in-situ measurements made on the island of Tenerife at two different altitudes (2370 and 3550 m a.s.l., using two Picarro L2120-i water isotopologue analyzers) and aboard an aircraft (between 200 and 6800 m a.s.l., using the homemade ISOWAT instrument).

  4. Comparison of independent integrated water vapour estimates from GPS and sun photometer measurements and a meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugnaghi, S.; Boccolari, M.; Fazlagić, S.; Pacione, R.; Santangelo, R.; Vedel, H.; Vespe, F.

    Measurements using the Global Positioning System (GPS) are affected by the so-called tropospheric delay. Of this, the so-called wet delay is related mainly to the amount of water vapour along the path of the GPS signal through the troposphere. Precise knowledge of the abundance of water vapour, in space and time, is important for meteorology, both in forecasting and now-casting as well as in climate studies. Both because water vapour is the predecessor of precipitation, which is a forecast product, and because a very significant fraction of the energy released to the atmosphere comes from latent heat via water vapour. Despite the high variability of water vapour compared to other meteorological fields, like pressure and wind, water vapour observations are scarce; wherefore additional measurements of water vapour are expected to benefit meteorology. Water vapour is crucial for the development of the small scale, but sometimes very severe,precipitation events which are often seen at mid latitudes, and which are very hard to predict. In this work a comparison between radiometric (sun photometer) and GPS integrated water vapour (IWV) is presented. A sun photometer has been installed at the ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente) base of Lampedusa Island. The sun photometer is quite close (less then 4 km) to an ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) GPS permanent receiver. In Venezia an ASI GPS permanent receiver is collocated with another sun photometer. Both sun photometers are installed as part of the AERONET (AErosol and RObotic NETwork) program. A long record of sun photometric measurements, GPS data, and meteorological data is available for the Venezia site. A shorter record (summer period of the year 2000) is available for the station at Lampedusa. The comparison among the three different methods for water vapour delay estimation is presented. We find that the GPS and sun photometric data are better correlated (S.D. about 10 mm for the wet delay

  5. Validation of water vapour transport in the tropical tropopause region in coupled Chemistry Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremser, S.; Rex, M.; Langematz, U.; Dameris, M.; Wohltmann, I.

    2008-06-01

    In this study backward trajectories from the tropical lower stratosphere were calculated for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winters 1995-1996, 1997-1998 (El Niño) and 1998-1999 (La Niña) and summers 1996, 1997 and 1999 using both ERA-40 reanalysis data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) data. The calculated trajectories were analyzed to determine the distribution of points where individual air masses encounter the minimum temperature and thus minimum water vapour mixing ratio during their ascent through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) into the stratosphere. The geographical distribution of these dehydration points and the local conditions there determine the overall water vapour entry into the stratosphere. Results of two CCMs are presented: the ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM (hereafter: E39/C) from the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Freie Universität Berlin Climate Middle Atmosphere Model with interactive chemistry (hereafter: FUB-CMAM-CHEM). In the FUB-CMAM-CHEM model the minimum temperatures are overestimated by about 7 K in Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter as well as in NH summer, resulting in too high water vapour entry values compared to ERA-40. However, the geographical distribution of dehydration points is fairly reproduced for NH winter 1995-1996 and 1998-1999 and in all boreal summers. The distribution of dehydration points suggests an influence of the Indian monsoon upon the water vapour transport. The E39/C model displays a temperature bias of about +3 K. Hence, the minimum water vapour mixing ratios are higher relative to ERA-40. The geographical distribution of dehydration points is satisfactory in NH winter 1995-1996 and 1997-1998 with respect to ERA-40. The distribution is not reproduced for the NH winter 1998-1999 (La Niña event) compared to ERA-40. There is excessive mass flux through warm regions e.g. Africa, leading to excessive water vapour flux in the NH winter and

  6. Phase correction of VLBI with water vapour radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Alan; Rottmann, H.; Teuber, U.; Keller, R.

    We demonstrate phase correction of 3-mm VLBI observations using the scanning 18-GHz to 26GHz water vapour radiometer (WVR) at Effelsberg and we demonstrate an absolute accuracy of 15-mm in zenith path delay by comparing with GPS and radiosondes. This accuracy should provide significant improvement in astrometric phase-referencing observations. It is not good enough for geodetic VLBI to replace the tropospheric delay estimation but could be used to remove short-term path-length fluctuations and so improve the geodetic observables. We discuss lessons learned and opportunities for further improvement.

  7. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Miguel A.; Menzl, Georg; Aragones, Juan L.; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frederic; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Dellago, Christoph; Valeriani, Chantal

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  8. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    SciTech Connect

    González, Miguel A.; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Menzl, Georg; Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Aragones, Juan L.; Caupin, Frederic

    2014-11-14

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  9. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  10. The seasonal cycle of water vapour on Mars from assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, François; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-07-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr μm depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around LS=240-260°. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  11. Southern Greenland water vapour isotopic composition at the crossroads of Atlantic and Arctic moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, J. L.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Risi, C. M.; Werner, M.; Sodemann, H.; Lacour, J. L.; Fettweis, X.; Cesana, G.; Delmotte, M.; Cattani, O.; Clerbaux, C.; Sveinbjörnsdottir, A. E.; Masson-Delmotte, V.

    2014-12-01

    , depicting the northward propagation of an isotopic signal inherited from the meteorological conditions during evaporation. Overall, our observations provide valuable information for interpreting Greenland ice core records as well as for evaluating water vapour isotopic simulations in atmospheric models.

  12. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Seasonally-active water can be defined to include any water reservoir that communicates with other reservoirs on time scales of a year or shorter. It is the interaction of these water reservoirs, under the influence of varying solar radiation and in conjunction with surface and atmospheric temperatures, that determines the phase-stability field for water at the surface, and the distribution of water in various forms below, on, and above the surface. The atmosphere is the critical, dynamical link in this cycling system, and also (fortunately) one of the easiest to observe. Viking and Mars Global Surveyor observations paint a strongly asymmetric picture of the global seasonal water cycle, tied proximately to planetary eccentricity, and the existence of residual ice caps of different composition at the two poles. The northern summer experiences the largest water vapour columns, and is associated with sublimation from the northern residual water ice cap. The southern summer residual carbon dioxide ice cap is cold trap for water. Asymmetry in the water cycle is an unsolved problem. Possible solutions may involve the current timing of perihelion (the water cap resides at the pole experiencing the longer but cooler summer), the trapping of water ice in the northern hemisphere by tropical water ice clouds, and the bias in the annual-average, zonal-mean atmospheric circulation resulting from the zonal-mean difference in the elevation of the northern and southern hemispheres. Adsorbed and frozen water have proven harder to constrain. Recent Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer results suggest substantial ground ice in the mid- and high-latitudes, but this water is likely below the seasonal skin depth for two reasons: the GRS results are best fit with such a model, and GCM models of the water cycle produce dramatically unrealistic atmospheric vapour distributions when such a very near surface, GRS-like distribution is initialized - ultimately removing the water to the northern and

  13. Airborne and satellite remote sensing of the mid-infrared water vapour continuum.

    PubMed

    Newman, Stuart M; Green, Paul D; Ptashnik, Igor V; Gardiner, Tom D; Coleman, Marc D; McPheat, Robert A; Smith, Kevin M

    2012-06-13

    Remote sensing of the atmosphere from space plays an increasingly important role in weather forecasting. Exploiting observations from the latest generation of weather satellites relies on an accurate knowledge of fundamental spectroscopy, including the water vapour continuum absorption. Field campaigns involving the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements research aircraft have collected a comprehensive dataset, comprising remotely sensed infrared radiance observations collocated with accurate measurements of the temperature and humidity structure of the atmosphere. These field measurements have been used to validate the strength of the infrared water vapour continuum in comparison with the latest laboratory measurements. The recent substantial changes to self-continuum coefficients in the widely used MT_CKD (Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies) model between 2400 and 3200 cm(-1) are shown to be appropriate and in agreement with field measurements. Results for the foreign continuum in the 1300-2000 cm(-1) band suggest a weak temperature dependence that is not currently included in atmospheric models. A one-dimensional variational retrieval experiment is performed that shows a small positive benefit from using new laboratory-derived continuum coefficients for humidity retrievals. PMID:22547235

  14. Quantification of uncertainties of water vapour column retrievals using future instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, H.; Preusker, R.; Lindstrot, R.; Fischer, J.

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a quantification of uncertainties of water vapour retrievals based on near infrared measurements of upcoming instruments. The concepts of three scheduled spectrometer were taken into account: OLCI (Ocean and Land Color Instrument) on Sentinel-3, METimage on MetOp (Meteorological Operational Satellite) and FCI (Flexible Combined Imager) on MTG (Meteosat Third Generation). Optimal estimation theory was used to estimate the error of an hypothetical total water vapour column retrieval for 27 different atmospheric cases. The errors range from 100% in very dry cases to 2% in humid cases with a very high surface albedo. Generally the absolute uncertainties increase with higher water vapour column content due to H2O-saturation and decrease with a brighter surface albedo. Uncertainties increase with higher aerosol optical thickness, apart from very dark cases. Overall the METimage channel setting enables the most accurate retrievals. The retrieval using the MTG-FCI buildup has the highest uncertainties apart from very bright cases. A retrieval using two absorption channels increases the accuracy, in some cases by one order of magnitude, in comparison to a retrieval using just one absorption channel. On the other hand, a retrieval using three absorption channels has no significant advantage over a two-absorption channel retrieval. Furthermore, the optimal position of the absorption channels was determined using the concept of the "information content". For a single channel retrieval a channel at 900 or 915 nm has the highest mean information contents over all cases. The second absorption channel is ideally weakly correlated with the first one, thus positioned at 935 nm, in a region with stronger water vapour absorption.

  15. Quantification of uncertainties of water vapour column retrievals using future instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, H.; Preusker, R.; Lindstrot, R.; Fischer, J.

    2013-02-01

    This study presents a quantification of uncertainties of total column water vapour retrievals based on simulated near-infrared measurements of upcoming instruments. The concepts of three scheduled spectrometers were taken into account: OLCI (Ocean and Land Color Instrument) on Sentinel-3, METimage on an EPS-SG (EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation) satellite and FCI (Flexible Combined Imager) on MTG (Meteosat Third Generation). Optimal estimation theory was used to estimate the error of a hypothetical total water vapour column retrieval for 27 different atmospheric cases. The errors range from 100% in very dry cases to 2% in humid cases with a very high surface albedo. Generally, the absolute uncertainties increase with higher water vapour column content due to H2O-saturation and decrease with a brighter surface albedo. Uncertainties increase with higher aerosol optical thickness, apart from very dark cases. Overall, the METimage channel setting enables the most accurate retrievals. The retrieval using the MTG-FCI build-up has the highest uncertainties apart from very bright cases. On the one hand, a retrieval using two absorption channels increases the accuracy, in some cases by one order of magnitude, in comparison to a retrieval using just one absorption channel. On the other hand, a retrieval using three absorption channels has no significant advantage over a two-absorption channel retrieval. Furthermore, the optimal position of the absorption channels was determined using the concept of the "information content". For a single channel retrieval, a channel at 900 or 915 nm has the highest mean information content over all cases. The second absorption channel is ideally weakly correlated with the first one, and therefore positioned at 935 nm, in a region with stronger water vapour absorption.

  16. UTLS water vapour from SCIAMACHY limb measurementsV3.01 (2002-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, K.; Rozanov, A.; Azam, F.; Bramstedt, K.; Damadeo, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Gebhardt, C.; Hurst, D.; Kraemer, M.; Lossow, S.; Read, W.; Spelten, N.; Stiller, G. P.; Walker, K. A.; Weber, M.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) aboard the Envisat satellite provided measurements from August 2002 until April 2012. SCIAMACHY measured the scattered or direct sunlight using different observation geometries. The limb viewing geometry allows the retrieval of water vapour at about 10-25 km height from the near-infrared spectral range (1353-1410 nm). These data cover the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), a region in the atmosphere which is of special interest for a variety of dynamical and chemical processes as well as for the radiative forcing. Here, the latest data version of water vapour (V3.01) from SCIAMACHY limb measurements is presented and validated by comparisons with data sets from other satellite and in situ measurements. Considering retrieval tests and the results of these comparisons, the V3.01 data are reliable from about 11 to 23 km and the best results are found in the middle of the profiles between about 14 and 20 km. Above 20 km in the extra tropics V3.01 is drier than all other data sets. Additionally, for altitudes above about 19 km, the vertical resolution of the retrieved profile is not sufficient to resolve signals with a short vertical structure like the tape recorder. Below 14 km, SCIAMACHY water vapour V3.01 is wetter than most collocated data sets, but the high variability of water vapour in the troposphere complicates the comparison. For 14-20 km height, the expected errors from the retrieval and simulations and the mean differences to collocated data sets are usually smaller than 10 % when the resolution of the SCIAMACHY data is taken into account. In general, the temporal changes agree well with collocated data sets except for the Northern Hemisphere extratropical stratosphere, where larger differences are observed. This indicates a possible drift in V3.01 most probably caused by the incomplete treatment of volcanic aerosols in the retrieval. In all other regions a

  17. Infra-red measurements of stratospheric composition. I - The balloon instrument and water vapour measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaloner, C. P.; Drummond, J. R.; Houghton, J. T.; Roscoe, H. K.; Jarnot, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of a balloon-borne instrument for remote-sensing of stratospheric composition is described. Thermal emission from the constituents is detected and the spectral selectivity of the instrument is tailored to a specific gas by the use of a cell of the same gas in the optical path of the radiometer. The pressure of the gas in the cell is cycled and the resultant transmission function is shown to be highly selective to radiation from the same gas in the atmosphere. The first flight of the instrument and the retrieval of a water vapour profile in the range 15-40 km is described.

  18. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum. PMID:22547234

  19. The effects of urbanization on water vapour pressure in a semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiçek, I.; Türkoğlu, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates data from Aksaray, a medium sized urban city, and Cihanbeyli, a small town in Turkey, in order to show the effects of urbanization on water vapour pressure. Data taken at 07:00, 14:00 and 21:00 h and daily means were analyzed to identify the daily changes in water vapour pressure and temperatures. In Aksaray, positive urban heat island values were observed in all months except during afternoon hours. At all observation times during winter, weak water vapour pressure differences were recorded. During summer, on the other hand, positive water vapour differences were seen during afternoon and evening hours. A more humid city at afternoon hours is not typical of other mid-latitude countries. This is thought to be mainly related to the semi-arid climatic conditions in the area. Water vapour differences were seen to have a decreasing trend except during afternoon hours. As for temperature differences, an increase was seen during morning and evening hours, while a decrease was seen during afternoon hours and in daily means. A new trend was observed to start after the 1980s in both sets of data, which coincides with rapid population growth in Aksaray. Negative correlations were seen between water vapour pressure and temperature differences. No increase in water vapour pressure due to urbanization was observed in Aksaray. The decreasing evapotranspiration and the urban geometry appear to be the most influential factors in determining the water vapour pressure in Aksaray.

  20. The millennium water vapour drop in the stratosphere in chemistry-climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkop, Sabine; Dameris, Martin; Joeckel, Patrick; Garny, Hella; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the millennium water vapour drop, the abrupt and severe water vapour decline in the stratosphere beginning in year 2000, by means of various simulations using the Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) EMAC. Since the beginning 1980s, balloon borne stratospheric water vapour measurements and corresponding satellite measurements starting in the early 1990s indicated a long-term steady increase of water vapour concentrations. However, the multi-year data sets also show significant fluctuations on different time scales. In the year 2000, an extraordinary sudden drop of stratospheric water vapour concentration has been observed followed by persistent low values for several years. Solomon et al. (2010) showed that this drop slowed down the rate of increase in global surface temperature over the following decade by about 25%. So far, the stratospheric water vapour variations observed by satellite from 1992 to 2012 are not reproduced by CCM simulations forced by observed changes in sea surface temperatures, greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting substances (Gettelman et al., 2010, Randel and Jensen, 2013). However, the CCM EMAC is able to reproduce the signature and pattern of the water vapour disturbances in agreement with those derived from observations. In this paper we present results of a hierarchy of simulations with the CCM EMAC, demonstrating that it is possible to retrace the observed water vapour fluctuations in the stratosphere (incl. the millennium drop), if suitable inner and outer boundary conditions are applied.

  1. Condensation of water vapour on moss-dominated biological soil crust, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Pan, Yan-Xia; Hu, Rui; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Characteristics of water vapour condensation, including the onset, duration, and amount of water vapour condensation on moss-dominated biological soil crust (BSC) and dune sand were studied under simulated conditions with varying air temperature and relative humidity. The simulations were performed in a plant growth chamber using an electronic balance recording the weight of condensation. There was a positive linear correlation between the water vapour condensation and relative humidity while the mean temperature was negatively linearly related to amounts of water vapour condensation for both soil surfaces. The amount of water vapour condensation on BSC and dune sand can be described by the difference between air temperature and dew point with an exponential function, indicating that when the difference of air temperature and dew point exceeds a value of 35.3◦C, there will be zero water vapour condensed on BSC. In contrast, when the difference of air temperature and dew point exceeds a value of 20.4◦C, the water vapour condensation will be zero for dune sand. In general, when the air is fully saturated with water and the dew point is equal to the current air temperature, the water vapour condensed on BSC attained its maximum value of 0.398 mm, whereas it was 0.058 mm for dune sand. In comparison, water vapour condensed on BSC was at a relatively high temperature and low relative humidity, while we did not detect water vapour condensation on the dune sand under the similar conditions. Physical and chemical analyses of the samples pointed to a greater porosity, high content of fine particles, and high salinity for BSC compared to the dune sand. These results highlight that soil physicochemical properties are the likely factors influencing the mechanism of water vapour condensation under specific meteorological conditions, as onset was earlier and the duration was longer for water vapour condensation on BSC in comparison with that of dune sand. This contributed to

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Troy Darrell

    The APCVD of vanadium(IV) oxide thin films from halide precursors was investigated. It was found that the phase of vanadium oxide obtained could be controlled by the reactor temperature and precursor ratio. For vanadium(IV) chloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VCI4 was required to produce VO2 thin films. For vanadium(V) oxytrichloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VOCI3 also produced VO2 but required low total gas flow rates (< 1 L min 1) for complete coverage of the substrate. Vanadium(IV) oxide thin films doped with metal ions (W, Cr, Nb, Ti, Mo or Sn) were also prepared by the APCVD process in order to reduce the thermochromic transition temperature (TC) from 68 °C for the undoped material to < 30 °C. The most successful dopant was tungsten, introduced into the VOCl3, and water system as WCI6, which lowered T to 5 °C for a 3 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Tungsten (VI) ethoxide was introduced into the VCI4 and water system and reduced TC, of VO2, to 42 °C for a 1 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Chromium, introduced as CrCO2Cl2, formed a chromium vanadium oxide that did not display any thermochromic properties. Niobium, introduced as NbCl5 into the VOCl3 system, reduced TC of VO2, but the amount of niobium introduced could not be easily controlled. Molybdenum, introduced as MoCI5, also reduced TC of VO2, but the form of the molybdenum appeared to be different from that required for complete control of TC, Titanium, introduced as TiCl4, produced phase segregated films of VO2 and TiO2, with interesting multifunctional properties and a reduced TC. Tin, introduced as SnCl4, also formed a phase segregated material of VO2, and SnO2, with a slightly reduced TC.

  3. Recent advances in measurement of the water vapour continuum in the far-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Green, Paul D; Newman, Stuart M; Beeby, Ralph J; Murray, Jonathan E; Pickering, Juliet C; Harries, John E

    2012-06-13

    We present a new derivation of the foreign-broadened water vapour continuum in the far-infrared (far-IR) pure rotation band between 24 μm and 120 μm (85-420 cm(-1)) from field data collected in flight campaigns of the Continuum Absorption by Visible and IR radiation and Atmospheric Relevance (CAVIAR) project with Imperial College's Tropospheric Airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TAFTS) far-IR spectro-radiometer instrument onboard the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft; and compare this new derivation with those recently published in the literature in this spectral band. This new dataset validates the current Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies (MT-CKD) 2.5 model parametrization above 300 cm(-1), but indicates the need to strengthen the parametrization below 300 cm(-1), by up to 50 per cent at 100 cm(-1). Data recorded at a number of flight altitudes have allowed measurements within a wide range of column water vapour environments, greatly increasing the sensitivity of this analysis to the continuum strength. PMID:22547236

  4. A new microwave spectrometer for ground-based observations of water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallgren, K.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a new, high time-resolution, microwave heterodyne spectrometer for observations of water vapour in the middle atmosphere. It measures the rotational transition of water vapour at 22.235 GHz in the vertical and horizontal polarisation. The two polarisations are averaged in order to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio. The different polarisations have separate, but identical, signal chains consisting of a 22 GHz cooled HEMT amplifier, a second, warm, 22 GHz HEMT booster amplifier, an IF stage and a Chirp Transform Spectrometer (CTS) backend. Continuous calibration with two internal loads kept at temperatures close to the observed atmosphere, a wobbling optical table to reduce standing waves in the optical path and the low receiver temperature ensures a time resolution of an order of magnitude better than what has been achieved by earlier instruments. The error sources in the retrieved spectrum are discussed and the data is compared and validated against EOS-MLS on the NASA Aura satellite. The profiles are found to be in good agreement with each other.

  5. A global climatology of total columnar water vapour from SSM/I and MERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrot, R.; Stengel, M.; Schröder, M.; Fischer, J.; Preusker, R.; Schneider, N.; Steenbergen, T.

    2014-01-01

    A global time series of total columnar water vapour from combined data of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard ESA's Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) onboard the satellite series of the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is presented. The unique dataset, generated in the framework of the ESA Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project, combines atmospheric water vapour observations over land and ocean, derived from measurements in the near infrared and the microwave range, respectively. Daily composites and monthly means of total columnar water vapour are available as global maps on rectangular latitude-longitude grids with a spatial resolution of 0.05° × 0.05° over land and 0.5° × 0.5° over ocean for the years 2003 to 2008. The data is stored in NetCDF files and is fully compliant with the NetCDF Climate Forecast convention. Through the combination of high quality microwave observations and near infrared observations over ocean and land surfaces, respectively, the dataset provides global coverage. The combination of both products is carried out such that the individual properties of the microwave and near-infrared products, in particular their uncertainties, are not changed and therefore well defined. Due to the global coverage and the provided uncertainty estimates this data set is potentially of high value for climate research. The SSM/I-MERIS TCWV data set is freely available via the GlobVapour project web page with associated doi (doi:10.5676/DFE/WV_COMB/FP). In this paper, the details of the dataset generation, i.e. the satellite data used, the retrieval techniques and merging approaches are presented. The derived level 3 products are compared to global radiosonde data from the GCOS upper air network (GUAN), showing a high agreement with a root mean square deviation of roughly 4.4 kg m-2 and a small

  6. A global climatology of total columnar water vapour from SSM/I and MERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrot, R.; Stengel, M.; Schröder, M.; Fischer, J.; Preusker, R.; Schneider, N.; Steenbergen, T.; Bojkov, B. R.

    2014-06-01

    A global time series of total columnar water vapour from combined data of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard ESA's Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) onboard the satellite series of the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is presented. The unique data set, generated in the framework of the ESA Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project, combines atmospheric water vapour observations over land and ocean, derived from measurements in the near-infrared and the microwave range, respectively. Daily composites and monthly means of total columnar water vapour are available as global maps on rectangular latitude-longitude grids with a spatial resolution of 0.05° × 0.05° over land and 0.5° × 0.5° over ocean for the years 2003 to 2008. The data are stored in NetCDF files and is fully compliant with the NetCDF Climate Forecast convention. Through the combination of high-quality microwave observations and near-infrared observations over ocean and land surfaces, respectively, the data set provides global coverage. The combination of both products is carried out such that the individual properties of the microwave and near-infrared products, in particular their uncertainties, are not modified by the merging process and are therefore well defined. Due to the global coverage and the provided uncertainty estimates this data set is potentially of high value for climate research. The SSM/I-MERIS TCWV data set is freely available via the GlobVapour project web page (www.globvapour.info) with associated doi:10.5676/DFE/WV_COMB/FP. In this paper, the details of the data set generation, i.e. the satellite data used, the retrieval techniques and merging approaches, are presented. The derived level 3 products are compared to global radiosonde data from the GCOS upper air

  7. Analysis of atmospheric concentrations of quinones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in vapour and particulate phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Alam, Mohammed S.; Godri Pollitt, Krystal J.; Stark, Christopher; Harrison, Roy M.

