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Sample records for atom tranfer radical

  1. 1,2-shifts of hydrogen atoms in aryl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, M.A.; Scott, L.T.

    1999-06-16

    An energy barrier on the order of 60 kcal/mol is predicted for the 1,2-shift of hydrogen atoms in aryl radicals. Such rearrangements are, therefore, not expected to occur under ordinary laboratory conditions, but they should be prevalent in the aryl radicals formed during combustion, flash vacuum pyrolysis, and other high-temperature gas-phase processes. As a demonstration of this rearrangement, the 2-benzo[c]phenanthryl radical (1) was generated by flash vacuum pyrolysis of the corresponding aryl bromide. A 1,2-shift of hydrogen out of the sterically congested cover region of 1, followed by cyclization and rearomatization of the resulting radical, is proposed to explain the observation of benzo[ghi]fluoranthene as the dominant monomeric product formed. Under the same conditions, [1,3,4,5-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]-2-bromobenzo[c]phenanthrene gives [1,2,3,4-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]-benzo[ghi]fluoranthene as the dominant monomeric product, in accord with the expectation of a deuterium atom 1,2-shift.

  2. Transition state geometry in radical hydrogen atom abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Shestakov, Alexander F.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2012-12-01

    The interatomic distances in the transition states of radical hydrogen atom abstraction reactions X•+HY → XH+Y• determined by quantum chemical calculations are systematized and generalized. It is shown that depending on the reaction centre structure, these reactions can be subdivided into classes with the same X...Y interatomic distance in each class. The transition state geometries found by the methods of intersecting parabolas and intersecting Morse curves are also presented. The X...H...Y fragments are almost linear, the hydrogen atom position being determined by the reaction enthalpy. The effects of triplet repulsion, electronegativities and radii of X and Y atoms, the presence of adjoining π-bonds, and steric effects on the X...Y interatomic distances are analyzed and characterized. The bibliography includes 62 references.

  3. Organocatalyzed atom transfer radical polymerization driven by visible light.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Jordan C; Lim, Chern-Hooi; Yang, Haishen; Ryan, Matthew D; Musgrave, Charles B; Miyake, Garret M

    2016-05-27

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has become one of the most implemented methods for polymer synthesis, owing to impressive control over polymer composition and associated properties. However, contamination of the polymer by the metal catalyst remains a major limitation. Organic ATRP photoredox catalysts have been sought to address this difficult challenge but have not achieved the precision performance of metal catalysts. Here, we introduce diaryl dihydrophenazines, identified through computationally directed discovery, as a class of strongly reducing photoredox catalysts. These catalysts achieve high initiator efficiencies through activation by visible light to synthesize polymers with tunable molecular weights and low dispersities. PMID:27033549

  4. Studies of Atomic Free Radicals Stored in a Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David M.; Hubbard, Dorthy (Technical Monitor); Alexander, Glen (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-Helium Solids are porous gel-like solids consisting of impurity atoms and molecules surrounded by thin layers of solid helium. They provide an ideal medium for matrix isolation of free radicals to prevent recombination and store chemical energy. In this work electron spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and ultrasound techniques have all been employed to study the properties of these substances. Detailed studies via electron spin resonance of exchange tunneling chemical reactions involving hydrogen and deuterium molecular and atomic impurities in these solids have been performed and compared with theory. Concentrations of hydrogen approaching the quantum solid criterion have been produced. Structured studies involving X ray diffraction, ultrasound, and electron spin resonance have shown that the impurities in impurity helium solids are predominantly contained in impurity clusters, with each cluster being surrounded by thin layers of solid helium.

  5. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  6. Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methacrylic Acid: A Won Challenge.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Marco; Isse, Abdirisak A; Venzo, Alfonso; Gennaro, Armando; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-15

    Polymerization of acidic monomers is one of the biggest challenges for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). An intramolecular cyclization reaction leading to the loss of the C-X chain-end functionality was found to be the main reason for the partial termination of the growing polymer chains. Three approaches were used to overcome this problem: using Cl as the chain-end halogen, lowering the pH (to 0.9), and increasing polymerization rate. Methacrylic acid (MAA) was polymerized by both electrochemically mediated ATRP and supplemental activator and reducing agent ATRP up to high conversion (>90%), in t ≤ 4 h at 25 °C, using inexpensive and nontoxic reagents (NaCl, diluted HCl, water). Control over molecular weight (MW) dispersity was satisfactory, and MWs were in agreement with theoretical values. The "livingness" of the process was confirmed by an electrochemical switch, used to repeatedly and periodically deactivate/reactivate growing chains. PMID:27244091

  7. Iodinated (Perfluoro)alkyl Quinoxalines by Atom Transfer Radical Addition Using ortho-Diisocyanoarenes as Radical Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Leifert, Dirk; Studer, Armido

    2016-09-12

    A simple method for the preparation of functionalized quinoxalines is reported. Starting from readily accessible ortho-diisocyanoarenes and (perfluoro)alkyl iodides, the quinoxaline core is constructed during (perfluoro)alkylation by atom transfer radical addition (ATRA), resulting in 2-iodo-3-(perfluoro)alkylquinoxalines. The radical cascades are readily initiated either with visible light or by using α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN). The heteroarene products are obtained in high yields (up to 94 %), and the method can be readily scaled up. Useful follow-up chemistry documents the value of the novel radical quinoxaline synthesis. PMID:27510610

  8. Antibacterial polypropylene via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinyu; Murata, Hironobu; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2007-05-01

    Polypropylene (PP) coated by a non-leachable biocide was prepared by chemically attaching poly(quaternary ammonium) (PQA) to the surface of PP. The well-defined poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA), a precursor of PQA, was grown from the surface of PP via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The tertiary ammine groups in PDMAEMA were consequently converted to QA in the presence of ethyl bromide. Successful surface modification was confirmed by ATR-FTIR, contact angle measurement, and an antibacterial activity test against Escherichia coli (E. coli). The biocidal activity of the resultant surfaces depends on the amount of the grafted polymers (the number of available quaternary ammonium units). With the same grafting density, the surface grafted with relatively high MW polymers (M(n) > 10,000 g/mol) showed almost 100% killing efficiency (killing all of the input E. coli (2.9 x 10(5)) in the shaking test), whereas a low biocidal activity (85%) was observed for the surface grafted with shorter PQA chains (M(n) = 1,500 g/mol). PMID:17417906

  9. Radical and Atom Transfer Halogenation (RATH): A Facile Route for Chemical and Polymer Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Yu; Liang, Mong; Liu, Ying-Ling

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a new halogenation reaction through sequential radical and halogen transfer reactions, named as "radical and atom transfer halogenation" (RATH). Both benzoxazine compounds and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) have been demonstrated as active species for RATH. Consequently, the halogenated compound becomes an active initiator of atom transfer radical polymerization. Combination of RATH and sequential ATRP provides an convenient and effective approach to prepare reactive and crosslinkable polymers. The RATH reaction opens a new window both to chemical synthesis and molecular design and preparation of polymeric materials. PMID:27027639

  10. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Mark J.

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  11. Alkali-Metal-Ion-Assisted Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Homocysteine Radical.

    PubMed

    Lesslie, Michael; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Lawler, John T; Siu, K W Michael; Oomens, Jos; Berden, Giel; Hopkinson, Alan C; Ryzhov, Victor

    2016-02-12

    Intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) was examined in homocysteine (Hcy) thiyl radical/alkali metal ion complexes in the gas phase by combination of experimental techniques (ion-molecule reactions and infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy) and theoretical calculations. The experimental results unequivocally show that metal ion complexation (as opposed to protonation) of the regiospecifically generated Hcy thiyl radical promotes its rapid isomerisation into an α-carbon radical via HAT. Theoretical calculations were employed to calculate the most probable HAT pathway and found that in alkali metal ion complexes the activation barrier is significantly lower, in full agreement with the experimental data. This is, to our knowledge, the first example of a gas-phase thiyl radical thermal rearrangement into an α-carbon species within the same amino acid residue and is consistent with the solution phase behaviour of Hcy radical. PMID:26836574

  12. New horizons in chemical propulsion. [processes using free radicals, atomic hydrogen, excited species, etc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, W.

    1973-01-01

    After a review of the work of the late-Fifties on free radicals for propulsion, it is concluded that atomic hydrogen would provide a potentially large increase in specific impulse. Work conducted to find an approach for isolating atomic hydrogen is considered. Other possibilities for obtaining propellants of greatly increased capability might be connected with the technology for the generation of activated states of gases, metallic hydrogen, fuels obtained from other planets, and laser transfer of energy.

  13. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  14. Anticoagulant surface of 316 L stainless steel modified by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Zhu, Jian; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhu, Xiulin

    2011-05-01

    Polished 316 L stainless steel (SS) was first treated with air plasma to enhance surface hydrophilicity and was subsequently allowed to react with 2-(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)ethyltrimethoxysilane to introduce an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Accordingly, the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA) was carried out on the surface of the modified SS. The grafting progress was monitored by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The polymer thickness as a function different polymerization times was characterized using a step profiler. The anticoagulative properties of the PEGMA modified SS surface were investigated. The results showed enhanced anticoagulative to acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) blood after grafting PEGMA on the SS surface. PMID:21528878

  15. Relative rate constants for the reactions of atomic oxygen with HO2 anad OH radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Relative rate constants for the reactions O + HO2 - OH + O2 (1) and O + OH - H + O2 (2) were obtained by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at 2 torr total pressure and 299 K. HO2 radicals were generated by reacting atomic hydrogen with an excess of O2. Quasi-steady-state concentrations of OH and HO2 were established in the presence of excess atomic oxygen. Observed concentration ratios, namely the ratio of the OH concentration to the HO2 concentration, resulted in a value of 1.7 + or 0.2 for k1/k2. The error limits are twice the standard deviation obtained from the data analysis. Overall experimental error is estimated to be + or - 25 percent. This result confirms earlier direct measurements of k1 and k2 which required knowledge of absolute radical or atomic oxygen concentrations.

  16. Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Functionalized Vinyl Monomers Using Perylene as a Visible Light Photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Jordan C; Ryan, Matthew D; French, Tracy A; Pearson, Ryan M; Miyake, Garret M

    2016-01-01

    A standardized technique for atom transfer radical polymerization of vinyl monomers using perylene as a visible-light photocatalyst is presented. The procedure is performed under an inert atmosphere using air- and water-exclusion techniques. The outcome of the polymerization is affected by the ratios of monomer, initiator, and catalyst used as well as the reaction concentration, solvent, and nature of the light source. Temporal control over the polymerization can be exercised by turning the visible light source off and on. Low dispersities of the resultant polymers as well as the ability to chain-extend to form block copolymers suggest control over the polymerization, while chain end-group analysis provides evidence supporting an atom-transfer radical polymerization mechanism. PMID:27166728

  17. Reversible H Atom Abstraction Catalyzed by the Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Enzyme HydG

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The organometallic H-cluster at the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases is synthesized by three accessory proteins, two of which are radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes (HydE, HydG) and one of which is a GTPase (HydF). In this work we probed the specific role of H atom abstraction in HydG-catalyzed carbon monoxide and cyanide production from tyrosine. The isotope distributions of 5′-deoxyadenosine and p-cresol were evaluated using deuterium-labeled tyrosine substrates in H2O and D2O. The observation of multiply deuterated 5′-deoxyadenosine and deuterated S-adenosylmethionine when the reaction is carried out in D2O provides evidence for a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical-mediated abstraction of a hydrogen atom from a solvent-exchangeable position as a reversible event. PMID:25099480

  18. Structural and Mechanistic Aspects of Copper Catalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintauer, Tomislav; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    During the past decade, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has had a tremendous impact on the synthesis of macromolecules with well-defined compositions, architectures, and functionalities. Structural features of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes with bidentate, tridentate, tetradentate, and multidentate nitrogen-based ligands commonly utilized in ATRP are reviewed and discussed. Additionally, recent advances in mechanistic understanding of copper-mediated ATRP are outlined.

  19. Trajectory calculations of OH radical- and Cl atom-initiated reaction of glyoxal: atmospheric chemistry of the HC(O)CO radical.

    PubMed

    Setokuchi, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    On-the-fly quasi-classical trajectory calculations using the density functional method were carried out to investigate the dynamics of the HC(O)CO radical, formed by OH radical- and Cl atom-initiated reactions of glyoxal at 298 K. The energy difference between the A' HC(O)CO radical, formed immediately after H atom abstraction, and the most stable A″ HC(O)CO radical is estimated to be 6.0 kcal mol(-1). The surplus energy followed by relaxation from A' HC(O)CO to A″ HC(O)CO goes to internal energy of the nascent HC(O)CO radicals and causes prompt decomposition into HCO + CO. The average internal energy partitioned into the HC(O)CO radical is higher in the OH reaction than in the Cl reaction, in accordance with exothermicity of the reactions. A fraction of the nascent HC(O)CO radicals (91% for the OH reaction and 47% for the Cl reaction) promptly decomposes into HCO and CO within 2.5 ps. The remaining HC(O)CO radicals, which do not undergo prompt decomposition, decompose thermally or add with O(2) in the presence of O(2). I re-evaluated the previous two experiment results of the product yield ratio [CO]/[CO(2)] vs. [O(2)](-1) in the Cl atom-initiated reaction, in light of the reaction mechanism involving prompt decomposition. The two results give 9.5 × 10(6) s(-1) and 1.08 × 10(7) s(-1) for the thermal decomposition rate and 47% and 41% for the fraction of prompt decomposition in the Cl atom-initiated reaction, in good agreement with the present trajectory calculation. PMID:21359367

  20. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex. PMID:27186790

  1. Thioether bond formation by SPASM domain radical SAM enzymes: Cα H-atom abstraction in subtilosin A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Lefranc, Benjamin; Vaudry, Hubert; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    AlbA is a radical SAM enzyme catalyzing the formation of three unusual thioether bonds in the antibiotic subtilosin A. We demonstrate here that AlbA catalyzes direct Cα H-atom abstraction and likely contains three essential [4Fe-4S] centers. This leads us to propose novel mechanistic perspectives for thioether bond catalysis by radical SAM enzymes. PMID:27087315

  2. ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF N-BUTYL METHACRYLATE IN AQUEOUS DISPERSED SYSTEMS: A MINIEMULSION APPROACH. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasonication was applied in combination with a hydrophobe for the copper-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate in an aqueous dispersed system. A controlled polymerization was successfully achieved, as demonstrated by a linear correlation between...

  3. Stimuli-responsive surfaces using polyampholyte polymer brushes prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Neil; Cyrus, Crystal D; Brittain, William J

    2007-03-27

    The synthesis of AB diblock copolymer polyampholyte polymer brushes of the type Si/SiO2//poly(acrylic acid-b-vinyl pyridine) prepared using atom transfer radical polymerization is reported. Both 2- and 4-vinyl pyridine have been used. The diblock polyampholyte polymer brushes demonstrate stimuli-responsive behavior with respect to pH, showing both polyelectrolyte and polyampholyte effects. Furthermore, we have quaternized the 4-vinyl pyridine segments to form a mixed weak/strong, or annealed/quenched, polyelectrolyte system. The quaternized polymer brush exhibits different pH-responsive behavior, with decreasing film thickness being observed with increasing pH. PMID:17319701

  4. Synthesis and characterization of carbon fibers functionalized with poly (glycidyl methacrylate) via atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongwei; Xiong, Lei; Qin, Xiaokang; Wang, Zhengyue; Ding, Bei; Ren, Huan; Pi, Xiaolong

    2015-07-01

    In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CF) were chemically modified with poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to improve the interaction between the CF and polymer matrix. The FT-IR, TGA, and XPS were used to determine the chemical structure of the resulting products and the quantities of PGMA chains grafted from the CF surface. The experimental results confirm that the CF surface was functionalized and glycidyl methacrylate was graft-polymerized onto the CF, and the grafting content of polymer could reach 10.2%.

  5. A chaperonin as protein nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Renggli, Kasper; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Urbani, Raphael; Pfohl, Thomas; Bruns, Nico

    2014-01-27

    The group II chaperonin thermosome (THS) from the archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum is reported as nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A copper catalyst was entrapped into the THS to confine the polymerization into this protein cage. THS possesses pores that are wide enough to release polymers into solution. The nanoreactor favorably influenced the polymerization of N-isopropyl acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol)methylether acrylate. Narrowly dispersed polymers with polydispersity indices (PDIs) down to 1.06 were obtained in the protein nanoreactor, while control reactions with a globular protein-catalyst conjugate only yielded polymers with PDIs above 1.84. PMID:24459061

  6. Mechanism of Photoinduced Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiangcheng; Fang, Cheng; Fantin, Marco; Malhotra, Nikhil; So, Woong Young; Peteanu, Linda A; Isse, Abdirisak A; Gennaro, Armando; Liu, Peng; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2016-02-24

    Photoinduced metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate was investigated using several phenothiazine derivatives and other related compounds as photoredox catalysts. The experiments show that all selected catalysts can be involved in the activation step, but not all of them participated efficiently in the deactivation step. The redox properties and the stability of radical cations derived from the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Laser flash photolysis (LFP) was used to determine the lifetime and activity of photoexcited catalysts. Kinetic analysis of the activation reaction according to dissociative electron-transfer (DET) theory suggests that the activation occurs only with an excited state of catalyst. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed the structures and stabilities of the radical cation intermediates as well as the reaction energy profiles of deactivation pathways with different photoredox catalysts. Both experiments and calculations suggest that the activation process undergoes a DET mechanism, while an associative electron transfer involving a termolecular encounter (the exact reverse of DET pathway) is favored in the deactivation process. This detailed study provides a deeper understanding of the chemical processes of metal-free ATRP that can aid the design of better catalytic systems. Additionally, this work elucidates several important common pathways involved in synthetically useful organic reactions catalyzed by photoredox catalysts. PMID:26820243

  7. Product study of the OH radical and Cl atom initiated oxidation of 1,3-dioxane.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Jennie; Wenger, John C; Sidebottom, Howard W

    2010-12-17

    The products of the hydroxyl (OH) radical and chlorine (Cl) atom initiated oxidation of 1,3-dioxane are determined under various reaction conditions in a 50 L teflon reaction chamber using FTIR spectroscopy for analysis. The major products detected in all experiments are (2-oxoethoxy)methyl formate, formic acid and methylene glycol diformate with average molar yields of 0.50±0.05, 0.41±0.02 and 0.03±0.01 respectively for the OH initiated oxidation in the presence of NO(x). The yields of these products do not vary significantly with O(2) partial pressure or oxidising agent (OH or Cl). However, the yield of formic acid decreased by at least a factor of two in the absence of NO(x). The results of these experiments are used to elucidate a simplified gas-phase atmospheric degradation scheme for 1,3-dioxane and also provide valuable information on the atmospheric fate of the cyclic and linear alkoxy radicals produced in these and similar reactions. The available experimental data suggests that the relative importance of the competing pathways (reaction with O(2) and ring opening by C-C or C-O bond fission) is a strong function of the ring strain in the cycloalkoxy radicals. PMID:20949582

  8. Organocatalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Using N-Aryl Phenoxazines as Photoredox Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ryan M; Lim, Chern-Hooi; McCarthy, Blaine G; Musgrave, Charles B; Miyake, Garret M

    2016-09-01

    N-Aryl phenoxazines have been synthesized and introduced as strongly reducing metal-free photoredox catalysts in organocatalyzed atom transfer radical polymerization for the synthesis of well-defined polymers. Experiments confirmed quantum chemical predictions that, like their dihydrophenazine analogs, the photoexcited states of phenoxazine photoredox catalysts are strongly reducing and achieve superior performance when they possess charge transfer character. We compare phenoxazines to previously reported dihydrophenazines and phenothiazines as photoredox catalysts to gain insight into the performance of these catalysts and establish principles for catalyst design. A key finding reveals that maintenance of a planar conformation of the phenoxazine catalyst during the catalytic cycle encourages the synthesis of well-defined macromolecules. Using these principles, we realized a core substituted phenoxazine as a visible light photoredox catalyst that performed superior to UV-absorbing phenoxazines as well as previously reported organic photocatalysts in organocatalyzed atom transfer radical polymerization. Using this catalyst and irradiating with white LEDs resulted in the production of polymers with targeted molecular weights through achieving quantitative initiator efficiencies, which possess dispersities ranging from 1.13 to 1.31. PMID:27554292

  9. Radical-mediated dehydrogenation of bile acids by means of hydrogen atom transfer to triplet carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Miro, P; Marin, M L; Miranda, M A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to explore the potential of radical-mediated dehydrogenation of bile salts (BSs), which is reminiscent of the enzymatic action of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (HSDH). The concept has been demonstrated using triplet carbonyls that can be efficiently generated upon selective UVA-excitation. Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from BSs to triplet benzophenone (BP) derivatives gave rise to radicals, ultimately leading to reduction of the BP chromophore with concomitant formation of the oxo-analogs of the corresponding BSs. The direct reactivity of triplet BP with BSs in the initial step was evaluated by determining the kinetic rate constants using laser flash photolysis (LFP). The BP triplet decay was monitored (λmax = 520 nm) upon addition of increasing BS concentrations, and the obtained rate constant values indicated a reactivity of the methine hydrogen atoms in the order of C-3 < C-12 < C-7. The steady-state kinetics of the overall process, monitored through the disappearance of the typical BP absorption band at 260 nm, was much faster under N2 than under O2, also supporting the role of the oxygen-quenchable triplet in the dehydrogenation process. Furthermore, irradiation of deaerated aqueous solutions of sodium cholate in the presence of KPMe provided the oxo-analogs, 3[O],7[O]-CA, 3[O]-CA and 7[O]-CA, arising from the HAT process. PMID:26833240

  10. Quantitative aspects of ESR and spin trapping of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms in gamma-irradiated aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, A.J.; Makino, K.; Riesz, P.

    1984-11-01

    The efficiency of 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO) and ..cap alpha..-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN) to spin trap hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms, respectively, was studied in ..gamma..-irradiated solutions where the radical yields are accurately known. The effects of dose, spin trap concentration, and pH and of the stability of the spin adducts on the spin-trapping efficiency were investigated. In degassed or N/sub 2/-saturated solutions the spin-trapping efficiencies were 35% for DMPO and hydroxyl radicals and 14% for POBN and hydrogen atoms. The low spin-trapping efficiency of DMPO may be explained by the reaction of hydroxyl radicals to abstract hydrogen from the DMPO molecule to produce carbon radicals as well as addition to the N=C double bond to form nitroxide radicals. For POBN the low spin-trapping efficiency for hydrogen atoms is explained in terms of addition reactions of hydrogen atoms to the aromatic ring and the pyridinium and nitrone oxygens.

  11. Preparation and characterization of optical-functional diblock copolymer brushes on hollow sphere surface via atom transfer radical polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Wen-Zhi; Zhao, Li-Min; Zhang, Chun-Juan; Wang, Yan-Dong; Kong, Li-Li; Li, Ling-Ling

    2010-09-15

    The optical-functional poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-Tb complex diblock copolymer brushes grafted from hollow sphere surface via atom transfer radical polymerization were investigated in this work. A sufficient amount of azo initiator was introduced onto hollow sphere surface firstly. Then the monomer methyl methacrylate was polymerized via surface-initiated reverse atom transfer radical polymerization using azo group modified hollow sphere as initiator. Following, the poly(methyl methacrylate) modified hollow sphere was used as maroinitiator for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of Tb complex. The samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatographer and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the poly(methyl methacrylate) had grafted from hollow sphere surface and the average diameter of hollow core was about 1 {mu}m. The optical properties of the poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-Tb copolymer modified hollow sphere were also reported.

  12. Rate constant calculations of H-atom abstraction reactions from ethers by HȮ2 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2014-02-27

    In this work, we detail hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from six ethers by the hydroperoxyl radical, including dimethyl ether, ethyl methyl ether, propyl methyl ether, isopropyl methyl ether, butyl methyl ether, and isobutyl methyl ether, in order to test the effect of the functional group on the rate constant calculations. The Møller-Plesset (MP2) method with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set has been employed in the geometry optimizations and frequency calculations of all of the species involved in the above reaction systems. The connections between each transition state and the corresponding local minima have been determined by intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Energies are reported at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory and include the zero-point energy corrections. As a benchmark in the electronic energy calculations, the CCSD(T)/CBS extrapolation was used for the reactions of dimethyl ether + HȮ2 radicals. A systematic calculation of the high-pressure limit rate constants has been performed using conventional transition-state theory, including asymmetric Eckart tunneling corrections, in the temperature range of 500-2000 K. The one dimensional hindrance potentials obtained at MP2/6-311G(d,p) for the reactants and transition states have been used to describe the low frequency torsional modes. Herein, we report the calculated individual, average, and total rate constants. A branching ratio analysis for every reaction site has also been performed. PMID:24483837

  13. Chemical probing of RNA with the hydroxyl radical at single-atom resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Shakti; Azad, Robert N.; Jain, Swapan S.; Tullius, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    While hydroxyl radical cleavage is widely used to map RNA tertiary structure, lack of mechanistic understanding of strand break formation limits the degree of structural insight that can be obtained from this experiment. Here, we determine how individual ribose hydrogens of sarcin/ricin loop RNA participate in strand cleavage. We find that substituting deuterium for hydrogen at a ribose 5′-carbon produces a kinetic isotope effect on cleavage; the major cleavage product is an RNA strand terminated by a 5′-aldehyde. We conclude that hydroxyl radical abstracts a 5′-hydrogen atom, leading to RNA strand cleavage. We used this approach to obtain structural information for a GUA base triple, a common tertiary structural feature of RNA. Cleavage at U exhibits a large 5′ deuterium kinetic isotope effect, a potential signature of a base triple. Others had noted a ribose-phosphate hydrogen bond involving the G 2′-OH and the U phosphate of the GUA triple, and suggested that this hydrogen bond contributes to backbone rigidity. Substituting deoxyguanosine for G, to eliminate this hydrogen bond, results in a substantial decrease in cleavage at G and U of the triple. We conclude that this hydrogen bond is a linchpin of backbone structure around the triple. PMID:25313156

  14. In-Channel Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization of Thermoset Polyester Microfluidic Devices for Bioanalytical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Fiorini, Gina S.; Chiu, Daniel T.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2012-01-01

    A new technique for polymer microchannel surface modification, called in-channel atom-transfer radical polymerization, has been developed and applied in the surface derivatization of thermoset polyester (TPE) microdevices with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electroosmotic flow (EOF), and contact angle measurements indicate that PEG has been grafted on the TPE surface. Moreover, PEG-modified microchannels have much lower and more pH-stable EOF, more hydrophilic surfaces and reduced nonspecific protein adsorption. Capillary electrophoresis separation of amino acid and peptide mixtures in these PEG-modified TPE microchips had good reproducibility. Phosducin-like protein and phosphorylated phosducin-like protein were also separated to measure the phosphorylation efficiency. Our results indicate that PEG-grafted TPE microchips have broad potential application in biomolecular analysis. PMID:17640094

  15. Encapsidated Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization in Qβ Virus-like Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are unique macromolecular structures that hold great promise in biomedical and biomaterial applications. The interior of the 30 nm-diameter Qβ VLP was functionalized by a three-step process: (1) hydrolytic removal of endogenously packaged RNA, (2) covalent attachment of initiator molecules to unnatural amino acid residues located on the interior capsid surface, and (3) atom-transfer radical polymerization of tertiary amine-bearing methacrylate monomers. The resulting polymer-containing particles were moderately expanded in size; however, biotin-derivatized polymer strands were only very weakly accessible to avidin, suggesting that most of the polymer was confined within the protein shell. The polymer-containing particles were also found to exhibit physical and chemical properties characteristic of positively charged nanostructures, including the ability to easily enter mammalian cells and deliver functional small interfering RNA. PMID:25073013

  16. Surface modification of nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene by atom transfer radical polymerization or click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova, Katja; Schulte, Lars; Vigild, Martin E; Ndoni, Sokol

    2010-02-01

    Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and click chemistry were used to obtain functional nanoporous polymers based on nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) with gyroid morphology. The ATRP monolith initiator was prepared by immobilizing bromoester initiators onto the pore walls through two different methodologies: (1) three-step chemical conversion of double bonds of PB into bromoisobutyrate, and (2) photochemical functionalization of PB with bromoisobutyrate groups. Azide functional groups were attached onto the pore walls before click reaction with alkynated MPEG. Following ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while the morphology was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:20099923

  17. Atom Transfer Radical Copolymerization of Gradient Copolymers of HEMA/DMAEMA with Arbitrary Composition Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallow, Keith; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2009-03-01

    Gradient copolymers represent a new class of statistical copolymers where a non-uniform composition profile is controllably introduced along the length of the polymer chain. Gradient copolymers have thermal and mechanical properties that are different from random or block copolymers having the same average composition. Due to synthetic limitations, however, the introduction of arbitrary composition profiles remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably introduce arbitrary composition profiles along copolymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) by atom transfer radical copolymerization in a semi-batch reactor. Using gas chromatography to monitor monomer consumption, we have constructed a kinetic model which we use as a basis to synthesize copolymers with linear and parabolic composition profiles. The overall DMAEMA content and molecular weight of these gradient copolymers were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography, respectively, and both show good agreement with our model's predictions.

