Sample records for atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization

  1. Microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Marttila, Seppo J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2004-11-15

    A novel microchip heated nebulizer for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Anisotropic wet etching is used to fabricate the flow channels, inlet, and nozzle on a silicon wafer. An integrated heater of aluminum is sputtered on a glass wafer. The two wafers are jointed by anodic bonding, creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI source with a sample channel in the middle and gas channels symmetrically on both sides. The ionization is initiated with an external corona-discharge needle positioned 2 mm in front of the microchip heated nebulizer. The microchip APCI source provides flow rates down to 50 nL/min, stable long-term analysis with chip lifetime of weeks, good quantitative repeatability (RSD < 10%) and linearity (r(2) > 0.995) with linear dynamic rage of at least 4 orders of magnitude, and cost-efficient manufacturing. The limit of detection (LOD) for acridine measured with microchip APCI at flow rate of 6.2 muL/min was 5 nM, corresponding to a mass flow of 0.52 fmol/s. The LOD with commercial macro-APCI at a flow rate of 1 mL/min for acridine was the same, 5 nM, corresponding to a significantly worse mass flow sensitivity (83 fmol/s) than measured with microchip APCI. The advantages of microchip APCI makes it a very attractive new microfluidic detector. PMID:15538790

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives using alternating current corona discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbaevich; Chen, Lee Chuin; Yu, Zhan; Yamabe, Shinichi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2015-04-01

    Ensuring public safety and security in today's mobile society requires robust detection technologies that are field-deployable and offer ever-improving sensitivity and specificity. Atmospheric pressure ionization is well suited to field-based sampling but pumping requirements to offset high gas loads can restrict an instrument's deployability and detection sensitivity. In the Special Feature, Usmanov and co-workers describe improved detection for nitrogen-containing explosive compounds using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization with an alternating current corona discharge source. An electromolded capillary yields a more stable ac corona allowing it to be positioned within 1mm from the inlet for detection limits in the tens of pg. PMID:26149117

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Eiceman; J. F. Bergloff; J. E. Rodriguez; W. Munro; Z. Karpas

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5?x\\u000a F\\u000a x\\u000a OH where x=0–5) in nitrogen with Cl? as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M·Cl? through ion associations or (M?H)? through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting\\u000a that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID)

  4. Carbon disulfide reagent allows the characterization of nonpolar analytes by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Amundson, Lucas M; Archibold, Enada F; Tan, Xiaoli; Azyat, Khalid; Tykwinski, Rik; Gray, Murray; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-07-30

    While atmospheric pressure ionization methodologies have revolutionized the mass spectrometric analysis of nonvolatile analytes, limitations native to the chemistry of these methodologies hinder or entirely inhibit the analysis of certain analytes, specifically, many nonpolar compounds. Examination of various analytes, including asphaltene and lignin model compounds as well as saturated hydrocarbons, demonstrates that atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using CS(2) as the reagent produces an abundant and stable molecular ion (M(+•)) for all model compounds studied, with the exception of completely saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons and the two amino acids tested, arginine and phenylalanine. This reagent substantially broadens the applicability of mass spectrometry to nonvolatile nonpolar analytes and also facilitates the examination of radical cation chemistry by mass spectrometry. PMID:21698674

  5. Facilities: NHMFL 9.4 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Citation: Atmospheric Pressure Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    : Atmospheric Pressure Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of atmospheric pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption chemical ionization (AP/ LIAD-CI) source. The laser a powerful new approach for the analysis of saturated hydrocarbon mixtures: atmospheric pressure laser

  6. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  7. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  8. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:16642989

  9. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  10. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Molecular ionization is owed much of its development from the early implementation of electron ionization (EI). Although dramatically increasing the library of compounds discovered, an inherent problem with EI was the low abundance of molecular ions detected due to high fragmentation leading to the difficult task of the correct chemical identification after mass spectrometry (MS). These problems stimulated the research into new ionization methods which sought to "soften" the ionization process. In the late 1980s the advancements of ionization techniques was thought to have reached its pinnacle with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Both ionization techniques allowed for "soft" ionization of large molecular weight and/or labile compounds for intact characterization by MS. Albeit pervasive, neither ESI nor MALDI can be viewed as "magic bullet" ionization techniques. Both techniques require sample preparation which often included native sample destruction, and operation of these techniques took place in sealed enclosures and often, reduced pressure conditions. New open-air ionization techniques termed "ambient MS" enable direct analysis of samples of various physical states, sizes and shapes. One particular technique named Direct Analysis In Real Time (DART) has been steadily growing as one of the ambient tools of choice to ionize small molecular weight (< 1000 Da) molecules with a wide range of polarities. Although there is a large list of reported applications using DART as an ionization source, there have not been many studies investigating the fundamental properties of DART desorption and ionization mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis is aimed to provide in depth findings on the physicochemical phenomena during open-air DART desorption and ionization MS and current application developments. A review of recent ambient plasma-based desorption/ionization techniques for analytical MS is presented in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 presents the first investigations into the atmospheric pressure ion transport phenomena during DART analysis. Chapter 3 provides a comparison on the internal energy deposition processes during DART and pneumatically assisted-ESI. Chapter 4 investigates the complex spatially-dependent sampling sensitivity, dynamic range and ion suppression effects present in most DART experiments. New implementations and applications with DART are shown in Chapters 5 and 6. In Chapter 5, DART is coupled to multiplexed drift tube ion mobility spectrometry as a potential fieldable platform for the detection of toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents simulants. In Chapter 6, transmission-mode DART is shown to be an effective method for reproducible sampling from materials which allow for gas to flow through it. Also, Chapter 6 provides a description of a MS imaging platform coupling infrared laser ablation and DART-like phenomena. Finally, in Chapter 7 I will provide perspective on the work completed with DART and the tasks and goals that future studies should focus on.

  11. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiji G. Asano; Michael J. Ford; Bruce A. Tomkins; Gary J. Van Berkel

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly

  12. Stability studies of propoxur herbicide in environmental water samples by liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lei Sun; Hian Kee Lee

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry has been investigated for the analysis of polar pesticides in water. The degradation behavior of propoxur, selected as a model pesticide belonging to the N-methylcarbamate group, in various aqueous matrices (Milli-Q water, drinking water, rain water, seawater and river water) was investigated. Two interfaces of atmospheric pressure ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)

  13. An added dimension: GC atmospheric pressure chemical ionization FTICR MS and the Athabasca oil sands.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Mark P; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V

    2014-08-19

    The Athabasca oil sands industry, an alternative source of petroleum, uses large quantities of water during processing of the oil sands. In keeping with Canadian environmental policy, the processed water cannot be released to natural waters and is thus retained on-site in large tailings ponds. There is an increasing need for further development of analytical methods for environmental monitoring. The following details the first example of the application of gas chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FTICR MS) for the study of environmental samples from the Athabasca region of Canada. APCI offers the advantages of reduced fragmentation compared to other ionization methods and is also more amenable to compounds that are inaccessible by electrospray ionization. The combination of GC with ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry can improve the characterization of complex mixtures where components cannot be resolved by GC alone. This, in turn, affords the ability to monitor extracted ion chromatograms for components of the same nominal mass and isomers in the complex mixtures. The proof of concept work described here is based upon the characterization of one oil sands process water sample and two groundwater samples in the area of oil sands activity. Using the new method, the Ox and OxS compound classes predominated, with OxS classes being particularly relevant to the oil sands industry. The potential to resolve retention times for individual components within the complex mixture, highlighting contributions from isomers, and to characterize retention time profiles for homologous series is shown, in addition to the ability to follow profiles of double bond equivalents and carbon number for a compound class as a function of retention time. The method is shown to be well-suited for environmental forensics. PMID:25036898

  14. Unusual atmospheric pressure chemical ionization conditions for detection of organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, David; Vogel, René; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2003-09-01

    Organic peroxides such as the cumene hydroperoxide I (M(r) = 152 u), the di-tert-butyl peroxide II (M(r) = 146 u) and the tert-butyl peroxybenzoate III (M(r) = 194 u) were analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a water-methanol mixture as solvent with a low flow-rate of mobile phase and unusual conditions of the source temperature (< or =50 degrees C) and probe temperature (70-200 degrees C). The mass spectra of these compounds show the formation of (i) an [M + H](+) ion (m/z 153) for the hydroperoxide I, (ii) a stable adduct [M + CH(3)OH(2)](+) ion (m/z 179) for the dialkyl peroxide II and (iii) several protonated adduct species such as protonated molecules (m/z 195) and different protonated adduct ions (m/z 227, 389 and 421) for the peroxyester III. Tandem mass spectrometric experiments, exact mass measurements and theoretical calculations were performed for characterize these gas-phase ionic species. Using the double-well energy potential model illustrating a gas-phase bimolecular reaction, three important factors are taken into account to propose a qualitative interpretation of peroxide behavior toward the CH(3)OH(2) (+), i.e. thermochemical parameters (DeltaHdegrees(reaction)) and two kinetic factors such as the capture constant of the initial stable ion-dipole and the magnitude of the rate constant of proton transfer reaction into the loose proton bond cluster. PMID:14505320

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives using alternating current corona discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, D T; Chen, L C; Yu, Z; Yamabe, S; Sakaki, S; Hiraoka, K

    2015-04-01

    The high-sensitive detection of explosives is of great importance for social security and safety. In this work, the ion source for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry using alternating current corona discharge was newly designed for the analysis of explosives. An electromolded fine capillary with 115?µm inner diameter and 12?mm long was used for the inlet of the mass spectrometer. The flow rate of air through this capillary was 41?ml/min. Stable corona discharge could be maintained with the position of the discharge needle tip as close as 1?mm to the inlet capillary without causing the arc discharge. Explosives dissolved in 0.5?µl methanol were injected to the ion source. The limits of detection for five explosives with 50?pg or lower were achieved. In the ion/molecule reactions of trinitrotoluene (TNT), the discharge products of NOx (-) (x?=?2,3), O3 and HNO3 originating from plasma-excited air were suggested to contribute to the formation of [TNT?-?H](-) (m/z 226), [TNT?-?NO](-) (m/z 197) and [TNT?-?NO?+?HNO3 ](-) (m/z 260), respectively. Formation processes of these ions were traced by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26149109

  16. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  17. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS. PMID:16804601

  18. Characterization of astaxanthin esters in Haematococcus pluvialis by liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fengping Miao; Dayan Lu; Yeguang Li; Mingtao Zeng

    2006-01-01

    After first being analyzed by HPLC, 4 free carotenoids, 15 astaxanthin monoesters, 12 astaxanthin diesters, and 3 astacin monoesters in Haematococcus pluvialis were identified by liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC–(APCI)MS). Identification of each compound was based on the characteristic fragment ions of the positive ion mode, negative ion mode, and MS2. Astaxanthin esters were identified based on

  19. Alternately pulsed nanoelectrospray ionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for ion/ion reactions in an electrodynamic ion trap.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaorong; Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A

    2006-05-01

    The alternate operation of nanoelectrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, using a common atmosphere/vacuum interface and ion path, has been implemented to facilitate ion/ion reaction experiments in a linear ion trap-based tandem mass spectrometer. The ion sources are operated in opposite polarity modes whereby one of the ion sources is used to form analyte ions while the other is used to form reagent ions of opposite polarity. This combination of ion sources is well-suited to implementation of experiments involving multiply charged ions in reaction with singly charged ions of opposite polarity. Three analytically useful ion/ion reaction types are illustrated: the partial deprotonation of a multiply protonated protein, the partial protonation of a multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide, and electron transfer to a multiply protonated peptide. The approach described herein is attractive in that it enables both single proton-transfer and single electron-transfer ion/ion reaction experiments to be implemented without requiring major modifications to the tandem mass spectrometer hardware. Furthermore, a wide range of reactant ions can be formed with these ionization methods and the pulsed nature of operation appears to lead to no significant compromise in the performance of either ion source. PMID:16643016

  20. Mass spectrometric behavior of anabolic androgenic steroids using gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. Part I: ionization.

    PubMed

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Sancho, J V; Pitarch, E; Hernández, F; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Gómez, C; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2014-06-01

    The detection of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is one of the most important topics in doping control analysis. Gas chromatography coupled to (tandem) mass spectrometry (GC-MS(/MS)) with electron ionization and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry have been traditionally applied for this purpose. However, both approaches still have important limitations, and, therefore, detection of all AAS is currently afforded by the combination of these strategies. Alternative ionization techniques can minimize these drawbacks and help in the implementation of a single method for the detection of AAS. In the present work, a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source commercialized for gas chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer has been tested to evaluate the ionization of 60 model AAS. Underivatized and trimethylsylil (TMS)-derivatized compounds have been investigated. The use of GC-APCI-MS allowed for the ionization of all AAS assayed irrespective of their structure. The presence of water in the source as modifier promoted the formation of protonated molecules ([M+H](+)), becoming the base peak of the spectrum for the majority of studied compounds. Under these conditions, [M+H](+), [M+H-H2O](+) and [M+H-2·H2O](+) for underivatized AAS and [M+H](+), [M+H-TMSOH](+) and [M+H-2·TMSOH](+) for TMS-derivatized AAS were observed as main ions in the spectra. The formed ions preserve the intact steroid skeleton, and, therefore, they might be used as specific precursors in MS/MS-based methods. Additionally, a relationship between the relative abundance of these ions and the AAS structure has been established. This relationship might be useful in the structural elucidation of unknown metabolites. PMID:24913403

  1. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in GC-QTOF MS for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Newton, A; Hancock, P

    2010-08-01

    The potential applications of a new atmospheric pressure source for GC-MS analysis have been investigated in this work. A list of around 100 GC-amenable pesticides, which includes organochlorine, organophosphorus and organonitrogenated compounds, has been used to evaluate their behavior in the new source. Favoring the major formation of the molecular ion in the source has been the main goal due to the wide-scope screening possibilities that this fact brings in comparison with the traditional, highly fragmented electron ionization spectra. Thus, the addition of water as modifier has been tested as a way to promote the generation of protonated molecules. Pesticides investigated have been classified into six groups according to their ionization/fragmentation behavior. Four of them are characterized by the abundant formation of the protonated molecule in the atmospheric pressure source, mostly being the base peak of the spectrum. These results show that wide-scope screening could be easily performed with this source by investigating the presence of the protonated molecule ion, MH+. The developed procedure has been applied to pesticide screening in different food samples (nectarine, orange and spinach) and it has allowed the presence of several pesticides to be confirmed such as chlorpyriphos ethyl, deltamethrin and endosulfan sulfate. The availability of a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument made it feasible to perform additional MS/MS experiments for both standards and samples to go further in the confirmation of the identity of the detected compounds. Results shown in this paper have been obtained using a prototype source which exhibits promising features that could be applied to other analytical problems apart from those illustrated in this work. PMID:20641006

  2. Characterization of polymethoxylated flavones in Fructus aurantii by liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization combined with tandem mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Da-Yong Zhou; De-Liang Chen; Qing Xu; Xing-Ya Xue; Fei-Fang Zhang; Xin-Miao Liang

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) was operated in positive mode (PI) to characterize polymethoxylated flavonoids (PMFs) through its specific radical cations by collision-induced dissociation (CID). The fragments of [M+H?n×15]+ produced by loss of one or more methyl group from the protonated molecule, as well as [M+H?29]+, [M+H?31]+, [M+H?33]+, [M+H?43]+, [M+H?46]+, and [M+H?61]+ fragment ions were detected, which were

  3. Characterization of phthalides in Ligusticum chuanxiong by liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhe; Xiao, Hongbin; Xu, Qing; Li, Xiuling; Wang, Jianing; Liang, Xinmiao

    2003-09-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection interfaced to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) is applied to analyze phthalides from Chuanxiong (the rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong). This herb material, containing plenty of phthalide compositions, is selected as the analytical target in this paper for its hematological activity. Some of the phthalides are not stable and are difficult to analyze by gas chromatography-MS. Under optimized LC-MS-MS conditions, six phthalides in the methanol extract of Chuanxiong are unambiguously identified, and characteristic fragments are obtained using homemade reference standards. Ten other phthalides in the extract are confirmed by means of LC-APCI-MS with positive-negative ion mode and collision-induced dissociation in combination with UV spectrophotometry. The results show that LC-MS-MS is a method of choice for fast detection and detailed structural analysis of such mixtures in the crude extract of Chuanxiong. PMID:14558936

  4. Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure, in Vivo, and Imaging Mass

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure, in Vivo, and Imaging Mass. For example, atmospheric pressure infrared MALDI (AP IR-MALDI), capable of producing ions from small ionization (DESI),5 desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI),6 and matrix- assisted laser

  5. Analysis of intact tetraether lipids in archaeal cell material and sediments by high performance liquid chromatography\\/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Sinninghe Damsté; E. C. Hopmans; S. Schouten; R. D. Pancost; M. T. J. van der Meer

    2000-01-01

    A method combining normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with positive ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) was developed for the analysis of intact glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in archaeal cell material and sediments. All GDGTs previously reported to occur in the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus could be identified based on their mass spectra and retention

  6. Analysis of toxic norditerpenoid alkaloids in Delphinium species by electrospray, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and sequential tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D R; Panter, K E; Pfister, J A; Knight, A P

    1999-12-01

    A rapid electrospray mass spectrometry method was developed for screening larkspur (Delphinium spp.) plant material for toxic norditerpenoid alkaloids. The method was calibrated using two standard alkaloids, methyllycaconitine (1) and deltaline (2), with a recovery of 92% from spiked samples and relative standard deviations of 6.0% and 8.1% for the two alkaloids, respectively. Thirty-three samples of plains larkspur, Delphinium geyeri, were analyzed. Methyllycaconitine (1) concentration was 0.27% +/- 0.08% during a 1-month period in 1997 establishing the relative risk of poisoning from the plant to be low. The method was also applied to the trace analysis (<1 ppm) of 1 in serum samples from sheep dosed different levels of the alkaloid. Electrospray ionization combined with sequential tandem mass spectrometry and HPLC coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry were used to detect and tentatively identify three new norditerpenoid alkaloids from Delphinium nuttallianum [bearline (6), 14-acetylbearline (7), 16-deacetylgeyerline (8)]. The tentative structure of the new alkaloids was predicted from the tandem mass spectra fragmentation patterns and assigning the substitution pattern for methoxy and acetyl groups at the C-14 and C-16 carbons. PMID:10606571

  7. Accurate quantitation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and its degradation products using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brust, Hanneke; van Asten, Arian; Koeberg, Mattijs; Dalmolen, Jan; van der Heijden, Antoine; Schoenmakers, Peter

    2014-04-18

    After an explosion of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), its degradation products pentaerythritol trinitrate (PETriN), dinitrate (PEDiN) and mononitrate (PEMN) were detected using liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). Discrimination between post-explosion and naturally degraded PETN could be achieved based on the relative amounts of the degradation products. This information can be used as evidence when investigating a possible relationship between a suspect and a post-explosion crime scene. The present work focuses on accurate quantitation of PETN and its degradation products, using PETriN, PEDiN and PEMN standards specifically synthesized for this purpose. With the use of these standards, the ionization behavior of these compounds was studied, and a quantitative method was developed. Quantitation of PETN and trace levels of its degradation products was shown to be possible with accuracy between 85.7% and 103.7% and a precision ranging from 1.3% to 11.5%. The custom-made standards resulted in a more robust and reliable method to discriminate between post-explosion and naturally-degraded PETN. PMID:24656542

  8. Determination of chlorantraniliprole residues in crops by liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grant, Joann; Rodgers, Carol A; Chickering, Clark D; Hill, Sidney J; Stry, James J

    2010-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for the determination of chlorantraniliprole residues in crops. Chlorantraniliprole residues were extracted from crop matrixes with acetonitrile after a water soak. The extracts were passed through a strong anion-exchange (SAX) SPE cartridge stacked on top of a reversed-phase (RP) polymer cartridge. After both cartridges were rinsed and vacuum-dried, the SAX cartridge was removed, and chlorantraniliprole was eluted from the RP polymer cartridge with acetonitrile. The acetonitrile eluate was evaporated to dryness, reconstituted, and analyzed using an LC/MS/MS instrument equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. The method was successfully validated at 0.010, 0.10, and 10 mg/kg for the following crop matrixes: potatoes, sugar beets (tops), lettuce, broccoli, soybeans, soybean forage, tomatoes, cucumbers, oranges, apples, pears, peaches, almonds (nutmeat), rice grain, wheat grain, wheat hay, corn stover, alfalfa forage, cottonseed, grapes, and corn grain. The average recoveries from all crop samples fortified at the method LOQ ranged from 91 to 108%, with an overall average recovery of 97%. The average recoveries from all crop samples fortified at 10 times the method LOQ ranged from 89 to 115%, with an overall average recovery of 101%. For all of the fortified control samples analyzed in this study, the overall average recovery was 99%. PMID:20922964

  9. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Keiji G [ORNL; Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  10. Analysis of underivatized amphetamines and related phenethylamines with high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bogusz, M J; Krüger, K D; Maier, R D

    2000-03-01

    Amphetamine, methamphetamine, illicit designer phenethylamines (MDA, MDEA, MDMA, MBDB, and BDMPEA), and other phenethylamines (benzyl-1-phenylethylamine, cathinone, ephedrine, fenfluramine, norfenfluramine, phentermine, 1-phenylethylamine, phenylpropanolamine, and propylhexedrine) were extracted from serum using a solid-phase extraction procedure. The extracts were examined with high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). The drugs were separated on ODS column in acetonitrile/50 mM ammonium formate buffer (pH 3.0) (25:75) as a mobile phase. Full-scan mass spectra of drugs examined by means of APCI with collision-induced dissociation showed protonated molecular ions and fragments typical for particular drugs. LC-APCI-MS allowed an unequivocal differentiation of all drugs involved. The quantitation was performed using selected ion monitoring of protonated molecular ions and fragments of drugs involved and their deuterated analogues. The limits of detection ranged from 1 to 5 microg/L serum, and the recoveries ranged from 58 to 96%. A linear response was observed for all drugs in the range from 5 to 500 microg/L. The method was applied for routine determination of amphetamine, MDMA, MDA, and MDEA in one run. Solid-phase extraction used assured simultaneous isolation of various groups of basic drugs of forensic interest (opiates, cocaines, phenethylamines, and benzodiazepines) from biofluids. PMID:10732943

  11. Sensitive and specific determination of clindamycin in human serum and bone tissue applying liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization–mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Martens-Lobenhoffer; P. Banditt

    2001-01-01

    A method for the quantification of clindamycin in human serum and in human bone tissue samples applying high-performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization–mass spectrometry (APCI–MS) is presented. Lincomycin is used as the internal standard. Serum samples are prepared only by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Bone tissue samples have to be crushed and homogenized in extraction buffer prior to

  12. Quantitative analysis of levamisole in porcine tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Cherlet; Siegrid De Baere; Siska Croubels; Patrick De Backer

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the development and the validation of an LC–MS–MS method with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the quantitative determination of levamisole, an anthelmintic for veterinary use, in porcine tissue samples. A liquid–liquid back extraction procedure using hexane–isoamylalcohol (95:5, v\\/v) as extraction solvent was followed by a solid-phase extraction procedure using an SCX column to clean up the tissue

  13. Determination of imidacloprid, metalaxyl, myclobutanil, propham, and thiabendazole in fruits and vegetables by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ximo Pous; Yolanda Picó

    2001-01-01

    Imidacloprid, metalaxyl, myclobutanil, propham, and thiabendazole have been simultaneously determined in strawberries, oranges, potatoes, pears, and melons by matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) in positive-ion mode. The samples were homogenized with C8 bonded silica as MSPD sorbent, placed in a glass column, and eluted with dichloromethane. Chromatographic separation of the compounds was

  14. Identification of acylated xanthone glycosides by liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes from the lichen Umbilicaria proboscidea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomᚠ?ezanka; Valery M. Dembitsky

    2003-01-01

    The xanthoside composition of the crude extract of Umbilicaria proboscidea (L.) Schrader was characterized using LC–UV diode array detection and LC–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS methods. The presence of acylated xanthone-O-glucosides was determined by both positive and negative ion LC–APCI-MS methods. Based on UV and MS spectral data and NMR spectroscopy, a total of 14 compounds (6-O-acylated umbilicaxanthosides A

  15. Multiple-stage mass spectrometric analysis of six pesticides in oranges by liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization–ion trap mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Blasco; Yolanda Picó

    2004-01-01

    Six pesticides were determined by liquid chromatography (LC) with positive ion (PI) atmospheric pressure chemical ionization quadrupole ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (APCI–MS–MS). Ion fragmentation was studied by MS, MS2 and MS3. Fragmentation of the pesticides produced ions formed by various losses from the side-chains and through heterocyclic ring opening, but without any common fragmentation pathway. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of

  16. Improved quantitative detection of 11 urinary phthalate metabolites in humans using liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manori J Silva; Nicole A Malek; Carolyn C Hodge; John A Reidy; Kayoko Kato; Dana B Barr; Larry L Needham; John W Brock

    2003-01-01

    Phthalates are widely used as industrial solvents and plasticizers, with global use exceeding four million tons per year. We improved our previously developed high-performance liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC–APCI-MS\\/MS) method to measure urinary phthalate metabolites by increasing the selectivity and the sensitivity by better resolving them from the solvent front, adding three more phthalate metabolites, monomethyl phthalate

  17. Determination of Melamine and Derivatives in Foods by Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Diode Array Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pilar Viñas; Natalia Campillo; Gema Férez-Melgarejo; Manuel Hernández-Córdoba

    2012-01-01

    Two liquid chromatographic methods based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) and diode array detection (DAD) are evaluated for the rapid determination of melamine (MEL) and structurally related compounds, including ammeline (AMN), ammelide (AMD) and cyanuric acid (CA) in foods. Both procedures used ion-exchange LC and isocratic elution. Samples were extracted by homogenization with acetonitrile\\/water\\/diethylamine. Specificity was demonstrated

  18. Quantitative analysis of adenosine using liquid chromatography\\/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC\\/APCI-MS\\/MS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annelies Van Dycke; Alain Verstraete; Kristof Pil; Robrecht Raedt; Kristl Vonck; Detlev Boison; Paul Boon

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine-secreting cellular brain implants constitute a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of epilepsy. To engineer neural stem cells for therapeutic adenosine delivery, a reliable and fast analytical method is necessary to quantify cell-based adenosine release. Here we describe the development, optimization and validation of adenosine measurement using liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–APCI-MS\\/MS). LC–MS\\/MS in positive ion

  19. Rapid and sensitive analysis of azadirachtin and related triterpenoids from Neem ( Azadirachta indica) by high-performance liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Otmar Schaaf; Andrew P Jarvis; S. Andrew van der Esch; Germina Giagnacovo; Neil J Oldham

    2000-01-01

    Based on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry, a HPLC–MS method was developed to permit the rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of azadirachtin and related tetranortriterpenoids from seeds and tissue cultures of Neem (Azadirachta indica). APCI+ standard scanning mass spectra of the major Neem triterpenoids were recorded and utilized to select suitable ions

  20. Total microcystins analysis in water using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Fayad, Paul B; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-04-11

    A new approach for the analysis of the cyanobacterial microcystins (MCs) in environmental water matrices has been developed. It offers a cost efficient alternative method for the fast quantification of total MCs using mass spectrometry. This approach permits the quantification of total MCs concentrations without requiring any derivatization or the use of a suite of MCs standards. The oxidation product 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) was formed through a Lemieux oxidation and represented the total concentration of free and bound MCs in water samples. MMPB was analyzed using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). LDTD is a robust and reliable sample introduction method with ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s sample(-1)). Several oxidation and LDTD parameters were optimized to improve recoveries and signal intensity. MCs oxidation recovery yield was 103%, showing a complete reaction. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the use of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PB) as internal standard and showed good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.9 ?g L(-1), respectively. These values are comparable with the WHO (World Health Organization) guideline of 1 ?g L(-1) for total microcystin-LR congener in drinking water. Accuracy and interday/intraday variation coefficients were below 15%. Matrix effect was determined with a recovery of 91%, showing no significant signal suppression. This work demonstrates the use of the LDTD-APCI-MS/MS interface for the screening, detection and quantification of total MCs in complex environmental matrices. PMID:24745740

  1. Determination of nitrated phenolic compounds in rain by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Martin; Heeb, Norbert V

    2003-07-01

    A sensitive, specific, and rapid analytical method based on liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for trace analysis of nitrated phenolic compounds in rain samples. Selective detection in the low nanogram-per-milliliter range was achieved on the basis of selected ion monitoring of the respective phenolate anions [M - H]-. The presence of alkylated (C1-C3) and nonalkylated nitrophenols (C0) was confirmed by their characteristic neutral loss of nitrogen dioxide upon collision-induced dissociation in tandem mass spectrometry mode. In individual rain samples, 27 C0-C3-nitrophenol isomers as well as 16 C0-C3-dinitrophenol isomers were detected. Total levels of nitro- and dinitrophenol isomers were estimated on the basis of 2-nitrophenol and 2,6-dinitrophenol. Concentrations between 0.66 and 2.0, 12-29, 12-36, and 5.5-12 microg/L were obtained for the C0-, C1-, C2-, and C3-nitrophenols, respectively. Lower levels of 0.19-1.4, 0.39-2.1, 0.053-0.55, and 0.081-0.10 microg/L were estimated for the corresponding C0-, C1-, C2-, and C3-dinitrophenols. The highest number of individual isomers was found in winter rain samples, and distinctive isomeric patterns were observed for individual samples. Mono- and dialkylated nitrophenols and non- and monoalkylated dinitrophenols represent the major part of nitro- and dinitrophenol species. Comparing the pattern of Co-, C1-, and C2-nitrophenols in rain with the corresponding Co-, C1-, and C2-benzene pattern in ambient air suggests that atmospheric oxidation and nitration processes of alkylbenzenes are favored, as compared to those of benzene. PMID:12964759

  2. Gas-phase Meerwein reaction of epoxides with protonated acetonitrile generated by atmospheric pressure ionizations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lianming Wu; David Q. Liu; Alireza S. Kord

    2010-01-01

    Ethylnitrilium ion can be generated by protonation of acetonitrile (when used as the LC-MS mobile phase) under the conditions\\u000a of atmospheric pressure ionizations, including electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization\\u000a (APCI) as well as atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Ethylnitrilium ion ($$CH_3 - C \\\\equiv \\\\mathop N\\\\limits^ + H$$ and its canonical form $$CH_3 - \\\\mathop C\\\\limits^ + =

  3. Atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Furuya, Hiroko; Okazaki, Shigemitsu

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study on the atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization (APP(e)I) of gaseous organic compounds with Ar* has been made. The metastable argon atoms (Ar*: 11.55 eV for (3)P(2) and 11.72 eV for (3)P(0)) were generated by the negative-mode corona discharge of atmospheric-pressure argon gas. By applying a high positive voltage (+500 to +1000 V) to the stainless steel capillary for the sample introduction (0.1 mm i.d., 0.3 mm o.d.), strong ion signals could be obtained. The ions formed were sampled through an orifice into the vacuum and mass-analyzed by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The major ions formed by APP(e)I are found to be molecular-related ions for alkanes, aromatics, and oxygen-containing compounds. Because only the molecules with ionization energies less than the internal energy of Ar* are ionized, the present method will be a selective and highly sensitive interface for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. PMID:15384154

  4. Alternately Pulsed Nano-electrospray Ionization/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization for Ion/Ion Reactions in an Electrodynamic Ion Trap

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaorong; Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The alternate operation of nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), using a common atmosphere/vacuum interface and ion path, has been implemented to facilitate ion/ion reaction experiments in a linear ion trap-based tandem mass spectrometer. The ion sources are operated in opposite polarity modes whereby one of the ion sources is used to form analyte ions while the other is used to form reagent ions of opposite polarity. This combination of ion sources is well-suited to implementation of experiments involving multiply charged ions in reaction with singly charged ions of opposite polarity. Three analytically useful ion/ion reactions types are illustrated: the partial deprotonation of a multiply protonated protein, the partial protonation of a multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide, and electron transfer to a multiply protonated peptide. The approach described herein is attractive in that it enables both single proton transfer and single electron transfer ion/ion reaction experiments to be implemented without requiring major modifications to the tandem mass spectrometer hardware. Furthermore, a wide range of reactant ions can be formed with these ionization methods and the pulsed nature of operation appears to lead to no significant compromise in the performance of either ion source. PMID:16643016

  5. Identification of ubiquinones and menaquinones in activated sludge by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng-chun; Yang, Min; Hu, Jian-ying; Shao, Bing; Zhang, Hai-feng; Li, Hong-yan

    2003-07-25

    A sensitive analytical method has been developed for identification of ubiquinones (UQ-n(Hx)) and menaquinones (MK-n(Hx)) in activated sludge by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in negative mode (LC-NI-APCI-MS). Extraction and clean-up of samples were carried out on Sep-Pak Plus Silica solid-phase extraction cartridges. Complete separation of quinones was achieved with an ODS analytical column and using isopropyl ether-methanol (17:83, v/v) as the mobile phase. The compositions of ubiquinones and menaquinones were determined directly using combined information on retention time, the molecular ion mass and fragment ion masses. The lowest instrument quantitative detection limits (LODinst) for UQ-6, UQ-10, and Vitamin K1 were estimated to be 0.4, 4 and 0.12 ng (S/N = 10) using LC-NI-APCI-MS in SIM mode, and the lowest method detection limits (LODmeth) achieved by spiking experiment were estimated to be 0.2, 2 and 0.06 microg/g for UQ-6, UQ-10 and Vitamin K1, respectively. On the other hand, the LODinst for UQ-6, UQ-10, and Vitamin K1 were estimated to be 10, 100 and 2 ng (S/N = 10) using LC-NI-APCI-MS in full-scan mode, and the LODmeth were estimated to be 7, 60 and 1.2 microg/g for UQ-6, UQ-10, and Vitamin K1, respectively. Both LC-NI-APCI-MS and LC-UV/DAD were applied in the analysis of an activated sludge extract. UQ-n (n = 6-10), MK-n (n = 6-10), MK-n(H2) (n = 7-10), MK-n(H4) (n = 8-9) and MK-8(H6) were detected by LC-NI-APCI-MS, while UQ-6, UQ-7, MK-7(H), MK-9 and MK-10(H2) were not found by LC-UV/DAD. These results suggest that LC-NI-APCI-MS is more sensitive than LC-UV/DAD for the analysis of quinones in environmental samples such as sediment, activated sludge and bio-film in biological processes and other aquatic environments. PMID:12924548

  6. Characterization of Nonpolar Lipids and Selected Steroids by Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Chemical Ionization, Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization, and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Daiya, Shivani; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5?-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and ?-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H2O) with the ClMn(H2O)+ ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H2O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H2O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids. PMID:21528012

  7. Characterization of nonpolar lipids and steroids by using laser-induced acoustic desorption/chemical ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Daiya, S.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5?-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and ?-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H{sub 2}O) upon reaction with the ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H{sub 2}O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H{sub 2}O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids.

  8. Liquid chromatography\\/atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry in drug metabolism studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Kostiainen; T. Kotiaho; T. Kuuranne; S. Auriola

    2003-01-01

    Thestudyofthemetabolicfateofdrugs isanessentialand importantpartofthedrug developmentprocess. The analysis of metabolites is a challenging task and several different analytical methods have been used in these studies. However, after the introduction of the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) technique, electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, liquid chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (LC\\/MS) has become an important and widely used method in the analysis of metabolites owing to its

  9. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  10. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-01

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 ?g/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 ?g/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring. PMID:23339735

  11. Identification of acylated xanthone glycosides by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes from the lichen Umbilicaria proboscidea.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2003-05-01

    The xanthoside composition of the crude extract of Umbilicaria proboscidea (L.) Schrader was characterized using LC-UV diode array detection and LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS methods. The presence of acylated xanthone-O-glucosides was determined by both positive and negative ion LC-APCI-MS methods. Based on UV and MS spectral data and NMR spectroscopy, a total of 14 compounds (6-O-acylated umbilicaxanthosides A and B) were identified in U. proboscidea for the first time. In order to further develop the applicability of LC-MS techniques in phytochemical characterization, the effect of different ionization energy on fragmentation was studied using APCI. The optimal ionization conditions were achieved in positive ion APCI by using ammonium acetate buffer and in negative ion APCI by using formic acid (pH 4). PMID:12800927

  12. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 ?g/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 ?g/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene. PMID:25885756

  13. Differentiation of regioisomeric aromatic ketocarboxylic acids by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization CAD tandem mass spectrometry in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Lucas M.; Owen, Ben C.; Gallardo, Vanessa A.; Habicht, S. C.; Fu, M.; Shea, R. C.; Mossman, A. B.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Positive-mode atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS n ) was tested for the differentiation of regioisomeric aromatic ketocarboxylic acids. Each analyte forms exclusively an abundant protonated molecule upon ionization via positive-mode APCI in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Energy-resolved collision-activated dissociation (CAD) experiments carried out on the protonated analytes revealed fragmentation patterns that varied based on the location of the functional groups. Unambiguous differentiation between the regioisomers was achieved in each case by observing different fragmentation patterns, different relative abundances of ion-molecule reaction products, or different relative abundances of fragment ions formed at different collision energies. The mechanisms of some of the reactions were examined by H/D exchange reactions and molecular orbital calculations.

  14. Hop as an interesting source of resveratrol for brewers: optimization of the extraction and quantitative study by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callemien, Delphine; Jerkovic, Vesna; Rozenberg, Raoul; Collin, Sonia

    2005-01-26

    Nowadays, hop is used almost exclusively by brewers for bitterness and flavor. Although hop polyphenols have been widely studied in the past decade for their antioxidant activity in the boiling kettle, very little is known about their real impact on health. The discovery of resveratrol in hop pellets highlights the potential health-promoting effect of moderate beer consumption. Here, we have optimized a quantitative extraction procedure for resveratrol in hop pellets. Preliminary removal of hydrophobic bitter compounds with toluene and cyclohexane at room temperature allows 99% trans-resveratrol recovery by ethanol:water (75:25, v/v) solid/liquid extraction at 60 degrees C. Reverse phase liquid chromatography proves an excellent means of separating isomers. In addition, we have compared two mass spectrometry ionization methods-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI)-in both the positive and the negative modes. On the basis of standard additions applied with the optimized extraction procedure and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography-APCI(+)-tandem mass spectrometry, it appears that Tomahawk hop pellets (T90, harvest 2002) contain 0.5 ppm trans-resveratrol, 2 ppm trans-piceid, no cis-resveratrol, and 0.9 ppm cis-piceid. PMID:15656683

  15. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer ?-? interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed using principal component analysis. The results of the principal component analysis enabled a clear identification of different plant oils. By using this two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system coupled with principal component analysis, adulterated soybean oils with 5% added lord oil and peanut oils with 5% added soybean oil can be clearly identified. PMID:26070817

  16. Trace analysis of selected hormones and sterols in river sediments by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mati?, Ivana; Gruji?, Svetlana; Jaukovi?, Zorica; Lauševi?, Mila

    2014-10-17

    In this paper, development and optimization of new LC-MS method for determination of twenty selected hormones, human/animal and plant sterols in river sediments were described. Sediment samples were prepared using ultrasonic extraction and clean up with silica gel/anhydrous sodium sulphate cartridge. Extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The optimized extraction parameters were extraction solvent (methanol), weight of the sediment (2 g) and time of ultrasonic extraction (3× 10 min). Successful chromatographic separation of hormones (estriol and estrone, 17?- and 17?-estradiol) and four human/animal sterols (epicoprostanol, coprostanol, ?-cholestanol and ?-cholestanol) that have identical fragmentation reactions was achieved. The developed and optimized method provided high recoveries (73-118%), low limits of detection (0.8-18 ng g(-1)) and quantification (2.5-60 ng g(-1)) with the RSDs generally lower than 20%. Applicability of the developed method was confirmed by analysis of six river sediment samples. A widespread occurrence of human/animal and plant sterols was found. The only detected hormone was mestranol in just one sediment sample. PMID:25182857

  17. Identification and quantification of antitumor thioproline and methylthioproline in Korean traditional foods by a liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hyo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-11-01

    A liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-APCI-MS/MS) has been developed for the sensitive determination of antitumor thioproline and methylthioproline from fermented foods. Thioproline and methylthioproline were derivatized in one step with ethyl chloroformate at room temperature. These compounds were identified and quantified in various traditional Korean fermented foods by LC-APCI-MS/MS. The concentration range of thioproline of each food was found for doenjang (0.011-0.032mg/kg), gochujang (0.010-0.038mg/kg), and ganjang (0.010-0.038mg/kg). Those of methylthioproline of each food was found for doenjang (0.098-0.632mg/kg), gochujang (0.015-0.112mg/kg), and ganjang (0.023-1.468mg/kg). A prolonged aging time leads to an increase in both the thioproline and methylthioproline contents, suggesting that the storage time plays a key role in the formation of thioproline and methylthioproline in Korean traditional foods. The results here suggest that thioproline and methylthioproline are related to the biological activities of traditional Korean fermented foods. PMID:25128876

  18. In-source fragmentation of partially oxidized mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography

    PubMed

    Letzel; Poschl; Rosenberg; Grasserbauer; Niessner

    1999-01-01

    Partially oxidized derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to be important environmental pollutants. For the identification of these substances in complex mixtures, e.g. atmospheric aerosol samples, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC/APCI-MS) has been found to be a suitable analytical technique. In this study 31 derivatives of mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with up to five condensed aromatic rings carrying different functional groups (carboxyl, dicarboxylic anhydride, lactone, hydroxyl, and carbonyl) were characterized by LC/APCI-MS. Each substance was measured in positive and negative ion detection mode at four different fragmentor voltages (90 to 190 V). For the first time, the results show that characteristic and well-interpretable fragmentation patterns can be obtained for these classes of compounds by in-source collision-induced dissociation in a single quadrupole LC/APCI-MS system. For each class of compounds typical spectral features and optimum measurement conditions are reported, and fragmentation pathways are proposed. The study demonstrates the applicability of LC/APCI-MS for the determination of most of the investigated compounds at trace levels, and it provides a database for the identification of unknown partially oxidized aromatic hydrocarbons. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10589094

  19. Phenyl-modified reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry: a universal method for the analysis of partially oxidized aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Letzel, T; Pöschl, U; Wissiack, R; Rosenberg, E; Grasserbauer, M; Niessner, R

    2001-04-01

    A new liquid chromatographic method for the efficient separation of aromatic compounds having a wide range of sizes, molecular structures, and polarities has been developed. Based on a phenyl-modified silica reversed stationary phase and a methanol-water solvent gradient, it allows the separation of mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) having up to five condensed aromatic rings and partially oxidized derivatives within a single chromatographic run of 40-min duration. The applicability of the method is demonstrated using 81 reference substances (PAHs, phenols, quinones, acids, lactones, esters, etc.) and real samples of environmental, medical, and technical relevance (ozonized PAHs, lake water, human urine, diesel exhaust condensates). The retention times of the investigated aromatics exhibit a regular increase with molecular mass and a systematic decrease with increasing number and polarity of functional groups. In case of intramolecular hydrogen bonding, a positive shift of retention time provides additional structural information. The combination of chromatographic retention time with the molecular mass and structural information from mass spectrometric detection allows the tentative identification of unknown aromatic analytes at trace levels, even without specific reference substances. With atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), low detection limits and highly informative fragmentation patterns can be obtained by in-source collision-induced fragmentation in a single-quadrupole LC-APCI-MS system as applied in this study, and multidimensional MS experiments are expected to further enhance the potential of the presented method. PMID:11321321

  20. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cva?ka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa. Graphical Abstract The diagnostic fragments in the APCI PQD MS(2) spectrum of the [M + 55](+•) adduct of triolein. PMID:25701424

  1. Characterization of HOCl using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy E. Caldwell; K. L. Foster; Thorsten Benter; Sarka Langer; John C. Hemminger; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

    1999-01-01

    HOCl is an important intermediate in stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry. Although it can be readily measured in laboratory systems at low pressures (â¤20 Torr) using conventional electron impact ionization mass spectrometry, there is a need for a measurement technique that can operate at higher pressures, up to 1 atm in air. One such technique seeing increasing use is atmospheric pressure

  2. Flavor release measurement by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, construction of interface and mathematical modeling of release profiles.

