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Sample records for atomic clock application

  1. Compact, Continuous Beam Cold Atom Clock for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, Walter

    2000-06-01

    Highly stable atomic frequency standards are of increasing importance for a variety of space applications, ranging from communication to navigation and time transfer to tests of fundamental science. The requirements for an atomic clock vary significantly depending on the application, and for many space systems compactness and robust design are at a premium and stability dominates over absolute accuracy. We report on progress with our design for a compact Cs beam atomic clock suitable for space applications and featuring a cold atomic beam source based on a single beam, conical mirror MOT with a hole at the apex to produce a low velocity high flux atomic beam. This cold atomic beam is then used in a laser-pumped Ramsey clock, with the clock signal derived from either a microwave C-field or alternatively by Raman resonance between the Ramsey fields. The cold atom source produces a continuous beam, which relaxes requirements on the local oscillator as compared with pulsed sources. In order to reduce light shifts from the MOT light and improve signal-to-noise, the atomic beam is optically deflected and transversely cooled upon exiting the MOT's conical reflector. We estimate that the shot-noise-limited stability achievable with this physics package can be two to three orders of magnitude better than current cesium beam atomic clocks used in space applications. We present our latest experimental progress towards a working frequency standard.

  2. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  3. Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynands, Robert

    Time is a strange thing. On the one hand it is arguably the most inaccessible physical phenomenon of all: both in that it is impossible to manipulate or modify—for all we know—and in that even after thousands of years mankind's philosophers still have not found a fully satisfying way to understand it. On the other hand, no other quantity can be measured with greater precision. Today's atomic clocks allow us to reproduce the length of the second as the SI unit of time with an uncertainty of a few parts in 1016—orders of magnitude better than any other quantity. In a sense, one can say [1

  4. Optical atomic clocks and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The atomic clock has long demonstrated the capability to measure time or frequency with very high precision. Consequently, these clocks are used extensively in technological applications such as advanced synchronization or communication and navigation networks. Optical atomic clocks are next- generation timekeepers which reference narrowband optical transitions between suitable atomic states. Many optical time/frequency standards utilize state-of-the-art quantum control and precision measurement. Combined with the ultrahigh quality factors of the atomic resonances at their heart, optical atomic clocks have promised new levels of timekeeping precision, orders of magnitude higher than conventional atomic clocks based on microwave transitions. Such measurement capability enables and/or enhances many of the most exciting applications of these clocks, including the study of fundamental laws of physics through the measurement of time evolution. Here, I will highlight optical atomic clocks and their utility, as well as review recent advances in their development and performance. In particular, I will describe in detail the optical lattice clock and the realization of frequency measurement at the level of one part in 1018. To push the performance of these atomic timekeepers to such a level and beyond, several key advances are being explored worldwide. These will be discussed generally, with particular emphasis on our recent efforts at NIST in developing the optical lattice clock based on atomic ytterbium.

  5. Higher Pole Linear Traps for Atomic Clock Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically higher pole linear ion traps for frequency standard use. We have built a 12-pole trap and have successfully loaded ions into it from a linear quadrupole trap. By solving the Boltzmann equation describing large ion clouds where space charge interactions are important, we show that clock frequency changes due to ion number fluctuations are much smaller in ion clocks based multipole traps than comparable clocks based on quadrupole linear traps.

  6. VCSELs for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Peake, Gregory M.; Geib, Kent M.; Lutwak, Robert; Garvey, R. Michael; Varghese, Mathew; Mescher, Mark

    2006-02-01

    The spectroscopic technique of coherent population trapping (CPT) enables an all-optical interrogation of the groundstate hyperfine splitting of cesium (or rubidium), compared to the optical-microwave double resonance technique conventionally employed in atomic frequency standards. All-optical interrogation enables the reduction of the size and power consumption of an atomic clock by two orders of magnitude, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are preferred optical sources due to their low power consumption and circular output beam. Several research teams are currently using VCSELs for DARPA's chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) program with the goal of producing an atomic clock having a volume < 1 cm^3, a power consumption < 30 mW, and an instability (Allan deviation) < 1x10^-11 during a 1-hour averaging interval. This paper describes the VCSEL requirements for CPT-based atomic clocks, which include single mode operation, single polarization operation, modulation bandwidth > 4 GHz, low power consumption (for the CSAC), narrow linewidth, and low relative intensity noise (RIN). A significant manufacturing challenge is to reproducibly obtain the required wavelength at the specified VCSEL operating temperature and drive current. Data are presented that show the advantage of operating at the D1 (rather than D2) resonance of the alkali atoms. Measurements of VCSEL linewidth will be discussed in particular, since atomic clock performance is especially sensitive to this parameter.

  7. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity, respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous - whose rates are related by a non-constant function beta sub a - is demonstrated. The cosmological character of beta sub a is also discussed.

  8. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  9. VLBI clock synchronization. [for atomic clock rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential accuracy of VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) for clock epoch and rate comparisons was demonstrated by results from long- and short-baseline experiments. It was found that atomic clocks at widely separated sites (several thousand kilometers apart) can be synchronized to within several nanoseconds from a few minutes of VLBI observations and to within one nanosecond from several hours of observations.

  10. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  11. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  12. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  13. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  14. Shielding of longitudinal magnetic fields with thin, closely, spaced concentric cylindrical shells with applications to atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. A.; Gubser, D. U.; Cox, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A general formula is given for the longitudinal shielding effectiveness of N closed concentric cylinders. The use of these equations is demonstrated by application to the design of magnetic shields for hydrogen maser atomic clocks. Examples of design tradeoffs such as size, weight, and material thickness are discussed. Experimental results on three sets of shields fabricated by three manufacturers are presented. Two of the sets were designed employing the techniques described. Agreement between the experimental results and the design calculations is then demonstrated.

  15. Optical pumping and readout of bismuth hyperfine states in silicon for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, K.; Szech, M.; Dluhy, P.; Salvail, J.Z.; Morse, K.J.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N.V.; Nötzel, N.; Litvinenko, K.L.; Murdin, B.N.; Thewalt, M.L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The push for a semiconductor-based quantum information technology has renewed interest in the spin states and optical transitions of shallow donors in silicon, including the donor bound exciton transitions in the near-infrared and the Rydberg, or hydrogenic, transitions in the mid-infrared. The deepest group V donor in silicon, bismuth, has a large zero-field ground state hyperfine splitting, comparable to that of rubidium, upon which the now-ubiquitous rubidium atomic clock time standard is based. Here we show that the ground state hyperfine populations of bismuth can be read out using the mid-infrared Rydberg transitions, analogous to the optical readout of the rubidium ground state populations upon which rubidium clock technology is based. We further use these transitions to demonstrate strong population pumping by resonant excitation of the bound exciton transitions, suggesting several possible approaches to a solid-state atomic clock using bismuth in silicon, or eventually in enriched 28Si. PMID:25990870

  16. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  17. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  18. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  19. Orientation-Dependent Entanglement Lifetime in a Squeezed Atomic Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Leroux, Ian D.; Schleier-Smith, Monika H.; Vuletic, Vladan

    2010-06-25

    We study experimentally the application of a class of entangled states, squeezed spin states, to the improvement of atomic-clock precision. In the presence of anisotropic noise, the entanglement lifetime is strongly dependent on squeezing orientation. We measure the Allan deviation spectrum of a clock operated with a phase-squeezed input state. For averaging times up to 50 s the squeezed clock achieves a given precision 2.8(3) times faster than a clock operating at the standard quantum limit.