  18. [Preparation of a novel polymer monolith using atom transfer radical polymerization method for solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Qi, Li; Qiao, Juan; Mao, Lanqun; Chen, Yi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel polymer monolith based solid phase extraction (SPE) material has been prepared by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Firstly, employing ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linker, a polymer monolith filled in a filter head has been in-situ prepared quickly under mild conditions. Then, the activators generated by electron transfer ATRP (ARGET ATRP) was used for the modification of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl-methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) on the monolithic surface. Finally, this synthesized monolith for SPE was successfully applied in the extraction and enrichment of steroids. The results revealed that ATRP can be developed as a facile and effective method with mild reaction conditions for monolith construction and has the potential for preparing monolith in diverse devices. PMID:23898628

  19. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization from chitin nanofiber macroinitiator film.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuya; Yoshida, Sho; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports the preparation of chitin nanofiber-graft-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (CNF-g-polyHEA) films by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of HEA monomer from a CNF macroinitiator film. First, a CNF film was prepared by regeneration from a chitin ion gel with an ionic liquid. Then, acylation of the CNF surface with α-bromoisobutyryl bromide was carried out to obtain the CNF macroinitiator film having the initiating moieties (α-bromoisobutyrate group). The surface-initiated graft polymerization of HEA from the CNF macroinitiator film by ATRP was performed to produce the CNF-g-polyHEA film. The IR, XRD, and SEM measurements of the resulting film indicated the progress of the graft polymerization of HEA on surface of CNFs. The molecular weights of the grafted polyHEAs increased with prolonged polymerization times, which affected the mechanical properties of the films under tensile mode. PMID:25129725

  20. Preparation of well-defined poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) macromonomers via atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengcheng; Armes, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    A series of six near-monodisperse methacrylic macromonomers is prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate using a tertiary amine-functionalized initiator at 50 °C, followed by quaternization with excess 4-vinylbenzyl chloride at 20 °C. GPC analyses indicate polydispersities of around 1.20 and their mean degrees of polymerization (DP) range from 20 to 70, as judged by both (1) H NMR and UV spectroscopy. The former technique is more convenient but the latter proved more accurate for the higher DP values, provided that an appropriate model compound is utilized for calibration. Finally, these new macromonomers are used to prepare sterically stabilized polystyrene latexes with relatively narrow size distributions via alcoholic dispersion polymerization. PMID:24123461

  1. Recent developments in atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP): methods to reduce metal catalyst concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qin; Shipp, Devon A

    2012-10-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was initially developed in the mid-1990s, and with continued refinement and use has led to significant discoveries in new materials. However, metal contamination of the polymer product is an issue that has proven detrimental to widespread industrial application of ATRP. The laboratories of K. Matyjaszewski have made significant progress towards removing this impediment, leading the development of "activators regenerated by electron transfer" ATRP (ARGET ATRP) and electrochemically mediated ATRP (eATRP) technologies. These variants of ATRP allow polymers to be produced with great molecular weight and functionality control but at significantly reduced catalyst concentrations, typically at parts per million levels. This Concept examines these polymerizations in terms of their mechanism and outcomes, and is aimed at giving the reader an overview of recent developments in the field of ATRP. PMID:22539367

  2. Sustainable Electrochemically-Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization with Inexpensive Non-Platinum Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Marco; Lorandi, Francesca; Isse, Abdirisak A; Gennaro, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemically-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (eATRP) of oligo(ethylene oxide) methyl ether methacrylate in water is investigated on glassy carbon, Au, Ti, Ni, NiCr and SS304. eATRPs are performed both in divided and undivided electrochemical cells operating under either potentiostatic or galvanostatic mode. The reaction is fast, reaching high conversions in ≈4 h, and yields polymers with dispersity <1.2 and molecular weights close to the theoretical values. Most importantly, eATRP in a highly simplified setup (undivided cell under galvanostatic mode) with inexpensive nonnoble metals, such as NiCr and SS304, as cathode is well-controlled. Additionally, these electrodes neither release harmful ions in solution nor react directly with the CX chain end and can be reused several times. It is demonstrated that Pt can be replaced with cheaper, and more readily available materials without negatively affecting eATRP performance. PMID:27333068

  3. Heavy atom nitroxyl radicals. I: An ab initio study of the ground and lower electronic excited states of the H2As=O free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarroni, Riccardo; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2009-09-01

    A series of ab initio calculations have been undertaken to predict the spectroscopic properties of the ground and first two excited states of the recently discovered arsenyl (H2AsO) free radical. This 13 valence electron species can be viewed as similar to the formaldehyde radical anion with a ground state electron configuration of ⋯(π)2(n)2(π∗)1. The arsenyl radical is nonplanar (pyramidal) in the ground state with a 59° out-of-plane angle and a 1.67 Å AsO bond length. It has a low-lying n-π ∗(Ã A2″) excited state (Te˜5000 cm-1) which has a much larger out-of-plane angle (86°) and longer AsO bond length (1.81 Å). The π-π ∗(B˜ A2') excited state at ˜20 500 cm-1 is less pyramidal (out-of-plane angle=70°) and has a somewhat shorter AsO bond (1.77 Å). Similar trends are found for the H2PO and H2NO free radicals, although the latter has a planar ground state, due to sp2 hybridization of the N atom, and a very long B˜ state AsO bond length. The geometric variations of the ground and excited states of the H2EO (E=N, P, As) radicals, as well as the ground states of the corresponding anions and cations, can be readily rationalized from the Walsh diagram of the anion. The variations in the E-O bond length are a result of changes in both the orbital occupancy and pyramidalization of the molecule. The results of the present work have been employed in the analysis of the B˜ A2'-X˜ A2' electronic band system of the H2AsO free radical as reported in the companion paper.

  4. State-to-state inelastic scattering of Stark-decelerated OH radicals with Ar atoms.

    PubMed

    Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Kłos, Jacek; Dagdigian, Paul J; Alexander, Millard H; Meijer, Gerard; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2010-09-28

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce molecular beams with a tunable velocity. These tamed molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise crossed beam scattering studies as a function of the collision energy. The method has advanced sufficiently to compete with state-of-the-art beam methods that are used for scattering studies throughout. This is demonstrated here for the scattering of OH radicals (X(2)Pi(3/2), J = 3/2, f) with Ar atoms, a benchmark system for the scattering of open-shell molecules with atoms. Parity-resolved integral state-to-state inelastic scattering cross sections are measured at collision energies between 80 and 800 cm(-1). The threshold behavior and collision energy dependence of 13 inelastic scattering channels is accurately determined. Excellent agreement is obtained with the cross sections predicted by close-coupling scattering calculations based on the most accurate ab initio OH + Ar potential energy surfaces to date. PMID:20657906

  5. Rapid cellular internalization of multifunctional star polymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong Y; Gao, Haifeng; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Hong, Joanna; Bencherif, Sidi A; Siegwart, Daniel J; Paik, Hyun-Jong; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-09-13

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) star polymers containing GRGDS (Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide sequences on the star periphery were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA), GRGDS modified poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (GRGDS-PEG-Acryl), fluorescein o-methacrylate (FMA), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) via an "arm-first" method. Star polymers were approximately 20 nm in diameter, as measured by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Conjugation of FMA to the stars was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, and successful attachment of GRGDS segments to the star periphery was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both fluorescent PEG star polymers with and without peripheral GRGDS peptide segments were cultured with MC3T3-E1.4 cells. These star polymers were biocompatible with ≥ 90% cell viability after 24 h of incubation. Cellular uptake of PEG star polymers in MC3T3-E1.4 cells was observed by confocal microscopy. Rapid uptake of PEG star polymers with GRGDS peptides (∼ 100% of FITC-positive cells in 15 min measured by flow cytometry) was observed, suggesting enhanced delivery potential of these functional star polymers. PMID:20831270

  6. Surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization grafting of sodium styrene sulfonate from titanium and silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Rami N.; Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi; Castner, David G.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the grafting of poly-sodium styrene sulfonate (pNaSS) from trichlorosilane/10-undecen-1-yl 2-bromo-2-methylpropionate functionalized Si and Ti substrates by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The composition, molecular structure, thickness, and topography of the grafted pNaSS films were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. XPS and ToF-SIMS results were consistent with the successful grafting of a thick and uniform pNaSS film on both substrates. VASE and AFM scratch tests showed the films were between 25 and 49 nm thick on Si, and between 13 and 35 nm thick on Ti. AFM determined root-mean-square roughness values were ∼2 nm on both Si and Ti substrates. Therefore, ATRP grafting is capable of producing relatively smooth, thick, and chemically homogeneous pNaSS films on Si and Ti substrates. These films will be used in subsequent studies to test the hypothesis that pNaSS-grafted Ti implants preferentially adsorb certain plasma proteins in an orientation and conformation that modulates the foreign body response and promotes formation of new bone. PMID:24482558

  7. New oxygen radical source using selective sputtering of oxygen atoms for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoji; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a new oxygen radical source based on the reactive sputtering phenomena of a titanium target for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films. In this oxygen radical source, oxygen radicals are mainly produced by two mechanisms: selective sputter-emission of oxygen atoms from the target surface covered with a titanium oxide layer, and production of high-density oxygen plasma in the space near the magnetron-sputtering cathode. Compared with molecular oxygen ions, the amount of atomic oxygen radicals increased significantly with an increase in discharge current so that atomic oxygen radicals were mainly produced by this radical source. It should be noted that oxygen atoms were selectively sputtered from the target surface, and titanium atoms sputter-emitted from the target cathode were negligibly small. The amount of oxygen radicals supplied from this radical source increased linearly with increasing discharge current, and oxygen radicals of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/s/cm{sup 2} were supplied to the substrate surface at a discharge current of 1.2 A. We conclude that our newly developed oxygen radical source can be a good tool to achieve high rate deposition and to control the structure of TiO{sub 2} films for many industrial design applications.

  8. Heavy atom nitroxyl radicals. II: Spectroscopic detection of H2As=O, the prototypical arsenyl free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sheng-Gui; Sunahori, Fumie X.; Yang, Jie; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2009-09-01

    The previously unknown arsenyl (H2AsO) free radical has been identified in the gas phase through a combination of laser-induced fluorescence and single vibronic level emission spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion. Three isotopologues, H2AsO, HDAsO, and D2AsO have been detected as products of an electric discharge in mixtures of arsine or deuterated arsines, CO2, and argon. The observed spectra are assigned as due to the B˜ A2'-X˜ A2' electronic transition in which an electron in the ground state π orbital is promoted to the π∗ orbital. Rotational analysis of high-resolution spectra proves that the radical is nonplanar in both electronic states with the following r0 structures: r″(As-H)=1.513(4) Å, r″(As-O)=1.672(1) Å, θ″(HAsH)=101.8(4)°, ground state out-of-plane angle=63.1°; r'(As-H)=1.525(10) Å, r'(As-O)=1.806(3) Å, θ'(HAsH)=93.4(10)°, and excited state out-of-plane angle=70.7°. Small hyperfine splittings in the spectra have enabled the determination of the arsenic Fermi contact parameter in both states. The results of our ab initio studies of the ground and excited state of this radical (see immediately preceding paper) are in good agreement with the spectroscopic analysis.

  9. Role of spin-orbit coupling in the kinetics of geminal recombination of triplet radical pairs in micelles. Effect of an internal heavy atom

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, P.P.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors use radicals from the laser photolysis of benzophenone, bromobenzophenone, 4-phenylphenol, and 4-phenylaniline to study the effect of a heavy atom introduced as a substituent on the recombination kinetics of triplet radical pairs in micelles as a function of the external magnetic field strength. They found that intercombination conversion, which takes place due to the spin-orbit coupling between radicals, makes a significant contribution to the process of singlet-triplet transitions in radical pairs together with the hyperfine interaction. The role of spin-orbit coupling increases significantly when heavy atoms are present in the radicals.

  10. PREFACE: Light element atom, molecule and radical behaviour in the divertor and edge plasma regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kung

    2015-01-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains contributions by participants in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on "Light element atom, molecule and radical behaviour in the divertor and edge plasma regions" (in magnetic fusion devices). Light elements are the dominant impurity species in fusion experiments and in the near-wall plasma they occur as atoms or ions and also as hydrides and other molecules and molecular ions. Hydrogen (H or D, and T in a reactor) is the dominant species in fusion experiments, but all light elements He - O and Ne are of interest for various reasons. Helium is a product of the D+T fusion reaction and is introduced in experiments for transport studies. Lithium is used for wall coating and also as a beam diagnostic material. Beryllium is foreseen as a wall material for the ITER experiment and is used on the Joint European Torus (JET) experiment. Boron may be used as a coating material for the vessel walls. Carbon (graphite or carbon-fiber composite) is often used as the target material for wall regions subject to high heat load. Nitrogen may be used as a buffer gas for edge plasma cooling. Oxygen is a common impurity in experiments due to residual water vapor. Finally, neon is another choice as a buffer gas. Data for collisional and radiative processes involving these species are important for plasma modelling and for diagnostics. The participants in the CRP met 3 times over the years 2009-2013 for a research coordination meeting. Reports and presentation materials for these meetings are available through the web page on coordinated research projects of the (IAEA) Atomic and Molecular Data Unit [1]. Some of the numerical data generated in the course of the CRP is available through the ALADDIN database [2]. The IAEA takes the opportunity to thank the participants in the CRP for their dedicated efforts in the course of the CRP and for their contributions to this volume. The IAEA

  11. Heavy atom nitroxyl radicals. VI. The electronic spectrum of jet-cooled H2PO, the prototypical phosphoryl free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, Mohammed A.; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Riccardo

    2011-12-01

    The previously unknown electronic spectrum of the H2PO free radical has been identified in the 407-337 nm region using a combination of laser-induced fluorescence and single vibronic level emission spectroscopy. High level ab initio predictions of the properties of the ground and first two excited doublet states were used to identify the spectral region in which to search for the electronic transition and were used to aid in the analysis of the data. The band system is assigned as the {tilde B}2A'-{tilde X}2A' electronic transition which involves promotion of an electron from the π to the π* molecular orbital. The excited state r0 molecular structure was determined by rotational analysis of high resolution LIF spectra to be r(PO) = 1.6710(2) Å, r(PH) = 1.4280(6) Å, θ(HPO) = 105.68(7)°, θ(HPH) = 93.3(2)°, and the out-of-plane angle = 66.8(2)°. The structural changes on electronic excitation, which include substantial increases in the PO bond length and out-of-plane angle, are as expected based on molecular orbital theory and our previous studies of the isoelectronic H2AsO, Cl2PS, and F2PS free radicals.

  12. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  13. Theoretical kinetic estimates for the recombination of hydrogen atoms with propargyl and allyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2000-01-12

    Ab initio quantum chemical simulations are coupled with variational transition state theory in estimating rate constants for the H+C{sub 3}H{sub 3} and H+C{sub 3}H{sub 5} recombination reactions. The energy of interaction between the H atom and each of the radicals is evaluated at the CAS+1+2 level for the range of separations and relative orientations spanning the transition state region. An analytic representation of these interaction energies is then implemented in variable reaction coordinate transition state theory calculations of the high pressure limit recombination rate constant for temperatures ranging from 200 to 2000 K. For the propargyl reaction the overall addition rate is separated into contributions correlating with the initial formation of allene and propyne. These theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data as well as with corresponding theoretical estimates for the H+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and H+C{sub 2}H{sub 5} reactions. The H+propargyl and H+allyl total recombination rates are remarkably similar, with both being greater than the H+vinyl and H+ethyl rates, due to the presence of twice as many addition channels.

  14. Velocity distributions of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals produced through solar photodissociation of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Chen, F. Z.

    1993-01-01

    The velocity distributions of H and OH fragments produced through solar photodissociation of gaseous H2O molecules under collisionless conditions are presented. The calculations are carried out using: the most recently available absolute partial cross sections for the production of H and OH through photodissociation of H2O from its absorption onset at 1860 A down to 500 A; the newly available vibrational and rotational energy distributions of both the excited and ground state OH photofragments; the calculated cross sections for the total dissociation processes; and the integrated solar flux in 10 A increments from 500 to 1860 A in the continuum regions and the specific wavelength and flux at the bright solar lines. The calculated results show that the H atoms and the OH radicals produced exhibit multiple velocity groups. Since most current cometary modeling uses a single velocity of 20 km/sec associated with the photodissociation of H2O, the present results may be useful in interpreting the many peaks observed in the velocity distributions of the H Lyman alpha and H alpha of comets.

  15. Velocity distributions of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals produced through solar photodissociation of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Chen, F. Z.

    1993-04-01

    The velocity distributions of H and OH fragments produced through solar photodissociation of gaseous H2O molecules under collisionless conditions are presented. The calculations are carried out using: the most recently available absolute partial cross sections for the production of H and OH through photodissociation of H2O from its absorption onset at 1860 A down to 500 A; the newly available vibrational and rotational energy distributions of both the excited and ground state OH photofragments; the calculated cross sections for the total dissociation processes; and the integrated solar flux in 10 A increments from 500 to 1860 A in the continuum regions and the specific wavelength and flux at the bright solar lines. The calculated results show that the H atoms and the OH radicals produced exhibit multiple velocity groups. Since most current cometary modeling uses a single velocity of 20 km/sec associated with the photodissociation of H2O, the present results may be useful in interpreting the many peaks observed in the velocity distributions of the H Lyman alpha and H alpha of comets.

  16. Surface modification of polymer microfluidic devices using in-channel atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Liu, Jikun; Lee, Milton L

    2008-07-01

    In-channel atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to graft a PEG layer on the surface of microchannels formed in poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-co-(methyl methacrylate) (PGMAMMA) microfluidic devices. The patterned and cover plates were first anchored with ATRP initiator and then thermally bonded together, followed by pumping a solution containing monomer, catalyst, and ligand into the channel to perform ATRP. A PEG-functionalized layer was grafted on the microchannel wall, which resists protein adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the initiator-bound surface, and EOF was measured to evaluate the PEG-grafted PGMAMMA microchannel. Fast, efficient, and reproducible separations of amino acids, peptides, and proteins were obtained using the resultant microdevices. Separation efficiencies were higher than 1.0x10(4) plates for a 3.5 cm separation microchannel. Compared with microdevices modified using a previously reported ATRP technique, these in-channel modified microdevices demonstrated better long-term stability. PMID:18615784

  17. Controlled synthesis of photochromic polymer brushes by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Piech, Marcin; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Long, Timothy Michael

    2005-06-01

    This work reports on the grafting of methyl methacrylate polymer brushes containing spirobenzopyran pendant groups from flat silica surfaces and colloidal particles utilizing atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to the kind of surface bound initiator, the type of halide and ligand used in the catalytic complex, the presence/absence of untethered initiator, and solvent type. This enabled synthesis of coatings up to 80 {+-} 3 nm thick with controlled spirobenzopyran content. While polymerization kinetics indicate the presence of chain termination reactions, the 'living' character of the process is confirmed by controlled formation of block copolymer brushes. UV/vis spectroscopy was used to characterize the UV-induced isomerization of spirobenzopyran to zwitterionic merocyanine and the thermal back-reaction. Spectral and kinetic analyses of this latter bleaching process points to the existence of free and associated merocyanines in the polymeric brush in both tetrahydrofuran and toluene. However, stabilization of merocyanine species by the polymer matrix is considerably greater in toluene with thermal back-reaction rates approaching those determined for solid dry films.

  18. Uranium Recovery from Seawater: Development of Fiber Adsorbents Prepared via Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Kim, Jungseung; Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel adsorbent preparation method using atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) combined with radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) was developed to synthesize an adsorbent for uranium recovery from seawater. The ATRP method allowed a much higher degree of grafting on the adsorbent fibers (595 2818%) than that allowed by RIGP alone. The adsorbents were prepared with varied composition of amidoxime groups and hydrophilic acrylate groups. The successful preparation revealed that both ligand density and hydrophilicity were critical for optimal performance of the adsorbents. Adsorbents synthesized in this study showed a relatively high performance (141 179 mg/g at 49 62 % adsorption) in laboratory screening tests using a uranium concentration of ~6 ppm. This performance is much higher than that of known commercial adsorbents. However, actual seawater experiment showed impeded performance compared to the recently reported high-surface-area-fiber adsorbents, due to slow adsorption kinetics. The impeded performance motivated an investigation of the effect of hydrophilic block addition on the graft chain terminus. The addition of hydrophilic block on the graft chain terminus nearly doubled the uranium adsorption capacity in seawater, from 1.56 mg/g to 3.02 mg/g. The investigation revealed the importance of polymer chain conformation, in addition to ligand and hydrophilic group ratio, for advanced adsorbent synthesis for uranium recovery from seawater.

  19. Modification of polysulfone membranes via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Han-Bang; Xu, You-Yi; Yi, Zhuan; Shi, Jun-Li

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophilic poly((poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (P(PEGMA)) and poly(glycidylmethacrylate) (PGMA) brushes were grafted from chloromethylated polysulfone (CMPSF) membrane surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Prior to ATRP, chloromethylation of PSF was performed beforehand and the obtained CMPSF was prepared into porous membranes by phase inversion process. It was demonstrated that the benzyl chloride groups on the CMPSF membrane surface afforded effective macroinitiators to graft the well-defined polymer brushes. 1H NMR was employed to confirm the structure of CMPSF. The grafting yield of P(PEGMA) and PGMA was determined by weight gain measurement. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the grafting of P(PEGMA) and PGMA chains. Water contact angle measurements indicated that the introduction of P(PEGMA) and PGMA graft chains promoted remarkably the surface hydrophilicity of PSF membranes. The effects of P(PEGMA) and PGMA immobilization on membrane morphology, permeability and fouling resistance were investigated. It was found that P(PEGMA) and PGMA grafts brought higher pure water flux, improved hydrophilic surface and better anti-protein absorption ability to PSF membranes after modification. And evidently, macromonomer P(PEGMA) brought much better properties to the PSF membranes than PGMA macromonomer.

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with bromobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Ponomarev, D. A.; Hurley, M. D.; Wallington, T. J.

    2002-02-01

    Relative rate techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with bromobenzene (C 6H 5Br) in 20-700 Torr of N 2, O 2, or air diluent at 295±2 K. Using the observed rate constant ratios k(C 6H 5Br+Cl)/ k(C 2H 5Cl+Cl)=1.56±0.05 and k(C 6H 5Br+Cl)/ k(C 2H 6+Cl)=0.24±0.01, the C 6H 5Br+Cl rate constant is determined to be k( C6H5Br+ Cl)=(1.32±0.20)×10 -11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 giving exclusively C 6H 5Cl through a displacement mechanism. Using the observed rate constant ratios k(C 6H 5Br+OH)/ k(C 6H 6+OH)=0.77±0.06 and k(C 6H 5Br+OH)/ k(C 2H 4+OH)=0.11±0.004, the C 6H 5Br+OH rate constant is determined to be k( C6H5Br+ OH)=(9.37±2.04)×10 -13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The product expected from a displacement mechanism, phenol, was not observed (<10% yield).

  1. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with diethyl ethylphosphonate and triethyl phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laversin, H.; El Masri, A.; Al Rashidi, M.; Roth, E.; Chakir, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rate coefficients for the reaction of two organophosphorus compounds: Triethyl phosphate (TEP) and Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) with OH radicals and Cl atoms at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298-352 K. The following expressions (in cm3 molecule-1 s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP and TEP: kOH+DEEP = (7.84 ± 0.65) × 10-14exp((1866 ± 824)/T), kOH+TEP = (6.54 ± 0.42) × 10-14exp((1897 ± 626)/T), kCl+DEEP = (5.27 ± 0.80) × 10-11exp(765 ± 140/T) and kCl+TEP = (5.23 ± 0.80) × 10-11exp(736 ± 110/T). These results show that the reaction of the studied compounds with Cl atoms proceeds more rapidly than that with OH radicals. The related tropospheric lifetimes suggest that once emitted into the atmosphere, TEP and DEEP can be removed within a few hours in areas close to their emission sources. TEP and DEEP are principally removed by OH radicals. However, in coastal areas where the Cl atoms' concentration is higher, TEP and DEEP removal by reaction with Cl atoms could be a competitive process.

  2. MINDO/3-FP atom-in-molecule polarizabilities of TCNQ, TTF, TMPD, and of their radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, R.M.

    1981-03-15

    The MINDO/3-FP method was used to obtain molecular polarizabilities ..cap alpha.. and atom-in-molecule polarizabilities ..cap alpha../sub i/ for the neutral molecules 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetrathiofulvalene (TTF), and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylparaphenylenediamine (TMPD), and their radical ions TCNQ/sup -/, TTF/sup +/, and TMPD/sup +/. Except for the direction perpendicular to the molecular plane, the ..cap alpha.. and the ..cap alpha../sub i/ describe fairly well the covalent bonding environment. The radical ions are more polarizable than their parent neutral molecules, but not spectacularly so. The ..cap alpha../sub i/ appear to be covalent bond polarizabilities, and are the largest for the atoms that lie on the longest molecular axis.