    PubMed

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Madsen, Henrik; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Bredie, Wender L P; Stahnke, Louise H; Refsgaard, Hanne H F

    2003-02-01

    An instrumental on-line retronasal flavor analysis was developed to obtain information about the release of flavor compounds in expired air from humans during eating. The volatile flavor compounds were measured by ion trap mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (APCI). An interface was designed to sample the breath directly from the nose. The repeatability in vitro for seven different flavor compounds came out with relative standard derivation less than 10% in most cases, which is acceptable. In vitro quantification was carried out by a determination of the concentration in the gas phase over a flavor solution by GC/MS, followed by measurements of intensities by the APCI ion trap. Ion suppression by acetone in the breath was negligible at concentration levels relevant in these experiments. The instrumental limits of detection for menthone and menthol coincide with that of the flavor detection threshold. An application study on the release of menthone and menthol from chewing gum by a group of six test persons was performed. Flavored chewing gum was used as a model matrix because of the long chewing periods and the simplicity of the system. It is concluded that the interface and the method can be used to measure breath from the nose. A mathematical model of the data was developed to give a quantitative method for description and characterization of the release of flavor compounds. The release profiles consisted of two sequences, one for a chewing period, and one for a phasing out process. The proposed method for modeling provided a reasonable description of the release process. In addition to flavor compounds, this new interface and mathematical application could provide information on chemicals in the human breath, which could be interesting, for example, within medical diagnosis. PMID:12585498

  3. High-Throughput Walkthrough Detection Portal as a Measure for Counter Terrorism: Design of a Vapor Sampler for Detecting Triacetone Triperoxide Vapor by Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical-Ionization Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuaki Takada; Yasutaka Suzuki; Hisashi Nagano; Masuyuki Sugiyama; Eri Nakajima; Masakazu Sugaya; Yuichiro Hashimoto; Minoru Sakairi

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to prevent terrorist attacks in places where many people are coming and going, we have been developing a “high-throughput detection portal system.” The portal system consists of a vapor sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization ion source, and an explosives detector based on ion-trap mass spectrometry. The vapor sampler was designed to be installed in an automated ticket gate of a

  4. Screening for library-assisted identification and fully validated quantification of 22 beta-blockers in blood plasma by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans H. Maurer; Oliver Tenberken; Carsten Kratzsch; Armin A. Weber; Frank T. Peters

    2004-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic–mass spectrometric assay with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC–APCI–MS) is presented for screening for, library-assisted identification (both in scan mode) and quantification (selected-ion mode) of the beta-blockers acebutolol, diacetolol, alprenolol, atenolol, betaxolol, bisoprolol, bupranolol, carazolol, carteolol, carvedilol, celiprolol, esmolol, labetalol, metoprolol, nadolol, nebivolol, oxprenolol, penbutolol, propranolol, sotalol, talinolol and timolol in blood plasma after mixed-mode (HCX) solid-phase extraction

  5. Quantitative determination of endogenous sorbitol and fructose in human nerve tissues by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, H R; Takagaki, T; Foltz, R L; Bennett, P

    2005-01-01

    Attachment of anions to sorbitol and fructose has been shown to enhance sensitivity in both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. The post-column addition of CHCl3 produced Cl-adducts of sorbitol and fructose but their signals were suppressed due to the elevated background. Different chlorinated compounds and different additive methods were systematically investigated to form more abundant Cl-adduct precursor ions and deprotonated product ions. The major causes of the high background were explored and effective methods were developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratios and reproducibility. The compositions of mobile phase, percentages of organic modifiers (MeCN, MeOH and water), columns, oven temperature, flow rates and different gradients were investigated to separate sorbitol from fructose along with their isomers including glucose, galactose, mannose, sorbose, mannitol, and dulcitol. The optimized separation was achieved on a Luna 5 mu NH2 100A column (150 x 4.6 mm) using a mobile phase containing MeCN with 0.1% of CH2Cl2 and 50% MeOH in water at a flow rate of 800 microL/min and an oven temperature of 40 degrees C using a gradient liquid chromatography (LC) system. Human nerve tissue samples were extracted by protein precipitation followed by mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. The LC/ESI-MS/MS method produced higher peak intensities than LC/APCI-MS/MS. However, there were matrix effects from extracted tissues in LC/ESI-MS/MS but not in LC/APCI-MS/MS. Consequently, APCI proved to be the more effective method of ionization. Then the LC/APCI-MS/MS method was fully validated and successfully applied to analysis of clinical samples. The concentrations of endogenous sorbitol and fructose were determined using calibration curves employing sorbitol-13C6 and fructose-13C6 as surrogate analytes. The method has provided excellent intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy with linear ranges of 0.2-80 ng/mg for sorbitol and 1-400 ng/mg for fructose in human nerve tissues. PMID:16034846

  6. Analysis of trimethoprim, lincomycin, sulfadoxin and tylosin in swine manure using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Massé, Daniel; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A new extraction method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the determination of four veterinary antibiotics. The analytes belong to different groups of antibiotics such as chemotherapeutics, sulfonamides, lincosamides and macrolides. Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfadoxin (SFX), lincomycin (LCM) and tylosin (TYL) were extracted from lyophilized manure using a sonication extraction. McIlvaine buffer and methanol (MeOH) were used as extraction buffers, followed by cation-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) for clean-up. Analysis was performed by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical-ionization (LDTD-APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The LDTD is a high throughput sample introduction method that reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample, compared to minutes when using traditional liquid chromatography (LC). Various SPE parameters were optimized after sample extraction: the stationary phase, the extraction solvent composition, the quantity of sample extracted and sample pH. LDTD parameters were also optimized: solvent deposition, carrier gas, laser power and corona discharge. The method limit of detection (MLD) ranged from 2.5 to 8.3 µg kg(-1) while the method limit of quantification (MLQ) ranged from 8.3 to 28µgkg(-1). Calibration curves in the manure matrix showed good linearity (R(2)? 0.996) for all analytes and the interday and intraday coefficients of variation were below 14%. Recoveries of analytes from manure ranged from 53% to 69%. The method was successfully applied to real manure samples. PMID:25059125

  7. Determination of total nitrofuran metabolites in shrimp muscle using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode.

    PubMed

    An, Haejung; Henry, Mark; Cain, Teresa; Tran, Bichsa; Paek, Han Chol; Farley, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The method of MacMahon and Lohne for analysis of nitrofuran metabolites in shrimp was optimized to streamline the extraction processes and the LC analysis. This revised method includes 16 h of mild acid hydrolysis/derivatization followed by ethyl acetate extraction and analysis by LC/MS/MS in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode. This revised method was validated in shrimp for concentrations of 0.25 to 2.0 ng/g. The LOQ was 0.25 ng/g for all metabolites. The LOD was 0.052 nglg for 1-aminohydantoin (AHD), 0.206 ng/g for 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), 0.108 ng/g for semicarbazide (SC), and 0.062 ng/g for 3-amino-5-morpholinomethyl-2-oxazolidinone (AMOZ). The spike recoveries with RSD into negative matrix at 1 ng/g were 100.2% (3.2%) for AHD, 102.5% (1.0%) for AOZ, 103.7% (2.3%) for SC, and 104.0% (3.3%) for AMOZ. The spike recoveries at 1 ng/g into unknown samples (n=108) containing varied levels of nitrofuran metabolites were 112.6% (25.7%) for AHD, 108.1% (12.1%) for AOZ, 103.0% (12.0%) for SC, and 100.3% (6.9%) for AMOZ. Interday precision with samples containing incurred AOZ concentrations of 0.92 to 17.8 ppb performed over a year was 10.4% RSD. The method is accurate and precise for determining nitrofuran concentrations in the edible tissue of shrimp. PMID:22970594

  8. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI. PMID:25828352

  9. Ionization of EPA Contaminants in Direct and Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization and Atmospheric Pressure Laser Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  10. Laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry applied for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanshoeft, Christian; Heudi, Olivier; Leuthold, Luc Alexis; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Elbast, Walid; Picard, Franck; Kretz, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive and ultra-fast method utilizing the laser diode thermal desorption ion source using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of BKM120, an investigational anticancer drug in human plasma. Samples originating from protein precipitation (PP) followed by salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) were spotted onto the LazWell™ plate prior to their thermal desorption and detection by tandem mass spectrometry in positive mode. The validated method described in this paper presents a high absolute extraction recovery (>90 %) for BKM120 and its internal standard (ISTD) [D8]BKM120, with precision and accuracy meeting the acceptance criteria. Standard curves were linear over the range of 5.00 to 2000 ng mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination (R (2)) >0.995. The method specificity was demonstrated in six different batches of human plasma. Intra- and inter-run precision as well as accuracy within ±20 % at the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and ±15 % (other levels) were achieved during a three-run validation for quality control (QC) samples. The post-preparative stability on the LazWell™ plate at room temperature was 72 h and a 200-fold dilution of spiked samples was demonstrated. The method was applied successfully to three clinical studies (n?=?847) and cross-checked with the validated LC-ESI-MS/MS reference method. The sample analysis run time was 10 s as compared to 4.5 min for the current validated LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The resultant data were in agreement with the results obtained using the validated reference LC-ESI-MS/MS assay and the same pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated for both analytical assays. This work demonstrates that LDTD-APCI-MS/MS is a reliable method for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 which can be used to speed-up and support its bioanalysis in the frame of the clinical trials. PMID:24958346

  11. The method for on-site determination of trace concentrations of methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide in air using a mobile mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, combined with a fast enrichment/separation system.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Andrey S; Makas, Alexey L; Troshkov, Mikhail L; Grachev, Mikhail ?; Pod'yachev, Sergey P

    2014-06-01

    A method for fast simultaneous on-site determination of methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide in air was developed. The target compounds were actively collected on silica gel, followed by direct flash thermal desorption, fast separation on a short chromatographic column and detection by means of mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. During the sampling of ambient air, water vapor was removed with a Nafion selective membrane. A compact mass spectrometer prototype, which was designed earlier at Trofimuk Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, was used. The minimization of gas load of the atmospheric pressure ion source allowed reducing the power requirements and size of the vacuum system and increasing its ruggedness. The measurement cycle is about 3 min. Detection limits in a 0.6 L sample are 1 ppb for methyl mercaptan and 0.2 ppb for dimethyl sulfide. PMID:24725876

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization in Transmission Geometry

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Atmospheric Pressure Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization in Transmission Geometry Marsha C, Washington, D.C. 20375 In both atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser de- sorption/ionization (AP MALDI a significant impediment. Atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI promises to eliminate the need for this step.1

  13. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization as a plume diagnostic tool in laser evaporation methods

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization as a plume diagnostic tool introduced analytical method, atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (AP- MALDI write; Atmospheric pressure MALDI; Laser evaporation; Plume diagnostics 1. Introduction Diagnostics

  14. An atmospheric pressure ion lens to improve electrospray ionization at low solution ow-rates

    E-print Network

    Chen, David D.Y.

    An atmospheric pressure ion lens to improve electrospray ionization at low solution ¯ow by the addition of an atmospheric pressure ion lens near the tip of the tapered sprayer. The magnitude, but no discussion was given as to whether it increased the ion signals. Franzen used an atmospheric pressure ring

  15. Application of an Air Ionization Device Using an Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Process for Water Purification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Wohlers; In-Ock Koh; Wolfram Thiemann; Wolfgang Rotard

    2009-01-01

    Pesticides presently being discharged into the aquatic environment are not only toxic but also only partially biodegradable,\\u000a they are not easily removed by conventional water treatment plants. Air ionization devices using an atmospheric pressure corona\\u000a discharge process show great promise in improving degradation of chemical and biological contaminants in water purification\\u000a plants. In order to assess the effectiveness of this

  16. Development of an Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (APIMS) was purchased from EXTREL Mass Spectrometry, Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA). Our research objectives were to adapt this instrument and develop techniques for real-time determinations of the concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. The prototype instrument is capable of making high frequency measurements with no sample preconcentrations. Isotopically labeled standards are used as an internal standard to obtain high precision and to compensate for changes in instrument sensitivity and analyte losses in the sampling manifold as described by Bandy and coworkers. The prototype instrument is capable of being deployed on NASA C130, Electra, P3, and DC8 aircraft. After purchasing and taking delivery by June 1994, we assembled the mass spectrometer, data acquisition, and manifold flow control instrumentation in electronic racks and performed tests.

  17. Hyphenation of Thermal Analysis to Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry) Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization For Studying Composition and Thermal Degradation of Complex Materials.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Miersch, Toni; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the hyphenation of a thermobalance to an ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (UHR FTICR MS) is presented. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is used for efficient ionization. The evolved gas analysis (EGA), using high-resolution mass spectrometry allows the time-resolved molecular characterization of thermally induced processes in complex materials or mixtures, such as biomass or crude oil. The most crucial part of the setup is the hyphenation between the thermobalance and the APCI source. Evolved gases are forced to enter the atmospheric pressure ionization interface of the MS by applying a slight overpressure at the thermobalance side of the hyphenation. Using the FTICR exact mass data, detailed chemical information is gained by calculation of elemental compositions from the organic species, enabling a time and temperature resolved, highly selective detection of the evolved species. An additional selectivity is gained by the APCI ionization, which is particularly sensitive toward polar compounds. This selectivity on the one hand misses bulk components of petroleum samples such as alkanes and does not deliver a comprehensive view but on the other hand focuses particularly on typical evolved components from biomass samples. As proof of principle, the thermal behavior of different fossil fuels: heavy fuel oil, light fuel oil, and a crude oil, and different lignocellulosic biomass, namely, beech, birch, spruce, ash, oak, and pine as well as commercial available softwood and birch-bark pellets were investigated. The results clearly show the capability to distinguish between certain wood types through their molecular patterns and compound classes. Additionally, typical literature known pyrolysis biomass marker were confirmed by their elemental composition, such as coniferyl aldehyde (C10H10O3), sinapyl aldehyde (C11H12O4), retene (C18H18), and abietic acid (C20H30O2). PMID:26024433

  18. Characterization of HOCl using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, T.E.; Foster, K.L.; Benter, T.; Langer, S.; Hemminger, J.C.; Finlayson-Pitts, B.J.

    1999-10-14

    HOCl is an important intermediate in stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry. Although it can be readily measured in laboratory systems at low pressures ({le}20 Torr) using conventional electron impact ionization mass spectrometry, there is a need for a measurement technique that can operate at higher pressures, up to 1 atm in air. One such technique seeing increasing use is atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (API-MS). The authors report here studies of the API-MS of {approximately}0.5--50 ppm HOCl at a total pressure of 1 atm and room temperature. Major peaks from the ion-adducts with Cl{sup {minus}} and OCI{sup {minus}} were observed. The Br{sup {minus}} adduct of HOCl can also be generated using bromoform in the discharge region of the ion source. At the lower range of HOCl concentrations studied in air, the O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} adduct and small parent peaks assigned to HOCl{sup {minus}} were observed. The species present as minor impurities in the HOCl source (Cl{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}O and HCl) can be readily distinguished through identification of the parent ion for Cl{sub 2}, or as their adducts with Cl{sup {minus}} and Br{sup {minus}} for Cl{sub 2}O and HCI. The identification of HOCl was confirmed using electron impact ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (El-MS). HOCl was quantified using EI-MS to measure the Cl{sub 2} generated when the HOCl reacted heterogeneously on a water-ice/HCl surface and independently by photolysis of the HOCl to generate atomic chlorine, which was trapped using propene and measured as chloroacetone. The implications for the use of API-MS for measuring HOCl in laboratory systems and in ambient air are discussed.

  19. Ion-pair liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of quaternary ammonium herbicides.

    PubMed

    Castro, R; Moyano, E; Galceran, M T

    1999-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization) has been used to characterize some quaternary ammonium herbicides (quats). The separation of these compounds was carried out using ion-pair chromatography with heptafluorobutyric acid (15 mM, pH 3.3) and acetonitrile gradient elution for successful coupling to mass spectrometry. Detection limits down to 0.1-4 micrograms l-1 were obtained for spiked tap water following a preconcentration step. Good reproducibilities (day-to-day and run-to-run) were also obtained. PMID:10023623

  20. Determination of metformin in mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Peter, Raimund M

    2010-11-01

    A simple, rapid and robust high-throughput assay for the quantitative analysis of metformin in plasma from different species using laser diode thermal desorption interfaced with atmospheric chemical pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MSMS) was developed for use in a pharmaceutical discovery environment. In order to minimize sample preparation a generic protein precipitation method was used to extract metformin from the plasma. Laser diode thermal desorption is a relatively new sample introduction method, the optimization of the instrumental parameters are presented. The method was successfully applied to spiked mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples and was subsequently used to determine the oral pharmacokinetics of metformin after dosing to male rats in order to support drug discovery projects. The deviations for intra-assay accuracy and precision across the four species were less than 30% at all calibration and quality control levels. PMID:20547025

  1. The role of physical and chemical properties of Pd nanostructured materials immobilized on inorganic carriers on ion formation in atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-06-01

    Fundamental parameters influencing the ion-producing efficiency of palladium nanostructures (nanoparticles [Pd-NP], nanoflowers, nanofilms) during laser irradiation were studied in this paper. The nanostructures were immobilized on the surface of different solid inorganic carrier materials (porous and mono-crystalline silicon, anodic porous aluminum oxide, glass and polished steel) by using classical galvanic deposition, electroless local deposition and sputtering. It was the goal of this study to investigate the influence of both the nanoparticular layer as well as the carrier material on ion production for selected analyte molecules. Our experiments demonstrated that the dimensions of the synthesized nanostructures, the thickness of the active layers, surface disorders, thermal conductivity and physically or chemically adsorbed water influenced signal intensities of analyte ions during surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) while no effects such as plasmon resonance, photoelectric effect or catalytic activity were expected to occur. Excellent LDI abilities were seen for Pd-NPs immobilized on steel, while Pd nanoflowers on porous silicon exhibited several disadvantages; viz, strong memory effects, dependency of the analytical signal on amount of physically and chemically adsorbed water inside porous carrier, reduced SALDI activity from unstable connections between Pd and semiconductor material, decrease of the melting point of pure silicon after Pd immobilization and resulting strong laser ablation of metal/semiconductor complex, as well as significantly changed surface morphology after laser irradiation. The analytical performance of Pd-NP/steel was further improved by applying a hydrophobic coating to the steel surface before galvanic deposition. This procedure increased the distance between Pd-NPs, thus reducing thermal stress upon LDI; it simultaneously decreased spot sizes of deposited sample solutions. PMID:24913399

  2. Schinus terebinthifolius scale-up countercurrent chromatography (Part I): High performance countercurrent chromatography fractionation of triterpene acids with off-line detection using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mariana Neves; Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2015-04-10

    'Countercurrent chromatography' (CCC) is an ideal technique for the recovery, purification and isolation of bioactive natural products, due to the liquid nature of the stationary phase, process predictability and the possibility of scale-up from analytical to preparative scale. In this work, a method developed for the fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries dichloromethane extract was thoroughly optimized to achieve maximal throughput with minimal solvent and time consumption per gram of processed crude extract, using analytical, semi-preparative and preparative 'high performance countercurrent chromatography' (HPCCC) instruments. The method using the biphasic solvent system composed of n-heptane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was volumetrically scaled up to increase sample throughput up to 120 times, while maintaining separation efficiency and time. As a fast and specific detection alternative, the fractions collected from the CCC-separations were injected to an 'atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometer' (APCI-MS/MS) and reconstituted molecular weight MS-chromatograms of the APCI-ionizable compounds from S. terebinthifolius were obtained. This procedure led to the direct isolation of tirucallane type triterpenes such as masticadienonic and 3?-masticadienolic acids. Also oleanonic and moronic acids have been identified for the first time in the species. In summary, this approach can be used for other CCC scale-up processes, enabling MS-target-guided isolation procedures. PMID:25757818

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry: A New Analytical

    E-print Network

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry: A New Analytical Chemical Characterization Method climate, air quality, and ecosystem processes. Atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization mass, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8058 The complex mixture of organic compounds in the atmosphere influences

  4. Real-time air monitoring of mustard gas and Lewisite 1 by detecting their in-line reaction products by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow ion introduction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2015-01-20

    A new method enabling sensitive real-time air monitoring of highly reactive chemical warfare agents, namely, mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1), by detecting ions of their in-line reaction products instead of intact agents, is proposed. The method is based on corona discharge-initiated atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) via counterflow ion introduction. Therefore, it allows for highly sensitive and specific real-time detection of a broad range of airborne compounds. In-line chemical reactions, ionization reactions, and ion fragmentations of these agents were investigated. Mustard gas is oxygenated in small quantity by reactive oxygen species generated in the corona discharge. With increasing air humidity, the MS(2) signal intensity of protonated molecules of mono-oxygenated HD decreases but exceeds that of dominantly existing intact HD. This result can be explained in view of proton affinity. Lewisite 1 is hydrolyzed and oxidized. As the humidity increases from zero, the signal of the final product, namely, didechlorinated, dihydroxylated, and mono-oxygenated L1, quickly increases and reaches a plateau, giving the highest MS(2) and MS(3) signals among those of L1 and its reaction products. The addition of minimal moisture gives the highest signal intensity, even under low humidity. The method was demonstrated to provide sufficient analytical performance to meet the requirements concerning hygienic management and counter-terrorism. It will be the first practical method, in view of sensitivity and specificity, for real-time air monitoring of HD and L1 without sample pretreatment. PMID:25553788

  5. Separation and identification of polar degradation products of benzo[a]pyrene with ozone by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry after optimized column chromatographic clean-up.

    PubMed

    Letzel, T; Rosenberg, E; Wissiack, R; Grasserbauer, M; Niessner, R

    1999-09-10

    The environmental relevance of oxidized degradation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases due to enhanced combustion of organic matter and fossil fuels. For PAHs consisting of more than three condensed aromatic rings, soot aerosols are the main carrier, on the surface of which they can react with trace gases like ozone. In this study the clean-up procedure and analysis of ozonized benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was optimized. B[a]P and its degradation products were preseparated into three fractions. Different reversed-phase materials were evaluated for high-performance liquid chromatographic separation. Among these, a phenyl-modified silica material proved best-suited and the chromatographic separation was optimized on this material. For the detection of separated degradation products, liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) was used. With this method, 29 components could be characterized. Besides the three known main degradation products (B[a]P-1,6-dione, B[a]P-3,6-dione, B[a]P-6,12-dione, B[a]P-4,5-dione and 4-oxa-benzo[d,e,f]chrysene-5-one (B[def]C-lactone), were identified for the first time with the help of reference substances. B[def]C-lactone is known as a substance with a mutagenic potential similar to B[a]P. Several other compounds could be tentatively identified. PMID:10519088

  6. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization study of the positive and negative ion chemistry of the hydrofluorocarbons 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and of perfluoro-n-hexane (FC-72) in air plasma at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Ester; Paradisi, Cristina; Scorrano, Gianfranco

    2004-07-01

    A report is given on the ionization/dissociation behavior of the title compounds within air plasmas produced by electrical corona discharges at atmospheric pressure: both positive and negative ions were investigated at different temperatures using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). CHF(2)CH(3) (HFC-152a) undergoes efficient ionic oxidation to C(2)H(5)O(+), in which the oxygen comes from water present in the plasma. In contrast, CF(3)CH(2)F (HFC-134a) does not produce any characteristic positive ion under APCI conditions, its presence within the plasma being revealed only as a neutral ligand in ion-molecule complexes with ions of the background (H(3)O(+) and NO(+)). Analogously, the perfluorocarbon FC-72 (n-C(6)F(14)) does not produce significant positive ions at 30 degrees C: at high temperature, however, it undergoes dissociative ionization to form many product ions including C(3)F(6)(+), C(2)F(4)(+), C(n)F(2n+1)(+) and a few families of oxygen containing cations (C(n)F(2n+1)OH(2)(+), C(n)F(2n)OH(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(2)H(2)(+), C(n)F(2n-2)O(2)H(+)) which are suggested to derive from C(n)F(2n+1)(+) in a cascade of steps initiated by condensation with water followed by steps of HF elimination and H(2)O addition. Negative ions formed from the fluoroethanes CHF(2)CH(3) and CF(3)CH(2)F (M) include complexes with ions of the background, O(2)(-)(M), O(3)(-)(M) and some higher complexes involving also water, and complexes of the fluoride ion, F(-)(H(2)O), F(-)(M) and higher complexes with both M and H(2)O also together. The interesting product O(2)(-)(HF) is also formed from 1,1-difluoroethane. In contrast to the HFCs, perfluoro-n-hexane gives stable molecular anions, M(-), which at low source temperature or in humidified air are also detected as hydrates, M(-)(H(2)O). In addition, in humidified air F(-)(H(2)O)(n) complexes are also formed. The reactions leading to all major positive and negative product ions are discussed also with reference to available thermochemical data and relevant literature reports. The effects on both positive and negative APCI spectra due to ion activation via increasing V(cone) are also reported and discussed: several interesting endothermic processes are observed under these conditions. The results provide important information on the role of ionic reactions in non-thermal plasma processes. PMID:15282758

  7. Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure Molecular Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    -IR) MALDI (3), laser ablation S.S. Rubakhin, J.V. Sweedler (eds.), Mass Spectrometry Imaging, MethodsChapter 9 Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization for Atmospheric Pressure Molecular Imaging Mass method for the direct imaging of biological tis- sues by mass spectrometry. By performing ionization

  8. Preparative mass-spectrometry profiling of bioactive metabolites in Saudi-Arabian propolis fractionated by high-speed countercurrent chromatography and off-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry injection.

    PubMed

    Jerz, Gerold; Elnakady, Yasser A; Braun, André; Jäckel, Kristin; Sasse, Florenz; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A; Omar, Mohamed O M; Winterhalter, Peter

    2014-06-20

    Propolis is a glue material collected by honeybees which is used to seal cracks in beehives and to protect the bee population from infections. Propolis resins have a long history in medicinal use as a natural remedy. The multiple biological properties are related to variations in their chemical compositions. Geographical settings and availability of plant sources are important factors for the occurrence of specific natural products in propolis. A propolis ethylacetate extract (800mg) from Saudi Arabia (Al-Baha region) was separated by preparative scale high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) using a non-aqueous solvent system n-hexane-ACN (1:1, v/v). For multiple metabolite detection, the resulting HSCCC-fractions were sequentially injected off-line into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) device, and a reconstituted mass spectrometry profile of the preparative run was visualized by selected ion traces. Best ion-intensities for detected compounds were obtained in the negative APCI mode and monitored occurring co-elution effects. HSCCC and successive purification steps resulted in the isolation and characterization of various bioactive natural products such as (12E)- and (12Z)-communic acid, sandaracopimaric acid, (+)-ferruginol, (+)-totarol, and 3?-acetoxy-19(29)-taraxasten-20a-ol using EI-, APCI-MS and 1D/2D-NMR. Cycloartenol-derivatives and triterpene acetates were isolated in mixtures and elucidated by EI-MS and 1D-NMR. Free fatty acids, and two labdane fatty acid esters were identified by APCI-MS/MS. In total 19 metabolites have been identified. The novel combination of HSCCC fractionation, and APCI-MS-target-guided molecular mass profiling improve efficiency of lead-structure identification. PMID:24831423

  9. Established and Emerging Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Pasilis, Sofie P [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The number and type of atmospheric pressure techniques suitable for sampling analytes from surfaces, forming ions from those analytes, and subsequently transporting those ions into vacuum for interrogation by mass spectrometry has rapidly expanded over the last several years. Moreover, the literature in this area is complicated by an explosion in acronyms for these techniques, many of which provide no information relating to the chemical or physical processes involved. In this review, we sort this vast array of techniques into a relatively few categories on the basis of the approaches used for surface sampling and ionization. For each technique, we explain, as best known, many of the underlying principles of operation, describe representative applications, and in some cases, discuss needed research or advancements and attempt to forecast their future analytical utility.

  10. Identification of milk fat triacylglycerols by capillary supercritical fluid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical lonization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Päivi Laakso; Pekka Manninen

    1997-01-01

    Identification of milk fat triacylglycerols was accomplished by capillary supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) combined\\u000a with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry [(APCI)MS]. Supercritical carbon dioxide was the carrier fluid\\u000a in SFC. Ionization was achieved by introducing vapor of ammonia in methanol into the ionization chamber, which resulted in\\u000a the formation of abundant [M+18]+ and [M-RCOO]+ ions of triacylglycerols. These ions

  11. Part-per-trillion level determination of antifouling pesticides and their byproducts in seawater samples by off-line solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, K; Ferrer, I; Barceló, D

    2000-05-19

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of antifouling pesticides and some of their byproducts such as dichlofluanid, diuron and its byproducts [demethyldiuron and 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea], (2-thiocyanomethylthio)ben: zothiazole, chlorothalonil, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and one of its byproducts (2-methylthio-4-tert.-butylamino-s-triazine) in seawater was developed. The extraction of these compounds from the filtered seawater samples was performed off-line with different solid-phase extraction sorbents using (I) a 500 mg graphitized carbon black cartridge (ENVI-Carb) and (II) 200 mg polymeric cartridges (LiChrolut EN and Isolute ENV+) and passing 500 ml of the sample through these cartridges. The detection was carried out by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry both in the negative and positive ion modes. The recovery ranged from 76 to 96% for the whole antifouling group with the ENVI-Carb cartridges and the detection limit was at the part-per-trillion level except for TCMTB. The method utilizing the polymeric cartridge proved to be very useful, time saving and with good recoveries when only Irgarol and its byproduct, Sea-nine 211 and diuron and its byproducts, have to be analyzed. The different cartridges were applied to the analysis of these pesticides in different marinas of the Catalan coast; diuron, dichlofluanid, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol as well as demethyldiuron and the Irgarol byproduct being the must ubiquitous pollutants. Maximum concentration levels were 2-3.5 microg/l of diuron and Sea-nine 211, respectively. PMID:10870693

  12. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of vitamins D and K in foods by liquid chromatography with diode-array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    A simple and rapid method was developed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with both diode array (DAD) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of the vitamins ergocalciferol (D2), cholecalciferol (D3), phylloquinone (K1), menaquinone-4 (K2) and a synthetic form of vitamin K, menadione (K3). The Taguchi experimental method, an orthogonal array design (OAD), was used to optimize an efficient and clean preconcentration step based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). A factorial design was applied with six factors and three levels for each factor, namely, carbon tetrachloride volume, methanol volume, aqueous sample volume, pH of sample, sodium chloride concentration and time of the centrifugation step. The DLLME optimized procedure consisted of rapidly injecting 3 mL of acetonitrile (disperser solvent) containing 150 µL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) into the aqueous sample, thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and the sedimented phase was evaporated with nitrogen, reconstituted with 50 µL of acetonitrile, and injected. The LC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile, 2-propanol and water, under gradient elution. Quantification was carried out by the standard additions method. The APCI-MS spectra, in combination with UV spectra, permitted the correct identification of compounds in the food samples. The method was validated according to international guidelines and using a certified reference material. The validated method was applied for the analysis of vitamins D and K in infant foods and several green vegetables. There was little variability in the forms of vitamin K present in vegetables, with the most abundant vitamer in all the samples being phylloquinone, while menadione could not be detected. Conversely, cholecalciferol, which is present in food of animal origin, was the main form in infant foods, while ergocalciferol was not detected. PMID:24054666

  13. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17?-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)?0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision. PMID:23140957

  14. Determination of nivalenol and deoxynivalenol in wheat using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with negative ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Razzazi-Fazeli; J Böhm; W Luf

    1999-01-01

    A new, rapid and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) by using HPLC in combination with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-interface and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. Different LC and MS parameters have been optimized prior to this in order to obtain better results and sensitivity. The effect of nebulizing temperature

  15. Radio frequency induced ionized collisional flow model for application at atmospheric pressures

    E-print Network

    Roy, Subrata

    Radio frequency induced ionized collisional flow model for application at atmospheric pressures include both volume and surface discharges, at pressures of atmospheric level at low speeds to O 10 Torr atmospheric uniform glow discharge1,11 (AUGD) shows tremendous potential in the areas of electro gas dy- namic

  16. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-05-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  17. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:25947197

  18. Excited level populations and excitation kinetics of nonequilibrium ionizing argon discharge plasma of atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Akatsuka, Hiroshi [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-10, O-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Population densities of excited states of argon atoms are theoretically examined for ionizing argon plasma in a state of nonequilibrium under atmospheric pressure from the viewpoint of elementary processes with collisional radiative model. The dependence of excited state populations on the electron and gas temperatures is discussed. Two electron density regimes are found, which are distinguished by the population and depopulation mechanisms for the excited states in problem. When the electron impact excitation frequency for the population or depopulation is lower than the atomic impact one, the electron density of the plasma is considered as low to estimate the population and depopulation processes. Some remarkable characteristics of population and depopulation mechanisms are found for the low electron density atmospheric plasma, where thermal relaxation by atomic collisions becomes the predominant process within the group of close-energy states in the ionizing plasma of atmospheric pressure, and the excitation temperature is almost the same as the gas temperature. In addition to the collisional relaxation by argon atoms, electron impact excitation from the ground state is also an essential population mechanism. The ratios of population density of the levels pairs, between which exists a large energy gap, include information on the electron collisional kinetics. For high electron density, the effect of atomic collisional relaxation becomes weak. For this case, the excitation mechanism is explained as electron impact ladderlike excitation similar to low-pressure ionizing plasma, since the electron collision becomes the dominant process for the population and depopulation kinetics.

  19. Chemical Ionization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jürgen H. Gross; Mass Spectrometry

    \\u000a Mass spectrometrists have ever been searching for ionization methods softer than EI, because molecular weight determination\\u000a is key for structure elucidation. Chemical ionization (CI) is the first of the so-called soft ionization methods we are going to discuss (cf. Fig. 1.2).

  20. Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Youn Moon, Se [High-enthalpy Plasma Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaeyoung [5771 La Jolla Corona Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000?nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popovi?. In 280–450?nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

  1. Destruction of simulated chemical warfare agents in non-thermal atmospheric-pressure air plasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Jarrige; P. Vervisch

    The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) using an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in air was investigated. Stainles s steel samples inoculated with malathion (a surrogate for nerve agent VX) were placed on the ca thode, where they were treated by the chemical active species produced in the streamers. An effect ive decontamination (>99.7 %) was achieved after 10

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry for in vivo analysis of volatile flavour release

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Taylor; R. S. T. Linforth; B. A. Harvey; A. Blake

    2000-01-01

    To follow volatile flavour release in the expired air of people during eating, several physiological and analytical constraints must be observed to obtain good quality data. An interface has been developed to sample air from the nose and ionise the volatile compounds contained therein by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation. The ions formed are detected in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The

  3. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Henins, I.; Park, J.; Selwyn, G. S.

    1999-05-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schütze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products.

  4. Decontamination of Chemical/Biological Warfare (CBW) Agents Using an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1998-11-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure, uniform glow discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g. He/O_2/H_2O) which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains metastables (e.g. O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g. O, OH). These reactive species have been shown to be effective neutralizers of surrogates for anthrax spores, mustard blister agent and VX nerve gas. Unlike conventional, wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion of most surfaces and does not damage wiring, electronics, nor most plastics. This makes it highly suitable for decontamination of high value sensitive equipment such as is found in vehicle interiors (i.e. tanks, planes...) for which there is currently no good decontamination technique. Furthermore, the reactive species rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful byproducts. Physics of the APPJ will be discussed and results of surface decontamination experiments using simulant and actual CBW agents will be presented.

  5. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Park, J.; Selwyn, G.S. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Sch{umlt u}tze {ital et al.}, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. {bold 26}, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}}, He{sup {asterisk}}) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Back corona enhanced organic film deposition inside an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Xie, Shuzheng; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    A grounded screen with short needle-like protrusions has been designed to generate back corona in an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) reactor. The grounded screen with protrusions is placed downstream at a variable gap length from an array of needles that is energized with 60 Hz high voltage. The excitation voltage is in the range 0--10 kV RMS and the feed gas mixture consists of argon and acetylene. A Lecroy 9350AL 500 MHz digital oscilloscope is used to monitor the reactor voltage and current using a resistive voltage divider and a current viewing resistor, respectively. The current signal contains many positive and negative current pulses associated with corona discharge. Analysis of the current signal shows asymmetry between positive and negative corona discharge currents. Photographs show substantial back corona generated near the tips of the protrusions situated at the grounded screen. The back corona activates via bond scission acetylene radicals that are transported downstream to form a plasma-polymerized film on a substrate positioned downstream from the grounded screen. The oscillograms will be used to generate corona mode maps that show the nature of the corona discharge as a function of gap spacing, applied voltage and many other reactor parameters.

  7. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of TiN from tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and ammonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. N. Musher; R. G. Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Near stoichiometric titanium nitride (TiN) was deposited from tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and ammonia using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. Experiments were conducted in a belt furnace; static experiments provided kinetic data and continuous operation uniformly coated 150-mm substrates. Growth rate, stoichiometry, and resistivity are examined as functions of deposition temperature (190420°C), ammonia flow relative to TDMAT (030), and total gas-flow rate

  8. High-temperature open tubular liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lena M. Nyholm; Per J. R. Sjöberg; Karin E. Markides

    1996-01-01

    A micro heated nebuliser interface was constructed and used for coupling of open tubular liquid chromatography at 150°C to atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. For the chromatography, 50 ?m I.D. columns were utilised at a flow-rate of 0.1–1.6 ?l\\/min. The efficiency loss due to the MS detector, including the interface, was found to correspond to only 5% for a

  9. Effect of silicon source gas on silicon-germanium chemical vapor deposition kinetics at atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. I. Kamins; D. J. Meyer

    1992-01-01

    Epitaxial Si1?xGex alloy layers have been deposited in an atmospheric-pressure, chemical-vapor-deposition reactor using dichlorosilane, silane, and disilane, along with germane. The deposition rate increases and the Ge content decreases with increasing reactivity of the silicon-containing gas. The rate increases monotonically with increasing Ge content in the layer for all three gases, in contrast to the behavior seen in systems operating

  10. Kinetics of silicon-germanium deposition by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. I. Kamins; D. J. Meyer

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of Si1?xGex alloy layers in an atmospheric-pressure, chemical vapor deposition reactor has been studied by separately examining the silicon and the germanium components of the deposition rate. The overall deposition rate increases approximately linearly with GeH4 partial pressure, but is relatively independent of SiH2Cl2 partial pressure. The silicon component of the deposition rate increases rapidly with increasing temperature

  11. Optical response of tin nitride thin films prepared by halide chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Takahashi; K. Terada; T. Takahashi; T. Nakamura; W. Inami; Y. Kawata

    2003-01-01

    Optical response of tin nitride (SnNx) films, which were deposited onto quartz substrates by means of atmospheric pressure, halide chemical vapor deposition (AP-HCVD),\\u000a were examined by pulsed irradiation of a YAG laser (532 nm). It was observed that the transmittance of a light of a He-Ne\\u000a laser (633 nm) through the SnNx film decreases after the film is irradiated with

  12. Atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seigi Suh; Zuhua Zhang; Wei-Kan Chu; David M. Hoffman

    1999-01-01

    Fluorine-doped tin oxide films were deposited on silicon, glass and quartz substrates at 370–490°C by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition from (CH3(CH2)3)2Sn(O2CCF3)2 and oxygen. Backscattering spectra indicate the films are stoichiometric with O\\/Sn ratios of 1.9–2.0. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for fluorine gives F\\/Sn ratios of 0.005–0.015 with the amount of fluorine in the films increasing with increasing deposition temperature. The

  13. Desorption/ionization of acrylamide in aqueous solutions in atmospheric pressure air using a microdischarge with vortex focusing of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervukhin, V. V.; Sheven', D. G.

    2014-09-01

    A method of desorption/ionization in a microdischarge with ion vortex focusing (vortex focusing microdischarge, VFM) is suggested. A glow microdischarge is initiated in an air flow, and resulting ions act on the surface of interest. As a model compound, an aqueous solution of acrylamide is taken. Desorption/ionization taking place under atmospheric pressure is followed by the mass-spectrometric identification of the ions. The operating parameters of the VFM system are studied and optimized. Upon optimization of the system, the detection limit of acrylamide trace amounts in aqueous solutions is determined using the suggested method of desorption/ionization and analyte ion focusing with a vortex (swirling) jet. The acrylamide detection limit is found to be 2 × 10-3 g/L.

  14. The effects of added hydrogen on a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet ambient desorption/ionization source.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan P; Heywood, Matthew S; Thurston, Glen K; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2013-03-01

    We present mass spectrometric data demonstrating the effect that hydrogen has on a helium-based dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) atmospheric-pressure plasma jet used as an ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source. The addition of 0.9 % hydrogen to the helium support gas in a 35-W plasma jet increased signals for a range of test analytes, with enhancement factors of up to 68, without proportional increases in background levels. The changes in signal levels result from a combination of changes in the desorption kinetics from the surface and increased ion production in the gas phase. The enhancement in ADI-MS performance despite the quenching of key plasma species reported in earlier studies suggests that ionization with a H2/He plasma jet is the result of an alternate mechanism involving the direct generation of ionized hydrogen. PMID:23393059

  15. Atmospheric pressure ionization waves propagating through a flexible high aspect ratio capillary channel and impinging upon a target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization waves (IWs) propagating in flexible capillary tubes are a unique way of transporting a plasma and its active species to remote sites for applications such as biomedical procedures, particularly in endoscopic procedures. The propagation mechanisms for such IWs in tubes having aspect ratios of hundreds to thousands are not clear. In this paper, results are discussed from a numerical investigation of the fundamental properties of ionization waves generated by nanosecond voltage pulses inside a 15 cm long, 600 µm wide (aspect ratio 250), flexible dielectric channel. The channel, filled with a Ne/Xe = 99.9/0.1 gas mixture at 1 atm, empties into a small chamber separated from a target substrate by 1 cm. The IWs propagate through the entire length of the channel while maintaining similar strength and magnitude. Upon exiting the channel into the chamber, the IW induces a second streamer discharge at the channel-chamber junction. This streamer then propagates across the chamber and impinges upon the target. The average speeds of the capillary-bounded IW are about 5 × 107 cm s-1 and 1 × 108 cm s-1 for positive and negative polarities, respectively. The propagation speed is sensitive to the curvature of the channel. In both cases, the peak in ionization tends to be located along the channel walls and alternates from side-to-side depending on the direction of the local instantaneous electric field and curvature of the channel. The ionization region following the IW extends up to several centimeters inside the channel, as opposed to being highly localized at the ionization front in unconstrained, atmospheric pressure IWs. The maximum speed of the IW in the chamber is about twice that in the channel.

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Zinc Oxide Whiskers by Chemical-Vapor Deposition under Atmospheric Pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minoru Satoh; Norio Tanaka; Yoshikazu Ueda; Shigeo Saitoh; Hidetoshi Saitoh

    1999-01-01

    ZnO whiskers were epitaxially grown by a chemical-vapor deposition technique employed at atmospheric pressure. Highly oriented ZnO whiskers grew at a substrate temperature of 550°C on (0001)alpha-Al2O3 substrates with a growth rate of 3.7 nm\\/s. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the epitaxial relationship between the whiskers and the substrate was determined as ZnO[\\\\bar{1}010](0001)\\/\\/Al2O3[\\\\bar{1}2\\\\bar{1}0](0001) or ZnO[\\\\bar{1}2\\\\bar{1}0](0001)\\/\\/Al2O3[\\\\bar{1}010](0001). In addition, the full-width at half

  17. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis due to its high heat and mass transfer efficiency and well-controlled flow parameters. Experimental studies of CVD microreactor technology are slow and expensive. Analytical solution of the governing equations is impossible due to the complexity of intertwined non-linear physical and chemical processes. Computer simulation is the most effective tool for design and optimization of microreactors. Our computational fluid dynamics model employs mass, momentum and energy balance equations for a laminar transient flow of a chemically reacting gas mixture at low Reynolds number. Simulation results show the influence of microreactor configuration and process parameters on SiO2 deposition rate and uniformity. We simulated three microreactors with the central channel diameter of 5, 10, 20 micrometers, varying gas flow rate in the range of 5-100 microliters per hour and temperature in the range of 300-800 °C. For each microchannel diameter we found an optimal set of process parameters providing the best quality of deposited material. The model will be used for optimization of the microreactor configuration and technological parameters to facilitate the experimental stage of this research.