  20. Mitigating aliasing in atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Akhalwaya, Ismail; Sastrawan, Jarrah; Biercuk, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Passive atomic clocks periodically calibrate a classical local oscillator against an atomic quantum reference through feedback. The periodic nature of this correction leads to undesirable aliasing noise. The Dick Effect, is a special case of aliasing noise consisting of the down-conversion of clock noise at harmonics of the correction frequency to a frequency of zero. To combat the Dick effect and aliasing noise in general, we suggest an extension to the usual feedback protocol, in which we incorporate information from multiple past measurements into the correction after the most recent measurement, approximating a crude low pass anti-aliasing filter of the noise. An analytical frequency domain analysis of the approach is presented and supported by numerical time domain simulations.

  1. Atomic clocks for astrophysical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recently developed atomic hydrogen masers have achieved stability well into the 10 to the -16th domain for averaging time intervals beyond 1000 sec and that further improvements are in prospect. These devices are highly adaptable for space use in very high precision measurements of angle through Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and of range and range-rate through Doppler techniques. Space missions that will use these clocks for measuring the sun's gravity field distribution and for testing gravitation and relativity (a project that will include a search for pulsed low-frequency gravitational waves) are discussed. Estimates are made of system performance capability, and the accuracy capability of relativistic measurements is evaluated in terms of the results from the 1976 NASA/SAO spaceborne clock test of the Einstein Equivalence Principle.

  2. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: Application to gravitational wave searches

    SciTech Connect

    Tinto, Massimo; Dick, George J.; Prestage, John D.; Armstrong, J. W.

    2009-05-15

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multilink CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would give GW strain sensitivity of 3.7x10{sup -14} Hz{sup -1/2} for randomly polarized, monochromatic GW signals isotropically distributed over the celestial sphere, over a two-decade ({approx}0.0001-0.01 Hz) region of the low-frequency band. This is about an order of magnitude better than currently achieved with traditional two-way coherent Doppler experiments. The utility of optimally combining simultaneous up- and down-link observations is not limited to GW searches. The Doppler tracking technique discussed here could be performed at minimal incremental cost to improve also other radio science experiments (i.e., tests of relativistic gravity, planetary and satellite gravity field measurements, atmospheric and ring occultations) on future interplanetary missions.

  3. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I.

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  4. Analysis of a magnetically trapped atom clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kadio, D.; Band, Y. B.

    2006-11-15

    We consider optimization of a rubidium atom clock that uses magnetically trapped Bose condensed atoms in a highly elongated trap, and determine the optimal conditions for minimum Allan variance of the clock using microwave Ramsey fringe spectroscopy. Elimination of magnetic field shifts and collisional shifts are considered. The effects of spin-dipolar relaxation are addressed in the optimization of the clock. We find that for the interstate interaction strength equal to or larger than the intrastate interaction strengths, a modulational instability results in phase separation and symmetry breaking of the two-component condensate composed of the ground and excited hyperfine clock levels, and this mechanism limits the clock accuracy.

  5. Hunting for topological dark matter with atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevianko, A.; Pospelov, M.

    2014-12-01

    The cosmological applications of atomic clocks so far have been limited to searches for the uniform-in-time drift of fundamental constants. We point out that a transient-in-time change of fundamental constants can be induced by dark-matter objects that have large spatial extent, such as stable topological defects built from light non-Standard Model fields. Networks of correlated atomic clocks, some of them already in existence, such as the Global Positioning System, can be used as a powerful tool to search for topological defect dark matter, thus providing another important fundamental physics application for the ever-improving accuracy of atomic clocks. During the encounter with an extended dark-matter object, as it sweeps through the network, initially synchronized clocks will become desynchronized. Time discrepancies between spatially separated clocks are expected to exhibit a distinct signature, encoding the defect's space structure and its interaction strength with atoms.

  6. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  7. Systematic Effects in Atomic Fountain Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibble, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    We describe recent advances in the accuracies of atomic fountain clocks. New rigorous treatments of the previously large systematic uncertainties, distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing, and background gas collisions, enabled these advances. We also discuss background gas collisions of optical lattice and ion clocks and derive the smooth transition of the microwave lensing frequency shift to photon recoil shifts for large atomic wave packets.

  8. An atomic clock with 10(-18) instability.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, N; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Schioppo, M; Lemke, N D; Beloy, K; Pizzocaro, M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2013-09-13

    Atomic clocks have been instrumental in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Timekeeping precision at 1 part in 10(18) enables new timing applications in relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests of physics beyond the standard model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both using spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of 1.6 × 10(-18) after only 7 hours of averaging. PMID:23970562

  9. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  10. Deep Space Atomic Clock Ticks Toward Success

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Todd Ely, principal investigator for NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., spotlights the paradigm-busting innovations now in development to revol...

  11. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  12. Tests of Lorentz invariance with atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Lakshmi

    Lorentz invariance has been the cornerstone of special relativity. Recent theories have been proposed which suggest violations of Lorentz invariance. Experiments have been conducted using clocks that place the strictest limits on these theories. The thesis focuses on the Mansouri and Sexl formulation and I calculate using this framework the Doppler effect, Compton effect, Maxwell's equations, Hydrogen energy levels and other effects. I conclude the thesis by suggesting a possible method of testing my results using atomic clocks.

  13. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  14. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology. PMID:26550871

  15. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, R.; Hush, M. R.; Bishop, T.; Lesanovsky, I.; Fernholz, T.

    2015-10-01

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology.

  16. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  17. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, A.; Obreshkov, B.; Dzuba, V. A.

    2009-09-25

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  18. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  19. Blackbody radiation shifts in optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail; Clark, Charles

    2012-03-01

    A review of recent theoretical calculations of blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts in optical atomic clocks is presented. We summarize previous results for monovalent ions that were obtained by a relativistic all-order single-double method, where all single and double excitations of the Dirac- Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. A recently developed method for accurate calculations of BBR shifts in divalent atoms is then presented. This approach combines the relativistic all-order method and the configuration interaction method, which provides for accurate treatment of correlation corrections in atoms with two valence electrons. Calculations of the BBR shifts in B+, Al+, and In+ have enabled us to reduce the present fractional uncertainties in the frequencies of their clock transitions as measured at room temperature: to 4 × 10-19 for Al+ and 10-18 for B+ and In+. These uncertainties approach recent estimates of the limits of precision of currently proposed optical atomic clocks. We discuss directions of future theoretical developments for reducing clock uncertainties resulting from blackbody radiation shifts. PMID:22481777

  20. Efficient atomic clocks operated with several atomic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, J; Sørensen, A S

    2013-08-30

    Atomic clocks are typically operated by locking a local oscillator (LO) to a single atomic ensemble. In this Letter, we propose a scheme where the LO is locked to several atomic ensembles instead of one. This results in an exponential improvement compared to the conventional method and provides a stability of the clock scaling as (αN)(-m/2) with N being the number of atoms in each of the m ensembles and α a constant depending on the protocol being used to lock the LO. PMID:24033017

  1. Zero-dead-time operation of interleaved atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, G W; Takase, K; Wu, X; Deslauriers, L; Roy, S; Kasevich, M A

    2013-10-25

    We demonstrate a zero-dead-time operation of atomic clocks. This clock reduces sensitivity to local oscillator noise, integrating as nearly 1/τ whereas a clock with dead time integrates as 1/τ(1/2) under identical conditions. We contend that a similar scheme may be applied to improve the stability of optical clocks. PMID:24206471

  2. Relativistic general-order coupled-cluster method for high-precision calculations: Application to the Al{sup +} atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kallay, Mihaly; Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Visscher, Lucas

    2011-03-15

    We report the implementation of a general-order relativistic coupled-cluster method for performing high-precision calculations of atomic and molecular properties. As a first application, the black-body radiation shift of the Al{sup +} clock has been estimated precisely. The computed shift relative to the frequency of the 3s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{sup e}{yields}3s3p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup o} clock transition given by (-3.66{+-}0.60)x10{sup -18} calls for an improvement over the recent measurement with a reported result of (-9{+-}3)x10{sup -18}[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 070802 (2010)].