  3. Reactions of OOH radical with beta-carotene, lycopene, and torulene: hydrogen atom transfer and adduct formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Francisco-Marquez, Misaela

    2009-08-13

    The relative free radical scavenging activity of beta-carotene, lycopene, and torulene toward OOH radicals has been studied using density functional theory. Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF) mechanisms have been considered. All the possible reaction sites have been included in the modeling, and detailed branching ratios are reported for the first time. The reactions of hydrocarbon carotenoids (Car) with peroxyl radicals, in both polar and nonpolar environments, are predicted to proceed via RAF mechanism, with contributions higher than 98% to the overall OOH + Car reactions. Lycopene and torulene were found to be more reactive than beta-carotene. In nonpolar environments the reactivity of the studied carotenoids toward peroxyl radical follows the trend LYC > TOR > BC, whereas in aqueous solutions it is TOR > LYC > BC. OOH adducts are predicted to be formed mainly at the terminal sites of the conjugated polyene chains. The main addition sites were found to be C5 for beta-carotene and lycopene and C30 for torulene. The general agreement between the calculated magnitudes and the available experimental data supports the predictions from this work. PMID:19627101

  4. Protein microarrays based on polymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Raphael; Kauffmann, Ekkehard; Ehrat, Markus; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2010-12-13

    Polymer brushes represent an interesting platform for the development of high-capacity protein binding surfaces. Whereas the protein binding properties of polymer brushes have been investigated before, this manuscript evaluates the feasibility of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) and PGMA-co-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PGMA-co-PDEAEMA) (co)polymer brushes grown via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as protein reactive substrates in a commercially available microarray system using tantalum-pentoxide-coated optical waveguide-based chips. The performance of the polymer-brush-based protein microarray chips is assessed using commercially available dodecylphosphate (DDP)-modified chips as the benchmark. In contrast to the 2D planar, DDP-coated chips, the polymer-brush-covered chips represent a 3D sampling volume. This was reflected in the results of protein immobilization studies, which indicated that the polymer-brush-based coatings had a higher protein binding capacity as compared to the reference substrates. The protein binding capacity of the polymer-brush-based coatings was found to increase with increasing brush thickness and could also be enhanced by copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA), which catalyzes epoxide ring-opening of the glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) units. The performance of the polymer-brush-based microarray chips was evaluated in two proof-of-concept microarray experiments, which involved the detection of biotin-streptavidin binding as well as a model TNFα reverse assay. These experiments revealed that the use of polymer-brush-modified microarray chips resulted not only in the highest absolute fluorescence readouts, reflecting the 3D nature and enhanced sampling volume provided by the brush coating, but also in significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. These characteristics make the proposed polymer brushes an attractive alternative to commercially available, 2D microarray

  5. Extension of Structure-Reactivity Correlations for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction to Methyl Radical and Comparison to Chlorine Atom, Bromine Atom, and Hydroxyl Radical

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2016-01-01

    Recently we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by three electrophilic radicals (X + HCR3 XH + CR3; X = Cl , HO , and Br ); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable rH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett-Taft constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Here we present a parallel treatment for the less electronegative CH3 . In spite of a limited and scattered data base, the resulting least-squares fit [log k437(CH3 ) = 0.0251( rH) + 0.96( F) 0.56( R) 19.15] was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. As expected, the polar effect appears to be minor and its directionality, i.e., the philicity of CH3 , may depend on the nature of the substituents.

  6. Extension of Structure-Reactivity Correlations for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction to the Methyl Radical and Comparison to the Chlorine Atom, Bromine Atom, and Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp(3)-hybridized carbon by three electrophilic radicals (X(•) + HCR3 → XH + (•)CR3; X = Cl(•), HO(•), and Br(•)); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the "polar effect" by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett-Taft constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Here we present a parallel treatment for the less electronegative CH3(•). In spite of a limited and scattered database, the resulting least-squares fit [log k437(CH3(•)) = -0.0251(ΔrH) + 0.96(ΣF) - 0.56(ΣR) - 19.15] was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. As expected, the polar effect appears to be minor and its directionality, i.e., the "philicity" of CH3(•), may depend on the nature of the substituents. PMID:27266850

  7. Extension of structure-reactivity correlations for the hydrogen abstraction reaction to methyl radical and comparison to chlorine atom, bromine atom, and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2016-06-07

    In this study, we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by three electrophilic radicals (X• + HCR3 → XH + •CR3; X = Cl•, HO•, and Br); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett-Taft constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Here we present a parallel treatment for the less electronegative CH3•. In spite of a limited and scattered data base, the resulting least-squares fit [log k437(CH3•) = 0.0251(ΔrH) + 0.96(ΣF) 0.56(ΣR) – 19.15] was modestlymore » successful and useful for initial predictions. As expected, the polar effect appears to be minor and its directionality, i.e., the philicity of CH3, may depend on the nature of the substituents.« less

  8. Effect of pH on Swelling Behavior of Polyelectrolyte Brushes Produced via Surface Confined Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankhe, Amit

    2005-03-01

    Surface-tethered polyelectrolyte brushes comprised of poly (itaconic acid) (PIA) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) were grown using surface-confined atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface- tethered initiator monolayer was formed by self-assembling 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide terminated thiol molecules on gold coated silicon substrates. This polymerization initiator molecule and a copper-based organometallic catalyst allowed tethered polyelectrolyte chains to be grown via radical polymerization at room temperature in aqueous solutions. The behavior of these polyelectrolyte brushes as a function of pH was studied using a phase modulated ellipsometery. The presentation explains how the brushes are affected by external conditions such as the pH of the contacting solution. As the polymer brushes already exist in the charged state, addition of neutral water or salt solution did not affect the polymer brush height, however a decrease of thickness with pH is found.

  9. Controlled atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on the grafting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxides (GO) through controlled radical polymerization (CRP). To increase the density of surface grafting, GO was first diazotized (DGO), followed by esterification with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, which resulted in an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator-functionalized DGO-Br. The functionalized DGO-Br was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and XRD patterns. PMMA chains were then grafted onto the DGO-Br surface through a ‘grafting from’ technique using ATRP. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results revealed that polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) follows CRP. Thermal studies show that the resulting graphene-PMMA nanocomposites have higher thermal stability and glass transition temperatures (Tg) than those of pristine PMMA. PMID:25114639

  10. Controlled atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Chung, Jin Suk; Hur, Seung Hyun

    2014-07-01

    We report on the grafting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxides (GO) through controlled radical polymerization (CRP). To increase the density of surface grafting, GO was first diazotized (DGO), followed by esterification with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, which resulted in an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator-functionalized DGO-Br. The functionalized DGO-Br was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and XRD patterns. PMMA chains were then grafted onto the DGO-Br surface through a `grafting from' technique using ATRP. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results revealed that polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) follows CRP. Thermal studies show that the resulting graphene-PMMA nanocomposites have higher thermal stability and glass transition temperatures ( T g) than those of pristine PMMA.

  11. The effect of spin-orbit splitting on the association kinetics of barrierless halogen atom-hydrocarbon radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the geometry dependence of spin-orbit splitting on transition state theory (TST) predictions for radical-radical recombination rate coefficients is examined. The effects are illustrated with direct ab initio variable-reaction-coordinate (VRC)-TST calculations for the reactions of two types of hydrocarbon radicals (R = CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}) with three halogen atoms (X = F, Cl, and Br). These halogen atoms exhibit a range of spin-orbit interaction strengths, while their interactions with the two hydrocarbon radicals exhibit a range of attractiveness. The transition state dividing surfaces for these barrierless reactions occur over a range of R-X fragment separations ({approx}3-7 {angstrom}) where the magnitude of the spin-orbit splitting is strongly geometry dependent. Perturbative models for incorporating the energetic effect of spin-orbit splitting into barrierless kinetics are presented and tested. Simply neglecting the variation in the spin-orbit splitting is demonstrated to contribute an error of less than 15% to the predicted rate coefficients for all but the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, where its neglect increases the rate by up to a factor of 2. For the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, the effect of spin-orbit splitting is not perturbative and instead qualitatively changes the long-range interaction potential and association dynamics. The present theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental measurements and previous theoretical work. For the CH{sub 3} + F association reaction, the errors associated with limitations in the basis set and in the active space are studied, and a detailed comparison is made between VRC-TST and rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator variational TST.

  12. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  13. Calculation of activation energies for hydrogen-atom abstractions by radicals containing carbon triple bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.; Laufer, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Activation energies are calculated by the bond-energy-bond-order (BEBO) and the bond-strength-bond-length (BSBL) methods for the reactions of C2H radicals with H2, CH4, and C2H6 and for the reactions of CN radicals with H2 and CH4. The BSBL technique accurately predicts the activation energies for these reactions while the BEBO method yields energies averaging 9 kcal higher than those observed. A possible reason for the disagreement is considered.

  14. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of unsaturated C6 methyl esters with hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan-De; Ni, Zhong-Hai

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a systematic ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical (OH) on typical isomers of unsaturated C6 methyl esters at the CBS/QB3 level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants at different reaction sites for all the methyl esters in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K are calculated via transition-state theory with the Wigner method for quantum tunneling effect and fitted to the modified three parameters Arrhenius expression using least-squares regression. Further, a branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has been performed.

  15. Laboratory studies of the kinetics of tropospheric and stratospheric atom and radical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golde, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Direct measurements of reaction rate constants and branching fractions for elementary reactions necessary in the modeling of the troposphere or stratosphere are provided. Details of reaction mechanisms are elucidated by studying pressure and temperature dependences of reactions, as well as by use of isotopic labels. Measurement techniques are improved for radical species in the laboratory. Progress and results in each area are given.

  16. To jump or not to jump? Cα hydrogen atom transfer in post-cleavage radical-cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J

    2013-02-14

    Conventionally, electron capture or transfer to a polyprotonated peptide ion produces an initial radical-cation intermediate which dissociates "directly" to generate complementary c(n)' and z(m)(•) sequence ions (or ions and neutrals). Alternatively, or in addition, the initial radical-cation intermediate can undergo H(•) migration to produce c(n)(•) (or c(n) - H(•)) and z(m)' (or z(m)(•) + H(•)) species prior to complex separation ("nondirect"). This reaction significantly complicates spectral interpretation, creates ambiguity in peak assignment, impairs effective algorithmic processing (reduction of the spectrum to solely (12)C m/z values), and reduces sequence ion signal-to-noise. Experimental evidence indicates that the products of hydrogen atom transfer reactions are substantially less prevalent for higher charge state precursors. This effect is generally rationalized on the basis of decreased complex lifetime. Here, we present a theoretical study of these reactions in post N-C(α) bond cleavage radical-cation complexes as a function of size and precursor charge state. This approach provides a computational estimate of the barriers associated with these processes for highly charged peptides with little charge solvation. The data indicate that the H(•) migration is an exothermic process and that the barrier governing this reaction rises steeply with precursor ion charge state. There is also some evidence for immediate product separation following N-C(α) bond cleavage at higher charge state. PMID:22809411

  17. Reactions between chlorine atom and acetylene in solid para-hydrogen: Infrared spectrum of the 1-chloroethyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Golec, Barbara; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-10-28

    We applied infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy to investigate the reactions between Cl atom and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) in a para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) matrix at 3.2 K; Cl was produced via photodissociation at 365 nm of matrix-isolated Cl{sub 2} in situ. The 1-chloroethyl radical ({center_dot}CHClCH{sub 3}) and chloroethene (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl) are identified as the main products of the reaction Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in solid p-H{sub 2}. IR absorption lines at 738.2, 1027.6, 1283.4, 1377.1, 1426.6, 1442.6, and 2861.2 cm{sup -1} are assigned to the 1-chloroethyl radical. For the reaction of Cl + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, lines due to the {center_dot}CDClCH{sub 2}D radical and trans-CHDCDCl are observed; the former likely has a syn-conformation. These assignments are based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and {sup 13}C- and D-isotopic shifts with those predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. Our observation indicates that the primary addition product of Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, 2-chlorovinyl ({center_dot}CHCHCl) reacts readily with a neighboring p-H{sub 2} molecule to form {center_dot}CHClCH{sub 3} and C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl. Observation of {center_dot}CDClCH{sub 2}D and trans-CHDCDCl from Cl + C{sub 2}D{sub 2} further supports this conclusion. Although the reactivity of p-H{sub 2} appears to be a disadvantage for making highly reactive free radicals in solid p-H{sub 2}, the formation of 1-chloroethyl radical indicates that this secondary reaction might be advantageous in producing radicals that are difficult to prepare from simple photolysis or bimolecular reactions in situ.

  18. Reactions between chlorine atom and acetylene in solid para-hydrogen: Infrared spectrum of the 1-chloroethyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Golec, Barbara; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-11-07

    We applied infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy to investigate the reactions between Cl atom and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) in a para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) matrix at 3.2 K; Cl was produced via photodissociation at 365 nm of matrix-isolated Cl{sub 2} in situ. The 1-chloroethyl radical ({center_dot}CHClCH{sub 3}) and chloroethene (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl) are identified as the main products of the reaction Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in solid p-H{sub 2}. IR absorption lines at 738.2, 1027.6, 1283.4, 1377.1, 1426.6, 1442.6, and 2861.2 cm{sup -1} are assigned to the 1-chloroethyl radical. For the reaction of Cl + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, lines due to the {center_dot}CDClCH{sub 2}D radical and trans-CHDCDCl are observed; the former likely has a syn-conformation. These assignments are based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and {sup 13}C- and D-isotopic shifts with those predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. Our observation indicates that the primary addition product of Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, 2-chlorovinyl ({center_dot}CHCHCl) reacts readily with a neighboring p-H{sub 2} molecule to form {center_dot}CHClCH{sub 3} and C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl. Observation of {center_dot}CDClCH{sub 2}D and trans-CHDCDCl from Cl + C{sub 2}D{sub 2} further supports this conclusion. Although the reactivity of p-H{sub 2} appears to be a disadvantage for making highly reactive free radicals in solid p-H{sub 2}, the formation of 1-chloroethyl radical indicates that this secondary reaction might be advantageous in producing radicals that are difficult to prepare from simple photolysis or bimolecular reactions in situ.

  19. Kinetics and Mechanism of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction from Rhodium Hydrides by Alkyl Radicals in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pestovsky, Oleg; Veysey, Stephen W.; Bakac, Andrej

    2011-03-22

    The kinetics of the reaction of benzyl radicals with [L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhH{l_brace}D{r_brace}]{sup 2+} (L{sup 1}=1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) were studied directly by laser-flash photolysis. The rate constants for the two isotopologues, k=(9.3 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (H) and (6.2 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (D), lead to a kinetic isotope effect k{sub H}/k{sub D}=1.5 {+-} 0.1. The same value was obtained from the relative yields of PhCH{sub 3} and PhCH{sub 2}D in a reaction of benzyl radicals with a mixture of rhodium hydride and deuteride. Similarly, the reaction of methyl radicals with {l_brace}[L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhH]{sup 2+} + [L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhD]{sup 2+}{r_brace} produced a mixture of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}D that yielded k{sub H}/k{sub D}=1.42 {+-} 0.07. The observed small normal isotope effects in both reactions are consistent with reduced sensitivity to isotopic substitution in very fast hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions. These data disprove a literature report claiming much slower kinetics and an inverse kinetic isotope effect for the reaction of methyl radicals with hydrides of L{sup 1}Rh.

  20. Theoretical study of the rate constants for the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of esters with (•)OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2014-07-10

    A systematic investigation of the rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radicals on esters has been performed. The geometry optimizations and frequency calculations were obtained using the second-order Møller-Plesset method with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. The same method was also used in order to determine the dihedral angle potential for each individual hindered rotor in each reactant and transition state. Intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations were used in order to connect each transition state to the corresponding local minimum. For the reactions of methyl ethanoate with an (•)OH radical, the relative electronic energies were calculated using the G3 and the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T, and Q) methods, which were extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. The electronic energies obtained using the G3 method were then benchmarked against the CBS results and were found to be within 1 kcal mol(-1) of one another. The high-pressure limit rate constants for every reaction channel were calculated by conventional transition-state theory, with an asymmetric Eckart tunneling correction, using the energies obtained with the G3 method. We report the individual, average, and total rate constants in the temperature range from 500 to 2200 K. Our calculated results are within a factor of 2 for methyl ethanoate and between 40% to 50% for methyl propanoate and methyl butanoate when compared to previously reported experimental data. PMID:24878337

  1. Preparation of Core-Shell Hybrid Compounds by Atomic Transfer Radical Polymerization and Its Application to Plastic Lens of Headlamp.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seung-Man; Ahn, Jae-Beum; Choi, Ki-Hyun; Park, Seung-Kyu

    2015-09-01

    Nano silica ball (NSB) core polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) shell hybrid nanocomposites were synthesized by atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method for the application to the clearcoat to enhance scratch resistance. The characteristics of the synthesized inorganic/organic hybrid material were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), particle size analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC). The scratch resistance and light transmittance of the clearcoat were measured by a nano-scratch tester and UV-visible spectroscopy, respectively. The average particle size of the NSB-PMMA hybrid compounds was 30 nm with narrow size distribution. Even 0.1 wt% loading of NSB-PMMA in the clearcoat dramatically enhanced the scratch resistance, about 40% increase in the force of the first fracture, while slightly reduced the light transmittance, about 5% only. PMID:26716303

  2. Nanoengineered analytical immobilized metal affinity chromatography stationary phase by atom transfer radical polymerization: Separation of synthetic prion peptides

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, P.; Chattopadhyay, M.; Millhauser, G.L.; Tsarevsky, N.V.; Bombalski, L.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Shimmin, D.; Avdalovic, N.; Pohl, C.

    2010-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was employed to create isolated, metal-containing nanoparticles on the surface of non-porous polymeric beads with the goal of developing a new immobilized metal affnity chromatography (IMAC) stationary phase for separating prion peptides and proteins. Transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize nanoparticles on the substrate surface. Individual ferritin molecules were also visualized as ferritin–nanoparticle complexes. The column's resolving power was tested by synthesizing peptide analogs to the copper binding region of prion protein and injecting mixtures of these analogs onto the column. As expected, the column was capable of separating prion-related peptides differing in number of octapeptide repeat units (PHGGGWGQ), (PHGGGWGQ)2, and (PHGGGWGQ)4. Unexpectedly, the column could also resolve peptides containing the same number of repeats but differing only in the presence of a hydrophilic tail, Q → A substitution, or amide nitrogen methylation. PMID:17481564

  3. A silver bullet: elemental silver as an efficient reducing agent for atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Valerie A; Ribelli, Thomas G; Chmielarz, Pawel; Park, Sangwoo; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    Elemental silver was used as a reducing agent in the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylates. Silver wire, in conjunction with a CuBr(2)/TPMA catalyst, enabled the controlled, rapid preparation of polyacrylates with dispersity values down to Đ = 1.03. The silver wire in these reactions was reused several times in sequential reactions without a decline in performance, and the amount of copper catalyst used was reduced to 10 ppm without a large decrease in control. A poly(n-butyl acrylate)-block-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) diblock copolymer was synthesized with a molecular weight of 91 400 and Đ = 1.04, demonstrating good retention of chain-end functionality and a high degree of livingness in this ATRP system. PMID:25599253

  4. Preparation of poly(methyl methacrylate) grafted titanate nanotubes by in situ atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Gao, Xueping; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2008-12-10

    This paper reports the successful preparation of core-shell hybrid nanocomposites by a 'grafting from' approach based on in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from titanate nanotubes (TNTs). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of the products provide direct evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure, possessing a hard core of TNTs and a soft shell of poly-MMA (PMMA). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to determine the chemical structure, morphology, and the grafted PMMA quantities of the resulting products. The grafted PMMA content was well controlled and increased with increasing monomer/initiator ratio. Further copolymerization of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with PMMA-coated TNTs as initiators was realized, illustrating the 'living' characteristics of the ATRP method used in this paper. PMID:21730679

  5. Bottom-Up Fabrication of Nanopatterned Polymers on DNA Origami by In Situ Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yu; Jiang, Yanyan; Welle, Alexander; Stenzel, Martina H; Krzemien, Katarzyna M; Michaelis, Jens; Berger, Rüdiger; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2016-05-01

    Bottom-up strategies to fabricate patterned polymers at the nanoscale represent an emerging field in the development of advanced nanodevices, such as biosensors, nanofluidics, and nanophotonics. DNA origami techniques provide access to distinct architectures of various sizes and shapes and present manifold opportunities for functionalization at the nanoscale with the highest precision. Herein, we conduct in situ atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on DNA origami, yielding differently nanopatterned polymers of various heights. After cross-linking, the grafted polymeric nanostructures can even stably exist in solution without the DNA origami template. This straightforward approach allows for the fabrication of patterned polymers with low nanometer resolution, which provides access to unique DNA-based functional hybrid materials. PMID:27058968

  6. Expanded corn starch as a versatile material in atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene and methyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankushi; Kumar, Arvind; Latha, Patnam Padma; Ray, Siddharth Sankar; Chatterjee, Alok Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Polymerization of styrene (St) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) was performed by surface initiated (SI) and activator generated by electron transfer (AGET) systems of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using renewable expanded corn starch (ECS) as a support. This prepared ECS is found to have V type crystallinity with 50 m(2)g(-1) surface area (<1m(2)g(-1) for corn starch (CS)) and average pore volume of 0.43 cm(3)g(-1) (<0.1cm(3)g(-1) for CS). In SI-ATRP, hydroxyl groups on ECS were converted into macro-initiator by replacing with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide (BIBB) with a 0.06 degree of substitution determined from NMR. In AGET-ATRP, CuBr2/ligand complex get adsorbed on ECS (Cu(II)/ECS=10 wt.%) to catalyze the polymerization. Synthesized PS/PMMA was characterized by SEM, FT-IR, (1)H NMR. PMID:26076629

  7. Activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene in the presence of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khezri, Khezrollah; Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-41) on the activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) is investigated. Decrement of conversion and number average molecular weight and also increment of polydispersity index (PDI) values are three main results of addition of MCM-41 nanoparticles. Incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles in the polystyrene matrix can clearly increase thermal stability and decrease glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites. - Highlights: • Spherical morphology, hexagonal structure, and high surface area with regular pore diameters of the synthesized MCM-41 nanoparticles are examined. • AGET ATRP of styrene in the presence of MCM-41 nanoparticles is performed. • Effect of MCM-41 nanoparticles addition on the polymerization rate, conversion and molecular weights of the products are discussed. • Improvement in thermal stability of the nanocomposites and decreasing T{sub g} values was also observed by incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles. - Abstract: Activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization was employed to synthesize well-defined mesoporous silica nanoparticles/polystyrene composites. Inherent features of spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques. Conversion and molecular weight evaluations were carried out using gas and size exclusion chromatography respectively. By the addition of only 3 wt% mesoporous silica nanoparticles, conversion decreases from 81 to 58%. Similarly, number average molecular weight decreases from 17,116 to 12,798 g mol{sup −1}. However, polydispersity index (PDI) values increases from 1.24 to 1.58. A peak around 4.1–4.2 ppm at proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results clearly confirms the living nature of the polymerization. Thermogravimetric

  8. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. FTIR gas-phase kinetic study on the reactions of some acrylate esters with OH radicals and Cl atoms.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Gallego-Iniesta, M P; Taccone, R; Martín, M P; Cabañas, B; Salgado, M S

    2014-10-01

    Acrylate esters are α,β-unsaturated esters that contain vinyl groups directly attached to the carbonyl carbon. These compounds are widely used in the production of plastics and resins. Atmospheric degradation processes of these compounds are currently not well understood. The kinetics of the gas phase reactions of OH radicals with methyl 3-methylacrylate and methyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate were determined using the relative rate technique in a 50 L Pyrex photoreactor using in situ FTIR spectroscopy at room temperature (298 ± 2 K) and atmospheric pressure (708 ± 8 Torr) with air as the bath gas. Rate coefficients obtained were (in units cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.27 ± 0.33) × 10(-11) and (4.43 ± 0.42) × 10(-11), for CH3CH═CHC(O)OCH3 and (CH3)2CH═CHC(O)OCH3, respectively. The same technique was used to study the gas phase reactions of hexyl acrylate and ethyl hexyl acrylate with OH radicals and Cl atoms. In the experiments with Cl, N2 and air were used as the bath gases. The following rate coefficients were obtained (in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k3 (CH2═CHC(O)O(CH2)5CH3 + Cl) = (3.31 ± 0.31) × 10(-10), k4(CH2═CHC(O)OCH2CH(CH2CH3)(CH2)3CH3 + Cl) = (3.46 ± 0.31) × 10(-10), k5(CH2═CHC(O)O(CH2)5CH3 + OH) = (2.28 ± 0.23) × 10(-11), and k6(CH2═CHC(O)OCH2CH(CH2CH3)(CH2)3CH3 + OH) = (2.74 ± 0.26) × 10(-11). The reactivity increased with the number of methyl substituents on the double bond and with the chain length of the alkyl group in -C(O)OR. Estimations of the atmospheric lifetimes clearly indicate that the dominant atmospheric loss process for these compounds is their daytime reaction with the hydroxyl radical. In coastal areas and in some polluted environments, Cl atom-initiated degradation of these compounds can be significant, if not dominant. Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) index and global warming potential (GWP) were also calculated, and it was concluded that these compounds have significant MIR values, but they do

  10. Electroless plating of copper on polyimide films modified by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of 4-vinylpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Yan, Guoping; Wu, Jiangyu; Yu, Xianghua; Guo, Qingzhong; Kang, Entang

    2008-09-01

    Surface modification of polyimide (PI) films were first carried out by chloromethylation under mild conditions, followed by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) from the chloromethylated PI surfaces. The composition and topography of the PI surfaces modified by poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The P4VP brushes with well-preserved pyridine groups on the PI surface was used not only as the chemisorption sites for the palladium complexes without prior sensitization by SnCl 2 solution during the electroless plating of copper, but also as an adhesion promotion layer to enhance the adhesion of the electrolessly deposited copper to the PI surfaces. The T-peel adhesion strength of the electrolessly deposited copper on the modified PI surface could reach about 6.6 N/cm. Effects of the polymerization time and the activation time in the PdCl 2 solution on the T-peel adhesion strength of the electrolessly deposited copper in the Sn-free process to the modified PI surface were also studied.

  11. Protein-resistant polyurethane via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2009-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by surface-initiated simultaneous normal and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP) of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly (OEGMA)). Oxygen plasma treatment was employed for initial activation of the PU surface. The grafted polymer chain length was adjusted by varying the molar ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution from 5:1 to 200:1. The modified PU surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Protein adsorption experiments from tris-buffered saline (TBS) and plasma were carried out to evaluate the protein-resistance of the surfaces. Adsorption from single and binary protein solutions as well as from plasma was significantly reduced after modification. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. Fibrinogen (Fg) adsorption on the 200:1 monomer/initiator surface was in the range of 3-33 ng/cm(2) representing 96-99% reduction compared with the unmodified PU. Fg adsorption from 0.01-10% plasma was as low as 1-5 ng/cm(2). Moreover, binary protein adsorption experiments using Fg and lysozyme (Lys) showed that protein size is a factor in the protein resistance of these surfaces. PMID:19148931

  12. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  13. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present. PMID:16838991

  14. Radical prostatectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Prostatectomy - radical; Radical retropubic prostatectomy; Radical perineal prostatectomy; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; LRP; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy; RALP; Pelvic lymphadenectomy; ...