    2013-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are often measured in studies of atmospheric chemistry or health effects of air pollution, due to their known human carcinogenicity. In recent years, PAH quinone derivatives have also become a focus of interest, primarily because they can contribute to oxidative stress. This work reports concentrations of 17 PAH and 15 quinones measured in air samples collected at a trafficked roadside. Data are presented for four compounds not previously reported in ambient air: 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone, methyl-1,4-benzoquinone and 2,3-dimethylanthraquinone, and a large vapour phase component is measured, not analysed in most earlier studies. Analyses are reported also for SRM 1649a and 1649b, including many compounds (8 for SRM 1649a and 12 for SRM 1649b) for which concentrations have not previously been reported. This work assesses the vapour/particle phase distribution of PAHs and quinones in relation to their molecular weight, vapour pressure, polarity and Henry's Law constant, finding that both molecular weight and vapour pressure (which are correlated) are good predictors of the partitioning.

  8. Airborne hygrometer calibration inter-comparison against a metrological water vapour standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorgon, Denis; Boese, Norbert; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Water vapour is the most important atmospheric greenhouse gas, which causes a major feedback to warming and other changes in the climate system. Knowledge of the distribution of water vapour and its climate induced changes is especially important in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) where vapour plays a critical role in atmospheric radiative balance, cirrus cloud formation, and photochemistry. But, our understanding of water in the UT/LS is limited by significant uncertainties in current UT/LS water measurements. One of the most comprehensive inter-comparison campaigns for airborne hygrometers, termed AQUAVIT (AV1) [1], took place in 2007 at the AIDA chamber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. AV1 was a well-defined, referred, blind inter-comparison of 22 airborne field instruments from 17 international research groups. One major metrological deficit of AV1, however, was, that no traceable reference instrument participated in the inter-comparison experiments and that the calibration procedures of the participating instruments were not monitored or interrogated. Consequently a follow-up inter-comparison was organized in April 2013, which for the first time also provides a traceable link to the international humidity scale. This AQUAVIT2 (AV2) campaign (details see: http://www.imk-aaf.kit.edu/aquavit/index.php/Main_Page) was again located at KIT/AIDA and organised by an international organizing committee including KIT, PTB, FZJ and others. Generally AV2 is divided in two parallel comparisons: 1) AV2-A uses the AIDA chamber for a simultaneous comparison of all instruments (incl. sampling and in-situ instruments) over a broad range of conditions characteristic for the UT/LS; 2) AV2-B, about which this paper is reporting, is a sequential comparison of selected hygrometers and (when possible) their reference calibration infrastructures by means of a chilled mirror hygrometer traced back to the primary National humidity standard

  9. Stable isotope ratios in rainfall and water vapour at Bangalore, Southern India during the monsoon period of 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peethambaran, Rahul; Ghosh, Prosenjit

    2015-04-01

    Rainwater and water vapour were collected during monsoon rainfall from Bangalore station to identifying the signature of moisture sources. Moisture responsible for the rainfall originates from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal and advected to the station together with vapour generated from the local . Total no of samples includes 72 for water vapour and 81 for rainwater respectively. The mean difference between water vapour and rainwater was found to be -13.27±2.5 ‰ for δ18O, -100±9 ‰ for δD, which was calculated from monthly mean values of water vapour and rainwater. The most enriched samples of rainwater and water vapour were found during the pre monsoon months which correspond to temperature maximum at the study location. Lighter isotopic ratios were recorded in samples collected during the starting of monsoon showers which goes to further depletion in δ18O during the period of post monsoon. This was mainly due to the change in the prevailing wind direction from southwest to northeast. Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL) generated for rainwater (d = 7.49 δ 18O + 5.2555, R² = 0.93) equation suggesting enrichment due to evaporation. Local Vapour Line (LVL) (d = 7.5248 δ 18O + 6.6534,R² = 0.8957) indicates the dominance of vapor from local source. The time series of d-xcess of rainwater and water vapor reveals large variability, coinciding with the presence of transported and local sources. It was observed that rainwater and water vapor exhibits higher values indicating re-evaporation from the region. Repetition of this feature demonstrated pattern of moisture recycling in the atmosphere and the contribution of continental evaporation and transpiration. The sensitivity of isotopes to the sudden change in wind direction was documented by an abrupt variations in the isotope values. Such changes in wind patterns were mostly associated with the prevalence of low pressure depression systems during the monsoon periods. Detailed analysis on role of wind patterns and

  10. Assessment of UTLS water vapour measurements from limb-sounders within the SPARC Data Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Tegtmeier, S.; Anderson, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Fuller, R. A.; Funke, B.; Jones, A. K.; Kyrola, E. T.; Lingenfelser, G. S.; Lumpe, J. D.; Remsberg, E. E.; Rozanov, A.; Toohey, M.; Urban, J.; von Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The last few decades represent a "golden age" of stratospheric composition measurements that were crucial in advancing our understanding of atmospheric processes and their role in climate. It is likely that the future stratosphere will not be as well measured as it is now. It is important to capture existing knowledge on current and recent instruments before this knowledge is lost. In this contribution we will present a comprehensive comparison of UTLS water vapour measurements obtained from a multi-national set of limb-viewing satellite instruments within the SPARC Data Initiative. We will highlight key results, such as the physical consistency of the different data sets in reproducing the tape recorder, polar vortex dehydration, interannual variability, and seasonal cycles. We will discuss potential reasons for the differences and implications for the use of the data sets in merging and model validation activities, as well as for the interpretation of atmospheric trends and processes.

  11. Ground-based GPS-derived Precipitable Water Vapour Estimates for Climate Application in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Suelynn; Dawson, John; Jia, Minghai; Kuleshov, Yuriy

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric water vapour is a critical component of the greenhouse effect and plays a significant role in the global climate system. The knowledge of the long-term spatial and temporal variability of water vapour is vital for understanding climate change. The Global Positioning System (GPS) has long offered the prospect of retrieving column integrated Precipitable Water Vapour (PWV) profiles from the time-varying tropospheric Zenith Path Delay (ZPD), which can be retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS measurements. However, observing GPS-PWV for climate studies requires a homogenous and long-term time series of GPS data. We present a regional reanalysis of GPS data focussing on the Australian Regional GPS Network stations from 1997 to 2012 (15 years). These stations are selectively chosen to provide a representative regional distribution of GPS sites on the Australian continent while ensuring conventional meteorological observations (surface-based data) are available for PWV conversion and other PWV sensors (e.g. upper-air data from radiosondes) for validation purposes. The research work is divided into three components: 1) estimation of homogenous long-term tropospheric ZPD from GPS measurements that are accurate, stable and consistent; 2) conversion of tropospheric ZPD to PWV estimates given surface temperature and pressure readings, and 3) intertechnique comparison and validation of the GPS-derived PWV. The derived data will be used to investigate the secular trend and seasonal variation PWV time series and its implications for climate application. This research represents the first attempt to utilise the Australian regional network of GPS stations to study the climate processes and variations from the long-term time series of GPS-PWV.

  12. Water vapour foreign-continuum absorption in near-infrared windows from laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    Ptashnik, Igor V; McPheat, Robert A; Shine, Keith P; Smith, Kevin M; Williams, R Gary

    2012-06-13

    For a long time, it has been believed that atmospheric absorption of radiation within wavelength regions of relatively high infrared transmittance (so-called 'windows') was dominated by the water vapour self-continuum, that is, spectrally smooth absorption caused by H(2)O--H(2)O pair interaction. Absorption due to the foreign continuum (i.e. caused mostly by H(2)O--N(2) bimolecular absorption in the Earth's atmosphere) was considered to be negligible in the windows. We report new retrievals of the water vapour foreign continuum from high-resolution laboratory measurements at temperatures between 350 and 430 K in four near-infrared windows between 1.1 and 5 μm (9000-2000 cm(-1)). Our results indicate that the foreign continuum in these windows has a very weak temperature dependence and is typically between one and two orders of magnitude stronger than that given in representations of the continuum currently used in many climate and weather prediction models. This indicates that absorption owing to the foreign continuum may be comparable to the self-continuum under atmospheric conditions in the investigated windows. The calculated global-average clear-sky atmospheric absorption of solar radiation is increased by approximately 0.46 W m(-2) (or 0.6% of the total clear-sky absorption) by using these new measurements when compared with calculations applying the widely used MTCKD (Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies) foreign-continuum model. PMID:22547232

  13. Retrieval of Temperature and Water Vapour from Multiple Channel Lidar Systems Using an Optimal Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, Robert; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    While the application of optimal estimation methods (OEMs) is well-known for the retrieval of atmospheric parameters from passive instruments, active instruments have typically not employed the OEM. For instance, the measurement of temperature in the middle atmosphere with Rayleigh-scatter lidars is an important technique for assessing atmospheric change. Current retrieval schemes for these temperatures have several shortcomings which can be overcome using an OEM. Forward models have been constructed that fully characterize the measurement and allow the simultaneous retrieval of temperature, dead time and background. The OEM allows a full uncertainty budget to be obtained on a per profile basis that includes, in addition to the statistical uncertainties, the smoothing error and uncertainties due to Rayleigh extinction, ozone absorption, the lidar constant, nonlinearity in the counting system, variation of the Rayleigh-scatter cross section with altitude, pressure, acceleration due to gravity and the variation of mean molecular mass with altitude. The vertical resolution of the temperature profile is found at each height, and a quantitative determination is made of the maximum height to which the retrieval is valid. A single temperature profile can be retrieved from measurements with multiple channels that cover different height ranges, vertical resolutions and even different detection methods. The OEM employed is shown to give robust estimates of temperature consistent with previous methods, while requiring minimal computational time. Retrieval of water vapour mixing ratio from vibrational Raman scattering lidar measurements is another example where an OEM offers a considerable advantage over the standard analysis technique, with the same advantages as discussed above for Rayleigh-scatter temperatures but with an additional benefit. The conversion of the lidar measurement into mixing ratio requires a calibration constant to be employed. Using OEM the calibration

  14. Retrieval of Temperature and Water Vapour From Multiple Channel Lidar Systems Using an Optimal Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, Robert; Haefele, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    While the application of optimal estimation methods (OEMs) is well-known for the retrieval of atmospheric parameters from passive instruments, active instruments have typically not employed the OEM. For instance, the measurement of temperature in the middle atmosphere with Rayleigh-scatter lidars is an important technique for assessing atmospheric change. Current retrieval schemes for these temperatures have several shortcomings which can be overcome using an OEM. Forward models have been constructed that fully characterize the measurement and allow the simultaneous retrieval of temperature, dead time and background. The OEM allows a full uncertainty budget to be obtained on a per profile basis that includes, in addition to the statistical uncertainties, the smoothing error and uncertainties due to Rayleigh extinction, ozone absorption, the lidar constant, nonlinearity in the counting system, variation of the Rayleigh-scatter cross section with altitude, pressure, acceleration due to gravity and the variation of mean molecular mass with altitude. The vertical resolution of the temperature profile is found at each height, and a quantitative determination is made of the maximum height to which the retrieval is valid. A single temperature profile can be retrieved from measurements with multiple channels that cover different height ranges, vertical resolutions and even different detection methods. The OEM employed is shown to give robust estimates of temperature consistent with previous methods, while requiring minimal computational time. Retrieval of water vapour mixing ratio from vibrational Raman scattering lidar measurements is another example where an OEM offers a considerable advantage over the standard analysis technique, with the same advantages as discussed above for Rayleigh-scatter temperatures but with an additional benefit. The conversion of the lidar measurement into mixing ratio requires a calibration constant to be employed. Using OEM the calibration

  15. Measurements of mesospheric water vapour, aerosols and temperatures with the Spectral Absorption Line Imager (SALI-AT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Mullins, M.; Brown, S.; Sargoytchev, S. I.

    2001-08-01

    Water vapour concentration is one of the most important, yet one of the least known quantities of the mesosphere. Knowledge of water vapour concentration is the key to understanding many mesospheric processes, including the one that is primary focus of our investigation, mesospheric clouds (MC). The processes of formation and occurrence parameters of MC constitute an interesting problem in their own right, but recently evidence has been provided which suggests that they are a critical indicator of atmospheric change. The aim of the SALI-AT experiment is to make simultaneous (although not strictly collocated) measurements of water vapour, aerosols and temperature in the mesosphere and the mesopause region under twilight condition in the presence of mesospheric clouds. The water vapour will be measured in the regime of solar occultation utilizing a water vapour absorption band at 936 nm wavelength employing the SALI (Spectral Absorption Line Imager) instrument concept. A three-channel zenith photometer, AT-3, with wavelengths of 385 nm, 525 nm, and 1040 nm will measure Mie and Rayleigh scattering giving both mesospheric temperature profiles and the particle size distribution. Both instruments are small, low cost and low mass. It is envisioned that the SALI-AT experiment be flown on a small rocket - the Improved Orion/Hotel payload configuration, from the Andoya Rocket range, Norway. Alternatively the instrument can be flown as a "passenger" on larger rocket carrying other experiments. In either case flight costs are relatively low. Some performance simulations are presented showing that the instrument we have designed will be sufficiently sensitive to measure water vapor in concentrations that are expected at the summer mesopause, about 85 km height.

  16. Pressure effects on water vapour lines: beyond the Voigt profile.

    PubMed

    Ngo, N H; Tran, H; Gamache, R R; Hartmann, J M

    2012-06-13

    A short overview of recent results on the effects of pressure (collisions) regarding the shape of isolated infrared lines of water vapour is presented. The first part of this study considers the basic collisional quantities, which are the pressure-broadening and -shifting coefficients, central parameters of the Lorentzian (and Voigt) profile and thus of any sophisticated line-shape model. Through comparisons of measured values with semi-classical calculations, the influences of the molecular states (both rotational and vibrational) involved and of the temperature are analysed. This shows the relatively unusual behaviour of H(2)O broadening, with evidence of a significant vibrational dependence and the fact that the broadening coefficient (in cm(-1) atm(-1)) of some lines increases with temperature. In the second part of this study, line shapes beyond the Voigt model are considered, thus now taking 'velocity effects' into account. These include both the influence of collisionally induced velocity changes that lead to the so-called Dicke narrowing and the influence of the dependence of collisional parameters on the speed of the radiating molecule. Experimental evidence of deviations from the Voigt shape is presented and analysed. The interest of classical molecular dynamics simulations, to model velocity changes, together with semi-classical calculations of the speed-dependent collisional parameters for line-shape predictions from 'first principles', are discussed. PMID:22547229

  17. Design Of A Geosynchronous SAR System For Water-Vapour Maps And Deformation Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, Andrea Monti; Perletta, Luca; Rocca, Fabio; Scapin, Diego; Tebaldini, Stefano; Broquetas, Antoni; Ruiz, Josep

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a geosynchronous SAR concept that makes use of dual frequencies to achieve WIDE and SPOT coverage, aiming at continuous monitoring of deformation and generation of water vapour maps at high space-temporal resolution.

  18. Mesoscale modelling of water vapour in the tropical UTLS: two case studies from the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Durry, G.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Rivière, E. D.; Pirre, M.

    2006-08-01

    In this study, we evaluate the ability of the BRAMS mesoscale model compared to ECMWF global analysis to simulate the observed vertical variations of water vapour in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The observations are balloon-borne measurements of water vapour mixing ratio and temperature from micro-SDLA (Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometer) instrument. Data from two balloon flights performed during the 2004 HIBISCUS field campaign are used to compare with the mesoscale simulations and to ECMWF analysis. The mesoscale model performs significantly better than ECMWF analysis for water vapour in the upper troposphere and similarly or slightly worse for temperature. The improvement provided by the mesoscale model for water vapour comes mainly from (i) the enhanced vertical resolution in the UTLS (250 m for BRAMS and ~1 km for ECMWF model) and (ii) the more detailed microphysical parameterization providing ice supersaturations as in the observations. The ECMWF vertical resolution (~1 km) is too coarse to capture the observed fine scale vertical variations of water vapour in the UTLS. In near saturated or supersaturated layers, the mesoscale model relative humidity with respect to ice saturation is close to observations provided that the temperature profile is realistic. For temperature, ECMWF analysis gives good results partly thanks to data assimilation. The analysis of the mesoscale model results showed that in undersaturated layers, the water vapour profile depends mainly on the dynamics. In saturated/supersaturated layers, microphysical processes play an important role and have to be taken into account on top of the dynamical processes to understand the water vapour profiles. In the lower stratosphere, the ECMWF model and the BRAMS model give very similar water vapour profiles that are significantly dryer than micro-SDLA measurements. This similarity comes from the fact that BRAMS is initialised using ECMWF analysis and that no mesoscale

  19. Vertical structure of stratospheric water vapour trends derived from merged satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Plummer, D. A.; Shepherd, T. G.; Scinocca, J. F.; Anderson, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Funke, B.; Hurst, D.; Rozanov, A.; Urban, J.; von Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, H. J.; Tegtmeier, S.; Weigel, K.

    2014-10-01

    Stratospheric water vapour is a powerful greenhouse gas. The longest available record from balloon observations over Boulder, Colorado, USA shows increases in stratospheric water vapour concentrations that cannot be fully explained by observed changes in the main drivers, tropical tropopause temperatures and methane. Satellite observations could help resolve the issue, but constructing a reliable long-term data record from individual short satellite records is challenging. Here we present an approach to merge satellite data sets with the help of a chemistry-climate model nudged to observed meteorology. We use the models' water vapour as a transfer function between data sets that overcomes issues arising from instrument drift and short overlap periods. In the lower stratosphere, our water vapour record extends back to 1988 and water vapour concentrations largely follow tropical tropopause temperatures. Lower and mid-stratospheric long-term trends are negative, and the trends from Boulder are shown not to be globally representative. In the upper stratosphere, our record extends back to 1986 and shows positive long-term trends. The altitudinal differences in the trends are explained by methane oxidation together with a strengthened lower-stratospheric and a weakened upper-stratospheric circulation inferred by this analysis. Our results call into question previous estimates of surface radiative forcing based on presumed global long-term increases in water vapour concentrations in the lower stratosphere.

  20. Calibration of a water vapour Raman lidar with a kite-based humidity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totems, Julien; Chazette, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    We present a calibration method for a water vapour Raman lidar using a meteorological probe lifted by a kite, flown steadily above the lidar site, within the framework of the Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) and Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) campaigns. The experiment was carried out in Menorca (Spain) during June 2013, using the mobile water vapour and aerosol lidar WALI. Calibration using a kite demonstrated a much better degree of co-location with the lidar system than that which could be achieved with radiosondes, and it allowed us to determine the overlap function and calibration factor simultaneously. The range-dependent water vapour lidar calibration was thus determined with an uncertainty of 2 % in the 90-8000 m altitude range. Lidar water vapour measurements are further compared with radiosondes, showing very good agreement in the lower troposphere (1-5 km) and a relative difference and standard deviation of 5 and 9 % respectively. Moreover, a reasonable agreement with MODIS-integrated water vapour content is found, with a relative mean and standard deviation of 3 and 16 % respectively. However, a discrepancy is found with AERONET retrievals, showing the latter to be underestimated by 28 %. Reanalyses by the ECMWF/IFS numerical weather prediction model also agree with the temporal evolution highlighted with the lidar, with no measurable drift in integrated water vapour content over the period.

  1. Preliminary tropospheric ozone DIAL, water vapour, and aerosol lidar measurements during ARC-IONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, Kevin B.; Firanski, Bernard J.

    2009-09-01

    A new lidar instrument, dubbed AeRO (Aerosol Raman Ozone) Lidar, is being developed at Environment Canada's Centre For Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE). The new system will use three lasers to simultaneously measure ozone, water vapour and aerosol profiles (including extinction) from near ground to the tropopause. The main thrust will focus on understanding Air Quality within the airshed with the capability of looking at Stratospheric Tropospheric Exchange (STE) processes to determine the magnitude and frequency of such events leading to elevated levels of tropospheric ozone. In addition a wind profiler through a partnership with University of Western Ontario will soon be deployed to CARE to provide complementary observations of the tropopause. The lidar participated in the ARC-IONS field campaign during April and July of 2008. During the field campaign, daily ozonesondes were released to further compliment the lidar measurements. Details of the system design and preliminary results from the lidar measurements will be presented.

  2. Formation of formic acid and organic peroxides in the ozonolysis of ethene with added water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Osamu; Neeb, Peter; Limbach, Stefan; Moortgat, Geert K.

    1994-07-01

    Ozonolysis of C2H4 was carried out in a 580 l glass reaction vessel at 1-5 ppm reactant concentrations, with added water vapour. Under dry conditions ([H2O]0 = 0.5 ppm), HCHO, CO, CO2, (CHO)2O (formic acid anhydride), H2O2, and CH3OOH were identified as the reaction products. Under wet conditions ([H2O]0 = 2 × 104 ppm), HCOOH yields approaching ca. 20% of the converted C2H4, were observed, while no (CHO)2O was formed. Hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, HOCH2OOH, was observed as the major peroxide, and found to be formed only in the presence of water vapour. Direct reactions of H2O vapour with the excited CH2OO* radicals and with stabilized CH2OO radicals are postulated to explain the formation of HCOOH and HOCH2OOH in the presence of water vapour, respectively.

  3. A decrease in mesospheric water vapour detected in South-Korea in February 2008; from observation to interpretation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wachter, Evelyn; Kaempfer, Niklaus; Flury, Thomas; Ka, Soohyun; Oh, Jung Jin

    Since November 2006, the University of Bern in Switzerland has been operating a ground-based microwave [GBMW] radiometer in Seoul, S-Korea [37.32N, 126.57E]. At the end of February 2008 we observed a significant decrease in mesospheric water vapour of more than 2 ppmv [around 40Trajectories were calculated and the temperature and wind field distribution in the northern hemisphere was analyzed. We validated the trajectory model results by a match tech-nique with other GBMW radiometer data from stations of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change [NDACC]. In addition, we investigated the possible impact of the major sudden stratospheric warming [SSW], which occured in February 2008 at midlat-itudes, to the mesospheric region, leaving signatures in the water vapour distribution at the observation site in Seoul.