  3. Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Kohel, J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Seidel, D. J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    The goals of the Glovebox Laser-cooled Atomic Clock Experiment (GLACE) are: (1) first utilization of tunable, frequency-stabilized lasers in space, (2) demonstrate laser cooling and trapping in microgravity, (3) demonstrate longest 'perturbation-free' interaction time for a precision measurement on neutral atoms, (4) Resolve Ramsey fringes 2-10 times narrower than achievable on Earth. The approach taken is: the use of COTS components, and the utilization of prototype hardware from LCAP flight definition experiments. The launch date is scheduled for Oct. 2002. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) specifications are reviewed, and a picture of the MSG is shown.

  4. Atomic clock using coherent population trapping in a cesium cell: frequency stability and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejri, Sinda; Tricot, Francois; Danet, Jean-Marie; Yun, Peter; De Clercq, Emeric; Guerandel, Stephane

    2016-06-01

    Toward the next generation of compact devices, atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT) offer a very interesting alternative. We present a review of our studies on the short and mid term stability of a compact high performance atomic clock based on CPT in view of portable applications.

  5. Atomic clock augmentation for receivers using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Paul Andrew

    For receivers using the Global Positioning System (GPS), it is standard procedure to treat the receiver clock bias from GPS time as an unknown. This requires four range measurements to the satellites in order to solve for three dimensional position and clock offset. If the receiver clock could be synchronized with GPS time, the extra range measurement would not be necessary. To achieve this synchronization, a stable frequency reference must be incorporated into the GPS user set. This concept is known as clock aiding or clock augmentation of GPS receivers. Clock augmentation increases the availability of the navigation function because only three GPS satellites are required. Also, it is shown that clock augmentation improves vertical accuracy by reducing the vertical dilution of precision (VDOP), which is a unitless multiplier that translates range measurement error into vertical position error. This improvement in vertical accuracy is particularly beneficial for applications involving final approach and landing of aircraft using GPS, because GPS typically provides better horizontal accuracy than vertical accuracy. The benefits of atomic clock augmentation are limited by factors that cause a loss of synchronization either between the receiver and GPS time, or between ground station and airborne receivers processing GPS data in differential mode (DGPS). Among the error sources that cause a clock offset are antenna rotation, hardware drifts due to temperature variations, and relativistic effects for GPS receivers on moving platforms. Antenna rotation and temperature effects are addressed and supported by experimental data. It is shown that two particular relativity terms thought to be missing from GPS receiver algorithms are not evident in data collected during a flight test experiment. Upon addressing the error sources, the dissertation concludes with analysis of DGPS data collected during a flight test at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Tech Center in

  6. VCSEL polarization control for chip-scale atomic clocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Wendt, Joel Robert; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Keeler, Gordon Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Mytek, LLC have collaborated to develop a monolithically-integrated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) assembly with controllable polarization states suitable for use in chip-scale atomic clocks. During the course of this work, a robust technique to provide polarization control was modeled and demonstrated. The technique uses deeply-etched surface gratings oriented at several different rotational angles to provide VCSEL polarization stability. A rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) model was used to optimize the design for high polarization selectivity and fabrication tolerance. The new approach to VCSEL polarization control may be useful in a number of defense and commercial applications, including chip-scale atomic clocks and other low-power atomic sensors.

  7. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  8. Intense, Narrow Atomic-Clock Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Post, A. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Braun, A. M.; Romalis, M. V.; Happer, W.

    2004-03-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results showing that magnetic resonance transitions from the “end” sublevels of maximum or minimum spin in alkali-metal vapors are a promising alternative to the conventional 0-0 transition for small-size gas-cell atomic clocks. For these “end resonances,” collisional spin-exchange broadening, which often dominates the linewidth of the 0-0 resonance, decreases with increasing spin polarization and vanishes for 100% polarization. The end resonances also have much stronger signals than the 0-0 resonance, and are readily detectable in cells with high buffer-gas pressure.

  9. The dynamic Allan Variance IV: characterization of atomic clock anomalies.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2015-05-01

    The number of applications where precise clocks play a key role is steadily increasing, satellite navigation being the main example. Precise clock anomalies are hence critical events, and their characterization is a fundamental problem. When an anomaly occurs, the clock stability changes with time, and this variation can be characterized with the dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). We obtain the DAVAR for a series of common clock anomalies, namely, a sinusoidal term, a phase jump, a frequency jump, and a sudden change in the clock noise variance. These anomalies are particularly common in space clocks. Our analytic results clarify how the clock stability changes during these anomalies. PMID:25965674

  10. The chip-scale atomic clock : prototype evaluation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mescher, Mark; Varghese, Mathew; Lutwak, Robert; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Tepolt, Gary; Geib, Kent Martin; Leblanc, John; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Rashid, Ahmed

    2007-12-01

    The authors have developed a chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) for applications requiring atomic timing accuracy in portable battery-powered applications. At PTTI/FCS 2005, they reported on the demonstration of a prototype CSAC, with an overall size of 10 cm{sup 3}, power consumption > 150 mW, and short-term stability sy(t) < 1 x 10-9t-1/2. Since that report, they have completed the development of the CSAC, including provision for autonomous lock acquisition and a calibrated output at 10.0 MHz, in addition to modifications to the physics package and system architecture to improve performance and manufacturability.

  11. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  12. A (201)Hg+ Comagnetometer for (199)Hg+ Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Taghavi, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for unambiguously measuring the exact magnetic field experienced by trapped mercury ions contained within an atomic clock intended for space applications. In general, atomic clocks are insensitive to external perturbations that would change the frequency at which the clocks operate. On a space platform, these perturbative effects can be much larger than they would be on the ground, especially in dealing with the magnetic field environment. The solution is to use a different isotope of mercury held within the same trap as the clock isotope. The magnetic field can be very accurately measured with a magnetic-field-sensitive atomic transition in the added isotope. Further, this measurement can be made simultaneously with normal clock operation, thereby not degrading clock performance. Instead of using a conventional magnetometer to measure ambient fields, which would necessarily be placed some distance away from the clock atoms, first order field-sensitive atomic transition frequency changes in the atoms themselves determine the variations in the magnetic field. As a result, all ambiguity over the exact field value experienced by the atoms is removed. Atoms used in atomic clocks always have an atomic transition (often referred to as the clock transition) that is sensitive to magnetic fields only in second order, and usually have one or more transitions that are first-order field sensitive. For operating parameters used in the (199)Hg(+) clock, the latter can be five orders of magnitude or more sensitive to field fluctuations than the clock transition, thereby providing an unambiguous probe of the magnetic field strength.

  13. The Sr optical lattice clock at JILA: A new record in atomic clock performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Travis; Bloom, Benjamin; Williams, Jason; Campbell, Sara; Bishof, Michael; Zhang, Xibo; Zhang, Wei; Bromley, Sarah; Hutson, Ross; McNally, Rees; Ye, Jun

    2014-05-01

    The exquisite control exhibited over quantum states of individual particles has revolutionized the field of precision measurement, as exemplified by highly accurate atomic clocks. Optical clocks have been the most accurate frequency standards for the better part of a decade, surpassing even the cesium microwave fountains upon which the SI second is based. Two classes of optical clocks have outperformed cesium: single-ion clocks and optical lattice clocks. Historically ion clocks have always been more accurate, and the precision of ion clocks and lattice clocks has been comparable. For years it has been unclear if lattice clocks can overcome key systematics and become more accurate than ion clocks. In this presentation I report the first lattice clock that has surpassed ion clocks in both precision and accuracy. These measurements represent a tenfold improvement in precision and a factor of 20 improvement in accuracy over the previous best lattice clock results. This work paves the way for a better realization of SI units, the development of more sophisticated quantum sensors, and precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature.