  15. PREPARATION OF BLOCK COPOLYMERS OF POLY(STYRENE) AND POLY(T-BUTYL ACRYLATE) OF VARIOUS MOLECULAR WEIGHTS AND ARCHITECTURES BY ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Block copolymers of polystyrene and poly(t-butyl acrylate) were prepared using atom transfer radical polymerization techniques. These polymers were synthesized with a CuBr/N,N,N,NTheoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of esters with H(O.)2 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2013-12-27

    This work details an ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by the hydroperoxyl radical (HȮ2) on the following esters: methyl ethanoate, methyl propanoate, methyl butanoate, methyl pentanoate, methyl isobutyrate, ethyl ethanoate, propyl ethanoate, and isopropyl ethanoate. Geometry optimizations and frequency calculations of all of the species involved, as well as the hindrance potential descriptions for reactants and transition states, have been performed with the Møller-Plesset (MP2) method using the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. A validation of all of the connections between transition states and local minima was performed by intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Electronic energies for all of the species are reported at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory in kcal mol(-1) with the zero-point energy corrections. The CCSD(T)/CBS (extrapolated from CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ, in which X = D, T, Q) was used for the reactions of methyl ethanoate + HȮ2 radicals as a benchmark in the electronic energy calculations. High-pressure limit rate constants, in the temperature range 500-2000 K, have been calculated for all of the reaction channels using conventional transition state theory with asymmetric Eckart tunneling corrections. The 1-D hindered rotor approximation has been used for the low frequency torsional modes in both reactants and transition states. The calculated individual and total rate constants are reported for all of the reaction channels in each reaction system. A branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has also been investigated for all of the esters studied in this work. PMID:24175616

  16. The fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic coating by electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yichuan; Yang, Guang; Liang, Bo; Fang, Lu; Ma, Guanglong; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Shengfu; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-02-01

    A well-controllable electrochemically mediated surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (e-siATRP) method for the fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic hydrogel coatings based on poly(sulbetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) was developed in this work. The effects of the electric condition on polymerization as well as its antifouling performances both in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. Different potentials (-0.08 V, -0.15 V and -0.22 V) and polymerization times (from 8 to 48 h) were chosen to study the polymerization procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the properties of the polymer layers. Ellipsometry measurements showed that a higher potential provided faster polymerization and thicker polymer layers; however, the protein absorption experiments showed that the best polymerization condition was under a constant potential of -0.15 V and 32 h, under which the protein absorption was 0.8% in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (compared to a bare gold electrode). The electrodes with a pSBMA coating effectively deduced the current sensitivity decay both in undiluted serum and in vivo. The usage of the commercially available polymerization monomer of SBMA, the simple convenient synthesis process regardless of the presence of oxygen and the excellent controllability of e-siATRP make it a very promising and universal technique in the preparation of zwitterionic polymer coatings, especially in the development of biocompatible material for implantable devices such as neural and biosensor electrodes. PMID:25463508

  17. Synthesis of zwitterionic polymer-based amphiphilic triblock copolymers by atom transfer radical polymerization for production of extremely stable nanoemlusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Woong

    2015-03-01

    In fields of soft matter, there have been growing interests in utilizing amphiphilic block copolymers due to their intriguing properties, such as surface activity as well as self-assembly. In this work, we synthesize a series of poly (2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl phosphorylcholine)- b-poly (ɛ-caprolactone)- b-poly (2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC- b-PCL- b-PMPC) triblock copolymers by using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). We have a particular interest in using poly (2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) as a hydrophilic block, since it can have both electrostatic repulsion and steric repulsion in complex fluid systems. Assembling them at the oil-water interface by using the phase inversion method enables production of highly stable nanoemulsions. From the analyses of the crystallography and self-assembly behavior, we have found that the triblock copolymers assemble to form a flexible but tough molecular thin film at the interface, which is essential for the remarkable improvement in the emulsion stability.

  18. Uranium Adsorbent Fibers Prepared by Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization from Chlorinated Polypropylene and Polyethylene Trunk Fibers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Li, Meijun; Yue, Yanfeng; Tsouris, Costas; Janke, Christopher J.; Saito, Tomonori; Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-10

    Seawater contains a large amount of uranium (~4.5 billion tons) which can serve as a limitless supply of an energy source. However, in order to make the recovery of uranium from seawater economically feasible, lower manufacturing and deployment costs are required, and thus, solid adsorbents must have high uranium uptake, reusability, and high selectivity toward uranium. In this study, atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), without the radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP), was used for grafting acrylonitrile (AN) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) from a new class of trunk fibers, forming adsorbents in a readily deployable form. The new class of trunk fibers wasmore » prepared by the chlorination of PP round fiber, hollow-gear-shaped PP fiber, and hollow-gear-shaped PE fiber. During ATRP, degrees of grafting (d.g.) varied according to the structure of active chlorine sites on trunk fibers and ATRP conditions, and the d.g. as high as 2570% was obtained. Resulting adsorbent fibers were evaluated in U-spiked simulated seawater and the maximum adsorption capacity of 146.6 g U/kg, much higher than that of a standard adsorbent JAEA fiber (75.1 g/kg), was obtained. This new type of trunk fibers can be used for grafting a variety of uranium-interacting ligands, including designed ligands that are highly selective toward uranium.« less

  19. Surface modification of glycidyl-containing poly(methyl methacrylate) microchips using surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Liu, Jikun; Lee, Milton L

    2008-02-01

    Fabrication of microfluidic systems from polymeric materials is attractive because of simplicity and low cost. Unfortunately, the surfaces of many polymeric materials can adsorb biological samples. Therefore, it is necessary to modify their surfaces before these polymeric materials can be used for separation and analysis. Oftentimes it is difficult to modify polymeric surfaces because of their resistance to chemical reaction. Recently, we introduced a surface-reactive acrylic polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) (PGMAMMA), which can be modified easily and is suitable for fabrication of microfluidic devices. Epoxy groups on the surface can be activated by air plasma treatment, hydrolysis, or aminolysis. In this work, the resulting hydroxyl or amino groups were reacted with 2-bromoisobutylryl bromide to introduce an initiator for surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) layers grown on the surface using this method were uniform, hydrophilic, stable, and resistant to protein adsorption. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize activated polymer surfaces, initiator-bound surfaces, and PEG-grafted surfaces. We obtained excellent capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations of proteins and peptides with the PEG-modified microchips. A separation efficiency of 4.4 x 10(4) plates for a 3.5 cm long separation channel was obtained. PMID:18179249

  1. Robust Thick Polymer Brushes Grafted from Gold Surfaces Using Bidentate Thiol-Based Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization Initiators.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul Soon; Lee, Han Ju; Jamison, Andrew C; Lee, T Randall

    2016-03-01

    A new bromoisobutyrate-terminated alkanethiol, 16-(3,5-bis(mercaptomethyl)phenoxy)hexadecyl 2-bromo-2-methylpropanoate (BMTBM), was designed as a bidentate adsorbate to form thermally stable bromoisobutyrate-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on flat gold surfaces to conduct atom-transfer radical polymerizations (ATRPs). The monolayers derived from BMTBM were characterized by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and compared to the monolayers formed from 16-mercaptohexadecyl 2-bromo-2-methylpropanoate (MBM), 16-(3-(mercaptomethyl)phenoxy)hexadecyl 2-bromo-2-methyl-propanoate (MTBM), and octadecanethiol (C18SH). In this study, although the monolayer derived from BMTBM was less densely packed than those derived from MBM and MTBM, the bidentate adsorbates demonstrated much higher thermal stability in solution-phase thermal desorption tests, owing to the "chelate effect". The enhanced stability of the BMTBM SAMs ensured the development of thick brushes of poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene at elevated temperatures (60, 90, 105, and 120 °C). In contrast, SAMs derived from MBM and MTBM failed to grow polymer brushes at temperatures above 100 °C. PMID:26841087

  2. Reduction biodegradable brushed PDMAEMA derivatives synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization and click chemistry for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Yanglin; Yang, Qizhi; Li, Cao; Hennink, Wim E; Zhuo, Renxi; Jiang, Xulin

    2013-08-01

    Novel reducible and degradable brushed poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as non-viral gene delivery vectors. First, alkyne-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) with a disulfide linker between the propargyl group and backbone poly([(propargyl carbamate)-cystamine]-α,β-aspartamide) (P(Asp-SS-AL)) was synthesized. Second, linear low molecular weight (LMW) monoazido-functionalized PDMAEMAs synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated to the polypeptide side-chains of P(Asp-SS-AL) via click chemistry to yield high molecular weight (HMW) polyaspartamide-based disulfide-containing brushed PDMAEMAs (PAPDEs). The PAPDEs were able to condense plasmid DNA to form 100 to 200nm polyplexes with positive ζ-potentials. Moreover, in the presence of dithiothreitol the PAPDEs degraded into LMW PDAMEMA, resulting in disintegration of the PAPDE/DNA polyplexes and subsequent release of plasmid DNA. In vitro experiments revealed that the PAPDEs were less cytotoxic and more effective in gene transfection than control 25kDa poly(ethyleneimine) and HMW linear PDMAEMA. In conclusion, reducible and degradable polycations composed of LMW PDMAEMAs coupled to a polypeptide backbone via reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds are effective gene vectors with an excellent cytocompatibility. PMID:23660547

  3. Reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) for anti-clotting PU-LaCl3-g-P(MPC) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunyan; Zhou, Ninglin; Xiao, Yinghong; Tang, Yida; Jin, Suxing; Wu, Yue; Shen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Low grafting density is a disadvantage both in reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) and ATRP. In this work, the surfaces of polyurethane (PU) were treated by LaCl3·6H2O to obtain modified surfaces with hydrated layers. The reaction of surface-initiated RATRP was carried out easily, which may be attributed to the enriched hydroxyl groups on the hydrated layers. An innovation found in this work is that some free lanthanum ions (La3+) reacted with the silane coupling agent (CPTM) and the product served as mixed ligand complex. The mixed ligand complex instead of conventional 2,2‧-bipyridine was adopted to serve as a ligand in the process of RATRP. As a result, PU surfaces grafted with well-defined polymer brushes (MPC) were obtained. PU substrates before and after modification were characterized by FTIR, XPS, AFM, SEM, SCA, respectively. The results showed that zwitterionic brushes were successfully fabricated on the PU surfaces (P(MPC)), and the content of the grafted layer increased gradually with polymerization time with the grafting density as high as 97.9%. The blood compatibility of the PU substrates was evaluated by plasma recalcification profiles test and platelet adhesion tests in vitro. It was found that all PU functionalized with zwitterionic brush showed improved resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  4. Preparation of 17β-estradiol-imprinted material by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanru; Niu, Yuling; Gong, Xiaohan; Ma, Meihua; Ren, Xiaowei; Zhu, Weihua; Luo, Ruiming; Gong, Bolin

    2015-04-01

    A novel 17β-estradiol molecularly imprinted polymer was grafted onto the surface of initiator-immobilized silica by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The resulting molecularly imprinted polymer was characterized by elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. The binding property of molecularly imprinted polymer for 17β-estradiol was also studied with both static and dynamic methods. The results showed that the molecularly imprinted polymer possessed excellent recognition capacity for 17β-estradiol (180.65 mg/g at 298 K), and also exhibited outstanding selectivity for 17β-estradiol over the other competitive compounds (such as testosterone and progesterone). Then, the determination of trace 17β-estradiol in beef samples was successfully developed by using molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography. The limit of detection was 0.25 ng/mL, and the amount of 17β-estradiol in beef samples was detected at 2.83 ng/g. This work proposed a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and convenient approach for the determination of trace 17β-estradiol in complicated beef samples. PMID:25619938

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry of CF3CF=CH2: Reactions With Cl Atoms, OH Radicals and Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulbaek Andersen, M. P.; Javadi, M. S.; Nielsen, O. J.; Hurley, M. D.; Wallington, T. J.; Singh, R.

    2006-12-01

    The detrimental effects of chlorine chemistry on stratospheric ozone levels are well established. Consequently, there has been a concerted international effort to find replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) used previously as electronic equipment cleaners, heat transfer agents, refrigerants, and carrier fluids for lubricant deposition. The replacements for CFCs, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and hydrofluorochlorocarbons (HCFCs), have found widespread industrial use over the past decade. Unsaturated fluorinated hydrocarbons are a new class of compounds which have been developed to replace CFCs and HFCs in air condition units. Prior to any large-scale industrial use an assessment of the atmospheric chemistry, and hence environmental impact, of these compounds is needed. To address this need the atmospheric chemistry of CF3CF=CH2 was investigated. Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to determine the following properties for this compound: (i) kinetics of reactions with chlorine atoms (ii) kinetics of reactions with hydroxyl radicals (iii) kinetics of reactions with ozone, (iv) atmospheric lifetimes, (v) atmospheric degradation mechanism, and (vi) global warming potentials. The results are discussed with regard to the environmental impact of CF3CF=CH2 and the atmospheric chemistry of unsaturated fluorinated hydrocarbons.

  6. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  7. Uranium Adsorbent Fibers Prepared by Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization from Chlorinated Polypropylene and Polyethylene Trunk Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Li, Meijun; Yue, Yanfeng; Tsouris, Costas; Janke, Christopher J.; Saito, Tomonori; Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-10

    Seawater contains a large amount of uranium (~4.5 billion tons) which can serve as a limitless supply of an energy source. However, in order to make the recovery of uranium from seawater economically feasible, lower manufacturing and deployment costs are required, and thus, solid adsorbents must have high uranium uptake, reusability, and high selectivity toward uranium. In this study, atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), without the radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP), was used for grafting acrylonitrile (AN) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) from a new class of trunk fibers, forming adsorbents in a readily deployable form. The new class of trunk fibers was prepared by the chlorination of PP round fiber, hollow-gear-shaped PP fiber, and hollow-gear-shaped PE fiber. During ATRP, degrees of grafting (d.g.) varied according to the structure of active chlorine sites on trunk fibers and ATRP conditions, and the d.g. as high as 2570% was obtained. Resulting adsorbent fibers were evaluated in U-spiked simulated seawater and the maximum adsorption capacity of 146.6 g U/kg, much higher than that of a standard adsorbent JAEA fiber (75.1 g/kg), was obtained. This new type of trunk fibers can be used for grafting a variety of uranium-interacting ligands, including designed ligands that are highly selective toward uranium.

  8. Effect of Surface Charge on Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization from Cellulose Nanocrystals in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Zoppe, Justin O; Xu, Xingyu; Känel, Cindy; Orsolini, Paola; Siqueira, Gilberto; Tingaut, Philippe; Zimmermann, Tanja; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2016-04-11

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with different charge densities were utilized to examine the role of electrostatic interactions on surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) in aqueous media. To this end, growth of hydrophilic uncharged poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAM) brushes was monitored by electrophoresis, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Molecular weight and polydispersity of PDMAM brushes was determined by GPC analysis of hydrolytically cleaved polymers. Initiator and polymer brush grafting densities, and thus, initiator efficiencies were derived from elemental analysis. Higher initiator efficiency of polymer brush growth was observed for CNCs with higher anionic surface sulfate half-ester group density, but at the expense of high polydispersity caused by inefficient deactivation. PDMAM grafts with number-average molecular weights up to 530 kDa and polydispersity indices <1.5 were obtained under highly diluted monomer concentrations. The role of surface chemistry on the growth of neutral polymer brushes from CNCs in water is emphasized and a model of the interfacial region at the onset of polymerization is proposed. The results presented here could have implications for other substrates that present surface charges and for the assumption that the kinetics of Cu-mediated SI-CRP are analogous to those conducted in solution. PMID:26901869

  9. In situ development of self-reinforced cellulose nanocrystals based thermoplastic elastomers by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Wang, Chunpeng; Wang, Jifu; Chu, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the utilization of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a reinforcing material has received a great attention due to its high elastic modulus. In this article, a novel strategy for the synthesis of self-reinforced CNCs based thermoplastic elastomers (CTPEs) is presented. CNCs were first surface functionalized with an initiator for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Subsequently, SI-ATRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) was carried out in the presence of sacrificial initiator to form CTPEs in situ. The CTPEs together with the simple blends of CNCs and linear poly(MMA-co-BA) copolymer (P(MMA-co-BA)) were characterized for comparative study. The results indicated that P(MMA-co-BA) was successfully grafted onto the surface of CNCs and the compatibility between CNCs and the polymer matrix in CTPEs was greatly enhanced. Specially, the CTPEs containing 2.15wt% CNCs increased Tg by 19.2°C and tensile strength by 100% as compared to the linear P(MMA-co-BA). PMID:26877006

  10. Chlorine atom-initiated low-temperature oxidation of prenol and isoprenol: The effect of C=C double bonds on the peroxy radical chemistry in alcohol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-07-04

    The chlorine atom-initiated oxidation of two unsaturated primary C5 alcohols, prenol (3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, (CH3)2CCHCH2OH) and isoprenol (3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, CH2C(CH3)CH2CH2OH), is studied at 550 K and low pressure (8 Torr). The time- and isomer-resolved formation of products is probed with multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) using tunable vacuum ultraviolet ionizing synchrotron radiation. The peroxy radical chemistry of the unsaturated alcohols appears much less rich than that of saturated C4 and C5 alcohols. The main products observed are the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes – prenal (3-methyl-2-butenal) from prenol oxidation and isoprenal (3-methyl-3-butenal) from isoprenol oxidation. No significant products arising from QOOH chemistry are observed. Thesemore » results can be qualitatively explained by the formation of resonance stabilized allylic radicals via H-abstraction in the Cl + prenol and Cl + isoprenol initiation reactions. The loss of resonance stabilization upon O2 addition causes the energies of the intermediate wells, saddle points, and products to increase relative to the energy of the initial radicals and O2. These energetic shifts make most product channels observed in the peroxy radical chemistry of saturated alcohols inaccessible for these unsaturated alcohols. The experimental findings are underpinned by quantum-chemical calculations for stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the initial radicals with O2. Under our conditions, the dominant channels in prenol and isoprenol oxidation are the chain-terminating HO2-forming channels arising from radicals, in which the unpaired electron and the –OH group are on the same carbon atom, with stable prenal and isoprenal co-products, respectively. These results suggest that the presence of C=C double bonds in alcohols will reduce low-temperature reactivity during autoignition.« less

  11. Extension of Structure-Reactivity Correlations for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction by Bromine Atom and Comparison to Chlorine Atom and Hydroxyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2016-01-21

    Recently we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase ambient-temperature rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp(3)-hybridized carbon by chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical (Cl•/HO• + HCR3 → HCl/HOH + •CR3); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the "polar effect" by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Both these reactions are predominantly exothermic and have early transition states. Here, we present a parallel treatment for Br• whose reaction is significantly endothermic with a correspondingly late transition state. Despite lower expectations because the available database is less extensive and much more scattered and because long temperature extrapolations are often required, the resulting least-squares fit (log k298,Br = -0.147 ΔrH - 4.32 ΣF - 4.28 ΣR - 12.38 with r(2) = 0.92) was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. The coefficient of ΔrH was ∼4-fold greater, indicative of the change from an early to a late transition state; meanwhile the sizable coefficients of ΣF and ΣR indicate the persistence of the "polar effect". Although the mean unsigned deviation of 0.79 log k298 units is rather large, it must be considered in the context of a total span of over 15 log units in the data set. The major outliers are briefly discussed. PMID:26653077

  12. Extension of structure-reactivity correlations for the hydrogen abstraction reaction by bromine atom and comparison to chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2015-12-14

    Recently we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase ambient-temperature rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical (Cl•/HO• + HCR3 → HCl/HOH + •CR3); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Both these reactions are predominantly exothermic and have early transition states. Here we present a parallel treatment for Br• whose reaction is significantly endothermic with a correspondingly late transition state. In spite of lower expectations because the available data base is less extensive and much more scattered and because long temperature extrapolations are often required, the resulting least-squares fit (log k298,Br = –0.147 ΔrH –4.32 ΣF –4.28 ΣR –12.38 with r2 = 0.92) was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. The coefficient of ΔrH was ~4-fold greater, indicative of the change from an early to a late transition state; meanwhile the sizable coefficients of ΣF and ΣR indicate the persistence of the polar effect. Although the mean unsigned deviation of 0.79 log k298 units is rather large, it must be considered in the context of a total span of over 15 log units in the data set. Lastly, the major outliers are briefly discussed.

  13. Extension of structure-reactivity correlations for the hydrogen abstraction reaction by bromine atom and comparison to chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2015-12-14

    Recently we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase ambient-temperature rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical (Cl•/HO• + HCR3 → HCl/HOH + •CR3); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Both these reactions are predominantly exothermic and have early transition states. Here we present a parallel treatment for Br• whose reaction is significantly endothermic with a correspondingly late transition state. In spite of lower expectations because the available data basemore » is less extensive and much more scattered and because long temperature extrapolations are often required, the resulting least-squares fit (log k298,Br = –0.147 ΔrH –4.32 ΣF –4.28 ΣR –12.38 with r2 = 0.92) was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. The coefficient of ΔrH was ~4-fold greater, indicative of the change from an early to a late transition state; meanwhile the sizable coefficients of ΣF and ΣR indicate the persistence of the polar effect. Although the mean unsigned deviation of 0.79 log k298 units is rather large, it must be considered in the context of a total span of over 15 log units in the data set. Lastly, the major outliers are briefly discussed.« less

  14. Method of making a membrane having hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces for adhering cells or antibodies by using atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portion of an organic polymer article such as a membrane is made hydrophilic by exposing a hydrophobic surface of the article to a depth of about 50 to about 5000 angstroms to atomic oxygen or hydroxyl radicals at a temperature below 100C., preferably below 40 C, to form a hydrophilic uniform surface layer of hydrophilic hydroxyl groups. The atomic oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are generated by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, and the surface is outside of a plasma produced by the discharge. A membrane having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces can be used in an immunoassay by adhering antibodies to the hydrophobic surface. In another embodiment, the membrane is used in cell culturing where cells adhere to the hydrophilic surface. Prior to adhering cells, the hydrophilic surface may be grafted with a compatibilizing compound. A plurality of hydrophilic regions bounded by adjacent hydrophobic regions can be produced such that a maximum of one cell per each hydrophilic region adheres.

  15. Self-assembly of well-defined polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymer on fibrillar clays via ultrasonic-assisted surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Tingmei; Su, Zhixing

    2006-06-01

    Well-defined polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymers were grafted from the fibrillar clay, attapulgite, by a four-step self-assembly process: (i) the gamma-aminopropyltriethoxyl silane was self-assembled onto the surfaces of the attapulgite; (ii) the surface amino groups were amidated with bromoacetylbromide; (iii) the bromo-acetamide modified attapulgite was used as macro-initiator for the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene with the catalyst of the complex of 1,10-phenanthroline and Cu(I)Br; (iv) the polystyrene grafted attapulgite was then used as macroinitiator for the polymerization of acrylamide. The two steps of the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerizations were all conducted under ultrasonic irradiation at room temperature. The product, polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymers grafted attapulgite, had been characterized with elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:17025071

  16. Atomic-scale insight into the interactions between hydroxyl radicals and DNA in solution using the ReaxFF reactive force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlackt, C. C. W.; Neyts, E. C.; Jacob, T.; Fantauzzi, D.; Golkaram, M.; Shin, Y.-K.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-10-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas have proven to provide an alternative treatment of cancer by targeting tumorous cells while leaving their healthy counterparts unharmed. However, the underlying mechanisms of the plasma-cell interactions are not yet fully understood. Reactive oxygen species, and in particular hydroxyl radicals (OH), are known to play a crucial role in plasma driven apoptosis of malignant cells. In this paper we investigate the interaction of OH radicals, as well as H2O2 molecules and HO2 radicals, with DNA by means of reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. Our results provide atomic-scale insight into the dynamics of oxidative stress on DNA caused by the OH radicals, while H2O2 molecules appear not reactive within the considered time-scale. Among the observed processes are the formation of 8-OH-adduct radicals, forming the first stages towards the formation of 8-oxoGua and 8-oxoAde, H-abstraction reactions of the amines, and the partial opening of loose DNA ends in aqueous solution.

  17. Kinetics studies of aqueous phase reactions of Cl atoms and Cl2(-) radicals with organic sulfur compounds of atmospheric interest.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Nicovich, J Michael; Wine, Paul H

    2005-05-01

    A laser flash photolysis-long path UV-visible absorption technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of aqueous phase reactions of chlorine atoms (Cl) and dichloride radicals (Cl2(-)) with four organic sulfur compounds of atmospheric interest, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; CH3S(O)CH3), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2; CH3(O)S(O)CH3), methanesulfinate (MSI; CH3S(O)O-), and methanesulfonate (MS; CH3(O)S(O)O-). Measured rate coefficients at T = 295 +/- 1 K (in units of M(-1) s(-1)) are as follows: Cl + DMSO, (6.3 +/- 0.6) x 10(9); Cl2(-) + DMSO, (1.6 +/- 0.8) x 10(7); Cl + DMSO2, (8.2 +/- 1.6) x 10(5); Cl2(-) + DMSO2, (8.2 +/- 5.5) x 10(3); Cl2(-) + MSI, (8.0 +/- 1.0) x 10(8); Cl + MS, (4.9 +/- 0.6) x 10(5); Cl2(-) + MS, (3.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(3). Reported uncertainties are estimates of accuracy at the 95% confidence level and the rate coefficients for MSI and MS reactions with Cl2(-) are corrected to the zero ionic strength limit. The absorption spectrum of the DMSO-Cl adduct is reported; peak absorbance is observed at 390 nm and the peak extinction coefficient is found to be 5760 M(-1) cm(-1) with a 2sigma uncertainty of +/-30%. Some implications of the new kinetics results for understanding the atmospheric sulfur cycle are discussed. PMID:16833708

  18. Kinetics of the Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Reactions from 1-Butanol by Hydroxyl Radical: Theory Matches Experiment and More

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Prasenjit; Oyedepo, Gbenga; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-17

    In the present work, we study the H atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical at all five sites of 1-butanol. Multistructural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) was employed to estimate the five thermal rate constants. MS-VTST utilizes a multifaceted dividing surface that accounts for the multiple conformational structures of the transition state, and we also include all the structures of the reactant molecule. The vibrational frequencies and minimum energy paths (MEPs) were computed using the M08-HX/MG3S electronic structure method. The required potential energy surfaces were obtained implicitly by direct dynamics employing interpolated variational transition state theory with mapping (IVTST-M) using a variational reaction path algorithm. The M08-HX/MG3S electronic model chemistry was then used to calculate multistructural torsional anharmonicity factors to complete the MS-VTST rate constant calculations. The results indicate that torsional anharmonicity is very important at higher temperatures, and neglecting it would lead to errors of 26 and 32 at 1000 and 1500 K, respectively. Our results for the sums of the site-specific rate constants agree very well with the experimental values of Hanson and co-workers at 896–1269 K and with the experimental results of Campbell et al. at 292 K, but slightly less well with the experiments of Wallington et al., Nelson et al., and Yujing and Mellouki at 253–372 K; nevertheless, the calculated rates are within a factor of 1.61 of all experimental values at all temperatures. Finally, this gives us confidence in the site-specific values, which are currently inaccessible to experiment.