  18. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (<4 sec) and short-distance (<40 mm) plasma irradiation, and the high transfection efficiency of 53% is realized together with the high cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  19. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Sascha, E-mail: s.albrecht@fz-juelich.de; Stroh, Fred, E-mail: f.stroh@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Stratosphere (IEK-7), 52428 Jülich (Germany)] [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Stratosphere (IEK-7), 52428 Jülich (Germany); Klopotowski, Sebastian, E-mail: s.klopotowski@uni-wuppertal.de; Derpmann, Valerie, E-mail: v.derpmann@uni-wuppertal.de; Klee, Sonja, E-mail: s.klee@uni-wuppertal.de; Brockmann, Klaus J., E-mail: brockma@uni-wuppertal.de; Benter, Thorsten, E-mail: tbenter@uni-wuppertal.de [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Institute for Pure and Applied Mass Spectrometry, University of Wuppertal, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)] [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Institute for Pure and Applied Mass Spectrometry, University of Wuppertal, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  20. Determination of triamcinolone acetonide in equine serum and urine by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koupai-Abyazani, M R; Yu, N; Esaw, B; Laviolette, B

    1995-01-01

    Urine and serum samples collected from four standard-bred mares after 30-mg intraarticular administrations of triamcinolone acetonide were analyzed using combined high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry. Maximum triamcinolone acetonide concentrations of 32.3, 14.8, 24.3, and 29.4 ng/mL in the urine and 2.7, 1.9, 2.3, and 2.5 ng/mL in the serum samples were observed. The peak concentrations of the drug were detected approximately 22 h (urine) and 12 h (serum) after administration. The drug elimination profiles for both urine and serum are presented and discussed. PMID:7564297

  1. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of electrochromic Mo–W thin oxide films: Structural, optoelectronic and vibration properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Gesheva; T. Ivanova; M. Kozlov; S. Boyadzhiev

    2010-01-01

    Transition metal oxides exhibit electrochromic effect, under a small voltage they transfer from transparent state to colored one and if voltage polarity is turned back, they bleach again. Oxide coatings possess this ability, but in order to exhibit it, they should be part of a multilayer system-electrochromic device. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition technology was used for preparation of mixed

  2. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  3. A systematic study of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of large-area monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Chen, Yu; Lin, Yung-Chen; Qu, Yongquan; Bai, Jingwei; Ivanov, Ivan A; Liu, Gang; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-28

    Graphene has attracted considerable interest as a potential material for future electronics. Although mechanical peel is known to produce high quality graphene flakes, practical applications require continuous graphene layers over a large area. The catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising synthetic method to deliver wafer-sized graphene. Here we present a systematic study on the nucleation and growth of crystallized graphene domains in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Parametric studies show that the mean size of the graphene domains increases with increasing growth temperature and CH4 partial pressure, while the density of domains decreases with increasing growth temperature and is independent of the CH4 partial pressure. Our studies show that nucleation of graphene domains on copper substrate is highly dependent on the initial annealing temperature. A two-step synthetic process with higher initial annealing temperature but lower growth temperature is developed to reduce domain density and achieve high quality full-surface coverage of monolayer graphene films. Electrical transport measurements demonstrate that the resulting graphene exhibits a high carrier mobility of up to 3000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. PMID:25414547

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Spray Chemical Vapor Deposited CuInS2 Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. D.; Raffaelle, R. P.; Banger, K. K.; Smith, M. A.; Scheiman, D. A.; Hepp, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    Solar cells have been prepared using atmospheric pressure spray chemical vapor deposited CuInS2 absorbers. The CuInS2 films were deposited at 390 C using the single source precursor (PPh3)2CuIn(SEt)4 in an argon atmosphere. The absorber ranges in thickness from 0.75 - 1.0 micrometers, and exhibits a crystallographic gradient, with the leading edge having a (220) preferred orientation and the trailing edge having a (112) orientation. Schottky diodes prepared by thermal evaporation of aluminum contacts on to the CuInS2 yielded diodes for films that were annealed at 600 C. Solar cells were prepared using annealed films and had the (top down) composition of Al/ZnO/CdS/CuInS2/Mo/Glass. The Jsc, Voc, FF and (eta) were 6.46 mA per square centimeter, 307 mV, 24% and 0.35%, respectively for the best small area cells under simulated AM0 illumination.

  5. Chemical reactions in liquid induced by atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shimokawa, Yudai; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally investigated some of the initial reactions in a liquid induced by electron or positive-ion irradiation from an atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with the liquid. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, AgNO3, and HAuCl4 are used as the electrolyte. We measured the pH and conductivity in the liquid at approximately 1 cm below the solution surfaces. OH radical generation in the liquid was observed by a chemical probe method. Experimental results showed that electron irradiation of the liquid surface generates OH? in water and that positive-ion irradiation of the liquid surface generates H+ in water even without the dissolution of gas-phase nitrogen oxide. A possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. In particular, the contribution of charge transfer collision between impinging low-energy positive ions and water molecules to the ionic species in the liquid is used to explain the overall tendency of the experimental results.

  6. Silicon dimethylamido complexes and ammonia as precursors for the atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride thin films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Gordon; D. M. Hoffman; U. Riaz

    2009-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films are widely used in the microelectronics industry as diffusion barriers, passivation layers, and the active charge storage elements in metal-nitride-oxide semiconductor nonvolatile memory products. Silicon nitride films are normally prepared either by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) using silane and ammonia as precursors or by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using dichlorosilane and ammonia. Herein,

  7. Simultaneous imaging of small metabolites and lipids in rat brain tissues at atmospheric pressure by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Peter; Woods, Amina S; Vertes, Akos

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure imaging mass spectrometry is a rapidly expanding field that offers advantages in the ability to study biological systems in their native condition, simplified sample preparation, and high-throughput experiments. In laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), the native water molecules in biological tissues facilitate sampling by a focused mid-infrared laser beam. The ionization of the ablated material is accomplished by electrospray postionization. In this work, we demonstrate that the imaging variant of LAESI simultaneously provides lateral distributions for small metabolites and lipids directly in rat brain sections. To cope with the fragile nature and potential dehydration of the brain tissue due to drying in the ambient environment as well as to minimize analyte redistribution, a Peltier cooling stage is integrated into the LAESI imaging system. We demonstrate the utility of high-resolution (m/Deltam > 6000) time-of-flight mass spectrometry with LAESI to deconvolute spatial distributions of different chemical species with identical nominal mass. To help with the evaluation of the massive data sets, Pearson colocalization maps are calculated for selected small metabolites and lipids. We show that this approach reveals biologically meaningful correlations between these two classes of biomolecules. PMID:20050678

  8. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) with atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry for drug detection.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, Kristyn M; Tufariello, Jessica A; Zhang, Xing; Li, Shelly X; Goetz, Gilles H; Cheng, Guilong; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2014-04-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was coupled to an ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM-TOFMS) for the direct analysis of active ingredients in pharmaceutical samples. The DESI source was also coupled with a standalone IMS demonstrating potential of portable and inexpensive drug-quality testing platforms. The DESI-IMS required no sample pretreatment as ions were generated directly from tablets and cream formulations. The analysis of a range of over-the-counter and prescription tablet formations was demonstrated for amphetamine (methylphenidate), antidepressant (venlafaxine), barbiturate (Barbituric acid), depressant (alprazolam), narcotic (3-methylmorphine) and sympatholytic (propranolol) drugs. Active ingredients from soft and liquid formulations, such as Icy Hot cream (methyl salicylate) and Nyquil cold medicine (acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, doxylamine) were also detected. Increased sensitivity for selective drug responses was demonstrated through the formation of sodiated adduct ions by introducing small quantities of NaCl into the DESI solvent. Of the drugs and pharmaceuticals tested in this study, 68% (22 total samples) provided a clear ion mobility response at characteristic mobilities either as (M + H)(+), (M - H)(-), or (M + Na)(+) ions. PMID:24551872

  9. Feasibility of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor urinary steroid metabolites during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kauppila, Tiina J; Cva?ka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-06-23

    Steroids have important roles in the progress of pregnancy, and their study in maternal urine is a non-invasive method to monitor the steroid metabolome and its possible abnormalities. However, the current screening techniques of choice, namely immunoassays and gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, do not offer means for the rapid and non-targeted multi-analyte studies of large sample sets. In this study, we explore the feasibility of two ambient mass spectrometry methods in steroid fingerprinting. Urine samples from pregnant women were screened by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The urine samples were processed by solid phase extraction for the DESI measurements and by enzymatic hydrolysis and liquid-liquid-extraction for DAPPI. Consequently, steroid glucuronides and sulfates were detected by negative ion mode DESI-HRMS, and free steroids by positive ion mode DAPPI-HRMS. In DESI, signals of eleven steroid metabolite ions were found to increase as the pregnancy proceeded, and in DAPPI ten steroid ions showed at least an order of magnitude increase during pregnancy. In DESI, the increase was seen for ions corresponding to C18 and C21 steroid glucuronides, while DAPPI detected increased excretion of C19 and C21 steroids. Thus both techniques show promise for the steroid marker screening in pregnancy. PMID:26092341

  10. Low temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of group 14 oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M. [Houston Univ., TX (United States); Atagi, L.M. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chu, Wei-Kan; Liu, Jia-Rui; Zheng, Zongshuang [Houston Univ., TX (United States); Rubiano, R.R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Springer, R.W.; Smith, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Depositions of high quality SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} films from the reaction of homoleptic amido precursors M(NMe{sub 2})4 (M = Si,Sn) and oxygen were carried out in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition r. The films were deposited on silicon, glass and quartz substrates at temperatures of 250 to 450C. The silicon dioxide films are stoichiometric (O/Si = 2.0) with less than 0.2 atom % C and 0.3 atom % N and have hydrogen contents of 9 {plus_minus} 5 atom %. They are deposited with growth rates from 380 to 900 {angstrom}/min. The refractive indexes of the SiO{sub 2} films are 1.46, and infrared spectra show a possible Si-OH peak at 950 cm{sup {minus}1}. X-Ray diffraction studies reveal that the SiO{sub 2} film deposited at 350C is amorphous. The tin oxide films are stoichiometric (O/Sn = 2.0) and contain less than 0.8 atom % carbon, and 0.3 atom % N. No hydrogen was detected by elastic recoil spectroscopy. The band gap for the SnO{sub 2} films, as estimated from transmission spectra, is 3.9 eV. The resistivities of the tin oxide films are in the range 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega}cm and do not vary significantly with deposition temperature. The tin oxide film deposited at 350C is cassitterite with some (101) orientation.

  11. Transparent and Conductive ZnO Thin Films Prepared by Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Zinc Acetylacetonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadatsugu Minami; Hideo Sonohara; Shinzo Takata; Hirotoshi Sato

    1994-01-01

    Highly transparent and conductive undoped and impurity-doped ZnO thin films have been prepared by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Zn(C5H7O2)2 as a zinc source. A resistivity as low as 4.6×10-3 Omega · cm and an average transmittance above 85% in the visible range were obtained for undoped ZnO thin films deposited at 550°C using H2O as the oxygen source.

  12. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

  13. Determination of nivalenol and deoxynivalenol in wheat using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Böhm, J; Luf, W

    1999-08-27

    A new, rapid and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) by using HPLC in combination with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-interface and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. Different LC and MS parameters have been optimized prior to this in order to obtain better results and sensitivity. The effect of nebulizing temperature on the sensitivity and fragmentation of NIV and DON in an APCI interface was investigated. Also, the influence of the cone voltage on the fragmentation pattern was studied, which was shown to have a tremendous effect. Furthermore, the effect of modifiers such as ammonium acetate, acetic acid and ammonia on the ionisation yield of the above substances have been investigated. The extraction was carried out using acetonitrile-water. A two step purification was then applied on two different Mycosep clean up columns. We have used a modified, rapid and isocratic HPLC method combined with a negative ion APCI-MS for the separation and quantitative determination of NIV and DON in wheat extract. An RP C18 column was used for the separation of selected compounds in wheat extract with water-acetonitrile-methanol (82:9:9, v/v/v) at a flow-rate of 1 ml/min without a split. Calibration curves show good linearity and reproducibility. The detection limit and precision were determined for NIV and DON. Both compounds could be detected down to microg/kg level in wheat using selected ion monitoring of the [M-H]- ions and the main fragments. PMID:10497927

  14. Chemical filters by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas for reactive fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osamu Sakai; Tadasuke Morita; Yoshihiko Ueda; Noriaki Sano; Kunihide Tachibana

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas in electrode configurations are designed in this study and investigated at atmospheric pressure for generation of reactive fields. A combination of insulated wire electrodes and bare metal wire electrodes makes it possible to obtain a filter-like assembly of microplasmas, even in ambient air or in aqueous solutions. Oxidation and reduction fields are obtained by controlling the gas supply

  15. Screening of lake sediments for emerging contaminants by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Krauss, Martin; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-01-15

    We developed a multiresidue method for the target and suspect screening of more than 180 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, biocides, additives, corrosion inhibitors, musk fragrances, UV light stabilizers, and industrial chemicals in sediments. Sediment samples were freeze-dried, extracted by pressurized liquid extraction, and cleaned up by liquid-liquid partitioning. The quantification and identification of target compounds with a broad range of physicochemical properties (log K(ow) 0-12) was carried out by liquid chromatography followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). The overall method average recoveries and precision are 103% and 9% (RSD), respectively. The method detection limits range from 0.010 to 4 ng/g(dw), while limits of quantification range from 0.030 to 14 ng/g(dw). The use of APPI as an alternative ionization source helped to distinguish two isomeric musk fragrances by means of different ionization behavior. The method was demonstrated on sediment cores from Lake Greifensee located in northeastern Switzerland. The results show that biocides, musk fragrances, and other personal care products were the most frequently detected compounds with concentrations ranging from pg/g(dw) to ng/g(dw), whereas none of the targeted pharmaceuticals were found. The concentrations of many urban contaminants originating from wastewater correlate with the highest phosphorus input into the lake as a proxy for treatment efficiency. HRMS enabled a retrospective analysis of the full-scan data acquisition allowing the detection of suspected compounds like quaternary ammonium surfactants, the biocide triclocarban, and the tentative identification of further compounds without reference standards, among others transformation products of triclosan and triclocarban. PMID:23215447

  16. Real-time explosives/narcotics vapor enhancement and collection systems for use with the atmospheric pressure ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintze, M. Marx; Hansen, Byron L.; Heath, Russell L.

    1992-05-01

    This paper is a companion document to the Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (API TOFMS) presentation (Lee, et al., 1992). Two significant technique challenges related to design and implementation of vapor collection systems are addressed. They are as follows: (1) freeing deposited or trapped explosive material particles or vapor; and (2) transportation of sample specimen from the pickup point to the detector. Addressed in this dissertation will be both hand-held collection and air shower booth accumulation.

  17. Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge (LS-APGD) Ionization Source for Elemental Mass Spectrometry: Preliminary Parametric Evaluation and Figures of Merit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Derrick Quarles; Anthony J. Carado; Charles J. Barinaga; David W. Koppenaal; R. Kenneth Marcus

    2012-01-01

    A new, low power ionization source for the elemental analysis of aqueous solutions has recently been described. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) source operates at relatively low currents (<20 mA) and solution flow rates (<50 L min¹), yielding a relatively simple alternative for atomic mass spectrometry applications. The LS-APGD has been interfaced to what is otherwise an organic,

  18. Rapid screening procedures for the hydrolysis products of chemical warfare agents using positive and negative ion liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W Read; Robin M Black

    1999-01-01

    Qualitative screening procedures have been developed for the rapid detection and identification of the hydrolysis products of chemical warfare agents in aqueous samples and extracts, using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI). Previously reported screening procedures, which used positive APCI or electrospray ionisation (ESI), were modified by using LC conditions that allowed acquisition of

  19. Etodolac in equine urine and serum: determination by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection, confirmation, and metabolite identification by atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koupai-Abyazani, M R; Esaw, B; Laviolette, B

    1999-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was used for the detection of etodolac in equine serum and urine. The method consisted of a one-step liquid-liquid extraction, separation on a reversed-phase (RP-18) column and detection using an ultraviolet detector. Additional confirmation methods included a HPLC coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer (APCI-MS). Free (unbound) etodolac and its conjugates were present in the samples. Concentrations of the drug in the serum and urine samples collected from four standardbred mares after a single oral administration of Ultradol were determined. Maximum etodolac concentrations of 712, 716, 568, and 767 microg/mL in urine and 4.1, 3.6, 3.1, and 2.2 microg/mL in serum were observed. The peak concentrations of the drug were detected 2-10 h (urine) and 40 min-6 h (serum) after administration to four horses. The maximum detection time was 79 h in urine and 48 h in serum after the drug administration. The drug-elimination profiles for both urine and serum are presented and discussed. Method ruggedness and precision and stability studies of etodolac in serum and urine are presented. Three major metabolites were detected in the urine by liquid chromatography-APCI-MS. All three metabolites were identified as monohydroxylated etodolac. PMID:10369330

  20. Structure-dependent degradation of polar compounds in weathered oils observed by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ananna; Kim, Donghwi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-15

    The resin fractions of fresh mixtures of three oils spilled during the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill, as well as weathered oils collected at weathering stages II and IV from the oil spill site were analyzed and compared by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The significantly decreased abundance of N(+) and [N-H+D](+) ions suggested that secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds were preferentially degraded during the early stage of weathering. [N+H](+) and [N+D](+) ions previously attributed to pyridine-type compounds degraded more slowly than secondary and tertiary amine-containing compounds. The preferential degradation of nitrogen-containing compounds was confirmed by photo-degradation experiments using 15 standard compounds. In addition, significant increases of [S1O1+H](+) and [S1O1+D](+) ions with higher DBE values were observed from fresh oil mixtures as compared to stages II and IV samples, and that could be linked with the decrease of higher DBE compounds of the S1 class. This study presented convincing arguments and evidence demonstrating that secondary and tertiary amines were more vulnerable to photo-degradation than compounds containing pyridine, and hence, preferential degradation depending on chemical structures must be considered in the production of hazardous or toxic components. PMID:25913675

  1. Atmospheric pressure MALDI-FTMS of normal and chemically modified RNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine A. Kellersberger; Eizadora T. Yu; Samuel I. Merenbloom; Daniele Fabris

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI has been combined with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) to obtain the unambiguous\\u000a characterization of RNA samples modified by solvent accessibility reagents used in structural studies of RNA and protein-RNA\\u000a complexes. The formation of cation adducts typical of MS analysis of nucleic acids was effectively reduced by extensive washing\\u000a of the anionic analytes retained onto the

  2. In situ identification of organic components of ink used in books from the 1900s by atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurato, Laura; Candura, Andrea; Grasso, Giuseppe; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes the use of atmospheric pressure/matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (AP/MALDI-MS) as a spatially resolved analytical technique for the study of organic components of inks used to print coloured parts of ancient books. The possibility to operate at atmospheric pressure makes MALDI-MS a new in situ micro-destructive diagnostic tool suitable for analysing samples in air, simplifying the investigation of the organic components of artistic and archaeological objects. In this work, several organic dyes and pigments were identified in situ by analysing different coloured areas of books printed in the years 1911 and 1920. The detected colouring materials, which were available since the 1890s, were often identified as a mixture, confirming the typical procedures used in the lithographic printing processes. The matrix deposition and the laser desorption process did not cause visible alteration of the sample surface.

  3. Determination of selected antifouling booster biocides by high-performance liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin V Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A simple and rapid technique is described for the quantitative determination of four antifouling booster biocides [diuron, 4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothazolin-3-one (Kathon 5287), (2-thiocyanomethylthio)benzothiazole (TCMTB) and (2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulphonyl) (TCMS pyridine) in aqueous samples. The analytes were extracted with high recoveries (ca. 100±?15%) from 2.7-l water samples, using C18 solid-phase extraction. Sample extracts were quantitatively analysed by reversed-phase HPLC and polarity switching atmospheric pressure chemical

  4. Regulated In Situ Generation of Molecular Ions or Protonated Molecules under Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma-Ionization Mass Spectrometric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gangam, Rekha; Pavlov, Julius; Attygalle, Athula B

    2015-07-01

    In an enclosed atmospheric-pressure helium-plasma ionization (HePI) source engulfed with dehumidified ambient gases, molecular cations are generated from compounds such as toluene, bromobenzene, and iodobenzene. Evidently, the ionization is effected by a direct Penning mechanism attributable to interactions of the gas-phase analyte with metastable helium atoms. It is widely known that secondary ions generated from ambient gases also play an important role in the overall ionization process. For example, when the ambient gases bear even traces of moisture, the analytes are ionized by proton transfer reactions with gaseous H3O(+). In this study, we demonstrate how a controlled variation of experimental conditions can manipulate the abundance of molecular ions and protonated molecules in a HePI source. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:25804892

  5. Aircraft Performance: Atmospheric Pressure

    E-print Network

    Aircraft Performance: Atmospheric Pressure FAA Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chap 10 #12 ­ 21% Oxygen ­ 1% other gases (argon, helium, etc) · Most oxygen Atmospheric Pressure;High Density Altitude (worse performance) · High elevations · Low atmospheric pressures · High

  6. Application of liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry, to the analysis and identification of degradation products of chemical warfare agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robin M. Black; Robert W. Read

    1997-01-01

    A qualitative screening procedure was developed for the detection of the hydrolysis and related products of chemical warfare agents using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation. A mixed C8\\/C18 reversed-phase column gave acceptable chromatography for the range of acidic, neutral and basic analytes. Detection limits for pure standards were less than 0.2 ng injected for the simple hydrolysis

  7. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  8. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  9. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of electrochromic Mo-W thin oxide films: Structural, optoelectronic and vibration properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesheva, K. A.; Ivanova, T.; Kozlov, M.; Boyadzhiev, S.

    2010-04-01

    Transition metal oxides exhibit electrochromic effect, under a small voltage they transfer from transparent state to colored one and if voltage polarity is turned back, they bleach again. Oxide coatings possess this ability, but in order to exhibit it, they should be part of a multilayer system-electrochromic device. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition technology was used for preparation of mixed MoO 3-WO 3 films, utilizing thermal decomposition of tungsten and molybdenum carbonyls mixture in oxygen atmosphere. Surface morphology of the films was studied by Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Micro Raman spectroscopy was applied for studying crystalline structure and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed the chemical composition of the mixed oxide thin films. The films of MoO 3-WO 3 show improved electrochromic characteristics compared to single oxide films, especially when the mixed films are in as deposited state and possess amorphous structure.

  10. Step-coverage simulation for tetraethoxysilane and ozone atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, K. (Semiconductor Process Lab., Toyko (Japan)); Egashira, Y.; Shimogaki, Y.; Komiyama, H. (Univ. of Tokyo, (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    A simulation model for atmospheric pressure (AP) CVD has bee developed using one-dimensional diffusion and mass conservation equations. The model was applied to trench step-coverage of the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and O[sub 3] CVD, in which it was not necessary to consider lateral diffusion because of narrow (and deep) trenches. For nondoped silicate glass (NSG), the step-coverage of a 4.5 aspect ratio trench showed a good fit if a sticking probability of 0.0039 was assumed for the 0.6% ozone (in oxygen) deposition and of 0.0026 for the 6% ozone deposition (both 400 C). The reaction rate constant was compared with the diffusion mass-transfer coefficient, and the reaction proved to be limited by diffusion of the reactant, TEOS, which directly participated in the CVD reaction. For the 2 m/o phosphosilicate glass (PSG) step-coverage, which had a slight overhang, the model matched the obtained results well only when an active growth species with a high sticking probability of 1.0 was added to the growth species of nondoped oxide. This analytical simulation method satisfactorily explains the experimental data.

  11. Abstract--Doping reaction of diborane B2H6 on Si(100) substrates in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-print Network

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) system has been studied in terms of dopant profile and junction depth in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) system at 700 ºC, effective B-doping of the silicon vapor deposition (CVD), junction depth, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), sheet resistance

  12. Direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry for aroma analysis: Speed, sensitivity and resolution of isobaric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jublot, Lionel; Linforth, Robert S. T.; Taylor, Andrew J.

    2005-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) sources were developed for real time analysis of volatile release from foods using an ion trap (IT) mass spectrometer (MS). Key objectives were spectral simplicity (minimal fragmentation), response time and signal to noise ratio. The benefits of APCI-IT-MS were assessed by comparing the performance for in vivo and headspace analyses with that obtained using APCI coupled to a quadrupole mass analyser. Using MS-MS, direct APCI-IT-MS was able to differentiate mixtures of some C6 and terpene isobaric aroma compounds. Resolution could be achieved for some compounds by monitoring specific secondary ions. Direct resolution was also achieved with two of the three isobaric compounds released from chocolate with time as the sample was eaten.

  13. Chemical detoxification of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in a microwave discharge plasma reactor at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the application of plasma technology to hazardous waste treatment. Microwave sustained plasmas are used to thermal degrade trichloroethylene and trichloroethane at atmospheric pressure. (JL)

  14. Chemical detoxification of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in a microwave discharge plasma reactor at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.R.; Helt, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    This report focuses on the application of plasma technology to hazardous waste treatment. Microwave sustained plasmas are used to thermal degrade trichloroethylene and trichloroethane at atmospheric pressure. (JL)

  15. Analysis of lipids with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) and desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Suni, Niina M; Aalto, Henni; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-05-01

    In this article, the effect of spray solvent on the analysis of selected lipids including fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins, triacylglycerols, steroids, phospholipids, and sphingolipids has been studied by two different ambient mass spectrometry (MS) methods, desorption electrospray ionization-MS (DESI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-MS (DAPPI-MS). The ionization of the lipids with DESI and DAPPI was strongly dependent on the spray solvent. In most cases, the lipids were detected as protonated or deprotonated molecules; however, other ions were also formed, such as adduct ions (in DESI), [M-H](+) ions (in DESI and DAPPI), radical ions (in DAPPI), and abundant oxidation products (in DESI and DAPPI). DAPPI provided efficient desorption and ionization for neutral and less polar as well as for ionic lipids but caused extensive fragmentation for larger and more labile compounds because of a thermal desorption process. DESI was more suitable for the analysis of the large and labile lipids, but the ionization efficiency for less polar lipids was poor. Both methods were successfully applied to the direct analysis of lipids from pharmaceutical and food products. Although DESI and DAPPI provide efficient analysis of lipids, the multiple and largely unpredictable ionization reactions may set challenges for routine lipid analysis with these methods. PMID:22576874

  16. Halo-shaped Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow – a Heavenly New Design for Simplified Sample Introduction and Improved Ionization in Ambient Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Schaper, J. Niklas; Shelley, Jacob T.; Ray, Steven J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Bings, Nicolas H.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    The flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) is a promising new source for atmospheric pressure, ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. However, problems exist with reproducible sample introduction into the FAPA source. To overcome this limitation, a new FAPA geometry has been developed in which concentric tubular electrodes are utilized to form a halo-shaped discharge; this geometry has been termed the halo-FAPA or h-FAPA. With this new geometry, it is still possible to achieve direct desorption and ionization from a surface; however, sample introduction through the inner capillary is also possible and improves interaction between the sample material (solution, vapor, or aerosol) and the plasma to promote desorption and ionization. The h-FAPA operates with a helium gas flow of 0.60 L/min outer, 0.30 L/min inner, applied current of 30 mA at 200 V for 6 watts of power. In addition, separation of the discharge proper and sample material prevents perturbations to the plasma. Optical-emission characterization and gas rotational temperatures reveal that the temperature of the discharge is not significantly affected (< 3% change at 450K) by water vapor during solution-aerosol sample introduction. The primary mass-spectral background species are protonated water clusters, and the primary analyte ions are protonated molecular ions (M+H+). Flexibility of the new ambient sampling source is demonstrated by coupling it with a laser ablation unit, a concentric nebulizer and a droplet-on-demand system for sample introduction. A novel arrangement is also presented in which the central channel of the h-FAPA is used as the inlet to a mass spectrometer. PMID:23808829

  17. A comparison of the gas sensing properties of solid state metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors produced by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition and screen printing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell Binions; Claire J Carmalt; Ivan P Parkin

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of metal chloride, MCln (where M = Ga, Sb or Sn) and ethyl acetate under atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) conditions leads to the production of metal oxide thin films on a variety of gas sensor substrates. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that an island growth mechanism predominated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed binding energy shifts similar to previous

  18. Homoleptic tin and silicon amido compounds as precursors for low-temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of tin and silicon oxide thin films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauren M. Atagi; David M. Hoffman; Jia-Rui Liu; Zongshuang Zheng; Wei-Kan Chu; Rodrigo R. Rubiano; Robert W. Springer; David C. Smith

    1994-01-01

    Tin oxide films doped with fluorine or antimony are transparent conductors used in optoelectronic devices and solar cells. Silicon oxide thin films are used as diffusion barriers, passivation layers and dielectric layers in the microelectronics industry. Tin oxide thin films are commonly deposited in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) processes by hydrolyzing SnCl[sub 4] or by reacting tetramethyltin with

  19. Plasma decontamination of chemical & biological warfare agents by a cold arc plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Man Hyeop Han; Joo Hyun Noh; Ki Wan Park; Hyeon Seok Hwang; Hong Koo Baik

    2008-01-01

    The cold arc plasma jet was introduced to decontaminate chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents for the application of a portable CBW decontamination system. The cold arc plasma jet is a low temperature, high density plasma that produces highly reactive species such as oxygen atoms and ozone. Moreover, it is possible to maintain stable plasma without He or Ar. The

  20. Z .Thin Solid Films 392 2001 231 235 Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of

    E-print Network

    of electrochromic tungsten oxide films Roy G. Gordona,U , Sean Barryb , Jeffrey T. Bartona , Randy N.R. Broomhall oxide, WO , is a coloring layer commonly used in electrochromic windows and displays. Successful: Chemical vapor deposition; Tungsten; Oxides; Electrochromism 1. Introduction Tungsten oxide is a key

  1. Internal energy deposition and ion fragmentation in atmospheric-pressure mid-infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Peter; Huang, Hehua; Vertes, Akos

    2012-02-21

    Mid-infrared laser ablation of water-rich targets at the maximum of the 2.94 ?m absorption band is a two-step process initiated by phase explosion followed by recoil pressure induced material ejection. Particulates and/or droplets ejected by this high temperature high pressure process can be ionized for mass spectrometry by charged droplets from an electrospray. In order to gauge the internal energy introduced in this laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI®) process, we apply the survival yield method and compare the results with electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). The results indicate that LAESI yields ions with internal energies indistinguishable from those produced by ESI. This finding is consistent with the recoil pressure induced ejection of low micrometre droplets that does not significantly change the internal energy of solute molecules. PMID:22249858

  2. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of friction modifier additives analyzed directly from base oil solutions.

    PubMed

    Widder, Lukas; Brennerb, Josef; Huttera, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    To develop new products and to apply measures of quality control quick and simple accessibility of additive composition in automo- tive lubrication is important. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analyzing organic friction modifier additives by means of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry [AP-MALDI-MS] from lubricant solu- tions without the use of additional separation techniques. Analyses of selected friction modifier ethoxylated tallow amines and oleic acid amide were compared using two ionization methods, positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and AP-MALDI, using a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Pure additives were characterized from solvent solutions, as well as from synthetic and mineral base oil mixtures. Detected ions of pure additive samples consisted mainly of [M + H]+, but also alkaLi metal adducts [M + Na]+ and [M + K]+ could be seen. Characterizations of blends of both friction modifiers from the base oil mixtures were carried out as well and showed significant inten- sities for several additive peaks. Thus, this work shows a method to directly analyze friction modifier additives used in the automotive industry from an oil blend via the use of AP-MALDI without any further separation steps. The method presented will further simplify the acquisition of data on lubricant composition and additives. Furthermore, it allows the perspective of analyzing additive reaction products directly from formulated oil blends. PMID:25420342

  3. Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of friction modifier additives analyzed directly from base oil solutions.

    PubMed

    Widder, Lukas; Brennerb, Josef; Huttera, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    To develop new products and to apply measures of quality control quick and simple accessibility of additive composition in automo- tive lubrication is important. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analyzing organic friction modifier additives by means of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry [AP-MALDI-MS] from lubricant solu- tions without the use of additional separation techniques. Analyses of selected friction modifier ethoxylated tallow amines and oleic acid amide were compared using two ionization methods, positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and AP-MALDI, using a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Pure additives were characterized from solvent solutions, as well as from synthetic and mineral base oil mixtures. Detected ions of pure additive samples consisted mainly of [M + H]+, but also alkaLi metal adducts [M + Na]+ and [M + K]+ could be seen. Characterizations of blends of both friction modifiers from the base oil mixtures were carried out as well and showed significant inten- sities for several additive peaks. Thus, this work shows a method to directly analyze friction modifier additives used in the automotive industry from an oil blend via the use of AP-MALDI without any further separation steps. The method presented will further simplify the acquisition of data on lubricant composition and additives. Furthermore, it allows the perspective of analyzing additive reaction products directly from formulated oil blends. PMID:25507326

  4. Numerical simulation for the production of chemically active species in primary and secondary streamers in atmospheric-pressure dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Production of chemically active species in primary and secondary streamers is investigated using a two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulation model. The production processes of N2(v??=??1), O(3P) and N(4S), which each have different threshold energies, are simulated using experimentally obtained pulsed voltages with peak values, Vpeak, of 18, 24 and 30 kV in dry air at atmospheric pressure. As Vpeak increases, the simulated length of the secondary streamer increases, although there is little change in the primary streamer characteristics. This means that the ratio of the secondary streamer phase to the primary streamer phase increases for increasing Vpeak. The simulated results show that as Vpeak increases, the energy efficiency of O(3P) production increases and that of N2(v??=??1) production decreases. On the other hand, the energy efficiency of N(4S) production has reduced dependence on Vpeak. These characteristics can be explained by the spatiotemporal variations of the reduced electric field in the primary and secondary streamer.

  5. Identification of desulphoglucosinolates in Brassicaceae by LC/MS/MS: comparison of ESI and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-MS.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Nadine S; Gerendás, Jóska; Krumbein, Angelika

    2007-12-01

    In order to develop a sensitive method for the detection of desulphoglucosinolates by HPLC-MS, the two most common interfaces for HPLC-MS, atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) and ESI, were compared. While working with the APCI-interface the evaporation temperature and corona amperage were optimised. In doing so 300 degrees C and 6 muA proved to be most suitable for aliphatic and indole desulphoglucosinolates. The use of formic acid instead of water in the eluent in HPLC-ESI-MS measurements increased the sensitivity for the indole desulphoglucosinolates in the presence of 1 mM formic acid, while the sensitivity for the aliphatic desulphoglucosinolate desulphoglucoraphanin was substantially increased by the presence of 5 mM formic acid. Using an Agilent ion trap, two optimisation procedures for the MS parameters, smart and expert mode, were available. In smart mode the software optimises several parameters automatically, which is much more time efficient than expert mode, in which the optimisation is done manually. It turned out that ESI-MS is most sensitive in smart mode, while for APCI-MS a higher sensitivity could be gained using the expert mode. Comparing both interfaces, APCI-MS was more sensitive than ESI-MS. However, no additional information, in terms of structure determination, was obtained by APCI-MS. PMID:18030659

  6. Synthesis of Diamond-Like Carbon Films on Planar and Non-Planar Geometries by the Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noborisaka, Mayui; Hirako, Tomoaki; Shirakura, Akira; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Masashi; Seki, Masaki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by the dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure and their hardness and gas barrier properties were measured. A decrease in size of grains and heating substrate temperature improved nano-hardness up to 3.3 GPa. The gas barrier properties of DLC-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) sheets were obtained by 3-5 times of non-coated PET with approximately 0.5 µm in film thickness. The high-gas-barrier DLC films deposited on PET sheets are expected to wrap elevated bridge of the super express and prevent them from neutralization of concrete. We also deposited DLC films inside PET bottles by the microwave surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method at near-atmospheric pressure. Under atmospheric pressure, the films were coated uniformly inside the PET bottles, but did not show high gas barrier properties. In this paper, we summarize recent progress of DLC films synthesized at atmospheric pressure with the aimed of food packaging and concrete pillar.

  7. Infrared Laser Ablation Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Infrared Laser Ablation Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry Anu Vaikkinen ablation atmo- spheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 e

  8. Comparing magnetotransport and surface magnetic properties of half-metallic CrO2 films grown by low pressure and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pathak; X. Zhong; J. Wang; X. Zhang; T. M. Klein; P. Leclair; A. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    CrO2 films prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using Cr(CO)6 precursor have been investigated and compared with epitaxial half metallic CrO2 films prepared at atmospheric pressure (APCVD) using CrO3 precursor for their magnetotransport and surface magnetic properties. LPCVD films showed higher resistivity than APCVD epitaxial (100) CrO2 films prepared on (100) TiO2 substrates. Magnetoresistance of LPCVD films is

  9. Microscopic investigations of the indium nitride crystals with flower-like morphology grown by means of halide chemical vapour deposition under atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoyuki Takahashi; Haruka Sugiura; Takato Nakamura; Masayuki Yoshioka

    2004-01-01

    Indium nitride prepared under atmospheric pressure using a halide chemical vapour deposition method has been examined by means of a variety of analytical techniques. From the scanning electron microscopic observations of the crystals deposited onto a Si(100) substrate, it was found that they have flower-like morphology. Based on the electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses, it was deduced that

  10. Decontamination of the chemical warfare agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate by means of large-area low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan Bee Kim; B. Gweon; S. Y. Moon; W. Choe

    2009-01-01

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a chemical simulant of the nerve gas GB, was decontaminated with a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma. The decontamination efficiency was measured qualitatively by means of Fourier transform spectroscopy and quantitatively by means of gas chromatography. With helium gas only, 10g\\/m2 of DMMP on an aluminum surface was 99.9% decontaminated in 2min, furthermore, with the addition of 5%

  11. Two-temperature chemically non-equilibrium modelling of high-power Ar N2 inductively coupled plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasunori Tanaka

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional thermal and chemical non-equilibrium model was developed for high-power Ar-N2 inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) at atmospheric pressure, which are conventionally assumed to be under local thermal equilibrium condition. The energy conservation equation of electrons was treated separately from that of heavy particles. These equations consider reaction heat effects and energy transfer between electrons and heavy particles as well

  12. Preparation of Cu 2O films on MgO (1 1 0) substrate by means of halide chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroki Kobayashi; Takato Nakamura; Naoyuki Takahashi

    2007-01-01

    High-quality Cu2O thin films were grown epitaxially on MgO (110) substrate by halide chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure (AP-HCVD). The full width at half maximum of X-ray diffraction ? rocking measurement of the (220) plane was 0.1429° and that the of the (1?10) plane was 0.303°.This result showed that the Cu2O films have a high degree of out-of-plane and

  13. Growth of the AlN nano-pillar crystal films by means of a halide chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masayuki Yoshioka; Naoyuki Takahashi; Takato Nakamura

    2004-01-01

    Preparation of AlN thin film has been examined by halide chemical vapor deposition technique using AlI3 and NH3 as starting materials under atmospheric pressure (AP-HCVD). The structural analysis of the deposited AlN films prepared on a Si(100) substrate by the AP-HCVD technique were carried out by the X-ray pole figure analysis. They consist of the hexagonal AlN nano-pillar crystals. It

  14. Effect of cluster\\/particle deposition on atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 from four gaseous organic Si-containing precursors and ozone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshiyuki Fujimoto; Kikuo Okuyama; Satoshi Yamada; Motoaki Adachi

    1999-01-01

    In order to analyze the particle generation and its effect on the SiO2 thin film in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process using four organic silicon vapors and ozone gas, gas-phase particle generation, growth, transportation and vapor-cluster\\/particle codeposition processes were studied experimentally and theoretically using a flow-type vertical tube reactor. Decomposition reaction rates of four organic silicon vapors

  15. Environmental PAH analysis by gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure laser ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (GC-APLI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stader, Christian; Beer, Fokko Tjark; Achten, Christine

    2013-09-01

    The application of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis by gas chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure laser ionization and mass spectrometry (GC-APLI-MS) to environmental samples was investigated in the study. The limit of detection for 40 PAH in a standard mixture was 5-100 fg, demonstrating GC-APLI-MS to be a highly sensitive technique and more sensitive by a factor of 100-3,500 compared to GC-MS. Acenaphthylene and cyclopenta[cd]pyrene were not detectable <2,500 fg per injection. To make use of this very high PAH sensitivity, the technique was applied to samples of environmental interest with limited available sample amounts such as particulate matter (PM), soot and a sample from a bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus. First, special sample preparation was necessary and ultrasonic extraction proved to be suitable, if a thorough clean-up was performed and plastic materials avoided. By GC-APLI-MS and GC-MS, 224 and 28 single PAH compounds were detected in PM, about 1,000 and 15 in birch soot, and 9 and 2 in worm tissue, respectively, revealing the enormous potential of the method. The selectivity of GC-APLI-MS was shown for a crude oil where >2,200 PAH were detected without any sample preparation. PMID:23852149

  16. Practical considerations when using radio frequency-only quadrupole ion guide for atmospheric pressure ionization sources with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hang, Wei; Lewis, Cris; Majidi, Vahid

    2003-03-01

    Construction details and performance evaluation of a radio frequency (rf)-only quadrupole ion guide for use with an electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer is presented in this paper. Angiotensin III and cytochrome c were used in these experiments to investigate the ion transmission properties of the rf-only quadrupole for different m/z species. In addition, influence of ion kinetic energies along with the characteristic fragmentation due to collision induced dissociation (CID) were studied. These experiments demonstrate that the transmissions of different m/z ions were not only dependent on the frequency and magnitude of the rf waveform, which is similar to a high vacuum rf-only quadrupole ion guide, but also on the pressure inside the quadrupole chamber. For the pressure range tested, low m/z ions are better focused with increasing pressure. As expected, transmission of ions are subject to space charge limitations when significant numbers of ions are focused on the axis of the quadrupole. It is also observed that CID results are related to transverse motion and longitude motion of ions inside the quadrupole region. Consequently, CID is useful for fragmentation of linear peptides and it is not effective (in present configuration) for large bulky proteins. The kinetic energy of ions that enter the repelling region of the TOFMS is ultimately determined by the ensemble effect resulting from the dc bias potential of the quadrupole (the dominant factor), skimmer-2, pressure inside the quadrupole chamber, and jet expansion. While this system is tested with an ESI source, the operational principle and design criteria are directly applicable for improving other atmospheric pressure ionization sources with time-of-flight mass analyzers such as an inductively coupled plasma ion source. PMID:12705387

  17. Selective growth of silicon-germanium alloys by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition at low temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Agnello; T. O. Sedgwick; M. S. Goorsky; J. Ott; T. S. Kuan; G. Scilla

    1991-01-01

    Dichlorosilane and germane were used to grow silicon-germanium alloys at temperatures as low as 550 °C at atmospheric pressure. The silicon-germanium alloy composition was varied over the range 15%–44%. Films containing high Ge mole fractions were grown at a temperature of 625 °C and below and exhibit smooth surface morphology. Silicon-germanium\\/silicon multilayers with abrupt heterointerfaces have been achieved. Selective growth

  18. Development and validation of sensitive method for determination of serum cotinine in smokers and nonsmokers by liquid chromatography\\/atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John T. Bernert; Wayman E. Turner; James L. Pirkle; Connie S. Sosnoff; James R. Akins; Mary K. Waldrep; Qinghong Ann; Thomas R. Covey; Wanda E. Whitfield; Elaine W. Gunter; Barbara B. Miller; Donald G. Patterson; Larry L. Needham; W. Harry; Eric J. Sampson

    We describe a sensitive and specific method for measur- ing cotinine in serum by HPLC coupled to an atmo- spheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spec- trometer. This method can analyze 100 samples\\/day on a routine basis, and its limit of detection of 50 ng\\/L makes it applicable to the analysis of samples from nonsmok- ers potentially exposed to environmental

  19. The potential of organic (electrospray- and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation) mass spectrometric techniques coupled to liquid-phase separation for speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Erwin

    2003-06-01

    The use of mass spectrometry based on atmospheric pressure ionisation techniques (atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation, APCI, and electrospray ionisation, ESI) for speciation analysis is reviewed with emphasis on the literature published in and after 1999. This report accounts for the increasing interest that atmospheric pressure ionisation techniques, and in particular ESI, have found in the past years for qualitative and quantitative speciation analysis. In contrast to element-selective detectors, organic mass spectrometric techniques provide information on the intact metal species which can be used for the identification of unknown species (particularly with MS-MS detection) or the confirmation of the actual presence of species in a given sample. Due to the complexity of real samples, it is inevitable in all but the simplest cases to couple atmospheric pressure MS detection to a separation technique. Separation in the liquid phase (capillary electrophoresis or liquid chromatography in reversed phase, ion chromatographic or size-exclusion mode) is particularly suitable since the available techniques cover a very wide range of analyte polarities and molecular mass. Moreover, derivatisation can normally be avoided in liquid-phase separation. Particularly in complex environmental or biological samples, separation in one dimension is not sufficient for obtaining adequate resolution for all relevant species. In this case, multi-dimensional separation, based on orthogonal separation techniques, has proven successful. ESI-MS is also often used in parallel with inductively coupled plasma MS detection. This review is structured in two parts. In the first, the fundamentals of atmospheric pressure ionisation techniques are briefly reviewed. The second part of the review discusses recent applications including redox species, use of ESI-MS for structural elucidation of metal complexes, characterisation and quantification of small organometallic species with relevance to environment, health and food. Particular attention is given to the characterisation of biomolecules and metalloproteins (metallothioneins and phytochelatins) and to the investigation of the interaction of metals and biomolecules. Particularly in the latter field, ESI-MS is the ideal technique due to the softness of the ionisation process which allows to assume that the detected gas-phase ions are a true representation of the ions or ion-biomolecule complexes prevalent in solution. It is particularly this field, important to biochemistry, physiology and medical chemistry, where we can expect significant developments also in the future. PMID:12877203

  20. Preparation of Ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12 Thin Films with c-Axis Orientation by Atmospheric-Pressure MetalOrganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuniaki Yoshimura; Minoru Ishinabe; Soichiro Okamura; Takeyo Tsukamoto

    1995-01-01

    Ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12 thin films were prepared by the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method at atmospheric pressure using Bi( o-C7H7)3 and Ti( i-OC3H7)2(DPM)2 as metalorganic sources. Assist Ar gas flow rate effects on the growth of the thin films were also examined. Thin films obtained were characterized by XRD analysis, SEM, AFM and D-E hysteresis loop observations. Most of the

  1. Growth of zinc oxide films and nanowires by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition using zinc powder and water as source materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Terasako; M. Yagi; M. Ishizaki; Y. Senda; H. Matsuura; S. Shirakata

    2007-01-01

    Highly oriented ZnO films have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrate by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition using Zn powder and H2O as source materials. Photoluminescence intensity ratio of the green band at ?2.5 eV to the near-band-edge emission at ?3.2 eV (IGB\\/INBE) decreased with increasing the source feeding ratio of H2O to Zn (VI\\/II), indicating the possibility of the defect control. The

  2. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of, e.g. Werner von Siemens [9], who studied a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in the context of ozone generation. DBD discharges often consist of numerous filamentary discharges which are inherently transient in nature and with a characteristic size similar to the dimensions of microplasmas. Several groups are investigating the stabilization of such plasma filaments to perform temporal and spatial resolved diagnostics. To this end and due to the many similar challenges for diagnostics, this type of discharge is also included in this special issue. Research on microplasmas is performed in many groups spread all over the world, and a biannual workshop is devoted to the topic. The 7th edition of this International Workshop on Microplasmas was held in Beijing in May 2013. Large research programs consisting of clusters of research labs such as in Japan, Germany, France and the USA have been producing a wealth of information available in the literature. As the editors of this special issue, we are very pleased to have attracted a collection of excellent papers from leading experts in the field covering most of the current diagnostics performed in microplasmas. As an introduction to the regular special issue papers, a review paper is included [10]. It describes the key characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasmas and microplasmas in particular, and reviews the state of the art in plasma diagnostics. Special attention has been given in this review to highlighting the issues and challenges to probe microplasmas. The regular papers cover a large range of different diagnostics including coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) [11], (two-photon) laser induced fluorescence ((Ta)LIF) [12, 13, 18, 24], absorption spectroscopy [13-18], optical emission spectroscopy [12, 16-21, 24], imaging [22, 23], surface diagnostics [24, 25] and mass spectrometry [26, 27]. Different aspects of microplasmas are broadly investigated from a perspective of diagnostics, modelling and applications. Diagnostics are pivotal to both the development of models and the optimization and explorat

  3. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled using proximal probe thermal desorption with electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemica lionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure proximal probe thermal desorption sampling method coupled with secondary ionization by electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was demonstrated for the mass spectrometric analysis of a diverse set of compounds (dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, explosives and pesticides) separated on various high-performance thin-layer chromatography plates. Line scans along or through development lanes on the plates were carried out by moving the plate relative to a stationary heated probe positioned close to or just touching the stationary phase surface. Vapors of the compounds thermally desorbed from the surface were drawn into the ionization region of a combined electrospray ionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source where they merged with reagent ions and/or charged droplets from a corona discharge or an electrospray emitter and were ionized. The ionized components were then drawn through the atmospheric pressure sampling orifice into the vacuum region of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected using full scan, single ion monitoring, or selected reaction monitoring mode. Studies of variable parameters and performance metrics including the proximal probe temperature, gas flow rate into the ionization region, surface scan speed, read-out resolution, detection limits, and surface type are discussed.