  14. Stable 85Rb micro vapour cells: fabrication based on anodic bonding and application in chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Juan; Deng, Ke; Guo, Deng-Zhu; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Geng-Min; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2010-11-01

    We describe the microfabrication of 85Rb vapour cells using a glass-silicon anodic bonding technique and in situ chemical reaction between rubidium chloride and barium azide to produce Rb. Under controlled conditions, the pure metallic Rb drops and buffer gases were obtained in the cells with a few mm3 internal volumes during the cell sealing process. At an ambient temperature of 90 °C the optical absorption resonance of 85Rb D1 transition with proper broadening and the corresponding coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance, with a signal contrast of 1.5% and linewidth of about 1.7 kHz, have been detected. The sealing quality and the stability of the cells have also been demonstrated experimentally by using the helium leaking detection and the after-9-month optoelectronics measurement which shows a similar CPT signal as its original status. In addition, the physics package of chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) based on the cell was realized. The measured frequency stability of the physics package can reach to 2.1 × 10-10 at one second when the cell was heated to 100 °C which proved that the cell has the quality to be used in portable and battery-operated devices.

  15. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  16. Suppressing Loss of Ions in an Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An improvement has been made in the design of a compact, highly stable mercury- ion clock to suppress a loss of ions as they are transferred between the quadrupole and higher multipole ion traps. Such clocks are being developed for use aboard spacecraft for navigation and planetary radio science. The modification is also applicable to ion clocks operating on Earth: indeed, the success of the modification has been demonstrated in construction and operation of a terrestrial breadboard prototype of the compact, highly stable mercury-ion clock. Selected aspects of the breadboard prototype at different stages of development were described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The following background information is reviewed from previous articles: In this clock as in some prior ion clocks, mercury ions are shuttled between two ion traps, one a 16- pole linear radio-frequency trap, while the other is a quadrupole radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a 202Hg lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at approximately 40.507 GHz. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling that would otherwise be caused by collisions between clock atoms and the wall of a gas cell. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave-resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. This is similar to the operation of an atomic beam clock, except that with ions the beam can be halted and reversed as ions are shuttled back and forth between the two traps. When the two traps are driven at the same radio frequency, the strength of confinement can be reduced near the junction between the two traps, depending upon the relative phase of the RF voltage used to operate each of the two traps, and

  17. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks. PMID:26274639

  18. Parcs:. a Laser-Cooled Atomic Clock in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavner, T. P.; Hollberg, L. W.; Jefferts, S. R.; Robinson, H. G.; Sullivan, D. B.; Walls, F. L.; Ashby, N.; Klipstein, W. M.; Maleki, L.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Wu, S.; Young, L.; Mattison, E. M.; Vessot, R. F. C.; Demarchi, A.

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes progress toward the development of a Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space (PARCS) and reviews the scientific and technical objectives of the PARCS mission. PARCS is a collaborative effort involving the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the University of Colorado, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (SAO) and the Politecnico di Torino. Space systems for this experiment include a laser-cooled cesium atomic clock and a GPS frequency-comparison and orbit determination system, along with a hydrogen maser that serves as both a local oscillator for the cesium clock and a reference against which certain tests of gravitational theory can be made. In the microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS), cesium atoms can be launched more slowly through the clock's microwave cavity, thus significantly reducing a number of troubling effects (including several critical systematic effects), so clock performance can be substantially improved beyond that achieved on earth.

  19. Detection of atomic clock frequency jumps with the Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2012-03-01

    Frequency jumps are common anomalies in atomic clocks aboard navigation system satellites. These anomalous behaviors must be detected quickly and accurately to minimize the impact on user positioning. We develop a detector for frequency jumps based on the Kalman filter. Numerical simulations show that the detector is fast, with high probability of detection and low probability of false alarms. It also has a low computational cost because it takes advantage of the recursive nature of the Kalman filter. Therefore, it can be used in applications in which little computational power is available, such as aboard navigation system satellites. PMID:22481785

  20. ac Stark shift of the Cs microwave atomic clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbusch, P.; Ghezali, S.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the ac Stark shift of the Cs microwave atomic clock transition theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical and experimental data are in good agreement with each other. Results indicate the absence of a magic wavelength at which there would be no differential shift of the clock states having zero projections of the total angular momentum.

  1. Limitations on long-term stability and accuracy in atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The limits to accuracy and long term stability in present atomic clocks are examined. Recent proposals for new frequency standards are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of frequency standards based on such ideas as laser transitions, single atoms, and atom cooling. The applicability of some of these new techniques to existing standards is examined.

  2. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  3. Quantum Atomic Clock Synchronization: An Entangled Concept of Nonlocal Simultaneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Jozsa, R.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that two spatially separated parties (Alice and Bob) can utilize shared prior quantum entanglement, as well as a classical information channel, to establish a synchronized pair of atomic clocks.

  4. High-stability compact atomic clock based on isotropic laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esnault, Francois-Xavier; Holleville, David; Rossetto, Nicolas; Guerandel, Stephane; Dimarcq, Noel

    2010-09-15

    We present a compact cold-atom clock configuration where isotropic laser cooling, microwave interrogation, and clock signal detection are successively performed inside a spherical microwave cavity. For ground operation, a typical Ramsey fringe width of 20 Hz has been demonstrated, limited by the atom cloud's free fall in the cavity. The isotropic cooling light's disordered properties provide a large and stable number of cold atoms, leading to a high signal-to-noise ratio limited by atomic shot noise. A relative frequency stability of 2.2x10{sup -13{tau}-1/2} has been achieved, averaged down to 4x10{sup -15} after 5x10{sup 3} s of integration. Development of such a high-performance compact clock is of major relevance for on-board applications, such as satellite-positioning systems. As a cesium clock, it opens the door to a new generation of compact primary standards and timekeeping devices.

  5. Micromagic Clock: Microwave Clock Based on Atoms in an Engineered Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-27

    We propose a new class of atomic microwave clocks based on the hyperfine transitions in the ground state of aluminum or gallium atoms trapped in optical lattices. For such elements magic wavelengths exist at which both levels of the hyperfine doublet are shifted at the same rate by the lattice laser field, canceling its effect on the clock transition. A similar mechanism for the magic wavelengths may work in microwave hyperfine transitions in other atoms which have the fine-structure multiplets in the ground state.

  6. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  7. Atomic clock based on transient coherent population trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Tao; Deng Ke; Chen Xuzong; Wang Zhong

    2009-04-13

    We proposed a scheme to implement coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock based on the transient CPT phenomenon. We proved that the transient transmitted laser power in a typical {lambda} system near CPT resonance features as a damping oscillation. Also, the oscillating frequency is exactly equal to the frequency detuning from the atomic hyperfine splitting. Therefore, we can directly measure the frequency detuning and then compensated to the output frequency of microwave oscillator to get the standard frequency. By this method, we can further simplify the structure of CPT atomic clock, and make it easier to be digitized and miniaturized.

  8. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  9. Remote atomic clock synchronization via satellites and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piester, D.; Rost, M.; Fujieda, M.; Feldmann, T.; Bauch, A.