  19. Reactivity of atomic oxygen radical anions bound to titania and zirconia nanoparticles in the gas phase: low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Xu, Bo; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Ding, Xun-Lei; Li, Xiao-Na; He, Sheng-Gui

    2013-02-27

    Titanium and zirconium oxide cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize are prepared by laser ablation and reacted with carbon monoxide in a fast low reactor. The cluster reactions are characterized by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The oxygen atom transfers from (TiO(2))(n)O(-) (n = 3-25) to CO and formations of (TiO(2))(n)(-) are observed, whereas the reactions of (ZrO(2))(n)O(-) (n = 3-25) with CO generate the CO addition products (ZrO(2))(n)OCO(-), which lose CO(2) upon the collisions (studied for n = 3-9) with a crossed helium beam. The computational study indicates that the (MO(2))(n)O(-) (M = Ti, Zr; n = 3-8) clusters are atomic radical anion (O(-)) bonded systems, and the energetics for CO oxidation by the O(-) radicals to form CO(2) is strongly dependent on the metals as well as the cluster size for the titanium system. Atomic oxygen radical anions are important reactive intermediates, while it is difficult to capture and characterize them for condensed phase systems. The reactivity pattern of the O(-)-bonded (TiO(2))(n)O(-) and (ZrO(2))(n)O(-) correlates very well with different behaviors of titania and zirconia supports in the low-temperature catalytic CO oxidation. PMID:23368886

  20. Assignment of high-lying bending mode levels in the threshold photoelectron spectrum of NH2: a comparison between pyrolysis and fluorine-atom abstraction radical sources.

    PubMed

    Holzmeier, F; Lang, M; Fischer, I; Hemberger, P; Garcia, G A; Tang, X; Loison, J-C

    2015-07-15

    In this manuscript we present threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of the amidogen radical, NH2, recorded at two vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation beamlines, the DESIRS beamline of Synchrotron SOLEIL and the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Amidogen radicals were generated by two different methods, (a) H-atom abstraction of ammonia in a fluorine microwave discharge flow tube and (b) flash pyrolysis of methylhydrazine and diphenylmethylamine. Due to the large geometry change upon photoionization from the bent neutral molecule NH2 (X[combining tilde] (2)B1) to the quasi-linear cation NH2(+) (X[combining tilde] (3)B1), significant activity in the bending vibration υ2(+) of NH2(+) (X[combining tilde] (3)B1) is observed in the TPES. Transitions into a large number of υ2(+), Ka(+) levels of the cation are resolved. PMID:26146367

  1. Chlorine atom-initiated low-temperature oxidation of prenol and isoprenol: The effect of C=C double bonds on the peroxy radical chemistry in alcohol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-07-04

    The chlorine atom-initiated oxidation of two unsaturated primary C5 alcohols, prenol (3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, (CH3)2CCHCH2OH) and isoprenol (3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, CH2C(CH3)CH2CH2OH), is studied at 550 K and low pressure (8 Torr). The time- and isomer-resolved formation of products is probed with multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) using tunable vacuum ultraviolet ionizing synchrotron radiation. The peroxy radical chemistry of the unsaturated alcohols appears much less rich than that of saturated C4 and C5 alcohols. The main products observed are the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes – prenal (3-methyl-2-butenal) from prenol oxidation and isoprenal (3-methyl-3-butenal) from isoprenol oxidation. No significant products arising from QOOH chemistry are observed. These results can be qualitatively explained by the formation of resonance stabilized allylic radicals via H-abstraction in the Cl + prenol and Cl + isoprenol initiation reactions. The loss of resonance stabilization upon O2 addition causes the energies of the intermediate wells, saddle points, and products to increase relative to the energy of the initial radicals and O2. These energetic shifts make most product channels observed in the peroxy radical chemistry of saturated alcohols inaccessible for these unsaturated alcohols. The experimental findings are underpinned by quantum-chemical calculations for stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the initial radicals with O2. Under our conditions, the dominant channels in prenol and isoprenol oxidation are the chain-terminating HO2-forming channels arising from radicals, in which the unpaired electron and the –OH group are on the same carbon atom, with stable prenal and isoprenal co-products, respectively. These results suggest that the presence of C=C double bonds in alcohols will reduce

  2. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media. PMID:25469518

  3. Spatial control over brush growth through sunlight-induced atom transfer radical polymerization using dye-sensitized TiO2 as a photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yu, Bo; Zhou, Feng

    2014-07-01

    Simulated-sunlight induced atom transfer radical polymerization is used for spatial control over polymer brush growth by in situ photo-generation of the Cu(I) /L activator complex from its higher oxidation state Cu(II) /L deactivator complex using dye sensitized titanium dioxide nano-particles. The polymerization is well controlled under sunlight irradiation. Another attractive feature of this method is the possibility of creating various patterned surfaces of brushes using photomasks. When a nanoporous alumina oxide membrane is used as the template for confinement diffusion of photogenerated Cu(I) /L catalyst, patterns with sub-50 nm resolution are obtained. PMID:24740888

  4. Facile synthesis of brush poly(phosphoamidate)s via one-pot tandem ring-opening metathesis polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang; Qiu, Jun; Wei, Jun; Zhu, Zhenshu

    2014-09-01

    Poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA)-based brush poly(phosphoamidate)s are successfully synthesized by a combination of ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) following either a commutative two-step procedure or a straightforward one-pot process using Grubbs ruthenium-based catalysts for tandem catalysis. Compared with the traditional polymerization method, combining ROMP and ATRP in a one-pot process allows the preparation of brush copolymers characterized by a relatively moderate molecular weight distribution and quantitative conversion of monomer. Moreover, the surface morphologies and aggregation behaviors of these polymers are studied by AFM and TEM measurements. PMID:24729161

  5. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization of 18-e Cobalt(I)-containing norbornene and application as heterogeneous macromolecular catalyst in atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Zhang, Jiuyang; Wilbon, Perry; Qiao, Yali; Tang, Chuanbing

    2014-11-01

    In the last decades, metallopolymers have received great attention due to their various applications in the fields of materials and chemistry. In this article, a neutral 18-electron exo-substituted η(4) -cyclopentadiene CpCo(I) unit-containing polymer is prepared in a controlled/"living" fashion by combining facile click chemistry and ring-opening meta-thesis polymerization (ROMP). This Co(I)-containing polymer is further used as a heterogeneous macromolecular catalyst for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate and styrene. PMID:25250694

  6. Transport and Distribution of Hydroxyl Radicals and Oxygen Atoms from H2O Photodissociation in the Inner Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ian-Lin; Su, Cheng-Chin; Ip, Wing-Huen; Wei, Chen-En; Wu, Jong-Shinn; Lo, Ming-Chung; Liao, Ying; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    With a combination of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculation and test particle computation, the ballistic transport process of the hydroxyl radicals and oxygen atoms produced by photodissociation of water molecules in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is modelled. We discuss the key elements and essential features of such simulations which results can be compared with the remote-sensing and in situ measurements of cometary gas coma from the Rosetta mission at different orbital phases of this comet.

  7. A New Hyaluronic Acid Derivative Obtained from Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization as a siRNA Vector for CD44 Receptor Tumor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Bavuso Volpe, Antonella; Bongiovì, Flavia; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Giammona, Gaetano

    2015-11-01

    Two derivatives of hyaluronic acid (HA) have been synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), starting from an ethylenediamino HA derivative (HA-EDA) and by using diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) as a monomer for polymerization. Both samples, indicated as HA-EDA-pDEAEMA a and b, are able to condense siRNA, as determined by gel retardation assay and resulting complexes show a size and a zeta potential value dependent on polymerization number, as determined by dynamic light scattering measurements. In vitro studies performed on HCT 116 cell line, that over express CD44 receptor, demonstrate a receptor mediated uptake of complexes, regardless of their surface charge. PMID:26136372

  8. Experimental Evidence for Heavy-Atom Tunneling in the Ring-Opening of Cyclopropylcarbinyl Radical from Intramolecular 12C/13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-James, Ollie M.; Zhang, Xue; Datta, Ayan; Hrovat, David A.; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    The intramolecular 13C kinetic isotope effects for the ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical were determined over a broad temperature range. The observed isotope effects are unprecedentedly large, ranging from 1.062 at 80 °C to 1.163 at −100 °C. Semi-classical calculations employing canonical variational transition state theory drastically underpredict the observed isotope effects, but the predicted isotope effects including tunneling by a small-curvature tunneling model match well with experiment. These results and a curvature in the Arrhenius plot of the isotope effects support the recently predicted importance of heavy-atom tunneling in cyclopropylcarbinyl ring-opening. PMID:20722415

  9. Experimental evidence for heavy-atom tunneling in the ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical from intramolecular 12C/13C kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-James, Ollie M; Zhang, Xue; Datta, Ayan; Hrovat, David A; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Singleton, Daniel A

    2010-09-15

    The intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects for the ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical were determined over a broad temperature range. The observed isotope effects are unprecedentedly large, ranging from 1.062 at 80 degrees C to 1.163 at -100 degrees C. Semiclassical calculations employing canonical variational transition-state theory drastically underpredict the observed isotope effects, but the predicted isotope effects including tunneling by a small-curvature tunneling model match well with experiment. These results and a curvature in the Arrhenius plot of the isotope effects support the recently predicted importance of heavy-atom tunneling in cyclopropylcarbinyl ring-opening. PMID:20722415

  10. One-Step Immobilization of Initiators for Surface-Initiated Ring Opening Polymerization and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization by Poly(norepinephrine) Coating.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung Min; Lee, Haeshin

    2015-02-01

    We report a facile method for surface-initiated ring opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) via a poly(norepinephrine) coating. Solid substrates were modified by poly(norepinephrine) under alkaline conditions, with concurrent co-adsorption of an ATRP initiator. The poly(norepinephrine) layer acted as a ROP initiator due to the presence of hydroxyl groups in its side chain, resulting in a surface that was able to initiate ATRP and ROP simultaneously. ε-Caprolactone (ε-CL) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) were grafted onto the surface via ROP and ATRP, respectively, and the polymers subsequently grown from the surfaces were characterized in detail using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle goniometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). PMID:26353697

  11. Main-Chain and Side-Chain Sequence-Regulated Vinyl Copolymers by Iterative Atom Transfer Radical Additions and 1:1 or 2:1 Alternating Radical Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takamasa; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2016-01-27

    Main- and side-chain sequence-regulated vinyl copolymers were prepared by a combination of iterative atom transfer radical additions (ATRAs) of vinyl monomers for side-chain control and 1:1 or 2:1 alternating radical copolymerization of the obtained side-chain sequenced "oligomonomers" and vinyl comonomers for main-chain control. A complete set of sequence-regulated trimeric vinyl oligomers of styrene (S) and/or methyl acrylate (A) were first synthesized via iterative ATRAs of these monomers to a halide of monomeric S or A unit (X-S or X-A) under optimized conditions with appropriate ruthenium or copper catalysts, which were selected depending on the monomers and halides. The obtained halogen-capped oligomers were then converted into a series of maleimide (M)-ended oligomonomers with different monomer compositions and sequences (M-SSS, M-ASS, M-SAS, M-AAS, M-SSA, M-ASA, M-SAA, M-AAA) by a substitution reaction of the halide with furan-protected maleimide anion followed by deprotection of the furan units. These maleimide-ended oligomonomers were then radically copolymerized with styrene or limonene to enable the 1:1 or 2:1 monomer-sequence regulation in the main chain and finally result in the main- and side-chain sequence-regulated vinyl copolymers with high molecular weights in high yield. The properties of the sequence-regulated vinyl copolymers depended on not only the monomer compositions but also the monomer sequences. The solubility was highly affected by the outer monomer units in the side chains whereas the glass transition temperatures were primarily affected by the two successive monomer sequences. PMID:26761148

  12. Ketyl Radical Formation via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in an Aqueous Solution versus Hydrogen Atom Transfer in Isopropanol after Photoexcitation of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiting; Ma, Jiani; Li, Songbo; Li, Ming-De; Guan, Xiangguo; Lan, Xin; Zhu, Ruixue; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-07-01

    The excited nπ* and ππ* triplets of two benzophenone (BP) and two anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives have been observed in acetonitrile, isopropanol, and mixed aqueous solutions using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic and nanosecond transient absorption experiments. These experimental results, combined with results from density functional theory calculations, reveal the effects of solvent and substituents on the properties, relative energies, and chemical reactivities of the nπ* and ππ* triplets. The triplet nπ* configuration was found to act as the reactive species for a subsequent hydrogen atom transfer reaction to produce a ketyl radical intermediate in the isopropanol solvent, while the triplet ππ* undergoes a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in aqueous solutions to produce a ketyl radical intermediate. This PCET reaction, which occurs via a concerted proton transfer (to the excited carbonyl group) and electron transfer (to the excited phenyl ring), can account for the experimental observation by several different research groups over the past 40 years of the formation of ketyl radicals after photolysis of a number of BP and AQ derivatives in aqueous solutions, although water is considered to be a relatively "inert" hydrogen-donor solvent. PMID:27266916

  13. Reactions between atomic chlorine and pyridine in solid para-hydrogen: infrared spectrum of the 1-chloropyridinyl (C5H5N-Cl) radical.

    PubMed

    Das, Prasanta; Bahou, Mohammed; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2013-02-01

    With infrared absorption spectra we investigated the reaction between Cl atom and pyridine (C(5)H(5)N) in a para-hydrogen (p-H(2)) matrix. Pyridine and Cl(2) were co-deposited with p-H(2) at 3.2 K; a planar C(5)H(5)N-Cl(2) complex was identified from the observed infrared spectrum of the Cl(2)/C(5)H(5)N/p-H(2) matrix. Upon irradiation at 365 nm to generate Cl atom in situ and annealing at 5.1 K for 3 min to induce secondary reaction, the 1-chloropyridinyl radical (C(5)H(5)N-Cl) was identified as the major product of the reaction Cl + C(5)H(5)N in solid p-H(2); absorption lines at 3075.9, 1449.7, 1200.6, 1148.8, 1069.3, 1017.4, 742.9, and 688.7 cm(-1) were observed. The assignments are based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and relative IR intensities with those predicted using the B3PW91/6-311++G(2d, 2p) method. The observation of the preferential addition of Cl to the N-site of pyridine to form C(5)H(5)N-Cl radical but not 2-, 3-, or 4-chloropyridine (ClC(5)H(5)N) radicals is consistent with the reported theoretical prediction that formation of the former proceeds via a barrierless path. PMID:23406119

  14. Kinetic study of the OH, NO3 radicals and Cl atom initiated atmospheric photo-oxidation of iso-propenyl methyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccone, Raúl Alberto; Moreno, Alberto; Colmenar, Inmaculada; Salgado, Sagrario; Martín, María Pilar; Cabañas, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Rate coefficients at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for the reaction of isopropenyl methyl ether (i-PME) (CH2dbnd C(CH3)OCH3), with OH and NO3 radicals and with Cl atoms have been determined in a 50 L Pyrex glass reaction chamber in conjunction with Fourier Transform Infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) as a detection technique. The chamber is equipped with a White-type multiple-reflection mirror system with a total optical path length of ≈200 m. Additional experiments were carried out using evacuable Teflon-coated bags (volume 150 L) and a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-time of flight (GC-TOF MS) detection system. This is the first kinetic study carried out to date for these reactions. The rate coefficients k (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) obtained are: (1.14 ± 0.10) × 10-10 for the OH reaction, (2.41 ± 0.50) × 10-11, for the NO3 reaction and (7.03 ± 0.67) × 10-10 for the Cl reaction. A mechanism is proposed from the observed reaction products. The atmospheric lifetimes of the studied ether is estimated considering the rate coefficients of the reactions with OH and NO3 radicals and Cl atom. Calculated atmospheric lifetimes reveal that the dominant loss process for i-PME is clearly the night-time reaction with the NO3 radical. The radiative efficiency (RE) is obtained from the infrared spectra of the ether and the global warming potential (GWP) is then estimated. Atmospheric implications of the ether emission are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane: kinetics and mechanisms of reactions with chlorine atoms and OH radicals and global warming potentials.

    PubMed

    Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Nielsen, Ole J; Karpichev, Boris; Wallington, Timothy J; Sander, Stanley P

    2012-06-21

    The smog chamber/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to measure the rate coefficients k(Cl + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), isoflurane) = (4.5 ± 0.8) × 10(-15), k(Cl + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2), desflurane) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-15), k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F, sevoflurane) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(-13), and k(OH + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F) = (3.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) in 700 Torr of N(2)/air diluent at 295 ± 2 K. An upper limit of 6 × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) was established for k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOC(O)F). The laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) technique was employed to determine hydroxyl radical rate coefficients as a function of temperature (241-298 K): k(OH + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2)) = (7.05 ± 1.80) × 10(-13) exp[-(1551 ± 72)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1); k(296 ± 1 K) = (3.73 ± 0.08) × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1), and k(OH + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F) = (9.98 ± 3.24) × 10(-13) exp[-(969 ± 82)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1); k(298 ± 1 K) = (3.94 ± 0.30) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1). The rate coefficient of k(OH + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), 296 ± 1 K) = (1.45 ± 0.16) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) was also determined. Chlorine atoms react with CF(3)CHFOCHF(2) via H-abstraction to give CF(3)CFOCHF(2) and CF(3)CHFOCF(2) radicals in yields of approximately 83% and 17%. The major atmospheric fate of the CF(3)C(O)FOCHF(2) alkoxy radical is decomposition via elimination of CF(3) to give FC(O)OCHF(2) and is unaffected by the method used to generate the CF(3)C(O)FOCHF(2) radicals. CF(3)CHFOCF(2) radicals add O(2) and are converted by subsequent reactions into CF(3)CHFOCF(2)O alkoxy radicals, which decompose to give COF(2) and CF(3)CHFO radicals. In 700 Torr of air 82% of CF(3)CHFO radicals undergo C-C scission to yield HC(O)F and CF(3) radicals with the remaining 18% reacting with O(2) to give CF(3)C(O)F. Atmospheric oxidation of (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F gives (CF(3))(2)CHOC(O)F in a molar yield of 93 ± 6% with CF(3)C(O)CF(3) and HCOF as minor products. The IR

  16. Cold collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in a magnetic field: an ab initio study of He + CH2(X) collisions.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, T V; Grinev, T A; Yu, H-G; Dalgarno, A; Kłos, Jacek; Ma, Lifang; Alexander, Millard H

    2012-09-14

    We develop a rigorous quantum mechanical theory for collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. The theory is based on a fully uncoupled space-fixed basis set representation of the multichannel scattering wave function. Explicit expressions are presented for the matrix elements of the scattering Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 and spin-1 polyatomic molecular radicals interacting with structureless targets. The theory is applied to calculate the cross sections and thermal rate constants for spin relaxation in low-temperature collisions of the prototypical organic molecule methylene [CH(2)(X(3)B(1))] with He atoms. To this end, two accurate three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the He-CH(2)(X(3)B(1)) complex are developed using the state-of-the-art coupled-cluster method including single and double excitations along with a perturbative correction for triple excitations and large basis sets. Both PESs exhibit shallow minima and are weakly anisotropic. Our calculations show that spin relaxation in collisions of CH(2), CHD, and CD(2) molecules with He atoms occurs at a much slower rate than elastic scattering over a large range of temperatures (1 μK-1 K) and magnetic fields (0.01-1 T), suggesting excellent prospects for cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling of ground-state ortho-CH(2)(X(3)B(1)) molecules in a magnetic trap. Furthermore, we find that ortho-CH(2) undergoes collision-induced spin relaxation much more slowly than para-CH(2), which indicates that magnetic trapping can be used to separate nuclear spin isomers of open-shell polyatomic molecules. PMID:22979854

  17. Cold collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in a magnetic field: An ab initio study of He + CH2(X~) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Grinev, T. A.; Yu, H.-G.; Dalgarno, A.; Kłos, Jacek; Ma, Lifang; Alexander, Millard H.

    2012-09-01

    We develop a rigorous quantum mechanical theory for collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. The theory is based on a fully uncoupled space-fixed basis set representation of the multichannel scattering wave function. Explicit expressions are presented for the matrix elements of the scattering Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 and spin-1 polyatomic molecular radicals interacting with structureless targets. The theory is applied to calculate the cross sections and thermal rate constants for spin relaxation in low-temperature collisions of the prototypical organic molecule methylene [CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1)] with He atoms. To this end, two accurate three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the He-CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1) complex are developed using the state-of-the-art coupled-cluster method including single and double excitations along with a perturbative correction for triple excitations and large basis sets. Both PESs exhibit shallow minima and are weakly anisotropic. Our calculations show that spin relaxation in collisions of CH2, CHD, and CD2 molecules with He atoms occurs at a much slower rate than elastic scattering over a large range of temperatures (1 μK-1 K) and magnetic fields (0.01-1 T), suggesting excellent prospects for cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling of ground-state ortho-CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1) molecules in a magnetic trap. Furthermore, we find that ortho-CH2 undergoes collision-induced spin relaxation much more slowly than para-CH2, which indicates that magnetic trapping can be used to separate nuclear spin isomers of open-shell polyatomic molecules.

  18. Theoretical chemical kinetic study of the H-atom abstraction reactions from aldehydes and acids by Ḣ atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2014-12-26

    We have performed a systematic, theoretical chemical kinetic investigation of H atom abstraction by Ḣ atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals from aldehydes (methanal, ethanal, propanal, and isobutanal) and acids (methanoic acid, ethanoic acid, propanoic acid, and isobutanoic acid). The geometry optimizations and frequencies of all of the species in the reaction mechanisms of the title reactions were calculated using the MP2 method and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment for reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations were also determined at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. For the reactions of methanal and methanoic acid with Ḣ atoms and ȮH, HȮ2, and ĊH3 radicals, the calculated relative electronic energies were obtained with the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T, and Q) method and were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The electronic energies obtained with the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ method were benchmarked against the CCSD(T)/CBS energies and were found to be within 1 kcal mol(-1) of one another. Thus, the energies calculated using the less expensive CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ method were used in all of the reaction mechanisms and in calculating our high-pressure limit rate constants for the title reactions. Rate constants were calculated using conventional transition state theory with an asymmetric Eckart tunneling correction, as implemented in Variflex. Herein, we report the individual and average rate constants, on a per H atom basis, and total rate constants in the temperature range 500-2000 K. We have compared some of our rate constant results to available experimental and theoretical data, and our results are generally in good agreement. PMID:25387985

  19. Preparation of Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment by direct precipitation and graft onto cellulose fiber via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yue; Lv, Lihua; Cui, Yongzhu; Wei, Chunyan; Pang, Guibing

    2016-02-01

    Mg(OH)2 flame retardant hybrid pigment is synthesized through simultaneous solution precipitation and adsorption of anionic dyes (C.I. Acid Red 6). The Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment bearing vinyl groups after surface silane modification is immobilized onto the surface of bromo end-functional cellulose fiber by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The morphology and structure of Mg(OH)2 pigments and cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are characterized. The thermal properties, flammability and color fastness of cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are measured. The results reveal that anionic dye molecules are adsorbed onto Mg(OH)2 crystals and affect the formation of lamella-like Mg(OH)2 crystals. The cellulose fiber grafted with modified Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment absorbs about four times heat more than original cellulose fiber with about 4% immobilization ratio of pigment, which shortens nearly half of afterflame time and afterglow time.

  20. Fabrication of an ionic liquid-based macroporous polymer monolithic column via atom transfer radical polymerization for the separation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Bai, Ligai; Wei, Zhen; Liu, Sha; Liu, Haiyan; Yan, Hongyuan

    2016-03-01

    A polymer monolithic column was prepared in a stainless steel column (50×4.6mm i.d.) via atom transfer radical polymerization technique using triallyl isocyanurate and ionic liquid (1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) as co-monomers, ethylene dimethacrylate as cross linking agent, polyethylene glycol 200, 1,4-butanediol, and N, N- dimethylformamide as porogen system, CCl4 as initiator, and FeCl2 as catalyst. The optimized polymer columns were characterized by scanning electron microscope, nitrogen adsorption-desorption instrument, mercury intrusion porosimetry, infrared spectrometer, and thermogravimetric analysis technique. Respectively, all of these factors above could illustrate that the optimized columns had relative uniform macroporous structure and high thermal stability. A series of basic and acidic small molecules, isomers, and homologues were used to evaluate the performance of these monoliths and enhanced column efficiency was obtained. PMID:26717814

  1. High-temperature shock tube and modeling studies on the reactions of methanol with D-atoms and CH3-radicals.

    PubMed

    Peukert, S L; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the hydrogen abstraction reactions D + CH3OH → CH2O + H + HD (A) and CH3 + CH3OH → CH2O + H + CH4 (B). For reaction A, the experiments span a T-range of 1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K, at pressures 0.25 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.46 bar. The experiments on reaction B, CH3 + CH3OH, cover a T-range of 1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K, at pressures around 0.40 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments, monitoring the depletion of D-atoms by applying D-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS), were performed on reaction A using gas mixtures of C2D5I and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. C2D5I was used as precursor for D-atoms. For reaction B, reflected shock tube experiments monitoring H-atom formation with H-ARAS, were carried out using gas mixtures of diacetyl ((CH3CO)2) and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. (CH3CO)2 was used as the source of CH3-radicals. Detailed reaction models were assembled to fit the D-atom and H-atom time profiles in order to obtain experimental rate constants for reactions A and B. Total rate constants from the present experiments on D + CH3OH and CH3 + CH3OH can be represented by the Arrhenius equations kA(T) = 1.51 × 10(-10) exp(-3843 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K) and kB(T) = 9.62 × 10(-12) exp(-7477 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K). The experimentally obtained rate constants were compared with available rate data from the literature. The results from quantum chemical studies on reaction A were found to be in good agreement with the present results. The present work represents the first direct experimental study on these bimolecular reactions at combustion temperatures and is important to the high-temperature oxidation of CH3OH. PMID:23968550

  2. Time-resolved study on the reactions of organic selenides with hydroxyl and oxide radicals, hydrated electrons, and H-atoms in aqueous solution, and DFT calculations of transients in comparison with sulfur analogues.