  4. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-08-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologues data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and interferences from humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the humidity interference error and we recommend applying it for isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  5. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  6. Long-term series of tropospheric water vapour amounts and HDO/H2O ratio profiles above Jungfraujoch.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, B.; Mahieu, E.; Schneider, M.; Hase, F.; Servais, C.; Demoulin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Water vapour is a crucial climate variable involved in many processes which widely determine the energy budget of our planet. In particular, water vapour is the dominant greenhouse gas in the Earth's atmosphere and its radiative forcing is maximum in the middle and upper troposphere. Because of the extremely high variability of water vapour concentration in time and space, it is challenging for the available relevant measurement techniques to provide a consistent data set useful for trend analyses and climate studies. Schneider et al. (2006a) showed that ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, performed from mountain observatories, allows for the detection of H2O variabilities up to the tropopause. Furthermore, the FTIR measurements allow the retrieval of HDO amounts and therefore the monitoring of HDO/H2O ratio profiles whose variations act as markers for the source and history of the atmospheric water vapour. In the framework of the MUSICA European project (Multi-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, http://www.imk-asf.kit.edu/english/musica.php), a new approach has been developed and optimized by M. Schneider and F. Hase, using the PROFFIT algorithm, to consistently retrieve tropospheric water vapour profiles from high-resolution ground-based infrared solar spectra and so taking benefit from available long-term data sets of ground-based observations. The retrieval of the water isotopologues is performed on a logarithmic scale from 14 micro-windows located in the 2600-3100 cm-1 region. Other important features of this new retrieval strategy are: a speed dependant Voigt line shape model, a joint temperature profile retrieval and an interspecies constraint for the HDO/H2O profiles. In this contribution, we will combine the quality of the MUSICA strategy and of our observations, which are recorded on a regular basis with FTIR spectrometers, under clear-sky conditions, at the NDACC site

  7. Water Vapour GNSS Based Tomography For Wet Delay Compensation In In-SAR Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notarpietro, Riccardo; Cucca, Manuela; Perona, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    One of the most challenging exploitation of GNSS signals for meteorological applications is the retrieval of Water Vapor tridimensional distribution. The real-time (or quasi real-time) knowledge of such distributions could be very useful for several applications: from operative meteorology to atmospheric modeling, or for atmospheric compensation purposes applied for example to SAR or In-SAR observations, in order to improve land remote sensing. In the framework of the European Space Agency project METAWAVE (Mitigation of Electromagnetic Transmission errors induced by Atmospheric Water Vapor Effects), several techniques were investigated in order to find out an In-SAR data compensation strategy for the propagation delay effects due to Water Vapour. Thanks to METAWAVE, a quite dense GPS network (7 dual frequency GPS receivers) was deployed over COMO area and was used for an extensive measurement campaign. The acquired L1 and L2 carrier phase observations were processed in terms of hourly averaged Zenith Wet Delays. These vertical information were mapped along the correspondent line of sights (by up-sampling at 30 second sample times the 15 minutes GPS satellites positions obtained from IGS files) and inverted using a tomographic procedure. The used algorithm performs a first reconstruction (namely, the tomographic pre-processing) based on generalized inversion mechanisms, in order to define a low resolution first guess for the next step. This second step inverts GPS observables using a more refined algebraic tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to improve both vertical and horizontal resolution. Results of this inversion are Wet Refractivity maps distributed over an area of 16 km x 20 km (x 10 km height) around the COMO city, characterized by horizontal resolutions varying from 2 km to 4 km and vertical resolution of 500m. This contribution deals with the description of the results obtained evaluating Water Vapour path delays from such Wet Refractivity maps

  8. Water vapour transport in the tropical tropopause region in coupled Chemistry-Climate Models and ERA-40 reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremser, Stefanie; Wohltmann, Ingo; Rex, Markus; Langematz, Ulrike; Dameris, Martin; Kunze, Markus

    2009-04-01

    In this study backward trajectories from the tropical lower stratosphere were calculated for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winters 1995-1996, 1997-1998 (El Niño) and 1998-1999 (La Niña) and summers 1996, 1997 and 1999 using both ERA-40 reanalysis data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and coupled Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) data. The calculated trajectories were analysed to determine the distribution of points where individual air masses encounter the minimum temperature and thus minimum water vapour mixing ratio during their ascent through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) into the stratosphere. The geographical distribution of these dehydration points and the local conditions there determine the overall water vapour entry into the stratosphere. Results of two CCMs are presented: the ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM (hereafter: E39/C) from the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Freie Universität Berlin Climate Middle Atmosphere Model with interactive chemistry (hereafter: FUB-CMAM-CHEM). In the FUB-CMAM-CHEM model the minimum temperatures are overestimated by about 9 K in NH winter and about 3 K in NH summer, resulting in too high water vapour entry values compared to ERA-40. However, the geographical distribution of dehydration points is fairly similar to ERA-40 for NH winter 1995-1996 and 1998-1999. The distribution of dehydration points in the boreal summer 1996 suggests an influence of the Indian monsoon upon the water vapour transport. The E39/C model displays a temperature bias of about +5 K. Hence, the minimum water vapour mixing ratios are higher relative to ERA-40. The geographical distribution of dehydration points is fairly well in NH winter 1995-1996 and 1997-1998 with respect to ERA-40. The distribution is not reproduced for the NH winter 1998-1999 (La Niña event) compared to ERA-40. There is an excessive water vapour flux through warm regions e.g. Africa in the NH winter and summer. The possible influence of the Indian

  9. Forecasting the precipitable water vapour content: validation for astronomical observatories using radiosoundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordán, G.; Castro-Almazán, J. A.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Codina, B.; Vernin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The atmospheric precipitable water vapour content (PWV) strongly affects astronomical observations in the infrared (IR). We have validated the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model as an operational forecasting tool for PWV. In the validation, we used atmospheric radiosounding data obtained directly at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory [ORM: ≈2200 metres above sea level (masl)] during three intensive runs and an aditional verification sample of 1 yr of radiosonde data from World Meteorological Organization (WMO) station 60018 in Güímar (Tenerife, TFE: ≈105 masl). These data sets allowed us to calibrate the model at the observatory site and to validate it under different PWV and atmospheric conditions. The ability of the WRF model in forecasting the PWV at astronomical observatories and the effects of horizontal model grid size on the computed PWV and vertical profiles of humidity are discussed. An excellent agreement between model forecasts and observations was found at both locations, with correlations above 0.9 in all cases. Subtle but significant differences between model horizontal resolutions have been found, the 3 km grid size being the most accurate and the one selected for future work. Absolute calibrations are given for the lowest and finest grid resolutions. The median PWV values obtained were 3.8 and 18.3 mm at ORM and TFE, respectively. WRF forecasts will complement the PWV measured by the GPS monitoring system at the Canarian Observatories.

  10. Kinetic model of water vapour adsorption by gluten-free starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocieczek, Aneta; Kostek, Robert; Ruszkowska, Millena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch molecules derived from wheat. The aim of the study was to determine an equation that would allow estimation of water content in tested material in any timepoint of the adsorption process aimed at settling a balance with the environment. An adsorption isotherm of water vapour on starch granules was drawn. The parameters of the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer equation were determined by characterizing the tested product and adsorption process. The equation of kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch was determined based on the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer model describing the state of equilibrium and on the model of a first-order linear inert element describing the changes in water content over time.

  11. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G.; Weigel, K.; Braesicke, P.; Pitts, M. C.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Murtagh, D.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O) increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations). The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000-2014) from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O) observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Performing linear regression analyses we derive from the Envisat/MIPAS (2002-2012) and Aura/MLS (2004-2014) observations predominantly positive changes in the potential temperature range 350 to 1000 K. The linear changes in water vapour derived from Envisat/MIPAS observations are largely insignificant, while those from Aura/MLS are mostly significant. For the temperature neither of the two instruments indicate any significant changes. Given the strong inter-annual variation observed in

  12. A global view on near-surface deuterated water vapour - First results from SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenberg, C.; Aben, I.; Butz, A.; Griffith, D.; Hase, F.; Schneider, M.; Schrijver, H.; Warneke, T.; Roeckmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    Water vapour is by far the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and an accurate knowledge of hydrological cycles and their feedback mechanisms is therefore indispensable for reliable climate predictions. The relative abundance of HDO provides a deeper insight into hydrological cycles as evaporation and condensation processes deplete heavy water in the gas phase. Only recently, global measurements of HDO depletions in the middle to lower troposphere were performed by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard the Aura spacecraft. Global measurements of the isotopic composition of near-surface water vapor are so far missing. The SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) instrument aboard the European Space Agency (ESA)'s environmental research satellite ENVISAT records the intensity of solar radiation, reflected from the Earth surface or the atmosphere, at moderate spectral resolution between 240 and 2390 nm. Its potential to simultaneously retrieve HDO and H2O total columns with high sensitivity toward the surface has so far not been exploited. Here, we present first retrievals of the near-global relative deuterated water vapor distribution from SCIAMACHY. Large scale features such as the latitudinal effect or continental gradients in North-America can be nicely observed. Even small scale features such as relatively high HDO abundances above the Red Sea can be observed. Comparisons with ground-based Fourier Transform measurements (FTS) indicate that also retrievals at high latitude sites such as Ny Alesund (79deg N) are feasible. We will present near-global measurements from SCIAMACHY, including long-term means showing pronounced large-scale as well as small-scale features. Further, we report on large seasonal variations, being higher than those observed by TES. For selected stations in tropical, mid and high-latitude sites, we show comparisons with ground-based direct sun FTS measurements.

  13. Initial evaluation of airborne water vapour measurements by the IAGOS-GHG CRDS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filges, Annette; Gerbig, Christoph; Smit, Herman G. J.; Krämer, Martina; Spelten, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Accurate and reliable airborne measurements of water vapour are still a challenge. Presently, no airborne humidity sensor exists that covers the entire range of water vapour content between the surface and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region with sufficient accuracy and time resolution. Nevertheless , these data are a pre-requisite to study the underlying processes in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. The DENCHAR project (Development and Evaluation of Novel Compact Hygrometer for Airborne Research) addresses this deficit by developing and characterizing novel or improved compact airborne hygrometers for different airborne applications within EUFAR (European Facility for Airborne Research). As part of the DENCHAR inter-comparison campaign in Hohn (Germany), 23 May - 1 June 2011, a commercial gas analyzer (G2401-m, Picarro Inc.,US), based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), was installed on a Learjet to measure water vapour, CO2, CH4 and CO. The CRDS components are identical to those chosen for integration aboard commercial airliner within IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System). Thus the campaign allowed for the initial assessment validation of the long-term IAGOS H2O measurements by CRDS against reference instruments with a long performance record (FISH, the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer, and CR2 frostpoint hygrometer, both research centre Juelich). The inlet system, a one meter long 1/8" FEP-tube connected to a Rosemount TAT housing (model 102BX, deiced) installed on a window plate of the aircraft, was designed to eliminate sampling of larger aerosols, ice particles, and water droplets, and provides about 90% of ram-pressure. In combination with a lowered sample flow of 0.1 slpm (corresponding to a 4 second response time), this ensured a fully controlled sample pressure in the cavity of 140 torr throughout an aircraft altitude operating range up to 12.5 km without the need of an upstream sampling pump

  14. [CO2-exchange of some lichens after absorption of water vapour].

    PubMed

    Bertsch, A

    1966-06-01

    The relation between CO2-exchange and water content of the lichens Evernia divaricata, E. prunastri, Ramalina thrausta and R. farinacea was investigated. The dry thalli absorb water vapour up to 70% of their dry weight. This uptake of water vapour is sufficient to reactivate the CO2-exchange. In equilibrium with the vapour pressure of the nearly saturated air the apparent CO2-uptake amounts to 90% of the value obtained after imbibition with liquid water. Even in unsaturated air the CO2-exchange is reactivated and the compensation point is reached between 80 and 85% relative humidity (saturation deficit at 10°C: 1,85-1,38 mm Hg). PMID:24557739

  15. Verification of H2O lines from the HITRAN database for remote sensing of the water vapour isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokotyan, N. V.; Zakharov, V. I.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Voronin, B. A.; Lavrentieva, N. N.; Dudaryonok, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The quality of the spectroscopic line parameters from the HITRAN Database for remote sensing of the water vapour isotopic composition of the atmosphere is widely discussed. In this research we show that the HITRAN-2008 data for H2O isotopologues in the near infrared spectral range (4000-6400 cm-1) is reasonably good. The HITRAN data was tested with independent calculation (ab initio et al.). For the evaluation we've used two following criteria: a quality of the fitting of atmospheric spectra measured at the Ural Atmospheric Station (UAS, Kourovka) with the high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and an agreement between the retrieved HDO/H2O relative concentration ratios in the atmospheric column and the results of the simulation of the isotopic general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso (validated for Kourovka region).

  16. EDITORIAL: The global atmospheric water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Lennart

    2010-06-01

    Water vapour plays a key role in the Earth's energy balance. Almost 50% of the absorbed solar radiation at the surface is used to cool the surface, through evaporation, and warm the atmosphere, through release of latent heat. Latent heat is the single largest factor in warming the atmosphere and in transporting heat from low to high latitudes. Water vapour is also the dominant greenhouse gas and contributes to a warming of the climate system by some 24°C (Kondratev 1972). However, water vapour is a passive component in the troposphere as it is uniquely determined by temperature and should therefore be seen as a part of the climate feedback system. In this short overview, we will first describe the water on planet Earth and the role of the hydrological cycle: the way water vapour is transported between oceans and continents and the return of water via rivers to the oceans. Generally water vapour is well observed and analysed; however, there are considerable obstacles to observing precipitation, in particular over the oceans. The response of the hydrological cycle to global warming is far reaching. Because different physical processes control the change in water vapour and evaporation/precipitation, this leads to a more extreme distribution of precipitation making, in general, wet areas wetter and dry areas dryer. Another consequence is a transition towards more intense precipitation. It is to be expected that the changes in the hydrological cycle as a consequence of climate warming may be more severe that the temperature changes. Water on planet Earth The total amount of available water on the Earth amounts to some 1.5 x 109 km3. The dominant part of this, 1.4 x 109 km3, resides in the oceans. About 29 x 106 km3 are locked up in land ice and glaciers and some 15 x 106 km3 are estimated to exist as groundwater. If all land ice and glaciers were to melt the sea level would rise some 80 m (Baumgartner and Reichel 1975). 13 x 103 km3 of water vapour are found in the

  17. The measurement of water vapour transfer rate through clothing system with air gap between layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ae-Gyeong

    2008-02-01

    The experiments described in this paper are designed to test the water vapour transfer rates through outdoor clothing system with air gap between layers under conditions more closely actual wear. It was adopted distance of 5 mm to ensure no disturbance of the air gap thickness between layers throughout the measurement period with all fabrics. The results have indicated that the water vapour transfer rates of clothing system decrease very slightly with time, it is shown that they approached nearly equilibrium state throughout the experiment. It is revealed that the water vapour transfer rates of the clothing system were ordered into groups determined by the type of waterproof breathable fabric as a shell layer being ordered.

  18. VAPOUR IS THE PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF WATER IMBIBED BY SEED IN UNSATURATED SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The assumption that seeds imbibe most of the water they require for germination as liquid through seed-to-soil contact has been a dominant factor in germination research and seeding technology. Under most conditions seed is exposed to water vapour during imbibition, but the relative contributions of...

  19. Recent decadal trends in Iberian water vapour: GPS analysis and WRF process study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Pedro M. A.; Nogueira, Miguel; Semedo, Alvaro; Benevides, Pedro; Catalao, Joao; Costa, Vera

    2016-04-01

    A 24-year simulation of the recent Iberian climate, using the WRF model at 9km resolution forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis (1989-2012), is analysed for the decadal evolution of the upwelling forcing coastal wind and for column integrated Precipitable water vapour (PWV). Results indicate that, unlike what was found by Bakun et al. (2009) for the Peruvian region, a statistically significant trend in the upwelling favourable (northerly) wind has been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in PWV, not only inland but also over the coastal waters. Such increase is consistent with a reinforced northerly coastal jet in the maritime boundary layer contributing to atmospheric Ekman pumping of dry continental air into the coastal region. Diagnostics of the prevalence of the Iberian thermal low following Hoinka and Castro (2003) also show a positive trend in its frequency during an extended summer period (April to September). These results are consistent with recent studies indicating an upward trend in the frequency of upwelling in SW Iberia (Alves and Miranda 2013), and may be relevant for climate change applications as an increase in coastal upwelling (Miranda et al 2013) may lead to substantial regional impacts in the subtropics. The same analysis with ERA-Interim reanalysis data, which was used to force the WRF simulations, does not reveal the same signal in PWV, and indeed correlates poorly with the GPS observations, indicating that the data assimilation process makes the water vapour data in reanalysis unusable for climate change purposes. The good correlation between the WRF simulated data and GPS observations allow for a detailed analysis of the processes involved in the evolution of the PWV field. Akcnowledgements: Study done within FCT Grant RECI/GEO-MET/0380/2012, financially supported by FCT Grant UID/ GEO/50019/2013-IDL Alves JMR, Miranda PMA (2013) Variability of Iberian upwelling implied by ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalyses, Tellus A 2013, http

  20. How accurately can we measure the water vapour content with astronomical spectra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausch, Wolfgang; Noll, Stefan; Smette, Alain; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Kerber, Florian; Jones, Amy M.; Szyszka, Cezary; Unterguggenberger, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Light from astronomical objects unavoidably has to pass through the Earth's atmosphere when being observed by ground-based telescopes. Thus, the fingerprint of the atmospheric state at the time of the observation is present in any spectrum taken by astronomical spectrographs due to absorption and emission arising in the atmosphere. The Very Large Telescope (VLT), operated by the European Southern Observatory, is one of the world's largest telescope facilities located at Cerro Paranal in the Chilean Atacama Desert offering a wide selection of various instruments. One of the most versatile instruments is X-Shooter. This medium resolution Echelle spectrograph covers the entire wavelength regime from 0.3 to 2.5 μm and is mounted on one of the 8m-class telescopes of the VLT. Due to its versatility, it is widely used, which leads to a good temporal coverage. We have recently developed the software package molecfit, a tool used to model and correct for atmospheric absorption lines visible in astronomical spectra. It is based on the radiative transfer code LBLRTM, the HITRAN line parameter database, the GDAS atmospheric profiles, and local meteorological data. A by-product is the determination of the amount of precipitable water vapour (PWV) above the observatory, as well as several other molecules, including CO2. In this poster, we investigate the accuracy of this method. We have used a set of X-Shooter spectra of so-called telluric standard stars, which are hot and bright stars showing nearly no intrinsic spectral features in the near infrared regime. Thus, most absorption features present in these spectra are related to the absorption arising in the Earth's atmosphere. For each spectrum, we have determined the PWV with our molecfit code and compared it with direct measurements achieved by the LHATPRO radiometer recently installed at Cerro Paranal. Therefore we have extended the results obtained by Kerber et al. (2012, Proc. SPIE, 8446) on a long time scale. Due to the

  1. The radiative impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have significant impact on the earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes also the stratosphere is influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the EMAC model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour after the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as important sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on the tropospheric water vapour and ENSO are evident.

  2. Mars atmospheric water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Grossman, A. W.; Muhleman, D. O.

    1992-01-01

    We indicate the Dec. 3-4 spectrum averaged over the morning limb of Mars. Two synthetic spectra indicate the expected line emission for 3 precipitable microns of water with a uniform vertical distribution (dotted) and a vertical distribution in which water decreases rapidly above 20 km altitude if Mars atmospheric temperatures are approximately 20 K cooler than implied by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapping (IRTM) and lander descent observations. Such cooler atmospheric temperatures have been argued on the basis of ground-based microwave observations of Mars atmospheric CO. Our 3 pr micron column abundance for water can be compared to the global value of approximately 6 pr microns, observation for the same season with the Viking MAWD experiment in 1977. We will investigate the latitude and diurnal variations when the data corresponding to the second day of observations are reduced. We also plan to compare these VLA water observations with a very complementary set of Hubble Space Telescope ozone observations. Ultraviolet (220-330 nm) spectra and imates of Mars were obtained on Dec. 13 1990 as part of a general Mars observing program with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  3. Seasonal comparisons of retrieved temperature and water vapour between ACE-FTS and COSMIC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kevin; Toon, Geoff; Boone, Chris; Strong, Kim

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the selection of a high-resolution solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to fly to Mars, we developed new algorithms for retrieving vertical profiles of temperature and pressure from spectra. We present temperature retrieval results from remote sensing spectra collected by the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), which recently celebrated its tenth year in orbit. ACE utilizes a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating between 750-4400 cm-1 in limb-scanning mode using the sun as a light source (solar occultation). We compare our retrieved profiles to those of the ACE Science Team and the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC). COSMIC is a group of six small satellites that use signals from GPS satellites to measure water vapour pressure an temperature via radio occultation. We have collected five sets of zonal and seasonal coincidences with a tight criteria of 150 km and 1 hour. Retrieved H2O profiles from both satellites will also be presented for these data sets. Compared to ACE, we can achieve T differences between 1 and 5 K below 50 km, perform less well between 50 and 100 km. Compared to COSMIC, available below 40 km, we perform similarly, while the ACE retrievals are in close agreement.

  4. EDITORIAL: The global atmospheric water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Lennart

    2010-06-01

    Water vapour plays a key role in the Earth's energy balance. Almost 50% of the absorbed solar radiation at the surface is used to cool the surface, through evaporation, and warm the atmosphere, through release of latent heat. Latent heat is the single largest factor in warming the atmosphere and in transporting heat from low to high latitudes. Water vapour is also the dominant greenhouse gas and contributes to a warming of the climate system by some 24°C (Kondratev 1972). However, water vapour is a passive component in the troposphere as it is uniquely determined by temperature and should therefore be seen as a part of the climate feedback system. In this short overview, we will first describe the water on planet Earth and the role of the hydrological cycle: the way water vapour is transported between oceans and continents and the return of water via rivers to the oceans. Generally water vapour is well observed and analysed; however, there are considerable obstacles to observing precipitation, in particular over the oceans. The response of the hydrological cycle to global warming is far reaching. Because different physical processes control the change in water vapour and evaporation/precipitation, this leads to a more extreme distribution of precipitation making, in general, wet areas wetter and dry areas dryer. Another consequence is a transition towards more intense precipitation. It is to be expected that the changes in the hydrological cycle as a consequence of climate warming may be more severe that the temperature changes. Water on planet Earth The total amount of available water on the Earth amounts to some 1.5 x 109 km3. The dominant part of this, 1.4 x 109 km3, resides in the oceans. About 29 x 106 km3 are locked up in land ice and glaciers and some 15 x 106 km3 are estimated to exist as groundwater. If all land ice and glaciers were to melt the sea level would rise some 80 m (Baumgartner and Reichel 1975). 13 x 103 km3 of water vapour are found in the

  5. Water vapour variability during Indian monsoon over Trivandrum observed using Microwave Radiometer and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suresh C.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Ramachandran Pillai, Renju; Uma, K. N.; Saha, Korak

    2012-07-01

    The Indian summer monsoon is a highly regular synoptic event, providing most of the annual rainfall received over the sub-continent. Trivandrum, at the southwestern tip of Indian peninsula, is considered as the gate way of Indian monsoon, with its climatological onset on June 01. During this season, the region, experiences large seasonal variation in water vapor, rain fall and wind (speed and direction) in the troposphere. The variability in water vapor and wind information are the vital parameters in forecasting the onset of monsoon. This study focuses on water vapor measurements over the tropical coastal station Trivandrum (8.5oN & 76.9oE) using microwave techniques and the analyses with an effort to link the seasonal variability of water vapor with the onset of monsoon. At Trivandrum a hyper-spectral microwave radiometer profiler (MRP) and a Triple-frequency global positioning system receiver (GPS) have been in regular operation since April 2010. A station-dependent simple empirical relation suitable for the equatorial atmospheric condition is formulated to map the nonhydrostatic component of GPS tropospheric delay to the PWV, based on the columnar water vapor estimated from the multi-year daily radiosonde ascends from Trivandrum. A trained artificial neural network (ANN) with climatological atmospheric data of Trivandrum, is employed to derive the water vapor from the MRP brightness temperature measurements. The accuracy, reliability and consistency of PWV measurements over the tropical coastal station from these two independent instruments are assessed by comparing PWV derived from MRP and GPS measurements which resulted an rms deviation of <1.2mm (with correlation coefficient of ~0.98). This confirms the PWV derived over Trivandrum from microwave measurements are accurate even during the monsoon period in the presence of clouds and rain. PWV from microwave radiometer measurements for more than two years are used to study the water vapour variability during

  6. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-08-21

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 10(4) and 10(6), spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies. PMID:24849267

  7. ZWD2PW - A Global Model for the Conversion of Zenith Wet Delays to Precipitable Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozsa, S.; Juni, I.

    2015-12-01

    Water vapor plays an important role as a basic climate variable in the thermodynamics and dynamics of the storm systems at the atmosphere and in the hydrological cycle on the local, regional and global scales. Recently the precipitable water vapour content (PW) is estimated using the zenith wet delay (ZWD) derived from ground-based GNSS data. This study introduces a new global model for the conversion of zenith wet delays (ZWD) obtained from GNSS observations to precipitable water vapour (PW). The model was developed using a monthly mean ERA-Interim global numerical weather model datasets of 14 years between 2001-2014. The 1°×1° global grids of 37 pressure levels of temperature, relative humidity and the geopotential were collected from the ECMWF and the ZWD and PW values as well as the mean temperature of the water vapour (Tm) were calculated for each gridpoint. Afterwards a direct and an indirect method was used to derive the global grids of the parameters used for the computation of the conversion factor between ZWD and PW. In the indirect method the conversion factor is computed as a function of the mean temperature of water vapour, where Tm is estimated as an empirical function of the surface temperature. The direct method models the conversion factor as a polynomial function of the surface temperature. The global grids of the model parameters were derived for both of the approaches. The results show that the global climate strongly affects the parameters of the conversion formulae. It is well known that the most widely used conversion formulae were derived from North American and European radiosonde observations only. Our results show that the relative differences in terms of the conversion factors reach the level of 10%, which can lead a similar relative error in PW estimation. The ZWD2PW model is also validated by a global set of radiosonde observations and the results show that it can be efficiently used for the conversion of ZWD to PW globally

  8. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 2: Investigation of HDO / H2O variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jöckel, P.; Lossow, S.

    2015-06-01

    Studying the isotopic composition of water vapour in the lower stratosphere can reveal the driving mechanisms of changes in the stratospheric water vapour budget and therefore help to explain the trends and variations of stratospheric water vapour during recent decades. We equipped a global chemistry climate model with a description of the water isotopologue HDO, comprising its physical and chemical fractionation effects throughout the hydrological cycle. We use this model to improve our understanding of the processes which determine the patterns in the stratospheric water isotope composition and in the water vapour budget itself. The link between the water vapour budget and its isotopic composition in the tropical stratosphere is presented through their correlation in a simulated 21-year time series. The two quantities depend on the same processes; however, they are influenced with different strengths. A sensitivity experiment shows that fractionation effects during the oxidation of methane have a damping effect on the stratospheric tape recorder signal in the water isotope ratio. Moreover, the chemically produced high water isotope ratios overshadow the tape recorder in the upper stratosphere. Investigating the origin of the boreal-summer signal of isotopically enriched water vapour reveals that in-mixing of old stratospheric air from the extratropics and the intrusion of tropospheric water vapour into the stratosphere complement each other in order to create the stratospheric isotope ratio tape recorder signal. For this, the effect of ice lofting in monsoon systems is shown to play a crucial role. Furthermore, we describe a possible pathway of isotopically enriched water vapour through the tropopause into the tropical stratosphere.