    2011-07-01

    In the global network of institutions engaged with the realization of International Atomic Time (TAI), atomic clocks and time scales are compared by means of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and by employing telecommunication satellites for two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). The frequencies of the state-of-the-art primary caesium fountain clocks can be compared at the level of 10-15 (relative, 1 day averaging) and time scales can be synchronized with an uncertainty of one nanosecond. Future improvements of worldwide clock comparisons will require also an improvement of the local signal distribution systems. For example, the future ACES (atomic clock ensemble in space) mission shall demonstrate remote time scale comparisons at the uncertainty level of 100 ps. To ensure that the ACES ground instrument will be synchronized to the local time scale at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) without a significant uncertainty contribution, we have developed a means for calibrated clock comparisons through optical fibers. An uncertainty below 40 ps over a distance of 2 km has been demonstrated on the campus of PTB. This technology is thus in general a promising candidate for synchronization of enhanced time transfer equipment with the local realizations of Coordinated Universal Time UTC. Based on these experiments we estimate the uncertainty level for calibrated time transfer through optical fibers over longer distances. These findings are compared with the current status and developments of satellite based time transfer systems, with a focus on the calibration techniques for operational systems.

  10. Applications of Clocks to Space Navigation & "Planetary GPS"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to fly atomic clocks on GPS satellites has profoundly defined the capabilities and limitations of GPS in near-Earth applications. It is likely that future infrastructure for Lunar and Mars applications will be constrained by financial factors. The development of a low cost, small, high performance space clock -- or ultrahigh performance space clocks -- could revolutionize and drive the entire approach to GPS-like systems at the Moon (or Mars), and possibly even change the future of GPS at Earth. Many system trade studies are required. The performance of future GPS-like tracking systems at the Moon or Mars will depend critically on clock performance, availability of inertial sensors, and constellation coverage. Example: present-day GPS carry 10(exp -13) clocks and require several updates per day. With 10(exp -15) clocks, a constellation at Mars could operate autonomously with updates just once per month. Use of GPS tracking at the Moon should be evaluated in a technical study.

  11. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms.

    PubMed

    Kómár, P; Topcu, T; Kessler, E M; Derevianko, A; Vuletić, V; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles. PMID:27541452

  12. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kómár, P.; Topcu, T.; Kessler, E. M.; Derevianko, A.; Vuletić, V.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  13. Accurate Optical Lattice Clock with {sup 87}Sr Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Le Targat, Rodolphe; Baillard, Xavier; Fouche, Mathilde; Brusch, Anders; Tcherbakoff, Olivier; Rovera, Giovanni D.; Lemonde, Pierre

    2006-09-29

    We report a frequency measurement of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition of {sup 87}Sr atoms in an optical lattice clock. The frequency is determined to be 429 228 004 229 879(5) Hz with a fractional uncertainty that is comparable to state-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms in free fall. The two previous measurements of this transition were found to disagree by about 2x10{sup -13}, i.e., almost 4 times the combined error bar and 4 to 5 orders of magnitude larger than the claimed ultimate accuracy of this new type of clocks. Our measurement is in agreement with one of these two values and essentially resolves this discrepancy.

  14. Heisenberg-limited atom clocks based on entangled qubits.

    PubMed

    Kessler, E M; Kómár, P; Bishof, M; Jiang, L; Sørensen, A S; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2014-05-16

    We present a quantum-enhanced atomic clock protocol based on groups of sequentially larger Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states that achieves the best clock stability allowed by quantum theory up to a logarithmic correction. Importantly the protocol is designed to work under realistic conditions where the drift of the phase of the laser interrogating the atoms is the main source of decoherence. The simultaneous interrogation of the laser phase with a cascade of GHZ states realizes an incoherent version of the phase estimation algorithm that enables Heisenberg-limited operation while extending the coherent interrogation time beyond the laser noise limit. We compare and merge the new protocol with existing state of the art interrogation schemes, and identify the precise conditions under which entanglement provides an advantage for clock stabilization: it allows a significant gain in the stability for short averaging time. PMID:24877919

  15. Magnetic shielding of the cold atom space clock PHARAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moric, Igor; Laurent, Philippe; Chatard, Philippe; de Graeve, Charles-Marie; Thomin, Stephane; Christophe, Vincent; Grosjean, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    The space clock PHARAO is an atomic clock based on laser cooled cesium atoms. In order to attenuate magnetic field fluctuation in orbit, PHARAO clock uses three concentric Mumetal magnetic shields combined with several coils to improve the field homogeneity. We have characterized the attenuation and magnetic field homogeneity of the shields used to build the flight model. The average value of attenuation inside the three shields is around 18,000 when the external field is similar to the orbit field (30 μT) and the field homogeneity is lower than 10 nT. These values have not changed after vibrations and thermal tests for the space qualification. Permeability variation of the shields as a function of the intercepted flux has been analyzed.

  16. The Deep Space Atomic Clock: Ushering in a New Paradigm for Radio Navigation and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd; Seubert, Jill; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the on-orbit performance of a high-accuracy, high-stability miniaturized mercury ion atomic clock during a year-long experiment in Low Earth Orbit. DSAC's timing error requirement provides the frequency stability necessary to perform deep space navigation based solely on one-way radiometric tracking data. Compared to a two-way tracking paradigm, DSAC-enabled one-way tracking will benefit navigation and radio science by increasing the quantity and quality of tracking data. Additionally, DSAC also enables fully-autonomous onboard navigation useful for time-sensitive situations. The technology behind the mercury ion atomic clock and a DSAC mission overview are presented. Example deep space applications of DSAC, including navigation of a Mars orbiter and Europa flyby gravity science, highlight the benefits of DSAC-enabled one-way Doppler tracking.

  17. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  18. Atomic Clock Based on Opto-Electronic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan

    2005-01-01

    A proposed highly accurate clock or oscillator would be based on the concept of an opto-electronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized to an atomic transition. Opto-electronic oscillators, which have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, generate signals at frequencies in the gigahertz range characterized by high spectral purity but not by longterm stability or accuracy. On the other hand, the signals generated by previously developed atomic clocks are characterized by long-term stability and accuracy but not by spectral purity. The proposed atomic clock would provide high spectral purity plus long-term stability and accuracy a combination of characteristics needed to realize advanced developments in communications and navigation. In addition, it should be possible to miniaturize the proposed atomic clock. When a laser beam is modulated by a microwave signal and applied to a photodetector, the electrical output of the photodetector includes a component at the microwave frequency. In atomic clocks of a type known as Raman clocks or coherent-population-trapping (CPT) clocks, microwave outputs are obtained from laser beams modulated, in each case, to create two sidebands that differ in frequency by the amount of a hyperfine transition in the ground state of atoms of an element in vapor form in a cell. The combination of these sidebands produces a transparency in the population of a higher electronic level that can be reached from either of the two ground-state hyperfine levels by absorption of a photon. The beam is transmitted through the vapor to a photodetector. The components of light scattered or transmitted by the atoms in the two hyperfine levels mix in the photodetector and thereby give rise to a signal at the hyperfine- transition frequency. The proposed atomic clock would include an OEO and a rubidium- or cesium- vapor cell operating in the CPT/Raman regime (see figure). In the OEO portion of this atomic clock, as in a typical prior OEO, a

  19. Optical lattice clock with atoms confined in a shallow trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonde, Pierre; Wolf, Peter

    2005-09-15

    We study the trap depth requirement for the realization of an optical clock using atoms confined in a lattice. We show that site-to-site tunneling leads to a residual sensitivity to the atom dynamics hence requiring large depths [(50-100)E{sub r} for Sr] to avoid any frequency shift or line broadening of the atomic transition at the 10{sup -17}-10{sup -18} level. Such large depths and the corresponding laser power may, however, lead to difficulties (e.g., higher-order light shifts, two-photon ionization, technical difficulties) and therefore one would like to operate the clock in much shallower traps. To circumvent this problem we propose the use of an accelerated lattice. Acceleration lifts the degeneracy between adjacents potential wells which strongly inhibits tunneling. We show that using the Earth's gravity, much shallower traps (down to 5E{sub r} for Sr) can be used for the same accuracy goal.