    PubMed

    Tobien, Thomas; Bonifacić, Marija; Naumov, Sergej; Asmus, Klaus-Dieter

    2010-07-01

    A complementary experimental and quantum chemical study has been undertaken on the reactivity, formation and properties of transients generated in the reaction of selected organic selenides with hydroxyl radicals, oxide radical ions, hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms in aqueous solution. A detailed study of the OH and O (-) reactions with Me(2)Se revealed the formation of the respective adduct-radicals as precursors of (Me(2)Se thereforeSeMe(2))(+) radical cations. In case of the neutral adduct radical Me(2)Se (OH) the conversion into the three-electron bonded dimer species proceeds, in part, via the molecular (Me(2)Se thereforeOH(2))(+) radical cation. Absolute rate constants have been determined for all the underlying processes. The respective reactions with hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms indicate that selenides exhibit a higher reactivity towards redox-active species than sulfides. A most interesting finding is that the reaction of Me(2)Se with H atoms is faster (k = 4.1 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) than the reduction by hydrated electrons (k = 2.1 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)), precluding an electron transfer as mechanistic background. The rationale is rather an effective dissociative attack of the hydrogen atom on the selenium. Both, the e(aq)(-)- and H -induced reductions of Me(2)Se and Me(2)S lead, under cleavage of CH(3) radicals, to the direct formation of selenol and thiol, respectively. Complementary quantum chemical studies, performed with Density Functional Theory (DFT) BHandHLYP methods, confirm this mechanism. They also reveal a generally higher thermodynamic stability of the Se-centered radicals relative to the S-centered ones, e.g., for the molecular radical anions (Me(2)Se) (-) (DeltaH-27 kJ mol(-1)) and (Me(2)S) (-) (DeltaH-16 kJ mol(-1)). Despite of these stabilization energies the calculations indicate an instantaneous Se/S-CH(3) bond lengthening in the respective molecular radical anions. The same applies for the reaction of Me(2)S and Me(2)Se with

  3. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme 4-demethylwyosine synthase reveals the site of hydrogen atom abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Anthony P.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2015-01-01

    TYW1 catalyzes the formation of 4-demethylwyosine via the condensation of N-methylguanosine (m1G) with carbons 2 and 3 of pyruvate. In this study labeled transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) and pyruvate were utilized to determine the site of hydrogen atom abstraction and regiochemistry of the pyruvate addition. tRNA containing a 2H labeled m1G methyl group was used to identify the methyl group of m1G as the site of hydrogen atom abstraction by S-adenosyl-L-methionine. [2-13C1,3,3,3-2H3]-Pyruvate was used to demonstrate retention of all the pyruvate protons indicating that C2 of pyruvate forms the bridging carbon of the imidazoline ring and C3 the methyl. PMID:26052987

  4. Counter-intuitive experimental evidence on the initiation of radical crack in ceramic thin films at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Chunqiang Li, Zhipeng; Lin, Songsheng

    2015-10-15

    The basic issue related to radial crack in ceramic thin films has received considerable attention due to the fact that the radial crack plays an important role in evaluating the toughness properties of ceramic materials. In this work, an atomic-scale new experimental evidence is clearly presented to reveal the counter-intuitive initiation, the nucleation and the propagation mechanism of the radial crack in Al-Cr-N ceramic thin films.

  5. Counter-intuitive experimental evidence on the initiation of radical crack in ceramic thin films at the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Li, Zhipeng; Lin, Songsheng

    2015-10-01

    The basic issue related to radial crack in ceramic thin films has received considerable attention due to the fact that the radial crack plays an important role in evaluating the toughness properties of ceramic materials. In this work, an atomic-scale new experimental evidence is clearly presented to reveal the counter-intuitive initiation, the nucleation and the propagation mechanism of the radial crack in Al-Cr-N ceramic thin films.

  6. Free radical reactions at the Ru(0 0 0 1) surface: Atomic oxygen and dissociated NH 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Sudha; Gaddam, Sneha Sen; Kelber, Jeffry

    2009-08-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the effect of atomic oxygen on Ru(0 0 0 1), and the effect of dissociated ammonia on RuO 2/Ru(0 0 0 1), in UHV conditions at ambient temperature. The Ru(0 0 0 1) surface was exposed, at ambient temperature, to a mixed flux of atomic and molecular oxygen generated by dissociation of O 2 in a thermal catalytic cracker, with ˜45% dissociation efficiency. The detailed study of the XPS spectra shows the formation of a disordered multilayer oxide (RuO 2). No formation of higher oxides of Ru was observed. The formation of RuO 2 proceeded without saturation for total oxygen exposures of up to 10 5 Langmuir, at which point an average oxide thickness of 68 Å was observed. RuO 2 formed by the reaction with atomic oxygen was exposed to a flux of NH x ( x = 1, 2) + H generated by the cracker. The reduction of RuO 2 to Ru metal was observed by XPS. An exposure of 3.6 × 10 2 L of NH x + H, resulted in the observation of adsorbed H 2O and OH, but no evidence of lattice oxide. The chemisorbed species were removed by additional NH x + H exposure. No nitrogen adsorption was observed.

  7. Photoinduced Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization with ppm-Level Cu Catalyst by Visible Light in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiangcheng; Malhotra, Nikhil; Simakova, Antonina; Wang, Zongyu; Konkolewicz, Dominik; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-16

    Photoinduced ATRP was successfully performed in aqueous media. Polymerization of oligo(ethylene oxide) methyl ether methacrylate (OEOMA) in the presence of CuBr2 catalyst and tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine ligand when irradiated with visible light of 392 nm wavelength at 0.9 mW/cm(2) intensity was well controlled. Linear semi-logarithmic kinetic plots and molecular weights increasing with conversion were observed. Polymers of OEOMA were synthesized with low dispersity (Mw/Mn = 1.12) using only 22 ppm of copper catalyst in the presence of excess bromide anions in highly diluted (90% v/v) aqueous media. The effects of copper concentration, salt, and targeted degrees of polymerization were investigated. The polymerization could be directly regulated by external stimulation, i.e., switching the irradiation on/off, with a good retention of chain-end functionality, as proved by clean chain extension of the OEOMA polymers. This new system could enable applications for controlled aqueous radical polymerization due to its low catalyst loading in the absence of any other chemicals. PMID:26634963

  8. Free radical hydrogen atom abstraction from saturated hydrocarbons: A crossed-molecular-beams study of the reaction Cl + C{sub 3}H{sub 8} {yields} HCl + C{sub 3}H{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Hemmi, N.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    The abstraction of hydrogen atoms from saturated hydrocarbons are reactions of fundamental importance in combustion as well as often being the rate limiting step in free radical substitution reactions. The authors have begun studying these reactions under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique on beamline 9.0.2.1, utilizing VUV undulator radiation to selectively ionize the scattered hydrocarbon free radical products (C{sub x}H{sub 2x+1}). The crossed molecular beam technique involves two reactant molecular beams fixed at 90{degrees}. The molecular beam sources are rotatable in the plane defined by the two beams. The scattered neutral products travel 12.0 cm where they are photoionized using the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. In the authors initial investigations they are using halogen atoms as protypical free radicals to abstract hydrogen atoms from small alkanes. Their first study has been looking at the reaction of Cl + propane {r_arrow} HCl + propyl radical. In their preliminary efforts the authors have measured the laboratory scattering angular distribution and time of flight spectra for the propyl radical products at collision energies of 9.6 kcal/mol and 14.9 kcal/mol.

  9. Inorganic-organic hybrid coatings on stainless steel by layer-by-layer deposition and surface-initiated atom-transfer-radical polymerization for combating biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S J; Pehkonen, S O; Ting, Y P; Neoh, K G; Kang, E T

    2009-03-01

    To improve the biocorrosion resistance of stainless steel (SS) and to confer the bactericidal function on its surface for inhibiting bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, well-defined inorganic-organic hybrid coatings, consisting of the inner compact titanium oxide multilayers and outer dense poly(vinyl-N-hexylpyridinium) brushes, were successfully developed. Nanostructured titanium oxide multilayer coatings were first built up on the SS substrates via the layer-by-layer sol-gel deposition process. The trichlorosilane coupling agent, containing the alkyl halide atom-transfer-radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, was subsequently immobilized on the titanium oxide coatings for surface-initiated ATRP of 4-vinylpyridine (4VP). The pyridium nitrogen moieties of the covalently immobilized 4VP polymer, or P(4VP), brushes were quaternized with hexyl bromide to produce a high concentration of quaternary ammonium salt on the SS surfaces. The excellent antibacterial efficiency of the grafted polycations, poly(vinyl-N-pyridinium bromide), was revealed by viable cell counts and atomic force microscopy images of the surface. The effectiveness of the hybrid coatings in corrosion protection was verified by the Tafel plot and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. PMID:20355986

  10. Uranium Adsorbent Fibers Prepared by Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) from Poly(vinyl chloride)- co -chlorinated Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC- co -CPVC) Fiber

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Suree; Yue, Yanfeng; Kuo, Li-Jung; Mehio, Nada; Li, Meijun; Gill, Gary; Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Dai, Sheng

    2016-03-11

    The need to secure future supplies of energy attracts researchers in several countries to a vast resource of nuclear energy fuel: uranium in seawater (estimated at 4.5 billion tons in seawater). In this study, we developed effective adsorbent fibers for the recovery of uranium from seawater via atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from a poly-(vinyl chloride)-co-chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC-co-CPVC) fiber. ATRP was employed in the surface graft polymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA), precursors for uranium-interacting functional groups, from PVC-co-CPVC fiber. The [tBA]/[AN] was systematically varied to identify the optimal ratio between hydrophilic groups (from tBA) and uranyl-binding ligandsmore » (from AN). The best performing adsorbent fiber, the one with the optimal [tBA]/[AN] ratio and a high degree of grafting (1390%), demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities that are significantly greater than those of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) reference fiber in natural seawater tests (2.42 3.24 g/kg in 42 days of seawater exposure and 5.22 g/kg in 49 days of seawater exposure, versus 1.66 g/kg in 42 days of seawater exposure and 1.71 g/kg in 49 days of seawater exposure for JAEA). Lastly, adsorption of other metal ions from seawater and their corresponding kinetics were also studied. The grafting of alternative monomers for the recovery of uranium from seawater is now under development by this versatile technique of ATRP.« less

  11. Grafting of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Brushes from Magnetite Nanoparticles Using a Phosphonic Acid Based Initiator by Ambient Temperature Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATATRP)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) in the brush form is grown from the surface of magnetite nanoparticles by ambient temperature atom transfer radical polymerization (ATATRP) using a phosphonic acid based initiator. The surface initiator was prepared by the reaction of ethylene glycol with 2-bromoisobutyrl bromide, followed by the reaction with phosphorus oxychloride and hydrolysis. This initiator is anchored to magnetite nanoparticles via physisorption. The ATATRP of methyl methacrylate was carried out in the presence of CuBr/PMDETA complex, without a sacrificial initiator, and the grafting density is found to be as high as 0.90 molecules/nm2. The organic–inorganic hybrid material thus prepared shows exceptional stability in organic solvents unlike unfunctionalized magnetite nanoparticles which tend to flocculate. The polymer brushes of various number average molecular weights were prepared and the molecular weight was determined using size exclusion chromatography, after degrafting the polymer from the magnetite core. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectra and diffused reflection FT-IR were used to confirm the grafting reaction.

  12. Preparation of a magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of parabens from fruit juices.

    PubMed

    You, Xiaoxiao; Piao, Chungying; Chen, Ligang

    2016-07-01

    A silica-based surface magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of parabens was prepared using a facile and general method that combined atom-transfer radical polymerization with surface imprinting technique. The prepared magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and physical property measurement. The isothermal adsorption experiment and kinetics adsorption experiment investigated the adsorption property of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer to template molecule. The four parabens including methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben were used to assess the rebinding selectivity. An extraction method, which used magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer as adsorbents coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of the four parabens in fruit juice samples was developed. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detections of the four parabens were 0.028, 0.026, 0.021, and 0.026 mg/L, respectively. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation ranging from 2.6 to 8.9% was obtained. In all three fortified levels, recoveries of parabens were in the range of 72.5-89.4%. The proposed method has been applied to different fruit juice samples including orange juice, grape juice, apple juice and peach juice, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27214157

  13. Self-assemblies of γ-CDs with pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA and endcapping via atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Kong, Tao; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ai-ying

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were self-assembled with varying amounts of γ-CDs to prepare poly(pseudorotaxanes) (PPRs). When the concentration of γ-CDs was lower, the central PEO segment served as a shell of the micelles and was preferentially bent to pass through the γ-CD cavity to construct double-chain-stranded tight-fit PPRs characterized by a channel-like crystal structure. With an increase in the amount of γ-CDs added, they began to accommodate the poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) segments dissociated from the core of the micelles. When more γ-CDs were threaded and slipped over the segments, the γ-CDs were randomly distributed along the pentablock copolymer chain to generate single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs and showed no characteristic channel-like crystal structure. All the self-assembly processes of the pentablock copolymers resulted in the formation of hydrogels. After endcapping via in situ ATRP of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), these single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs were transformed into conformational identical polyrotaxanes (PRs). The structures of the PPRs and PRs were characterized by means of 1H NMR, GPC, 13C CP/MAS NMR, 2D 1H NOESY NMR, FTIR, WXRD, TGA and DSC analyses. PMID:26732122

  14. Using the Interior Cavity of the P22 Capsid for Site Specific Initiation of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization with Tremendously Increased Cargo Loading

    PubMed Central

    Lucon, Janice; Qazi, Shefah; Uchida, Masaki; Bedwel, Gregory J.; LaFrance, Ben; Prevelige, Peter E.; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have emerged as important and versatile architectures for chemical manipulation in the development of functional hybrid nanostructures. Here we have successfully demonstrated the site selective initiation of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) reactions to form an addressable polymer constrained within the interior cavity of a VLP. This protein-polymer hybrid, of P22 and crosslinked poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate), is potentially useful as a new high-density delivery vehicle for encapsulation and delivery of small molecule cargos. In particular, the encapsulated polymer can act as a scaffold for the attachment of primary amine reactive molecules of interest, such as a fluorescein dye or a Gd-DTPA MRI contrast agent. Using this approach, a significant increase in labeling density of the VLP, compared to previous modifications of VLPs, can be achieved. These results highlight the use of multimeric protein-polymer conjugates for their potential utility in the development of VLP-based MRI contrast agents with the possibility of loading other cargos. PMID:23000990

  15. A New Global Potential Energy Surface for the Hydroperoxyl Radical, HO2: Reaction Coefficients for H + O2 and Vibrational Splittings for H Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A new analytic global potential energy surface describing the hydroperoxyl radical system H((sup 2)S) + O2(X (sup 3)Sigma((sup -)(sub g))) (reversible reaction) HO2 ((X-tilde) (sup 2)A'') (reversible reaction) O((sup 3)P) + O H (X (sup 2)Pi) has been fitted using the ab initio complete active space SCF (self-consistent-field)/externally contracted configuration interaction (CASSCF/CCI) energy calculations of Walch and Duchovic. Results of quasiclassical trajectory studies to determine the rate coefficients of the forward and reverse reactions at combustion temperatures will be presented. In addition, vibrational energy levels were calculated using the quantum DVR-DGB (discrete variable representation-distributed Gaussian basis) method and the splitting due to H atom migration is investigated. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  16. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; et al

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, whichmore » demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.« less

  17. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Abney, Carter W.; Jiang, De-en; Brown, Suree; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, which demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.

  18. Relative kinetic measurements of rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms and OH radicals with a series of methyl alkyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Nicole; Zhong, Xiaoyin; Kirschbaum, Stefan; Bejan, Iustinian; Barnes, Ian; Benter, Thorsten

    2010-12-01

    Relative kinetic studies have been performed on the reactions of Cl atoms with a series of methyl alkyl esters in a 405-liter borosilicate glass chamber at (298 ± 3) K and one atmosphere of synthetic air using in situ FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the reactants. Rate coefficients (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) were determined for the following compounds: methyl acetate (2.48 ± 0.58) × 10 -12; methyl propanoate (1.68 ± 0.36) × 10 -11; methyl butanoate (4.77 ± 0.87) × 10 -11; methyl pentanoate (7.84 ± 1.15) × 10 -11; methyl hexanoate (1.09 ± 0.31) × 10 -10; methyl heptanoate (1.56 ± 0.37) × 10 -10; methyl cyclohexane carboxylate (3.32 ± 0.76) × 10 -10; methyl-2-methyl butanoate (9.41 ± 1.39) × 10 -11. In addition rate coefficients (in units of 10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) have been obtained for the reactions of OH radicals with the following compounds: methyl butanoate (3.55 ± 0.71), methyl pentanoate (5.41 ± 1.08), and methyl-2-methyl butanoate (4.08 ± 0.82). Using the kinetic rate data tropospheric lifetimes for the methyl alkyl esters with respect to their reactions with OH, and Cl have been estimated for typical ambient air concentrations of these oxidants.

  19. pH-responsive controlled-release fertilizer with water retention via atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylic acid on mussel-inspired initiator.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-yuan; Jia, Xin; Zhang, Guo-xiang; Hu, Jia-mei; Zhang, Xiu-lan; Liu, Zhi-yong; Wang, He-yun; Zhou, Feng

    2013-06-12

    This work reports a polydopamine-graft-poly(acrylic acid) (Pdop-g-PAA)-coated controlled-release multi-element compound fertilizer with water-retention function by a combination of mussel-inspired chemistry and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) techniques for the first time. The morphology and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometry. The results revealed that the stimuli-responsive layer formed by a Pdop inner layer and a PAA outer corona exhibit outstanding selective permeability to charged nutrients and the release rate of encapsulated elements can be tailored by the pH values. At low pH, the Pdop-g-PAA layer can reduce nutrient loss, and at high pH, the coating restrains transportation of negative nutrients but favors the release of cations. Moreover, PAA brushes provide good water-retention property. This Pdop-graft-polymer brushes coating will be effective and promising in the research and development of multi-functional controlled-release fertilizer. PMID:23692274

  20. Preparation of high-capacity, weak anion-exchange membranes by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) and subsequent derivatization with diethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiaolei; Fan, Hua; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2013-04-01

    Ion-exchange membrane is of importance for the development of membrane chromatography. In this work, a high-capacity anion-exchange membrane was prepared by grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto the surface of regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and subsequent derivatization with diethylamine. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize changes in the chemical functionality, surface topography and pore morphology of the modified membranes. The static capacity of the prepared anion-exchange membrane was evaluated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. The results indicated that the anion-exchange membrane which could reach a maximum capacity of 96 mg/mL for static adsorption possesses a higher adsorption capacity, and the adsorption capacity increases with the polymerization time. The effect of pH and salt concentration confirmed that the adsorption of BSA followed ion-exchange mechanism. The established method would have potential application in the preparation of anion-exchange membrane.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Surface Grafted Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and Poly(Carboxylic Acid)– Iron Particles via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sutrisno, Joko; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    This research relates to the preparation and characterization of surface grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(carboxylic acid)–micron-size iron particles via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface grafted polymers–iron particles result in multifunctional materials which can be used in biomedical applications. The functionalities consist of cell targeting, imaging, drug delivery, and immunological response. The multifunctional materials are synthesized in two steps. First, surface grafting is used to place polymer molecules on the iron particles surface. The second step, is conjugation of the bio-molecules onto the polymer backbone. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to confirm the presence of polymers on the iron particles. The thickness of the grafted polymers and glass transition temperature of the surface grafted polymers were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The covalent bond between grafted polymers and iron particles caused higher glass transition temperature as compared with non-grafted polymers. The ability to target the bio-molecule and provide fluorescent imaging was simulated by conjugation of rat immunoglobulin and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled anti-rat. The fluorescence intensity was determined using flow cytometry and conjugated IgG-FITC anti-rat on iron particles which was imaged using a fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25382869

  2. Tuning reactivity and selectivity in hydrogen atom transfer from aliphatic C-H bonds to alkoxyl radicals: role of structural and medium effects.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-11-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) is a fundamental reaction that takes part in a wide variety of chemical and biological processes, with relevant examples that include the action of antioxidants, damage to biomolecules and polymers, and enzymatic and biomimetic reactions. Moreover, great attention is currently devoted to the selective functionalization of unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds, where HAT based procedures have been shown to play an important role. In this Account, we describe the results of our recent studies on the role of structural and medium effects on HAT from aliphatic C-H bonds to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)). Quantitative information on the reactivity and selectivity patterns observed in these reactions has been obtained by time-resolved kinetic studies, providing a deeper understanding of the factors that govern HAT from carbon and leading to the definition of useful guidelines for the activation or deactivation of aliphatic C-H bonds toward HAT. In keeping with the electrophilic character of alkoxyl radicals, polar effects can play an important role in the reactions of CumO(•). Electron-rich C-H bonds are activated whereas those that are α to electron withdrawing groups are deactivated toward HAT, with these effects being able to override the thermodynamic preference for HAT from the weakest C-H bond. Stereoelectronic effects can also influence the reactivity of the C-H bonds of ethers, amines, and amides. HAT is most rapid when these bonds can be eclipsed with a lone pair on an adjacent heteroatom or with the π-system of an amide functionality, thus allowing for optimal orbital overlap. In HAT from cyclohexane derivatives, tertiary axial C-H bond deactivation and tertiary equatorial C-H bond activation have been observed. These effects have been explained on the basis of an increase in torsional strain or a release in 1,3-diaxial strain in the HAT transition states, with kH(eq)/kH(ax) ratios that have been shown to exceed one order of

  3. A crossed beams study of the reaction of carbon atoms, C(3Pj), with vinyl cyanide, C2H3CN(X 1A')--investigating the formation of cyano propargyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Gu, X; Zhang, F; Tang, M S; Sun, B J; H Chang, A H; Kaiser, R I

    2006-12-14

    The chemical dynamics of the reaction of ground state carbon atoms, C(3Pj), with vinyl cyanide, C2H3CN(X 1A'), were examined under single collision conditions at collision energies of 29.9 and 43.9 kJ mol(-1) using the crossed molecular beams approach. The experimental studies were combined with electronic structure calculations on the triplet C4H3N potential energy surface (H. F. Su, R. I. Kaiser, A. H. H. Chang, J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 122, 074320). Our investigations suggest that the reaction follows indirect scattering dynamics via addition of the carbon atom to the carbon-carbon double bond of the vinyl cyanide molecule yielding a cyano cyclopropylidene collision complex. The latter undergoes ring opening to form cis/trans triplet cyano allene which fragments predominantly to the 1-cyano propargyl radical via tight exit transition states; the 3-cyano propargyl isomer was inferred to be formed at least a factor of two less; also, no molecular hydrogen elimination channel was observed experimentally. These results are in agreement with the computational studies predicting solely the existence of a carbon versus hydrogen atom exchange pathway and the dominance of the 1-cyano propargyl radical product. The discovery of the cyano propargyl radical in the reaction of atomic carbon with vinyl cyanide under single collision conditions implies that this molecule can be an important reaction intermediate in combustion flames and also in extraterrestrial environments (cold molecular clouds, circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars) which could lead to the formation of cyano benzene (C6H5CN) upon reaction with a propargyl radical. PMID:17119654

  4. RATE CONSTANTS FOR THE REACTIONS OF OH RADICALS AND CL ATOMS WITH DI-N-PROPYL ETHER AND DI-N-BUTYL ETHER AND THEIR DEUTERATED ANALOGS. (R825252)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using relative rate methods, rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with di-n-propyl ether, di-n-propyl ether-d14, di-n-butyl ether and di-n-butyl ether-d18 have been measured at 296 ? 2 K and atmos...

  5. Preparation of (Ba,Sr)TiO3@polystrene core-shell nanoparticles by solvent-free surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaowei, Yang; Yanwei, Zeng; Tongxiang, Cai; Zhenxing, Hu

    2012-07-01

    The polystyrene shells have been successfully grown on the barium strontium titanate (BST) nanocrystals, which were synthesized by microwave-activated glycothermal method, via a solvent-free surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) after the 2-bromo-2-methylpropionic acid molecules (Br-MPA) were anchored at the surface of BST nanocrystals through ligand exchange with hydroxyl groups on their surfaces. These surface modified BST nanocrystals can then be perfectly dispersed in styrene monomer and act as macroinitiators for ATRP to yield BST@PS core-shell structured nanoparticles, which endow the BST nanocrystals with exceptionally good dispersibility and stability in hydrophobic solvents. The BST@PS core-shell structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy (Raman), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and gel permeation chromatography were also employed to probe the Br-MPA and PS on the BST nanocrystals. It has been shown that after the BST nanocrystals are surface-modified with Br-MPA, the polymerization of styrene can steadily occur at the surface of BST nanocrystals to form a uniform polystyrene shell and its thickness can reach ∼10 nm when the polymerization reaction is extended to 36 h, while no changes are found to take place with the BST nanocrystals. Compared with typical high molecular weight PS (Mn = 6700), the as-obtained PS possess a relatively low molecular weight (Mn = 5473) and a lower glass transition temperature (Tg ∼ 93 °C). The research results demonstrate a viable strategy for the preparation of polymer-coated functional metal oxides nanocrystals, potentially useful in biological and nanoelectronic applications.

  6. Preparation of a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and analysis of protein adsorption resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Onodera, Yuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) and assess its resistance to protein adsorption from the dissolved state of poly(MPC) chains in an aqueous condition. The thick poly(MPC) brush layer was prepared through the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of MPC with a free initiator from an initiator-immobilized substrate at given [Monomer]/[Free initiator] ratios. The ellipsometric thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layers could be controlled by the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) chains. The thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was larger than that in air, and this tendency became clearer when the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) increased. The maximum thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was around 110nm. The static air contact angle of the poly(MPC) brush layer in water indicated a reasonably hydrophilic nature, which was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer at the surface. This result occurred because the hydrated state of the poly(MPC) chains is not influenced by the environment surrounding them. Finally, as measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, the amount of protein adsorbed from a fetal bovine serum solution (10% in phosphate-buffered saline) on the original substrate was 420ng/cm(2). However, the poly(MPC) brush layer reduced this value dramatically to less than 50ng/cm(2). This effect was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer for thicknesses between 20nm and about 110nm. These results indicated that the surface covered with a poly(MPC) brush layer is a promising platform to avoid biofouling and could also be applied to analyze the reactions of biological molecules with a high signal/noise ratio. PMID:26896657

  7. Components of the Bond Energy in Polar Diatomic Molecules, Radicals, and Ions Formed by Group-1 and Group-2 Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoyu; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-07-14

    Although many transition metal complexes are known to have high multireference character, the multireference character of main-group closed-shell singlet diatomic molecules like BeF, CaO, and MgO has been less studied. However, many group-1 and group-2 diatomic molecules do have multireference character, and they provide informative systems for studying multireference character because they are simpler than transition metal compounds. The goal of the present work is to understand these multireference systems better so that, ultimately, we can apply what we learn to more complicated multireference systems and to the design of new exchange-correlation functionals for treating multireference systems more adequately. Fourteen main-group diatomic molecules and one triatomic molecule (including radicals, cations, and anions, as well as neutral closed-shell species) have been studied for this article. Eight of these molecules contain a group-1 element, and six contain a group-2 element. Seven of these molecules are multireference systems, and eight of them are single-reference systems. Fifty-three exchange-correlation functionals of 11 types [local spin-density approximation (LSDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA), nonseparable gradient approximation (NGA), global-hybrid GGA, meta-GGA, meta-NGA, global-hybrid meta GGA, range-separated hybrid GGA, range-separated hybrid meta-GGA, range-separated hybrid meta-NGA, and DFT augmented with molecular mechanics damped dispersion (DFT-D)] and the Hartree-Fock method have been applied to calculate the bond distance, bond dissociation energy (BDE), and dipole moment of these molecules. All of the calculations are converged to a stable solution by allowing the symmetry of the Slater determinant to be broken. A reliable functional should not only predict an accurate BDE but also predict accurate components of the BDE, so each bond dissociation energy has been decomposed into ionization potential (IP) of the electropositive

  8. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be

  9. Atmospheric chemistry of (CF3)2C=CH2: OH radicals, Cl atoms and O3 rate coefficients, oxidation end-products and IR spectra.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Spitieri, Christina S; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Lendar, Maria; Daële, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2015-10-14

    The rate coefficients for the gas phase reactions of OH radicals, k1, Cl atoms, k2, and O3, k3, with 3,3,3-trifluoro-2(trifluoromethyl)-1-propene ((CF3)2C=CH2, hexafluoroisobutylene, HFIB) were determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure employing the relative rate method and using two atmospheric simulation chambers and a static photochemical reactor. OH and Cl rate coefficients obtained by both techniques were indistinguishable, within experimental precision, and the average values were k1 = (7.82 ± 0.55) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k2 = (3.45 ± 0.24) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The quoted uncertainties are at 95% level of confidence and include the estimated systematic uncertainties. An upper limit for the O3 rate coefficient was determined to be k3 < 9.0 × 10(-22) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). In global warming potential (GWP) calculations, radiative efficiency (RE) was determined from the measured IR absorption cross-sections and treating HFIB both as long (LLC) and short (SLC) lived compounds, including estimated lifetime dependent factors in the SLC case. The HFIB lifetime was estimated from kinetic measurements considering merely the OH reaction, τOH = 14.8 days and including both OH and Cl chemistry, τeff = 10.3 days. Therefore, GWP(HFIB,OH) and GWP(HFIB,eff) were estimated to be 4.1 (LLC) and 0.6 (SLC), as well as 2.8 (LLC) and 0.3 (SLC) for a hundred year time horizon. Moreover, the estimated photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)) of HFIB was calculated to be 4.60. Finally, HCHO and (CF3)2C(O) were identified as final oxidation products in both OH- and Cl-initiated oxidation, while HC(O)Cl was additionally observed in the Cl-initiated oxidation. PMID:26372403

  10. Rearrangement of sulfonamidyl radicals with hydrogen migration

    SciTech Connect

    Troyanskii, E.I.; Lazareva, M.I.; Nikishin, G.I.