  9. Validation of GOME-2/Metop total column water vapour with ground-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakoski, Niilo; Kujanpää, Jukka; Sofieva, Viktoria; Tamminen, Johanna; Grossi, Margherita; Valks, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The total column water vapour product from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 on board Metop-A and Metop-B satellites (GOME-2/Metop-A and GOME-2/Metop-B) produced by the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) is compared with co-located radiosonde observations and global positioning system (GPS) retrievals. The validation is performed using recently reprocessed data by the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7. The time periods for the validation are January 2007-July 2013 (GOME-2A) and December 2012-July 2013 (GOME-2B). The radiosonde data are from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) maintained by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The ground-based GPS observations from the COSMIC/SuomiNet network are used as the second independent data source. We find a good general agreement between the GOME-2 and the radiosonde/GPS data. The median relative difference of GOME-2 to the radiosonde observations is -2.7 % for GOME-2A and -0.3 % for GOME-2B. Against the GPS, the median relative differences are 4.9 % and 3.2 % for GOME-2A and B, respectively. For water vapour total columns below 10 kg m-2, large wet biases are observed, especially against the GPS retrievals. Conversely, at values above 50 kg m-2, GOME-2 generally underestimates both ground-based observations.

  10. Comparison of GOME-2/Metop total column water vapour with ground-based and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalakoski, N.; Kujanpää, J.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Grossi, M.; Valks, P.

    2014-12-01

    Total column water vapour product from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 on board Metop-A and Metop-B satellites (GOME-2/Metop-A and GOME-2/Metop-B) produced by the Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M SAF) is compared with co-located radiosonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) observations. The comparisons are performed using recently reprocessed data by the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7. The comparisons are performed for the period of January 2007-July 2013 (GOME-2A) and from December 2012 to July 2013 (GOME-2B). Radiosonde data are from the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) maintained by National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and screened for soundings with incomplete tropospheric column. Ground-based GPS observations from COSMIC/SuomiNet network are used as the second independent data source. Good general agreement between GOME-2 and the ground-based observations is found. The median relative difference of GOME-2 to radiosonde observations is -2.7% for GOME-2A and -0.3% for GOME-2B. Against GPS observations, the median relative differences are 4.9 and 3.2% for GOME-2A and B, respectively. For water vapour total columns below 10 kg m-2, large wet biases are observed, especially against GPS observations. Conversely, at values above 50 kg m-2, GOME-2 generally underestimates both ground-based observations.

  11. Validation of two independent retrievals of SCIAMACHY water vapour columns using radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Piesanie, A.; Piters, A. J. M.; Aben, I.; Schrijver, H.; Wang, P.; Noël, S.

    2013-10-01

    Two independently derived SCIAMACHY total water vapour column (WVC) products are compared with integrated water vapour data calculated from radiosonde measurements, and with each other. The two SCIAMACHY WVC products are retrieved with two different retrieval algorithms applied in the visible and short-wave infrared wavelength regions respectively. The first SCIAMACHY WVC product used in the comparison is ESA's level 2 version 5.01 WVC product derived with the Air Mass Corrected Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (AMC-DOAS) retrieval algorithm applied in the visible wavelength range (SCIAMACHY-ESA). The second SCIAMACHY WVC product is derived using the iterative maximum likelihood method (IMLM) in the short-wave infrared wavelength range and developed by Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SCIAMACHY-IMLM). Both SCIAMACHY WVC products are compared with collocated water vapour amounts determined from daily relative humidity radiosonde measurements obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) radiosonde network. The SCIAMACHY-ESA WVC product is compared with radiosonde-derived WVC amounts for an 18-month period from February 2010 to mid-August 2011, and the SCIAMACHY-IMLM WVC amounts are compared with radiosonde WVC amounts for the two individual years of 2004 and 2009. In addition the WVC amounts from SCIAMACHY-ESA and SCIAMACHY-IMLM are also compared with each other for a 1-month period for June 2009. The AMC-DOAS method used to retrieve SCIAMACHY-ESA WVC is able to correct for water vapour present below the clouds and can be used during cloudy conditions over both land and ocean surfaces. Results indicate a good agreement between the WVC amounts of SCIAMACHY-ESA and that of radiosondes, with a mean difference of -0.32 g cm-2 for all collocated cases. Overall the SCIAMACHY-ESA WVC amounts are smaller than the radiosonde WVC amounts, especially over oceans. For cloudy conditions the WVC bias has a clear dependence on

  12. Insight from ozone and water vapour on transport in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, F.; Fueglistaler, S.; Grooß, J.-U.; Günther, G.; Konopka, P.; Liu, Y. S.; Müller, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Schiller, C.; Ulanovski, A.; Riese, M.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the potential of ozone observations to constrain transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and contrast it with insights that can be obtained from water vapour. Global fields from Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and in-situ observations are predicted using a backtrajectory approach that captures advection, instantaneous freeze-drying and photolytical ozone production. Two different representations of transport (kinematic and diabatic 3-month backtrajectories based on ERA-Interim data) are used to evaluate the sensitivity to differences in transport. Results show that mean profiles and seasonality of both tracers can be reasonably reconstructed. Water vapour predictions are similar for both transport representations, but predictions for ozone are systematically higher for kinematic transport. Compared to global HALOE observations, the diabatic model prediction underestimates the vertical ozone gradient. Comparison of the kinematic prediction with observations obtained during the tropical SCOUT-O3 campaign shows a large high bias above 390 K potential temperature. We show that ozone predictions and vertical dispersion of the trajectories are highly correlated, rendering ozone an interesting tracer for aspects of transport to which water vapour is not sensitive. We show that dispersion and mean upwelling have similar effects on ozone profiles, with slower upwelling and larger dispersion both leading to higher ozone concentrations. Analyses of tropical upwelling based on mean transport characteristics, and model validation have to take into account this ambiguity between tropical ozone production and in-mixing from the stratosphere. In turn, ozone provides constraints on transport in the TTL and lower stratosphere that cannot be obtained from water vapour.

  13. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  14. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  15. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour.

    PubMed

    Martin, T L; Coe, C; Bagot, P A J; Morrall, P; Smith, G D W; Scott, T; Moody, M P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  16. Computational implementation of interfacial kinetic transport theory for water vapour transport in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Hill, Reghan J.

    2014-01-01

    A computational framework is developed for applying interfacial kinetic transport theory to predict water vapour permeability of porous media. Modified conservation equations furnish spatially periodic disturbances from which the average flux and, thus, the effective diffusivity is obtained. The equations are solved exactly for a model porous medium comprising parallel layers of gas and solid with arbitrary solid volume fraction. From the microscale effective diffusivity, a two-point boundary-value problem is solved at the macroscale to furnish the water vapour transport rate in membranes subjected to a finite RH differential. Then, the microscale model is implemented using a computational framework (extended finite-element method) to examine the role of particle size, aspect ratio and positioning for periodic arrays of aligned super-ellipses (model particles that pack with high density). We show that the transverse water vapour permeability can be reduced by an order of magnitude only when fibres with a high-aspect ratio cross section are packed in a periodic staggered configuration. Maximum permeability is achieved at intermediate micro-structural length scales, where gas-phase diffusion is enhanced by surface diffusion, but not limited by interfacial-exchange kinetics. The two-dimensional computations demonstrated here are intended to motivate further efforts to develop efficient computational solutions for realistic three-dimensional microstructures. PMID:24399918

  17. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-board the Polarstern research vessel and in the Siberian Lena delta Samoylov research station (N 72° 22', E 126° 29'). The Polarstern measurements cover the summer 2015 Arctic campaign from July to mid-October, including six weeks in the Fram Strait region in July- August, followed by a campaign reaching the North Pole and a transect from the Norwegian Sea to the North Sea. These vapour observations are completed by water isotopic measurements in samples from the surface ocean water for Polarstern and from precipitation in Samoylov and Tiksi (120 km south-east of the station). A custom-made designed automatic calibration system has been implemented in a comparable manner for both vapour instruments, based on the injection of different liquid water standards, which are completely vaporised in dry air at high temperature. Subsequent humidity level can be adjusted from 2000 to at least 30000 ppm. For a better resilience, an independent calibration system has been added on the Samoylov instrument, allowing measurements of one standard at humidity levels ranging from 2000 to 15000 ppm: dry air is introduced in a tank containing a large amount of liquid water standard, undergoing evaporation under a controlled environment. The measurement protocol includes an automatic calibration every 25 hours. First instrument characterisation experiments depict a significant isotope-humidity effect at low humidity, dependant on the isotopic composition of the standard. For ambient air, our first isotope

  18. Understanding climatic controls on Svalbard water vapour and precipitation isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Steen-Larsen, Hans-Christian; Zanetti, Nathalie; Cattani, Olivier; Maturilli, Marion; Debatin, Siegrid; Terzer, Stefan; Bonne, Jean-Louis; Schneider, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the meteorological and climatic controls on the isotopic composition of vapour and precipitation at Ny Alesund, Svalbard. This is based on the IAEA database of monthly precipitation isotopic composition data spanning 1993-2012 as well as new measurements performed using a PICARRO CRDS analyzer deployed since June 2014 at Ny Alesund. The precipitation data depict a strong decoupling between oxygen 18 and temperature at the seasonal scale and for monthly anomalies. While a relationship is observed between winter precipitation isotopic composition and temperature, this disappears during summer, at the inter-annual scale. Moreover, the deuterium versus oxygen 18 relationship depicts different meteoric water lines in winter and summer, consistent with the strong seasonal cycle of deuterium excess, and indicating shifts in moisture origin. The continuous water vapour data (investigated from July to December 2014 so far) show in contrast a tight relationship between hourly oxygen 18 data and surface temperature and humidity, as well as strong antiphase between deuterium excess and oxygen 18. No significant diurnal variability is observed. We show how precipitation intermittency strongly alters the sampling provided by precipitation data and distorts the relationship with local temperature. The surface vapour deuterium data are compared with FTIR retrievals. The importance of changes in air mass origins is also assessed by comparison with moisture backtrajectories.

  19. Characterization of sorption properties of selected soils from Lublin region by using water vapour adsorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skic, Kamil; Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545 Among many methods proposed to study sorption properties of soils an analysis of adsorption/ desorption isotherm is probably the easiest and most convenient one. It characterizes both quantity and quality of mineral and organic components and also their physical and physicochemical properties. The main aim of this study is comparison of sorption properties of selected Polish soils by using water vapour adsorption method. Samples were taken from the depth of 0-20 cm, from the Lublin region, eastern Poland. Soils were selected on the basis of their different physicochemical properties and were classified as: Haplic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem, Mollic Gleysol, Rendzic Phaeozem, Stagnic Luvisol, Haplic Cambisol (WG WRB 2006). Data taken from experimental adsorption isotherms were used to determine parameters of monolayer capacity, specific surface area and the total amount of vapour adsorbed at relative pressure of 0.974. Obtained adsorption and desorption isotherms reviled that adsorbate molecules interacted with the soil particles in different extent. Similar monolayer capacity was observed for Haplic Fluvisol, Haplic Chernozem and Stagnic Luvisol, while for Mollic Gleysol was more than 4 times higher. Mollic Gleysol was also characterized by highest values of specific surface area as well as quantity of adsorbed vapour at relative pressure of 0.974. Higher sorption was caused by presence of soil colloids which contains functional groups of a polar nature (mainly hydroxyls, phenolic and carboxyls). These groups similarly to silicates, oxides, hydratable cations as well as electric charge form adsorption centres for water vapour molecules.

  20. Warm water vapour in the sooty outflow from a luminous carbon star.

    PubMed

    Decin, L; Agúndez, M; Barlow, M J; Daniel, F; Cernicharo, J; Lombaert, R; De Beck, E; Royer, P; Vandenbussche, B; Wesson, R; Polehampton, E T; Blommaert, J A D L; De Meester, W; Exter, K; Feuchtgruber, H; Gear, W K; Gomez, H L; Groenewegen, M A T; Guélin, M; Hargrave, P C; Huygen, R; Imhof, P; Ivison, R J; Jean, C; Kahane, C; Kerschbaum, F; Leeks, S J; Lim, T; Matsuura, M; Olofsson, G; Posch, T; Regibo, S; Savini, G; Sibthorpe, B; Swinyard, B M; Yates, J A; Waelkens, C

    2010-09-01

    The detection of circumstellar water vapour around the ageing carbon star IRC +10216 challenged the current understanding of chemistry in old stars, because water was predicted to be almost absent in carbon-rich stars. Several explanations for the water were postulated, including the vaporization of icy bodies (comets or dwarf planets) in orbit around the star, grain surface reactions, and photochemistry in the outer circumstellar envelope. With a single water line detected so far from this one carbon-rich evolved star, it is difficult to discriminate between the different mechanisms proposed. Here we report the detection of dozens of water vapour lines in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre spectrum of IRC +10216 using the Herschel satellite. This includes some high-excitation lines with energies corresponding to approximately 1,000 K, which can be explained only if water is present in the warm inner sooty region of the envelope. A plausible explanation for the warm water appears to be the penetration of ultraviolet photons deep into a clumpy circumstellar envelope. This mechanism also triggers the formation of other molecules, such as ammonia, whose observed abundances are much higher than hitherto predicted. PMID:20811453

  1. Electron drift velocities in He and water mixtures: Measurements and an assessment of the water vapour cross-section sets

    SciTech Connect

    Urquijo, J. de; Juárez, A. M.; Basurto, E.; Ness, K. F.; Robson, R. E.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-07-07

    The drift velocity of electrons in mixtures of gaseous water and helium is measured over the range of reduced electric fields 0.1–300 Td using a pulsed-Townsend technique. Admixtures of 1% and 2% water to helium are found to produce negative differential conductivity (NDC), despite NDC being absent from the pure gases. The measured drift velocities are used as a further discriminative assessment on the accuracy and completeness of a recently proposed set of electron-water vapour cross-sections [K. F. Ness, R. E. Robson, M. J. Brunger, and R. D. White, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024318 (2012)]. A refinement of the momentum transfer cross-section for electron-water vapour scattering is presented, which ensures self-consistency with the measured drift velocities in mixtures with helium to within approximately 5% over the range of reduced fields considered.

  2. Total ozone column, water vapour and aerosol effects on erythemal and global solar irradiance in Marsaxlokk, Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; de Miguel, Argimiro

    2014-12-01

    Observations of erythemal (UVER; 280-400 nm) and total solar shortwave irradiance (SW; 305-2800 nm), total ozone column (TOC), water vapour column (w), aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (α) were carried out at Marsaxlokk, in south-east Malta. These measurements were recorded during a measurement campaign between May and October 2012, aimed at studying the influence of atmospheric compounds on solar radiation transfer through the atmosphere. The effects of TOC, AOD and w on UVER and SW (global, diffuse and direct) irradiance were quantified using irradiance values under cloud-free conditions at different fixed solar zenith angles (SZA). Results show that UVER (but not SW) irradiance correlates well with TOC. UVER variations ranged between -0.24% DU-1 and -0.32% DU-1 with all changes being statistically significant. Global SW irradiance varies with water vapour column between -2.44% cm-1 and -4.53% cm-1, these results proving statistically significant and diminishing when SZA increases. The irradiance variations range between 42.15% cm-1 and 20.30% cm-1 for diffuse SW when SZA varies between 20° and 70°. The effect of aerosols on global UVER is stronger than on global SW. Aerosols cause a UVER reduction of between 28.12% and 52.41% and a global SW reduction between 13.46% and 41.41% per AOD550 unit. Empirical results show that solar position plays a determinant role, that there is a negligible effect of ozone on SW radiation, and stronger attenuation by aerosol particles in UVER radiation.

  3. Localized sources of water vapour on the dwarf planet (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Küppers, Michael; O'Rourke, Laurence; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Zakharov, Vladimir; Lee, Seungwon; von Allmen, Paul; Carry, Benoît; Teyssier, David; Marston, Anthony; Müller, Thomas; Crovisier, Jacques; Barucci, M Antonietta; Moreno, Raphael

    2014-01-23

    The 'snowline' conventionally divides Solar System objects into dry bodies, ranging out to the main asteroid belt, and icy bodies beyond the belt. Models suggest that some of the icy bodies may have migrated into the asteroid belt. Recent observations indicate the presence of water ice on the surface of some asteroids, with sublimation a potential reason for the dust activity observed on others. Hydrated minerals have been found on the surface of the largest object in the asteroid belt, the dwarf planet (1) Ceres, which is thought to be differentiated into a silicate core with an icy mantle. The presence of water vapour around Ceres was suggested by a marginal detection of the photodissociation product of water, hydroxyl (ref. 12), but could not be confirmed by later, more sensitive observations. Here we report the detection of water vapour around Ceres, with at least 10(26) molecules being produced per second, originating from localized sources that seem to be linked to mid-latitude regions on the surface. The water evaporation could be due to comet-like sublimation or to cryo-volcanism, in which volcanoes erupt volatiles such as water instead of molten rocks. PMID:24451541

  4. Stable isotopes in monsoon precipitation and water vapour in Nagqu, Tibet, and their implications for monsoon moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Siyuan; Richards, Keith

    2016-09-01

    Understanding climate variations over the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau has become essential because the high plateau sustains various ecosystems and water sources, and impacts on the Asian monsoon system. This paper provides new information from isotopic signals in meteoric water and atmospheric water vapour on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau using high frequency observation data over a relatively short period. The aim is to explore temporal moisture changes and annual variations at the onset and during the summer monsoon season at a transitional site with respect to the monsoon influence. Data show that high frequency and short period observations can reveal typical moisture changes from the pre-monsoon to the monsoon seasons (2010), and the large variation in isotopic signals in different years with respect to active/inactive periods during a mature phase of the monsoon (2011), especially inferring from the temporal changes in the d-excess of precipitation and its relationship with δ18O values, when higher d-excess is found in the pre-monsoon precipitation. In this transition zone on a daily basis, δ18O values in precipitation are controlled mainly by the amount of rainfall during the monsoon season, while temperature seems more important before the onset of monsoon. Furthermore, the "amount effect" is significant for night-time rain events. From comparison of signals in both the precipitation and water vapour, an inconsistent relationship between d-excess values suggests various moisture fluxes are active in a short period. The temporal pattern of isotopic signal change from the onset of the monsoon to the mature monsoon phase provides information about the larger circulation dynamics of the Asian monsoon.

  5. Influence of water and water vapour on the characteristics of KI treated HgI 2 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponpon, J. P.; Amann, M.; Sieskind, M.

    After being cleaned using a potassium iodide solution in water followed by a water rinse, the surface of mercuric iodide is covered by a chemical complex identified as being KHgI 3·H 2O. This compound can adsorb large quantities of water and its electrical properties are strongly sensitive to water and water vapour. The consequences on the manufacturing and storing conditions (especially the relative humidity), of mercuric iodide-based devices are therefore of great concern. They are illustrated by the study of the electrical and spectrometric properties of HgI 2 nuclear radiation detectors.

  6. Water vapour is a pre-oviposition attractant for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To date no semiochemicals affecting the pre-oviposition behaviour of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu lato have been described. Water vapour must be the major chemical signal emanating from a potential larval habitat, and although one might expect that gravid An. gambiae s.l. detect and respond to water vapour in their search for an aquatic habitat, this has never been experimentally confirmed for this species. This study aimed to investigate the role of relative humidity or water vapour as a general cue for inducing gravid An. gambiae sensu stricto to make orientated movements towards the source. Methods Three experiments were carried out with insectary-reared An. gambiae s.s. One with unfed females and two with gravid females during their peak oviposition time in the early evening. First, unfed females and gravid females were tested separately in still air where a humidity difference was established between opposite ends of a WHO bioassay tube and mosquitoes released individually in the centre of the tube. Movement of mosquitoes to either low or high humidity was recorded. Additionally, gravid mosquitoes were released into a larger air-flow olfactometer and responses measured towards collection chambers that contained cups filled with water or empty cups. Results Unfed females equally dispersed in the small bioassay tubes to areas of high and low humidity (mean 50% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38-62%). In contrast, gravid females were 2.4 times (95% CI 1.3-4.7) more likely to move towards high humidity than unfed females. The results were even more pronounced in the airflow olfactometer. Gravid females were 10.6 times (95% CI 5.4-20.8) more likely to enter the chamber with water than a dry chamber. Conclusions Water vapour is a strong pre-oviposition attractant to gravid An. gambiae s.s. in still and moving air and is likely to be a general cue used by mosquitoes for locating aquatic habitats. PMID:24120083

  7. Localized sources of water vapour on the dwarf planet (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küppers, M.; O'Rourke, L.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Zakharov, V.; Lee, S.; von Allmen, P.; Carry, B.; Teyssier, D.; Marston, A.; Müller, T.; Crovisier, J.; Barucci, A.; Moreno, R.

    2014-07-01

    We report the detection of water vapour on (1) Ceres, the first unambiguous discovery of water on an object in the asteroid main belt. Most of the water vapour stems from localized regions at low latitude, possibly from surface features known from adaptive-optics observations. We suggest either cometary-type sublimation from the near surface or cryovolcanism as the origin of the waver vapour [1]. The snowline conventionally divides Solar System objects into dry bodies, ranging out to the main asteroid belt, and icy bodies beyond the belt. Recently, the detection of dust emission from ''main-belt comets'' [2] and of hydration features and possible water ice absorption on some main-belt asteroids [3], together with theories of migration of small bodies in the solar system [4], cast some doubts on the classical picture. Ceres is thought to be differentiated into an icy core and a silicate mantle [5] and hydrated minerals were found on infrared spectra of its surface [6]. A marginal detection of OH, a photodissociation product of water was reported in 1991 [7], but questioned by later, more sensitive observations [8]. We observed Ceres with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [9] on the Herschel Space Observatory [10] in the context of the MACH 11 guaranteed time program and with a follow-up DDT program. The observations took place in Nov. 2011, Oct. 2012, and March 2013. We searched for the signature of water in the ground state line of ortho-water at 556.936 GHz. After a non- detection in the first observation, an absorption line is clearly visible in all other observations. In March 2013, water is detected in emission as well (at 3 sigma level). The production rate of water on Ceres is a few times 10^{26} s^{-1}. The signal from the water vapour from Ceres was found to be linearly polarized during some of the observations, with the absorption being stronger in the horizontal branch. The measured line-area ratio of up to 2.5 between H and V

  8. Experimental determination and theoretical framework of kinetic fractionation at the water vapour-ice interface at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Mathieu; Cauquoin, Alexandre; Landais, Amaelle; Israel, Dan; Orsi, Anaïs; Pangui, Edouard; Landsberg, Janek; Kerstel, Erik; Prie, Frederic; Doussin, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Water isotopes are commonly used for climate reconstruction from ice cores. The different heavy isotopes of water such as H218O, H217O or HDO give information about local temperature but also temperature and humidity of water vapour sources. Quantification of these parameters relies on the good knowledge of equilibrium and kinetic isotopic fractionation at each step of the water cycle. One of the strongest limitations when interpreting water isotopes in remote Antarctic ice cores is the formulation of the isotopic fractionation at solid condensation (vapour to ice). This classical formulation also implies a good knowledge of coefficients for equilibrium fractionation and water vapour diffusion in air as well as supersaturation in clouds. The uncertainties associated with these different parameters make the formulation of isotopic fractionation at solid condensation only empirical. Here, we make use (1) of recent development in the measurements of water isotopes in the water vapour through infra-red spectroscopy and (2) of the possibility to measure accurately 17O-excess of water to test the classical formulation and parameterization of isotopic fractionation at solid condensation. A first experiment involving very strong supersaturation evidences a strong kinetic effect on 17O-excess at solid condensation, similar to d-excess. It also shows the limits of the classical formulation of water isotopic fractionation during solid condensation estimation at very low temperature. A second experiment performed in a cloud chamber under controlled conditions uses cavity ring down spectrometers (CRDS) to determine the spatial variability of water vapour isotopic composition due to diffusion (kinetic effect) during solid condensation. The spatial variability of water vapour isotopic composition can be relatively well reproduced by the resolution of diffusion toward a cold plate. This preliminary study opens new perspectives to revisit the classical formulation of water isotopic

  9. Mass spectrometric investigation of the ionic species in a dielectric barrier discharge operating in helium-water vapour mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Allah, Z.; Sawtell, D. A. G.; McKay, K.; West, G. T.; Kelly, P. J.; Bradley, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    Using advanced mass spectrometry the chemistry of ionic species present in an atmospheric-pressure parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a single dielectric on the powered electrode have been identified. The discharge was driven in helium with controllable concentrations of water vapour using an excitation frequency of 10 kHz and an applied voltage of 1.2 kV. Both negative and positive ions were identified and their relative intensity determined with variation of water concentration in the discharge, inter-electrode spacing, gas residence time and nominal applied power. The most abundant negative ions were of the family \\text{O}{{\\text{H}}-}{{≤ft({{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O}\\right)}n} , while the positive ions were dominated by those of the form {{{H}}^ + }{{{(}}{{{H}}_2}{{O)}}_n} , with n up to 9 in both cases. Negative and positive ions responded in a similar way to changes in the operating parameters, with the particular response depending on the ion mass. Increasing the inter-electrode spacing and the water concentration in the discharge led to an increase in the intensity of large mass ionic water clusters. However, increasing the residence time of the species in the plasma region and increasing the applied power resulted in fragmentation of large water clusters to produce smaller ions.