  20. Searching for Dark Matter with Atomic Clocks and Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Yevgeny; Flambaum, Victor

    2016-05-01

    We propose new schemes for the direct detection of low-mass bosonic dark matter, which forms a coherently oscillating classical field and resides in the observed galactic dark matter haloes, using atomic clock, atomic spectroscopy and laser interferometry measurements in the laboratory. We have recently shown that such dark matter can produce both a `slow' cosmological evolution and oscillating variations in the fundamental constants. Using recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements in, we have derived limits on the quadratic interactions of scalar dark matter with ordinary matter that improve on existing constraints by up to 15 orders of magnitude. We have also proposed the use of laser and maser interferometry as novel high-precision platforms to search for dark matter, with effects due to the variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on alterations in the accumulated phase enhanced by up to 14 orders of magnitude. Other possibilities include the use of highly-charged ions, molecules and nuclear clocks.

  1. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  2. Portable compact cold atoms clock topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechoneri, R. D.; Müller, S. T.; Bueno, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The compact frequency standard under development at USP Sao Carlos is a cold atoms system that works with a distributed hardware system principle and temporal configuration of the interrogation method of the atomic sample, in which the different operation steps happen in one place: inside the microwave cavity. This type of operation allows us to design a standard much more compact than a conventional one, where different interactions occur in the same region of the apparatus. In this sense, it is necessary to redefine all the instrumentation associated with the experiment. This work gives an overview of the topology we are adopting for the new system.

  3. Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bishof, M.; Lin, Y.; Swallows, M. D.; Ye, J.; Rey, A. M.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2011-06-24

    We report the observation of resolved atomic interaction sidebands (ISB) in the {sup 87}Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional optical lattice. The ISB are a manifestation of the strong interactions that occur between atoms confined in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry and disappear when the confinement is relaxed along one dimension. The emergence of ISB is linked to the recently observed suppression of collisional frequency shifts. At the current temperatures, the ISB can be resolved but are broad. At lower temperatures, ISB are predicted to be substantially narrower and useful spectroscopic tools in strongly interacting alkaline-earth gases.

  4. Clock Technology Development in the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Dave; Thompson, R. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. It focuses on clock technology development. The topics include: 1) Overview of LCAP Flight Projects; 2) Space Clock 101; 3) Physics with Clocks in microgravity; 4) Space Clock Challenges; 5) LCAP Timeline; 6) International Space Station (ISS) Science Platforms; 7) ISS Express Rack; 8) Space Qualification of Components; 9) Laser Configuration; 10) Clock Rate Comparisons: GPS Carrier Phase Frequency Transfer; and 11) ISS Model Views. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  5. A new trapped ion atomic clock based on 201Hg+.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2010-03-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy has been performed on the ground-state hyperfine transitions in trapped (201)Hg+ ions as part of a program to investigate the viability of (201)Hg+ for clock applications. Part of the spectroscopy work was directed at magnetic-field-sensitive hyperfine lines with delta m(F) = 0, which allow accurate Doppler-free measurement of the magnetic field experienced by the trapped ions. Although it is possible to measure Doppler-free magnetic-field-sensitive transitions in the commonly used clock isotope, (199)Hg+, it is more difficult. In this paper, we discuss how this (199)Hg+ feature may be exploited to produce a more stable clock or one requiring less magnetic shielding in environments with magnetic field fluctuations far in excess of what is normally found in the laboratory. We have also determined that in discharge-lamp-based trapped mercury ion clocks, the optical pumping time for (201)Hg+ is about 3 times shorter than that of (199)Hg+ This can be used to reduce dead time in the interrogation cycle for these types of clocks, thereby reducing the impact of local oscillator noise aliasing effects. PMID:20211781

  6. Time scale algorithms for an inhomogeneous group of atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, C.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Douglas, R. J.; Morris, D.; Cundy, S.; Lam, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Through the past 17 years, the time scale requirements at the National Research Council (NRC) have been met by the unsteered output of its primary laboratory cesium clocks, supplemented by hydrogen masers when short-term stability better than 2 x 10(exp -12)tau(sup -1/2) has been required. NRC now operates three primary laboratory cesium clocks, three hydrogen masers, and two commercial cesium clocks. NRC has been using ensemble averages for internal purposes for the past several years, and has a realtime algorithm operating on the outputs of its high-resolution (2 x 10(exp -13) s at 1 s) phase comparators. The slow frequency drift of the hydrogen masers has presented difficulties in incorporating their short-term stability into the ensemble average, while retaining the long-term stability of the laboratory cesium frequency standards. We report on this work on algorithms for an inhomogeneous ensemble of atomic clocks, and on our initial work on time scale algorithms that could incorporate frequency calibrations at NRC from the next generation of Zacharias fountain cesium frequency standards having frequency accuracies that might surpass 10(exp -15), or from single-trapped-ion frequency standards (Ba+, Sr+,...) with even higher potential accuracies. The requirements for redundancy in all the elements (including the algorithms) of an inhomogeneous ensemble that would give a robust real-time output of the algorithms are presented and discussed.

  7. Atomic clock transitions in silicon-based spin qubits.

    PubMed

    Wolfowicz, Gary; Tyryshkin, Alexei M; George, Richard E; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Thewalt, Mike L W; Lyon, Stephen A; Morton, John J L

    2013-08-01

    A major challenge in using spins in the solid state for quantum technologies is protecting them from sources of decoherence. This is particularly important in nanodevices where the proximity of material interfaces, and their associated defects, can play a limiting role. Spin decoherence can be addressed to varying degrees by improving material purity or isotopic composition, for example, or active error correction methods such as dynamic decoupling (or even combinations of the two). However, a powerful method applied to trapped ions in the context of atomic clocks is the use of particular spin transitions that are inherently robust to external perturbations. Here, we show that such 'clock transitions' can be observed for electron spins in the solid state, in particular using bismuth donors in silicon. This leads to dramatic enhancements in the electron spin coherence time, exceeding seconds. We find that electron spin qubits based on clock transitions become less sensitive to the local magnetic environment, including the presence of (29)Si nuclear spins as found in natural silicon. We expect the use of such clock transitions will be of additional significance for donor spins in nanodevices, mitigating the effects of magnetic or electric field noise arising from nearby interfaces and gates. PMID:23793304

  8. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  9. Stability of a trapped-atom clock on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmuk, R.; Dugrain, V.; Maineult, W.; Reichel, J.; Rosenbusch, P.

    2015-07-01

    We present a compact atomic clock interrogating ultracold 87Rb magnetically trapped on an atom chip. Very long coherence times sustained by spin self-rephasing allow us to interrogate the atomic transition with 85% contrast at 5-s Ramsey time. The clock exhibits a fractional frequency stability of 5.8 ×10-13 at 1 s and is likely to integrate into the 10-15 range in less than a day. A detailed analysis of seven noise sources explains the measured frequency stability. Fluctuations in the atom temperature (0.4 nK shot-to-shot) and in the offset magnetic field (5 ×10-6 relative fluctuations shot-to-shot) are the main noise sources together with the local oscillator, which is degraded by the 30% duty cycle. The analysis suggests technical improvements to be implemented in a future second generation setup . The results demonstrate the remarkable degree of technical control that can be reached in an atom chip experiment.