  4. Metabolite localization by atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging in whole-body sections and individual organs of the rove beetle Paederus riparius.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Schott, Matthias; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging provides for non-targeted, label-free chemical imaging. In this study, atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) was used for the first time to describe the chemical distribution of the defensive compounds pederin, pseudopederin, and pederon in tissue sections (16 ?m thick) of the rove beetle Paederus riparius. The whole-insect tissue section was scanned with a 20-?m step size. Mass resolution of the orbital trapping mass spectrometer was set to 100,000 at m/z 200. Additionally, organ-specific compounds were identified for brain, nerve cord, eggs, gut, ovaries, and malpighian tubules. To confirm the distribution of the specific compounds, individual organs from the insect were dissected, and MSI experiments were performed on the dissected organs. Three ganglia of the nerve cord, with a dimension of 250-500 ?m, were measured with 10-?m spatial resolution. High-quality m/z images, based on high spatial resolution and high mass accuracy were generated. These features helped to assign mass spectral peaks with high confidence. Mass accuracy of the imaging experiments was <3 ppm root mean square error, and mapping of different compound classes from a single experiment was possible. This approach improved the understanding of the biochemistry of P. riparius. Concentration differences and distributions of pederin and its analogues could be visualized in the whole-insect section. Without any labeling, we assigned key lipids for specific organs to describe their location in the body and to identify morphological structures with a specificity higher than with staining or immunohistology methods. PMID:25424178

  5. Video Article Direct Analysis of Single Cells by Mass Spectrometry at Atmospheric Pressure

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Video Article Direct Analysis of Single Cells by Mass Spectrometry at Atmospheric Pressure Bindesh., Vertes A. (2010). Direct Analysis of Single Cells by Mass Spectrometry at Atmospheric Pressure. JoVE. 43 electrospray ionization (LAESI) and atmospheric pressure infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization

  6. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisin, J. R.

    Some of the problems related to chemical protection against ionizing radiation are discussed with emphasis on : definition, classification, degree of protection, mechanisms of action and toxicity. Results on the biological response modifyers (BRMs) and on the combination of nontoxic (i.e. low) doses of sulphydryl radioprotectors and BRMs are presented.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Silica SiO2-TiO2 Antireflective Thin Films for Glass Based Solar Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Klobukowski, Erik R [ORNL; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E [ORNL; McCamy, James [PPG; Harris, Caroline [PPG; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of SiO2-TiO2 thin films employing [[(tBuO)3Si]2O-Ti(OiPr)2], which can be prepared from commercially available materials, results in antireflective thin films on float glass under industrially relevant manufacturing conditions. It was found that while the deposition temperature had an effect on the SiO2:TiO2 ratio, the thickness was dependent on the time of deposition. This study shows that it is possible to use APCVD employing a single source precursor containing titanium and silicon to produce thin films on float glass with high SiO2:TiO2 ratios.

  8. Undoped and in-situ B doped GeSn epitaxial growth on Ge by atmospheric pressure-chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, B.; Gencarelli, F.; Bender, H.; Merckling, C.; Douhard, B.; Petersen, D. H.; Hansen, O.; Henrichsen, H. H.; Meersschaut, J.; Vandervorst, W.; Heyns, M.; Loo, R.; Caymax, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this letter, we propose an atmospheric pressure-chemical vapor deposition technique to grow metastable GeSn epitaxial layers on Ge. We report the growth of defect free fully strained undoped and in-situ B doped GeSn layers on Ge substrates with Sn contents up to 8%. Those metastable layers stay fully strained after 30 min anneal in N2 at 500 °C; Ge-Sn interdiffusion is seen at 500 °C but not at lower temperature. B is 100% active in the in-situ GeSn:B layers up to a concentration of 1.7 × 1019 cm-3. GeSn:B provides slightly lower Hall hole mobility values than in pure p-type Ge especially for low B concentrations.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, W. G.; Nersisyan, G. [International Research Centre for Experimental Physics, Queens University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-01

    Their relative engineering simplicity, plasma uniformity and chemistry make Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharges (APGD) very attractive for plasma processing applications. Here some of the basic characteristics of glow discharges are introduced. The basic dielectric barrier discharge and how it can be operated in a uniform glow rather filamentary mode is described. Electrical and laser-based measurements that throw light on the underlying physics of APGDs are presented, along with a model which seeks to explore the plasma chemistry of these discharges.

  10. Determination of aldehydes and ketones using derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suze M. van Leeuwen; Laurens Hendriksen; Uwe Karst

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (APPI-MS) is used for the analysis of aldehydes and ketones after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and liquid chromatographic separation. In the negative ion mode, the [M ? H]? pseudomolecular ions are most abundant for the carbonyls. Compared with the established atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-MS, limits of detection are typically lower using similar conditions. Automobile exhaust

  11. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of 3C-SiC for silicon thin-film solar cells on various substrates.

    PubMed

    Schillinger, Kai; Janz, Stefan; Reber, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    The production of crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on cost effective ceramic substrates depends on a highly reliable diffusion barrier to separate the light absorbing layers from the substrate. Ideally this intermediate layer should be deposited with cost effective techniques, be conductive and should feature optical confinement. Furthermore the intermediate layer should withstand high temperatures and harsh chemical environments like they occur during solar cell processing. Especially stability against oxidizing solvents like HNO3 or inactivity during e.g., oxide removing steps with HF is required. Crystalline silicon carbide (c-SiC) deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) can match all those requirements and additionally fits the thermal properties of crystalline silicon. The c-SiC intermediate layer is deposited from methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) and H2 at 1100 degrees C. Under these conditions, growth of solely cubic 3C-SiC could be observed by X-ray diffraction measurements. Use of such intermediate layers during high temperature steps prevents diffusion of transition metals, originating from the substrates, into active silicon layers. Doping of these 3C-SiC layers with nitrogen results in specific resistivity of less than 100 ohms cm. The different potentially cost-effective substrates are made from graphite, crystalline silicon, sintered silicon carbide and sintered zircon (ZrSiO4). Surface properties of the coated substrates were investigated, explaining changes in surface roughness and influences on the solar cell processing. PMID:22097538

  12. Optical diagnostics of atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C O Laux; T G Spence; C H Kruger; R N Zare

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure air plasmas are often thought to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium owing to fast interspecies collisional exchange at high pressure. This assumption cannot be relied upon, particularly with respect to optical diagnostics. Velocity gradients in flowing plasmas and\\/or elevated electron temperatures created by electrical discharges can result in large departures from chemical and thermal equilibrium. This paper reviews

  13. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  14. Preparation and residual stress characterization of polycrystalline silicon germanium films grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorini, P.; Sedky, S.; Caymax, M.; Baert, C.

    1997-07-01

    Polycrystalline silicon-germanium alloys (poly-SiGe) are deposited by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric and reduced pressure. The stress, as well as its profile along the growth direction, are measured. Depending on the deposition pressure the stress can be compressive or tensile, the profile of the stress is in both cases rather uniform. The behavior of the stress as a function of annealing temperature is also investigated. Films which are compressive as grown can be made tensile by annealing, films which are tensile as grown remains tensile even after high temperature annealing.

  15. Organo-Chlorinated Thin Films Deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition for Adhesion Enhancement between Rubber and Zinc-Plated Steel Monofilaments.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Cédric; Bulou, Simon; Maurau, Rémy; Siffer, Frederic; Belmonte, Thierry; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    A continuous-flow plasma process working at atmospheric pressure is developed to enhance the adhesion between a rubber compound and a zinc-plated steel monofilament, with the long-term objective to find a potential alternative to the electrolytic brass plating process, which is currently used in tire industry. For this purpose, a highly efficient tubular dielectric barrier discharge reactor is built to allow the continuous treatment of "endless" cylindrical substrates. The best treatment conditions found regarding adhesion are Ar/O2 plasma pretreatment, followed by the deposition from dichloromethane of a 75 nm-thick organo-chlorinated plasma polymerized thin film. Ar/O2 pretreatment allows the removal of organic residues, coming from drawing lubricants, and induces external growth of zinc oxide. The plasma layer has to be preferably deposited at low power to conserve sufficient hydrocarbon moieties. Surface analyses reveal the complex chemical mechanism behind the establishment of strong adhesion levels, more than five times higher after the plasma treatment. During the vulcanization step, superficial ZnO reacts with the chlorinated species of the thin film and is converted into porous and granular bump-shaped ZnwOxHyClz nanostructures. Together, rubber additives diffuse through the plasma layer and lead to the formation of zinc sulfide on the substrate surface. Hence, two distinct interfaces, rubber/thin film and thin film/substrate, are established. On the basis of these observations, hypotheses explaining the high bonding strength results are formulated. PMID:26069994

  16. Determination of validamycin A in agricultural food samples by solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanxian; Zhang, Zhigang; Shen, Yan; Tian, Zhengan; Xu, Dunming; Han, Chao

    2015-02-15

    For the first time, a rapid, sensitive and accurate liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS) method was developed for determination of validamycin A in agricultural food samples (rice, agaric, almond, cabbage, green onion, carrot, tomato, cucumber and spinach). The validamycin A residue was extracted with methanol-water (9/1, v/v) or methanol by vortex, and a HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge was used for cleaning up the extracts. LC-APCI-MS/MS data acquisition was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. A series of matrix-matched calibration solutions ranging from 2.5 to 50ngmL(-1) were used to record calibration curve. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 10?gkg(-1). The average recoveries, measured at three concentrations levels (10.0, 50.0, 100.0?gkg(-1)) were in the range 83.5-109.6%. The proposed method offers the best sensitivity and specificity for the routine analysis of validamycin A in agricultural food samples. PMID:25236210

  17. Effect of cluster/particle deposition on atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 from four gaseous organic Si-containing precursors and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Toshiyuki; Okuyama, Kikuo; Yamada, Satoshi; Adachi, Motoaki

    1999-04-01

    In order to analyze the particle generation and its effect on the SiO2 thin film in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process using four organic silicon vapors and ozone gas, gas-phase particle generation, growth, transportation and vapor-cluster/particle codeposition processes were studied experimentally and theoretically using a flow-type vertical tube reactor. Decomposition reaction rates of four organic silicon vapors (tetraethylorthosilicate, triethoxysilane, tetramethylorthosilicate, and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) due to the O?oxidation were determined by arranging the number concentrations of the generated particles in Arrhenius plots. The obtained activation energies and frequency factors of reaction rate constants were used to simulate the vapor-cluster/particle codeposition in the CVD process. In the numerical simulation, computational fluid dynamics equations (continuity, momentum, and energy conservation equations) were solved to evaluate the gas velocity, vapor concentration, and temperature profile inside the reactor. Particle population balance equations based on discrete-sectional presentation for the particle size spectrum were solved coupling with diffusion equations of vapors and clusters/particles. This numerical simulation code could explain the vapor-cluster/particle codeposition in the thin film preparation by the APCVD process. The film growth rate and the surface morphology of the film could be reasonably explained by the deposition flux and the size of deposited clusters/particles obtained as numerical simulation results, respectively.

  18. Advantages of atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry in support of drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanxuan; Kingery, David; McConnell, Oliver; Bach, Alvin C

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) technique was evaluated against five sets of standards and drug-like compounds and compared to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). The APPI technique was first used to analyze a set of 86 drug standards with diverse structures and polarities with a 100% detection rate. More detailed studies were then performed for another three sets of both drug standards and proprietary drug candidates. All 60 test compounds in these three sets were detected by APPI with an overall higher ionization efficiency than either APCI or ESI. Most of the non-polar compounds in these three sets were not ionized by APCI or ESI. Analysis of a final set of 201 Wyeth proprietary drug candidates by APPI, APCI and ESI provided an additional comparison of the ionization techniques. The detection rates in positive ion mode were 94% for APPI, 84% for APCI, and 84% for ESI. Combining positive and negative ion mode detection, APPI detected 98% of the compounds, while APCI and ESI detected 91%, respectively. This analysis shows that APPI is a valuable tool for day-to-day usage in a pharmaceutical company setting because it is able to successfully ionize more compounds, with greater structural diversity, than the other two ionization techniques. Consequently, APPI could be considered a more universal ionization method, and therefore has great potential in high-throughput drug discovery especially for open access liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) applications. PMID:15912481

  19. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-SiCN:H films: role of precursors on the film growth and properties.

    PubMed

    Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Andrie, Steven; Simon, Mark; Johnson, Kyle W; Sailer, Robert A

    2012-10-24

    Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) using Surfx Atomflow(TM) 250D APPJ was utilized to synthesize amorphous silicon carbonitride coatings using tetramethyldisilizane (TMDZ) and hexamethyldisilizane (HMDZ) as the single source precursors. The effect of precursor chemistry and substrate temperature (T(s)) on the properties of a-SiCN:H films were evaluated, while nitrogen was used as the reactive gas. Surface morphology of the films was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM); chemical properties were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); thickness and optical properties were determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry and mechanical properties were determined using nanoindentation. In general, films deposited at substrate temperature (T(s)) < 200 °C contained organic moieties, while the films deposited at T(s) > 200 °C depicted strong Si-N and Si-CN absorption. Refractive indices (n) of the thin films showed values between 1.5 and 2.0, depending on the deposition parameters. Mechanical properties of the films determined using nanoindentation revealed that these films have hardness between 0.5 GPa and 15 GPa, depending on the T(s) value. AFM evaluation of the films showed high roughness (R(a)) values of 2-3 nm for the films grown at low T(s) (<250 °C) while the films grown at T(s) ? 300 °C exhibited atomically smooth surface with R(a) of ~0.5 nm. Based on the gas-phase (plasma) chemistry, precursor chemistry and the other experimental observations, a possible growth model that prevails in the AP-PECVD of a-SiCN:H thin films is proposed. PMID:22979919

  20. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  1. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe for high efficiency thin film PV devices: Annual subcontract report, 26 January 1999--25 January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, P. V.; Kee, R.; Wolden, C.; Kestner, J.; Raja, L.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T.; Collins, R.; Fahrenbruch, A.

    2000-05-30

    ITN's three year project Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of CdTe for High Efficiency Thin Film PV Devices has the overall objectives of improving thin film CdTe PV manufacturing technology and increasing CdTe PV device power conversion efficiency. CdTe deposition by APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry as has been used to deposit 16% efficient CdTe PV films, i.e., close spaced sublimation, but employs forced convection rather than diffusion as a mechanism of mass transport. Tasks of the APCVD program center on demonstration of APCVD of CdTe films, discovery of fundamental mass transport parameters, application of established engineering principles to the deposition of CdTe films, and verification of reactor design principles which could be used to design high throughput, high yield manufacturing equipment. Additional tasks relate to improved device measurement and characterization procedures that can lead to a more fundamental understanding of CdTe PV device operation and ultimately to higher device conversion efficiency and greater stability. Under the APCVD program, device analysis goes beyond conventional one-dimensional device characterization and analysis toward two dimension measurements and modeling. Accomplishments of the second year of the APCVD subcontract include: deposition of the first APCVD CdTe; identification of deficiencies in the first generation APCVD reactor; design, fabrication and testing of a ``simplified'' APCVD reactor; deposition of the first dense, adherent APCVD CdTe films; fabrication of the first APCVD CdTe PV device; modeling effects of CdSTe and SnOx layers; and electrical modeling of grain boundaries.

  2. Improved method for the determination of zinc pyrithione in environmental water samples incorporating on-line extraction and preconcentration coupled with liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Bones; Kevin V. Thomas; Brett Paull

    2006-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) in environmental water samples using monolithic reversed-phase silica columns for rapid on-line large volume solid phase extraction in tandem with on-line matrix removal using sacrificial strong anion exchange (SAX) columns. This is coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometric detection. Limits of detection

  3. Constraints on Early Mars atmospheric pressure

    E-print Network

    Kite, Edwin

    Constraints on Early Mars atmospheric pressure from small ancient craters impactors, so impact crater size is a probe of atmospheric pressure. ebar4bar Diameter (m) Fractionofcraterssmallerthan ! Atmospheric pressure upper limit

  4. An atmospheric pressure plasma source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaeyoung Park; I. Henins; H. W. Herrmann; G. S. Selwyn; J. Y. Jeong; R. F. Hicks; D. Shim; C. S. Chang

    2000-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma source operated by radio frequency power has been developed. This source produces a unique discharge that is volumetric and homogeneous at atmospheric pressure with a gas temperature below 300 °C. It also produces a large quantity of oxygen atoms, ~5×1015 cm-3, which has important value for materials applications. A theoretical model shows electron densities of 0.2-2×1011

  5. The application of gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry to impurity identification in Pharmaceutical Development.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Tony; Harrison, Mark; Sims, Martin

    2010-06-15

    Accurate mass measurement (used to determine elemental formulae) is an essential tool for impurity identification in pharmaceutical development for process understanding. Accurate mass liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is used widely for these types of analyses; however, there are still many occasions when gas chromatography (GC)/MS is the appropriate technique. Therefore, the provision of robust technology to provide accurate mass GC/MS (and GC/MS/MS) for this type of activity is essential. In this report we describe the optimisation and application of a newly available atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) interface to couple GC to time-of-flight (TOF) MS.To fully test the potential of the new interface the APCI source conditions were optimised, using a number of standard compounds, with a variety of structures, as used in synthesis at AstraZeneca. These compounds were subsequently analysed by GC/APCI-TOF MS. This study was carried out to evaluate the range of compounds that are amenable to analysis using this technique. The range of compounds that can be detected and characterised using the technique was found to be extremely broad and include apolar hydrocarbons such as toluene. Both protonated molecules ([M + H](+)) and radical cations (M(+.)) were observed in the mass spectra produced by APCI, along with additional ion signals such as [M + H + O](+).The technique has been successfully applied to the identification of impurities in reaction mixtures from organic synthesis in process development. A typical mass accuracy of 1-2 mm/zunits (m/z 80-500) was achieved allowing the reaction impurities to be identified based on their elemental formulae. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of the technique as a tool for problem solving and process understanding in pharmaceutical development. The reaction mixtures were also analysed by GC/electron ionisation (EI)-MS and GC/chemical ionisation (CI)-MS to understand the capability of GC/APCI-MS relative to these two firmly established techniques. PMID:20486265

  6. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  7. Picosecond delays of light emitted by streamer in atmospheric pressure air: analysis of N2(C3

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Picosecond delays of light emitted by streamer in atmospheric pressure air: analysis of N2(C3 u occurring dur- ing the positive streamer propagation in atmospheric pressure air is presented. It is shown and motivation Streamer in atmospheric pressure air is a contracted ionizing wave that propagates into a low

  8. Early plume expansion in atmospheric pressure midinfrared laser ablation of water-rich targets Zhaoyang Chen and Akos Vertes*

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Early plume expansion in atmospheric pressure midinfrared laser ablation of water-rich targets laser pulses at atmospheric pressure. To describe the laser-target interaction and the plume expansion applications 19,23 . For example, atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization AP

  9. Sub-nanosecond delays of light emitted by streamer in atmospheric pressure air: analysis of N2(C3

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sub-nanosecond delays of light emitted by streamer in atmospheric pressure air: analysis of N2(C3 u propagation in atmospheric pressure air is presented. With tens-of-picoseconds and tens-of-microns precision by streamer-head electrons. 1 Introduction Streamer in atmospheric pressure air is a contracted ionizing wave

  10. Quantitative determination of dexamethasone in bovine milk by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cherlet, Marc; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick

    2004-06-01

    Dexamethasone (DXM) is a synthetic glucocorticoid that is authorized for therapeutic use in veterinary medicine. The European Community (EC) fixed a maximum residue limit (MRL) at 2ng/g for liver, 0.75ng/g for muscle and kidney tissues, and 0.3ng/ml for milk, while its use as growth-promoter is completely banned. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a simple and reliable method to determine DXM residues in bovine milk. Milk proteins were removed by the addition of concentrated trichloroacetic acid and paper filtration. Solid-phase extraction clean-up on a C18 reversed phase column was performed to obtain an extract suitable for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Chromatographic separation of DXM and the internal standard desoximetasone, was achieved on a PLRP-S polymeric reversed phase column, using a mixture of 0.1% (v/v) acetic acid in water (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B) as the mobile phases. They were identified using the MS/MS detection technique, and were subsequently quantified. The method has been validated according to the requirements of the EC at 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60ng/ml (being half the MRL, the MRL and double the MRL levels fixed by the EC). Calibration graphs were prepared in the 0.15-5ng/ml range and good linearity was achieved (r>or=0.99 and goodness of fit

  11. Identification of Organic Nitrates in the NO3 Radical Initiated Oxidation of ?-Pinene by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perraud, Veronique M.; Bruns, Emily A.; Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-07-07

    The gas-phase reactions of nitrate radicals (NO3) with biogenic organic compounds are a major sink for these organics during night-time. These reactions form secondary organic aerosols, including organic nitrates thatcanundergolongrange transport, releasing NOx downwind. We report here studies of the reaction of NO3 with R-pinene at 1 atm in dry syntheticair(relativehumidity?3%)andat298Kusingatmospheric pressurechemicalionizationtriplequadrupolemassspectrometry (APCI-MS) to identify gaseous and particulate products. The emphasis is on the identification of individual organic nitrates in the particle phase that were obtained by passing the product mixture through a denuder to remove gas-phase reactants and products prior to entering the source region of the mass spectrometer. Filter extracts were also analyzed by GCMS and by APCI time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-ToFMS) with methanol as the proton source. In addition to pinonaldehyde and pinonic acid, five organic nitrates were identified in the particles as well as in the gas phase: 3-oxopinane- 2-nitrate, 2-hydroxypinane-3-nitrate, pinonaldehyde-PAN, norpinonaldehyde-PAN, and (3-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-3-nitrooxycyclobutyl) acetaldehyde. Furthermore, therewasanadditional firstgeneration organic nitrate product tentatively identified as a carbonyl hydroxynitrate with a molecular mass of 229. These studies suggest that a variety of organic nitrates would partition between the gas phase and particles in the atmosphere, and serve as a reservoir for NO.

  12. A liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry quantitation method for nevirapine and its two oxidative metabolites, 2-hydroxynevirapine and nevirapine 4-carboxylic acid, and pharmacokinetics in baboons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongfa; Fan-Havard, Patty; Xie, Zhiliang; Ren, Chen; Chan, Kenneth K

    2007-01-01

    A rapid highly sensitive and specific electrospray ionization (ESI) liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for quantification of nevirapine (NVP) and its two metabolites, 2-hydroxynevirapine (2-OHNVP) and nevirapine 4-carboxylic acid (4-CANVP), in baboon serum was developed and validated. Nevirapine, 2-OHNVP, 4-CANVP, and the internal standard, hesperetin, were extracted from baboon serum with ethyl acetate. Components in the extract were separated on a 50 x 2.1 mm Aquasil C(18) 5 microm stainless steel column by isocratic elution with 40% acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The liquid flow was passed through a pre-source splitter and 5% of the eluant was introduced into the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source. The components were analyzed in the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode as the precursor/product ion pair of m/z 267.2/226.2 for NVP, 283.0/161.2 for 2-OHNVP, 297.2/279.2 for 4-CANVP, and 303.2/177.2 for hesperetin. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the range of 1-1000 ng/mL for NVP and 2-OHNVP and 5-1000 ng/mL for 4-CANVP, using 0.2 mL baboon serum, respectively. The within-day and between-day precisions were <10% for NVP and 2-OHNVP, and <11.5% for 4-CANVP. Due to the similar structures and fragmentation patterns of 2-OHNVP and 3-OHNVP, it is not expected that the LC/MS/MS can differentiate 2-OHNVP and 3-OHNVP and they were assayed as a composite. The method was applied to a single-dose escalation study of NVP in non-pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) to characterize the pharmacokinetics of NVP, 2-OHNVP plus 3-OHNVP, and 4-CANVP, and to determine the appropriate dose necessary to achieve comparable peak serum concentration of NVP as reported in healthy human adults. PMID:17654464

  13. Negative ion-atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiina J. Kauppila; Tapio Kotiaho; Risto Kostiainen; Andries P. Bruins

    2004-01-01

    The ionization mechanism in the novel atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry (APPI-MS) in negative ion mode\\u000a was studied thoroughly by the analysis of seven compounds in 17 solvent systems. The compounds possessed either gas-phase\\u000a acidity or positive electron affinity, whereas the solvent systems had different polarities and gas-phase acidities and some\\u000a of them positive electron affinities. The analytes that possessed

  14. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Fridman; A. Chirokov; A. Gutsol

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges over the past decade due to the increased number of industrial applications. Diverse applications demand a solid physical and chemical understanding of the operational principals of such discharges. This paper focuses on the four most important and widely used varieties of non-thermal discharges: corona, dielectric barrier, gliding arc and spark

  16. Modification of Glassy Carbon Surfaces by an Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma H. Mortensen 1

    E-print Network

    Modification of Glassy Carbon Surfaces by an Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Torch H. Mortensen 1] and is operated in a ventilated box at atmospheric pressure. The powered electrode is a 0.5-mm diameter tungsten of the surfaces is often necessary. Various methods are employed, such as wet chemical or low-pressure plasma

  17. Transport Properties of CrO2 (100) Film Grown on TiO2 by a Simple Atmosphere Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liang; Zhang, Jin Zhi; Cui, Nai Yi; Zhang, Hong Guang

    2014-06-01

    Epitaxial CrO2 (100)-oriented film was successfully fabricated on TiO2 (100) substrate by a simple chemical vapor deposition in a two-zone furnace with oxygen flow from a CrO3 precursor. The transport measurements show that the CrO2 film is metallic with a small residual resistivity 4 ?? cm down to 0.6 K. The temperature dependence of resistivity was best described by a phenomenological expression ?(T) = ?0 + AT2exp(-?/T) over the range of 0.6-300 K with ? = 123.6 K. The magnetization of the film becomes saturated in a relatively low field with a small coercive field. The temperature dependence of magnetization shows Bloch's T3/2 law and the slope of the curve suggests a critical wavelength of ?? 26.6 Å beyond which spin-flip scattering becomes important.

  18. Real-time Measurement of Secondary Organic Aerosols From The Photo-oxidation of Toluene Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, F.; Arias, M. C.; Merritt, J. V.; Hastie, D. R.

    A system has been developed to study the chemical composition of secondary or- ganic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of hydrocarbons using real-time atmo- spheric pressure chemical ionisation triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (APCI/MS- MS) analysis. To complement existing work with a smog chamber, a two-litre dynamic reaction cell has been built. This has a residence time of around two minutes (instead of several hours for smog chamber experiments), thus permitting on-line analysis. Sample gases are introduced into the air stream and irradiated by a 1000 W xenon arc lamp. Af- ter dilution, some of the mixture from the reaction cell is introduced in the MS ion source via a heated probe, with the particle number density being determined by a condensation nucleus counter on the remainder. The focus so far has been on SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene by HO radicals in presence of NO, with the HO radicals being generated by the photolysis of Isopy- lNitrite (IPN). Prior to performing analyses on the SOA, target compounds (detected in the particulate phase in other studies) were selected and three ions designated to make a fingerprint for each compound. Finally, by using either a denuder, a granu- lar bed diffusion battery or a filter, both gas and particulate phases have been studied independently and compared. Preliminary results show that a number of target compounds, such as methylglyoxylic acid, benzaldehyde or cresol, have been detected in both gas and particulate phases. Most of these compounds appear to be present mainly in the gas phase. An exhaustive identification of organic compounds is a part of the on-going work.

  19. Combinatorial atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of graded TiO?-VO? mixed-phase composites and their dual functional property as self-cleaning and photochromic window coatings.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mia; Kafizas, Andreas; Bawaked, Salem M; Obaid, Abdullah Y; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A; Basahel, Sulaiman N; Carmalt, Claire J; Parkin, Ivan P

    2013-06-10

    A combinatorial film with a phase gradient from V:TiO? (V: Ti ? 0.08), through a range of TiO?-VO? composites, to a vanadium-rich composite (V: Ti = 1.81) was grown by combinatorial atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (cAPCVD). The film was grown from the reaction of TiCl?, VCl?, ethyl acetate (EtAc), and H?O at 550 °C on glass. The gradient in gas mixtures across the reactor induced compositional film growth, producing a single film with numerous phases and compositions at different positions. Seventeen unique positions distributed evenly along a central horizontal strip were investigated. The physical properties were characterized by wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The functional properties examined included the degree of photoinduced hydrophilicity (PIH), UVC-photocatalysis, and thermochromism. Superhydrophilic contact angles could be achieved at all positions, even within a highly VO?-rich composite (V: Ti = 1.81). A maximum level of UVC photocatalysis was observed at a position bordering the solubility limit of V:TiO? (V: Ti ? 0.21) and fragmentation into a mixed-phase composite. Within the mixed-phase TiO?: VO? composition region (V: Ti = 1.09 to 1.81) a decrease in the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature of VO? from 68 to 51 °C was observed. PMID:23688025

  20. Generation Of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma By Diffusive And Constricted Discharges In Rest And Flowing Gases (Air And Nitrogen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Y.; Grushin, M.; Karalnik, V.; Kochetov, I.; Napartovich A.; Trushkin N.

    2010-07-01

    Weekly ionized non-thermal plasma (NTP) is of great interest for many applications because of its strong non-equilibrium state wherein an average electron energy Te exceeds markedly gas temperature Tg, i.e. electrons in the NTP are strongly overheated compared to neutral gas. Energetic electrons due to frequent collisions with the neutrals excite and dissociate effectively atoms and molecules of the plasma-forming gas that results in a creation of physically-, and bio-chemically active gaseous medium in a practically cold background gas. At present there are many kinds of plasma sources working at low and atmospheric pressure and using MW, RF, low frequency, pulsed and DC power supplies for NTP generation. The NTP at atmospheric pressure is of considerable interest for practice. A reason is that sustaining the NTP at atmospheric pressure at first allows us to avoid the use of expensive vacuum equipment and second gives opportunity to use the NTP for treatment of the exhausted gases and polluted liquids. The second opportunity cannot be realized at all with use of the NTP at low pressure. Main subject of this talk is low current atmospheric pressure gas discharges powering with DC power supplies. Plasma forming gases are air and nitrogen which are much cheaper compared to rare gases like He or Ar. Besides, great interest to molecular nitrogen as plasma forming gas is caused first of all its unique capability to accumulate huge energy in vibration, electron (metastables) and dissociated (atomic) states providing high chemical reactivity of the activated nitrogen. All active particles mentioned above have a long lifetime, and they can be therefore transported for a long distance away from place of their generation. Different current modes (diffusive and constricted) of these discharges are discussed. Experimental and numerical results on generation of chemically active species in the diffusive and constricted mode are presented. Some data on the usage of the atmospheric pressure NTP for gas cleanup, surface treatment and sterilization are given.

  1. Diagnostic methods used for atmospheric pressure thermal arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamoši?nas, A.; Valatkevi?ius, P.; Valin?ius, V.; Grigaitien?, V.; Kavaliauskas, Ž.

    2014-05-01

    Diagnostic methods used for atmospheric pressure thermal arc plasmas are presented in this paper. An experimental direct current arc plasma torch was used as a source for plasma generation at atmospheric pressure. Overheated water vapor was employed as a plasma-forming gas with an admixture of argon as a shielding gas. A couple of plasma diagnostic methods were invoked to perform the analysis of the generated plasma jet at the nozzle exhaust of the torch. Firstly, an optical emission spectroscopy method was used to determine the chemical composition of the water vapor plasma, and from the obtained spectra, the rotational and excitation temperatures were calculated roughly. Secondly, an enthalpy probe measurement was performed in order to measure the mean temperature and the velocity lengthwise and crosswise in the plasma stream.

  2. Sterilization and decontamination of surfaces using atmospheric pressure plasma discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Garate, E.; Gornostaeva, O.; Alexeff, I.; Kang, W.L.

    1999-07-01

    The goal of the program is to demonstrate that an atmospheric pressure plasma discharge can rapidly and effectively sterilize or decontaminate surfaces that are contaminated with model biological and chemical warfare agents. The plasma is produced by corona discharge from an array of pins and a ground plane. The array is constructed so that various gases, like argon or helium, can be flowed past the pins where the discharge is initiated. The pin array can be biased using either DC. AC or pulsed discharges. the work done to date has focused on the sterilization of aluminum, polished steel and tantalum foil metal coupons, about 2 cm on a side and 2 mm thick, which have been inoculated with up to 10{sup 6} spores per coupon of Bacillus subtilis var niger or Bascillus stearothermorphilus. Results indicate that 5 minute exposures to the atmospheric pressure plasma discharge can reduce the viable spore count by 4 orders of magnitude. The atmospheric pressure discharge is also effective in decomposing organic phosphate compounds that are stimulants for chemical warfare agents. Details of the decomposition chemistry, by-product formation, and electrical energy consumption of the system will be discussed.

  3. Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas Scott

    An atmospheric pressure plasma source operating at temperatures below 150?C and fed with 1.0-3.0 volume% oxygen in helium was used to activate the surfaces of the native oxide on silicon, carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024. Helium and oxygen were passed through the plasma source, whereby ionization occurred and ˜10 16 cm-3 oxygen atoms, ˜1015 cm -3 ozone molecules and ˜1016 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecules (O21Deltag) were generated. The plasma afterglow was directed onto the substrate material located 4 mm downstream. Surface properties of the plasma treated materials have been investigated using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The work presented herein establishes atmospheric-pressure plasma as a surface preparation technique that is well suited for surface activation and enhanced adhesive bond strength in a variety of materials. Atmospheric plasma activation presents an environmentally friendly alternative to wet chemical and abrasive methods of surface preparation. Attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was used to study the aging mechanism of the native oxide on silicon. During storage at ambient conditions, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 40° over a period of 12 hours. When stored under a nitrogen purge, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 30° over a period of 40-60 hours. The change in contact angle resulted from the adsorption of nonanal onto the exposed surface hydroxyl groups. The rate of adsorption of nonanal under a nitrogen purged atmosphere ranged from 0.378+/-0.011 hr-1 to 0.182+/-0.008 hr -1 molecules/(cm2•s), decreasing as the fraction of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl groups increased from 49% to 96% on the SiO 2 surface. The adsorption of the organic contaminant could be suppressed indefinitely by storing the silicon wafers in the presence of activated carbon or in a freezer at -22°C. The enhancement of adhesive bond strength and durability for carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024 was demonstrated with the atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma. All surfaces studied were converted from a hydrophobic state with a water contact angle of 65° to 80° into a hydrophilic state with a water contact angle between 20° and 40° within 5 seconds of plasma exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the carbon atoms on the carbon-fiber/epoxy composite were oxidized, yielding 17 atom% carboxylic acid groups, 10% ketones or aldehydes and 9% alcohols. Analysis of stainless steel and aluminum by XPS illustrate oxidation of the metal surface and an increase in the concentration of hydroxyl groups in the oxide film. Following plasma activation, the total hydroxyl species concentration on stainless steel increased from 31% to 57%, while aluminum exhibited an increase from 4% to 16% hydroxyl species. Plasma activation of the surface led to an increase in bond strength of the different surfaces by up to 150% when using Cytec FM300 and FM300-2 epoxy adhesives. Wedge crack extension tests following plasma activation revealed cohesive failure percentages of 97% for carbon-fiber/epoxy composite bonded to stainless steel, and 96% for aluminum bonded to itself. The bond strength and durability of the substrates correlated with changes in the specific surface chemistry, not the wetting angle or the morphological properties of the material. This suggests that enhanced chemical bonding at the interface was responsible for the improvement in mechanical properties following plasma activation. The surface preparation of polymers and composites using atmospheric pressure plasmas is a promising technique for replacing traditional methods of surface preparation by sanding, grit blasting or peel ply. After oxygen plasma activation and joining the materials together with epoxy, one observes 100% cohesive failure within the c

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  5. Does low atmospheric pressure independently trigger migraine?

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Rapoport, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Although atmospheric weather changes are often listed among the common migraine triggers, studies to determine the specific weather component(s) responsible have yielded inconsistent results. Atmospheric pressure change produces air movement, and low pressure in particular is associated with warm weather, winds, clouds, dust, and precipitation, but how this effect might generate migraine is not immediately obvious. Humans are exposed to low atmospheric pressure in situations such as ascent to high altitude or traveling by airplane in a pressurized cabin. In this brief overview, we consider those conditions and experimental data delineating other elements in the atmosphere potentially related to migraine (such as Saharan dust). We conclude that the available data suggest low atmospheric pressure unaccompanied by other factors does not trigger migraine. PMID:21906054

  6. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2011-09-19

    Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques. PMID:21819855

  7. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio-temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) gives the evolution of excited species along the trajectory of the plasma bullets. The APLTPJs' chemical composition includes short-lived species, such as He, N2, N+2 , and long-lived species, such as Hem (helium metastable), O3, NO, NO2. It is worth noting that metastable level excited atoms play an important role in promoting an enhanced chemistry along the plasma jet. Some of the APLTPJs' biomedical applications, such as dental hygiene applications and destruction of amyloid fibrils underlying Parkinson's disease, are explored along with an important discussion showing that the APLTPJs do not have a cytotoxic effect on living cells.

  8. Stability Measurements of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Max Karasik; G. Lemunyan; L. Roquemore; S. J. Zweben; G. A. Wurden

    1996-01-01

    Experiments on the stability of atmospheric pressure arcs have been started at PPPL to understand and improve the performance of arc furnaces used for processing applications in metallurgy and hazardous waste treatment. Previous studies have suggested that the violent instabilities in such arcs may be due to kink modes (P. M. Bellan and J. W. Higley. IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.,

  9. Performance of a corona ion source for measurement of sulfuric acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, A.; Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Curtius, J.

    2011-03-01

    The performance of an ion source based on corona discharge has been studied. This source is used for the detection of gaseous sulfuric acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) through the reaction of NO3- ions with H2SO4. The ion source is operated under atmospheric pressure and its design is similar to the one of a radioactive (americium-241) ion source which has been used previously. The results show that the detection limit for the corona ion source is sufficiently good for most applications. For an integration time of 1 min it is ~6 × 104 molecule cm-3 of H2SO4. In addition, only a small cross-sensitivity to SO2 has been observed for concentrations as high as 1 ppmv in the sample gas. This low sensitivity to SO2 is achieved even without the addition of an OH scavenger. When comparing the new corona ion source with the americium ion source for the same provided H2SO4 concentration, both ion sources yield almost identical values. These features make the corona ion source investigated here favorable over the more commonly used radioactive ion sources for most applications where H2SO4 is measured by CIMS.

  10. Electron heating in radio-frequency capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. W.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-29

    In atmospheric-pressure plasmas the main electron heating mechanism is Ohmic heating, which has distinct spatial and temporal evolutions in the {alpha} and {gamma} modes. In {gamma} discharges, ionizing avalanches in the sheaths are initiated not only by secondary electrons but also by metastable pooling reactions. In {alpha} discharges, heating takes place at the sheath edges and in contrast with low-pressure plasmas, close to 50% of the power absorbed by the electrons is absorbed at the edge of the retreating sheaths. This heating is due to a field enhancement caused by the large collisionality in atmospheric-pressure discharges.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnosis of an atmospheric-pressure waveguide-based microwave N2–Ar plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Zhe; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric-pressure N2–Ar plasma is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopic diagnosis concerning the variation of its fundamental parameters, electron density and plasma temperature, and concentrations of ionized molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and excited argon with the tuning variables, such as the input power and the ratio of N2 in N2–Ar mixture gas, in the discharge region of the plasma torch. Moreover, qualitative discussions are delivered with respect to the mechanisms for nitrogen dissociation and influence of the Ar component on the N2 plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  12. Nanoparticle Synthesis by Ionizing Source Gas in Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motoaki Adachi; Shigeki Tsukui; Kikuo Okuyama

    2003-01-01

    A new chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method called ionization CVD, in which reactant gases are ionized, was developed for the synthesis of nanoparticles. In such a CVD method, the particles formed are charged and the repulsive Coulombic force between them suppresses their coagulation, producing non-agglomerated particles that have a relatively high number concentration and small size. A tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS)\\/O2 mixture

  13. Simultaneous determination of diosmin and diosmetin in human plasma by ion trap liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry: Application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Angel Campanero; Manuel Escolar; Guiomar Perez; Emilio Garcia-Quetglas; Belen Sadaba; Jose Ramon Azanza

    2010-01-01

    Diosmetin (3?,5,7-trihydroxy-4?-methoxyflavone) is the aglycone of the flavonoid glycoside diosmin (3?,5,7-trihydroxy-4?-methoxyflavone-7-ramnoglucoside). Diosmin is hydrolyzed by enzymes of intestinal micro flora before absorption of its aglycone diosmetin. A specific, sensitive, precise, accurate and robust HPLC assay for the simultaneous determination of diosmin and diosmetin in human plasma was developed and validated. Plasma samples were incubated with ?-glucuronidase\\/sulphatase. The analytes were isolated

  14. A simple, rapid atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and D3.

    PubMed

    Garg, Uttam; Munar, Ada; Frazee, Clinton; Scott, David

    2012-09-01

    Vitamin D plays a vital role not only in bone health but also in pathophysiology of many other body functions. In recent years, there has been significant increase in testing of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vitamin D), a marker of vitamin D deficiency. The most commonly used methods for the measurement of 25-OH vitamin D are immunoassays and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Since immunoassays suffer from inaccuracies and interferences, LC-MS-MS is a preferred method. In LC-MS-MS methods, 25-OH vitamin D is extracted from serum or plasma by solid-phase or liquid-phase extraction. Because these extraction methods are time consuming, we developed an easy method that uses simple protein precipitation followed by injection of the supernatant to LC-MS-MS. Several mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio transitions, including commonly used transitions based on water loss, were evaluated and several tube types were tested. The optimal transitions for 25-OH vitamin D2 and D3 were 395.5 > 269.5 and 383.4 > 257.3, respectively. The reportable range of the method was 1-100 ng/mL, and repeatability (within-run) and within-laboratory imprecision were <4% and <6%, respectively. The method agreed well with the solid-phase extraction methods. PMID:23001980

  15. [Spectral investigation of atmospheric pressure plasma column].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Chen; Chang, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Long-Fei

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma column has many important applications in plasma stealth for aircraft. In the present paper, a plasma column with a length of 65 cm was generated in argon at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes in coaxial configurations. The discharge mechanism of the plasma column was studied by optical method and the result indicates that a moving layer of light emission propagates in the upstream region. The propagation velocity of the plasma bullet is about 0.6 x 10(5) m x s(-1) through optical measurement. Spectral intensity ratios as functions of the applied voltage and driving frequency were also investigated by spectroscopic method. The variation in spectral intensity ratio implies a change in the averaged electron energy. Results show that the averaged electron energy increases with the increase in the applied voltage and the driving frequency. These results have significant values for industrial applications of the atmospheric pressure discharge and have extensive application potentials in stealth for military aircraft. PMID:23016319

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma analysis by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda Gonzalvo, Y.; Whitmore, T.D.; Rees, J.A.; Seymour, D.L.; Stoffels, E. [Hiden Analytical Ltd., 420 Europa Boulevard, Warrington WA5 7UN (United Kingdom); Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    Fractional number density measurements for a rf plasma 'needle' operating at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system designed for diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas. The MBMS system comprises three differentially pumped stages and a mass/energy analyzer and includes an automated beam-to-background measurement facility in the form of a software-controlled chopper mechanism. The automation of the beam modulation allows the neutral components in the plasma to be rapidly and accurately measured using the mass spectrometer by threshold ionization techniques. Data are reported for plasma generated by a needle plasma source operated using a helium/air mixture. In particular, data for the conversion of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen into nitric oxide are discussed with reference to its significance for medical applications such as disinfecting wounds and dental cavities and for microsurgery.