  10. Validation of two independent retrievals of SCIAMACHY water vapour columns using radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Piesanie, A.; Piters, A. J. M.; Aben, I.; Schrijver, H.; Wang, P.; Noël, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two independently derived SCIAMACHY total water vapour column (WVC) products are compared with integrated water vapour data calculated from radiosonde measurements, and with each other. The two SCIAMACHY WVC products are retrieved with two different retrieval algorithms applied in the visible and short wave infrared wavelength regions respectively. The first SCIAMACHY WVC product used in the comparison is ESA's level 2 version 5.01 WVC product derived with the Air Mass Corrected Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (AMC-DOAS) retrieval algorithm (SCIAMACHY-ESA). The second SCIAMACHY WVC product is derived using the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM) developed by Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SCIAMACHY-IMLM). Both SCIAMACHY WVC products are compared with collocated water vapour amounts determined from daily relative humidity radiosonde measurements obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) radiosonde network, over an 18 month and 2 yr period respectively. Results indicate a good agreement between the WVC amounts of SCIAMACHY-ESA and the radiosonde, and a mean difference of 0.03 g cm-2 is found for cloud free conditions. Overall the SCIAMACHY-ESA WVC amounts are smaller than the radiosonde WVC amounts, especially over oceans. For cloudy conditions the WVC bias has a clear dependence on the cloud top height and increases with increasing cloud top heights larger than approximately 2 km. A likely cause for this could be the different vertical profile shapes of water vapour and O2 leading to different relative changes in their optical thickness, which makes the AMF correction method used in the algorithm less suitable for high clouds. The SCIAMACHY-IMLM WVC amounts compare well to the radiosonde WVC amounts during cloud free conditions over land. A mean difference of 0.08 g cm-2 is found which is consistent with previous results when comparing daily averaged SCIAMACHY-IMLM WVC amounts with ECMWF model data globally

  11. Water vapour isotopic exchange by epiphytic bromeliads in tropical dry forests reflects niche differentiation and climatic signals.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Casandra; Mejia-Chang, Monica; Jones, Glyn D; Griffiths, Howard

    2008-06-01

    The 18O signals in leaf water (delta18O(lw)) and organic material were dominated by atmospheric water vapour 18O signals (delta18O(vap)) in tank and atmospheric life forms of epiphytic bromeliads with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), from a seasonally dry forest in Mexico. Under field conditions, the mean delta18O(lw) for all species was constant during the course of the day and systematically increased from wet to dry seasons (from 0 to +6 per thousand), when relative water content (RWC) diminished from 70 to 30%. In the greenhouse, progressive enrichment from base to leaf tip was observed at low night-time humidity; under high humidity, the leaf tip equilibrated faster with delta18O(vap) than the other leaf sections. Laboratory manipulations using an isotopically depleted water source showed that delta18O(vap) was more rapidly incorporated than liquid water. Our data were consistent with a Craig-Gordon (C-G) model as modified by Helliker and Griffiths predicting that the influx and exchange of delta18O(vap) control delta18O(lw) in certain epiphytic life forms, despite progressive tissue water loss. We use delta18O(lw) signals to define water-use strategies for the coexisting species which are consistent with habitat preference under natural conditions and life form. Bulk organic matter (delta18O(org)) is used to predict the deltaO18(vap) signal at the time of leaf expansion. PMID:18266906

  12. Water vapour permeability of poly(lactic acid): Crystallinity and the tortuous path model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Z.; Thomas, N. L.

    2014-02-01

    The water vapour transmission rates (WVTR) through samples of polylactic acid of different crystallinities have been measured. Three different grades of commercial poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were used with different ratios of L-lactide and D-lactide to give a range of crystallinities from 0% to 50%. Sheets of PLA were prepared by melt compounding followed by compression moulding and annealing at different temperatures and for different times to give the range of crystallinities required. Crystallinity was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and the morphology of the samples was observed under crossed polars in a transmitted light microscope. Water vapour transmission rates through the films were measured at 38 °C and at a relative humidity of 90%. It was found that the measured values of WVTR decreased linearly with increasing crystallinity of the PLA from 0% to 50%. The results are discussed in terms of the effect of crystallinity on solubility and shown to fit the "Tortuous Path Model." The model was also successfully used to explain published data on water permeability of polyethylene terephthalate.

  13. A comparison of standard methods for measuring water vapour permeability of fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Elizabeth A.; Kwon, Myoungsook; Shim, Huensup

    2003-08-01

    It is difficult for outdoor apparel manufacturers to interpret the technical information provided by fabric suppliers concerning fabric 'breathability' properties because different methods and test conditions are used. In addition, fabrics with hydrophilic components change their properties under different humidity conditions. The purpose of this study was to measure the water vapour permeability and evaporative resistance of 26 different waterproof, windproof and breathable shell fabrics using five standard test methods. The water vapour transmission rate (WVTR) was measured using the ASTM E 96 upright and inverted cup tests with water, the JIS L 1099 desiccant inverted cup test and the new ASTM F 2298 standard using the dynamic moisture permeation cell (DMPC). The evaporative resistance was measured using the ISO 11092 sweating hot plate test. The WVTRs were consistently highest when measured with the desiccant inverted cup, followed by the inverted cup, DMPC and upright cup. The upright cup was significantly correlated with the DMPC (0.97), and the desiccant inverted cup was correlated to the sweating hot plate (-0.91).

  14. Carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes for one year above a temperate grazed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksic, V.; Kiely, G.; Albertson, J.; Scanlon, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Dripsey flux site in Cork, Ireland is a perennial ryegrass (C3 category) pasture and is grazed for approximately 8 to 10 months of the year. The lands are fertilised with approximately 200kg/ha/year of nitrogen. The flux tower monitoring carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy was established in June 2001 and we have continuous data since then. The site also includes streamflow hydrology and stream water chemistry. We present the results and analysis for carbon dioxide and water vapour for the year July 1, 2001 to July 1, 2002. The accumulated evapotranspiration amounts to 522mm/annum compared to 1600mm/annum of rainfall. The one year carbon sequestration is 3.9t/ha. The estimated carbon in the grass and silage is 3.6t/ha. This suggests that the soils in these pastures are a sink for approximately 0.3t carbon per hectare. This work is part of a five year (2002-2006) research project funded by the Irish Environmental Protection Agency.

  15. Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk.

    PubMed

    Eisner, J A

    2007-05-31

    Planetary systems (ours included) formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner-disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. Although the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star-forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-infrared interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-infrared emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-infrared interferometric observations that probe the gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to the dust, within one astronomical unit (1 au, the Sun-Earth distance) of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapour and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapour is probably produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets. PMID:17538613

  16. Rain scavenging of tritiated water vapour: a numerical Eulerian stationary model.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, D; Galeriu, D

    2011-01-01

    The tradition in tritium washout modeling is to unite the washout model with a Gaussian plume model describing dispersion of tritium vapour in the atmosphere. In the present study, an alternative approach is proposed. A numerical Eulerian model that describes washout independently of dispersion is developed. The sensitivity analysis to model parameters has shown that the washout process is influenced most significantly by rainfall parameters and air temperature: different raindrop size distributions cause differences of up to about 70% in the washout outputs; a change of 15°C in the air temperature causes an effect of about 50%. Results are presented showing calculated values of washout outputs (tritium concentration in rain, tritium downward flux, washout coefficient) for different tritium vapour profiles, rainfall rates and air temperatures. The general conclusion is that the washout process is too complex to be described comprehensively by the simple washout coefficient concept. We suggest the approach proposed here for directly calculating the tritium downward flux and concentration in the rainwater is preferable. PMID:20934237

  17. Discovery of water vapour around IRC+10216 as evidence for comets orbiting another star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Gary J.; Neufeld, David A.; Ford, K. E. Saavik; Hollenbach, David J.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.

    2001-07-01

    Since 1995, planets with masses comparable to that of Jupiter have been discovered around approximately 60 stars. These planets have not been seen directly, but their presence has been inferred from the small reflex motions that they gravitationally induce on the star they orbit; these motions result in small periodic wavelength shifts in the stellar spectrum. The presence of analogues of the smaller bodies in our Solar System cannot, however, be determined using this technique, because the induced reflex motions are too small-so an alternative approach is needed. Here we report the observation of circumstellar water vapour around the ageing carbon star IRC+10216 water is not expected in measurable quantities around such a star. The only plausible explanation for this water is that the recent evolution of IRC+10216, which has been accompanied by a prodigious increase in its luminosity, is causing the vaporization of a collection of orbiting icy bodies-a process considered in an earlier theoretical study.

  18. Development of a GNSS water vapour tomography system using algebraic reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Deng, Zhiguo; Wickert, Jens; Kahle, Hans-Gert; Raabe, Armin; Tetzlaff, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    A GNSS water vapour tomography system developed to reconstruct spatially resolved humidity fields in the troposphere is described. The tomography system was designed to process the slant path delays of about 270 German GNSS stations in near real-time with a temporal resolution of 30 min, a horizontal resolution of 40 km and a vertical resolution of 500 m or better. After a short introduction to the GPS slant delay processing the framework of the GNSS tomography is described in detail. Different implementations of the iterative algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) used to invert the linear inverse problem are discussed. It was found that the multiplicative techniques (MART) provide the best results with least processing time, i.e., a tomographic reconstruction of about 26,000 slant delays on a 8280 cell grid can be obtained in less than 10 min. Different iterative reconstruction techniques are compared with respect to their convergence behaviour and some numerical parameters. The inversion can be considerably stabilized by using additional non-GNSS observations and implementing various constraints. Different strategies for initialising the tomography and utilizing extra information are discussed. At last an example of a reconstructed field of the wet refractivity is presented and compared to the corresponding distribution of the integrated water vapour, an analysis of a numerical weather model (COSMO-DE) and some radiosonde profiles.

  19. Analysis of the sorption properties of different soils using water vapour adsorption and potentiometric titration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skic, Kamil; Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-07-01

    Parameters of specific surface area as well as surface charge were used to determine and compare sorption properties of soils with different physicochemical characteristics. The gravimetric method was used to obtain water vapour isotherms and then specific surface areas, whereas surface charge was estimated from potentiometric titration curves. The specific surface area varied from 12.55 to 132.69 m2 g-1 for Haplic Cambisol and Mollic Gleysol soil, respectively, and generally decreased with pH (R=0.835; α = 0.05) and when bulk density (R=-0.736; α = 0.05) as well as ash content (R=-0.751; α = 0.05) increased. In the case of surface charge, the values ranged from 63.00 to 844.67 μmol g-1 Haplic Fluvisol and Mollic Gleysol, respecively. Organic matter gave significant contributions to the specific surface area and cation exchange capacity due to the large surface area and numerous surface functional groups, containing adsorption sites for water vapour molecules and for ions. The values of cation exchange capacity and specific surface area correlated linearly at the level of R=0.985; α = 0.05.

  20. Post-wildfire effects on carbon and water vapour dynamics in a Spanish black pine forest.

    PubMed

    Dadi, T; Rubio, E; Martínez-García, E; López-Serrano, F R; Andrés-Abellán, M; García-Morote, F A; De las Heras, J

    2015-04-01

    Two eddy covariance systems were installed in a high-severity burned zone (BZ) and an adjacent unburned (UNB) zone to monitor water vapour and carbon dioxide fluxes for 21 months (from June 2011 to February 2013) at a Spanish black pine forest affected by a stand-replacing wildfire and located in a mountainous area of central-eastern Spain. The differences between both sites were significant especially during the growing season, affecting gross primary productivity (GPP) more than ecosystem respiration (Reco). Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for 2012 was -3.97 and 1.80 t C ha(-1) year(-1) for the unburned and burned sites, respectively, the GPP being 64% lower for the BZ than the UNB zone. Evapotranspiration (ET) at the UNB was 18% greater than at the BZ. Difference between sites was 160 mm during the whole studied period. This study reflects the effect of one of the major disturbances that can affect Mediterranean ecosystems, showing that carbon fluxes are more dramatically concerned than water vapour fluxes. PMID:25432426

  1. Evaluation of balloon and satellite water vapour measurements in the Southern tropical UTLS during the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoux, N.; Hauchecorne, A.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Durry, G.; Morel, B.; Jones, R. L.; Lefèvre, F.; Bencherif, H.

    2007-05-01

    Among the objectives of the HIBISCUS campaign was the study of water vapour in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) by balloon borne in situ and remote sensing, offering a unique opportunity for evaluating the performances of balloon and satellite water vapour data available at the southern tropics in February-April 2004. Instruments evaluated include balloon borne in situ tunable diode laser spectrometer (μ SDLA) and surface acoustic wave hygrometer (SAW), and remote sensing with a near IR spectrometer (SAOZ) flown on a circumnavigating long duration balloon. The satellite systems available are those of AIRS/AMSU (v4), SAGE-II (v6.2), HALOE (v19), MIPAS (v4.62) and GOMOS (v6.0). In the stratosphere between 20-25 km, three satellite instruments, HALOE, SAGE-II and MIPAS, are showing very consistent results (nearly constant mixing ratios), while AIRS, GOMOS and the SAOZ balloon are displaying a slight increase with altitude. Considering the previous studies, the first three appear the most precise at this level, HALOE being the less variable (5%), close to the atmospheric variability shown by the REPROBUS/ECMWF Chemistry-Transport model. The three others are showing significantly larger variability, AIRS being the most variable (35%), followed by GOMOS (25%) and SAOZ (20%). Lower down in the Tropical Tropopause Layer between 14-20 km, HALOE and SAGE-II are showing marked minimum mixing ratios around 17-19 km, not seen by all others. For HALOE, this might be related to an altitude registration error already identified on ozone, while for SAGE-II, a possible explanation could be the persistence of the dry bias displayed by previous retrieval versions, not completely removed in version 6.2. On average, MIPAS is consistent with AIRS, GOMOS and SAOZ, not displaying the dry bias observed in past versions, but a fast degradation of precision below 20 km. Compared to satellites, the μ SDLA measurements shows systematically larger humidity although

  2. Experimental determination and theoretical framework of kinetic fractionation at the water vapour - ice interface at low temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, M.; Prie, F.

    2015-12-01

    Isotopic fraction of water enables climate reconstruction from ice cores. The use of different heavy isotopes of water such as H218O, H217O or HDO gives information about local temperature but also temperature and humidity of water vapour sources. Quantification of these parameters relies on the good knowledge of equilibrium and kinetic isotopic fractionation at each step of the water cycle. The strongest limitation when interpreting water isotopes in remote Antarctic ice cores is the formulation of the isotopic fractionation at solid condensation (vapour to ice). This classical formulation also implies a good knowledge of coefficients for equilibrium fractionation and water vapour diffusion in air as well as supersaturation in clouds. The uncertainties lying on these different parameters make the formulation of isotopic fractionation at solid condensation only empirical. Here, we make use (1) of recent development in the measurements of water isotopes in the water vapour through infra-red spectroscopy and (2) of the possibility to measure accurately 17O-excess of water to test the classical formulation and parameterization of isotopic fractionation at solid condensation. A first experiment involving very strong supersaturation evidences a strong kinetic effect on 17O-excess on solid condensation, similar to d-excess. It also shows the limits of the classical formulation of water isotopic fractionation during solid condensation estimation at very low temperature. A second experiment performed in a cloud chamber in controlled conditions uses CRDS instruments to depict the spatial variability of water vapour isotopic composition due to diffusion (kinetic effect) during solid condensation. These experiments are in agreement with a new theoretical model that we present for the competition between diffusions of different isotopes. This preliminary study opens new perspectives to revisit the classical formulation of water isotopic fractionation during solid condensation

  3. Stratospheric temperatures in Antarctic winter: Does the 40-year record confirm midlatitude trends in stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, H. K.; Colwell, S. R.; Shanklin, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Water vapour is a potent greenhouse gas, and the observed increases in water vapour in the stratosphere act to cool it. Possible changes in stratospheric temperatures are important for future ozone loss because colder temperatures in the edge region of the Antarctic ozone hole act to increase polar stratospheric clouds there, and so delay recovery of the ozone hole. Trends in lower-stratospheric temperature within the core of the Antarctic vortex in winter should be a unique indicator of trends in stratospheric water vapour, because neither changes in CO2 nor in ozone have a large effect on temperature in the lower stratosphere in the dark. Here, measured stratospheric temperatures southward of 70°S in winter are presented and their quality and corrections discussed. The character and magnitude of the long-term changes at Halley (76°S) are similar from 100 to 70 hPa and at 50 hPa, whether corrected for sonde changes or not, and are also similar to those at other Antarctic sites. We found no significant trend in temperatures at Halley between 1960 and 2000, which is inconsistent with the change calculated from the trend in lower-stratospheric water vapour in northern hemisphere midlatitudes between 1960 and 2000. Over the shorter interval between 1980 and 2000 at Halley, the change in temperature was-1.8 ± 0.6 K, in agreement with the change calculated from the trend in stratospheric water vapour in northern hemisphere midlatitudes between 1980 and 2000. The differences between these periods are discussed in terms of: possible fortuitous agreement between 1980 and 2000; the poorer representation and quality of the measurements of stratospheric water vapour between 1960 and 1980; and a possible large variation in the rate of oxidation of CH4 to H2O in the upper stratosphere between 1960 and 1980. Such a variation in oxidation rate was observed by satellite between 1992 and 1999.

  4. The impact of deep overshooting convection on the water vapour and trace gas distribution in the TTL and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P. M.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    Overshooting convection penetrating the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and the lower stratosphere has a significant impact on the redistribution of water vapour and further trace gases. This is of importance for the stratospheric water vapour budget, which plays a central role in radiative and chemical processes. Modelling studies and in situ measurements show the hydration potential of convective overshooting partly by direct injection of ice particles into the stratosphere and subsequent sublimation. However, processes leading to dehydration of the TTL may also impact the stratospheric humidity by limiting the amount of water vapour carried aloft. While the large scale drives some of the dehydrating processes, others are of convective origin, for example gravity waves and cooling associated with overshooting turrets. Furthermore, downdrafts may transport dry and ozone rich air masses from the stratosphere into the TTL. Improving our understanding of overshooting convection and its influence on TTL water vapour will ultimately place better constraints on the budget of water vapour in the stratosphere.In this study we use three-dimensional cloud resolving (WRF-ARW) simulations of a deep convective thunderstorm (Hector) to study the redistribution of water vapour and trace gases in the upper TTL/lower stratosphere. Passive tracers are initialised to investigate the transport of air masses. The simulations focus on an Hector event that has been probed by aircraft during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Observations were performed in and around overshoots that even penetrated the stratosphere. These observations as well as the model simulations show downward transport and mixing of air masses from the stratosphere, though less strong and more localised in the simulation. Furthermore, the simulations shows a layering of hydrated and dehydrated air masses post-convection in the upper TTL and lower stratosphere. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the

  5. How do leaf hydraulics limit stomatal conductance at high water vapour pressure deficits?

    PubMed

    Bunce, James A

    2006-08-01

    A reduction in leaf stomatal conductance (g) with increasing leaf-to-air difference in water vapour pressure (D) is nearly ubiquitous. Ecological comparisons of sensitivity have led to the hypothesis that the reduction in g with increasing D serves to maintain leaf water potentials above those that would cause loss of hydraulic conductance. A reduction in leaf water potential is commonly hypothesized to cause stomatal closure at high D. The importance of these particular hydraulic factors was tested by exposing Abutilon theophrasti, Glycine max, Gossypium hirsutum and Xanthium strumarium to D high enough to reduce g and then decreasing ambient carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]), and observing the resulting changes in g, transpiration rate and leaf water potential, and their reversibility. Reducing the [CO2] at high D increased g and transpiration rate and lowered leaf water potential. The abnormally high transpiration rates did not result in reductions in hydraulic conductance. Results indicate that low water potential effects on g at high D could be overcome by low [CO2], and that even lower leaf water potentials did not cause a reduction in hydraulic conductance in these well-watered plants. Reduced g at high D in these species resulted primarily from increased stomatal sensitivity to [CO2] at high D, and this increased sensitivity may mediate stomatal responses to leaf hydraulics at high D. PMID:16898024

  6. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 1: Description and evaluation of the EMAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jockel, P.; Brinkop, S.; Werner, M.; Lossow, S.

    2015-05-01

    This modelling study aims at an improved understanding of the processes that determine the water vapour budget in the stratosphere by means of the investigation of water isotope ratios. An additional (and separate from the actual) hydrological cycle has been introduced into the chemistry-climate model EMAC, including the water isotopologues HDO and H218O and their physical fractionation processes. Additionally an explicit computation of the contribution of methane oxidation to H2O and HDO has been incorporated. The model expansions allow detailed analyses of water vapour and its isotope ratio with respect to deuterium throughout the stratosphere and in the transition region to the troposphere. In order to assure the correct representation of the water isotopologues in the model's hydrological cycle, the expanded system has been evaluated in several steps. The physical fractionation effects have been evaluated by comparison of the simulated isotopic composition of precipitation with measurements from a ground-based network (GNIP) and with the results from the isotopologue-enabled general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso. The model's representation of the chemical HDO precursor CH3D in the stratosphere has been confirmed by a comparison with chemical transport models (1-D, CHEM2D) and measurements from radiosonde flights. Finally, the simulated stratospheric HDO and the isotopic composition of water vapour have been evaluated, with respect to retrievals from three different satellite instruments (MIPAS, ACE-FTS, SMR). Discrepancies in stratospheric water vapour isotope ratios between two of the three satellite retrievals can now partly be explained.

  7. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 1: Description and evaluation of the EMAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jöckel, P.; Brinkop, S.; Werner, M.; Lossow, S.

    2014-09-01

    This modelling study aims on an improved understanding of the processes, that determine the water vapour budget in the stratosphere by means of the investigation of water isotope ratios. At first, a separate hydrological cycle has been introduced into the chemistry-climate model EMAC, including the water isotopologues HDO and H218O and their physical fractionation processes. Additionally an explicit computation of the contribution of methane oxidation to HDO has been incorporated. The model expansions allow detailed analyses of water vapour and its isotope ratio with respect to deuterium throughout the stratosphere and in the transition region to the troposphere. In order to assure the correct representation of the water isotopologues in the model's hydrological cycle, the expanded system has been evaluated in several steps. The physical fractionation effects have been evaluated by comparison of the simulated isotopic composition of precipitation with measurements from a ground-based network (GNIP) and with the results from the isotopologue-enabled general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso. The model's representation of the chemical HDO precursor CH3D in the stratosphere has been confirmed by a comparison with chemical transport models (CHEM1D, CHEM2D) and measurements from radiosonde flights. Finally, the simulated stratospheric HDO and the isotopic composition of water vapour have been evaluated, with respect to retrievals from three different satellite instruments (MIPAS, ACE-FTS, SMR). Discrepancies in stratospheric water vapour isotope ratios between two of the three satellite retrievals can now partly be explained.