  10. High accuracy measurement of optical atomic clock polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Jeff; Lemke, Nathan; Hinkley, Nathan; Pizzocaro, Marco; Fox, Richard; Ludlow, Andrew; Oates, Chris

    2012-06-01

    The differential static polarizability of ytterbium optical clock states αclock≡α(^3 0) - α(^1 0) is known theoretically to ˜10%. We report an experimental value of this polarizability, αclock= 36.2612(7) kHz (kV/cm)-2 at 20 parts-per-million (ppm) accuracy [1]. Ultracold ^171Yb atoms held in an optical lattice at the ac-Stark balancing ``magic'' wavelength (759 nm) are surrounded by rigidly spaced transparent conductive planar electrodes. An ultrastable laser (578 nm) is locked to the ^1 0<->^3 0 transition in an interleaved fashion for three electrode conditions: voltage applied, reversed, and grounded. These integrated error signals yield the quadratic Stark shift and a measure of stray fields. The electrode spacing is measured interferometrically in situ. The applied electric field at the site of the atoms deviates at the few ppm level from an infinite-planar model. When last evaluated, the ytterbium optical clock frequency uncertainty was dominated by that of the blackbody Stark shift. We show how this measurement reduces this uncertainty contribution an order of magnitude to a fractional level of 3x10-17.[4pt] [1] J.A. Sherman et al., arXiv:1112.2766 (2011).

  11. 3.4 GHz composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator for miniaturized atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Artieda, Alvaro; Muralt, Paul

    2011-06-27

    Triple layer SiO{sub 2}/AlN/SiO{sub 2} composite thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (TFBARs) were studied for applications in atomic clocks. The TFBAR's were tuned to 3.4 GHz, corresponding to half the hyperfine splitting of the ground state of rubidium {sup 87}Rb atoms. The quality factor (Q) was equal to 2300 and the temperature coefficient of the resonance frequency f{sub r} amounted to 1.5 ppm/K. A figure of merit Qf{sub r} of {approx} 0.8 x 10{sup 13} Hz and a thickness mode coupling factor of 1% were reached. Such figures are ideal for frequency sources in an oscillator circuit that tracks the optical signal in atomic clocks.

  12. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  13. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danet, Jean-Marie; Kozlova, Olga; Yun, Peter; Guérande, Stéphane; de Clercq, Emeric

    2014-08-01

    Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT) offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO) noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  14. Magnetic blackbody shift of hyperfine transitions for atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; King-Lacroix, J.

    2009-12-15

    We derive an expression for the magnetic blackbody shift of hyperfine transitions such as the cesium primary reference transition which defines the second. The shift is found to be a complicated function of temperature, and has a T{sup 2} dependence only in the high-temperature limit. We also calculate the shift of ground-state p{sub 1/2} hyperfine transitions which have been proposed as new atomic clock transitions. In this case interaction with the p{sub 3/2} fine-structure multiplet may be the dominant effect.

  15. Al-free active region laser diodes at 894 nm for compact Cesium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Bandel, N.; Bébé Manga Lobé, J.; Garcia, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Lecomte, M.; Drisse, O.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Time-frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks optically pumped is a promising area that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of laser diodes that are used for atomic pumping. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for earth applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. We are in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852nm (D2 line). The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and larger spectral separation between lines in the 894nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "dark states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be insensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894nm wavelength is grounded on our previous results for 852nm DFB. Thus, we show our first results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well broad-area lasers (100μm width, with lengths ranging from 2mm to 4mm), for further DFB operation at 894nm. We obtained low internal losses below 2cm-1, the external differential efficiency is 0.49W/A with uncoated facets and a low threshold current density of 190A/cm², for 2mm lasers at 20°C.

  16. New Techniques to Test Spin-Gravity Coupling with Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in laser technology have produced the opportunity to realize more stable and accurate atomic clocks, by laser excitation, manipulation and cooling of atoms. In this paper we will describe a new scheme based on the use of lasers with atomic clocks to increase the sensitivity of experimental search for a spin-gravity coupling.

  17. Microwave interrogation cavity for the rubidium space cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ren; Yuan-Ci, Gao; Tang, Li; De-Sheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    The performance of space cold atom clocks (SCACs) should be improved thanks to the microgravity environment in space. The microwave interrogation cavity is a key element in a SCAC. In this paper, we develop a microwave interrogation cavity especially for the rubidium SCAC. The interrogation cavity has two microwave interaction zones with a single feed-in source, which is located at the center of the cavity for symmetric coupling excitation and to ensure that the two interaction zones are in phase. The interrogation cavity has a measured resonance frequency of 6.835056471 GHz with a loaded quality factor of nearly 4200, which shows good agreement with simulation results. We measure the Rabi frequency of the clock transition of the rubidium atom in each microwave interaction zone, and subsequently demonstrate that the distributions of the magnetic field in the two interaction zones are the same and meet all requirements of the rubidium SCAC. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11034008), the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094304), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-09-15

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of {pi} between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts.

  19. Advancing Navigation, Timing, and Science with the Deep Space Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Seubert, Jill; Bell, Julia

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock mission is developing a small, highly stable mercury ion atomic clock with an Allan deviation of at most 1e-14 at one day, and with current estimates near 3e-15. This stability enables one-way radiometric tracking data with accuracy equivalent to and, in certain conditions, better than current two-way deep space tracking data; allowing a shift to a more efficient and flexible one-way deep space navigation architecture. DSAC-enabled one-way tracking will benefit navigation and radio science by increasing the quantity and quality of tracking data. Additionally, DSAC would be a key component to fully-autonomous onboard radio navigation useful for time-sensitive situations. Potential deep space applications of DSAC are presented, including orbit determination of a Mars orbiter and gravity science on a Europa flyby mission.

  20. In situ dissolution or deposition of Ytterbium (Yb) metal in microhotplate wells for a miniaturized atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Anderson, John M; Burns, George R; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Wheeler, David R; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2012-10-22

    Current atomic clocks are burdened by size, weight, power and portability limitations to satisfy a broad range of potential applications. One critical need in the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock is small, low-power metallic sources. Exploiting the relatively high vapor pressure of ytterbium (Yb) and its dissolution in anhydrous ammonia, we report two independent techniques for depositing Yb inside a well micromachined into a microhotplate. Subsequent in situ evaporation of Yb from the microhotplate well serves as a low-power metallic source suitable for atomic clocks. The deposition and evaporation of Yb were confirmed using a variety of physicochemical techniques including quartz crystal microbalance, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and laser fluorescence. We also describe the fabrication of the microhotplate device, an integral component of our Yb-based miniature atomic clock. The Yb deposition/evaporation on a microhotplate well is thus useful as a low power Yb source during the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock, and this technique could be used for other applications requiring a vapor of a metal that has a moderate vapor pressure. PMID:23187228

  1. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.; Taichenachev, Alexey V.; Yudin, Valery I.

    2010-01-15

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to approx =25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Recent improvements on the atomic fountain clock at SIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuan-Bo; Wei, Rong; Dong, Ri-Chang; Zou, Fan; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2015-07-01

    We report the recent advance in our rubidium atomic fountain clock (AFC). The parameters of the Ramsey cavity are optimized by balancing the coupling from the two ports. The temperature control system of the Ramsey interaction region is renovated, and the resonant temperature of the Ramsey cavity is regulated to be slightly above the room temperature. The quality of magnetic environment in the Ramsey interaction region is also improved. A new digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit that controls the local oscillator is adopted to decrease the noise of the oven-controlled crystal oscillator output. As a result, the short-term fractional frequency stability of 2.7 × 10-13τ-1/2 and the long-term fractional frequency stability of 1.6 × 10-15 at the average time of 32800 s are achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275204 and 91336105).

  3. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  4. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  5. Science Goals of the Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space (PARCS) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.

    2003-01-01

    The PARCS (Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space) experiment will use a laser-cooled Cesium atomic clock operating in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to provide both advanced tests of gravitational theory and to demonstrate a new cold-atom clock technology for space. PARCS is a joint project of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the University of Colorado (CU). This paper concentrates on the scientific goals of the PARCS mission. The microgravity space environment allows laser-cooled Cs atoms to have Ramsey times in excess of those feasible on Earth, resulting in improved clock performance. Clock stabilities of 5x10(exp -14) at one second, and accuracies better than 10(exp -16) are projected.