    1987-01-20

    One-step outlying oxidative chlorination of alkanesulfonamides by the action of the Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/-CuCl/sub 2/ system via intermediate sulfonamidyl radicals gives 3- and 4-chloroalkanesulfonamides. Rearrangements of sulfonamidyl radicals with H atom migration from the sulfonyl segment predominates over rearrangement with H atom migration from the amide segment.

  11. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the base of her partner’s penis during intercourse. Orgasm after radical hysterectomy Women who have had a ... the surgery will affect their ability to have orgasms. This has not been studied a great deal, ...

  12. Reactions between atomic chlorine and pyridine in solid para-hydrogen: Infrared spectrum of the 1-chloropyridinyl (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N-Cl) radical

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prasanta; Bahou, Mohammed; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2013-02-07

    With infrared absorption spectra we investigated the reaction between Cl atom and pyridine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N) in a para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) matrix. Pyridine and Cl{sub 2} were co-deposited with p-H{sub 2} at 3.2 K; a planar C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N-Cl{sub 2} complex was identified from the observed infrared spectrum of the Cl{sub 2}/C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N/p-H{sub 2} matrix. Upon irradiation at 365 nm to generate Cl atom in situ and annealing at 5.1 K for 3 min to induce secondary reaction, the 1-chloropyridinyl radical (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N-Cl) was identified as the major product of the reaction Cl + C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N in solid p-H{sub 2}; absorption lines at 3075.9, 1449.7, 1200.6, 1148.8, 1069.3, 1017.4, 742.9, and 688.7 cm{sup -1} were observed. The assignments are based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and relative IR intensities with those predicted using the B3PW91/6-311++G(2d, 2p) method. The observation of the preferential addition of Cl to the N-site of pyridine to form C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N-Cl radical but not 2-, 3-, or 4-chloropyridine (ClC{sub 5}H{sub 5}N) radicals is consistent with the reported theoretical prediction that formation of the former proceeds via a barrierless path.

  13. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO + hν{sub 248nm} → CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + HCO ϕ{sub 1a} = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + H + CO ϕ{sub 1e} = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}→{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO + HO{sub 2} ϕ{sub 1f} = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 4} + CO ϕ{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be

  14. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  15. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  16. Roaming Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Joel M.; Shepler, Benjamin C.

    2011-05-01

    Roaming is a recently verified unusual pathway to molecular products from unimolecular dissociation of an energized molecule. Here we present the evidence for this pathway for H2CO and CH3CHO. Theoretical analysis shows that this path visits the plateau region of the potential energy surface near dissociation to radical products. It is not clear whether roaming is a distinct isolated pathway, in addition to the conventional one via the well-known molecular saddle-point transition state. Evidence is presented to suggest that the two pathways may originate from a single, but highly complicated, dividing surface. Other examples of unusual reaction dynamics are also reviewed.

  17. Primary radical yields in pulse irradiated alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielden, E. M.; Hart, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primary radical yields of hydrated electrons, H atoms, and OH radicals are determined by measuring hydrated electron formation following a 4 microsecond pulse of X rays. The pH dependence of free radical yields beyond pH 12 is determined by observation of the hydrated electrons.

  18. OH-Radical Specific Addition to Glutathione S-Atom at the Air-Water Interface: Relevance to the Redox Balance of the Lung Epithelial Lining Fluid.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in epithelial lining fluids (ELF) prevent inhaled air pollutants from reaching lung tissue. This process, however, may upset ELF's redox balance, which is deemed to be expressed by the ratio of the major antioxidant glutathione (GSH) to its putative oxidation product GSSG. Previously, we found that at physiological pH O3(g) rapidly oxidizes GS(2-)(aq) (but not GSH(-)) to GSO3(-) rather than GSSG. Here, we report that in moderately acidic pH ≤ 5 media ·OH(g) oxidizes GSH(-)(aq) to sulfenic GSOH(-), sulfinic GSO2(-), and sulfonic GSO3(-) acids via ·OH specific additions to reduced S-atoms. The remarkable specificity of ·OH on water versus its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during [OH···GSH] interfacial encounters. Thus, both O3 and ·OH oxidize GSH to GSOH(-) under most conditions, and since GSOH(-) is reduced back to GSH in vivo by NADPH, redox balance may be in fact signaled by GSH/GSOH ratios. PMID:26722895

  19. Radical formation and radiation damage in adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.V.; DiGregorio, S.; DiMauro, L.; Wood, D.E.

    1980-10-30

    Unequivocal samples of the 1-adamantyl (1-Ad) and 2-Ad radicals have been prepared in a matrix of adamantane (Ad) by the simultaneous deposition of atomic sodium, 1- or 2-bromoadamantane, and adamantance at 77 K. The EPR spectrum of the 1-Ad radical contrary to previous reports has a clearly resolved hyperfine structure that can be analyzed in terms of the solution parameters of Krusic et al., and the spectrum of the 2-Ad radical is identical with that previously reported by Ferrell et al. It is also shown that conditions of purification and irradiation can greatly affect the spectra obtained upon X irradiation of Ad itself. Depending upon conditions, alicyclic radicals that are primary products of ring-opening reactions or benzylic-type radicals that are probably secondary reaction products can also be obtained in addition to 1-Ad and 2-Ad radicals.

  20. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  1. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  2. Atmospheric chemistry of cis-CF3CHdbnd CHCl (HCFO-1233zd(Z)): Kinetics of the gas-phase reactions with Cl atoms, OH radicals, and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Lene Løffler; Østerstrøm, Freja From; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P.; Nielsen, Ole John; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2015-10-01

    FTIR smog chamber techniques were used to measure the rate coefficients k(Cl + cis-CF3CHdbnd CHCl) = (6.26 ± 0.84) × 10-11, k(OH + cis-CF3CHdbnd CHCl) = (8.45 ± 1.52) × 10-13, and k(O3 + cis-CF3CHdbnd CHCl) = (1.53 ± 0.12) × 10-21 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The atmospheric lifetime of cis-CF3CHdbnd CHCl is determined by reaction with OH radicals and is estimated to be 14 days. The infrared spectrum of cis-CF3CHdbnd CHCl was recorded and the integrated absorption over the range 600-2000 cm-1 was measured to be (1.48 ± 0.07) × 10-16 cm molecule-1. Accounting for non-uniform horizontal and vertical mixing leads to a GWP100 value of essentially zero. Correction to account for unwanted Cl atom chemistry in our previous relative rate study of the kinetics of the reaction of OH with trans-CF3CHdbnd CHCl gives k(OH + trans-CF3CHdbnd CHCl) = (3.61 ± 0.37) × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  3. Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate via a strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis in a liquid/liquid biphasic system: homogeneous catalysis, facile heterogeneous separation, and recycling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jinlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis (TPSC) is applied to the Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in a p-xylene/PEG-200 biphasic system. Initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP) are used to establish the TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system using water-soluble TPMA as a ligand, EBPA as an initiator, CuBr2 as a catalyst, and AIBN as a reducing agent. By heating to 70 °C, unlimited miscibility of both solvents is achieved and the polymerization can be carried out under homogeneous conditions; then on cooling to 25 °C, the mixture separates into two phases again. As a result, the catalyst complex remains in the PEG-200 phase while the obtained polymers stay in the p-xylene phase. The catalyst can therefore be removed from the resultant polymers by easily separating the two different layers and can be reused again. It is important that well-defined PMMA with a controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution could be obtained using this TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system. PMID:25155655

  4. Measurement and modeling of Ar /H2/CH4 arc jet discharge chemical vapor deposition reactors. I. Intercomparison of derived spatial variations of H atom, C2, and CH radical densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennick, C. J.; Ma, J.; Henney, J. J.; Wills, J. B.; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Orr-Ewing, A. J.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.

    2007-09-01

    Comparisons are drawn between spatially resolved absorption spectroscopy data obtained for a 6.4kW dc arc jet reactor, operating with Ar /H2/CH4 gas mixtures, used for deposition of thin, polycrystalline diamond films, and the results of a two-dimensional (r,z) computer model incorporating gas activation, expansion into the low pressure reactor, and the chemistry of the neutral and charged species. The experimental measurements, using either cavity ring-down spectroscopy or diode laser absorption spectroscopy, determined absolute number densities of H(n =2) atoms, and column densities of C2(aΠu3), C2(XΣg+1), and CH(XΠ2) radicals, with vibrational and rotational quantum state resolutions, and their variation with height through the horizontally propagating arc jet plume. Spectra were also analyzed to obtain temperatures and local electron densities [from Stark broadening of H(n =2) absorption lines]. The experimental data are directly compared with the output data of the model that returns spatially inhomogeneous temperature, flow velocities, and number densities of 25 neutral and 14 charged species. Under the base operating conditions of the reactor [11.4SLM (standard liters per minute) of Ar and 1.8SLM of H2 entering the primary torch, with addition of 80SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) of CH4 downstream; 6.4kW input power; reactor pressure of 50Torr], the calculated and measured column and number densities agree to within factors of 2-3, the model reproduces the spatial dependence of column densities, and the mean temperatures of C2(a ) and CH(X ) radicals derived from spectra and model results are in good agreement. The model also captures the variation of these parameters with changes to operating conditions of the reactor such as flows of H2 and CH4, and input power. Further details of the model and the insights it provides are the subject of the accompanying paper [Mankelevich et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 063310 (2007) ].

  5. FTIR gas-phase kinetic study on the reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with unsaturated esters: Methyl-3,3-dimethyl acrylate, (E)-ethyl tiglate and methyl-3-butenoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, Juan P.; Blanco, María B.; Peñéñory, Alicia B.; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2013-11-01

    The relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rates coefficients for the reactions of the unsaturated esters methyl-3,3-dimethyl acrylate, (E)-ethyl tiglate and methyl-3-butenoate with OH radicals and chlorine atoms at (298 ± 2) K in synthetic air at a total pressure of (760 ± 10) Torr. The experiments were performed in an environmental chamber using in situ FTIR detection to monitor the decay of the esters relative to different reference compounds. The following room temperature rate coefficients (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) were obtained: k1(OH + (CH3)2Cdbnd CHC(O)OCH3) = (4.46 ± 1.05) × 10-11, k2(Cl + (CH3)2Cdbnd CHC(O)OCH3) = (2.78 ± 0.46) × 10-10, k3(OH + CH3CHdbnd C(CH3)C(O)OCH2CH3) = (8.32 ± 1.93) × 10-11, k4(Cl + CH3CHdbnd C(CH3)C(O)OCH2CH3) = (2.53 ± 0.35) × 10-10, k5(OH + CH2dbnd CHCH2C(O)OCH3) = (3.16 ± 0.57) × 10-11, k4(Cl + CH2dbnd CHCH2C(O)OCH3) = (2.10 ± 0.35) × 10-10. With the exception of the reaction of Cl with methyl-3,3-dimethyl acrylate (k2), for which one determination exists in the literature, this study is the first kinetic study for these reactions under atmospheric pressure. Reactivity trends are discussed in terms of the effect of the alkyl and ester groups attached to the double bond on the overall rate coefficients towards OH radicals. The atmospheric implications of the reactions were assessed by the estimation of the tropospheric lifetimes of the title reactions.

  6. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  7. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  8. Preparations and properties of a tunable void with shell thickness SiO2@SiO2 core-shell structures via activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yi-xian; Zhou, Guo-wei; Cao, Pei

    2016-02-01

    Core-shell structure nanoparticles are attracting considerable attention because of their applications in drug delivery, catalysis carrier, and nanomedicine. In this study, SiO2@SiO2 core-shell structure with tunable void and shell thickness was successfully prepared for the first time using SiO2-poly(buty acrylate) (PBA)-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) (SiO2-PBA-b-PDMAEMA) as the template and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the silica source. An amphiphilic copolymer PBA-b-PDMAEMA was first grafted onto the SiO2 nanosphere surface through activators regenerated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization. TEOS was hydrolyzed along with the PDMAEMA chain through hydrogen bonding, and the core-shell structure of SiO2@SiO2 was obtained through calcination to remove the copolymer. The gradient hydrophilicity of the PBA-b-PDMAEMA copolymer template facilitated the hydrolysis of TEOS molecules along the PDMAEMA to PBA segments, thereby tuning the voids between the SiO2 core and SiO2 shell, as well as the SiO2 shell thickness. The voids were about 10-15 nm and the shell thicknesses were about 4-11 nm when adding different amounts of DMAEMA monomer. SiO2@SiO2 core-shell structures with tunable void and shell thickness were employed as supports for the loading and release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) in PBS (pH 4.0). The samples demonstrated good loading capacity and controlled release rate of DOX.

  9. Fundamentals of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coessens, Veerle M. C.; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Today's market increasingly demands sophisticated materials for advanced technologies and high-value applications, such as nanocomposites, optoelectronic, or biomedical materials. Therefore, the demand for well-defined polymers with very specific molecular architecture and properties increases. Until recently, these kinds of polymers could only be…

  10. Macromolecular engineering by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V

    2014-05-01

    This Perspective presents recent advances in macromolecular engineering enabled by ATRP. They include the fundamental mechanistic and synthetic features of ATRP with emphasis on various catalytic/initiation systems that use parts-per-million concentrations of Cu catalysts and can be run in environmentally friendly media, e.g., water. The roles of the major components of ATRP--monomers, initiators, catalysts, and various additives--are explained, and their reactivity and structure are correlated. The effects of media and external stimuli on polymerization rates and control are presented. Some examples of precisely controlled elements of macromolecular architecture, such as chain uniformity, composition, topology, and functionality, are discussed. Syntheses of polymers with complex architecture, various hybrids, and bioconjugates are illustrated. Examples of current and forthcoming applications of ATRP are covered. Future challenges and perspectives for macromolecular engineering by ATRP are discussed. PMID:24758377

  11. Competition of charge- versus radical-directed fragmentation of gas-phase protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Love, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-24

    The fragmentation behavior of various cysteine sulfinyl ions (intact, N-acetylated, and O-methylated), new members of the gas-phase amino acid radical ion family, was investigated by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). The dominant fragmentation channel for the protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals ((SO•)Cys) was the radical-directed Cα-Cβ homolytic cleavage, resulting in the formation of glycyl radical ions and loss of CH2SO. This channel, however, was not observed for protonated N-acetylated cysteine sulfinyl radicals (Ac-(SO•)Cys); instead, charge-directed H2O loss followed immediately by SH loss prevailed. Counterintuitively, the H2O loss did not derive from the carboxyl group but involved the sulfinyl oxygen, a proton, and a Cβ hydrogen atom. Theoretical calculations suggested that N-acetylation significantly increases the barrier (~14 kcal mol(-1)) for the radical-directed fragmentation channel because of its reduced capability to stabilize the thus-formed glycyl radical ions via the captodative effect. N-Acetylation also assists in moving the proton to the sulfinyl site, which reduces the barrier for H2O loss. Our studies demonstrate that for cysteine sulfinyl radical ions, the stability of the product ions (glycyl radical ions) and the location of the charge (proton) can significantly modulate the competition between radical- and charge-directed fragmentation. PMID:23527556

  12. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions. PMID:27573794

  13. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  14. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  15. Sunlight and free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Thomas Tidwell reflects on the overlooked -- but prescient -- proposal by the British chemists Arthur Downes and Thomas Blunt for photochemical free-radical formation, decades before Moses Gomberg launched the field of radical chemistry by preparing triphenylmethyl, the first stable organic radical.

  16. Structure and Reactivity of the N-Acetyl-Cysteine Radical Cation and Anion: Does Radical Migration Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Sandra; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2011-10-01

    The structure and reactivity of the N-acetyl-cysteine radical cation and anion were studied using ion-molecule reactions, infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The radical cation was generated by first nitrosylating the thiol of N-acetyl-cysteine followed by the homolytic cleavage of the S-NO bond in the gas phase. IRMPD spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations revealed that for the radical cation the radical migrates from its initial position on the sulfur atom to the α-carbon position, which is 2.5 kJ mol-1 lower in energy. The radical migration was confirmed by time-resolved ion-molecule reactions. These results are in contrast with our previous study on cysteine methyl ester radical cation (Osburn et al., Chem. Eur. J. 2011, 17, 873-879) and the study by Sinha et al. for cysteine radical cation ( Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2010, 12, 9794-9800) where the radical was found to stay on the sulfur atom as formed. A similar approach allowed us to form a hydrogen-deficient radical anion of N-acetyl-cysteine, (M - 2H) •- . IRMPD studies and ion-molecule reactions performed on the radical anion showed that the radical remains on the sulfur, which is the initial and more stable (by 63.6 kJ mol-1) position, and does not rearrange.

  17. Contemporary Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Moul, Judd W.; Sun, Leon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer have more surgical treatment options than in the past. This paper focuses on the procedures' oncological or functional outcomes and perioperative morbidities of radical retropubic prostatectomy, radical perineal prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. A MEDLINE/PubMed search of the literature on radical prostatectomy and other new management options was performed. Results. Compared to the open procedures, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has no confirmed significant difference in most literatures besides less blood loss and blood transfusion. Nerve sparing is a safe means of preserving potency on well-selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Positive surgical margin rates of radical prostatectomy affect the recurrence and survival of prostate cancer. The urinary and sexual function outcomes have been vastly improved. Neoadjuvant treatment only affects the rate of positive surgical margin. Adjuvant therapy can delay and reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of the high risk prostate cancer. Conclusions. For the majority of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy remains a most effective approach. Radical perineal prostatectomy remains a viable approach for patients with morbid obesity, prior pelvic surgery, or prior pelvic radiation. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) has become popular among surgeons but has not yet become the firmly established standard of care. Long-term data have confirmed the efficacy of radical retropubic prostatectomy with disease control rates and cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:22110994

  18. Evidence of radicals created by plasma in bacteria in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chae Bok; Na, Young Ho; Hong, Tae-Eun; Choi, Eun Ha; Uhm, Han S.; Baik, Ku Youn E-mail: gckwon@kw.ac.kr; Kwon, Gichung E-mail: gckwon@kw.ac.kr

    2014-08-18

    Heavy water (D{sub 2}O) was introduced into a non-thermal plasma-jet (NTPJ) device to generate deuterium monoxide (OD) radicals at room temperature. Owing to the similar reactivity and low prevalence of deuterium in nature, OD radicals can be utilized to visualize the OH radical interactions with water and living cells. Escherichia coli in water were treated with OD radicals, and D atom incorporation into cells was visualized using time-of-flight SIMS and Nano-SIMS. The results show that D atoms from NTPJ reach the cytoplasm of E. coli in H{sub 2}O, indicating the usefulness of this OD-tracking method for the study of radical interactions with living cells.

  19. Reassessing Radical Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Responds to comments about, and critiques of, his own article on radical pedagogy. Outlines major points of contention raised by other commentators and responds to them, including matters of definition, power relations in the classroom, and tempering radical theory with pragmatism. (DSK)

  20. [Alchemists' humid radical].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The term radical has been used by chemists since the beginnings and even when they still were alchemists. The term "humid radical" is present in numerous alchemists' texts. It was used to represent a kind of "humid", which was considered as different from what is nowadays called "humid", but was a sort of principle necessary for life. PMID:17575839

  1. ESR study of the aziridine and azetidine radical cations: evidence for the C. C ring-opened aziridine radical cation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, X.Z.; Williams, F.

    1986-05-22

    The radical cations from aziridine and azetidine have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy following their generation in the solid state by ..gamma.. irradiation of dilute solutions of the parent compounds in the CFCl/sub 3/ matrix at 77 K. The ESR parameters of the azetidine radical cation are typical of those for nitrogen-centered amine radical cations such as Me/sub 2/NH*/sup +/. On the other hand, the radical cation formed from aziridine has very different ESR parameters that compare closely to those for the isoelectronic C...C ring-opened form of the oxirane radical cation and the allyl radical. The radical cation formed from azetidine is therefore assigned a ring-closed structure with the unpaired electron in a 2p/sub z/ orbital on nitrogen perpendicular to the ring plane, whereas the cation from aziridine is an allylic C...C ring-opened planar isomer with the unpaired electron in a nonbonding ..pi.. orbital centered mainly on the two end carbon atoms. The neutral 1-aziridinyl and 1-azetidinyl radicals have been detected as radical products following the ..gamma.. irradiation of the parent compounds in the CFCl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/Cl and CF/sub 3/CCl/sub 3/ matrices. In particular, the 1-azetidinyl radical is produced cleanly from the azetidine radical cation in the CFCl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/Cl matrix at ca. 100 K.

  2. Mechanistic insights into light-driven graphene-induced peroxide decomposition: radical generation and disproportionation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ya-Lan; Chen, Yen-An; Li, Wei-Chin; Chu, Jean-Ho; Chen, Chun-Hu; Chiang, Chao-Ming

    2016-07-28

    Interaction between adsorbed t-butyl peroxybenzoate and photoexcited graphene rendered trapped phenyl and t-butoxy radicals. Post-irradiation thermal desorption showed benzene, t-butanol, and isobutylene oxide as the end products. The required hydrogen atoms were obtained via the radical disproportionation. Graphene enabled radical species to be captured and their on-surface chemistry to be revealed. PMID:27366795

  3. Lewis Structure Representation of Free Radicals Similar to ClO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Warren; Kobrak, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the Lewis structure representation of various free radicals, which are quite similar to the ClO radical and its isoelectronic analogues. The analysis of the periodic trends of these radicals shows that oxygen is the most electronegative atom among them.

  4. FROM ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL ADDITION TO ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R829580)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Investigation of Fragmentation of Tryptophan Nitrogen Radical Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkivskyi, Andrii; Happ, Marshall; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Siu, K. W. Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2015-08-01

    This work describes investigation of the fragmentation mechanism of tryptophan N-indolyl radical cation, H3N+-TrpN• ( m/ z 204) studied via DFT calculations and several gas-phase experimental techniques. The main fragment ion at m/ z 131, shown to be a mixture of up to four isomers including 3-methylindole (3MI) π-radical cation, was found to undergo further loss of an H atom to yield one of the two isomeric m/ z 130 ions. 3-Methylindole radical cation generated independently (via CID of [CuII(terpy)3MI]•2+) displayed gas-phase reactivity partially similar to that of the m/ z 131 fragment, further confirming our proposed mechanism. CID of deuterated tryptophan N-indolyl radical cation ( m/ z 208) suggested that up to six H atoms are involved in the pathway to formation of the m/ z 131 ion, consistent with hydrogen atom scrambling during CID of protonated Trp.

  6. Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the cyclohexyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Michael; Liu, Yanlin; Zhang, Jingsong

    2015-03-01

    Cycloalkanes are important components in conventional fuels and oil shale derived fuels and the combustion of cyclohexane fuels leads to the production of benzene, a pollutant precursor. One of the pathways from cyclohexane to benzene is through sequential hydrogen loss, including the cyclohexyl radical as an intermediate. The ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation dynamics of the cyclohexyl (c-C6H11) radical was studied for the first time using the high- n Rydberg atom time-of-flight (HRTOF) technique in the range of 232-262 nm. The translational energy distributions of the H-atom loss product channel, P (ET) 's, show a large translational energy release and a large fraction of average translational energy in the total excess energy, , from 232-262 nm. The H-atom product angular distribution is anisotropic with a positive β parameter. The most likely H-atom loss pathway is an axial H ejection from the β-carbon in cyclohexyl to form cyclohexene + H, which along with the positive β parameter, indicates that the transition dipole moment, μ, is perpendicular to the ring. The P (ET) and anisotropy of the H-atom loss product channel are significantly larger than those expected for a statistical unimolecular dissociation of a hot radical, indicating a non-statistical dissociation mechanism. The dissociation mechanism is consistent with direct dissociation on a repulsive excited state surface or on the repulsive part of the ground state surface to produce cyclohexene + H, possibly mediated by a conical intersection. Cyclohexyl is the largest radical so far showing a direct dissociation mechanism.

  7. Glutathione--hydroxyl radical interaction: a theoretical study on radical recognition process.

    PubMed

    Fiser, Béla; Jójárt, Balázs; Csizmadia, Imre G; Viskolcz, Béla

    2013-01-01

    Non-reactive, comparative (2 × 1.2 μs) molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to characterize the interactions between glutathione (GSH, host molecule) and hydroxyl radical (OH(•), guest molecule). From this analysis, two distinct steps were identified in the recognition process of hydroxyl radical by glutathione: catching and steering, based on the interactions between the host-guest molecules. Over 78% of all interactions are related to the catching mechanism via complex formation between anionic carboxyl groups and the OH radical, hence both terminal residues of GSH serve as recognition sites. The glycine residue has an additional role in the recognition of OH radical, namely the steering. The flexibility of the Gly residue enables the formation of further interactions of other parts of glutathione (e.g. thiol, α- and β-carbons) with the lone electron pair of the hydroxyl radical. Moreover, quantum chemical calculations were carried out on selected GSH/OH(•) complexes and on appropriate GSH conformers to describe the energy profile of the recognition process. The relative enthalpy and the free energy changes of the radical recognition of the strongest complexes varied from -42.4 to -27.8 kJ/mol and from -21.3 to 9.8 kJ/mol, respectively. These complexes, containing two or more intermolecular interactions, would be the starting configurations for the hydrogen atom migration to quench the hydroxyl radical via different reaction channels. PMID:24040010

  8. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  9. Hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David; Weschler, Charles J.

    Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations were estimated using a new indoor air quality model which employs the SAPRC-99 atmospheric chemistry model to simulate indoor homogenous reactions. Model results indicate that typical indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are lower than typical outdoor summertime urban hydroxyl radical levels of 5-10×10 6 molecules cm -3; however, indoor levels can be similar to or greater than typical nighttime outdoor hydroxyl radical levels of approximately 5×10 4 molecules cm -3. Effects of selected parameters on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are presented herein. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are predicted to increase non-linearly with increasing outdoor ozone concentrations, indoor alkene emission rates, and air exchange rates. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations decrease with increasing outdoor nitric oxide concentrations. Indoor temperature and indoor light intensity have moderate impacts on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Outdoor hydroxyl radical concentrations, outdoor nitrate (NO 3rad ) radical concentrations, outdoor hydroperoxy radical concentrations, and hydroxyl radical removal by indoor surfaces are predicted to have no appreciable impact on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Production of hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments appears to be controlled primarily by reactions of alkenes with ozone, and nitric oxide with hydroperoxy radical. Estimated indoor hydroxyl radical levels may potentially affect indoor air quality. Two examples are presented in which reactions of d-limonene and α-pinene with indoor hydroxyl radicals produce aldehydes, which may be of greater concern than the original compounds.

  10. The photodissociation dynamics of alkyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-28

    The photodisscociation dynamics of the alkyl radicals i-propyl (CH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and t-butyl (C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) are investigated by H-atom photofragment imaging. While i-propyl is excited at 250 nm, the photodynamics of t-butyl are explored over a large energy range using excitation wavelengths between 347 nm and 233 nm. The results are compared to those obtained previously for ethyl, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}, and to those reported for t-butyl using 248 nm excitation. The translational energy (E{sub T}) distribution of the H-atom photofragments is bimodal and appears rather similar for all three radicals. The low E{sub T} part of the distribution shows an isotropic photofragment angular distribution, while the high E{sub T} part is associated with a considerable anisotropy. Thus, for t-butyl, two H-atom loss channels of roughly equal importance have been identified in addition to the CH{sub 3}-loss channel reported previously. A mechanism for the photodissociation of alkyl radicals is suggested that is based on interactions between Rydberg- and valence states.

  11. The photodissociation dynamics of alkyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giegerich, Jens; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The photodisscociation dynamics of the alkyl radicals i-propyl (CH(CH3)2) and t-butyl (C(CH3)3) are investigated by H-atom photofragment imaging. While i-propyl is excited at 250 nm, the photodynamics of t-butyl are explored over a large energy range using excitation wavelengths between 347 nm and 233 nm. The results are compared to those obtained previously for ethyl, CH3CH2, and to those reported for t-butyl using 248 nm excitation. The translational energy (ET) distribution of the H-atom photofragments is bimodal and appears rather similar for all three radicals. The low ET part of the distribution shows an isotropic photofragment angular distribution, while the high ET part is associated with a considerable anisotropy. Thus, for t-butyl, two H-atom loss channels of roughly equal importance have been identified in addition to the CH3-loss channel reported previously. A mechanism for the photodissociation of alkyl radicals is suggested that is based on interactions between Rydberg- and valence states.

  12. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  13. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  14. Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in low-temperature solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Takada, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Lund, Anders

    2001-06-01

    Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in 77 K solids were studied by the ESR method. 1-(Dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl is converted to 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentyl radical with photoirradiation of 254 nm light. A hydrogen atom of methyl groups can hence directly transfer to the radical site at a carbon atom other than an adjacent one in the photoinduced reactions of alkyl radicals. Cyclohexyl radical is converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical with irradiation of 254 nm light. The photolysis of cyclohexyl radical causes C-C bond scission, and results in the formation of 5-hexenyl radical. It is then converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical through intramolecular rearrangement.

  15. Aminoxyl (nitroxyl) radicals in the early decomposition of the nitramine RDX.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-03-14

    The explosive nitramine RDX (1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine) is thought to decompose largely by homolytic N-N bond cleavage, among other possible initiation reactions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the resulting secondary aminyl (R2N·) radical can abstract an oxygen atom from NO2 or from a neighboring nitramine molecule, producing an aminoxyl (R2NO·) radical. Persistent aminoxyl radicals have been detected in electron-spin resonance (ESR) experiments and are consistent with autocatalytic "red oils" reported in the experimental literature. When the O-atom donor is a nitramine, a nitrosamine is formed along with the aminoxyl radical. Reactions of aminoxyl radicals can lead readily to the "oxy-s-triazine" product (as the s-triazine N-oxide) observed mass-spectrometrically by Behrens and co-workers. In addition to forming aminoxyl radicals, the initial aminyl radical can catalyze loss of HONO from RDX. PMID:23373538

  16. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of storing large amounts of energy in a free radical system such as atomic hydrogen is analyzed. Attention is focused on theoretical calculations of the ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic triplet hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium. The solid-liquid phase transition in atomic hydrogen is also examined.

  17. Hydrogen transfer in SAM-mediated enzymatic radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Hioe, Johnny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-12-14

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) plays an essential role in a variety of enzyme-mediated radical reactions. One-electron reduction of SAM is currently believed to generate the C5'-desoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently abstracts a hydrogen atom from the actual substrate in a catalytic or a non-catalytic fashion. Using a combination of theoretical and experimental bond dissociation energy (BDE) data, the energetics of these radical processes have now been quantified. SAM-derived radicals are found to react with their respective substrates in an exothermic fashion in enzymes using SAM in a stoichiometric (non-catalytic) way. In contrast, the catalytic use of SAM appears to be linked to a sequence of moderately endothermic and exothermic reaction steps. The use of SAM in spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) appears to fit neither of these general categories and appears to constitute the first example of a SAM-initiated radical reaction propagated independently of the cofactor. PMID:23139189

  18. Reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, John L.; Laguna, Glenn

    1985-01-01

    We have measured the rates of reaction of both methyl and ethyl radicals with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in the gas phase. The method we used was to photolyze samples of UF6 in the presence of either methane or ethane. The radicals produced by reaction of fluorine atoms with these species then react with either themselves or with UF6. We inferred the rate constants from ratios of the reaction products and the published rate constants for radical recombination. The diagnostic technique was gas chromatography. The resulting rate constants for reaction with UF6 were (1.6±0.8)×10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for methyl radicals and (4±2)×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for ethyl radicals.

  19. Crossed beam reaction of atomic carbon C({sup 3}P{sub j}) with hydrogen sulfide, H{sub 2}S(X{sup 1}A{sub 1}): Observation of the thioformyl radical, HCS(X{sup 2}A{prime})

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.I.; Sun, W.; Suits, A.G. |

    1997-03-01

    One of the simplest organosulfur reactions, that between ground state carbon atoms, C({sup 3}P{sub j}), and hydrogen sulfide, H{sub 2}S(X{sup 1}A{sub 1}), was studied at an average collision energy of 21.0 kJmol{sup {minus}1} using the crossed molecular beams technique. The product angular distribution and time-of-flight spectra of m/e=45 (HC{sup 32}S) were monitored. Forward-convolution fitting of our data yields an almost isotropic center-of-mass angular flux-distribution, whereas the center-of-mass translational energy flux distribution peaks at about 50 kJmol{sup {minus}1}, indicating a tight exit transition state from the decomposing thiohydroxycarbene HCSH complex to the reaction products. The high energy cut-off of the translational energy flux distribution is consistent with the formation of the thioformyl radical HCS in its X{sup 2}A electronic ground state. The first experimental verification of an existing thiohydroxycarbene intermediate and the rigorous assignment of the HCS radical product under single collision conditions explicitly suggest inclusion of the title reaction in chemical reaction networks of molecular clouds TMC-1 and OMC-1, the outflow of the carbon star IRC+10216, Shoemaker/Levy 9 impact-induced nonequilibrium sulfur chemistry in the Jovian atmosphere, as well as combustion of sulfur containing coal.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the phenyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Song Yu; Lucas, Michael; Alcaraz, Maria; Zhang Jingsong; Brazier, Christopher

    2012-01-28

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation dynamics of jet-cooled phenyl radicals (C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and C{sub 6}D{sub 5}) are studied in the photolysis wavelength region of 215-268 nm using high-n Rydberg atom time-of-flight and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization techniques. The phenyl radicals are produced from 193-nm photolysis of chlorobenzene and bromobenzene precursors. The H-atom photofragment yield spectra have a broad peak centered around 235 nm and are in good agreement with the UV absorption spectra of phenyl. The H + C{sub 6}H{sub 4} product translational energy distributions, P(E{sub T})'s, peak near {approx}7 kcal/mol, and the fraction of average translational energy in the total excess energy, , is in the range of 0.20-0.35 from 215 to 268 nm. The H-atom product angular distribution is isotropic. The dissociation rates are in the range of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} s{sup -1} with internal energy from 30 to 46 kcal/mol above the threshold of the lowest energy channel H +o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} (ortho-benzyne), comparable with the rates from the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory. The results from the fully deuterated phenyl radical are identical. The dissociation mechanism is consistent with production of H +o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, as the main channel from unimolecular decomposition of the ground electronic state phenyl radical following internal conversion of the electronically excited state.

  1. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R.G.

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  2. Photo-induced free radicals on a simulated Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, S.-S.; Chang, S.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an electron spin resonance study of free radicals in the ultraviolet irradiation of a simulated Martian surface suggest that the ultraviolet photolysis of CO or CO2, or a mixture of both, adsorbed on silica gel at minus 170 C involves the formation of OH radicals and possibly of H atoms as the primary process, followed by the formation of CO2H radicals. It is concluded that the photochemical synthesis of organic compounds could occur on Mars if the siliceous surface dust contains enough silanol groups and/or adsorbed H2O in the form of bound water.

  3. Spin-trapping of oxygen free radicals in chemical and biological systems: New traps, radicals and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bačić, Goran; Spasojević, Ivan; Šećerov, Bojana; Mojović, Miloš

    2008-05-01

    The choice of the spin-trap that is to be applied in any EPR study represents the crossroad between a comprehensive investigation and an "ordinary" quantification of production of radicals. So, the scope of our study was to compare the performance of different spin-traps for qualitative analysis of radical-generating systems, and their ability to recognize previously unnoticed radicals. In addition, we present a brief account of the difficulties involved in the detection of oxygen-centered radicals in chemical and biological systems accompanied by the rationale for using the EPR spin-trapping technique in quantitative studies of such reactive species. Certain technical aspects of EPR experiments related to efficient trapping of free radicals in biochemical systems are also discussed. As an example we present here results obtained using EPR spectroscopy and the spin-trap DEPMPO, which show that the Fenton reaction, as well as various biological systems generate a previously unappreciated hydrogen ( rad H) atom.

  4. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  5. [Aging and free radicals].

    PubMed

    Manso, C

    1992-02-01

    Several theories on aging are presented. All of them give important contributions but none explains all the aspects of the problem. Oxygen radicals produced during cellular combustion contribute to aging through multiple cumulative microlesions throughout life. The importance of glucose is emphasized; it forms early and late Maillard compounds. Other causes of aging are discussed. PMID:1595373

  6. Tyrosyl Radicals in Dehaloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Dumarieh, Rania; D'Antonio, Jennifer; Deliz-Liang, Alexandria; Smirnova, Tatyana; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2013-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, having been shown to catalyze the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of trihalophenols to dihaloquinones, is the first oxygen binding globin that possesses a biologically relevant peroxidase activity. The catalytically competent species in DHP appears to be Compound ES, a reactive intermediate that contains both a ferryl heme and a tyrosyl radical. By simulating the EPR spectra of DHP activated by H2O2, Thompson et al. (Thompson, M. K., Franzen, S., Ghiladi, R. A., Reeder, B. J., and Svistunenko, D. A. (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 17501–17510) proposed that two different radicals, depending on the pH, are formed, one located on either Tyr-34 or Tyr-28 and the other on Tyr-38. To provide additional support for these simulation-based assignments and to deduce the role(s) that tyrosyl radicals play in DHP, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench EPR spectroscopic methods were employed to study radical formation in DHP when three tyrosine residues, Tyr-28, Tyr-34, and Tyr-38, were replaced either individually or in combination with phenylalanines. The results indicate that radicals form on all three tyrosines in DHP. Evidence for the formation of DHP Compound I in several tyrosine mutants was obtained. Variants that formed Compound I showed an increase in the catalytic rate for substrate oxidation but also an increase in heme bleaching, suggesting that the tyrosines are necessary for protecting the enzyme from oxidizing itself. This protective role of tyrosines is likely an evolutionary adaptation allowing DHP to avoid self-inflicted damage in the oxidative environment. PMID:24100039

  7. Unimolecular reaction dynamics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Terry A. Miller

    2006-09-01

    Free radical reactions are of crucial importance in combustion and in atmospheric chemistry. Reliable theoretical models for predicting the rates and products of these reactions are required for modeling combustion and atmospheric chemistry systems. Unimolecular reactions frequently play a crucial role in determining final products. The dissociations of vinyl, CH2= CH, and methoxy, CH3O, have low barriers, about 13,000 cm-1 and 8,000 cm-1, respectively. Since barriers of this magnitude are typical of free radicals these molecules should serve as benchmarks for this important class of reactions. To achieve this goal, a detailed understanding of the vinyl and methoxy radicals is required. Results for dissociation dynamics of vinyl and selectively deuterated vinyl radical are reported. Significantly, H-atom scrambling is shown not to occur in this reaction. A large number of spectroscopic experiments for CH3O and CHD2O have been performed. Spectra recorded include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), laser excited dispersed fluorescence (LEDF), fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) and stimulated emission pumping (SEP). Such results are critical for implementing dynamics experiments involving the dissociation of methoxy.

  8. Density functional calculations on model tyrosyl radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Himo, F; Gräslund, A; Eriksson, L A

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-corrected density functional theory approach (PWP86) has been applied, together with large basis sets (IGLO-III), to investigate the structure and hyperfine properties of model tyrosyl free radicals. In nature, these radicals are observed in, e.g., the charge transfer pathways in photosystem II (PSII) and in ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs). By comparing spin density distributions and proton hyperfine couplings with experimental data, it is confirmed that the tyrosyl radicals present in the proteins are neutral. It is shown that hydrogen bonding to the phenoxyl oxygen atom, when present, causes a reduction in spin density on O and a corresponding increase on C4. Calculated proton hyperfine coupling constants for the beta-protons show that the alpha-carbon is rotated 75-80 degrees out of the plane of the ring in PSII and Salmonella typhimurium RNR, but only 20-30 degrees in, e.g., Escherichia coli, mouse, herpes simplex, and bacteriophage T4-induced RNRs. Furthermore, based on the present calculations, we have revised the empirical parameters used in the experimental determination of the oxygen spin density in the tyrosyl radical in E. coli RNR and of the ring carbon spin densities, from measured hyperfine coupling constants. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:9083661

  9. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  10. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  11. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of radicals and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Taylor R.

    1999-12-16

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study free radicals and clusters. The low-lying {sup 2}{Sigma} and {sup 2}{Pi} states of C{sub 2n}H (n = 1--4) have been studied. The anion photoelectron spectra yielded electron affinities, term values, and vibrational frequencies for these combustion and astrophysically relevant species. Photoelectron angular distributions allowed the author to correctly assign the electronic symmetry of the ground and first excited states and to assess the degree of vibronic coupling in C{sub 2}H and C{sub 4}H. Other radicals studied include NCN and I{sub 3}. The author was able to observe the low-lying singlet and triplet states of NCN for the first time. Measurement of the electron affinity of I{sub 3} revealed that it has a bound ground state and attachment of an argon atom to this moiety enabled him to resolve the symmetric stretching progression.

  12. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  13. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  14. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fergany, Amr

    2012-01-01

    Objective Laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to open radical cystectomy (ORC). This review focuses on patient selection criteria, technical aspects and postoperative outcomes of LRC. Methods Material for the review was obtained by a PubMed search over the last 10 years, using the keywords ‘laparoscopic radical cystectomy’ and ‘laparoscopic bladder cancer’ in human subjects. Results Twenty-two publications selected for relevance and content were used for this review from the total search yield. The level of evidence was IIb and III. LRC results in comparable short- and intermediate-range oncological outcomes to ORC, with generally longer operative times but decreased blood loss, postoperative pain and hospital stay. Overall operative and postoperative morbidity are equivalent. Conclusion In experienced hands, LRC is an acceptable minimally invasive alternative to ORC in selected patients, with the main advantage of decreased blood loss and postoperative pain, as well as a shorter hospital stay and recovery. PMID:26558003

  15. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  16. Auxiliary iron-sulfur cofactors in radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Booker, Squire J

    2015-06-01

    A vast number of enzymes are now known to belong to a superfamily known as radical SAM, which all contain a [4Fe-4S] cluster ligated by three cysteine residues. The remaining, unligated, iron ion of the cluster binds in contact with the α-amino and α-carboxylate groups of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). This binding mode facilitates inner-sphere electron transfer from the reduced form of the cluster into the sulfur atom of SAM, resulting in a reductive cleavage of SAM to methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. The 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical then abstracts a target substrate hydrogen atom, initiating a wide variety of radical-based transformations. A subset of radical SAM enzymes contains one or more additional iron-sulfur clusters that are required for the reactions they catalyze. However, outside of a subset of sulfur insertion reactions, very little is known about the roles of these additional clusters. This review will highlight the most recent advances in the identification and characterization of radical SAM enzymes that harbor auxiliary iron-sulfur clusters. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25597998

  17. C{sub 60} as a radical sponge

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, C.N.; McKay, R.G.; Larsen, B.S.

    1992-05-20

    Facile additions of alkyl radicals and hydrogen atoms to C{sub 60} are observed to occur in a mass spectrometer ion source. These reactions have not been reported previously even though mass spectrometry played an important role in the discovery of the novel C{sub 60} allotrope of carbon, and numerous mass spectrometric studies have since been reported for the various fullernes, including chemical-ionization (CI) and electron-attachment (EA) studies in which adduct ions were observed. On the basis of the mass spectrometric characterization of the radical products from the solution work by Krusic et al. and the discovery in this laboratory of compounds that efficiently trap radicals under CI conditions, the authors looked for radical additions to C{sub 60} occurring in the CI ion source of a VG 70SE mass spectrometer.

  18. Revisiting the photodissociation dynamics of the phenyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Cole-Filipiak, Neil C.; Shapero, Mark; Negru, Bogdan; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-09-14

    We have reinvestigated the photodissociation dynamics of the phenyl radical at 248 nm and 193 nm via photofragment translational spectroscopy under a variety of experimental conditions aimed at reducing the nascent internal energy of the phenyl radical and eliminating signal from contaminants. Under these optimized conditions, slower translational energy (P(E{sub T})) distributions for H-atom loss were seen at both wavelengths than in previously reported work. At 193 nm, the branching ratio for C{sub 2}H{sub 2} loss vs. H-atom loss was found to be 0.2 ± 0.1, a significantly lower value than was obtained previously in our laboratory. The new branching ratio agrees with calculated Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus rate constants, suggesting that the photodissociation of the phenyl radical at 193 nm can be treated using statistical models. The effects of experimental conditions on the P(E{sub T}) distributions and product branching ratios are discussed.

  19. Dissociation of the Ethyl Radical: An Exercise in Computational Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassabeh, Nahal; Tran, Mark; Fleming, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    A set of exercises for use in a typical physical chemistry laboratory course are described, modeling the unimolecular dissociation of the ethyl radical to form ethylene and atomic hydrogen. Students analyze the computational results both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative structural changes are compared to approximate predicted values…

  20. Spectroscopy of Benzyl-Type Radicals Generated by Electric Discharge : Jet-Cooled Dichlorobenzyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Wook; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2013-06-01

    The technique of corona excited supersonic expansion coupled with a pinhole-type glass nozzle has been proved a useful laser-free spectroscopic tool for observation of vibronic emission spectra of large aromatic molecules, especially for molecular radicals which are long believed to play an important role as a reaction intermediate in aromatic chemical reactions. The vibronic emission spectra recorded with a long-path monochromator exhibit the electronic transition energy in the D_1 → D_0 transition and vibrational mode frequencies at the D_0 state. In this laboratory, all six isomeric dichlorobenzyl radicals have been produced from the corona discharge of corresponding dichlorotoluenes seeded in a large amount of inert carrier gas He. The vibronic emission spectra show very weak intensity due to the existence of Cl atoms in the precursor molecules and possible breakdown of benzene ring by free Cl atoms. Nevertheless, we clearly identified the origin band and a few well-known vibrational modes for each isomer. From an analysis of the spectra observed, we determined the energy of electronic transition and several vibrational modes in the ground electronic state. Also, the red-shift of the origin band from the parental benzyl radical clearly shows the substituent effect of Cl atoms on electronic energy, for which we satisfactorily explain in terms of the shape of the molecular planes and position of the nodal points at a given electronic state, recently developed in this laboratory for identification of isomeric multi-substituted benzyl-type radicals. Y. W. Yoon, C. S. Huh, and S. K. Lee, Chem. Phys. Lett. {550}, 58 (2012). S. K. Lee and S. J. Kim, Chem. Phys. Lett. {412}, 88 (2005).

  1. A Successful Experiment for Tranferring Prior Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Roslyn; Bruns, Phyllis A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Orange Coast College's Assessment of Prior Learning (APL) program, which involves student preparation of a fully documented autobiographical essay and an assessment procedure used to award credit for demonstrated competencies. Highlights faculty and industry involvement. (DMM)

  2. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  3. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  4. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  5. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  6. Radical-radical interactions among oxidized guanine bases including guanine radical cation and dehydrogenated guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-09-19

    We present here a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of di-ionized GG base pairs (G(•+)G(•+),G(-H1)(•)G(•+), and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•)) consisting of the guanine cation radical (G(•+)) and/or dehydrogenated guanine radical (G(-H1)(•)) using density functional theory calculations. Different coupling modes (Watson-Crick/WC, Hoogsteen/Hoog, and minor groove/min hydrogen bonding, and π-π stacking modes) are considered. We infer that a series of G(•+)G(•+) complexes can be formed by the high-energy radiation. On the basis of density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent (CASSCF) calculations, we reveal that in the H-bonded and N-N cross-linked modes, (G(•+)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minI, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minIII have the triplet ground states; (G(•+)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minII, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minII possess open-shell broken-symmetry diradical-characterized singlet ground states; and (G(•+)G(•+))HoogII, (G(•+)G(•+))minI, (G(•+)G(•+))minII, (G(•+)G(•+))minIII, (G(•+)G(•+))HoHo, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minIII, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoHo, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))HoHo are the closed-shell systems. For these H-bonded diradical complexes, the magnetic interactions are weak, especially in the diradical G(•+)G(•+) series and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•) series. The magnetic coupling interactions of the diradical systems are controlled by intermolecular interactions (H-bond, electrostatic repulsion, and radical coupling). The radical-radical interaction in the π-π stacked di-ionized GG base pairs ((G(•+)G(•+))ππ, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))ππ, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))ππ) are also considered, and the magnetic coupling interactions in these π-π stacked base pairs are large. This is the first theoretical prediction that some di

  7. Oxygen radicals and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid) are important mediators of renal damage in acute renal failure and glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. The role of these oxygen metabolites in the above entities is discussed, and the effects of antioxidants and scavengers of O2 radicals are considered. The role of oxygen radicals in the regulation of gene transcription is also considered. PMID:9387104

  8. Aryl sulfoxide radical cations. Generation, spectral properties, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Enrico; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Gerini, Maria Francesca; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2006-08-17

    Aromatic sulfoxide radical cations have been generated by pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis techniques. In water (pulse radiolysis) the radical cations showed an intense absorption band in the UV region (ca. 300 nm) and a broad less intense band in the visible region (from 500 to 1000 nm) whose position depends on the nature of the ring substituent. At very low pulse energy, the radical cations decayed by first-order kinetics, the decay rate increasing as the pH increases. It is suggested that the decay involves a nucleophilic attack of H(2)O or OH(-) (in basic solutions) to the positively charged sulfur atom to give the radical ArSO(OH)CH(3)(*). By sensitized [N-methylquinolinium tetrafluoborate (NMQ(+))] laser flash photolysis (LFP) the aromatic sulfoxide radical cations were generated in acetonitrile. In these experiments, however, only the band of the radical cation in the visible region could be observed, the UV band being covered by the UV absorption of NMQ(+). The lambda(max) values of the bands in the visible region resulted almost identical to those observed in water for the same radical cations. In the LFP experiments the sulfoxide radical cations decayed by second-order kinetics at a diffusion-controlled rate, and the decay is attributed to the back electron transfer between the radical cation and NMQ(*). DFT calculations were also carried out for a number of 4-X ring substituted (X = H, Me, Br, OMe, CN) aromatic sulfoxide radical cations (and their neutral parents). In all radical cations, the conformation with the S-O bond almost coplanar with the aromatic ring is the only one corresponding to the energy minimum. The maximum of energy corresponds to the conformation where the S-O bond is perpendicular to the aromatic ring. The rotational energy barriers are not very high, ranging from 3.9 to 6.9 kcal/mol. In all radical cations, the major fraction of charge and spin density is localized on the SOMe group. However, a substantial delocalization

  9. Roaming dynamics in radical addition-elimination reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Suits, Arthur G.; Mebel, Alexander M.

    2014-06-01

    Radical addition-elimination reactions are a major pathway for transformation of unsaturated hydrocarbons. In the gas phase, these reactions involve formation of a transient strongly bound intermediate. However, the detailed mechanism and dynamics for these reactions remain unclear. Here we show, for reaction of chlorine atoms with butenes, that the Cl addition-HCl elimination pathway occurs from an abstraction-like Cl-H-C geometry rather than a conventional three-centre or four-centre transition state. Furthermore, access to this geometry is attained by roaming excursions of the Cl atom from the initially formed adduct. In effect, the alkene π cloud serves to capture the Cl atom and hold it, allowing many subsequent opportunities for the energized intermediate to find a suitable approach to the abstraction geometry. These bimolecular roaming reactions are closely related to the roaming radical dynamics recently discovered to play an important role in unimolecular reactions.

  10. Radical production from photosensitization of imidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral Arroyo, P.; Gonzalez, L.; Steimer, S.; Aellig, R.; Volkamer, R. M.; George, C.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Reactions promoted by light are key in atmospheric chemistry. Some of them occur in the condensed phase of aerosols containing light absorbing organic compounds (George et al., 2015). This work explores the radical reactions initiated by near-UV light in mixtures of citric acid (CA) and imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) using NO as a probe molecule for HO2, by means of coated wall flow tube experiments. Citric acid may act as H atom or electron donor in condensed phase radical cycles. IC may act as a photosensitizer. The loss of NO was measured by a chemiluminescence detector. The dependence of the NO loss on the NO concentration, the IC/CA ratio in the film, relative humidity, light intensity, oxygen molar fraction were investigated as well as the HONO and NO2 yields. We also added halide salts to investigate the effect of a competing electron donor in the system and the output of halogens to the gas phase. We found a correlation between the loss of NO above the film and the molar ratio of IC/CA and the light intensity. The variation of the NO loss with oxygen corroborates a mechanism, in which the triplet excited state of IC is reduced by citric acid, to a reduced ketyl radical that transfers an electron to molecular oxygen, which in turn leads to production of HO2 radicals. Therefore, the NO loss in the gas phase is related to the production of HO2 radicals. Relative humidity had a strong impact on the HO2 output, which shows a maximum production rate at around 30%. The addition of halide ions (X- = Cl-, Br-, I-) increases the HO2 output at low concentration and decrease it at higher concentration when X2- radical ions likely scavenge HO2. We could preliminarily quantify for the first time the contribution of these processes to the oxidative capacity in the atmosphere and conclude that their role is significant for aerosol aging and potentially a significant source of halogen compounds to the gas phase.