  17. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, Hans W. (Los Alamos, NM); Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  18. Modeling the Charging of Highly Oxidized Cyclohexene Ozonolysis Products Using Nitrate-Based Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Hyttinen, Noora; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Rissanen, Matti P; Muuronen, Mikko; Ehn, Mikael; Kurtén, Theo

    2015-06-18

    Several extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) formed in the ozonolysis of endocyclic alkenes have recently been detected in laboratory and field studies. These experiments have been carried out with chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometers (CI-APi-TOF) with nitrate ions as reagent ions. The nitrate ion binds to the detected species through hydrogen bonds, but it also binds very strongly to one or two neutral nitric acid molecules. This makes the measurement highly selective when there is an excess amount of neutral nitric acid in the instrument. In this work, we used quantum-chemical methods to calculate the binding energies between a nitrate ion and several highly oxidized ozonolysis products of cyclohexene. These were then compared with the binding energies of nitrate ion-nitric acid clusters. Systematic configurational sampling of the molecules and clusters was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31+G* and ?B97xD/aug-cc-pVTZ levels, and the final single-point energies were calculated with DLPNO-CCSD(T)/def2-QZVPP. The binding energies were used in a kinetic simulation of the measurement system to determine the relative ratios of the detected signals. Our results indicate that at least two hydrogen bond donor functional groups (in this case, hydroperoxide, OOH) are needed for an ELVOC molecule to be detected in a nitrate ion CI-APi-TOF. Also, a double bond in the carbon backbone makes the nitrate cluster formation less favorable. PMID:26023711

  19. Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Bigelow, Wilbur C [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles (2.1 nm average diameter) at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2 and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes mounted on a specially designed specimen rod. Gas flow occurred through plastic tubing from the outside of the microscope to the specimen region and back. Gold nanoparticles of a full width half maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise and the achieved resolution was 0.5 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges: A Low-Cost System for Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graz, I.; Schwoediauer, R.; Bauer, S.; Gruber, H.; Romanin, C.

    2005-10-01

    Plasma treatment is a common way for modifying the surface of a material. A simple but effective source for a low-temperature nonequilibrium plasma is dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), also referred to as silent discharges. DBDs are characterized by the presence of at least one insulating (dielectric) layer in the discharge gap between two metal electrodes. When a high voltage is applied to the DBD configuration, tiny breakdown channels are formed in the discharge gap. These microdischarges are characterized as a weakly ionized plasma containing electrons with energies up to 10 eV and ions at room temperature. The energetic electrons provide an effective tool for chemical surface modification. Typical setups for DBD treatments consist of vacuum chambers and vacuum equipment, and so are very cost-intensive. Atmospheric pressure discharges provide a possibility for low-cost surface chemistry, because the setup consists only of the discharge set-up in normal air or in a specified inert gas atmosphere and a high-voltage amplifier coupled with a frequency generator. Silent discharges in air increase the wettability of polymer foils such as PTFE and FEP, sufficient for cell growth and further for surface-chemical binding of proteins onto the polymer. Thereby a simple and low-cost process to achieve protein chips for biomedical applications may be envisaged.

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges: A Low-Cost System for Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Graz, I.; Schwoediauer, R.; Bauer, S. [Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Gruber, H.; Romanin, C. [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2005-10-17

    Plasma treatment is a common way for modifying the surface of a material. A simple but effective source for a low-temperature nonequilibrium plasma is dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), also referred to as silent discharges. DBDs are characterized by the presence of at least one insulating (dielectric) layer in the discharge gap between two metal electrodes. When a high voltage is applied to the DBD configuration, tiny breakdown channels are formed in the discharge gap. These microdischarges are characterized as a weakly ionized plasma containing electrons with energies up to 10 eV and ions at room temperature. The energetic electrons provide an effective tool for chemical surface modification. Typical setups for DBD treatments consist of vacuum chambers and vacuum equipment, and so are very cost-intensive. Atmospheric pressure discharges provide a possibility for low-cost surface chemistry, because the setup consists only of the discharge set-up in normal air or in a specified inert gas atmosphere and a high-voltage amplifier coupled with a frequency generator. Silent discharges in air increase the wettability of polymer foils such as PTFE and FEP, sufficient for cell growth and further for surface-chemical binding of proteins onto the polymer. Thereby a simple and low-cost process to achieve protein chips for biomedical applications may be envisaged.

  2. Diagnostics of plasma-biological surface interactions in low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-surface interaction are required to understand in order to control the reactions precisely. Recent progress in atmospheric pressure plasma provides to apply as a tool of sterilization of contaminated foodstuffs. To use the plasma with safety and optimization, the real time in situ detection of free radicals - in particular dangling bonds by using the electron-spin-resonance (ESR) technique has been developed because the free radical plays important roles for dominantly biological reactions. First, the kinetic analysis of free radicals on biological specimens such as fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge. We have obtained information that the in situ real time ESR signal from the spores was observed and assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal was correlated with a link to the inactivation of the fungal spore. Second, we have studied to detect chemical modification of edible meat after the irradiation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ESR, signals give qualification results for chemical changes on edible liver meat. The in situ real-time measurements have proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  3. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  4. Charge Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; Westphall, Michael S.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and evaluate a new mechanism to account for analyte ion signal enhancement in ultraviolet-laser desorption mass spectrometry of droplets in the presence of corona ions. Our new insights are based on timing control of corona ion production, laser desorption, and peptide ion extraction achieved by a novel pulsed corona apparatus. We demonstrate that droplet charging rather than gas-phase ion-neutral reactions is the major contributor to analyte ion generation from an electrically isolated droplet. Implications of the new mechanism, termed charge assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI), are discussed and contrasted to those of the laser desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization method (LD-APCI). It is also demonstrated that analyte ion generation in CALDI occurs with external electric fields about one order of magnitude lower than those needed for atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization or electrospray ionization of droplets. PMID:18387311

  5. Disinfection of Ocular Cells and Tissues by Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paola Brun; Maria Vono; Paola Venier; Elena Tarricone; Velika Deligianni; Emilio Martines; Matteo Zuin; Silvia Spagnolo; Roberto Cavazzana; Romilda Cardin; Ignazio Castagliuolo; Alvise La Gloria Valerio; Andrea Leonardi

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundLow temperature plasmas have been proposed in medicine as agents for tissue disinfection and have received increasing attention due to the frequency of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. This study explored whether atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (APCP) generated by a new portable device that ionizes a flow of helium gas can inactivate ocular pathogens without causing significant tissue damage.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe tested the

  6. Atmospheric pressure discharge plasma decomposition for gaseous air contaminants-trichlorotrifluoroethane and trichloroethylene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuji Oda; Ryuichi Yamashita; Tadashi Takahashi; Senichi Masuda

    1996-01-01

    The decomposition performance of gaseous environmental destructive contaminants in air by using atmospheric pressure discharge plasma including the surface discharge induced plasma chemical processing (SPCP) was examined. The main contaminants tested were chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene, typically. The discharge exciting frequency range studied was wide-50 Hz to 50 kHz. Results showed the low frequency discharge requires high voltage to inject

  7. Collision-Based Ionization: Bridging the Gap between Chemical Ionization and Aerosol Particle Diffusion Charging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vinay Premnath; Derek Oberreit; Christopher J. Hogan Jr

    2011-01-01

    In diffusion charging theory, it is assumed that each ion–particle collision leads to the transfer of charge from ion to particle, and that charge transfer will not occur upon collision between a vapor molecule and a charged particle. However, in chemical ionization, charge transfer can occur in two directions—from charge-donating ion to vapor molecule and back from charged vapor molecule

  8. Sterilization of Surfaces with a Handheld Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Robert; Habib, Sara; Chan, Wai; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Tijerina, A.; Sloan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for decontaminating the surfaces of materials and equipment. In this study, an atmospheric pressure, oxygen and argon plasma was investigated for the destruction of viruses, bacteria, and spores. The plasma was operated at an argon flow rate of 30 L/min, an oxygen flow rate of 20 mL/min, a power density of 101.0 W/cm^3 (beam area = 5.1 cm^2), and at a distance from the surface of 7.1 mm. An average 6log10 reduction of viable spores was obtained after only 45 seconds of exposure to the reactive gas. By contrast, it takes more than 35 minutes at 121^oC to sterilize anthrax in an autoclave. The plasma properties were investigated by numerical modeling and chemical titration with nitric oxide. The numerical model included a detailed reaction mechanism for the discharge as well as for the afterglow. It was predicted that at a delivered power density of 29.3 W/cm^3, 30 L/min argon, and 0.01 volume% O2, the plasma generated 1.9 x 10^14 cm-3 O atoms, 1.6 x 10^12 cm-3 ozone, 9.3 x 10^13 cm-3 O2(^1?g), and 2.9 x 10^12 cm-3 O2(^1?^+g) at 1 cm downstream of the source. The O atom density measured by chemical titration with NO was 6.0 x 10^14 cm-3 at the same conditions. It is believe that the oxygen atoms and the O2(^1?g) metastables were responsible for killing the anthrax and other microorganisms.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas Incident onto Thin Liquid Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Norberg, Seth; Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of plasmas with liquids has increasing importance in advanced manufacturing and biomedical applications. Sustaining atmospheric pressure plasmas on liquids (as opposed to in liquids) can increase the chemical activity of the liquid by transferring more easily produced reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid. Often the intent is to treat the surface under the liquid layer, as in plasma medicine. The liquid then acts as a filter which modifies the fluxes of reactive species prior to reaching the underlying surface. The liquid in turn influences the plasma by evaporation which produces a saturated layer of, for example, water vapor above the liquid surface, or by the shape of liquid covered wounds and the dielectric properties of the liquid. Direct plasma exposure (e.g., a dielectric barrier discharge) enables intersection of ion and UV/VUV fluxes with the liquid surface whereas many remote plasma jets typically do not. This increases the rate of hydronium (H3O+) production which affects pH. In this paper, results from a computational investigation on the dynamics of atmospheric pressure plasmas intersecting thin water layers having dissolved gases and proteins will be discussed. Examples are taken from DBD and plasma jet exposure of water layers over a tissue-like dielectric, and plasmas sustained in bubbles in water. The mutual interaction of the plasma and liquid will be discussed based on radiation and ion transport into the water, evaporation, and transport and conversion of plasma produced reactivity through the water layer. The interaction of plasmas with liquids has increasing importance in advanced manufacturing and biomedical applications. Sustaining atmospheric pressure plasmas on liquids (as opposed to in liquids) can increase the chemical activity of the liquid by transferring more easily produced reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid. Often the intent is to treat the surface under the liquid layer, as in plasma medicine. The liquid then acts as a filter which modifies the fluxes of reactive species prior to reaching the underlying surface. The liquid in turn influences the plasma by evaporation which produces a saturated layer of, for example, water vapor above the liquid surface, or by the shape of liquid covered wounds and the dielectric properties of the liquid. Direct plasma exposure (e.g., a dielectric barrier discharge) enables intersection of ion and UV/VUV fluxes with the liquid surface whereas many remote plasma jets typically do not. This increases the rate of hydronium (H3O+) production which affects pH. In this paper, results from a computational investigation on the dynamics of atmospheric pressure plasmas intersecting thin water layers having dissolved gases and proteins will be discussed. Examples are taken from DBD and plasma jet exposure of water layers over a tissue-like dielectric, and plasmas sustained in bubbles in water. The mutual interaction of the plasma and liquid will be discussed based on radiation and ion transport into the water, evaporation, and transport and conversion of plasma produced reactivity through the water layer. Work supported by DOE Fusion Energy Science and NSF.

  10. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tonie M. vanDam; Geoffrey Blewitt; Michael B. Heflin

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is

  11. DC powered atmospheric pressure micro-plasmajet for biomedical applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Kolb; R. O. Price; A.-A. H. Mohamed; K. H. Schoenbach

    2006-01-01

    Summary form only given. Nonthermal (cold) plasmas operated in air at atmospheric pressure offer an appealing method for the processing and decontamination of surfaces. Most existing devices are operated with radiofrequency high voltages. Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs), on the other hand, allow us to generate a direct current driven plasma jet in atmospheric pressure gases, including air. The discharge is

  12. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lanfang H. Levine; Patricia A. Bisbee; Jeffrey T. Richards; Michele N. Birmele; Ronald L. Prior; Michele Perchonok; Mike Dixon; Neil C. Yorio; Gary W. Stutte; Raymond M. Wheeler

    2008-01-01

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96 kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and

  13. Nitric oxide generated by atmospheric pressure air microplasma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keita Matsuo; Hidekazu Yoshida; Jaegu Choi; S. Hamid; R. Hosseini; Takao Namihira; Sunao Katsuki; Hidenori Akiyama

    2009-01-01

    The production of atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet requires no vacuum devices and it uses air gas, which considerably reduces the investment cost. Atmospheric pressure microplasma jets have recently been used for industrial and medical applications, such as local dental treatment, inner surface treatment of capillaries, stimuli of microorganisms, and local cleaning of semiconductor devices. The other advantage of the

  14. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron–ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the ?- and ?-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and ?-? transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the ?-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  15. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  16. Generation of Integrated Atmospheric-Pressure Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Kazutake; Fukasawa, Takayuki; Yoshiki, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Yasuhiro

    2003-10-01

    This work is based on the motivation that by integrating microplasmas confined in a small volume, a large area high-density plasma source could be developed. Firstly, He gas microplasmas were generated by capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and inductively coupled type plasma (ICP-type) in single small diameter ceramic tubes supplied with 13.56 MHz power via electrodes. Then, based upon the obtained characteristics, sustaining voltage and RF power variations were discussed for integrating tubes two and three dimensionally. However, the presence of the CCP component was noticed from the weak discharge around the center of the highly integrated ICP-type. Therefore, the generation of planar-type plasma was also studied using narrow comb electrodes, which enabled us to produce the discharge at a lower voltage in accordance with Paschen’s law. As a result, uniform plasma was successfully generated in an area of 12 mm× 12 mm. Atmospheric-pressure microplasma generation of pure N2 gas as well as He gas was realized by planar type plasma at low sustaining voltages.

  17. Laser induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilecce, G.; Martini, L. M.; Tosi, P.; Scotoni, M.; De Benedictis, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper offers an outline of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics and practical recommendations for its use in atmospheric pressure discharges. LIF principles, technical requirements and rationalization of experimental outcomes by modelling are addressed. Important issues that are particularly relevant to small scale, spatially inhomogeneous discharges, like plasma-jets, are emphasized. For the first time, all collision processes and the spatial non-homogeneity of the laser beam are together accounted for in the LIF model. Saturation characteristics are discussed and used for the assessment of model parameters. A calibration procedure is discussed and implemented. Gas temperature measurements by LIF are also addressed. The whole description of the technique is given, without loss of generality, through the example of its application to the OH radical. Notes on other diatomic radicals, CH, NO and CN, are given along the paper. Some results in a RF plasma-jet are presented as an example of application in a discharge system where all the concepts developed in the paper are applied.

  18. Tooth bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Kim, Gon Jun; Kim, Jae Moon; Park, Jeong Kil; Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2009-04-01

    We demonstrated that room temperature plasma could be used for tooth bleaching. A nonthermal, atmospheric pressure, helium plasma jet device was developed to enhance the tooth bleaching effect of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). All teeth were sectioned sagittally into halves, which were assigned randomly to either the experimental group or the control group. The experimental group was treated with H(2)O(2) (28%, 20 microL every 30 seconds) plus plasma (5 W) for 10 minutes; the control group was treated with H(2)O(2) alone for the same duration. Removal of the tooth surface protein was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images and Ponceau staining. Production of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) was measured by using electron spin resonance spin-trapping. Combining plasma and H(2)O(2) improved the bleaching efficacy by a factor of 3 compared with using H(2)O(2) alone. Tooth surface proteins were noticeably removed by plasma treatment. When a piece of tooth was added to a solution of H(2)O(2) as a catalyst, production of *OH after plasma treatment was 1.9 times greater than when using H(2)O(2) alone. We suggest that the improvement in tooth bleaching induced by plasma is due to the removal of tooth surface proteins and to increased *OH production. PMID:19345811

  19. Dynamics behavior of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yan [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Henan 454000 (China); Gu Biao [State Key Laboratory for Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Wenchun; Wang Dezhen; Peng Xuwen [State Key Laboratory for Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2009-07-15

    An experimental study on the dynamics behavior of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge (HDBD) at atmospheric pressure is described in this paper. Two kinds of discharge mode, glow and Townsend discharge modes, can be easily identified according to the differential conductivity of current-voltage relationship in the ascent stage of discharge current for the atmospheric HDBD. A (three-dimensional) 3D phase space made by discharge current, gas gap voltage, and charge density of dielectric-plate surface was utilized in the study. By projecting the discharge evolution trajectory in the 3D space, the 3D trajectory of multiple current peaks discharge in atmospheric helium shows a limited cycle with convolutions and undergoes a series of bifurcation process; however, the 3D trajectory of atmospheric N{sub 2} HDBD is a limited cycle without any convolution and bifurcation process. In addition, the first ionization coefficient of working gas plays a key role to determine the discharge mode of atmospheric HDBD, the transition of discharge mode and the dynamics stability of atmospheric HDBD.

  20. Formation of plasma dust structures at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Babichev, V. N.; Dyatko, N. A.; Pal', A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Taran, M. D. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for High Energy Densities (Russian Federation)

    2006-02-15

    The formation of strongly coupled stable dust structures in the plasma produced by an electron beam at atmospheric pressure was detected experimentally. Analytical expressions were derived for the ionization rate of a gas by an electron beam in an axially symmetric geometry by comparing experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations. Self-consistent one-dimensional simulations of the beam plasma were performed in the diffusion drift approximation of charged plasma particle transport with electron diffusion to determine the dust particle levitation conditions. Since almost all of the applied voltage drops on the cathode layer in the Thomson glow regime of a non-self-sustained gas discharge, a distribution of the electric field that grows toward the cathode is produced in it; this field together with the gravity produces a potential well in which the dust particles levitate to form a stable disk-shaped structure. The nonideality parameters of the dust component in the formation region of a highly ordered quasi-crystalline structure calculated using computational data for the dust particle charging problem were found to be higher than the critical value after exceeding which an ensemble of particles with a Yukawa interaction should pass to the crystalline state.

  1. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Babij, Micha?; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet. PMID:24880391

  3. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Babij, Micha?; Kowalski, Zbigniew W., E-mail: zbigniew.w.kowalski@pwr.wroc.pl; Nitsch, Karol; Gotszalk, Teodor [Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27, 50-370 Wroc?aw (Poland)] [Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27, 50-370 Wroc?aw (Poland); Silberring, Jerzy [AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)] [AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  4. A Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Chemical Characterization of Ultrafine Aerosol Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Held; G. Jeffrey Rathbone; James N. Smith

    2009-01-01

    The development of a thermal desorption chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer for the chemical characterization of ultrafine aerosol particles is reported and first experimental results are presented. Atmospheric particles are size-classified and collected using a unipolar charger, a radial differential mobility analyzer and an electrostatic precipitator, and analyzed after thermal desorption and chemical ionization using an ion trap mass

  5. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yixiang; Huang, C.; Yu, Q. S.

    2007-01-01

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4W) up to tens of watts (up to 45W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15mm in width and less than 1.0mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42°C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500V to about 2500V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000to3500ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas for Decontamination of Complex Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Winter, Jörn; Polak, Martin; Ehlbeck, Jörg; von Woedtke, Thomas

    Atmospheric pressure plasma sources produce a multiplicity of different antimicrobial agents and are applicable to even complicated geometries as well as to heat sensitive materials. Thus, atmospheric pressure plasmas have a huge potential for the decontamination of even complex medical devices like central venous catheters and endoscopes. In this paper we present practicable realizations of atmospheric pressure plasma sources, namely plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge and microwave driven discharge that are able to penetrate fine lumen or are adaptable to difficult geometries. Furthermore, the antimicrobial efficacy of these sources is given for one example setup in each case.

  7. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  8. Laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry imaging of phytochemicals from sage leaves

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry imaging of phytochemicals. In this contribution, we explore the feasibility of laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI technique, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI),[12] for MSI. For microsampling

  9. Organic thin film deposition in atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, S.; Kogoma, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Kodama, M.; Nomiyama, H.; Ichinohe, K.

    1996-01-01

    The stabilization of a homogeneous glow discharge at atmospheric pressure has been studied since 1987. On flat surfaces, various plasma surface treatments and film depositions at atmospheric pressure have been examined. A practical application of the atmospheric pressure glow plasma on inner surfaces of flexible polyvinyl chloride tubes was tested for thin film deposition of polytetrafluoroethylene. Deposited film surfaces were characterized by ESCA and FT-IR/ATR measurements. Also SEM observation was done for platelet adhesion on the plasma treated polyvinyl chloride surface. These results showed remarkable enhancement in the inhibition to platelet adhesion on the inner surface of PVC tube, and homogeneous organic film deposition was confirmed. The deposition mechanism of polytetrafluoroethylene film in atmospheric pressure glow plasma is the same as the mechanism of film formation in the low pressure glow plasma, except for radical formation source.

  10. Visualization of a Copper Wire Explosion in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    E-print Network

    Jadidian, Jouya

    Experimental and computational images of a 90-?m thick copper wire explosion in atmospheric pressure air are presented. A Marx generator is used to produce a pulsed current density into the wire with a maximum rate of rise ...

  11. Analysis of Sterilization Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekem, N.; Akan, T.; Pat, S. [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Physics department, Eskisehir (Turkey); Akgun, Y.; Kiremitci, A. [Eskisehir Osmangazi University Microbiology department, Eskisehir (Turkey); Musa, G. [National Institute for Laser Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a new technology, the High Voltage Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma (HVAPPP), for bacteria killing. The aim of this paper is to present a simple device to generate plasma able to kill efficiently bacteria.

  12. Investigating Atmospheric Pressure with a Cup, Straw and Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is a reinforcement lab activity where students experiment with ways to get water to flow out of a cup and up a straw causing an imbalance in the atmospheric pressure surrounding the water.

  13. Nitrogen Atmospheric Pressure Post Discharges for Surface Biological Decontamination inside

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nitrogen Atmospheric Pressure Post Discharges for Surface Biological Decontamination inside Small) (PET) capillary tubes of different shapes and lengths and decontamination of flow tubes, both for several years at the Orsay Plasma Lab. Its biological decontamination efficiency has been demonstrated

  14. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lanfang H. Levine; Patricia A. Bisbee; Jeffrey T. Richards; Michele N. Birmele; Ronald L. Prior; Michele Perchonok; Mike Dixon; Neil C. Yorio; Gary W. Stutte; Raymond M. Wheeler

    2008-01-01

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and 0.12kPa,

  15. Dynamics and particle fluxes in atmospheric-pressure electronegative radio frequency microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, K.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G. [School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11-3TU (United Kingdom); Liu, D. X.; Rong, M. Z. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2011-08-29

    We report on intricate dynamics observed in atmospheric-pressure rf electronegative discharges where electrons and anions are separated due to their different mobilities. This results in the formation of positively charged regions between an electronegative plasma core and an oscillating electron ensemble. It is found that for a given input power, the electron, ion (both positive and negative) and neutral fluxes increase as the gap size is reduced, resulting in a more efficient delivery of chemical species to a treated target.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of lipopolysaccharide in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartis, E. A. J.; Graves, D. B.; Seog, J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2013-08-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been widely investigated for sterilization of surfaces, but studies on surface chemical changes of model compounds in controlled environments have been lacking. We present measurements on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy after 1% O2 in Ar APPJ treatments in controlled ambients composed of N2/Ar mixtures. By varying the N2 concentration from 20% to 100%, we find that the interaction of the jet with the environment plays a major role in modifying surface reactions. This is due to the plasma exciting N2, which quenches reactive oxygen species (ROS) that would otherwise modify the film surface. By minimizing the interaction of the APPJ with the environment, e.g. by changing the APPJ geometry, we show that surface modifications increase even when the plasma itself is removed farther from the LPS surface. Measurements on the biological activity, optical emission, and ozone production of the jet using O2, N2 and O2/N2 admixtures all demonstrate that ROS are readily quenched by N2 species excited by the plasma. These results clearly reveal the importance of considering plasma-environment interactions for APPJ treatments of surfaces.

  17. Assessment of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Danna, Natalie R.; Beutel, Bryan G.; Tovar, Nick; Witek, Lukasz; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the osseointegrative effects of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment for implants in a canine model. Control surfaces were untreated textured titanium (Ti) and calcium phosphate (CaP). Experimental surfaces were their 80-second air-based APP-treated counterparts. Physicochemical characterization was performed to assess topography, surface energy, and chemical composition. One implant from each control and experimental group (four in total) was placed in one radius of each of the seven male beagles for three weeks, and one implant from each group was placed in the contralateral radius for six weeks. After sacrifice, bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) were assessed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed decreased surface levels of carbon and increased Ti and oxygen, and calcium and oxygen, posttreatment for Ti and CaP surfaces, respectively. There was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in BIC for APP-treated textured Ti surfaces at six weeks but not at three weeks or for CaP surfaces. There were no significant (P = 0.57) differences for BAFO between treated and untreated surfaces for either material at either time point. This suggests that air-based APP surface treatment may improve osseointegration of textured Ti surfaces but not CaP surfaces. Studies optimizing APP parameters and applications are warranted. PMID:26090443

  18. Matrix Assisted Ionization in Vacuum, a Sensitive and Widely Applicable Ionization Method for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D.

    2013-05-01

    An astonishingly simple new method to produce gas-phase ions of small molecules as well as proteins from the solid state under cold vacuum conditions is described. This matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) mass spectrometry (MS) method produces multiply charged ions similar to those that typify electrospray ionization (ESI) and uses sample preparation methods that are nearly identical to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Unlike these established methods, MAIV does not require a laser or voltage for ionization, and unlike the recently introduced matrix assisted ionization inlet method, does not require added heat. MAIV-MS requires only introduction of a crystalline mixture of the analyte incorporated with a suitable small molecule matrix compound such as 3-nitrobenzonitrile directly to the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Vacuum intermediate pressure MALDI sources and modified ESI sources successfully produce ions for analysis by MS with this method. As in ESI-MS, ion formation is continuous and, without a laser, little chemical background is observed. MAIV, operating from a surface offers the possibility of significantly improved sensitivity relative to atmospheric pressure ionization because ions are produced in the vacuum region of the mass spectrometer eliminating losses associated with ion transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum. Mechanistic aspects and potential applications for this new ionization method are discussed.

  19. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Induces Transcriptional Changes in Ex Vivo Human Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Tarricone, Elena; Venier, Paola; Brun, Paola; Deligianni, Velika; Zuin, Matteo; Martines, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP) might be considered a novel tool for tissue disinfection in medicine since the active chemical species produced by low plasma doses, generated by ionizing helium gas in air, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that kill microorganisms without substantially affecting human cells. Objectives In this study, we evaluated morphological and functional changes in human corneas exposed for 2 minutes (min) to APCP and tested if the antioxidant n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) was able to inhibit or prevent damage and cell death. Results Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses of corneal tissues collected at 6 hours (h) post-APCP treatment demonstrated no morphological tissue changes, but a transient increased expression of OGG1 glycosylase that returned to control levels in 24 h. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time PCR performed on different corneas revealed in the treated corneas many differentially expressed genes: namely, 256 and 304 genes showing expression changes greater than ± 2 folds in the absence and presence of NAC, respectively. At 6 h post-treatment, the most over-expressed gene categories suggested an active or enhanced cell functioning, with only a minority of genes specifically concerning oxidative DNA damage and repair showing slight over-expression values (<2 folds). Moreover, time-related expression analysis of eight genes up-regulated in the APCP-treated corneas overall demonstrated the return to control expression levels after 24 h. Conclusions These findings of transient oxidative stress accompanied by wide-range transcriptome adjustments support the further development of APCP as an ocular disinfectant. PMID:26203910

  20. Comparison of electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for multi-residue analysis of biocides, UV-filters and benzothiazoles in aqueous matrices and activated sludge by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arne Wick; Guido Fink; Thomas A. Ternes

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-residue method for the determination of 36 emerging organic pollutants (26 biocides, 5 UV-filters and 5 benzothiazoles) in raw and treated wastewater, activated sludge and surface water using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS\\/MS). The target analytes were enriched from water samples adjusted to pH 6 by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on Oasis HLB 200mg

  1. Laser ablation coupled to a flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow for ambient mass spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-01

    A plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) source was used to perform molecular mass spectral imaging. A small amount of sample material was ablated by focusing 266 nm laser light onto a spot. The resulting aerosol was transferred by a nitrogen stream to the flowing afterglow of a helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge ionization source; the ionized sample material was analyzed by a Leco Unique time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Two-dimensional mass spectral images were generated by scanning the laser beam across a sample surface. The total analysis time for a 6 mm (2) surface, which is limited by the washout of the ablation chamber, was less than 30 min. With this technique, a spatial resolution of approximately 20 microm has been achieved. Additionally, the laser ablation configuration was used to obtain depth information of over 2 mm with a resolution of approximately 40 microm. The combination of laser ablation with the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow source was used to analyze several sample surfaces for a wide variety of analytes and with high sensitivity (LOD of 5 fmol for caffeine). PMID:18826246

  2. IonInduced Nucleation in Nanoparticle Synthesis by Ionization Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motoaki Adachi; Masataka Kusumi; Shigeki Tsukui

    2004-01-01

    Particle formation mechanisms in nanoparticle synthesis by ionization chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in which source gases are ionized before being fed into the reactor, were investigated experimentally. First, nonagglomerated nanoparticles were formed from a tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS)\\/O2 mixture ionized with a sonic-jet ionizer at various furnace temperatures, Tf, and TEOS concentrations, NTEOS. Then, the electrical mobility of the nanoparticles and ions

  3. Plate-like Dusty Structures in an e-Beam Sustained Glow Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, Anatoly V.; Babichev, Valery N.; Pal', Alexander F.; Starostin, Andrey N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, 142190 SRC RF TRINITI, TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-31

    The paper is devoted to studying the dusty plasma created by the injection of dust particles into the atmospheric pressure gas ionized by an electron beam of 85-120 keV energy. The beam current density was varied within 0.1-1.0 mA/cm2. The electron gun operated in the stationary regime. The behavior of dusty particles lighted by a laser 'knife' was observed with a digital video camera. Stable plate-like structures were observed in the cathode sheath of non-self-sustained discharge. Numerical simulation was performed by using the non-local model of the non-self-sustained discharge.

  4. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  5. Free radicals induced in aqueous solution by non-contact atmospheric-pressure cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ono, Yusuke; Kitano, Katsuhisa [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ikawa, Satoshi [Technology Research Institute of Osaka Prefecture, Izumi, Osaka 594-1157 (Japan)

    2012-06-18

    To understand plasma-induced chemical processing in liquids, we investigated the formation of free radicals in aqueous solution exposed to different types of non-contact atmospheric-pressure helium plasma using the spin-trapping technique. Both hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) and superoxide anion radical (O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot}) adducts were observed when neutral oxygen gas was additionally supplied to the plasma. In particular, O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} can be dominantly induced in the solution via oxygen flow into the afterglow gas of helium plasma. This type of plasma treatment can potentially be used in medical applications to control infectious diseases, because the O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} is crucial for sterilization of liquids via atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  6. Detection of positive and negative ions from a flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow using a mattauch-herzog mass spectrograph equipped with a faraday-strip array detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory D. Schilling; Jacob T. Shelley; James H. Barnes IV; Roger P. Sperline; M. Bonner Denton; Charles J. Barinaga; David W. Koppenaal; Gary M. Hieftje

    2010-01-01

    An ambient desorption\\/ionization (ADI) source, known as the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA), has been coupled\\u000a to a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph (MHMS) equipped with a focal plane camera (FPC) array detector. The FAPA ionization\\u000a source enables direct mass spectral analysis of solids, liquids, and gases through either positive or negative ionization\\u000a modes. In either case, spectra are generally simple with

  7. The kinetic ion mobility mass spectrometer: Measurements of ion-molecule reaction rate constants at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, K.; Grimsrud, E.P. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    1992-08-06

    This paper discusses how the kinetic ion mobility mass spectrometer is used to measure the rate constants of ion-molecule reactions in an atmospheric pressure buffer gas. One operational mode of the instrument avoids measurement errors associated with aperture sampling of a high-pressure ionized gas. This instrument is used to study the S{sub N}2 nucleophilic displacement reactions of chloride anions with a series of alkyl bromides in nitrogen. 40 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Statistical analysis of ionosphere parameters and atmospheric pressure correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloskov, Dmitriy; Bochkarev, Vladimir; Maslennikova, Yulia; Zagidullin, Bulat

    Ionosphere parameters such as Total electron content (TEC) and Doppler frequency shift characterize ionosphere influence on signals propagation, and therefore information about these parameters is important for radio communication tasks. Meteorological effects such as atmospheric pressure variations can influence on ionosphere parameters. This work is dedicated to analysis of correlations between meteorological and ionosphere parameters. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis meteorological maps, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) global TEC maps and data from Doppler phase goniometric complex “Spectr” were analysed. Data for 2009-2011 were investigated. Coherent oscillations with periods of 29-32 and 4 days were detected in atmospheric pressure and Doppler frequency shift variations.

  9. Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, Yuki; Ichiki, Ryuta; Kasamura, Kotaro; Yoshida, Masashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy Ti–6Al–4V has been achieved by using a pulsed-arc plasma jet with a N2/H2 gas mixture, where the plasma jet plume is sprayed onto the titanium surface under atmospheric pressure. We successfully formed a titanium nitride layer on the sample surface. Moreover, the diffusion layer was also formed, the hardness of which was increased from that of as-received titanium. The nitride layer growth was found to be diffusion-controlled, as in other conventional nitriding methods.

  10. Tailoring non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas for healthcare technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas operated at ambient atmospheric pressure are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. This includes the unique opportunity to deliver short-lived highly reactive species such as atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can initiate a wide range of reactions in biochemical systems, both therapeutic and toxic. The toxicological implications are not clear, e.g. potential risks through DNA damage. It is anticipated that interactions with biological systems will be governed through synergies between two or more species. Suitable optimized plasma sources are improbable through empirical investigations. Quantifying the power dissipation and energy transport mechanisms through the different interfaces from the plasma regime to ambient air, towards the liquid interface and associated impact on the biological system through a new regime of liquid chemistry initiated by the synergy of delivering multiple energy carrying species, is crucial. The major challenge to overcome the obstacles of quantifying energy transport and controlling power dissipation has been the severe lack of suitable plasma sources and diagnostic techniques. Diagnostics and simulations of this plasma regime are very challenging; the highly pronounced collision dominated plasma dynamics at very small dimensions requires extraordinary high resolution - simultaneously in space (microns) and time (picoseconds). Numerical simulations are equally challenging due to the inherent multi-scale character with very rapid electron collisions on the one extreme and the transport of chemically stable species characterizing completely different domains. This presentation will discuss our recent progress actively combining both advance optical diagnostics and multi-scale computer simulations.

  11. Didehydro radical anions from ketones via O- chemical ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mingxiang; Grabowski, Joseph J.

    2004-10-01

    Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions of the atomic oxygen radical anion, O- with selected ketones are investigated to explore a strategy to 1,3-distonic radical anions. These O- chemical ionization reactions, especially that of cyclopentanone, are examined in detail under the well-defined thermal energy conditions uniquely available by using the flowing afterglow technique. To further understanding of the reaction mechanism, a series of related ketones (acetone, 3-pentanone, 2-butanone, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanone, cyclohexanone) are also examined in detail. Rate constants for each ketone reaction are measured and products from each ketone examined are identified and their branching ratios are reported. Based on these results, a detailed reaction scheme for each ketone reaction studied is proposed. The individual reaction schemes are summarized in a composite O-/ketone reaction scheme and the specific reaction pathways are discussed. A strategy is developed to differentiate 1,1- and 1,3-H2+-abstraction products and to establish the absolute yields of 1,3-distonic radical anions from appropriate ketones.

  12. Preparation of nanodiamonds from carbon nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Fray, Derek J

    2015-04-01

    A route for producing diamond nanocrystals is reported in this paper. Li2CO3 containing carbon nanostructures synthesised in molten LiCl were transformed to nanodiamonds by simple heating at atmospheric pressure, far less severe conditions than conventional processes. The method presented offers the possibility of bulk production. PMID:25650151

  13. ANNUAL REPORT. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE PLASMA CLEANING OF CONTAMINATED SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a practical, atmospheric pressure plasma tool for the surface decontamination of nuclear waste. Decontamination of radioactive materials that have accumulated on the surfaces of equipment and structures is a challenging and costly unde...

  14. High-field operation of submicrometer devices at atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Madou; S. R. Morrison

    1991-01-01

    An array of micrometer-sized field emitter tips was used to produce ions in air or other gases at atmospheric pressure using only low voltages. The ions are produced by the dissociation of gaseous acids or bases in the high electric field near the tips. For example, with formic or acetic acid, ions are formed with the tip at about -50

  15. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F. Hicks; Hans W. Herrmann

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction

  16. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet for Chem\\/Bio Warfare Decontamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans W. Herrmann; Ivars Henins; Jaeyoung Park; Gary S. Selwyn

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) technology may provide a much needed method of CBW decontamination which, unlike traditional decon methods, is dry and nondestructive to sensitive equipment and materials. The APPJ discharge uses a high-flow feedgas consisting primarily of an inert carrier gas, such as He, and a small amount of a reactive additive, such as O2, which flows between

  17. Electrolytic synthesis of ammonia in molten salts under atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-15

    Ammonia was successfully synthesized by using a new electrochemical reaction with high current efficiency at atmospheric pressure and at lower temperatures than the Haber-Bosch process. In this method, nitride ion (N3-), which is produced by the reduction from nitrogen gas at the cathode, is anodically oxidized and reacts with hydrogen to produce ammonia at the anode. PMID:12517136

  18. Gravity and Atmospheric Pressure Effects on Crater Formation in Sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Johnson; J. A. Smith; E. G. Franklin; L. K. Moraski; D. J. Teal

    1969-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of varying gravity and atmospheric pressure on the size of small explosion craters formed in cohesionless sand. The explosives used were commercially available squibs and caps and a linear detonating cord. Gravity was varied by flying the test container in an aircraft through carefully controlled maneuvers to simulate 0.17, 0.38, and

  19. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary (Gloucester, VA); D'Silva, Arthur P. (Ames, IA); Fassel, Velmer A. (Ames, IA)

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  20. The Water Table As Affected by Atmospheric Pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Peck

    1960-01-01

    In the common situation where air is entrapped in the water, the water table height will vary with atmospheric pressure. The magnitude of this effect must be known before water-table changes can be related with any precision to other factors such as evapo- transpiration, infiltration, and drainage. A theory of this effect is developed and the influences of hysteresis and

  1. Global Atmospheric Pressure Effects of the October 30, 1961, Explosion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Wexler; W. A. Hass

    1962-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure waves set off by the explosion of October 30, 1961, were traced over a large portion of the world, including the antipodes in the Antarctic, by means of analyses of available ordinary microbarograph records. The observed geographic variations in propagation speed and maximum amplitude are examined with the aid of air density and wind analyses. Comparison is

  2. The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Akio; Fukuda, Wakako; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cabin pressure change on the respiratory system during flight is well documented in the literature, but how the change in atmospheric pressure affects ventricular assist device (VAD) output flow has not been studied yet. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the change in VAD output using a mock circulatory system in a low-pressure chamber mimicking high altitude. Changes in output and driving pressure were measured during decompression from 1.0 to 0.7 atm and pressurization from 0.7 to 1.0 atm. Two driving systems were evaluated: the VCT system and the Mobart system. In the VCT system, output and driving pressure remained the same during decompression and pressurization. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped and recovered during pressurization. The lowest output was observed at 0.7 atm, which was 80% of the baseline driven by the Mobart system. Under a practical cabin pressure of 0.8 atm, the output driven by the Mobart system was 90% of the baseline. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped, and recovered during pressurization. However, the decrease in output was slight. In an environment where the atmospheric pressure changes, it is necessary to monitor the diaphragmatic motion of the blood pump and the driving air pressure, and to adjust the systolic:diastolic ratio as well as the positive and negative pressures in a VAD system. PMID:21915797

  3. Electron yield X-ray absorption spectroscopy at atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Tourillon; E. Dartyge; A. Fontaine; M. Lemonnier; F. Bartol

    1987-01-01

    The electron yield at atmospheric pressure for X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a new technique able to study the very top surface of thick samples in real environments. A combined detector has been designed at LURE which yields EXAFS spectra in transmission, electron and fluorescence modes. A variable probed thickness is obtained, depending on the polarization. With a positively biased collector

  4. Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Laura; Ruuhela, Reija; Ostamo, Aini; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Suominen, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods ( P < 0.001), and may explain the clustering of suicide attempts. Men seem to be more vulnerable to attempt suicide under low atmospheric pressure and women under high atmospheric pressure. We show only statistical correlations, which leaves the exact mechanisms of interaction between weather and suicidal behavior open. However, suicidal behavior should be assessed from the point of view of weather in addition to psychiatric and social aspects.

  5. Decomposition of ilmenite by concentrated KOH solution under atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yumin Liu; Tao Qi; Jinglong Chu; Qijie Tong; Yi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A new process was provided for decomposition of ilmenite by concentrated KOH solution under atmospheric pressure. The significant effects of reaction temperature, KOH concentration, stirring speed, particle size, and alkali-to-ilmenite mass ratios on titanium extraction were studied. The temperature and initial particle size showed significant influence on titanium extraction. The experimental data of the extraction rates under the relevant operating

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Treatment of Polyethylene Surfaces for

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    , composite materials and metals need a pretreatment step before adhesive bonding or painting.[1 analysis and adhesive bonding experiments. The plasma is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy) samples were activated by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The improvement in adhesive bond strength

  7. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography. PMID:23812882

  8. Analysis of pesticide residues by fast gas chromatography in combination with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renáta Húšková; Eva Matisová; Svetlana Hrouzková; ?ubomír Švorc

    2009-01-01

    A combination of fast GC with narrow-bore column and bench top quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) detector in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode (with methane as reagent gas) is set up and utilized for the ultratrace analysis of 25 selected pesticides. The observed pesticides, belonging to the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), were from different chemical classes. A comparative study with electron

  9. Ionization of Samarium by Chemical Releases in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Caton, R.; Miller, D.; Groves, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The release of Samarium vapor into the upper atmosphere was studied using during the Air Force Research Laboratory sponsored Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) rocket launches in May 2009. The Naval Research Laboratory supported these experiments with 3-D photochemical modeling of the artificial plasma cloud including (1) reactions with atomic oxygen, (2) photo excitation, (3) photoionization, (4) dissociative recombination, and (5) ion and neutral diffusion. NRL provided the experimental diagnostic instrument on the rocket which was a dual frequency radio beacon on the rocket to measure changes in total electron content. The AFRL provided ground based diagnostics of incoherent scatter radar and optical spectroscopy and imagery. The NRL Chemical Release Model (CRM) has over 600 excited states of atomic Samarium neutrals, atomic ions, along with Samarium Oxide Ions and electrons. Diffusive transport of neutrals in cylindrical geometry and ions along magnetic field lines is computed along with the reactive flow to predict the concentrations of Sm, Sm-Ion, Sm0, and SmO Ion. Comparison of the CRM with observations demonstrates that Sm release into the upper atmosphere initially produces enhanced electron densities and SmO-Ions. The diatomic ions recombine with electrons to yield neutral Sm and O. Only the photo ionization of Sm yields a stable atomic ion that does not substantially recombine. The MOSC releases in sunlight yielded long duration ion clouds that can be replicated with the CRM. The CRM predicts that Sm releases in darkness would not produce long duration plasma clouds because of the lack of photo excitation and photoionization.