  8. Effect of resin hydrophilicity on water-vapour permeability of dental adhesive films.

    PubMed

    King, Nigel M; Hiraishi, Noriko; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Pashley, Edna L; Loushine, Robert J; Rueggeberg, Fred A; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2005-10-01

    This study examined the water-vapour permeability of thin polymerized resin films fabricated from five co-monomer blends of increasing degrees of hydrophilicity, as measured by their Hoy's solubility parameters. Neat resin films were prepared from five experimental light-curable resins (n = 10). Each film was mounted in a Fisher permeability cup with 8 g of water placed inside the cup. The experiments were conducted in a modified twin-outlet desiccator connected to a vacuum pump in one outlet to permit a continuous airflow to encourage water evaporation. Weight losses by water evaporation were measured at 3, 6, 9, 24, 30, and 48 h by using an analytical balance. Additional resin films were examined by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after immersion in ammoniacal silver nitrate. A significant correlation was observed between the cumulative water loss at 48 h and the Hoy's total cohesive energy density (delta(t)). Transmission electron microscopy revealed silver-filled channels along film peripheries and silver grains of decreasing dimensions toward the film centres in co-monomer blends 3, 4, and 5 of increasing hydrophilicity. Hydrophilic dentin adhesives polymerized in thin films are prone to water loss by evaporation. This probably accounts for the water droplets seen on the surface of vital-bonded dentin after the application of simplified dentin adhesives. PMID:16202033

  9. The Earth as an extrasolar transiting planet. II. HARPS and UVES detection of water vapour, biogenic O2, and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, L.; Ehrenreich, D.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Dumusque, X.; Nitschelm, C.; Querel, R. R.; Hedelt, P.; Berthier, J.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Ferlet, R.; Crooker, D.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The atmospheric composition of transiting exoplanets can be characterized during transit by spectroscopy. Detections of several chemical species have previously been reported in the atmosphere of gaseous giant exoplanets. For the transit of an Earth twin, models predict that biogenic oxygen (O2) and ozone (O3) atmospheric gases should be detectable, as well as water vapour (H2O), a molecule linked to habitability as we know it on Earth. Aims: The aim is to measure the Earth radius versus wavelength λ - or the atmosphere thickness h(λ) - at the highest spectral resolution available to fully characterize the signature of Earth seen as a transiting exoplanet. Methods: We present observations of the Moon eclipse of December 21, 2010. Seen from the Moon, the Earth eclipses the Sun and opens access to the Earth atmosphere transmission spectrum. We used two different ESO spectrographs (HARPS and UVES) to take penumbra and umbra high-resolution spectra from ≈3100 to 10 400 Å. A change of the quantity of water vapour above the telescope compromised the quality of the UVES data. We corrected for this effect in the data processing. We analyzed the data by three different methods. The first method is based on the analysis of pairs of penumbra spectra. The second makes use of a single penumbra spectrum, and the third of all penumbra and umbra spectra. Results: Profiles h(λ) are obtained with the three methods for both instruments. The first method gives the best result, in agreement with a model. The second method seems to be more sensitive to the Doppler shift of solar spectral lines with respect to the telluric lines. The third method makes use of umbra spectra, which bias the result by increasing the overall negative slope of h(λ). It can be corrected for this a posteriori from results with the first method. The three methods clearly show the spectral signature of the Rayleigh scattering in the Earth atmosphere and the bands of H2O, O2, and O3. Sodium is

  10. Chemical vapour deposition enhanced by atmospheric microwave plasmas: a large-scale industrial process or the next nanomanufacturing tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, T.; Gries, T.; Cardoso, R. P.; Arnoult, G.; Kosior, F.; Henrion, G.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes several specific aspects of atmospheric plasma deposition carried out with a microwave resonant cavity. Deposition over a wide substrate is first studied. We show that high deposition rates (several hundreds of μm h-1) are due to localization of fluxes on the substrate by convection when slightly turbulent flows are used. Next, we describe possible routes to localize deposition over a nanometre-sized area. Scaling down atmospheric plasma deposition is possible and two strategies to reach nanometre scales are described. Finally, we study self-organization of SiO2 nanodots deposited by chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure enhanced by an Ar-O2 micro-afterglow operating at high temperature (>1200 K). When the film being deposited is thin enough (~500 nm) nanodots are obtained and they can be assembled into threads to create patterned surfaces. When the coating becomes thicker (~1 µm), and for relatively high content in HMDSO, SiO2 walls forming hexagonal cells are obtained.

  11. OT1_dneufeld_2: The puzzle of water vapour in carbon-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, D.

    2010-07-01

    Using the HIFI instrument, we will address the puzzling - but widespread - appearance of water vapour in carbon-rich stars. Following up on detections of water in ALL SIX carbon-rich AGB stars observed to date in a pilot study performed in the HIFISTARS Key Program, we will target additional water transitions in four stars already observed or expected to show the most luminous water emissions. The target stars are CIT6, IRAC 15194-5155, V Cygni, and S Cep, and the additional transitions are the 4(22)-3(31) and 3(12) - 2(21) transitions at 916 GHz and 1153 GHz. Combined with spectra already obtained for the low-lying water transitions, and interpreted in the context of water excitation models, the proposed observations will place strong constraints upon the location of the emitting water. We will therefore be able to distinguish between various hypotheses that have been proposed for the origin of the observed water: the vaporization of orbiting comets or dwarf planets; catalytic formation on dust grains; or chemical processes initiated by the photodissociation of CO. In addition, we will carry out deep integrations to observe the lowest 1(11) - 0(00) transition of para-water at 1113 GHz in two carbon-rich AGB stars: IRAS+40540 and V Hya; here, ortho-water has been securely detected but existing observations of the 1113 GHz para-water line yield weak detections that lack the signal-to-noise ratio needed to constrain the ortho-to-para ratio.

  12. Usefulness of satellite water vapour imagery in forecasting strong convection: A flash-flood case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Christo G.; Kozinarova, Gergana

    Using a case study of a severe convective event as an example, a framework for interpreting 6.2 µm channel satellite imagery that enables to indicate upper-level conditioning of the convective environment is presented and discussed. In order to illustrate the approach, all convective cells during the summer of 2007 that produced precipitations over Bulgaria are considered. They are classified regarding the observed moisture pattern in mid-upper levels as well as the low-level conditions of air humidity and convergence of the flow. Water vapour (WV) images are used to study the evolution of the upper-level moist and dry structures. The proposed interpretation is that the role of the upper-level dry boundaries identified in the WV imagery as favoured areas for the initiation of deep moist convection cannot be understood (and hence cannot be forecasted accurately) by considering them in isolation from the dynamic rate at which they are maintained. The paper examines the 23 June 2006 flash flood in Sofia city as a case, in which the operational forecast of the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology of Bulgaria based on the mesoscale NWP model ALADIN underestimated the severity of the convective process. A comparison between the satellite water vapour imagery and the corresponding geopotential field of the dynamical tropopause, expressed in terms of potential vorticity (PV), shows an error in the performance of the ARPEGE operational numerical model. There is an obvious mismatch between the PV anomaly structure and the dry zone of the imagery. The forecast field shows underestimation of the tropopause height gradient and displacement of the PV anomaly to the southwest of the real position seen in the satellite image. It is concluded that the observed poor forecast is a result of the ARPEGE failure to treat correctly the interaction between the PV anomaly and the low-level warm anomaly.

  13. Representativeness of total column water vapour retrievals from instruments on polar orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Hannes; Wittchen, Falco; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    The remote sensing of total column water vapour (TCWV) from polar orbiting, sun-synchronous satellite spectrometers such as the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) on board of ENVISAT and the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board of Aqua and Terra enables observations on a high spatial resolution and a high accuracy over land surfaces. The observations serve studies about small-scale variations of water vapour as well as the detection of local and global trends. However, depending on the swath width of the sensor, the temporal sampling is low and the observations of TCWV are limited to cloud-free land scenes. This study quantifies the representativeness of a single TCWV observation at the time of the satellite overpass under cloud-free conditions by investigating the diurnal cycle of TCWV using 9 years of a 2-hourly TCWV data set from global GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations. It turns out that the TCWV observed at 10:30 local time (LT) is generally lower than the daily mean TCWV by 0.65 mm (4 %) on average for cloud-free cases. Averaging over all GNSS stations, the monthly mean TCWV at 10:30 LT, constrained to cases that are cloud-free, is 5 mm (25 %) lower than the monthly mean TCWV at 10:30 LT of all cases. Additionally, the diurnal variability of TCWV is assessed. For the majority of GNSS stations, the amplitude of the averaged diurnal cycle ranges between 1 and 5 % of the daily mean with a minimum between 06:00 and 10:00 LT and maximum between 16:00 and 20:00 LT. However, a high variability of TCWV on an individual day is detected. On average, the TCWV standard deviation is about 15 % regarding the daily mean.

  14. Water vapour intercomparison effort in the frame of HyMeX-SOP1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summa, Donato; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Stelitano, Dario; Cacciani, Marco; Flamant, Cyrille; Chazette, Patrick; Ducrocq, Véronique; Nuret, Mathieu; Fourié, Nadia; Richard, Evelyne

    2014-05-01

    A water vapour intercomparison effort, involving airborne and ground-based water vapour lidar systems and mesoscale models, was carried out in the framework of the international HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) dedicated to the hydrological cycle and related high-impact events. Within HyMeX, a major field campaign was dedicated to heavy precipitation and flash flood events from 5 September to 6 November 2012. The 2 month field campaign took place over the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding coastal regions in France, Italy, and Spain. The main objective of this work is to provide accurate error estimates for the lidar systems i.e. the ground-based Raman lidar BASIL and the CNRS DIAL Leandre 2 on board the ATR42, as well as use BASIL data to validate mesoscale model results from the MESO NH and Arome WMED. The effort will benefit from the few dedicated ATR42 flights in the frame of the EUFAR Project "WaLiTemp". In the present work our attention was focused on two specific case studies: 13 September and 2 October in the altitude region 0.5 - 5.5 km. Comparisons between the ground-based Raman lidar BASIL and the airborne CNRS DIAL indicate a mean relative bias between the two sensors of 6.5%, while comparisons between BASIL and CNRS DIAL vs. the radiosondes indicate a bias of 2.6 and -3.5 %, respectively. The bias of BASIL vs. the ATR insitu sensor indicate a bias of -20.4 %. Specific attention will also be dedicated to the WALI/BASIL intercomparison effort which took place in Candillargues on 30 October 2012. Specific results from this intercomparison effort and from the intercomparison between BASIL and Meso-NH/AROME-WMed will be illustrated and discussed at the Conference.

  15. Leaf expansion of soybean subjected to high and low atmospheric vapour pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Devi, M Jyostna; Taliercio, Earl W; Sinclair, Thomas R

    2015-04-01

    Vapour pressure deficit (VPD) is considered an important environmental factor that might affect leaf expansion and transpiration rate (TR) in plants. Two slow-wilting soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) genotypes PI 416937 and PI 471938 along with commercial cultivar Hutcheson were subjected to low (1.2-1.6 kPa) and high VPD (2.8-3 kPa) environments to study their leaf expansion and TR over five days. Among the three genotypes, PI 416937 had the lowest increase in its TR (34%) at high VPD compared with low VPD and the greatest decrease in leaf area (31%). In contrast, Hutcheson had the highest increase in TR (87%) under high VPD and the lowest decrease in leaf expansion rate (18%). Expansin and extensin genes were isolated in PI 416937 to determine if changes in leaf expansion were associated with changes at the molecular level. The four studied genes were all suppressed after five days in the high VPD environment. PMID:25618144

  16. Leaf expansion of soybean subjected to high and low atmospheric vapour pressure deficits

    PubMed Central

    Devi, M. Jyostna; Taliercio, Earl W.; Sinclair, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Vapour pressure deficit (VPD) is considered an important environmental factor that might affect leaf expansion and transpiration rate (TR) in plants. Two slow-wilting soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) genotypes PI 416937 and PI 471938 along with commercial cultivar Hutcheson were subjected to low (1.2–1.6 kPa) and high VPD (2.8–3 kPa) environments to study their leaf expansion and TR over five days. Among the three genotypes, PI 416937 had the lowest increase in its TR (34%) at high VPD compared with low VPD and the greatest decrease in leaf area (31%). In contrast, Hutcheson had the highest increase in TR (87%) under high VPD and the lowest decrease in leaf expansion rate (18%). Expansin and extensin genes were isolated in PI 416937 to determine if changes in leaf expansion were associated with changes at the molecular level. The four studied genes were all suppressed after five days in the high VPD environment. PMID:25618144

  17. The kinetics and mechanism of the uranium-water vapour reaction — an evaluation of some published work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A. G.

    1984-04-01

    The published results of Grimes and Morris on the rate of the uranium-water vapour reaction which were obtained using interferometry have been recalculated using the best values derived from the literature for the complex refractive indices of uranium and uranium dioxide (3.1-3.91 for uranium and 2.2-0.51 for uranium dioxide). The kinetics have been described by Haycock's model and the linear rate constant is given by K 1 = 1.3 × 10 4P {1}/{2}H 2O exp( - 9.0 kcal/RT )mg U/cm 2 h, where PH 2O is the water vapour pressure in torr or K 1 = 3.48 × 10 8r {1}/{2} exp( -14.1 kcal/RT)mg U/cm 2 h, where r is the fractional relative humidity, R is the gas constant and T is the absolute temperature. A mechanism is described which accounts for the observed dependence of the rate of uranium-water vapour reaction on the square root of the water vapour pressure.

  18. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  19. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  20. Seasonal snow cover in the Qilian Mountains of Northwest China: Its dependence on oasis seasonal evolution and lowland production of water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Charles P.-A.; Mir, Matin A.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryBack and forth exchange of water vapour and liquid water from oases at the base of the Qilian Mountains (NW China) and from the Qilian Mountains to oases as surface and shallow subsurface flow has been previously shown by model simulation to be a potentially important mechanism in the long-term stabilisation of oases in westcentral Gansu (Bourque and Hassan, 2009). In a subsequent re-examination of oasis self-support, we use monthly snow-cover patterns in the Qilian Mountains to determine the extent oasis vegetation and evapotranspiration in the low-lying portions of the upper and middle Shiyang and Hei River watersheds control snowfall dynamics in the Qilian Mountains. Monthly snow-cover area (SCA) in the watersheds is simulated with a spatially-distributed model designed to address differences in (i) topography along the prevailing wind direction, (ii) water-vapour production and transport, (iii) in-mountain production of precipitation, and (iv) precipitation phase changes. Seasonal variations in oasis vegetation, surface temperature (for model input), and SCA (for model validation) are described as separate timeseries of monthly composites of enhanced vegetation index, land surface temperature, and normalised difference snow index generated from MODIS optical reflectance and thermal emission data. Comparisons of modelled and snow-index-based estimates of SCA in the Shiyang and Hei River watersheds for the hydrological year, from August 2004 to July 2005, provide nearly similar spatiotemporal patterns; overlap between SCA's exceeds 60% for most months. An exception to this is in mid-summer of 2004, where overlap between SCA's is <30%. Agreement between monthly SCA's reinforces the importance of oasis-vegetation dynamics and mass transfer of water vapour to the atmosphere in guiding seasonal formation of precipitation and snow-cover dynamics in the Qilian Mountains.

  1. Influence of atmospheric vapour pressure deficit on ozone responses of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two genotypes of snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), one known to be sensitive to ozone and the other resistant, were examined to determine their response to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the presence and absence of ozone. Plants were grown in Outdoor Plant Environment Chambers in combin...

  2. An evaluation of materials and methods for vapour measurement of the isotopic composition of pore water in deep, unsaturated zones.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Dyan L; Lu, Mengna; Lee Barbour, S; Jim Hendry, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of in situ vapour sampling methods to measure δ(2)H and δ(18)O in pore water of deep, unsaturated soil profiles, including mine tailings and waste rock, is required to improve our ability to track water migration through these deposits. To develop appropriate field sampling methods, a laboratory study was first undertaken to evaluate potential materials and sampling methods to collect and analyse vapour samples from unsaturated mine waste. Field methods were developed based on these findings and tested at two mine sites using either on-site analyses with a portable isotope laser spectrometer or sample collection and storage prior to laboratory analyses. The field sites included a series of deep (>50 m) multiport profiles within a coal waste rock dump and open wells installed in a sand tailings dyke at an oil sands mine. Laboratory results show that memory effects in sample bags and tubing require 3-5 pore volumes of vapour flushing prior to sample collection and sample storage times are limited to 24 h. Field sampling highlighted a number of challenges including the need to correct for sample humidity and in situ temperature. Best results were obtained when a portable laser spectrometer was used to measure vapour samples in situ. PMID:27002493

  3. Temperature Humidity Dissimilarity and Heat-to-water-vapour Transport Efficiency Above and Within a Pine Forest Canopy: the Role of the Bowen Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamaud, E.; Irvine, M.

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 15 years atmospheric surface-layer experiments over heterogeneous canopies have shown that the vertical transfer of sensible heat and water vapour exhibit a strong dissimilarity. In particular, the sensible-heat-to-water-vapour transport efficiencies generally exceed unity. One of the main consequences is that evaporation (latent heat flux) computed by the flux-variance method is overestimated, as persistently demonstrated by comparisons with evaporation obtained with the eddy-correlation method. Various authors proposed to take into account the temperature humidity dissimilarity to extend the applicability of the flux-variance method in order to compute evaporation from non-uniform surfaces. They attempted to connect the sensible-heat-to-water-vapour transport efficiency (λ) to the correlation coefficient between temperature and humidity turbulent fluctuations ( R Tq ). This approach was found to be successful over ‘wet’ surfaces for which λ can be approximated by R Tq and ‘dry’ surfaces for which λ can be approximated by 1/ R Tq . However, no solution has been proposed until now for intermediate hydrological conditions. We investigated this question using eddy-correlation measurements above and inside a pine forest canopy. For both levels, our data present a strong likeness with previously published results over heterogeneous surfaces. In particular, they confirm that λ is R Tq in wet conditions and 1/ R Tq in dry conditions. Moreover, we defined the range of the Bowen ratio ( Bo) values for which those two approximations are valid (below 0.1 and greater than 1, respectively) and established a relationship between λ, R Tq and Bo for the intermediate range of Bo. We are confident that this new parameterization will enlarge the applicability of the flux-variance method to all kinds of heterogeneous surfaces in various hydrological conditions

  4. Influence of Ar + ion bombardment on the initial interaction of water vapour with polycrystalline magnesium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, S. J.; McIntyre, N. S.; Palumbo, G.

    1994-01-01

    The room temperature interaction of water vapour with magnesium surfaces irradiated with Ar + ions in the dose range θ = 10 to 2000 ions/surface atom and ion energy range 1 to 5 keV has been systematically studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The character of the kinetics of water interaction with irradiated surfaces has been found to be dependent upon the total ion bombardment dose and the ion energy and to change with the level of water exposure. The effect of ion bombardment was found to be most pronounced in the oxide nucleation and growth stage of the oxidation process. The dissociative chemisorption and final bulk thickening regimes were only weakly affected by prior irradiation. The results have been interpreted based on the assumption of competition between the effects of radiation defects (vacancies, vacancy clusters, dislocation loops) and implanted argon atoms on the oxidation process. The effect of vacancy-type defects was speculated to be the provision of adsorption sites of high sticking probability and nucleation sites of reduced activation energy for place exchange and subsequent island growth. The effect of implanted argon atoms was speculated to be the blocking of adsorption and nucleation sites and interference with oxide island ordering. At relatively high water exposures (20 L) there was enhanced penetration of oxygen into the magnesium lattice postulated to occur along dislocation emergence points. No such enhanced penetration was observed for shorter water exposures (0.3 L). The limiting thickness of the oxide layer formed on magnesium at room temperature was not found to be affected by the level of prior ion bombardment.

  5. Water vapour masers in long-period variable stars. I. RX Bootis and SV Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnberg, A.; Engels, D.; Brand, J.; Baldacci, L.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2008-05-01

    Context: Water vapour maser emission from late-type stars characterises them as asymptotic-giant-branch stars with oxygen-rich chemistry that are losing mass at a substantial rate. Further conclusions on the properties of the stars, however, are hampered by the strong variability of the emission. Aims: We wish to understand the reasons for the strong variability of H2O masers in circumstellar shells of late-type stars. In this paper we study RX Bootis and SV Pegasi as representatives of semiregular variable stars (SRVs). Methods: We monitored RX Boo and SV Peg in the 22-GHz maser line of water vapour with single-dish telescopes. The monitoring period covered two decades for RX Boo (1987-2007) and 12 years for SV Peg (1990-1995, 2000-2007). In addition, maps were obtained of RX Boo with the Very Large Array over several years. Results: We find that most of the emission in the circumstellar shell of RX Boo is located in an incomplete ring with an inner radius of 91 mas (15 AU). A velocity gradient is found in a NW-SE direction. The maser region can be modelled as a shell with a thickness of 22 AU, which is only partially filled. The gas crossing time is 16.5 years. The ring-like structure and the velocity gradient remained stable for at least 11 years, while the maser line profiles varied strongly. This suggests that the spatial asymmetry is not accidental, so that either the mass loss process or the maser excitation conditions in RX Boo are not spherically symmetric. The strong variability of the maser spectral features is mainly due to incoherent intensity fluctuations of maser emission spots, which have lifetimes of the order of 1 year. We found no correlation between the optical and the maser variability in either star. The variability properties of the SV Peg masers do not differ substantially from those of RX Boo. There were fewer spectral features present, and the range of variations was narrower. The maser was active on the >10-Jy level only 1990-1992 and

  6. Observations of precipitable water vapour over complex topography of Ethiopia from ground-based GPS, FTIR, radiosonde and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapour is one of the most important green house gases. Long-term changes in the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere need to be monitored not only for its direct role as a green house gas but also because of its role in amplifying other feedbacks in general circulation models. In recent decades, monitoring of water vapour on regular and continuous basis is becoming possible as a result of increase in the number of deployed Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) ground-based receivers at a faster pace. However, Horn of Africa region remains a data void region in this regard until recently when some GPS ground-receiver stations have been deployed to monitor tectonic movements in the Great Rift Valley. This study seizes this opportunity and the installation of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) at Addis Ababa to assess the quality and comparability of Precipitable Water Vapour (PWV) from GPS, FTIR, radiosonde and ERA-Interim over Ethiopia. The PWVs from the three instruments and reanalysis show good correlation in the range from 0.83 to 0.92. The radiosonde PWV shows dry bias with respect to other observations and reanalysis. ERA-Interim PWV shows wet bias with respect to all while GPS PWV exhibits wet bias with respect to FTIR. The intercomparison between GPS and ERA-Interim is extended to seven other GPS stations in the country. Despite the sensitivity of GPS PWV to uncertainty in surface pressure in general, observed surface pressure is used only at four GPS stations. The gain obtained from using observed surface pressure in terms of reducing bias and strengthening correlation is significant but shows some variations among the GPS sites. In contrast to comparison at Addis Ababa, the comparison between GPS and ERA-Interim PWVs over seven other GPS stations shows difference in the magnitude and sign of bias of ERA-Interim with respect to GPS PWV from station to station. This variation is also visible across different seasons. The main cause of the

  7. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  8. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water.

    PubMed

    Lau, Gabriel V; Ford, Ian J; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  9. Surface thermodynamics of planar, cylindrical, and spherical vapour-liquid interfaces of water

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.; Hunt, Patricia A.

    2015-03-21

    The test-area (TA) perturbation approach has been gaining popularity as a methodology for the direct computation of the interfacial tension in molecular simulation. Though originally implemented for planar interfaces, the TA approach has also been used to analyze the interfacial properties of curved liquid interfaces. Here, we provide an interpretation of the TA method taking the view that it corresponds to the change in free energy under a transformation of the spatial metric for an affine distortion. By expressing the change in configurational energy of a molecular configuration as a Taylor expansion in the distortion parameter, compact relations are derived for the interfacial tension and its energetic and entropic components for three different geometries: planar, cylindrical, and spherical fluid interfaces. While the tensions of the planar and cylindrical geometries are characterized by first-order changes in the energy, that of the spherical interface depends on second-order contributions. We show that a greater statistical uncertainty is to be expected when calculating the thermodynamic properties of a spherical interface than for the planar and cylindrical cases, and the evaluation of the separate entropic and energetic contributions poses a greater computational challenge than the tension itself. The methodology is employed to determine the vapour-liquid interfacial tension of TIP4P/2005 water at 293 K by molecular dynamics simulation for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. A weak peak in the curvature dependence of the tension is observed in the case of cylindrical threads of condensed liquid at a radius of about 8 Å, below which the tension is found to decrease again. In the case of spherical drops, a marked decrease in the tension from the planar limit is found for radii below ∼ 15 Å; there is no indication of a maximum in the tension with increasing curvature. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension tends towards the planar limit for large

  10. Determination of the amount of physical adsorption of water vapour on platinum-iridium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, S.; Ueda, K.; Ooiwa, A.; Fujii, K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the measurement of the physical adsorption of water vapour on platinum-iridium surfaces using a vacuum mass comparator. This value is of importance for redefining the kilogram, which will be realized under vacuum in the near future. Mirror-polished artefacts, consisting of a reference artefact and a test artefact, were manufactured for this experiment. The surface area difference between the reference and test artefacts was 226.2 cm2. This surface area difference was approximately 3.2 times the geometric surface area of the prototype of the kilogram made of platinum-iridium (71.7 cm2). The measurement results indicate that the amount of physical adsorption at a relative humidity of 50% is 0.0129 μg cm{{-}2} , with a standard uncertainty of 0.0016 μg cm{{-}2} . This value is 0.03 to 0.16 times that observed in other studies.

  11. Analysis of long time series of precipitable water vapour from GPS, DORIS and NWP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Olivier; Willis, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of GPS and DORIS measurements provides accurate estimates of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) and total column water vapour (TCWV). Such measurements are now available for more than 15 years from permanent ground-based stations which cover quite homogenously the globe and receive increasing interest for meteorology and climate research. This work assesses the quality of operational and reprocessed GPS and DORIS datasets. Regarding GPS, two solutions produced by JPL as contributions to IGS (repro1, covering period 1995-2007, and trop_new, covering period 2001-2010) are compared. An independent reprocessed solution produced by IGN (sgn_repro1, covering period 2004-2010) is also used in the intercomparison. Differences due to different data processing procedures and errors in metadata and discontinuities due to changes in data processing procedures are evidenced in the operational solution. A reprocessed DORIS solution (IGN solution, period 1993-2008) is also compared to GPS and to the ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-Interim). The impact of changes in GPS or DORIS equipment on the quality of the ZTD estimates is investigated. The reprocessed GPS and DORIS ZTD estimates are converted into TCWV and analysed globally and for different regions. The TCWV time series reveal significant variability at various timescales (inter-annual, seasonal, intra-seasonal and synoptic) and look very promising for validating independent observational datasets (e.g., radiosondes and satellite products) and models (reanalyses, climate models).