  10. Mechanisms for negative reactant ion formation in an atmospheric pressure corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

    2009-06-02

    In an effort to better understand the formation of negative reactant ions in air produced by an atmospheric pressure corona discharge source, the neutral vapors generated by the corona were introduced in varying amounts into the ionization region of an ion mobility spectrometer/mass spectrometer containing a 63Ni ionization source. With no discharge gas the predominant ions were O2- , however, upon the introduction of low levels of discharge gas the NO2- ion quickly became the dominant species. As the amount of discharge gas increased the appearance of CO3- was observed followed by the appearance of NO3-. At very high levels, NO3- species became effectively the only ion present and appeared as two peaks in the IMS spectrum, NO3- and the NO3-•HNO3 adduct, with separate mobilities. Since explosive compounds typically ionize in the presence of negative reactant ions, the ionization of an explosive, RDX, was examined in order to investigate the ionization properties with these three primary ions. It was found that RDX forms a strong adduct with both NO2- and NO3- with reduced mobility values of 1.49 and 1.44 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. No adduct was observed for RDX with CO3- although this adduct has been observed with a corona discharge mass spectrometer. It is believed that this adduct, although formed, does not have a sufficiently long lifetime (greater than 10 ms) to be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer.

  11. PULSED POSITIVE ION NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPLICATONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The simultaneous acquisition of both positive ion and negative ion data under chemical ionization mass spectrometric conditions can aid in the confirmation of assignments made by electron impact gas chromatography mass spectrometry or electron capture gas chromatography. Pulsed p...

  12. A study of the tropospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Broekhuizen, Keith Edward, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of reactions important to the troposphere have been investigated using a high pressure, turbulent, discharge-flow technique coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The ability to ...

  13. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  14. Surface properties and hydrophobic recovery of polymers treated by atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcia, C.; Punga, I. L.; Borcia, G.

    2014-10-01

    This paper provides an analysis on the relation between plasma effects on polymers exposed to inert gas atmospheric-pressure plasma, polymer structure characteristics and surface recovery during post-processing ageing. Polymers offering variety of structure, functionality, degree of oxidation, polarity, crystallinity are tested, using contact angle, XPS, XRD and solvent absorption measurement, thus exploring the relationship linking the surface polarity, the chemical structure and composition contribution in the combined functionalization/crosslinking surface modification mechanisms of plasma-exposed polymers. The limiting level of modification attainable, the surface stability and the factors controlling these are examined, concluding on the plasma capacity to provide operational stability for modified polymer surfaces.

  15. Self-pulsing discharges in pre-heated air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Mário; Machala, Zdenko; Dvon?, Lukáš; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe O.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of self-pulsing discharges in atmospheric pressure air pre-heated to 300–1000 K. Despite using a direct-current power supply, two self-pulsing discharge regimes, a repetitive transient spark (TS) and a repetitive streamer (RS) were generated. The pulse repetition frequency, on the order of a few kHz, can be controlled by adjusting the generator voltage. The TS is a discharge initiated by a streamer, followed by a short (tens of ns) spark current pulse (˜ 1 A), associated with the total discharging of the internal capacity of the electric circuit. The TS is suitable for the study of ‘memory’ effects (pre-heating, pre-ionization) on the mechanisms of streamer-to-spark transition and electrical breakdown in atmospheric pressure air. The TS regime was stable below ˜600 K. Above ˜600 K, a stable repetitive streamer (RS) regime was observed. In this regime, the breakdown and spark did not occur. After the initial streamer, the internal capacity of the electrical circuit discharged partially. With further pre-heating of the gas, the stable TS appeared again at ˜1000 K.

  16. Visualization of volatile substances in different organelles with an atmospheric-pressure mass microscope.

    PubMed

    Harada, Takahiro; Yuba-Kubo, Akiko; Sugiura, Yuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Wakui, Masatoshi; Suematsu, Makoto; Takeshita, Kengo; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a mass microscope (mass spectrometry imager with spatial resolution higher than the naked eye) equipped with an atmospheric pressure ion-source chamber for laser desorption/ionization (AP-LDI) and a quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight (QIT-TOF) analyzer. The optical microscope combined with the mass spectrometer permitted us to precisely determine the relevant tissue region prior to performing imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). An ultraviolet laser tightly focused with a triplet lens was used to achieve high spatial resolution. An atmospheric pressure ion-source chamber enables us to analyze fresh samples with minimal loss of intrinsic water or volatile compounds. Mass-microscopic AP-LDI imaging of freshly cut ginger rhizome sections revealed that 6-gingerol ([M + K](+)at m/z 333.15, positive mode; [M - H](-) at m/z 293.17, negative mode) and the monoterpene ([M + K](+) at m/z 191.09), which are the compounds related to pungency and flavor, respectively, were localized in oil drop-containing organelles. AP-LDI-tandem MS/MS analyses were applied to compare authentic signals from freshly cut ginger directly with the standard reagent. Thus, our atmosphere-imaging mass spectrometer enabled us to monitor a quality of plants at the organelle level. PMID:19788281

  17. Characterization of a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS) for ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie J. Waltman; Prabha Dwivedi; Herbert H. Hill Jr; William C. Blanchard; Robert G. Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in

  18. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-02-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C6H5CH3) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C6H5CH3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N2: O2: H2O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C6H5CH3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C6H5CH3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Matrali, S. H. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Gazeli, K. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Clement, F. [IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Antimisiaris, S. G. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICES)-FORTH, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  20. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Linczer, John; Go, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach.

  1. Double streamer phenomena in atmospheric pressure low frequency corona plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Choe, Wonho [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-15

    Time-resolved images of an atmospheric pressure corona discharge, generated at 50 kHz in a single pin electrode source, show unique positive and negative corona discharge features: a streamer for the positive period and a glow for the negative period. However, unlike in previous reports of dc pulse and low frequency corona discharges, multistreamers were observed at the initial time stage of the positive corona. A possible physical mechanism for the multistreamers is suggested.

  2. Characterization of a dc atmospheric pressure normal glow discharge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Staack; Bakhtier Farouk; Alexander Gutsol; Alexander Fridman

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure dc glow discharges were generated between a thin cylindrical anode and a flat cathode. Voltage-current characteristics, visualization of the discharge and estimations of the current density indicate that the discharge is operating in the normal glow regime. Emission spectroscopy and gas temperature measurements using the 2nd positive band of N2 indicate that the discharge forms a non-equilibirum plasma.

  3. The study of atmospheric pressure plasma for surface cleaning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Yi; Y. H. Lee; G. Y. Yeom

    2002-01-01

    In this study, capillary dielectric-covered dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate atmospheric pressure plasmas. The effect of various gas combinations such as He+O2, (He+O2)\\/Ar, and (He+O2)\\/SF6 was studied with respect to the changes in contact angle, surface energy and photoresist etch rate (ER). By adding a small percentage of O2 (40 sccm) to He (4 slm), we observed the

  4. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Composition on LIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremy J. Hatch [Pacific Univ., Forest Grove, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jill R. Scott [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Chemical and Radiation Measurement; Effenberger, A. J. Jr. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Center for Energy Research

    2014-03-01

    Most LIBS experiments are conducted at standard atmospheric pressure in air. However, there are LIBS studies that vary the pressure and composition of the gas. These studies have provided insights into fundamentals of the mechanisms that lead to the emission and methods for improving the quality of LIBS spectra. These atmospheric studies are difficult because the effects of pressure and gas composition and interconnected, making interpretation of the results difficult. The influence of pressures below and above 760 Torr have been explored. Performing LIBS on a surface at reduced pressures (<760 Torr) can result in enhanced spectra due to higher resolution, increased intensity, improved signal-to-noise (S/N), and increased ablation. Lower pressures produce increased resolution because the line width in LIBS spectra is predominantly due to Stark and Doppler broadening. Stark broadening is primarily caused from collisions between electrons and atoms, while Doppler broadening is proportional to the plasma temperature. Close examination using a high resolution spectrometer reveals that spectra show significant peak broadening and self-absorption as pressures increase, especially for pressures >760 Torr. During LIBS plasma expansion, energy is lost to the surrounding atmosphere, which reduces the lifetime of the laser plasma. Therefore, reducing the pressure increases the lifetime of the plasma, allowing more light from the laser plasma to be collected; thus, increasing the observed signal intensity. However, if pressures are too low (<10 Torr), then there is a steep drop in LIBS spectral intensity. This loss in intensity is mostly due to a disordered plasma that results from the lack of sufficient atmosphere to provide adequate confinement. At reduced pressures, the plasma expands into a less dense atmosphere, which results in a less dense shock wave. The reduced density in the shock wave results in reduced plasma shielding, allowing more photons to reach the sample. Increasing the number of photons interacting with the sample surface results in increased ablation, which can lead to increased intensity. The composition of the background gas has been shown to greatly influence the observed LIBS spectra by altering the plasma temperature, electron density, mass removal, and plasma shielding that impact the emission intensity and peak resolution. It has been reported that atmospheric Ar results in the highest plasma temperature and electron density, while a He atmosphere results in the lowest plasma temperatures and electron density. Studying temporal data, it was also found that Ar had the slowest decay of both electron density and plasma temperature, while He had the fastest decay in both parameters. The higher plasma temperature and electron density results in an increase in line broadenin, or poor resolution, for Ar compared to He. A rapidly developing LIBS plasma with a sufficient amount of electrons can absorb a significant portion of the laser pulse through inverse Bremsstahlung. Ar (15.8 eV ) is more easily ionized than He (24.4 eV). The breakdown threshold for He at 760 Torr is approximately 3 times greater than Ar and approximately 5 times greater at 100 Torr. The lower breakdown threshold in Ar, compared to He, creates an environment favorable for plasma shielding, which reduces sample vaporization and leads to a weaker LIBS signal.

  5. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  6. Simulations of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Bak, Moon; Cappelli, Mark A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-21

    This paper describes simulations of nanosecond pulse plasma formation between planer electrodes covered by dielectric barriers in air at atmospheric pressure and 340 K. The plasma formation process starts as electrons detach from negative ions of molecular oxygen that are produced from the previous discharge pulse. An ionization front is found to form close to the positively biased electrode and then strengthens and propagates towards the grounded electrode with increasing gap voltage. Charge accumulation and secondary emission from the grounded electrode eventually lead to sheath collapse. One interesting feature is a predicted reversal in gap potential due to the accumulated charge, even when there is no reversal in applied potential. The simulation results are compared to recent measurement of mid-gap electric field under the same discharge conditions [Ito et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065002 (2011)].

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Cold Argon/Oxygen Plasma Jet Assisted by Preionization of Syringe Needle Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Muyang; Ren, Chunsheng; Wang, Dezhen; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Jialiang

    2010-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium argon/oxygen plasma jet assisted by the preionization of syringe needle electrode discharge is reported. With the syringe needle plasma as its pre-ionization source, the hybrid barrier-jet was shown to generate uniform discharge with a lower breakdown voltage and a relatively low gas temperature varying from 390 K to 440 K, even when the vol.% oxygen in argon was up to 6%. Utilizing the actinometry method, the concentration of atomic oxygen was estimated to be about in an orders of magnitude of 1017 cm-3. The argon/oxygen plasma jet was then employed to clean out heat transfer oil, with a maximum cleaning rate of 0.1 mm/s achieved.

  8. Phase explosion in atmospheric pressure infrared laser ablation from water-rich targets

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Phase explosion in atmospheric pressure infrared laser ablation from water-rich targets Zhaoyang for preparative, medical,13 and analytical applications11 e.g., atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser at atmospheric pressure in the presence of phase ex- plosion. Compared to laser ablation in vacuum, in a back

  9. Influence of dissociative recombination on the LTE of argon high-frequency plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    at atmospheric pressure A. Sáinz1 , J. Margot2 , M. C. García1 , M. D. Calzada1 1 Grupo de Espectroscopía de+ ) are also expected to play an important role in the discharge kinetics. At atmospheric pressure obeys the Saha-Boltzmann distribution. However, at atmospheric pressure, molecular recombination

  10. Dynamics of pulse phenomena in helium dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    E-print Network

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Dynamics of pulse phenomena in helium dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges of pulse phenomena in conventional parallel-plate dielectric-barrier controlled atmospheric-pressure glow. DOI: 10.1063/1.1625414 I. INTRODUCTION There is rapidly growing interest in atmospheric- pressure glow

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Effect of electrode configuration, discharge behavior, and its formation mechanism

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Effect of electrode configuration, discharge behavior, and its 2008; accepted 8 June 2009; published online 10 July 2009 Atmospheric pressure plasma jet APPJ can The atmospheric pressure plasma is much advantageous over low pressure plasmas in various aspects. It can be dis

  12. Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    E-print Network

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges Xiaohui 2002 A computational study of capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure glow discharges in high atmospheric-pressure glow discharges. © 2002 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1497445 Several

  13. Video Article Atmospheric-pressure Molecular Imaging of Biological Tissues and Biofilms by

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Video Article Atmospheric-pressure Molecular Imaging of Biological Tissues and Biofilms by LAESI.3791/2097 Citation: Nemes P., Vertes A. (2010). Atmospheric-pressure Molecular Imaging of Biological Tissues with an atmospheric-pressure ion source interface is employed to analyze and record the composition of the released

  14. Simulation of a direct current microplasma discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Simulation of a direct current microplasma discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure Qiang Wang at atmospheric pressure was performed based on a one-dimensional fluid model. The microdischarge was found dc atmospheric pressure He microdischarge were presented, as well as successful comparisons

  15. Growth of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure for one-step gas sensor fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kehan; Bo, Zheng; Lu, Ganhua; Mao, Shun; Cui, Shumao; Zhu, Yanwu; Chen, Xinqi; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Chen, Junhong

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), two-dimensional "graphitic" platelets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate, can exhibit similar properties as graphene. Growth of CNWs reported to date was exclusively carried out at a low pressure. Here, we report on the synthesis of CNWs at atmosphere pressure using "direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition" by taking advantage of the high electric field generated in a pin-plate dc glow discharge. CNWs were grown on silicon, stainless steel, and copper substrates without deliberate introduction of catalysts. The as-grown CNW material was mainly mono- and few-layer graphene having patches of O-containing functional groups. However, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies confirmed that most of the oxygen groups could be removed by thermal annealing. A gas-sensing device based on such CNWs was fabricated on metal electrodes through direct growth. The sensor responded to relatively low concentrations of NO2 (g) and NH3 (g), thus suggesting high-quality CNWs that are useful for room temperature gas sensors. PACS: Graphene (81.05.ue), Chemical vapor deposition (81.15.Gh), Gas sensors (07.07.Df), Atmospheric pressure (92.60.hv)

  16. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber, bioregenerative life support

  17. Deposition of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers in atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Goto, Tomoya; Okazaki, Ken; Ohnishi, Kuma; Mangolini, Lorenzo; Heberlein, Joachim; Kortshagen, Uwe [Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro Tokyo 1528552 (Japan); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    Deposition of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been studied in an atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge without dielectric barrier covering the metallic electrodes. When the frequency is sufficiently high so that ions reside in the gap for more than one rf cycle ('trapped ions'), the operating voltage decreases remarkably and the transition from a uniform glow discharge to an arc discharge is suppressed even without dielectric barriers. More importantly, the trapped ions are able to build up a cathodic ion sheath. A large potential drop is created in the sheath between the bulk plasma and the electrode, which is essential for aligning growing CNFs. At the same time, the damage to CNFs due to ion bombardment can be minimized at atmospheric pressure. The primary interest of the present work is in identifying the cathodic ion sheath and investigating how it influences the alignment of growing CNFs in atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Spectral emission profiles of He (706 nm), H{alpha} (656 nm), and CH (432 nm) clearly showed that a dark space is formed between the cathode layer and the heated bottom electrode. However, increasing the rf power induced the transition to a nonuniform {gamma}-mode discharge which creates intense plasma spots in the dark space. Aligned CNFs can be grown at moderate input power during the initial stage of the deposition process. Catalyst particles were heavily contaminated by precipitated carbon in less than 5 min. Alignment deteriorates as CNFs grow and deposition was virtually terminated by the deactivation of catalyst particles.

  18. Optimization of the mass spectrometric analysis of triacylglycerols using negative-ion chemical ionization with ammonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Päivi Laakso; Heikki Kallio

    1996-01-01

    Conditions for the mass spectrometric analysis of triacylglycerols,via direct exposure probe, with ammonia negative-ion chemical ionization were optimized. Triacylglycerols were most favorably\\u000a ionized, using the reactant gas pressure of approximately 8500 mtorr at the ion source temperature of 200°C with the instrumentation\\u000a used. Abundant [M-H]? ions were produced under these conditions without the formation of [M+35]? cluster ions, which would

  19. Growth of the Bi 2O 3 thin films under atmospheric pressure by means of halide CVD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Takeyama; N. Takahashi; T. Nakamura; S. Ito

    2004-01-01

    Films of Bi2O3 were grown on glass substrate under atmospheric pressure by means of halide chemical vapour deposition (AP-HCVD) using BiI3 and O2 as the starting materials. In the XRD diffractogram of the film a strong diffraction peak appears at 27.91° assigned to the (111) diffraction of the ?-Bi2O3 with cubic structure. X-ray pole figure suggested that the ?111? direction

  20. Real-time analysis of ambient organic aerosols using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Karu, Einar; Stelzer, Torsten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, due to the chemical complexity its measurement remains a major challenge for analytical instrumentation.1 Here, we present the development, characterization and application of a new soft ionization technique that allows mass spectrometric real-time detection of organic compounds in ambient aerosols. The aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) ion source utilizes a helium glow discharge plasma to produce excited helium species and primary reagent ions. Ionization of the analytes occurs in the afterglow region after thermal desorption and results mainly in intact molecular ions, facilitating the interpretation of the acquired mass spectra. In the past, similar approaches were used to detect pesticides, explosives or illicit drugs on a variety of surfaces.2,3 In contrast, the AeroFAPA source operates 'online' and allows the detection of organic compounds in aerosols without a prior precipitation or sampling step. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge ionization technique to ambient aerosol samples. We illustrate that changes in aerosol composition and concentration are detected on the time scale of seconds and in the ng-m-3 range. Additionally, the successful application of AeroFAPA-MS during a field study in a mixed forest region in Central Europe is presented. Several oxidation products of monoterpenes were clearly identified using the possibility to perform tandem MS experiments. The acquired data are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that AeroFAPA-MS is a suitable tool for organic aerosol analysis. Furthermore, these results reveal the potential of this technique to enable new insights into aerosol formation, growth and transformation in the atmosphere. References: 1) IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, in press. 2) Shelley, J. T.; Wiley, J. S.; Hieftje, G. M. Ultrasensitive Ambient Mass Spectrometric Analysis with a Pin-to-Capillary Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow Source. Anal. Chem. 2011, 83(14), 5741-5748; DOI 10.1021/Ac201053q. 3) Albert, A.; Shelley, J.; Engelhard, C. Plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: state-of-the-art in qualitative and quantitative analysis. Anal Bioanal Chem 2014, 406(25), 6111-6127; DOI 10.1007/s00216-014-7989-z.

  1. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  2. Study of a dual frequency atmospheric pressure corona plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dan Bee; Moon, S. Y.; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Choe, Wonho [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Radio frequency mixing of 2 and 13.56 MHz was investigated by performing experimental measurements on the atmospheric pressure corona plasma. As a result of the dual frequency, length, current density, and electron excitation temperature of the plasma were increased, while the gas temperature was maintained at roughly the same level when compared to the respective single frequency plasmas. Moreover, observation of time-resolved images revealed that the dual frequency plasma has a discharge mode of 2 MHz positive streamer, 2 MHz negative glow, and 13.56 MHz continuous glow.

  3. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Sun, Yi; Wu, Haiyan; Zhu, Weidong; Lopez, Jose L.; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jue; Li, Ruoyu; Fang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  4. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Karl D. [Department of Engineering and Technology, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States) and Process Energetics Laboratory, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed.

  5. Pluto's Insolation History: Latitudinal Variations and Effects on Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    Since previous insolation modeling in the early 1990’s, new atmospheric pressure data, increased computational power, and the upcoming flyby of the Pluto system by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft have generated new motivation and increased capabilities for the study of Pluto’s complex long-term (million-years) insolation history. The two primary topics of interest in studying Pluto’s insolation history are the variations in insolation patterns when integrated over different intervals and the evolution of diurnal insolation patterns over the last several decades. We find latitudinal dichotomies when comparing average insolation over timescales of days, decades, centuries, and millennia. Depending on the timescales of volatile migration, some consequences of these insolation patterns may be manifested in the surface features revealed by New Horizons. For any single rotation of Pluto there is a latitude that receives more insolation relative to the others. Often this is the sub-subsolar latitude but it can also be an arctic circle latitude when near-polar regions of Pluto experience the "midnight sun". We define the amount of that greatest insolation value over the course of one rotation as the "maximum diurnal insolation" (MDI). We find that MDI is driven to its highest values when Pluto’s obliquity creates a long arctic summer (or “midnight sun”) beginning just after perihelion. Pluto’s atmospheric pressure, as measured through stellar occultation observations during the past three decades, appears to correlate with Pluto's currently occurring midnight sun as quantified by the MDI parameter. If insolation (as parameterized by the MDI value) is the single dominant factor driving Pluto's atmospheric pressure, this “Midnight Sun Model” predicts that Pluto's maximum atmospheric pressure will be reached in 2017 followed by a steady decline. Pluto's maximum diurnal insolation value begins dropping after 2017 due to two factors: Pluto’s sub-solar point becomes more equatorial (lessening the midnight sun effect) and the planet continues to recede toward aphelion. This work was supported in part by the NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto under SwRI Subcontract 299433Q.

  6. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  7. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, an external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  8. Electron kinetics in a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)] [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-14

    Electron kinetics during a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions model. It is obtained that the electron energy distribution function can be divided into three parts, namely, the non-equilibrium low-energy part, the Maxwellian function at moderate energies, and the high-energy tail. Simulation results showed that the role of the high-energy tail of electron energy distribution increases, when the distance between electrodes increases.

  9. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting, E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  10. Twin injection-needle plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Chon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-04-01

    Twin injection-needle plasmas at atmospheric pressure are introduced as low-temperature nonequilibrium plasma source. The plasmas with long plasma columns of about 55cm are produced from one alternating current (ac) power supply as if each of the plasmas is a fraternal twin and shows different characteristics in plasma column length and gas temperature. The twin plasma columns are regarded as skinny rods with a uniform charge distribution, and the change of the plasma column lengths with different distances between the plasmas is compared with the change of the capacitance of the skinny rods presented as a model.

  11. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, J. F.; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Price, R. O.; Swanson, R. J.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2008-06-01

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  12. QUANTITATION OF MONOSACCHARIDE ISOTOPIC ENRICHMENT IN PHYSIOLOGIC FLUIDS BY ELECTRON IONIZATION OR NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION GC/MS USING DI-O-ISOPROPYLIDENE DERIVATIVES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aldonitrile pentaacetate and other derivatives lack ions in the electron ionization (EI) spectra possessing an intact hexose structure and thus must be analyzed by chemical ionization GC/MS in order to study multiple isotopomers. We report methods for quantitation of hexose di-O-isopropylidene a...

  13. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND X-RAY IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Nomura, Hideko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri, E-mail: catherine.walsh@qub.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization; here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find that photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N{sub 2}H{sup +}, indicating that it is safe to adopt existing approximations of the X-ray ionization rate in typical T Tauri star-disk systems. The recalculation of the photorates increases the abundances of neutral molecules in the outer disk, highlighting the importance of taking into account the shape of the UV spectrum in protoplanetary disks. A recalculation of the photoreaction rates also affects the gas-phase chemistry due to the adjustment of the H/H{sub 2} and C{sup +}/C ratios. The disk ionization fraction is not significantly affected by the methods adopted to calculate the photochemistry and X-ray ionization. We determine that there is a probable 'dead zone' where accretion is suppressed, present in a layer, Z/R {approx}< 0.1-0.2, in the disk midplane, within R Almost-Equal-To 200 AU.

  14. Behavior of N2+ Ions in He Microplasma Jet at Atmospheric Pressure Measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Ito, Yosuke; Tachibana, Kunihide; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2008-06-01

    The behavior of N2+ ions in a low-frequency driven atmospheric pressure He plasma jet effused into ambient air was analyzed from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy measurements. The gas temperature derived from the rotational distribution was kept near room temperature and the drift velocity of N2+ ions estimated from the line shape was almost zero as compared to the apparent speed of the plasma bunch given by the spatiotemporal intensity profile. This shows that the mechanism of moving plasma bunches can be attributed to the ionization wave propagation similar to the streamer in positive corona discharge.

  15. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Seshan, V; Ullien, D; Castellanos-Gomez, A; Sachdeva, S; Murthy, D H K; Savenije, T J; Ahmad, H A; Nunney, T S; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K; Nesládek, M; van der Zant, H S J; Sudhölter, E J R; de Smet, L C P M

    2013-06-21

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ~50 ml?min (STP) at ~850 °C. The films were extensively evaluated by surface wettability, electron affinity, elemental composition, photoconductivity, and redox studies. In addition, electrografting experiments were performed. The surface characteristics as well as the optoelectronic and redox properties of the annealed films were found to be very similar to hydrogen plasma-treated films. Moreover, the presented method is compatible with atmospheric pressure and provides a low-cost solution to hydrogenate CVD diamond, which makes it interesting for industrial applications. The plausible mechanism for the hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films is based on the formation of surface carbon dangling bonds and carbon-carbon unsaturated bonds at the applied tempera-ture, which react with molecular hydrogen to produce a hydrogen-terminated surface. PMID:23802976

  16. Development of antimicrobial coatings by atmospheric pressure plasma using a guanidine-based precursor.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jacqueline H; Fleischman, Michelle S; Rodriguez-Santiago, Victor; Piehler, Lars T; Williams, André A; Leadore, Julia L; Pappas, Daphne D

    2013-11-27

    Antimicrobial coatings deposited onto ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) films were investigated using an atmospheric pressure - plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) process. Varying concentrations of a guanidine-based liquid precursor, 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine, were used, and different deposition conditions were studied. Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study the chemical structure and elemental composition of the coatings. Conformity, morphology, and coating thickness were assessed through SEM and AFM. Optimal AP-PECVD parameters were chosen and applied to deposit guanidine coatings onto woven fabrics. The coatings exhibited high antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) based on a modified-AATCC 100 test standard, where 2-5 log reductions were achieved. PMID:24164174

  17. Part-per-trillion level determination of antifouling pesticides and their byproducts in seawater samples by off-line solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography–atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karell Mart??nez; Imma Ferrer; Damiá Barceló

    2000-01-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of antifouling pesticides and some of their byproducts such as dichlofluanid, diuron and its byproducts [demethyldiuron and 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea], (2-thiocyanomethylthio)benzothiazole, chlorothalonil, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and one of its byproducts (2-methylthio-4-tert.-butylamino-s-triazine) in seawater was developed. The extraction of these compounds from the filtered seawater samples was performed off-line with different solid-phase extraction sorbents using

  18. Comparison of the Structures of Triacylglycerols from Native and Transgenic Medium-Chain Fatty Acid-Enriched Rape Seed Oil by Liquid Chromatography–Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry (LC–APCI-ITMS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Beermann; Nadine Winterling; Angelika Green; Michael Möbius; Joachim J. Schmitt; Günther Boehm

    2007-01-01

    The sn position of fatty acids in seed oil lipids affects physiological function in pharmaceutical and dietary applications. In\\u000a this study the composition of acyl-chain substituents in the sn positions of glycerol backbones in triacylglycerols (TAG) have been compared. TAG from native and transgenic medium-chain\\u000a fatty acid-enriched rape seed oil were analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with

  19. Chemical Processes in Protoplanetary Disks II. On the importance of photochemistry and X-ray ionization

    E-print Network

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T J; Aikawa, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization, here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO+, N2H+, H2O, CO2 and CH3OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N2H+ indicating it is safe to adopt existi...

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Solution by Atmospheric-Pressure N2, He, Air, and O2 Microplasmas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhang, Xianhui; Bi, Zhenhua; Zong, Zichao; Niu, Jinhai; Song, Ying; Liu, Dongping; Yang, Size

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure N2, He, air, and O2 microplasma arrays have been used to inactivate Escherichia coli cells suspended in aqueous solution. Measurements show that the efficiency of inactivation of E. coli cells is strongly dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2 and He microplasma arrays, air and O2 microplasma arrays may be utilized to more efficiently kill E. coli cells in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of inactivation of E. coli cells in water can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model, where reactive oxygen species play a crucial role in the inactivation process. Analysis indicates that plasma-generated reactive species can react with E. coli cells in water by direct or indirect interactions. PMID:26025895

  2. PENTACHLOROPHENOL IN THE ENVIRONMENT: EVIDENCE FOR ITS ORIGIN FROM COMMERCIAL PENTACHLOROPHENOL BY NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial pentachlorophenol (PCP) contains significant quantities of tetrachlorophenol (TCP). The occurrence of TCP in environmental samples provides a chemical marker for PCP originating from commercial formulations. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been used ...

  3. PENTACHLOROPHENOL IN THE ENVIRONMENT. EVIDENCE FOR ITS ORIGIN FROM COMMERCIAL PENTACHLOROPHENOL BY NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial pentachlorophenol (PCP) contains significant quantities of tetrachlorophenol (TCP). The occurrence of TCP in environmental samples provides a chemical marker for PCP originating from commercial formulations. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been used ...

  4. Parametric Investigations of an Atmospheric pressure Uniform Glow Discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Gadri, Rami

    1997-11-01

    In the cold plasma processing field, applications of the atmospheric pressure uniform glow discharge are numerous. Among them one can mention the increase of the surface energy of materials, the cleaning and etching of surfaces, and the decontamination and sterilization. The development of the glow regime at atmospheric pressure permits to avoid the technical and economical drawbacks of low pressure glow discharge systems. It also increases the efficiency of the surface treatment as compared to the corona discharge. In these conditions, a glow regime is obtained and studied in particular experimental conditions. The working gas is helium, the frequency in the range 1-20 kHz, the gap distance of some mm and the metallic electrodes are covered by a dielectric layer. The current is characterized by one peak per half cycle and is typically in the range of a few tens of mA. Since this discharge involves complex nonlinear processes and is sensitive to the variation of its parameters, detailed experimental (Ph. Decomps (1996), PhD thesis, Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse France, No d'ordre 2538.) and numerical studies, covering wide ranges of system parameters, were required. These investigations allowed the determination of the optimal operating conditions for which the discharge remains of the glow type, and therefore induces a better surface treatment. In this paper the detailed theory ( Ben Gadri R., Rabehi A., Massines F. and Segur P. (1994), XIIth Eur. Sect. Conf. on the At. & Mol. Phy. of Ionized Gases, The Netherlands, 23-26 August, pp. 228-229.) of the one dimensional f luid model and a parametric study of the discharge characteristics are presented. A particular attention will be given to the influence of the different system parameters on the operational mode of the discharge.

  5. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)] [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3} removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N{sub 2}: O{sub 2}: H{sub 2}O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3} decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3} is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  6. Quantitation of toxaphene in environmental samples using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah L. Swackhamer; M. Judith. Charles; Ronald A. Hites

    1987-01-01

    A method for quantitating toxaphene in environmental samples using methane negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) mass spectrometry in the selected ion mode is given. NICI is highly selective and sensitive for measuring toxaphene. This method monitors ions from each of the homologue groups in the toxaphene mixture having 6 to 10 chlorines corresponding to the M⁻ or the (M -

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquid covered tissue: touching and not-touching the liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    In the use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biological applications, the plasma-produced charged and neutral species in the plume of the jet often interact with a thin layer of liquid covering the tissue being treated. The plasma-produced reactivity must then penetrate through the liquid layer to reach the tissue. In this computational investigation, a plasma jet created by a single discharge pulse at three different voltages was directed onto a 200?µm water layer covering tissue followed by a 10?s afterglow. The magnitude of the voltage and its pulse length determined if the ionization wave producing the plasma plume reached the surface of the liquid. When the ionization wave touches the surface, significantly more charged species were created in the water layer with H3O+aq, O3?aq, and O2?aq being the dominant terminal species. More aqueous OHaq, H2O2aq, and O3aq were also formed when the plasma plume touches the surface. The single pulse examined here corresponds to a low repetition rate plasma jet where reactive species would be blown out of the volume between pulses and there is not recirculation of flow or turbulence. For these conditions, NxOy species do not accumulate in the volume. As a result, aqueous nitrites, nitrates, and peroxynitrite, and the HNO3aq and HOONOaq, which trace their origin to solvated NxOy, have low densities.

  8. Development of a miniature mass spectrometer with continuous atmospheric pressure interface.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Feng, Yan; Wei, Yongzheng; Wang, Yuzhuo; Xu, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The demand for on-the-spot analysis is met by a miniature mass spectrometer which is preferred to be robust, stable, as small as possible and capable of analyzing different samples by coupling with various ionization methods. However, largely constrained by the atmospheric pressure interface (API), these aspects are difficult to be realized in one system. Herein, we describe the development of a new miniature mass spectrometer with balanced performance. The miniature mass spectrometer is small in size (30 × 30 × 18 cm) but has a continuous API, which was achieved by high-pressure ion trap operation and maximized ion transfer efficiency with the utilization of a differential pumping system. The miniature mass spectrometer was characterized and optimized in terms of stability, sensitivity, mass range, mass resolution and scan speed. Rapid analysis of mixtures was demonstrated by coupling the miniature mass spectrometer with the ambient ionization technique of paper spray. This is the smallest miniature mass spectrometer to date, which has a continuous API. PMID:25860539

  9. Plasma formation in atmospheric pressure helium discharges under different background air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yaoge; Hao Yanpeng; Zheng Bin [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated between parallel-plate electrodes in helium have been characterized using temporally resolved emission spectra. The variation of typical spectral lines over time has been analyzed. In helium with a low concentration of N{sub 2}, the emission of He at 706.5 nm is dominant and appears 500 ns earlier than N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands, indicating low reaction rates of Penning ionization and charge transfer in the initial stage. During the decay, it is the Penning ionization caused by He metastables with a long lifetime rather than the charge transfer reaction that leads to the long decay of N{sub 2}{sup +} emissions. When helium contains a higher concentration of N{sub 2} molecules, the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands become the most intense, and emissions from He, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and O exhibit similar behavior as they increase. The emissions last for a shorter time under such conditions because of rapid consumption of He metastables and He{sub 2}{sup +}.

  10. Characterization of Nitrogen-Containing Species in Coal andPetroleum-Derived Products by ammonia Chemical Ionization-High Resolution MassSpectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1997-01-01

    A coal-derived light distillate and a petroleum-derived residuum have been studied by high resolution mass spectrometry using both low-pressure ammonia chemical ionization and low-voltage electron impact ionization. A mass calibration mixture for use with ammonia chemical ionization has been developed. Selective ionization of the basic nitrogen-containing compounds by ammonia chemical ionization and compound type characterization of the resulting quasi-molecular species has been demonstrated. Several homologous series of nitrogen-containing compounds were identified in a basic extract by electron impact ionization and compared with quasimolecular analogs identified by ammonia chemical ionization.

  11. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  12. Spectroscopic imagine of atmospheric-pressure helium ICP discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.; Boyes, A.L.M.; Cai, M.; Hsiech, C.; Zhang, H. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    Spatially-resolved information from atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICP) was acquired with a simple, inexpensive optical imaging spectrometer. The system uses a 35-cm focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator/spectrograph and a solid state charge-injection device (CID) or a charge coupled device (CCD), Quantitative image maps of the plasmas were produced with good resolution. For example, when the CID was used, the entire plasma image could be monitored with a spatial resolution of 0.13 and 0.10 mm in the horizontal and vertical directions. The spectral resolution was 4 mn. Lateral distributions of emission intensities were converted, using an Abel inversion routine, to radial distributions. Some unique features of the He ICP, compared to the commonly used Ar ICP, were identified at or around analytical conditions for elemental analysis of gaseous and aqueous samples.

  13. Effect of Neoangiogenesis Using Micro-spot Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Chihiro; Komachi, Toshifumi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Hirata, Takamichi; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Using an in vitro model, we investigated the effect of the atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation to NIH3T3 and porcine aortic endothelial cells. In the plasma exposure experiment using cell proliferation was inhibited in proportion to processing time. However, it was found that this inhibitory effect was suppressed by plasma irradiation and cells are rather on an increase trend. And, in comparison with the cell growth curve for the He gas flow group, the curve for the plasma irradiation group was shifted to the left. We investigated expression analysis in the subsequent experiment with focus on factors related to angiogenesis, it was found that the transient overexpression of VEGF are observed in 24 h from the plasma irradiation. This proliferative effect is likely related to several growth factor releases due to plasma-induced reactive ion/radical interaction.

  14. Efficacy of nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma for tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seoul Hee; Lee, Hae June; Hong, Jin Woo; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-01-01

    The conventional light source used for tooth bleaching has the potential to cause thermal damage, and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. In this study, we evaluated bleaching efficacy, temperature, and morphological safety after tooth bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma. Tooth bleaching combined with plasma had improved efficacy in providing a higher level of brightness. The temperature of the pulp chamber was maintained around 37°C, indicating that the plasma does not cause any thermal damage. The morphological results of tooth bleaching with plasma did not affect mineral composition under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. On the basis of these results, the application of plasma and low concentration of 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) has a high capability for effective tooth bleaching. It can be documented that plasma is a safe energy source, which has no deleterious effects on the tooth surface. PMID:25685843

  15. Controlled Microdroplet Transport in an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    E-print Network

    Maguire, P D; Kelsey, C P; Bingham, A; Montgomery, E P; Bennet, E D; Potts, H E; Rutherford, D; McDowell, D A; Diver, D A; Mariotti, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 micrometers falling to 13 micrometers with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of < 100 microseconds. The maximum gas temperature, determined from nitrogen spectral lines, was below 400 K and the observed droplet size reduction implies additional factors beyond standard evaporation, including charge and surface chemistry effects. The successful demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for pla...

  16. Time and space variability of spectral estimates of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavero, Flavio G.; Einaudi, Franco

    1987-01-01

    The temporal and spatial behaviors of atmospheric pressure spectra over the northern Italy and the Alpine massif were analyzed using data on surface pressure measurements carried out at two microbarograph stations in the Po Valley, one 50 km south of the Alps, the other in the foothills of the Dolomites. The first 15 days of the study overlapped with the Alpex Intensive Observation Period. The pressure records were found to be intrinsically nonstationary and were found to display substantial time variability, implying that the statistical moments depend on time. The shape and the energy content of spectra depended on different time segments. In addition, important differences existed between spectra obtained at the two stations, indicating a substantial effect of topography, particularly for periods less than 40 min.

  17. Phenomena of oscillations in atmospheric pressure direct current glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fu-cheng [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)] [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Yan, Wen; Wang, De-zhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Self-sustained oscillations in a dc glow discharge with a semiconductor layer at atmospheric pressure were investigated by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the dc glow discharge initially becomes unstable in the subnormal glow region and gives rise to oscillations of plasma parameters. A variety of oscillations with one or more frequencies have been observed under different conditions. The discharge oscillates between the glow discharge mode and the Townsend discharge mode in the oscillations with large amplitude while operates in the subnormal glow discharge mode all the while in the oscillations with small amplitude. Fourier Transform spectra of oscillations reveal the transition mechanism between different oscillations. The effects of semiconductor conductivity on the oscillation frequency of the dominant mode, gas voltage, as well as the discharge current have also been analyzed.

  18. Decomposition of Glycerine by Water Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayuki, Watanabe; Narengerile

    2013-04-01

    High concentration of aqueous glycerine was decomposed using a direct current (DC) plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. The torch can generate the plasma with water as the plasma-supporting gas in the absence of any additional gas supply system and cooling devices. The results indicated that 5 mol% glycerine was completely decomposed by water plasmas at arc powers of 0.55~1.05 kW. The major products in the effluent gas were H2 (68.9%~71.1%), CO2 (18.9%~23.0%), and CO (0.2%~0.6%). However, trace levels of formic acid (HCOOH) and formaldehyde (HCHO) were observed in the liquid effluent. The results indicated that the water plasma waste treatment process is capable of being an alternative green technology for organic waste decomposition.

  19. Controlled microdroplet transport in an atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, P. D.; Mahony, C. M. O.; Kelsey, C. P.; Bingham, A. J.; Montgomery, E. P.; Bennet, E. D.; Potts, H. E.; Rutherford, D. C. E.; McDowell, D. A.; Diver, D. A.; Mariotti, D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 ?m falling to 13 ?m with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of <100 ?s. The maximum gas temperature, determined from nitrogen spectral lines, was below 400 K and the observed droplet size reduction implies additional factors beyond standard evaporation, including charge and surface chemistry effects. The demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for plasma medicine.

  20. Generation of reactive species by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The role of gas mixing in reactive species delivery to treatment surfaces for an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled plasma helium jet is investigated by numerical modelling. Atomic oxygen in the jet effluent is shown to quickly convert to ozone for increasing device to surface separation due to the molecular oxygen present in the gas mixture. Surface profiles of reactive oxygen species show narrow peaks for atomic oxygen and broader surface distributions for ozone and metastable species. Production efficiency of atomic oxygen to the helium plasma jet by molecular oxygen admixture is shown to be dependent on electro-negativity. Excessive molecular oxygen admixture results in negative ion dominance over electrons which eventually quenches the plasma. Interaction of the plasma jet with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface. Gas heating by the plasma is found to be dominated by elastic electron collisions and positive ion heating. Comparison with experimental measurements for atomic oxygen shows good agreement.

  1. Cell immobilization on polymer by air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Om, Ji-yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-08-01

    The study of cell immobilization on delicate polymer by an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) is required for its medical application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AAPPJ treatment induce cell immobilization effect on delicate polymers without significant change of surface roughness by AAPPJ treatment. After surface roughness, dynamic contact angle, and chemical characteristics were investigated, the immobilization effect was evaluated with the mouse fibroblast L929 cell line. Surface roughness change was not observed (P > 0.05) in either delicate dental wax or polystyrene plate (PSP) as advancing and receding contact angles significantly decreased (P < 0.05), thanks to decreased hydrocarbon and formation of oxygen-related functional groups in treated PSP. Adherent L929 cells with elongated morphology were found in treated PSP along with the formation of immobilization markers vinculin and actin cytoskeleton. Increased PTK2 gene expression upregulated these markers on treated PSP.

  2. Direct measurement of methyl radicals in a methane/air flame at atmospheric pressure by radar REMPI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Bottom, Andrew; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M; Katta, Viswanath R

    2011-11-21

    We report the direct measurements of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure by using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI), also known as the Radar REMPI technique. A tunable dye laser was used to selectively induce the (2 + 1) REMPI ionization of methyl radicals (CH(3), 3p(2)A(2)('')0(0)(0) band) in a near adiabatic and premixed laminar methane/air flame, generated by a Hencken burner. In situ measurements of the REMPI electrons were made by non-intrusively using a microwave homodyne transceiver detection system. The REMPI spectrum of the CH(3) radical was obtained and a spatial distribution of the radicals limited by focused laser beam geometry, approximately 20 µm normal to the flame front and 2.4 mm parallel to the flame, was determined. The measured CH(3) was in good agreement with numerical simulations performed using the detailed kinetic mechanism of GRI-3.0. To the authors' knowledge, these experiments represent the first directly-measured spatially-resolved CH(3) in a flame at atmospheric pressure. PMID:22109424

  3. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  4. Reduction of surface gravity data from global atmospheric pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boy, Jean-Paul; Gegout, Pascal; Hinderer, Jacques

    2002-05-01

    Besides solid Earth and ocean tides, atmospheric pressure variations are one of the major sources of surface gravity perturbations. As shown by previous studies (Merriam 1992; Mukai et al. 1995; Boy et al. 1998), the usual pressure correction with the help of local pressure measurements and the barometric admittance (a simple transfer function between pressure and gravity, both measured locally) does not allow an adequate estimation of global atmospheric loading. We express the response of the Earth to pressure forcing using a Green's function formalism (Farrell 1972). The atmosphere acts on surface gravity through two effects: first, a direct gravitational attraction by air masses which is sensitive to regional (about 1000 km around the gravimeter) pressure variations; second, an elastic process induced by the Earth's surface deformation and mass redistribution which is sensitive to large scale pressure variations (wavelengths greater than 4000 km). We estimate atmospheric loading using Green's functions and global pressure charts provided by meteorological centres. We introduce different hypotheses on the atmospheric thickness and atmospheric density variations with altitude for the modelling of the direct Newtonian attraction. All computations are compared to gravity data provided by superconducting gravimeters of the GGP (Global Geodynamics Project) network. We show the improvement by modelling global pressure versus the local estimates in terms of reduction of the variance of gravity residuals. We can also validate the inverted barometer (IB) hypothesis as the oceanic response to pressure forcing for periods exceeding one week. The non-inverted barometer (NIB) hypothesis is shown to be definitely an inadequate assumption for describing the oceanic response to atmospheric pressure at seasonal timescales.

  5. Fragmentation of allylmethylsulfide by chemical ionization: dependence on humidity and inhibiting role of water.

    PubMed

    Maihom, Thana; Schuhfried, Erna; Probst, Michael; Limtrakul, Jumras; Märk, Tilmann D; Biasioli, Franco

    2013-06-20

    We report on a previously unknown reaction mechanism involving water in the fragmentation reaction following chemical ionization. This result stems from a study presented here on the humidity-dependent and energy-dependent endoergic fragmentation of allyl methyl sulfide (AMS) upon protonation in a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). The fragmentation pathways were studied with experimental (PTR-MS) and quantum chemical methods (polarizable continuum model (PCM), microhydration, studied at the MP2/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory). We report in detail on the energy profiles, reaction mechanisms, and proton affinities (G4MP2 calculations). In the discovered reaction mechanism, water reduces the fragmentation of protonated species in chemical ionization. It does so by direct interaction with the protonated species via covalent binding (C3H5(+)) or via association (AMS·H(+)). This stabilizes intermediate complexes and thus overall increases the activation energy for fragmentation. Water thereby acts as a reusable inhibitor (anticatalyst) in chemical ionization. Moreover, according to the quantum chemical (QC) results, when water is present in abundance it has the opposite effect and enhances fragmentation. The underlying reason is a concentration-dependent change in the reaction principle from active inhibition of fragmentation to solvation, which then enhances fragmentation. This amphoteric behavior of water is found for the fragmentation of C3H5(+) to C3H3(+), and similarly for the fragmentation of AMS·H(+) to C3H5(+). The results support humidity-dependent quantification efforts for PTR-MS and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Moreover, the results should allow for a better understanding of ion-chemistry in the presence of water. PMID:23682687

  6. Temporal evolution of the electron density produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in water vapor at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainct, Florent; Lacoste, Deanna; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Odic, Emmanuel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    A study of plasma discharges produced by nanosecond repetitive pulses (NRP) in water vapor at 450 K and 1 atm is presented. The plasma was generated between two point electrodes with 20-ns duration, high-voltage (0--20 kV) pulses, at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz, in the spark regime (2 mJ/pulse). Atomic lines measured by optical emission spectroscopy were used to determine the electron number density in this non-equilibrium water-vapor plasma. The broadenings and shifts of the H? and H? lines of the hydrogen Balmer series and of the atomic oxygen triplet at 777 nm were analyzed. For a maximum reduced electric field of about 200 Td, a maximum electron density of 2 × 1018 cm-3 was measured, corresponding to an ionization level of about 10 %. This ionization level is two orders of magnitude higher than the one obtained for similar NRP discharges in air at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Effect of sample compositions on chemical analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schriemer, D.; Dai, Y.; Li, L. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is an effective ionization technique for mass spectrometry. It takes advantages of some unique properties of certain organic chemicals to provide entrapment, isolation, vaporization, and ionization of the analyte of interest. While the main application of the MALDI technique is currently in the area of biological molecule analysis, it is possible to use this technique for monitoring polymer chemistry such as degradation processes. This is potentially important for studying and developing environmentally degradable polymers. Direct analysis of the analyte in real-world samples is possible with MALDI. However, there is a significant effect of the overall composition of a sample on the detectability and performance of MALDI. Two examples are given to illustrate the positive and negative effects of buffers, salts, and additives on the MALDI sample preparation.

  8. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials at 2.2-2.3 micron and 2.75 microns remain largely unaffected by the environmental conditions. A shift in the Christiansen feature towards shorter wavelengths has also been observed with decreasing atmospheric pressure and temperature in the midinfrared spectra of these samples.

  9. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials at 2.2-2.3 micrometers and 2.27 micrometers remain largely unaffected by the environmental conditions. A shift in the Christiansen feature towards shorter wavelengths has also been observed with decreasing atmospheric pressure and temperature in the midinfrared spectra of these samples.

  10. Advances in optical diagnostics of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilecce, G.; Ambrico, P. F.; de Benedictis, S.

    2008-07-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure have recently received a growing interest because of their potentially advantageous use in a number of applicative fields, in both their main classes of "volume" and "surface" geometric arrangements. The possibility of obtaining a uniform, or glow, regime, in contrast to the usual filamentary one, has further enlarged their perspectives for surface treatments applications. From a diagnostic point of view, the high pressure regime adds problems relevant to an enhanced role of collision quenching, vibrational and rotational relaxation, while maintaining most of the demands of a highly non-equilibrium system for a detailed characterization of its degrees of freedom. In addition, filamentary DBDs are intrinsically pulsed systems, in which the electron impact excitation is confined in small space regions and very short time intervals, such that a prominent afterglow phase, both spatial and temporal, is present in the discharge volume, and kinetic processes involving long-lived species, chemi- luminescent reactions, recombinations (aided by the large pressure) can competitively come into play in the excitation of electronic states. We have applied our ensemble of diagnostic methods, based on time resolved emission and laser spectroscopy, to the investigation of elementary kinetics in DBDs. Here we present our last two years results that include: Optical-Optical Double Resonance (OODR)-LIF measurements of N_2(A^3 Sigma_u^+) density, in a volume DBD that is of relevance in the debate upon the mechanisms for establishing the glow regime (Dilecce 2007); OODR-LIF and emission study on a Masuda type surface discharge (Ambrico 2008); measurement of N_2(C^3 Pi_u, v) quenching and vibrational relaxation rate constants and its relevance to nitrogen Second Positive System emission diagnostics at atmospheric pressure (Dilecce 2006, 2007); kinetics of CN(B^2 Sigma^+, v) formation and violet system emission in N_2 - CH_4 discharges. The latter issue shows in addition a correlation between emissions and surface status (i.e. the presence of a deposit) that is a clear monitor of a gas surface interplay.

  11. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. This work was supported by the FZP and SPbGU

  12. Response of the Mediterranean mean sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre-Yves Le Traon; Philippe Gauzelin

    1997-01-01

    The response of the Mediterranean mean sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing is analyzed using 3 years of TOPEX\\/POSEIDON data. Coherence analysis between mean sea level and atmospheric pressure shows a significant departure from a standard inverse barometer effect at frequencies higher than 30days-1. At high frequencies the phase difference between sea level and pressure is about 100°, while it

  13. Can atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations be neglected in soil vapor extraction?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kehua You; Hongbin Zhan

    Solutions to soil vapor extraction (SVE) are indispensable to characterize the unsaturated zone and to optimize SVE. Most of the existing solutions neglect the fluctuations of atmospheric pressure and water table. This study presents a new semi-analytical solution for SVE by considering the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations. Comparisons between the new and previous solutions indicate that the water

  14. Three-dimensional gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure microdischarges using Raman scattering

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Three-dimensional gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure microdischarges using Raman of small dimensions 100 s of micrometers , atmospheric pressure operation, and high power densities 10A discharge. © 2006 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2404594 High pressure nonequilibrium

  15. Microstreamer dynamics during plasma remediation of NO using atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    Microstreamer dynamics during plasma remediation of NO using atmospheric pressure dielectric- ate toxins from atmospheric pressure gas streams. Plasma remediation is one technique which has been methods for the removal of oxides of nitrogen NxOy from atmospheric gas streams and among those techniques

  16. Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2

    E-print Network

    Kite, Edwin

    1 Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2-dominated atmosphere, but direct constraints on paleoatmospheric11 pressure P are lacking. Of particular doubtful that increasing CO2 pressure (total atmospheric pressure, P) is enough to raise early39 Mars

  17. Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2

    E-print Network

    Kite, Edwin

    1 Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure1 inferred from small ancient craters2-dominated atmosphere, but direct constraints on paleoatmospheric11 pressure P are lacking1 that increasing CO240 pressure (total atmospheric pressure, P) is enough to raise early Mars mean

  18. Enhancement of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lignocellulosic Wastes by Microwave Pretreatment Under Atmospheric Pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Intanakul; M. Krairiksh; P. Kitchaiya

    2003-01-01

    A technique to improve enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic wastes by microwave pretreatment under atmospheric pressure was developed. Ground rice straw or sugar cane bagasse immersed in a glycerine medium with small amounts of water, was treated with 240 W of microwave irradiation for 10 min at atmospheric pressure. A temperature of about 200°C could be reached in this medium without high pressure

  19. Radioimmunoassay and chemical ionization/mass spectrometry compared for plasma cortisol determination

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, C. (AB Draco, Lund, Sweden); Johnson, S.; Hedner, P.; Gustafsson, A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for determination of cortisol in plasma and urine, based on chemical ionization/mass spectrometry with deuterium-labeled cortisol as the internal standard. The within-run precision (CV) was 2.5-5.7%, the between-run precision 4.6%. Results by this method were compared with those by a radioimmunological method (RIANEN Cortisol, New England Nuclear) for 395 plasma samples. The latter method gave significantly higher (approx. 25%) cortisol values.

  20. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis Dale (Albuquerque, NM); Thornberg, Steven Michael (Peralta, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  1. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

  2. Shrinking droplets in electrospray ionization and their influence on chemical equilibria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arno Wortmann; Anna Kistler-Momotova; Renato Zenobi; Martin C. Heine; Oliver Wilhelm; Sotiris E. Pratsinis

    2007-01-01

    We investigated how chemical equilibria are affected by the electrospray process, using simultaneous in situ measurements\\u000a by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and phase Doppler anemometry (PDA). The motivation for this study was the increasing number\\u000a of publications in which electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is used for binding constant determination. The PDA was\\u000a used to monitor droplet size and velocity, whereas LIF

  3. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Rimmer, P. B. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D. A., E-mail: craig.stark@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (?10{sup –7}) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10{sup –6}-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H{sub 2}, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  4. The solvation of electrons by an atmospheric-pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M; Sankaran, R Mohan; Go, David B

    2015-01-01

    Solvated electrons are typically generated by radiolysis or photoionization of solutes. While plasmas containing free electrons have been brought into contact with liquids in studies dating back centuries, there has been little evidence that electrons are solvated by this approach. Here we report direct measurements of solvated electrons generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma in contact with the surface of an aqueous solution. The electrons are measured by their optical absorbance using a total internal reflection geometry. The measured absorption spectrum is unexpectedly blue shifted, which is potentially due to the intense electric field in the interfacial Debye layer. We estimate an average penetration depth of 2.5±1.0?nm, indicating that the electrons fully solvate before reacting through second-order recombination. Reactions with various electron scavengers including H(+), NO2(-), NO3(-) and H2O2 show that the kinetics are similar, but not identical, to those for solvated electrons formed in bulk water by radiolysis. PMID:26088017

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Effects on Cryogenic Storage Tank Boil-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; Frontier, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) routinely utilizes cryostat test hardware to evaluate comparative and absolute thermal conductivities of a wide array of insulation systems. The test method is based on measurement of the flow rate of gas evolved due to evaporative boil-off of a cryogenic liquid. The gas flow rate typically stabilizes after a period of a couple of hours to a couple of days, depending upon the test setup. The stable flow rate value is then used to calculate the thermal conductivity for the insulation system being tested. The latest set of identical cryostats, 1,000-L spherical tanks, exhibited different behavior. On a macro level, the flow rate did stabilize after a couple of days; however the stable flow rate was oscillatory with peak to peak amplitude of up to 25 percent of the nominal value. The period of the oscillation was consistently 12 hours. The source of the oscillation has been traced to variations in atmospheric pressure due to atmospheric tides similar to oceanic tides. This paper will present analysis of this phenomenon, including a calculation that explains why other cryostats are not affected by it.

  6. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  7. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  8. Spectral Measurements of Low Temperature Plasma Formation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Ryberg, David; Hatfield, Lynn; Neuber, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the study of the emission and re-absorption of ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation which is produced during the initial phases of plasma formation leading to electric field breakdown at atmospheric pressures. Specifically, there is interest in understanding the photon dynamics during the streamer to spark phase transition of plasma discharges which form less than 200 ns in millimeter-sized air gaps. Fast rise-time photo-multiplier measurements reveal that the earliest VUV emission occurs in the region near the anode, with emission points following streamer positions identified by fast intensified CCD imaging with fast electronic gating (3 ns). Electron densities and dissociation characteristics are estimated by using measurements of the HI Lyman-? (121.5 nm) Stark-broadened line profile as a function of distance from the anode. Successive measurements in pure N2 environments show a distinct two-step transition from radiative contributions of both the N2 second positive system in the UV (300 - 400 nm) and NI atomic structure in the VUV (120 - 180 nm) during the early plasma phase, to primarily VUV emission shortly after the plasma spark has formed. The observed emission dynamics are due to a combination of N2 dissociation into NI and radiation-less quenching of the N2 molecules.

  9. Power modulation in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Power modulation in an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma jet is investigated by numerical modelling. The dynamics of successively pulsing the applied power on and off for a helium-oxygen (˜0.6%) plasma is investigated. The impact of power pulsing on reactive species generation and gas heating is discussed with control opportunities emphasized. Power modulation shows linear control for reactive species and heat flux delivery to a treatment surface above an initial phase of power growth. Power is found to be coupled primarily to the electrons with electron loss rates determining the interference between successive power modulation phases. Plasma decay in the power off phase is characterized by a large initial electron loss in the first 0.5 µs followed by ambipolar decay dominated by ions of opposite charge. Power modulation effects on gas heating show a larger range of temperature control when compared with convection cooling. Reactive oxygen species reaching a treatment surface are shown to typically vary over an order of magnitude for variation in the duty cycle.

  10. Benzene Dissociation in DC Atmospheric Pressure Air Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunqi; Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    By using a micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD) as an electron source to lower or eliminate the cathode fall voltage, a glow discharge could be operated in a dc atmospheric pressure air [1]. The effect of this glow discharge plasma on VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) remediation, particularly, benzene remediation, has been studied. A higher than 90 % destruction rate has been obtained by flowing a 300 ppm benzene/ dry air mixture through the plasma filament. The plasma is confined by a dielectric to a cross-section of 1 mm by 1.5 mm and extends over a depth of 0.8 mm. With a flow rate of 100 sccm, the residence time of the gas in the plasma column is 0.7 ms. A destruction efficiency of more than 0.5 L/kJ has been measured. The energy efficiency is 0.9 g/kWh which is comparable to that achieved by low pressure glow discharges in benzene/ noble gas mixtures [2]. References: [1] R. H. Stark and K. H. Schoenbach, "Direct Current Glow Discharges in Atmospheric Air," Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 3568 (2001). [2] D. L. McCorkle, W. Ding, C. Ma and L. A. Pinnaduwage, "Dissociation of Benzene and Methylene Chloride Based on Enhanced Dissociative Electron Attachment to Highly Excited Molecules," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 32, 46 (1999). Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  11. Spectroscopic characterisation of an atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S.; Steen, P. G.; Morrow, T.; Graham, W. G.; Herbert, P. A. F.

    2000-10-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in atmospheric discharges operating in a glow discharge mode i.e. with a spatial and sheath structure similar to that of low pressure glow discharges [1,2,3]. Here spectroscopy has been used to characterise an atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD), operating in air but with various other gases flowing through the inter-electrode space and with textile samples ranging from polyester to wool also present in that space. The emission spectra from 250nm to 800nm were dominated by emission from N2 but when textile samples were present OH emission at around 310nm was also observed. Electron temperatures of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV were determined from the relative intensities of Ar emission lines. When nitrogen was the flowing gas the vibrational states exhibited a Maxwellian distribution with a temperature of 2000K. 1. S. Kanazana et al. J.Phys.D., 21, 836 (1988) 2. J.R.Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering. (IOPP, London ) 1995 3. F. Massine et al. J. Appl. Phys. 83, 3411-3420 (1998)

  12. Study of a Filamentary Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Zeghondy, Barbar; Guaitella, Olivier; Bourdon, Anne; Rousseau, Antoine

    2006-10-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBD) at atmospheric pressure have many applications, for instance ozone production, surface treatment, and waste gas treatment. Generally, such a discharge is filamentary but it can be diffuse under particular conditions. Understanding the formation of the filament, which is an ionization wave or so-called ``streamer'', is very hard theoretically, numerically, and experimentally. This is due, first, to the non-linearity of the equations concerned, and second, because of the scaling in space and time of this phenomenon: a streamer has a radius on the order of a few microns, and propagates through distances of several centimeters in a few nanoseconds. In this study we will present the results obtained in experiments and in simulations for a plane-to-plane DBD. We electrically characterized this device and have observed collective effects that are still poorly understood. A point-to-plane DBD has also been studied for producing a much more localized discharge. In parallel with the experimental study we have developed a numerical model based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) to introduce an electrode having a complex geometry into a structured Cartesian mesh. The first results of the code will be discussed.

  13. Temporally-Resolved Emission Spectroscopic Diagnostics of the Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaoge; Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin

    2013-09-01

    Temporally-resolved spectroscopic diagnostics of dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in atmospheric-pressure helium was carried out to study the discharge mechanism. Using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) and a grating spectrometer, we obtained the emission spectra of homogeneous discharges and presented them in 3D graphs. We also studied the time variation of typical emissions from He, O and first negative bands of N+2. The results showed that the spectral lines do not develop synchronously as N+2(B2 ?u + X2 ?+g, 0~0, ?=391.4 nm) and N+2(B2 ?+u ? X2 ?+g, 0~1, ?=427.8 nm) appear earlier and last for a longer time than He (33S1 ? 23P1, ?=706.5 nm) and O (35P?35S, ?=777.4 nm). A certain number of He metastables produced in the initial stage of discharge. Even between adjacent pulses, the emissions from N+2 can still keep certain intensities while those from He and O extinguish. Since long-lifetime He metastables are produced and exist in the discharging space, it is the Penning ionization that keeps the long decay of N+2 emissions.

  14. Radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharge in {alpha} and {gamma} modes between two coaxial electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Wanli; Wang Dezhen [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang Yuantao [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    The discharge in pure helium and the influence of small nitrogen impurities at atmospheric pressure are investigated based on a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model controlled by a dielectric barrier between two coaxial electrodes. The simulation of the radiofrequency (rf) discharge is based on the one-dimensional continuity equations for electrons, ions, metastable atoms, and molecules, with the much simpler current conservation law replacing the Poisson equation for electric field. Through a computational study of rf atmospheric glow discharges over a wide range of current density, this paper presents evidence of at least two glow discharge modes, namely the {alpha} mode and the {gamma} mode. The simulation results show the asymmetry of the discharge set exercises great influence on the discharge mechanisms compared to that with parallel-plane electrodes. It is shown that the particle densities are not uniform in the discharge region but increase gradually from the outer to the inner electrode in both modes. The contrasting dynamic behaviors of the two glow modes are studied. Secondary electron emission strongly influences gas ionization in the {gamma} mode yet matters little in the {alpha} mode.

  15. Gliding arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a gliding arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) AC source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.

  16. Coupling CE with atmospheric pressure photoionization MS for pharmaceutical basic compounds: optimization of operating parameters.

    PubMed

    Schappler, Julie; Guillarme, Davy; Prat, Josiane; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Rudaz, Serge

    2007-08-01

    The use of CE coupled with MS (CE-MS) has evolved as a useful tool to analyze charged species in small sample volumes. Because of its sensitivity, versatility and ease of implementation, the ESI interface is currently the method of choice to hyphenate CE to MS. An alternative can be the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source, however, numerous parameters must be optimized for its coupling to CE. After evaluation of the sheath liquid composition and the CE capillary outlet position, an experimental design methodology was assessed for optimizing other ionization source parameters, such as sheath liquid flow rate, drying gas flow rate and temperature, nebulizing gas pressure, vaporizer temperature, and capillary voltage. For this purpose, a fractional factorial design (FFD) was selected as a screening procedure to identify factors which significantly influence sensitivity and efficiency. A face-centered central composite design (CCD) was then used to predict and optimize sensitivity, taking into account the most relevant variables. Sensitivity was finally evaluated with the optimized conditions and height-to-noise ratios (H/N) around 10 were achieved for an injection of 200 ng/mL of each analyte. PMID:17724698

  17. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  18. DETERMINATION OF PHTHALATES IN WATER AND SOIL BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY UNDER CHEMICAL IONIZATION CONDITIONS WITH ISOBUTANE AS REAGENT GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate determination is important because phthalates often are major impurities in samples and can have significant health effects. Tandem mass spectrometry under chemical ionization mass spectrometry conditions with isobutane as the reagent gas was used to determine 11 phthal...

  19. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by repetitive negatively pulsed helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets propagating into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have many beneficial effects in their use in surface treatment and, in particular, plasma medicine. One of these benefits is the controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the active discharge through the molecular gases added to the primary noble gas in the input mixture, and through the interaction of reactive species in the plasma effluent with the ambient air. In this computational investigation, a parametric study was performed on the production of RONS in a multiply pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet sustained in a He/O2 mixture and flowing into ambient humid air. The consequences of flow rate, O2 fraction, voltage, and repetition rate on reactant densities after a single discharge pulse, after 30 pulses, and after the same total elapsed time were investigated. At the end of the first discharge pulse, voltage has the greatest influence on RONS production. However, the systematic trends for production of RONS depend on repetition rate and flow rate in large part due to the residence time of RONS in the plasma zone. Short residence times result in reactive species produced by the previous pulse still being in the discharge tube or in the path of the ionization wave at the next pulse. The RONS therefore accumulate in the tube and in the near effluent on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This accumulation enables species requiring multiple reactions among the primary RONS species to be produced in greater numbers.

  20. Electron density measurement in atmospheric pressure plasma jets: Stark broadening of hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. Yu; Leys, Ch; Gonzalez, M. A.; Walsh, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    Electron density is one of the key parameters in the physics of a gas discharge. In this contribution the application of the Stark broadening method to determine the electron density in low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jets is discussed. An overview of the available theoretical Stark broadening calculations of hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated atomic lines is presented. The difficulty in the evaluation of the fine structure splitting of lines, which is important at low electron density, is analysed and recommendations on the applicability of the method for low ionization degree plasmas are given. Different emission line broadening mechanisms under atmospheric pressure conditions are discussed and an experimental line profile fitting procedure for the determination of the Stark broadening contribution is suggested. Available experimental data is carefully analysed for the Stark broadening of lines in plasma jets excited over a wide range of frequencies from dc to MW and pulsed mode. Finally, recommendations are given concerning the application of the Stark broadening technique for the estimation of the electron density under typical conditions of plasma jets.

  1. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, Asma [Independent University, Bangladesh, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Bashundhara, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Laroussi, Mounir [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Pervez, Mohammad Rasel [Master Mind College, Department of Physics, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  2. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure—the spark regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-12-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been studied in atmospheric pressure air preheated to 1000 K. Measurements of spark initiation and stability, plasma dynamics, gas temperature and current-voltage characteristics of the spark regime are presented. Using 10 ns pulses applied repetitively at 30 kHz, we find that 2-400 pulses are required to initiate the spark, depending on the applied voltage. Furthermore, about 30-50 pulses are required for the spark discharge to reach steady state, following initiation. Based on space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, the spark discharge in steady state is found to ignite homogeneously in the discharge gap, without evidence of an initial streamer. Using measured emission from the N2 (C-B) 0-0 band, it is found that the gas temperature rises by several thousand Kelvin in the span of about 30 ns following the application of the high-voltage pulse. Current-voltage measurements show that up to 20-40 A of conduction current is generated, which corresponds to an electron number density of up to 1015 cm-3 towards the end of the high-voltage pulse. The discharge dynamics, gas temperature and electron number density are consistent with a streamer-less spark that develops homogeneously through avalanche ionization in volume. This occurs because the pre-ionization electron number density of about 1011 cm-3 produced by the high frequency train of pulses is above the critical density for streamer-less discharge development, which is shown to be about 108 cm-3.

  3. Towards depth profiling of organic aerosols in real time using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2014-05-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a substantial fraction of tropospheric aerosol and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, the characterization of its chemical composition and transformations remain a major challenge and is still connected to large uncertainties (IPCC, 2013). Recent measurements revealed that organic aerosol particles may reside in an amorphous or semi-solid phase state which impedes the diffusion within the particles (Virtanen et al., 2010; Shiraiwa et al., 2011). This means that reaction products which are formed on the surface of a particle, e.g. by OH, NO3 or ozone chemistry, cannot diffuse into the particle's core and remain at the surface. Eventually, this leads to particles with a core/shell structure. In the particles' cores the initial compounds are preserved whereas the shells contain mainly the oxidation products. By analyzing the particles' cores and shells separately, thus, it is possible to obtain valuable information on the formation and evolution of the aerosols' particle and gas phase. Here we present the development of the aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) technique which allows the mass spectrometric analysis of organic aerosols in real time. The AeroFAPA is an ion source based on a helium glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. The plasma produces excited helium species and primary reagent ions which are transferred into the afterglow region where the ionization of the analytes takes place. Due to temperatures of only 80 ° C to 150 ° C and ambient pressure in the afterglow region, the ionization is very soft and almost no fragmentation of organic molecules is observed. Thus, the obtained mass spectra are easy to interpret and no extensive data analysis procedure is necessary. Additionally, first results of a combination of the AeroFAPA-MS with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) suggest that it is not only possible to analyze the entire particle phase but rather that a separate analysis of the particles' shells and cores is feasible by adjusting flow rates and temperatures in the ionization region. References: IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, in press. A. Virtanen; J. Joutsensaari; T. Koop; J. Kannosto; P. Yli-Pirila; J. Leskinen; J. M. Makela; J. K. Holopainen; U. Pöschl; M. Kulmala; D. R. Worsnop; A. Laaksonen, "An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles", Nature 7317, 824-827 [2010]. M. Shiraiwa; M. Ammann; T. Koop; U. Pöschl, "Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles", P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 27, 11003-11008 [2011].

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Air Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam; Al-Mashraqi, Ahmed; Benghanem, Mohamed; Al Shariff, Samir

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet is introduced in this work. It is AC (60 Hz to 20 kHz) cold plasma jet in air. The system is consisted of a cylindrical alumina insulator tube with outer diameter of 1.59 mm and 26 mm length and 0.80 mm inner diameter. AC sinusoidal high voltage was applied to the powered electrode which is a hollow needle inserted in the Alumina tube. The inner electrode is a hollow needle with 0.80 mm and 0.46 mm outer and inner diameters respectively. The outer electrode is grounded which is a copper ring surrounded the alumina tube locates at the nozzle end. Air is blowing through the inner electrode to form a plasma jet. The jet length increases with flow rate and applied voltage to reach 1.5 cm. The gas temperature decreases with distance from the end of the nozzle and with increasing the flow rate. The spectroscopic measurement between 200 nm and 900 nm indicates that the jet contains reactive species such as OH, O in addition to the UV emission. The peak to peak current values increased from 6 mA to 12 mA. The current voltage waveform indicates that the generated jet is homogenous plasma. The jet gas temperature measurements indicate that the jet has a room temperature. Atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet is introduced in this work. It is AC (60 Hz to 20 kHz) cold plasma jet in air. The system is consisted of a cylindrical alumina insulator tube with outer diameter of 1.59 mm and 26 mm length and 0.80 mm inner diameter. AC sinusoidal high voltage was applied to the powered electrode which is a hollow needle inserted in the Alumina tube. The inner electrode is a hollow needle with 0.80 mm and 0.46 mm outer and inner diameters respectively. The outer electrode is grounded which is a copper ring surrounded the alumina tube locates at the nozzle end. Air is blowing through the inner electrode to form a plasma jet. The jet length increases with flow rate and applied voltage to reach 1.5 cm. The gas temperature decreases with distance from the end of the nozzle and with increasing the flow rate. The spectroscopic measurement between 200 nm and 900 nm indicates that the jet contains reactive species such as OH, O in addition to the UV emission. The peak to peak current values increased from 6 mA to 12 mA. The current voltage waveform indicates that the generated jet is homogenous plasma. The jet gas temperature measurements indicate that the jet has a room temperature. This work was supported by the National Science, Technology and Innovation Plan(NSTIP) through the Science and Technology Unit (STU) at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawwarah, KSA, with the grant number 08-BIO24-5.

  5. Modeling of an atmospheric-pressure HE/CF[sub 4]/O[sub 2]plasma used for surface decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Teslow, H. L. (Hilary L.); Rosocha, L. A. (Louis A.); Kim, Y. (Yongho)

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas have been shown to be useful in many different applications, including surface decontamination. We will describe a useful plasma source, a non-thermal Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ), for such applications. In recent APPJ experiments, a plasma consisting of helium mixed with small percentages of carbon tetrafluoride and molecular oxygen was used to etch tantalum foils as well as plutonium on the surface of a sample metal coupon. Understanding the plasma, chemical, and surface kinetics of this plasma is crucial to the widespread application of this procedure to various contaminants, such as chemical and biological warfare agents (CBW). A complete, detailed model of the plasma, post-plasma gas chemistry, and surface chemistry is needed to determine the reactive species and exact surface reactions occurring in each of the experiments. Using commercial software (KINEMA and ELENDIF), we have created a post-plasma gas chemistry model which utilizes over 180 chemical reactions and initial conditions determined by gaseous electronics modeling. Multiple reaction reduction techniques were used to ascertain the most important reactions and relevant species. This model indicates that although fluorine may be a reactive species, other oxyfluorides such as OF, F{sub 2}O, and FCOO most likely contribute significantly to the etching process. Comparison with experimental data suggests that fluorine is not the sole etchant.

  6. Nanosecond time-resolved microscopic spectroscopy for diagnostics of an atmospheric-pressure discharge plasma formed in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banno, Motohiro; Kanno, Kenta; Someya, Yuu; Yui, Hiroharu

    2015-06-01

    Glow discharge plasma formed in solution under atmospheric pressure has been expected to provide reaction fields with characteristic physical and chemical properties owing to the frequent collisions and reactions of reactive particles inside and the rapid quenching of the products by the surrounding cold solutions. In particular, when an aqueous solution is utilized as the surrounding solution, the atmospheric-pressure in-solution glow (ASG) plasma contains hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals showing large activities for reduction and oxidation, respectively. In addition, because the ASG plasma is formed under atmospheric pressure, the collision frequencies between the particles contained in the plasma are higher than those in other plasmas ordinarily formed under low pressure. This feature should result in rapid energy redistribution among particles contained in the plasma. In the present study, time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with nanosecond time resolution was applied for the diagnostics of the ASG plasma with chemical species selectivity. The time-resolved measurements revealed that the temporal evolutions of the temperatures of blackbody, hydrogen radical, and hydroxyl radical contained in the ASG plasma consist of two stages: initial rise within 0.15 µs (rising stage) and fluctuation around certain values for about 1 µs (fluctuating stage). In the time region corresponding to the rising stage, the electron number density is about ten times larger than the value temporally averaged during the plasma emission. The initial rise should result from frequent collisions between charged particles accelerated by the applied voltage and unexcited particles. In the fluctuating stage, the electron number density strongly correlates with the increase in the radical temperatures. It is concluded that the electron number density, rather than the electron temperature, is a key parameter determining the temperatures of reactive species in the ASG plasma.

  7. Abatement of perfluorinated compounds using microwave plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabouzi, Y.; Moisan, M.; Rostaing, J. C.; Trassy, C.; Guérin, D.; Kéroack, D.; Zakrzewski, Z.

    2003-06-01

    Microwave plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure, for instance by electromagnetic surface waves, can be efficiently used to abate greenhouse-effect gases such as perfluorinated compounds. As a working example, we study the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6 at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 2.4% of the total gas flow where N2, utilized as a purge gas, is the carrier gas. O2 is added to the mixture at a fixed ratio of 1.2-1.5 times the concentration of SF6 to ensure full oxidation of the SF6 fragments, providing thereby scrubbable by-products. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been utilized for identification of the by-products and quantification of the residual concentration of SF6. Optical emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the gas temperature of the nitrogen plasma. In terms of operating parameters, the DRE is found to increase with increasing microwave power and decrease with increasing gas flow rate and discharge tube radius. Increasing the microwave power, in the case of a surface-wave discharge, or decreasing the gas flow rate increases the residence time of the molecules to be processed, hence, the observed DRE increase. In contrast, increasing the tube radius or the gas-flow rate increases the degree of radial contraction of the discharge and, therefore, the plasma-free space close to the tube wall: this comparatively colder region favors the reformation of the fragmented SF6 molecules, and enlarging it lowers the destruction rate. DRE values higher than 95% have been achieved at a microwave power of 6 kW with 2.4% SF6 in N2 flow rates up to 30 standard l/min.

  8. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges interacting with liquid covered tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of plasmas with liquids is of increasing importance in biomedical applications. Tissues treated by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in plasma medicine are often covered by a thin layer of liquid, typically a blood serum like water with dissolved gases and proteins up to hundreds of micrometres thick. The liquid processes the plasma-produced radicals and ions prior to their reaching the tissue. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the interaction of DBDs in humid air with a thin water layer covering tissue. The water layer, 50-400 µm thick, contains dissolved O2aq (aq means an aqueous species) and alkane-like hydrocarbons (RHaq). In the model, the DBDs are operated with multiple pulses at 100 Hz followed by a 1 s afterglow. Gas phase reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) intersect the water-vapour saturated air above the liquid and then solvate when reaching the water. The photolysis of water by plasma-produced UV/VUV plays a significant role in the production of radicals. Without RHaq, O_{2aq}^{-} , ONOO_{aq}^{-} , NO_{3aq}^{-} and hydronium (H_{3} O_{aq}^{+} ) dominate the water ions with H_{3} O_{aq}^{+} determining the pH. The dominant RONS in the liquid are O3aq, H2O2aq, and HNOxaq. Dissolved O2aq assists the production of HNO3aq and HOONOaq during the afterglow. With RHaq, reactive oxygen species are largely consumed, leaving an R·aq (alkyl radical) to reach the tissue. These results are sensitive to the thickness of the water layer.

  9. Analysis of biomolecules by atmospheric pressure visible-wavelength MALDI-ion trap-MS in transmission geometry.

    PubMed

    West, Raymond E; Findsen, Eric W; Isailovic, Dragan

    2013-10-01

    We report the development of a new AP visible-wavelength MALDI-ion trap-MS instrument with significantly improved performance over our previously reported system (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 315, 66-73 (2012)). A Nd:YAG pulsed laser emitting light at 532 nm was used to desorb and ionize oligosaccharides and peptides in transmission geometry through a glass slide. Limits of detection (LODs) achieved in MS mode correspond to picomole quantities of oligosaccharides and femtomole quantities of peptides. Tandem MS (MS/MS) experiments enabled identification of enzymatically digested proteins and oligosaccharides by comparison of MS/MS spectra with data found in protein and glycan databases. Moreover, the softness of ionization, LODs, and fragmentation spectra of biomolecules by AP visible-wavelength MALDI-MS were compared to those obtained by AP UV MALDI-MS using a Nd:YAG laser emitting light at 355 nm. AP visible-wavelength MALDI appears to be a softer ionization technique then AP UV MALDI for the analysis of sulfated peptides, while visible-wavelength MALDI-MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS spectra of other biomolecules analyzed were mostly similar to those obtained by AP UV MALDI-MS. Therefore, the methodology presented will be useful for MS and MS(n) analyses of biomolecules at atmospheric pressure. Additionally, the AP visible-wavelength MALDI developed can be readily used for soft ionization of analytes on various mass spectrometers. PMID:23893434

  10. Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy at Elevated Pressures: CO Adsorption on Pd(111) at Atmospheric Pressures

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Wayne

    Adsorption on Pd(111) at Atmospheric Pressures Emrah Ozensoy, Douglas C. Meier, and D. Wayne Goodman systems at or near the pressures of technical catalysts, that is, ambient (atmospheric) pressures. PMPolarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy at Elevated Pressures: CO

  11. Diamondoid synthesis by nanosecond pulsed microplasmas generated in He at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauss, Sven; Shizuno, Tomoki; Oshima, Fumito; Pai, David Z.; Terashima, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    Diamondoids are sp^3 hybridized carbon nanomaterials that possess interesting properties making them attractive for biotechnology, medicine, and opto- and nanoelectronics. So far, larger diamondoids have been synthesized using the smallest diamondoid (adamantane) as a precursor. For this electric discharges and pulsed laser plasmas generated in supercritical fluids, and hot filament chemical vapor deposition have been used, but these methods are difficult to realize or very time-consuming. We have developed a more convenient approach where diamondoids are synthesized by high-voltage nanosecond pulsed microplasmas (voltage 15 kVp-p, frequency 1 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) generated in He at atmospheric pressure using point-to-plane tungsten electrodes. Adamantane was used as a precursor, and synthesis was conducted for 10^5 pulses at gas temperatures of 297, 373 and 473 K. Energy dispersive X-ray and micro-Raman spectroscopy were conducted to determine the composition of the products, and gas chromatography - mass spectra indicated the formation of diamantane. It was found that synthesis is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperatures, and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy suggest that the chemical reactions take place in the afterglow.

  12. Characteristics of line pulsed glow discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure for preparation of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, K.; Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Matsuo, Y.; Horiguchi, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Nagata, M.; Yatsuzuka, M.

    2011-10-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have excellent physical and chemical properties for applications such as high mechanical hardness, low friction, chemical inertness, electrical insulation, optical transparency, and biological compatibility. For preparation of large-area amorphous carbon film, the line glow discharge plasma (LGDP) at atmospheric pressure was produced with a high-voltage, high-repetition bipolar pulse using the three-electrode configuration in our experiment. The DBD source plasma was generated by a high-voltage, high-repetition bipolar pulse with a fast rise time using the parallel-plate geometry with a gap width of 2 mm. Two quartz glasses were placed between two electrodes made of stainless-steel to produce DBD. A mixed gas of He as a carrier gas and CH4 as a precursor was supplied to the discharge region. Applying another pulsed bias voltage to the gap between the parallel plate electrode and the bias electrode (stainless-steel substrate), the LGDP was extracted on the substrate for a film deposition. When the pulsed bias voltage was applied to the substrate at several ?s later, the largest intensity of LGDP was observed at the both polarity of bias voltage. We will show the detail characteristics of the LGDP.

  13. Plasma-water interactions at atmospheric pressure in a dc microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jenish; N?mcová, Lucie; Mitra, Somak; Graham, William; Maguire, Paul; Švr?ek, Vladimir; Mariotti, Davide

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interactions generate a variety of chemical species that are very useful for the treatment of many materials and that makes plasma-induced liquid chemistry (PiLC) very attractive for industrial applications. The understanding of plasma-induced chemistry with water can open up a vast range of plasma-activated chemistry in liquid with enormous potential for the synthesis of chemical compounds, nanomaterials synthesis and functionalization. However, this basic understanding of the chemistry occurring at the plasma-liquid interface is still poor. In the present study, different properties of water are analysed when processed by plasma at atmospheric-pressure with different conditions. In particular, pH, temperature and conductivity of water are measured against current and time of plasma processing. We also observed the formation of molecular oxygen (O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the same plasma conditions. The current of plasma processing was found to affect the water properties and the production of hydrogen peroxide in water. The relation between the number of electrons injected from plasma in water and the number of H2O2 molecules was established and based on these results a scenario of reactions channels activated by plasma-water interface is concluded.

  14. Plasma Decomposition of Clathrate Hydrates by 2.45 GHz Microwave Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Eka Putra, Andi Erwin; Mukasa, Shinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Toyota, Hiromichi

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a process to use the plasma decomposition of clathrate hydrates to produce fuel gas. An ordinary microwave (MW) oven is used as the source of 2.45 GHz MW radiation under atmospheric-pressure. The plasma decomposition of the hydrates could pave the way for a new utilization of atmospheric pressure plasma. Cyclopentane (CP) hydrate formed at atmospheric pressure was decomposed by plasma in a MW oven generating gas with a content of 65% hydrogen, 12% CO, and 8% CO2. About 7% of the MW input power was consumed to decompose the hydrates.

  15. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters.

    PubMed

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators - a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  16. Diamond and Related Materials, 2 (1993) 661 666 661 Degenerate four-wave mixing diagnostics of atmospheric pressure

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    of atmospheric pressure diamond deposition T. G. Owano and C. H. Kruger Iti~'4h7~,mperatureGasdynamies Laboratory of atmospheric pressure diamond synthesis reactors are evaluated. Benefits and disadvantages of optical emission (DFWM), are discussed in terms of their applicability to the harsh environment of atmospheric pressure

  17. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    in argon gas at atmospheric pressures Alexander Miloshevsky, Sivanandan S. Harilal, Gennady Miloshevsky formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures. VC plasma expansion into a background gas at atmospheric pressure is cru- cial for many engineering

  18. Ulster MedJ2005; 74 (2) 113-121 Periods of low atmospheric pressure are associated with

    E-print Network

    Ulster MedJ2005; 74 (2) 113-121 Periods of low atmospheric pressure are associated with high period meteorological data including atmospheric pressure and air temperature were recorded daily incidence in relation to the monthly values for atmospheric pressure, pressure change and temperature

  19. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    in air at atmospheric pressure David Z. Pai,a Deanna A. Lacoste, and Christophe O. Laux Laboratoire EM2C January 2010; published online 6 May 2010 In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K.1063/1.3309758 I. INTRODUCTION Atmospheric pressure air plasmas have potential appli- cations in biomedical

  20. The emissions of gases from abandoned mines: role of atmospheric pressure changes and air temperature on the surface

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 The emissions of gases from abandoned mines: role of atmospheric pressure changes and air . Atmospheric pressure . Air temperature on the surface . Exits . Open or closed old mining voids Introduction, atmospheric pressure, speed and direction of the wind have also effects on mine gas outflow or atmospheric gas

  1. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma March 2014) Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises possibilities of plasma sources under investigation, the non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ

  2. Measurement of O and OH radical produced by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet nearby rat skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is getting much attention because it enables many kinds of plasma applications including biomedical application such as sterilization and cancer treatment. In biomedical plasma applications, it is though that active species like ions and radicals play important role. Especially, OH radical and O atom is very chemically reactive that they are deemed as major factors in cancer treatment. In this study, O and OH density distribution and its temporal behavior nearby rat skin were measured to demonstrate actual application. Plasma discharge was under AC10 kVp-p, 10 kHz with 1.5 slm (standard litter per minute) of helium gas flow. OH density was around 1 ppm and O atom density was around 10 ppm at maximum. We also measured time-evolution of OH and O atom density. Both OH and O density was almost constant between discharge pulses because lifetime of active species could be prolonged in helium. And density distribution of both species varied depending on helium flow rate and water concentration on the surface; on rat skin or on the grass surface. Those results suggest the production mechanisms and provision mechanisms of O atom and OH radical by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet. Atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is getting much attention because it enables many kinds of plasma applications including biomedical application such as sterilization and cancer treatment. In biomedical plasma applications, it is though that active species like ions and radicals play important role. Especially, OH radical and O atom is very chemically reactive that they are deemed as major factors in cancer treatment. In this study, O and OH density distribution and its temporal behavior nearby rat skin were measured to demonstrate actual application. Plasma discharge was under AC10 kVp-p, 10 kHz with 1.5 slm (standard litter per minute) of helium gas flow. OH density was around 1 ppm and O atom density was around 10 ppm at maximum. We also measured time-evolution of OH and O atom density. Both OH and O density was almost constant between discharge pulses because lifetime of active species could be prolonged in helium. And density distribution of both species varied depending on helium flow rate and water concentration on the surface; on rat skin or on the grass surface. Those results suggest the production mechanisms and provision mechanisms of O atom and OH radical by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet. This work is partially supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  3. Quantitation of Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolic Profiles in Human Bronchoalveolar H358) Cells by Stable Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Atmospheric Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ding; Harvey, Ronald G.; Blair, Ian A.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and are carcinogenic in multiple organs and species. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a representative PAH and has been studied extensively for its carcinogenicity and toxicity. B[a]P itself is chemically inert and requires metabolic activation to exhibit its toxicity and carcinogenicity. Three major metabolic pathways have been well documented. The signature metabolites generated from the radical cation (peroxidase or monooxygenase mediated) pathway are B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione, the signature metabolite generated from the diol-epoxide (P450 mediated) pathway is B[a]P-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydrotetrol (B[a]P-tetrol-1) and the signature metabolite generated from the o-quinone (aldo-keto reductase mediated) pathway is B[a]P-7,8-dione. The contributions of these different metabolic pathways to cancer initiation and the exploitation of this information for cancer prevention are still under debate. With the availability of a library of [13C4]-labeled B[a]P metabolite internal standards, we developed a sensitive stable isotope dilution atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method to address this issue by quantitating B[a]P metabolites from each metabolic pathway in human lung cells. This analytical method represents a 500 fold increased sensitivity compared with a method using HPLC-radiometric detection. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 6 fmol on column for 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OH-B[a]P), the generally accepted biomarker for B[a]P exposure. This high level of sensitivity and robustness of the method was demonstrated in a study of B[a]P metabolic profiles in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells induced or uninduced with the AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD). All the signature metabolites were detected and successfully quantitated. Our results suggest that all three metabolic pathways contribute equally in the overall metabolism of B[a]P in H358 cells with or without TCDD induction. The sensitivity of the method should permit the identification of cell-type differences in B[a]P activation and detoxication and could also be used for biomonitoring human exposure to PAH. PMID:21962213

  4. Multiscale simulation of atmospheric pressure pulsed discharges used in polymer surface functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoj, Ananth N.