  12. Development of a new mini-invasive tumour hyperthermia probe using high-temperature water vapour.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Hua; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Liu, Jing

    2004-01-01

    A new mini-invasive hyperthermia probe using high-temperature water vapour for deep regional tumour treatment was developed in this paper. The vacuum insulation mechanism was incorporated into the probe to avoid heating damage to the normal tissues around the edge of the insertion path. To better understand the heat transfer behaviour in living tissues due to operation of the probe, theoretical models based on the Pennes' equation were established and two closed form analytical solutions under constant flux or temperature heating at the tip of probe were obtained. Parametric studies were performed to investigate the influence of various parameters on the temperature response of tissues heated by the probe. Further, several simulating experiments on the actual heating performance of the probe fabricated in this paper were conducted on the in vitro biological materials (fresh pork) and phantom gel. It was demonstrated that the probe can cause a high enough temperature over the treatment area to thermally destroy the tumour tissue in due time, while the temperature over the surrounding healthy tissues can be kept below a safe threshold value. This mini-invasive heating probe may have significant applications in future clinical tumour hyperthermia. PMID:15371007

  13. On the inclusion of GPS precipitable water vapour in the nowcasting of rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, P.; Catalao, J.; Miranda, P. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal behaviour of precipitable water vapour (PWV) retrieved from GPS delay data is analysed in a number of case studies of intense precipitation in the Lisbon area, in the period 2010-2012 and in a continuous annual cycle of 2012 observations. Such behaviour is found to correlate positively with the probability of precipitation, especially in cases of severe rainfall. The evolution of the GPS PWV in a few stations is analysed by a least-squares fitting of a broken line tendency, made by a temporal sequence of ascents and descents over the data. It is found that most severe rainfall events occur in descending trends after a long ascending period and that the most intense events occur after steep ascents in PWV. A simple algorithm, forecasting rain in the 6 h after a steep ascent of the GPS PWV in a single station, is found to produce reasonable forecasts of the occurrence of precipitation in the nearby region, without significant misses in what concerns larger rain events, but with a substantial amount of false alarms. It is suggested that this method could be improved by the analysis of 2-D or 3-D time-varying GPS PWV fields or by its joint use with other meteorological data relevant to nowcast precipitation.

  14. On the inclusion of GPS precipitable water vapour in the nowcasting of rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, P.; Catalao, J.; Miranda, P. M. A.

    2015-06-01

    The temporal behaviour of Precipitable Water Vapour (PWV) retrieved from GPS delay data is analysed in a number of case studies of intense precipitation in the Lisbon area, in the period 2010-2012, and in a continuous annual cycle of 2012 observations. Such behaviour is found to correlate positively with the probability of precipitation, especially in cases of severe rainfall. The evolution of the GPS PWV in a few stations is analysed by a least-squares fitting of a broken line tendency, made by a temporal sequence of ascents and descents over the data. It is found that most severe rainfall event occurs in descending trends after a long ascending period, and that the most intense events occur after steep ascents in PWV. A simple algorithm, forecasting rain in the 6 h after a steep ascent of the GPS PWV in a single station is found to produce reasonable forecasts of the occurrence of precipitation in the nearby region, without significant misses in what concerns larger rain events, but with a substantial amount of false alarms. It is suggested that this method could be improved by the analysis of 2-D or 3-D time varying GPS PWV fields, or by its joint use with other meteorological data relevant to nowcast precipitation.

  15. Study of water vapour permeability of protein and gum-based edible films by a photothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, S. A.; Saavedra, R.; Cruz, A.; Pedroza-Islas, R.; San Martín, E.

    2005-06-01

    The water vapour permeability of protein and gum-based edible films was studied by means of a photothermal method. The films were prepared with two basic ingredients, whey protein concentrate and mesquite gum, according to the proportions 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100 (weight:weight). The water vapour diffusion coefficient of the analyzed films was found within the interval 0.37 × 10-6 to 2.04 × 10-6 cm^2/s, increasing linearly by increasing the mesquite gum composition in the films. The incorporation of mesquite gum in films produces less effective moisture barriers due to its highly hydrophilic property.

  16. SIGNAL : Water vapour flux variability and local wind field investigations within five differently managed agroforestry sites across Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Christian; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Optimising soil water uptake and ground water consumption in mono-specific agricultural systems plays an important role for sustainable land management. By including tree alleys into the agricultural landscape, called agroforestry (AF), the wind flow is modified leading to a presumably favourable microclimate behind the tree alleys. We expect that this zone is characterized by increased air temperature and atmospheric water vapour content, compared to mono-specific fields. This would extend the growing season and increase the yield production behind the tree alleys. Within the SIGNAL (Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture through Agroforestry) project the evapotranspiration (ET) variability and the local wind field of agroforestry sites compared to mono-specific agricultural systems is investigated. Our study is based on the comparison of five differently managed agroforestry sites across Germany. All site feature one agroforestry plot and one reference plot, which represents a mono-specific cropped system. Each plot is equipped with an eddy-covariance tower, including a high frequency 3D SONIC anemometer and instruments gathering standard meteorological parameter as pressure, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, ground heat flux, net- and global radiation. The Surface Energy Budget (SEB) method will be used to calculate evapotranspiration QE as QE = ‑ QN ‑ QH ‑ QG ‑ Res by measuring the sensible heat flux, QH, with the eddy covariance method, the radiation balance, QN and the ground heat flux, QG. QH and QN will be measured continuously long-term. We will quantify site specific energy balance non-closure, Res, by temporarily measuring QE, using eddy covariance and a roving tower and then solving the SEB equation for Res. The short term Res will be used to then continuously derive QE from the SEB method. We will compare measured evapotranspiration rates from the SEB method to modelled evapotranspiration of the agroforestry systems through

  17. Atmospheric correction for inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidot, Jerome; Santer, Richard P.

    2004-02-01

    Inland waters are an increasingly valuable natural resource with major impacts and benefits for population and environment. As the spatial resolution is improved for "ocean color" satellite sensors, such observations become relevant to monitor water quality for lakes. We first demonstrated that the required atmospheric correction cannot be conducted using the standard algorithms developed for ocean. The ocean color sensors have spectral bands that allow characterization of aerosol over dark land pixels (vegetation in the blue and in the red spectral bands). It is possible to use a representative aerosol model in the atmospheric correction over inland waters after validating the spatial homogeneity of the aerosol model in the lake vicinity. The performance of this new algorithm is illustrated on SeaWiFS scenes of the Balaton (Hungary; the Constance, Germany) lakes. We illustrated the good spatial homogeneity of the aerosols and the meaningfulness of the water leaving radiances derived over these two lakes. We also addressed the specificity of the computation of the Fresnel reflection. The direct to diffuse term of this Fresnel contribution is reduced because of the limited size of the lake. Based on the primary scattering approximation, we propose a simple formulation of this component.

  18. Preparation and characterization of CS-g-PNIPAAm microgels and application in a water vapour-permeable fabric.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiling; Yu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CS-g-PNIPAAm) was synthesised using sonication with and without the crosslinker, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). FTIR, variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic light scattering were used to characterize the microgels' chemical constituents, structures, morphologies, lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs), and thermo- and pH-responsiveness. The chemical structures of the two CS-g-PNIPAAm materials were found to be similar and both exhibited dual responsiveness towards temperature and pH. The microgel containing MBA had a higher LCST, smaller diameter, and more compact structure, but exhibited opposite pH- and similar thermo-responsiveness. Although the structure of the microgel particles prepared without crosslinking was unstable, the stability of the crosslinked microgel particles enabled them to be finished onto fabric. Because the microgel prepared with MBA retains thermosensitivity, it can be used to impart controllable water vapour permeability properties. The incorporation of the MBA-crosslinked CS-g-PNIPAAm microgel particles in cotton fabric was accomplished by a simple pad-dry-cure procedure from an aqueous microparticle dispersion. The water vapour permeation of the finished fabric was measured at 25 and 40°C and 50 and 90% relative humidities. The finished fabric displayed an obviously high water vapour permeability at 40°C. PMID:25965451

  19. High resolution Raman lidar measurements for the characterization of the water vapour inflow in the frame of the Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Cacciani, Marco; Stelitano, Dario; Summa, Donato

    2013-04-01

    The University of BASILicata Raman Lidar system (BASIL) was deployed in Candillargues (Southern France, Lat: 43°37' N, Long: 4° 4' E) in the frame of the Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment - HyMeX. Within this experiment a major field campaign (Special Observation Period 1-SOP1, September to November 2012) took place over the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding coastal regions in France, Italy and Spain, with a specific focus on the study of heavy precipitation and flash-flood events. During HyMeX-SOP1, BASIL operated between 5 September and 5 November 2012, collecting more than 600 hours of measurements, distributed over 51 measurement days and 19 intensive observation periods (IOPs). The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV (Di Girolamo et al., 2004, 2006, 2009). This makes it an ideal tool for the characterization of the water vapour inflow in Southern France, which is important piece of information to improve the comprehension and forecasting capabilities of heavy precipitations in the Northwestern Mediterranean basin. Preliminary measurements from this field deployment will be illustrated and discussed at the Conference. These measurements allow to monitor and characterize the marine atmospheric flow that transport moist and conditionaly unstable air towards the coasts, which is feeding into the HPE events in Southern France. Measurements from BASIL can also be used to better characterize Planetary Boundary Layer moisture transport mechanisms from the surface to deep-convection systems. Besides temperature and water vapour, BASIL also provides measurements of the particle (aerosol/cloud) backscattering coefficient at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, of the particle extinction coefficient at 355 and 532

  20. From GNSS and meteorological data to NRT 4D water vapour distribution - GNSS meteorology activities at WUELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw; Kaplon, Jan; Rohm, Witold; Sierny, Jan; Wilgan, Karina; Hadas, Tomasz; Hordyniec, Pawel

    2014-05-01

    The GNSS and Meteo group at Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (WUELS), Poland is continuously working on GNSS meteorology since 2010. Currently group maintain real-time (RT) service collecting GNSS and meteorological data and near real-time (NRT) services for estimation of Zenith Troposphere Delay (ZTD), Zenith Hydrostatic Delay (ZHD), Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) and GNSS tomography over the territory of Poland. Data are obtained with high resolution from EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations and Ground Base Augmentation System (GBAS) called ASG-EUPOS (www.asgeupos.pl). The GNSS data are available from 124 reference stations located in Poland and neighbour countries, with the average 70km distance between stations. The ground meteorological observations in the area of Poland and neighbour countries are available from: ASG-EUPOS stations included in EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), airport meteorological stations (METAR messages stations) and stations managed by national Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (SYNOP messages stations). The first part of the paper presents the methodology of ASG-EUPOS GNSS data processing for NRT ZTD and ZTD horizontal gradients estimation in double-differenced mode (under Bernese GNSS Software V5.0) as well as new results from PPP mode (under Bernese GNSS Software V5.2) and their validation with respect to Rapid and Final troposphere products. The second part is describing the quality assessment of meteorological parameters interpolation methods for determination of ZHD at GNSS sites performed on GNSS stations equipped with meteorological sensors. The third part concerns on the comparisons of ZTD from GNSS data and meteorological parameters from SYNOP stations with data from COAMPS numerical weather prediction system (NWP) and IWV calculation. The fourth part presents the development of GNSS tomography model TOMO2. The last part describes methods of above products validation and visualization over the

  1. Vapour dynamics during magma-water interaction experiments: hydromagmatic origins of submarine volcaniclastic particles (limu o Pele)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, C. Ian; Sonder, Ingo; Schmid, Andrea; White, James D. L.; Dürig, Tobias; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Recent observations have shattered the long-held theory that deep-sea (>500 m) explosive eruptions are impossible; however, determining the dynamics of unobserved eruptions requires interpretation of the deposits they produce. For accurate interpretation to be possible, the relative abilities of explosive magmatic degassing and non-explosive magma-water interaction to produce characteristic submarine volcaniclastic particles such as `limu o Pele' (bubble wall shards of glass) must be established. We experimentally address this problem by pouring remelted basalt (1300 °C, anhydrous) into a transparent, water-filled reservoir, recording the interaction with a high-speed video camera and applying existing heat transfer models. We performed the experiments under moderate to high degrees of water subcooling (˜8 l of water at 58 and 3 °C), with ˜0.1 to 0.15 kg of melt poured at ˜10-2 kg s-1. Videos show the non-explosive, hydromagmatic blowing and bursting of isolated melt bubbles to form limu o Pele particles that are indistinguishable from those found in submarine volcaniclastic deposits. Pool boiling around growing melt bubbles progresses from metastable vapour film insulation, through vapour film retraction/collapse, to direct melt-water contact. These stages are linked to the evolution of melt-water heat transfer to verify the inverse relationship between vapour film stability and the degree of water subcooling. The direct contact stage in particular explains the extremely rapid quench rates determined from glass relaxation speedometry for natural limu. Since our experimentally produced limu is made entirely by the entrapping of ambient water in degassed basaltic melt, we argue that the presence of fast-quenched limu o Pele in natural deposits is not diagnostic of volatile-driven explosive eruptions. This must be taken into account if submarine eruption dynamics are to be accurately inferred from the deposits and particles they produce.

  2. Modelling the Effect of Fruit Growth on Surface Conductance to Water Vapour Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    GIBERT, CAROLINE; LESCOURRET, FRANÇOISE; GÉNARD, MICHEL; VERCAMBRE, GILLES; PÉREZ PASTOR, ALEJANDRO

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims A model of fruit surface conductance to water vapour diffusion driven by fruit growth is proposed. It computes the total fruit conductance by integrating each of its components: stomata, cuticle and cracks. • Methods The stomatal conductance is computed from the stomatal density per fruit and the specific stomatal conductance. The cuticular component is equal to the proportion of cuticle per fruit multiplied by its specific conductance. Cracks are assumed to be generated when pulp expansion rate exceeds cuticle expansion rate. A constant percentage of cracks is assumed to heal each day. The proportion of cracks to total fruit surface area multiplied by the specific crack conductance accounts for the crack component. The model was applied to peach fruit (Prunus persica) and its parameters were estimated from field experiments with various crop load and irrigation regimes. • Key Results The predictions were in good agreement with the experimental measurements and for the different conditions (irrigation and crop load). Total fruit surface conductance decreased during early growth as stomatal density, and hence the contribution of the stomatal conductance, decreased from 80 to 20 % with fruit expansion. Cracks were generated for fruits exhibiting high growth rates during late growth and the crack component could account for up to 60 % of the total conductance during the rapid fruit growth. The cuticular contribution was slightly variable (around 20 %). Sensitivity analysis revealed that simulated conductance was highly affected by stomatal parameters during the early period of growth and by both crack and stomatal parameters during the late period. Large fruit growth rate leads to earlier and greater increase of conductance due to higher crack occurrence. Conversely, low fruit growth rate accounts for a delayed and lower increase of conductance. • Conclusions By predicting crack occurrence during fruit growth, this model could be helpful

  3. The impact of temperature resolution on trajectory modeling of stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Randel, W. J.; Kim, J.-E.

    2014-11-01

    Lagrangian trajectories driven by reanalysis meteorological fields are frequently used to study water vapour (H2O) in the stratosphere, in which the tropical cold-point temperatures regulate H2O amount entering the stratosphere. Therefore, the accuracy of temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is of great importance for trajectory studies. Currently, most reanalyses, such as the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), only provide temperatures with ~1.2 km vertical resolution in the TTL, which has been argued to introduce uncertainties in the simulations. In this paper, we quantify this uncertainty by comparing the trajectory results using MERRA temperatures on model levels (traj.MER-T) to those using temperatures in finite resolutions, including GPS temperatures (traj.GPS-T) and MERRA temperatures adjusted to recover wave-induced variability underrepresented by the current ~1.2 km vertical resolution (traj.MER-Twave). Comparing with traj.MER-T, traj.GPS-T has little impact on simulated stratospheric H2O (changes ~0.1 ppmv), whereas traj.MER-Twave tends to dry air by 0.2-0.3 ppmv. The bimodal dehydration peaks in traj.MER-T due to limited vertical resolution disappear in traj.GPS-T and traj.MER-Twave by allowing the cold-point tropopause to be found at finer vertical levels. Despite these differences in absolute values of predicted H2O and vertical dehydration patterns, there is virtually no difference in the interannual variability in different runs. Overall, we find that the finite resolution of temperature has limited impact on predicted H2O in the trajectory model.

  4. Coupled Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of Water Along the Soil-Plant- Atmosphere Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Webb, E. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of water within a plant vary with transpiration rates and the isotopic composition of soil water. Both of these parameters are affected by temperature and relative humidity. A controlled-temperature, growth-chamber experiment was conducted to determine the relationships among temperature, relative humidity, soil water evaporation and plant-water isotope composition in cattails and horsetails. Typha, a cattail species that grows in wetland conditions, and Equisetum, a horsetail species that prefers dry soils, were each grown in four chambers at 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees Celsius. The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of watering water, soil water, vapour in the growth chambers and plant water from the leaves and stems were analyzed throughout the eight-month long artificial growing season. Although the oxygen isotope composition of the watering water remained constant, the soil water, atmospheric vapour and plant water were progressively enriched in oxygen-18 and deuterium in each of the four chambers from low to high temperatures as a result of increasing evaporation. The oxygen isotope composition of plant water along the length of a single stem or leaf was increasingly enriched in the heavier isotopes towards the apex. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of this trend between species. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of plant water is primarily controlled by environmental conditions. The oxygen isotope composition of the water vapour in the growing chamber increased with temperature, consistent with equilibration between the vapour and the oxygen-18 enriched soil and plant water reservoirs. The magnitude and interaction of these variables, as measured for these modern samples of cattails and horsetails, should be useful in calibrating paleoclimate proxies based on fossilized plant materials (e.g., cellulose, phytoliths).

  5. The role of molecular hydrogen and methane oxidation in the water vapour budget of the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Texier, H.; Solomon, S.; Garcia, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    The detailed photochemistry of methane oxidation has been studied in a coupled chemical/dynamical model of the middle atmosphere. The photochemistry of formaldehyde plays an important role in determining the production of water vapor from methane oxidation. At high latitudes, the production and transport of molecular hydrogen is particularly important in determining the water vapor distribution. It is shown that the ratio of the methane vertical gradient to the water vapor vertical gradient at any particular latitude should not be expected to be precisely 2, due both to photochemical and dynamical effects. Modeled H2O profiles are compared with measurements from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment at various latitudes. Molecular hydrogen is shown to be responsible for the formation of a secondary maximum displayed by the model water vapor profiles in high latitude summer, a feature also found in the LIMS data.

  6. Partitioning understory evapotranspiration in semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia using the isotopic composition of water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Gaj, Marcel; Holtorf, Kim-Kirsten; Gröngröft, Alexander; Brokate, Ralph; Himmelsbach, Thomas; Eschenbach, Annette

    2016-04-01

    In dry environments with a sparse vegetation cover, understory evapotranspiration is a major component of the ecosystem water balance. Consequently, knowledge on the size of evapotranspiration fluxes and the driving factors is important for our understanding of the hydrological cycle. Understory evapotranspiration is made up of soil evaporation and plant transpiration. Soil evaporation can be measured directly from patches free of vegetation. However, when understory vegetation is present distinguishing between soil evaporation and plant transpiration is challenging. In this study, we aim to partition understory evapotranspiration based on an approach that combines the measurements of water-vapour fluxes using the closed chamber method with measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour. The measurements were done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management). The study sites were located in three different semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia: thornbush savanna, Baikiaea woodland and shrubland. At each site measurements were done under tree canopies as well as at unshaded areas between the canopies. We measured evaporation from the bare soil and evapotranspiration from patches covered with herbaceous species and shrubs using a transparent chamber connected with an infrared gas analyser (LI-8100A, LICOR Inc.). The stable isotope composition of water vapour inside the chamber and depth profiles of soil water stable isotopes were determined in-situ using a tuneable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscope (OA-ICOS, Los Gatos Research, DLT 100). Xylem samples were extracted using the cryogenic vacuum extraction method and the isotopic composition of the extracted water was measured subsequently with a cavity-ring-down spectrometer (CRDS L2120-i, Picarro Inc.). We will present the quantified fluxes of understory evapotranspiration measured in the three different ecosystems, show the

  7. Continuous monitoring of summer surface water vapour isotopic composition above the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Johnsen, S. J.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Stenni, B.; Risi, C.; Sodemann, H.; Balslev-Clausen, D.; Blunier, T.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Ellehøj, M. D.; Falourd, S.; Gkinis, V.; Grindsted, A.; Jouzel, J.; Popp, T.; Sheldon, S.; Simonsen, S. B.; Sjolte, J.; Steffensen, J. P.; Sperlich, P.; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, A. E.; Vinther, B. M.; White, J. W. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present here surface water vapor isotopic measurements conducted from June to August~2010 at the NEEM camp, NW-Greenland (77.45° N 51.05° W, 2484 m a.s.l.). Measurements were conducted at 9 different heights from 0.1 m to 13.5 m above the snow surface using two different types of cavity-enhanced near infrared absorption spectroscopy analyzers. For each instrument specific protocols were developed for calibration and drift corrections. The inter-comparison of corrected results from different instruments reveals excellent reproducibility, stability, and precision with a standard deviation of ~ 0.23‰ for δ18O and ~ 1.4‰ for δD. Diurnal and intra-seasonal variations show strong relationships between changes in local surface humidity and water vapor isotopic composition, and with local and synoptic weather conditions. This variability probably results from the interplay between local moisture fluxes, linked with firn-air exchanges, boundary layer dynamics, and large-scale moisture advection. Particularly remarkable are several episodes characterized by high (> 40‰) surface water vapor deuterium excess. Air mass back-trajectory calculations from atmospheric analyses and water tagging in the LMDZiso atmospheric model reveal that these events are associated with predominant Arctic air mass origin. The analysis suggests that high deuterium excess levels are a result of strong kinetic fractionation during evaporation at the sea ice margin.

  8. The Effect of Climate Change on Ozone Depletion through Changes in Stratospheric Water Vapour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk-Davidoff, Daniel B.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Anderson, James G.; Keith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have predicted substantial increases in Arctic ozone depletion due to the stratospheric cooling induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. But climate change may additionally influence Arctic ozone depletion through changes in the water vapor cycle. Here we investigate this possibility by combining predictions of tropical tropopause temperatures from a general circulation model with results from a one-dimensional radiative convective model, recent progress in understanding the stratospheric water vapor budget, modelling of heterogeneous reaction rates and the results of a general circulation model on the radiative effect of increased water vapor. Whereas most of the stratosphere will cool as greenhouse-gas concentrations increase, the tropical tropopause may become warmer, resulting in an increase of the mean saturation mixing ratio of water vapor and hence an increased transport of water vapor from the troposphere to the stratosphere. Stratospheric water vapor concentration in the polar regions determines both the critical temperature below which heterogeneous reactions on cold aerosols become important (the mechanism driving enhanced ozone depletion) and the temperature of the Arctic vortex itself. Our results indicate that ozone loss in the later winter and spring Arctic vortex depends critically on water vapor variations which are forced by sea surface temperature changes in the tropics. This potentially important effect has not been taken into account in previous scenarios of Arctic ozone loss under climate change conditions.

  9. Positive water vapour feedback in climate models confirmed by satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Lerner, J.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that GCMs used to evaluate climate change overestimate the greenhouse effect due to increased concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. Here, new satellite-generated water vapor data are used to compare summer and winter moisture values in regions of the middle and upper troposphere that have previously been difficult to observe with confidence. It is found that, as the hemispheres warm, increased convection leads to increased water vapor above 500 mbar in approximate quantitative agreement with results from current climate models. The same conclusion is reached by comparing the tropical western and eastern Pacific regions. Thus, water vapor feedback is not overestimated in models and should amplify the climate response to increased trace-gas concentrations.

  10. Assessment of small-scale integrated water vapour variability during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; Eikenberg, S.; Löhnert, U.; Dick, G.; Klocke, D.; Di Girolamo, P.; Crewell, S.