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma discharges are widely used for surface functionalization or treatment of commodity polymers to improve properties such as adhesion and wettability. Newer applications include textile fabric treatment to improve color fastness and biomedical surface functionalization. In this work, an unstructured mesh-based two-dimensional Plasma Equipment Model (PEM) was developed to investigate the physical and chemical processes in these discharges, which occur on temporal and spatial scales spanning many orders of magnitude and affect their interaction with polymer surfaces. Better insight into these processes will enable the tailoring and optimization of processing conditions. Transient phenomena (time variation of plasma properties) during breakdown in atmospheric pressure discharges are addressed, since the spatial distribution of radicals generated in the discharge is determined by the dynamics of breakdown. The breakdown dynamics is governed by a multitude of physical and chemical processes such as reaction kinetics, photoionization, electron energy transport, charged species and neutral transport. The ability to address non-equilibrium electron energy transport in plasma discharges was developed by enhancing an existing electron Monte-Carlo simulation to address multiple regions of nonequilibrium, and was demonstrated for breakdown in high pressure discharges. A high degree of uniformity in surface treatment is important for value-added materials. Increasing the proximity of reactive plasma produced species to the surface enables better uniformity, especially with polymers having complex surface shapes. The propagation of atmospheric pressure discharges in microchannels, such as those used in lab-on-a-chip devices was investigated to determine the possibility of producing reactive gas-phase radicals within small spaces, close to the surfaces requiring treatment. An integrated surface kinetics module was developed to address the cumulative surface treatment of polypropylene with microstructure, such as rough and porous surfaces, in repetitively pulsed O2 and NH3 containing discharges. Parameters such as gas composition, humidity, discharge polarity and applied power regulate the transport and reaction processes that ultimately affect the relative abundance and uniformity of various O and N surface functional groups. Electrons may penetrate gaps in the microstructure depending on discharge polarity and surface charging dynamics. The penetration of positive ions is limited due to ambipolar effects. Higher radical densities are produced near spaces in the microstructure in negative discharges. While reactive radicals are consumed here, slow-reacting radicals diffuse deeper into these spaces, treating surfaces not directly in the line-of-sight of the discharge over time. Photons generated in the discharge react with surface sites in the line-of-sight, increasing spatial nonuniformity in functionalization. An integrated incompressible fluid dynamics model was developed to investigate the impact of gas flow on radical generation and surface treatment. Convective gas flow alters the relative abundance of reactive species in the discharge that affects the surface composition. Continuous surface processing was simulated, wherein radicals formed on the polymer move out of the discharge zone but continue to react downstream. Changes in gas composition affect the relative importance of local reaction kinetics and convective transport of reactive species in the discharge.

  5. Water solubility in rhyolitic silicate melts at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly; Nichols, Alexander; Porritt, Lucy; Friedlander, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    High temperature (900-1100 °C) experiments have been conducted to measure the solubility of water in a rhyolitic melt at atmospheric pressure (1 atm) and to quantify the magnitude of retrograde solubility at low pressure. Individual cores (1 cm x 1 cm) of crystal- and bubble-free rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnugryggur, Krafla (Iceland) were held in a furnace at 900-1100 °C for 0.25 to 20 hours. During this time, the uniform bubble-free cores vesiculate to produce variably swollen bubble-rich run products. The volume change in each core reflects the volume of bubbles produced in each experiment and depends on the experimental temperature and the time held at that temperature. The run product volumes for isothermal experiments (e.g., 950 °C) increase non-linearly with increasing time (e.g., 0.18 cm3 at 1.5 h, 0.96 cm3 at 12.5 h) until reaching a maximum value, after which the volume does not change appreciably. We take this plateau in the isothermal volume:time curve as coinciding with the 1 atm. solubility limit for the rhyolite at this temperature. With increasing temperature, the slope and final horizontal plateaus of the volume:time curves increase such that samples from the higher temperature suites vesiculate more, as well as more rapidly (e.g., 0.85 cm3 after 0.5 hours, 1.78 cm3 after 1 hour at 1100 °C). The variations in the maximum volume of bubbles produced for each temperature constrain the retrograde solubility of water in the melt at 1 atm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses of the residual water content of the glass in the starting material and in the most vesiculated sample from each temperature suite shows a decrease in the water content of the glass from an initial 0.114 wt% (? 0.013) to 0.098 wt% (? 0.010), 0.087 wt% (? 0.009), 0.093 wt% (? 0.008), 0.090 wt% (? 0.006) and 0.108 wt% (? 0.010) for 900 °C, 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C and 1100 °C respectively. This change in the solubility of water at different temperatures, though slight, produces a marked change in maximum run product porosity from 50 to 70% through the temperature series, illuminating the effect of retrograde solubility at conduit- and surface-relevant pressures. The readiness of a rhyolitic silicate melt not only to produce more bubbles at higher temperatures, but also to resorb existing bubbles during cooling has important implications for magmatic fragmentation, flow of lava, and welding processes.

  6. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE ETHYLENE DIFFUSION FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract The microstructure of an atmospheric pressure, counterflow, sooting, flat, laminar ethylene diffusion flame has been studied experimentally by withdrawing samples from within the flame using a heated quartz microprobe coupled to an online gas chromatograph/mas...

  7. Negative differential resistance in MIM devices from vacuum to atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Peter D.; McHale, G.; Newton, M. I.

    1996-04-01

    When a thin gold film is electroformed under an oil diffusion-pumped vacuum, the device subsequently displays a voltage controlled negative differential resistance (NDR) with electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission (EE). In this work we present experimental data, showing a device continuing to exhibit NDR when taken from vacuum to atmospheric pressure in either argon or nitrogen gas. NDR is observed over many voltage cycles with an accompanying EL, which is in contrast to the suppression of NDR which occurs on the first cycle for a deice in air at atmospheric pressure; NDR can only then be re-established by returning the device to vacuum. Therefore, as NDR can be achieved at atmospheric pressure in argon or nitrogen gas this indicates it is the presence of oxygen that inhibits the NDR conduction mechanism when a voltage is applied at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Picoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry using narrow-bore chemically etched emitters

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) at flow rates below ~10 nL/min has been only sporadically explored due to difficulty in reproducibly fabricating emitters that can operate at lower flow rates. Here we demonstrate narrow orifice chemically etched emitters for stable electrospray at flow rates as low as 400 pL/min. Depending on the analyte concentration, we observe two types of MS signal response as a function of flow rate. At low concentrations, an optimum flow rate is observed slightly above 1 nL/min, while the signal decreases monotonically with decreasing flow rates at higher concentrations. For example, consumption of 500 zmol of sample yielded signal-to-noise ratios ~10 for some peptides. In spite of lower MS signal, the ion utilization efficiency increases exponentially with decreasing flow rate in all cases. Significant variations in ionization efficiency were observed within this flow rate range for an equimolar mixture of peptides, indicating that ionization efficiency is an analyte-dependent characteristic for the present experimental conditions. Mass-limited samples benefit strongly from the use of low flow rates and avoiding unnecessary sample dilution. These findings have important implications for the analysis of trace biological samples. PMID:24122304

  9. Influence of environmental moisture on atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of ultrahigh-modulus polyethylene fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Liu; H. Xu; L. Ge; C. Wang; L. Han; H. Yu; Y. Qiu

    2007-01-01

    One of the main differences between low-pressure and atmospheric-pressure plasma treatments is that there is little moisture involved in the low-pressure plasma treatment, although moisture could exist at the wall of the vacuum chamber or react with the substrate after plasma treatment, while in the atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment moisture exists not only in the environment but also in any hygroscopic

  10. Influence of Gas Flow on Plasma Length in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Furuichi, Tsubasa; Ogura, Kazuo

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas and foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of bullet is released like as a plume into the atmosphere. The travel length of plasma increases by increasing the gas flow rate in the laminar flow. The tip of plasma jet is disturbed by the turbulent flow which develops due to the decrease of helium gas ratio on the cross-section.

  11. Dissociation of nitrogen in a pulse-periodic dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, N. A., E-mail: npopov@mics.msu.su [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Nitrogen molecule dissociation in a pulse-periodic atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge is numerically analyzed. It is shown that the quenching rate of predissociation states at atmospheric pressure is relatively low and the production of nitrogen atoms in this case can be adequately described using the cross section for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2} molecules taken from the paper by P.C. Cosby [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 9544 (1993)].

  12. ?-Bi 2O 3 thin films deposited on dense YSZ substrates by CVD method under atmospheric pressure for intermediate temperature SOFC applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Takeyama; N. Takahashi; T. Nakamura; S. Itoh

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of ?-Bi2O3 were grown on a dense Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) substrate under atmospheric pressure by means of halide chemical vapour deposition (AP-HCVD) using BiI3 and O2 as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles confirm that above 700 °C ?-Bi2O3 film with a cubic structure is formed. When the ?-Bi2O3 is deposited at 850 °C, the ?111? direction

  13. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions. PMID:24446263

  14. A study of helium atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for potential biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeli, K.; Noël, C.; Clément, F.; Daugé, C.; Svarnas, P.; Belmonte, T.

    2013-04-01

    The origin of differences in the rotational temperatures of various molecules and ions ( N_{2}^{+} (B), OH(A) and N2(C)) is studied in helium atmospheric-pressure guided streamers. The rotational temperature of N_{2}^{+} (B) is room temperature. It is estimated from the emission band of the first negative system at 391.4 nm, and it is governed by the temperature of N2(X) in the surrounding air. N2(X) is ionized by direct electron impact in the outer part of the plasma. N_{2}^{+} (B) is deactivated by collisions with N2 and O2. The rotational temperature of OH(A), estimated from the OH band at 306.4 nm, is slightly higher than that of N_{2}^{+} (B). OH(A) is excited by electron impact with H2O during the first 100 ns of the applied voltage pulse. Next, OH(A) is produced by electron impact with OH(X) created by the quenching of OH(A) by N2 and O2. H2O diffuses deeper than N2 into the plasma ring and the rotational temperature of OH(A) is slightly higher than that of N_{2}^{+} (B). The rotational temperature of N2(C), estimated from the emission of the second positive system at 315.9 nm, is governed by its collisions with helium. The gas temperature of helium at the beginning of the pulse is predicted to be several hundred kelvin higher than room temperature.

  15. Influence of outgassing on plasma kinetics during wood treatment in dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R.; Levasseur, O.; Stafford, L.; Naude, N.; Gherardi, N.; Univ. de Montreal Team

    2013-09-01

    We have recently extended the range of applications of dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) at atmospheric pressure to the functionalization of wood surfaces with the objective of improving its durability following natural weathering. Having highly complex chemical composition and microstructure, it can release significant amount of impurities, which can play a crucial role on the plasma kinetics, and therefore on the process dynamics. The influence of wood outgassing on the physics driving DBD operated in nominally pure He was investigated using a combination of time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and collisional-radiative (CR) modeling. For completely outgassed samples, the He I 588 nm-to-707 nm and 668 nm-to-728 nm line intensity ratios were relatively high early in the discharge cycle, decreased abruptly and then remained stable as the current increased and the discharge eventually extinguished. These results were correlated to a decrease of the electron temperature from about 1 eV early in the cycle to about 0.2 eV in the main discharge lifetime. As wood outgassing evolve, study revealed that the release of products (essentially air) from the wood substrate yields to an increase of the cycle-averaged electron temperature as well as to a significant quenching of He metastable atoms. Selected experiments in presence of trace amounts of N2, O2 and dry-air were also performed to better understand their respective roles.

  16. Atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and wind variations between 50 and 200 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 50 and 200 km were collected from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others. These data were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of the irregular atmospheric variations are presented. Time structures of the irregular variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. The observed height variations of irregular winds and densities are found to be in accord with a theoretical relation between these two quantities. The latitude variations (at 50 - 60 km height) show an increasing trend with latitude. A possible explanation of the unusually large irregular wind magnitudes of the White Sands MRN data is given in terms of mountain wave generation by the Sierra Nevada range about 1000 km west of White Sands. An analytical method is developed which, based on an analogy of the irregular motion field with axisymmetric turbulence, allows measured or model correlation or structure functions to be used to evaluate the effective frequency spectra of scalar and vector quantities of a spacecraft moving at any speed and at any trajectory elevation angle.

  17. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyildiz, Halil I.; Mousa, Moataz Bellah M.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-Ox product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions.

  18. Localized etching of polymer films using an atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Honglei; Liu, Jingquan; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    A direct-write process device based on the atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet (A?PJ) has been developed for the localized etching of polymer films. The plasma was generated by the air discharge ejected out through a tip-nozzle (inner diameter of 100??m), forming the microplasma jet. The A?PJ was capable of reacting with the polymer surface since it contains a high concentration of oxygen reactive species and thus resulted in the selective removal of polymer films. The experimental results demonstrated that the A?PJ could fabricate different microstructures on a parylene-C film without using any masks or causing any heat damage. The etch rate of parylene-C reached 5.1??m?min?1 and microstructures of different depth and width could also be realized by controlling two process parameters, namely, the etching time and the distance between the nozzle and the substrate. In addition, combining XPS analysis and oxygen-induced chemical etching principles, the potential etching mechanism of parylene-C by the A?PJ was investigated. Aside from the etching of parylene-C, micro-holes on the photoresist and polyimide film were successfully created by the A?PJ. In summary, maskless pattern etching of polymer films could be achieved using this A?PJ.

  19. Stability of Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Induced Changes on Polycarbonate Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Holcomb, Edward; Trigwell, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Polycarbonate films are subjected to plasma treatment in a number of applications such as improving adhesion between polycarbonate and silicon alloy in protective and optical coatings. The changes in surface chemistry due to plasma treatment have tendency to revert back. Thus stability of the plasma induced changes on polymer surfaces over desired time period is very important. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ageing on atmospheric pressure helium-plasma treated polycarbonate (PC) sample as a function of treatment time. The ageing effects were studied over a period of 10 days. The samples were plasma treated for 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 minutes. Contact angle measurements were made to study surface energy changes. Modification of surface chemical structure was examined using, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Contact angle measurements on untreated and plasma treated surfaces were made immediately, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after treatment. Contact angle decreased from 93 deg for untreated sample to 30 deg for sample plasma treated for 10 minutes. After 10 days the contact angles for the 10 minute plasma treated sample increased to 67 deg, but it never reverted back to that of untreated surface. Similarly the O/C ratio increased from 0.136 for untreated sample to 0.321 for 10 minute plasma treated sample indication increase in surface energy.

  20. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma and decontamination. Can it contribute to preventing hospital-acquired infections?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, N; Cahill, O; Daniels, S; Galvin, S; Humphreys, H

    2014-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) affect ?4.5 million patients in Europe alone annually. With the ever-increasing number of 'multi-resistant' micro-organisms, alternative and more effective methods of environmental decontamination are being sought as an important component of infection prevention and control. One of these is the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) systems with clinical applications in healthcare facilities. CAPPs have been shown to demonstrate antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties and have been adopted for other uses in clinical medicine over the past decade. CAPPs vary in their physical and chemical nature depending on the plasma-generating mechanism (e.g. plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge, etc.). CAPP systems produce a 'cocktail' of species including positive and negative ions, reactive atoms and molecules (e.g. atomic oxygen, ozone, superoxide and oxides of nitrogen), intense electric fields, and ultraviolet radiation (UV). The effects of these ions have been studied on micro-organisms, skin, blood, and DNA; thus, a range of possible applications of CAPPs has been identified, including surface decontamination, wound healing, biofilm removal, and even cancer therapy. Here we evaluate plasma devices, their applications, mode of action and their potential role specifically in combating HCAIs on clinical surfaces. PMID:25146226

  1. Hydrophobic treatment on polymethylmethacrylate surface by nanosecond-pulse DBDs in CF4 at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Tao; Xie, Qing; Xu, Jiayu; Yang, Wenjin

    2014-08-01

    Nanosecond-pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can provide non-thermal plasmas with extremely high energy and high density, which can result in a series of complicated physical and chemical reactions in the surface treatment of polymers. Therefore, in this paper, hydrophobic treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surface is conducted by nanosecond-pulse DBD in carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) at atmospheric pressure. Investigations on surface morphology and chemical composition before and after the DBD treatment in CF4 are conducted with the contact angle measurement, atomic force microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. The effects of the applied voltage, CF4 flow rate, and treatment time on the hydrophobic modification are studied. Results show that the contact angles of the treated PMMA surface increases with the applied voltage, and it could be greatly affected by the CF4 flow rate and the treatment time. The water contact angle can increase from 68° to 100° after the treatment. Furthermore, both surface morphology and chemical composition of the PMMA samples are changed. Both the increase of the surface roughness and the occurrence of fluorine-containing functional groups on the PMMA surface treated by DBD in CF4 lead to the hydrophobicity improvement of the PMMA surface after high CF4 flow rate and long time treatment. Moreover, due to the small amount of oxygen in the DBD plasma, hydrophilic effect exists on the PMMA surface after small CF4 flow rate treatment. Similar phenomenon occurs at short time treatment. It is because that sbnd CH2F, sbnd CHFsbnd , sbnd CHF2 groups, having hydrophilic property, are likely generated in the initial stage of hydrogen abstraction. In addition, because the residual groups (mainly sbnd CFsbnd , sbnd CF2sbnd and sbnd CF3) on the PMMA surface have strong hydrophobic property, the hydrophobic behavior of the treated PMMA surface could maintain for 8-day aging period.

  2. Gas chromatography-electron ionization and chemical ionization mass spectrometric analysis of urinary phenmetrazine after derivatization with 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl chloride--a new derivative.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, A; Hart, A; Humphrey, P; Blackwell, W

    1998-05-01

    Phenmetrazine is a central nervous system stimulant currently used as an anorectic agent. The drug is abused and is reported to cause death from overdose. We describe a new derivatization method for phenmetrazine using 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl chloride. Quantitation of urinary phenmetrazine can be easily achieved by using N-ethyl amphetamine as an internal standard. The electron ionization mass spectrum of 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl derivative of phenmetrazine showed a molecular ion at m/z 427 and a base peak at m/z 70. In the methane chemical ionization mass spectrum, the base peak was observed at m/z 428 (protonated molecular ion). In the electron ionization mass spectrum of 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl derivative of the internal standard, N-ethyl amphetamine we did not observe a molecular ion. However, in the chemical ionization mass spectrum, the protonated molecular ion at m/z 414 was the base peak. The retention time of derivatized phenmetrazine (8.4 min) was substantially longer than the retention time of the underivatized molecule. Moreover, underivatized phenmetrazine showed poor peak shape (substantial tailing) while derivatized phenmetrazine had excellent chromatographic properties. The within-run and between-run precisions of the assay were 2.6% and 3.1% respectively at a urinary phenmetrazine concentration of 10 micrograms/mL. The assay was linear for urinary phenmetrazine concentration of 1 to 100 micrograms/mL with a detection limit of 0.2 microgram/mL. PMID:9608702

  3. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Glish, Gary L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  4. Effect of reactive gases in an atmospheric-pressure plasma for dye adsorption on ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham-Cong, De; Ahn, Kyun; Kim, Jong-Man; Jeong, Se-Young; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Kim, Hong Seung

    2012-04-01

    In this study, ZnO nanorods (NRs) were grown on F-doped SnO2 (FTO)/glass substrate by using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The NRs were crystallized well. The surfaces of the NRs were modified using an atmospheric-pressure (AP) plasma containing reactive gases such as O2, H2, and N2. In the case of the Ar/O2 and Ar/N2 plasma-treated ZnO NRs, chemical bonding states and the dye adsorption on the surface of the ZnO layer increased because of -O and -OH radicals. We present the efficiencies of ZnO-NR-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) treated with AP plasmas containing reactive gases.

  5. Picoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Narrow-bore Chemically Etched Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) at flow rates below ~10 nL/min has been only sporadically explored due to difficulty in reproducibly fabricating emitters that can operate at lower flow rates. Here we demonstrate narrow orifice chemically etched emitters for stable electrospray at flow rates as low as 400 pL/min. Depending on the analyte concentration, we observe two types of MS signal response as a function of flow rate. At low concentrations, an optimum flow rate is observed slightly above 1 nL/min, while the signal decreases monotonically with decreasing flow rates at higher concentrations. In spite of lower MS signal, the ion utilization efficiency increases exponentially with decreasing flow rate in all cases. No unimolecular response was observed within this flow rate range during the analysis of an equimolar mixture of peptides, indicating that ionization efficiency is an analyte-dependent characteristic in given experimental conditions. While little to no gain in signal-to-noise was achieved at ultralow flow rates for concentration-limited analyses, experiments consuming the same amount of analyte suggest that mass-limited analyses will benefit strongly from the use of low flow rates and avoiding unnecessary sample dilution. By operating under optimal conditions, consumption of just 500 zmol of sample yielded signal-to-noise ratios ~10 for some peptides. These findings have important implications for the analysis of trace biological samples.

  6. Chemical abundances and properties of the ionized gas in NGC 1705

    E-print Network

    Annibali, F; Pasquali, A; Aloisi, A; Mignoli, M; Romano, D

    2015-01-01

    We obtained [O III] narrow-band imaging and multi-slit MXU spectroscopy of the blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy NGC 1705 with FORS2@VLT to derive chemical abundances of PNe and H II regions and, more in general, to characterize the properties of the ionized gas. The auroral [O III]\\lambda4363 line was detected in all but one of the eleven analyzed regions, allowing for a direct estimate of their electron temperature. The only object for which the [O III]\\lambda4363 line was not detected is a possible low-ionization PN, the only one detected in our data. For all the other regions, we derived the abundances of Nitrogen, Oxygen, Neon, Sulfur and Argon out to ~1 kpc from the galaxy center. We detect for the first time in NGC 1705 a negative radial gradient in the oxygen metallicity of -0.24 \\pm 0.08 dex kpc^{-1}. The element abundances are all consistent with values reported in the literature for other samples of dwarf irregular and blue compact dwarf galaxies. However, the average (central) oxygen abundance, 12 +...

  7. Soft ionization chemical analysis of secondary organic aerosol from green leaf volatiles emitted by turf grass.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shashank; Zahardis, James; Petrucci, Giuseppe A

    2014-05-01

    Globally, biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions contribute 90% of the overall VOC emissions. Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important component of plant-derived BVOCs, including cis-3-hexenylacetate (CHA) and cis-3-hexen-1-ol (HXL), which are emitted by cut grass. In this study we describe secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the ozonolysis of dominant GLVs, their mixtures and grass clippings. Near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry (NIR-LDI-AMS) was used for chemical analysis of the aerosol. The chemical profile of SOA generated from grass clippings was correlated with that from chemical standards of CHA and HXL. We found that SOA derived from HXL most closely approximated SOA from turf grass, in spite of the approximately 5× lower emission rate of HXL as compared to CHA. Ozonolysis of HXL results in formation of low volatility, higher molecular weight compounds, such as oligomers, and formation of ester-type linkages. This is in contrast to CHA, where the hydroperoxide channel is the dominant oxidation pathway, as oligomer formation is inhibited by the acetate functionality. PMID:24666343

  8. Detecting benzodiazepines: immunoassays compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Rexin, D A; Herold, D A

    1994-03-01

    We tested 231 urine samples by six immunoassay methods--EMIT d.a.u., EMIT II, Roche Abuscreen Online, Abbott TDx, Diagnostic Products Corp. (DPC) double-antibody radioimmunoassay (RIA), and Biosite Triage--and by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine how the immunoassays performed on samples selected for suspected benzodiazepine use (n = 100) and in random urine drug screening (n = 131). In general, all of the assays were successful in detecting oxazepam and related metabolites, even at concentrations below the stated cutoffs. However, the negative predictive value of benzodiazepine immunoassays for samples selected for suspected benzodiazepine use ranged from 86% to 96%. A primary difference between the test kits was the ability of DPC RIA and Triage to detect lorazepam when other assays did not. Contrary to previous reports, pretreatment of specimens with glucuronidase was not necessary to detect oxazepam-related metabolites with these immunoassays. PMID:8131270

  9. Water chemical ionization mass spectrometry of aldehydes, ketones esters, and carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.

    1986-11-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI) of aliphatic and aromatic carbonyl compounds using water as the reagent gas provides intense pseudomolecular ions and class-specific fragmentation patterns that can be used to identify aliphatic aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters. The length of ester acyl and alkyl groups can easily be determined on the basis of loss of alcohols from the protonated parent. Water CI provides for an approximately 200:1 selectivity of carbonyl species over alkanes. No reagent ions are detected above 55 amu, allowing species as small as acetone, propanal, acetic acid, and methyl formate to be identified. When deuterate water was used as the reagent, only the carboxylic acids and ..beta..-diketones showed significant H/D exchange. The use of water CI to identify carbonyl compounds in a wastewater from the supercritical water extraction of lignite coal, in lemon oil, and in whiskey volatiles is discussed.

  10. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Analytical Chemistry Dept.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  11. An Introduction to Nonequilibrium Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    E-print Network

    Ebert, Ute

    Distributions Plasmas are increasingly used for chemical processing of gases such as air, combustion exhaust composition, electrode and wall configuration, and circuit characteristics more energy can be channeled when so much charge is deposited on the insulator surfaces that the field over the gas is screened

  12. Continuous nanoparticle generation and assembly by atmospheric pressure arc discharge

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Heiko O.

    of inorganic nanoma- terials continues to attract considerable growth as it provides a potential solution to the manufacture of low cost printable electronics, optoelectronics, and solar cells with higher per- formance than chemical synthetic routes combined with inkjet printing compete against gas phase synthesis and deposition

  13. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy. PMID:25184103

  14. The effects of atmospheric pressure on infrared reflectance spectra of Martian analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.; Patterson, William

    1993-01-01

    The use of terrestrial samples as analogs of Mars soils are complicated by the Martian atmosphere. Spectral features due to the Martian atmosphere can be removed from telescopic spectra of Mars and ISM spectra of Mars, but this does not account for any spectral differences resulting from atmospheric pressure or any interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. We are examining the effects of atmospheric pressure on reflectance spectra of powdered samples in the laboratory. Contrary to a previous experiment with granite, no significant changes in albedo or the Christiansen feature were observed from 1 bar pressure down to a pressure of 8 micrometers Hg. However, reducing the atmospheric pressure does have a pronounced affect on the hydration features, even for samples retained in a dry environment for years.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A. H. [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); McLinden, M. O. [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Tew, W. L. [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)] [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2013-09-11

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO{sub 2} concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa.

  16. Electrospun microfiber membrane with atmospheric pressure plasma modified surface\\/architecture as potential solar cell\\/biological applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruey-Shin Juang; Su-Ya Lin; Chun Huang; Hsu-Yi Cheng; Ching-Yuan Tsai

    2011-01-01

    Electrospun-poly(vinylidenefluoride cohexafluoro- propylene) (PVDF-HFP) micro-fiber membrane is modified by cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma. The gas phase temperature of cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma state was around 30? to 90?, indicating this plasma can treat electrospun PVDF-HFP membrane without harmful heat damages. The surface properties of cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma- treated electrospun PVDF-HFP micro-fiber membranes were examined by the static contact angle

  17. Modeling and simulations of DC and RF atmospheric pressure non-thermal micro plasma discharges: Analysis and applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanvir Iqbal Farouk

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma discharges are attractive for a wide range of applications due to their operational flexibility. Among the different atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma sources, atmospheric pressure non-thermal micro plasma discharge is a very recent development. However, the micron scale size of these discharges makes it difficult to measure basic plasma characteristics (species density, gas and electron temperature, electric

  18. Temporal evolution of temperature and OH density produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in water vapour at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainct, F. P.; Lacoste, D. A.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Odic, E.; Laux, C. O.

    2014-02-01

    We report on an experimental study of the temporal evolution of OH density and gas temperature in spark discharges created by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in pure water vapour at 475 K and atmospheric pressure. The plasma was generated by 20 kV, 20 ns pulses, at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The temperature was measured during the discharge by optical emission spectroscopy of the second positive system of N2, and between two discharges by two-colour OH-planar laser induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) using two pairs of rotational transitions. Between two successive discharges, the relative density of OH was measured by OH-PLIF and was found to decay very slowly, with a 1/e decay time of about 50 µs. With the use of a chemical kinetics model, the OH density was placed on an absolute scale.

  19. Columnar discharge mode between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)] [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Using a fast-gated intensified charge-coupled device, end- and side-view photographs were taken of columnar discharge between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium. Based on three-dimensional images generated from end-view photographs, the number of discharge columns increased, whereas the diameter of each column decreased as the applied voltage was increased. Side-view photographs indicate that columnar discharges exhibited a mode transition ranging from Townsend to glow discharges generated by the same discharge physics as atmospheric pressure glow discharge.

  20. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  1. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin, E-mail: guixin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liao, Shanshan [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shenzhen Power Supply Co. Ltd., Shenzhen 518000, Guangdong (China)

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  2. High-performance simulations for atmospheric pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav

    Plasma-assisted processing and deposition of materials is an important component of modern industrial applications, with plasma reactors sharing 30% to 40% of manufacturing steps in microelectronics production. Development of new flexible electronics increases demands for efficient high-throughput deposition methods and roll-to-roll processing of materials. The current work represents an attempt of practical design and numerical modeling of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The system utilizes plasma at standard pressure and temperature to activate a chemical precursor for protective coatings. A specially designed linear plasma head, that consists of two parallel plates with electrodes placed in the parallel arrangement, is used to resolve clogging issues of currently available commercial plasma heads, as well as to increase the flow-rate of the processed chemicals and to enhance the uniformity of the deposition. A test system is build and discussed in this work. In order to improve operating conditions of the setup and quality of the deposited material, we perform numerical modeling of the plasma system. The theoretical and numerical models presented in this work comprehensively describe plasma generation, recombination, and advection in a channel of arbitrary geometry. Number density of plasma species, their energy content, electric field, and rate parameters are accurately calculated and analyzed in this work. Some interesting engineering outcomes are discussed with a connection to the proposed setup. The numerical model is implemented with the help of high-performance parallel technique and evaluated at a cluster for parallel calculations. A typical performance increase, calculation speed-up, parallel fraction of the code and overall efficiency of the parallel implementation are discussed in details.

  3. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, Dorian F.; Ferret, Antoine; Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O. [Laboratoire EM2C, UPR 288, CNRS, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2010-11-15

    A wire-cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The objective of the work is to maximize the power supplied to the flow in order to increase acceleration while avoiding breakdown. Thus, the proposed experimental setup addresses the problem of decoupling the mechanism of ion generation from that of ion acceleration. Using a wire-plate configuration as a reference, we have focused on improving the topography of the electric field to (1) separate the ionization and acceleration zones in space, and (2) guide the trajectory of charged particles as parallel to the median axis as possible. In the proposed wire-cylinder-plate setup, a dc corona discharge is generated in the space between a wire and two cylinders. The ions produced by the corona then drift past the cylinders and into a channel between two plates, where they undergo acceleration. To maximize the ionic wind it is found that the geometric configuration must be as compact as possible and that the voltage applied must be right below breakdown. Experimentally, the optimized wire-plate reference setup provides a maximum flow velocity of 8 m s{sup -1}, a flow rate per unit electrode length of 0.034 m{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and a thrust per unit electrode length of 0.24 N m{sup -1}. The wire-cylinder-plate configuration provides a maximum flow velocity of 10 m s{sup -1}, a flow rate per unit electrode length of 0.041 m{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and a thrust per unit electrode length of 0.35 N m{sup -1}. This 46% increase in thrust is obtained by increasing the electric power per unit electrode length by only 16% (from 175 to 210 W m{sup -1}), which confirms the gain in efficiency obtained with the decoupled system. In comparison with a simple wire-wire corona configuration, the wire-cylinder-plate configuration increases the ionic wind velocity by up to a factor of 3, and the thrust by an order of magnitude.

  4. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Dorian F.; Ferret, Antoine; Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-11-01

    A wire-cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The objective of the work is to maximize the power supplied to the flow in order to increase acceleration while avoiding breakdown. Thus, the proposed experimental setup addresses the problem of decoupling the mechanism of ion generation from that of ion acceleration. Using a wire-plate configuration as a reference, we have focused on improving the topography of the electric field to (1) separate the ionization and acceleration zones in space, and (2) guide the trajectory of charged particles as parallel to the median axis as possible. In the proposed wire-cylinder-plate setup, a dc corona discharge is generated in the space between a wire and two cylinders. The ions produced by the corona then drift past the cylinders and into a channel between two plates, where they undergo acceleration. To maximize the ionic wind it is found that the geometric configuration must be as compact as possible and that the voltage applied must be right below breakdown. Experimentally, the optimized wire-plate reference setup provides a maximum flow velocity of 8 m s-1, a flow rate per unit electrode length of 0.034 m2 s-1, and a thrust per unit electrode length of 0.24 N m-1. The wire-cylinder-plate configuration provides a maximum flow velocity of 10 m s-1, a flow rate per unit electrode length of 0.041 m2 s-1, and a thrust per unit electrode length of 0.35 N m-1. This 46% increase in thrust is obtained by increasing the electric power per unit electrode length by only 16% (from 175 to 210 W m-1), which confirms the gain in efficiency obtained with the decoupled system. In comparison with a simple wire-wire corona configuration, the wire-cylinder-plate configuration increases the ionic wind velocity by up to a factor of 3, and the thrust by an order of magnitude.

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron-level aerosol chemical and biological threats. Polymer solution concentration, electrospinning voltage, and deposition areal density were varied to establish the relationship of processing-structure-filtration efficiency for electrospun fiber mats. A high barrier efficiency of greater than 99.5% was achieved on electrospun fiber mats without sacrificing air permeability and pressure drop. ii) Fabrication and Characterization of Multifunctional ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofibers ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats were prepared by an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process, The electrospinning of polymer solution and electrospraying of ZnO particles were carried out simultaneously such that the ZnO nanoparticles were dispersed on the surface of Nylon 6 nanofibers. The prepared ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats were tested for detoxifying characteristics against simulants of C-B agents. The results showed that ZnO/Nylon 6 functional nanofiber mats exhibited good detoxification action against paraoxon and have antibacterial efficiency over 99.99% against both the gram-negative E. coli and gram positive B. cereus bacteria. iii) Improving adhesion of electrospun nanofiber mat onto woven fabric by plasma pretreatment of substrate fabric and plasma-electrospinning hybrid process Electrospun nanofibers were deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric to improve the adhesion. In addition, the plasma-electrospinning hybrid process was developed and used in which the nanofibers were subjected to in-situ plasma treatment during electrospinning. The effects of plasma treatement on substrate fabric and electrospun fibers were characterized by water contact angle test, XPS analyses. The improvement of nanofiber adhesive properties on fabric substrate was evaluated by peel test, flex resistance test and abrasion resistance test. The test results showed that the plasma treatment caused introduction of active chemical groups on substrate fabric and electrospun nanofibers. These active chemical assisted in possible cross-linking formation between nanofiber mat and substrate fabric, and this hypothesi

  6. Implementation of a 3D PIC/MCC Simulation to Investigate Plasma Initiation in Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The particle-particle interactions involved in plasma formation are well suited to implement in a parallel environment due to the identical computations done for each particle. Specifically, a 3D PIC/MCC simulation was accelerated on an NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) using the CUDA framework for a developing plasma in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure to study the initial phase of breakdown. For this simulation, the computational volume was ~220 mm3 with 15 ?m spatial resolution containing two parabolic electrodes. The plasma development is typically characterized by the development of positive ion space charge creating a localized field enhancement thus accelerating ionization processes in this region. For instance, with the application of an 8 kV/cm electric field amplitude, after 1 ns into the simulation, the development of positive ion space charge near both anode and cathode is observed with the densities of ~1016 cm-3 and ~1014 - 1015 cm-3, respectively, while the electron density sits at ~1011 cm-3. Already 100 ps into the simulation, the distribution of electron energies exhibits non-thermal characteristics with an average electron energy of 0.98 eV that increases to ~10 eV at 1 ns. The particle-particle interactions involved in plasma formation are well suited to implement in a parallel environment due to the identical computations done for each particle. Specifically, a 3D PIC/MCC simulation was accelerated on an NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) using the CUDA framework for a developing plasma in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure to study the initial phase of breakdown. For this simulation, the computational volume was ~220 mm3 with 15 ?m spatial resolution containing two parabolic electrodes. The plasma development is typically characterized by the development of positive ion space charge creating a localized field enhancement thus accelerating ionization processes in this region. For instance, with the application of an 8 kV/cm electric field amplitude, after 1 ns into the simulation, the development of positive ion space charge near both anode and cathode is observed with the densities of ~1016 cm-3 and ~1014 - 1015 cm-3, respectively, while the electron density sits at ~1011 cm-3. Already 100 ps into the simulation, the distribution of electron energies exhibits non-thermal characteristics with an average electron energy of 0.98 eV that increases to ~10 eV at 1 ns. Work supported by an AFOSR grant on the Basic Physics of Plasma Discharges with student fellowship support provided by NPSC.

  7. The role of different phenomena in surface-activated chemical ionization (SACI) performance.

    PubMed

    Cristoni, Simone; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Guidugli, Federico; Tubaro, Michela; Traldi, Pietro

    2005-12-01

    In previous studies, the production of ions in an APCI source without any corona discharge was observed, and the intensity of the ion signals showed significant increases on placing a metallic surface at 45 degrees inside an orthogonal ion source. This method was named surface-activated chemical ionization (SACI). The present study was performed to investigate the mechanisms of ion production with or without the presence of the metallic surface, by varying instrumental parameters and the geometrical configuration. Approximate calculations show that, in the absence of corona discharge and of any additional surfaces, ions cannot be produced by collisional phenomena, because of their low kinetic energy, in the 10(-2) to 10(-3) eV range. Two alternative possibilities have been considered: the first takes into account that ions may originate by collision of neutral clusters of polar solvent molecules with the APCI source surfaces through clusterelectric effect. The second takes into account that the water dissociation constant k(w) is temperature dependent, passing from 10(-14.1669) at 20 degrees C to 10(-12.4318) at 90 degrees C. It means that the [H(+)] varies from 8.3 x 10(-8) to 6.1 x 10(-7) M going from 20 to 90 degrees C. Hence, at the high temperatures experimented in the APCI vaporizer, H(+) becomes available in solution in molar quantities analogous to those of analyte, and the protonation of the analyte itself can consequently occur. The activation of further ionization processes in the presence of the metallic surface can be reasonably attributed to interactions between gas-phase analyte molecules and solvent molecules adsorbed on the surface. Experiments performed with a thin layer of deuterated glycerol on the surface led to unequivocal results, i.e. the production of [M + D](+) ions of the analyte. PMID:16320302

  8. Pre-ionizing trigger system for a gas laser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Marchetti; E. Penco; U. Perito

    1984-01-01

    A pair of excitation electrodes in a laser cavity, filled with a gas mixture at substantially atmospheric pressure, are connected across a pumping capacitor by way of part of the winding of an autotransformer in series with a pre-ionizing device within the cavity acting as a trigger switch. The pre-ionizing device comprises a dielectric tube carrying a plurality of axially

  9. Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 on Almonds with a Fluidized Bed Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 on Almonds with a Fluidized Bed Atmospheric Pressure for the treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 on almonds. Each almond sample was spot inoculated with 10 µl is not conducive for microorganisms to multiply. Salmonella however can survive for extended periods under

  10. An Atmospheric Pressure, Fluidized Bed Combustion System Burning High-Chlorine Coals in the Convection Section

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Liu; W. Xie; W.-P. Pan; J. T. Riley

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of fireside corrosion in power plant boiler components is always a major concern when the fuels include high-sulfur and high-chlorine coals (or refuse waste). Sulfur and chloride products may play important roles especially in fireside corrosion in atmospheric pressure, fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) systems, caused by the capture of sulfur and chlorine by limestone used as bed material

  11. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorian F. Colas; Antoine Ferret; David Z. Pai; Deanna A. Lacoste; Christophe O. Laux

    2010-01-01

    A wire-cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The objective of the work is to maximize the power supplied to the flow in order to increase acceleration while avoiding breakdown. Thus, the proposed experimental setup addresses the problem of decoupling the mechanism of ion generation from that of

  12. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmosphericIonic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure control.6 We examine here several configurations using a corona discharge. The principle of the ionic wind

  13. Electron density mapping of atmospheric pressure glow discharge in air using two-wavelength interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Pons; Wei-Dong Zhu; K. H. Schoenbach; A. Bugayev

    2006-01-01

    Summary form only given. Atmospheric pressure air plasmas are of interest in aeronautic applications, such as electromagnetic wave cross-section reduction. The required electron densities for this application exceed 1011 cm-3 and may vary strongly over small spatial scales. Mapping of the electron density therefore requires diagnostic techniques that provide high spatial resolution. A laser interferometric method had been introduced by

  14. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY OF COLD ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMA APPLIED TO INOCULATED FOOD SURFACES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold, atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) has previously been shown to effectively eliminate bacteria, including human pathogens, from inert surfaces. A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate CAPP efficacy on food products that represent important classes of surfaces for potential treatment...

  15. Decontamination of objects in a sealed container by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Leipold; N. Schultz-Jensen; Y. Kusano; H. Bindslev; T. Jacobsen

    2011-01-01

    The decontamination of objects (food) in a sealed container by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas is investigated. The target is Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium which causes listeriosis and can be found in plants and food. The non-pathogenic species, Listeria innocua, is used for the experiments. Glass slides were inoculated with L. innocua. The slides were placed inside a low density

  16. Application of Electric Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure and Ambient Temperature for Bio-Decontamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Morgane Moreau; Nicole Orange; Jean-Louis Brisset

    2005-01-01

    A new method using an electric discharge at atmospheric pressure and quasi ambient temperature of the gliding arc type is tested for bio-decontamination purposes. Preliminary results are reported on model bacteria of limited pathological character. Inactivation of three strains of Erwinia was tested over 8-minute periods. The inactivation plots of Erwinia chrysanthemi (Ech) show that a 6-minute treatment induces a

  17. Uniform glowlike plasma source assisted by preionization of spark in ambient air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Bing; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Dezhen; Li Shouzhe; Wang Kun; Zhang Yutao [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Department of Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2006-09-25

    The ultraviolet radiation produced by spark discharges is employed to supply preionization for the dielectric barrier discharge in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of ultraviolet preionization and overvoltage on improving the uniformity of the dielectric barrier discharge is investigated experimentally. Based on the emission spectra and voltage-current wave forms, the optical and electrical characteristics of the discharge are discussed.

  18. Relationship Between the Number Density and the Phase Shift in Microwave Interferometry for Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mounir Laroussi

    1999-01-01

    Diagnosing atmospheric pressure discharges requires more sophisticated techniques than for low pressure plasmas. The plasma number density is a crucial parameter in several applications. Langmuir probe as a number density measuring technique is not applicable at high pressures because the electron mean free path is shorter than the Debye distance. Microwave interferometry appears to be an effective diagnostic technique in

  19. Nonthermal decontamination of biological media by atmospheric-pressure plasmas: review, analysis, and prospects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mounir Laroussi

    2002-01-01

    Although the use of an electrical discharge to disinfect water was suggested and applied more than a hundred years ago, basic and applied research on the interaction of plasmas with biological media was extensively carried out only relatively recently. In this context, a review of various works on the germicidal effects of atmospheric pressure, \\

  20. Atmospheric pressure loading corrections applied to GPS data at the observation level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Tregoning; T. van Dam

    2005-01-01

    Space-geodetic techniques can detect elastic deformation of the Earth caused by atmospheric pressure loading (ATML). However, it has not yet been demonstrated whether these surface displacements should be accounted for at the time of reduction of the observations or by applying time-averaged values to the coordinates after the analysis of the observations. An analysis of the power spectral density of