    2014-09-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of integrated water vapour (IWV) on small-scales of less than 10 km and hours is assessed with data from the two months of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). The statistical intercomparison of the unique set of observations during HOPE (microwave radiometer (MWR), Global Positioning System (GPS), sunphotometer, radiosondes, Raman Lidar, infrared and near infrared Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellites Aqua and Terra) measuring close together reveals a good agreement in terms of standard deviation (≤ 1 kg m-2) and correlation coefficient (≥ 0.98). The exception is MODIS, which appears to suffer from insufficient cloud filtering. For a case study during HOPE featuring a typical boundary layer development, the IWV variability in time and space on scales of less than 10 km and less than 1 h is investigated in detail. For this purpose, the measurements are complemented by simulations with the novel ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic modelling framework (ICON) which for this study has a horizontal resolution of 156 m. These runs show that differences in space of 3-4 km or time of 10-15 min induce IWV variabilities in the order of 4 kg m-2. This model finding is confirmed by observed time series from two MWRs approximately 3 km apart with a comparable temporal resolution of a few seconds. Standard deviations of IWV derived from MWR measurements reveal a high variability (> 1 kg m-2) even at very short time scales of a few minutes. These cannot be captured by the temporally lower resolved instruments and by operational numerical weather prediction models such as COSMO-DE (an application of the Consortium for Small-scale Modelling covering Germany) of Deutscher Wetterdienst, which is included in the comparison. However, for time scales larger than 1 h, a sampling resolution of 15 min is sufficient to capture the

  11. Assessment of small-scale integrated water vapour variability during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; Eikenberg, S.; Löhnert, U.; Dick, G.; Klocke, D.; Di Girolamo, P.; Crewell, S.

    2015-03-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of integrated water vapour (IWV) on small scales of less than 10 km and hours is assessed with data from the 2 months of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). The statistical intercomparison of the unique set of observations during HOPE (microwave radiometer (MWR), Global Positioning System (GPS), sun photometer, radiosondes, Raman lidar, infrared and near-infrared Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellites Aqua and Terra) measuring close together reveals a good agreement in terms of random differences (standard deviation ≤1 kg m-2) and correlation coefficient (≥ 0.98). The exception is MODIS, which appears to suffer from insufficient cloud filtering. For a case study during HOPE featuring a typical boundary layer development, the IWV variability in time and space on scales of less than 10 km and less than 1 h is investigated in detail. For this purpose, the measurements are complemented by simulations with the novel ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic modelling framework (ICON), which for this study has a horizontal resolution of 156 m. These runs show that differences in space of 3-4 km or time of 10-15 min induce IWV variabilities on the order of 0.4 kg m-2. This model finding is confirmed by observed time series from two MWRs approximately 3 km apart with a comparable temporal resolution of a few seconds. Standard deviations of IWV derived from MWR measurements reveal a high variability (> 1 kg m-2) even at very short time scales of a few minutes. These cannot be captured by the temporally lower-resolved instruments and by operational numerical weather prediction models such as COSMO-DE (an application of the Consortium for Small-scale Modelling covering Germany) of Deutscher Wetterdienst, which is included in the comparison. However, for time scales larger than 1 h, a sampling resolution of 15 min is

  12. Evaluation of Trichloroethylene vapour fluxes using measurements at the soil-air interface and in the atmosphere close to the soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Solenn; Nagel, Vincent; Schäfer, Gerhard; Marzougui, Salsabil; Razakarisoa, Olivier; Millet, Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Industrialization during the 19th and 20th century led to the use of chemical products such as chlorinated solvents, e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE). At locations where volatile organic compounds were accidentally spilled on the soil during transport or leaked from their storage places, they could have migrated vertically through the unsaturated zone towards the underlying groundwater. As a result of their high volatility a large vapour plume is consequently formed. Understanding when, at which concentrations and how long, these pollutants will be present in soil, groundwater, atmosphere or indoor air, still remains a challenge up to date. This study was conducted as part of a broader experiment of TCE multiphase mass transfer in a large (25m×12m×3m) well-instrumented artificial basin. TCE was injected as liquid phase in the vadose zone and experiments were conducted during several months. Firstly, TCE vapour fluxes were experimentally determined in two different ways: (a) direct measurements at the soil-air interface using a flux chamber and (b) evaluations based on measurements of TCE concentrations in the air above the soil surface using a modular experimental flume (5m×1m×1m) with a fixed air flow. Secondly, numerical simulations were conducted to analyse the differences between these two types of fluxes. Several positions of the flume on the soil surface were tested. Based on the TCE concentrations measured in the air, vapour fluxes were determined with the aerodynamic method using the modified Thornthwaite-Holzmann equation. It assumes that the concentrations and velocities are temporally and spatially constant in horizontal planes and requires data on the gradients of concentration, horizontal wind velocity and temperature. TCE vapour fluxes measured at the soil-air interface decrease with distance from the source zone. However, this decrease was either high, at the first stage of experiment (120μg/(m2s) near the source zone compared to 1,1μg/(m2s) 2m

  13. Evaluation of balloon and satellite water vapour measurements in the Southern tropical and subtropical UTLS during the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoux, N.; Hauchecorne, A.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Lefèvre, F.; Durry, G.; Jones, R. L.; Rozanov, A.; Dhomse, S.; Burrows, J. P.; Morel, B.; Bencherif, H.

    2009-07-01

    Balloon water vapour in situ and remote measurements in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) obtained during the HIBISCUS campaign around 20° S in Brazil in February-March 2004 using a tunable diode laser (μSDLA), a surface acoustic wave (SAW) and a Vis-NIR solar occultation spectrometer (SAOZ) on a long duration balloon, have been used for evaluating the performances of satellite borne remote water vapour instruments available at the same latitude and measurement period. In the stratosphere, HALOE displays the best precision (2.5%), followed by SAGE II (7%), MIPAS (10%), SAOZ (20-25%) and SCIAMACHY (35%), all of which show approximately constant H2O mixing ratios between 20-25 km. Compared to HALOE of ±10% accuracy between 0.1-100 hPa, SAGE II and SAOZ show insignificant biases, MIPAS is wetter by 10% and SCIAMACHY dryer by 20%. The currently available GOMOS profiles of 25% precision show a positive vertical gradient in error for identified reasons. Compared to these, the water vapour of the Reprobus Chemistry Transport Model, forced at pressures higher than 95 hPa by the ECMWF analyses, is dryer by about 1 ppmv (20%). In the lower stratosphere between 16-20 km, most notable features are the steep degradation of MIPAS precision below 18 km, and the appearance of biases between instruments far larger than their quoted total uncertainty. HALOE and SAGE II (after spectral adjustment for reducing the bias with HALOE at northern mid-latitudes) both show decreases of water vapour with a minimum at the tropopause not seen by other instruments or the model, possibly attributable to an increasing error in the HALOE altitude registration. Between 16-18 km where the water vapour concentration shows little horizontal variability, and where the μSDLA balloon measurements are not perturbed by outgassing, the average mixing ratios reported by the remote sensing instruments are substantially lower than the 4-5 ppmv observed by the μSDLA. Differences

  14. In situ measurements of nitric oxide, water vapour and ozone from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D. C.; Hilsenrath, E.; Ridley, B. A.; Schiff, H. I.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes flight tests of prototype instruments for the NASA global atmospheric sampling program (GASP). Three gas sampling instruments were included in the installation: (1) a chemiluminescent nitric oxide monitor; (2) an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor; and (3) an aluminum oxide water vapor hygrometer. Results indicate the range and kind of variability in NO, H2O, and O3 that can be expected in routine tropospheric air sampling. They have also demonstrated the need for increasing instrument sensitivities, particularly in NO measurement.

  15. Precipitable water vapour contents at "local" scale: a comparative study on GNSS-derived data versus modelled ones from ECMWF operational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Umberto; Tammaro, Umberto; Boy, Jean-Paul; Masson, Frederic; Capuano, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We present a comparative study between GNSS-derived precipitable water (PW) contents and modelled data from ECMWF operational models. Nearly 4 years of PW contents derived from meteorological and GNSS data are analyzed. We use GNSS data from a geodetic monitoring network of the Neapolitan active volcanoes managed by INGV as well as from some GPS stations installed on purpose. We compare PW time series retrieved from GNSS observations with those coming from models. The total water vapour content of the atmosphere can be derived by modelling from the vertical profile of the specific humidity. We use ECMWF operational models available at a horizontal resolution of about 15 km, 3-hourly samples. The number of vertical model levels is 91 up to mid 2013 and 137 afterwards. We recomputed the surface pressure on the real Earth surface, which differs from the orography, i.e. the smooth surface of the atmospheric model, by propagating the pressure from the orography to the surface. A very good agreement is achieved between PW retrieved from GNSS observations and computed from models using the highest time and space resolution (0.15 degree, 3-hourly 91-137 layers) operational models. We even focus our analysis on the occasion of some extreme raining events hitting Campania region (Italy).

  16. A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum and water vapour continuum at near infrared wavelengths from ground-based spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menang, K. P.

    A high resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (CAVIAR solar spectrum) and water vapour continuum have been derived in near infrared windows from 2000-10000 cm-1 (105μm), by applying the Langley technique to calibrated ground-based high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, made under clear-sky conditions. The effect of the choice of an extraterrestrial solar spectrum for radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky absorption and heating rates in the near infrared was also studied. There is a good agreement between the solar lines strengths and positions of the CAVIAR solar spectrum and those from both high-resolution satellite and ground-based measurements in their regions of spectral overlap. However, there are significant differences between the structure of the CAVIAR solar spectrum and spectra from models. Many of the detected lines are missing from widely-used modelled extraterrestrial solar spectrum. The absolute level and hence wavenumber-integrated solar irradiance of the CAVIAR solar spectrum was also found to be 8% lower than the satellite-based Thuillier et al spectra from 5200-10000 cm-1. Using different extraterrestrial solar spectra for radiative transfer calculations in the near infrared led to differences of up to about 11 W m-2 (8.2%) in the absorbed solar irradiance while the tropospheric and stratospheric heating rates could respectively differ by up to about 0.13K day-1 (8.1%) and 0.19 K day-1 (7.6%) for an overhead Sun and mid-latitude summer atmosphere. This work has shown that the widely-used empirically modelled continuum may be underestimating the strength of the water vapour continuum from 2000-10000 cm-1, with the derived continuum up to more than 2 orders of magnitude stronger at some wavenumbers in the windows. The derived continuum is also stronger than that implied by laboratory measurements, by a factor of up to 40 in some spectral regions.

  17. The GEWEX water vapour assessment (G-VAP) - first results from inter-comparisons and stability analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Marc; Lockhoff, Maarit; Shi, Lei; Fennig, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    In a Joint Letter from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the general need for coordinated international assessments of climate products was formulated. Such assessments are important mechanisms for improvements and to enhance and promote utilisation. The GEWEX Radiation Panel (GRP, renamed to GEWEX Data and Assessment Panel - GDAP) has initiated a Water Vapor Assessment in 2011, further on referred to as G-VAP. The major purpose of G-VAP is to: • Quantify the state of the art in water vapour products being constructed for climate applications, and by this; • Support the selection process of suitable water vapour products by GDAP for its production of globally consistent water and energy cycle products. The usage of products within GDAP activities essentially implies to study long-term data records. Since the start of G-VAP in 2011 two workshops have been conducted. The results of these workshops together with feedback from the first GDAP meeting were used for setting up the G-VAP assessment plan. This plan (available at www.gewex-vap.org) summarizes scope and goals of the assessement, introduces science questions and provides details on the planned technical and scientific activities. Major elements of G-VAP are: • All three parts of the GCOS Essential Climate Variables (ECV) on water vapour and their consistency are considered: Total Column Water Vapour, Upper Tropospheric Humidity as well as water vapour profiles and their related temperature profiles; • The assessment focuses on overall characteristics of participating satellite data records and reanalyses as determined from inter-comparison and comparisons against in situ observations as well as against ground-based products; • In this characterisation process the data records are not ranked according to their quality. Rather, the application areas and requirements of the individual data records as well as the GEWEX requirements are documented

  18. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films. PMID:25829623

  19. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheric branch of the water cycle, although containing just a tiny fraction of the Earth's total water reserves, presents a crucial interface between the physical climate (such as large-scale rainfall patterns) and the ecosystems upon which human societies ultimately depend. Because of the central importance of water in the Earth system, the question of how the water cycle is changing, and how it may alter in future as a result of anthropogenic changes, present one of the greatest challenges of this century. The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Climate Change and Water (Bates et al 2008) highlighted the increasingly strong evidence of change in the global water cycle and associated environmental consequences. It is of critical importance to climate prediction and adaptation strategies that key processes in the atmospheric water cycle are precisely understood and determined, from evaporation at the surface of the ocean, transport by the atmosphere, condensation as cloud and eventual precipitation, and run-off through rivers following interaction with the land surface, sub-surface, ice, snow and vegetation. The purpose of this special focus issue of Environmental Research Letters on anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle is to consolidate the recent substantial advances in understanding past, present and future changes in the global water cycle through evidence built upon theoretical understanding, backed up by observations and borne out by climate model simulations. Thermodynamic rises in water vapour provide a central constraint, as discussed in a guest editorial by Bengtsson (2010). Theoretical implications of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation are presented by O'Gorman and Muller (2010) and with reference to a simple model (Sherwood 2010) while observed humidity changes confirm these anticipated responses at the land and ocean surface (Willett et al 2008). Rises in low-level moisture are thought to fuel an

  20. Photocatalytic property of titanium dioxide thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in argon and water vapour plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.; Hatanaka, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is investigating the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 thin films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering of a pure TiO2 target in Ar and Ar/H2O (pressure ratio 40/3) plasmas. Optical absorption, structure, surface morphology and chemical structure of the deposited films were comparatively studied. The films were amorphous and included a large amount of hydroxyl groups (about 5% of oxygen atoms were bounded to hydrogen) irrespective of the intentional content of water in the deposition chamber. Incorporation of hydroxyl groups in the film deposited in pure Ar plasma is explained as contamination of the working gas with water molecules desorbed by plasma from the deposition chamber walls. However, intentional input of water vapour into the discharge chamber decreased the deposition speed and roughness of the deposited films. The good photocatalytic activity of the deposited films could be attributed hydroxyl groups in their structures.

  1. Determination of permeation parameters of experimental PET films coated with SiOx to ethyl acetate, oxygen and water vapour.

    PubMed

    Adamantiadi, A; Badeka, A; Kontominas, M G

    2001-11-01

    The permeation parameters of conventional PET films, films coated with SiOx and SiOx-coated films laminated to LDPE were determined for ethyl acetate using the permeation cell/gas chromatography method. Permeation to O2 and water vapour was also determined to monitor overall changes in the barrier properties of the experimental films. Coating of the PET film was achieved by a 'directed evaporation' method that increased the yield of the coating process from 30-35 to > 70%. It was shown that the SiOx coating increased the film barrier to ethyl acetate by approximately 20-30 times. Permeation values showed low reproducibility, indicating the need for further development and standardization of the 'directed evaporation' web-coating process. The barrier to oxygen and water vapour increased by 20-25 and 12-14 times respectively after coating. The web-coating speed did not seem to influence the barrier properties of the films. Permeation coefficients, diffusion coefficients and solubility coefficients were calculated for all samples. PMID:11665733

  2. Radiometric Investigation of Water Vapour Movement in Wood-based Composites by Means of Cold and Thermal Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbrig, K.; Frühwald, K.; Ressel, J. B.; Mannes, D.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.

    Wood-based composites are industrially produced panels made of resin-blended wood furnish material consolidated by hot pressing. Precise knowledge of the physical interrelations, such as heat and mass transfer induced densification and curing, are inevitable to control process performance and final product properties. Neutron radiography is able to distinguish between moisture and wood matter movement and thus to provide quantitative information considering the hot pressing process where only models exist. To this end, preliminary experiments were carried out utilising both cold and thermal neutrons to visualise and to quantify the water vapour movement within wood-based composites heated under sealing within a simplified mimicry of the hot pressing process conditions. Neutron radiography of this rather fast process was found to be feasible in general. The evaluation of the time-resolved image data maps the relative water content distribution within the sample during 9 min process time. A presumed wavefront-like vapour movement was confirmed. Hence, the results enhance the understanding of heat and mass transfer inside consolidated resin-blended wood furnish. These preliminary experiments prove neutron radiography as viable method for further comprehensive in-situ investigations of the hot pressing process of wood-based composites.

  3. Profiling atmospheric water vapor by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.; Szejwach, G.; Gesell, L. H.; Nieman, R. A.; Niver, D. S.; Krupp, B. M.; Gagliano, J. A.; King, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended kalman-Bucy filter was implemented and applied for the water vapor retrieval. The results show great promise in atmospheric water vapor profiling by microwave radiometry heretofore not attainable at lower frequencies.

  4. Water for food and nature in drought-prone tropics: vapour shift in rain-fed agriculture.

    PubMed Central

    Rockström, Johan

    2003-01-01

    This paper quantifies the eco-hydrological challenge up until 2050 of producing food in balance with goods and services generated by water-dependent ecosystems in nature. Particular focus is given to the savannah zone, covering 40% of the land area in the world, where water scarcity constitutes a serious constraint to sustainable development. The analysis indicates an urgent need for a new green revolution, which focuses on upgrading rain-fed agriculture. Water requirements to produce adequate diets for humans are shown to be relatively generic irrespective of hydro-climate, amounting to a global average of 1,300 m(3) cap(-1) yr(-1). Present food production requires an estimated 6,800 km(3) yr(-1) of consumptive green water (5,000 km(3) yr(-1) in rain-fed agriculture and 1,800 km(3) yr(-1) from irrigated crops). Without considering water productivity gains, an additional 5,800 km(3) yr(-1) of water is needed to feed a growing population in 2,050 and eradicate malnutrition. It is shown that the bulk of this water will be used in rain-fed agriculture. A dynamic analysis of water productivity and management options indicates that large 'crop per drop' improvements can be achieved at the farm level. Vapour shift in favour of productive green water flow as crop transpiration could result in relative water savings of 500 km(3) yr(-1) in semi-arid rain-fed agriculture. PMID:14728794

  5. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation, pulsed electric field, hot water and ethanol vapours treatment on functional properties of mung bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ankit; Siddiqui, Saleem; Upadhyay, Neelam; Soni, Jyoti

    2014-04-01

    The present investigation was conducted with the objective to study the effects of various treatments and storage conditions on ascorbic acid, total phenols, antioxidant activity and polyphenol oxidase activity of mung bean sprouts. The sprouts subjected to various treatments viz., pulsed electric field (PEF) (10,000 V for 10 s), hot water dip (HWD) (50 °C for 2 min), ethanol vapours (1 h) and UV-Irradiation (10 kJm(-2) in laminar flow chamber for 1 h); and then stored at room (25 ± 1 °C) and low (7 ± 1 °C) temperature conditions. The sprouts were analyzed regularly at 24 h interval till end of shelf life. Different treatments given to sprouts resulted in differential effect on various parameters. The ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity were highest in ethanol vapours treated sprouts. There was a general decrease in polyphenol oxidase activity by various treatments. During storage ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity of sprouts first increased and then decreased significantly, however, for polyphenol oxidase activity a progressive increase with increase in storage period was observed. The trends were similar at room and low temperature storage conditions. Thus, it can be concluded that the ethanol vapours significantly improved the ascorbic acid content, total phenols and antioxidant activity of mung bean sprouts, both at room as well as low temperature conditions of storage. PMID:24741164

  6. Observations of precipitable water vapour over complex topography of Ethiopia from ground-based GPS, FTIR, radiosonde and ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.

    2015-08-01

    Water vapour is one of the most important greenhouse gases. Long-term changes in the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere need to be monitored not only for its direct role as a greenhouse gas but also because of its role in amplifying other feedbacks such as clouds and albedo. In recent decades, monitoring of water vapour on a regular and continuous basis has become possible as a result of the steady increase in the number of deployed global positioning satellite (GPS) ground-based receivers. However, the Horn of Africa remained a data-void region in this regard until recently, when some GPS ground-receiver stations were deployed to monitor tectonic movements in the Great Rift Valley. This study seizes this opportunity and the installation of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) at Addis Ababa to assess the quality and comparability of precipitable water vapour (PWV) from GPS, FTIR, radiosonde and interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) over Ethiopia. The PWV from the three instruments and the reanalysis show good correlation, with correlation coefficients in the range from 0.83 to 0.92. On average, GPS shows the highest PWV followed by FTIR and radiosonde observations. ERA-Interim is higher than all measurements with a bias of 4.6 mm compared to GPS. The intercomparison between GPS and ERA-Interim was extended to seven other GPS stations in the country. Only four out of eight GPS stations included simultaneous surface pressure observations. Uncertainty in the model surface pressure of 1 hPa can cause up to 0.35 mm error in GPS PWV. The gain obtained from using observed surface pressure in terms of reducing bias and strengthening correlation is significant but shows some variations among the GPS sites. The comparison between GPS and ERA-Interim PWV over the seven other GPS stations shows differences in the magnitude and sign of bias of ERA-Interim with respect to GPS PWV from station to station. This feature is also prevalent in diurnal and seasonal

  7. Carbon and water vapour exchange in a recently burned east boreal jack pine stand, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, K.; Strachan, I. B.

    2013-12-01

    The circumpolar boreal forest is an extensive carbon (C) reservoir, storing an estimated 88 petagrams (Pg) of C in vegetation biomass with an additional 471 PgC residing within the soil itself. In the North American boreal, fire disturbance acts as the main stand-renewing agent along an approximate 100-year return interval. However, recent studies suggest that fire intensity and severity are increasing, driven by disproportionate climate warming of the northern latitudes. While estimates of direct C emissions from combustion are becoming more accurate, indirect loss due to post-fire effects on decomposition and regeneration has only recently become a focus of research. Paradoxically, it has been estimated that post-fire C releases are in the order of three times the amount directly released during initial combustion. In this study, we examine carbon and water exchange in a 6-year old, post-burn, jack pine stand located in the eastern James Bay region of the Canadian boreal; an area currently under-represented in fire studies. Over 1.5 years, covering two growing seasons and the spring and fall transitions, we measured net CO2 and energy exchange at the ecosystem level using an eddy covariance tower, and supplemented this with chamber measurements of soil respiration. At this stage of recovery, while demonstrating diurnal and seasonal patterns of exchange, overall the site was a net source of C and water to the atmosphere with brief periods of C sink.

  8. Discussion of band selection and methodologies for the estimation of precipitable water vapour from AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schanzer, Dena; Staenz, Karl

    1992-01-01

    An Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data set acquired over Canal Flats, B.C., on 14 Aug. 1990, was used for the purpose of developing methodologies for surface reflectance retrieval using the 5S atmospheric code. A scene of Rogers Dry Lake, California (23 Jul. 1990), acquired within three weeks of the Canal Flats scene, was used as a potential reference for radiometric calibration purposes and for comparison with other studies using primarily LOWTRAN7. Previous attempts at surface reflectance retrieval indicated that reflectance values in the gaseous absorption bands had the poorest accuracy. Modifications to 5S to use 1 nm step size, in order to make fuller use of the 20 cm(sup -1) resolution of the gaseous absorption data, resulted in some improvement in the accuracy of the retrieved surface reflectance. Estimates of precipitable water vapor using non-linear least squares regression and simple ratioing techniques such as the CIBR (Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio) technique or the narrow/wide technique, which relate ratios of combinations of bands to precipitable water vapor through calibration curves, were found to vary widely. The estimates depended on the bands used for the estimation; none provided entirely satisfactory surface reflectance curves.

  9. Raman water vapour concentration measurements for reduction of false alarms in forest fire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, C.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Malizia, A.; Richetta, M.; Ventura, P.

    2009-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of environmental catastrophe, with the natural outcomes of serious ecological and economic damages, together with the possibility to endanger human safety. At the aim to reduce this catastrophe several author have been shown that the Laser light scattering can be uses to reveals the particulate emitted in the smoke. Infact experimental and theoretical investigations have shown that lidar is a powerful tool to detect the tenuous smoke plumes produced by forest fires at an early stage. In early 90's Arbolino and Andreucci have shown the theoretical possibility to detect the particulate emitted in atmosphere from smoke forest fire. Vilar at all have shown experimentally the possibility to measure the density variation in atmosphere due to plume emitted in forest fire event. Gaudio at all. have already shown that it is possible to evaluate water vapor emitted in smoke of vegetable fuel using a CO2 dial system. In this paper a theoretical model to evaluate the capabilities of a lidar system in fire surveillance of wooded areas will be presented. In particular we intend propose a technique to minimizing the false alarm in the detection of forest fire by lidar based on a measurement of second components emitted in a combustion process. Usually to detect a fire alarm a rapid increase of aerosol amount is measured. If the backscattering signal report a peak, the presences of a forest fire will be probable. Our idea to confirm this hypothesis is measure the second components emitted in a forest fire at the aim to minimize the false alarm. The simulated measurements of the humidity amount within the smoke plume will be carried out by means of Raman analysis. Fixing the burning rate of the vegetable-fuels, the maximum range of detection will be evaluated.

  10. Tagging Water Sources in Atmospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tagging of water sources in atmospheric models allows for quantitative diagnostics of how water is transported from its source region to its sink region. In this presentation, we review how this methodology is applied to global atmospheric models. We will present several applications of the methodology. In one example, the regional sources of water for the North American Monsoon system are evaluated by tagging the surface evaporation. In another example, the tagged water is used to quantify the global water cycling rate and residence time. We will also discuss the need for more research and the importance of these diagnostics in water cycle studies.