  6. A review of atomic clock technology, the performance capability of present spaceborne and terrestrial atomic clocks, and a look toward the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1989-01-01

    Clocks have played a strong role in the development of general relativity. The concept of the proper clock is presently best realized by atomic clocks, whose development as precision instruments has evolved very rapidly in the last decades. To put a historical prospective on this progress since the year AD 1000, the time stability of various clocks expressed in terms of seconds of time error over one day of operation is shown. This stability of operation must not be confused with accuracy. Stability refers to the constancy of a clock operation as compared to that of some other clocks that serve as time references. Accuracy, on the other hand, is the ability to reproduce a previously defined frequency. The issues are outlined that must be considered when accuracy and stability of clocks and oscillators are studied. In general, the most widely used resonances result from the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and that of the outermost electron, which is characteristic of hydrogen and the alkali atoms. During the past decade hyperfine resonances of ions have also been used. The principal reason for both the accuracy and the stability of atomic clocks is the ability of obtaining very narrow hyperfine transition resonances by isolating the atom in some way so that only the applied stimulating microwave magnetic field is a significant source of perturbation. It is also important to make resonance transitions among hyperfine magnetic sublevels where separation is independent, at least to first order, of the magnetic field. In the case of ions stored in traps operating at high magnetic fields, one selects the trapping field to be consistent with a field-independent transition of the trapped atoms.

  7. Three-dimensional optical lattice clock with bosonic {sup 88}Sr atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Akatsuka, Tomoya; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2010-02-15

    We present detailed analyses of our recent experiment on the three-dimensional (3D) optical lattice clock with bosonic {sup 88}Sr atoms in which the collisional frequency shift was suppressed by applying a single-occupancy lattice. Frequency shifts in magnetically induced spectroscopy on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition ({lambda}=698 nm) of {sup 88}Sr were experimentally investigated by referencing a one-dimensional (1D) lattice clock based on spin-polarized {sup 87}Sr atoms. We discuss that the clock stability is limited by the current laser stability as well as the experimental sequence of the clock operation, which may be improved to {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=2x10{sup -16}/{radical}({tau}) by optimizing the cycle time of the clock operation.

  8. Cold-Atom Clocks on Earth and in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonde, Pierre; Laurent, Philippe; Santarelli, Giorgio; Abgrall, Michel; Sortais, Yvan; Bize, Sebastien; Nicolas, Christophe; Zhang, Shougang; Clairon, Andre; Dimarcq, Noel; Petit, Pierre; Mann, Antony G.; Luiten, Andre N.; Chang, Sheng; Salomon, Christophe

    We present recent progress on microwave clocks that make use of laser-cooled atoms. With an ultra-stable cryogenic sapphire oscillator as interrogation oscillator, a cesium fountain operates at the quantum projection noise limit. With 6 x10^5 detected atoms, the relative frequency stability is 4 x10^-14 &1/2circ, where τ is the integration time in seconds. This stability is comparable to that of hydrogen masers. At τ=2 x10^4s, the measured stability reaches 6 x10^-16. A 87Rb fountain has also been constructed and the 87Rb ground-state hyperfine energy has been compared to the Cs primary standard with a relative accuracy of 2.5 x10^-15. The 87Rb collisional shift is found to be at least 30 times below that of cesium. We also describe a transportable cesium fountain, which will be used for frequency comparisons with an accuracy of 10-15 or below. Finally, we present the details of a space mission for a cesium standard which has been selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to fly on the International Space Station in 2003.

  9. Enhancing coherence in molecular spin qubits via atomic clock transitions.

    PubMed

    Shiddiq, Muhandis; Komijani, Dorsa; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Hill, Stephen

    2016-03-17

    Quantum computing is an emerging area within the information sciences revolving around the concept of quantum bits (qubits). A major obstacle is the extreme fragility of these qubits due to interactions with their environment that destroy their quantumness. This phenomenon, known as decoherence, is of fundamental interest. There are many competing candidates for qubits, including superconducting circuits, quantum optical cavities, ultracold atoms and spin qubits, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. When dealing with spin qubits, the strongest source of decoherence is the magnetic dipolar interaction. To minimize it, spins are typically diluted in a diamagnetic matrix. For example, this dilution can be taken to the extreme of a single phosphorus atom in silicon, whereas in molecular matrices a typical ratio is one magnetic molecule per 10,000 matrix molecules. However, there is a fundamental contradiction between reducing decoherence by dilution and allowing quantum operations via the interaction between spin qubits. To resolve this contradiction, the design and engineering of quantum hardware can benefit from a 'bottom-up' approach whereby the electronic structure of magnetic molecules is chemically tailored to give the desired physical behaviour. Here we present a way of enhancing coherence in solid-state molecular spin qubits without resorting to extreme dilution. It is based on the design of molecular structures with crystal field ground states possessing large tunnelling gaps that give rise to optimal operating points, or atomic clock transitions, at which the quantum spin dynamics become protected against dipolar decoherence. This approach is illustrated with a holmium molecular nanomagnet in which long coherence times (up to 8.4 microseconds at 5 kelvin) are obtained at unusually high concentrations. This finding opens new avenues for quantum computing based on molecular spin qubits. PMID:26983539

  10. Enhancing coherence in molecular spin qubits via atomic clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiq, Muhandis; Komijani, Dorsa; Duan, Yan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Hill, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Quantum computing is an emerging area within the information sciences revolving around the concept of quantum bits (qubits). A major obstacle is the extreme fragility of these qubits due to interactions with their environment that destroy their quantumness. This phenomenon, known as decoherence, is of fundamental interest. There are many competing candidates for qubits, including superconducting circuits, quantum optical cavities, ultracold atoms and spin qubits, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. When dealing with spin qubits, the strongest source of decoherence is the magnetic dipolar interaction. To minimize it, spins are typically diluted in a diamagnetic matrix. For example, this dilution can be taken to the extreme of a single phosphorus atom in silicon, whereas in molecular matrices a typical ratio is one magnetic molecule per 10,000 matrix molecules. However, there is a fundamental contradiction between reducing decoherence by dilution and allowing quantum operations via the interaction between spin qubits. To resolve this contradiction, the design and engineering of quantum hardware can benefit from a ‘bottom-up’ approach whereby the electronic structure of magnetic molecules is chemically tailored to give the desired physical behaviour. Here we present a way of enhancing coherence in solid-state molecular spin qubits without resorting to extreme dilution. It is based on the design of molecular structures with crystal field ground states possessing large tunnelling gaps that give rise to optimal operating points, or atomic clock transitions, at which the quantum spin dynamics become protected against dipolar decoherence. This approach is illustrated with a holmium molecular nanomagnet in which long coherence times (up to 8.4 microseconds at 5 kelvin) are obtained at unusually high concentrations. This finding opens new avenues for quantum computing based on molecular spin qubits.

  11. Invited review article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales.

    PubMed

    Levine, Judah; Ibarra-Manzano, O

    2012-02-01

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed. PMID:22380071

  12. Invited Review Article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Judah

    2012-02-15

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed.

  13. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation.

    PubMed

    Safronova, M S; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Safronova, U I; Porsev, S G; Kozlov, M G

    2014-07-18

    We propose 10 highly charged ions as candidates for the development of next generation atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation. They have long-lived metastable states with transition wavelengths to the ground state between 170-3000 nm, relatively simple electronic structure, stable isotopes, and high sensitivity to α variation (e.g., Sm(14+), Pr(10+), Sm(13+), Nd(10+)). We predict their properties crucial for the experimental exploration and highlight particularly attractive systems for these applications. PMID:25083627

  14. Hyperfine-induced quadrupole moments of alkali-metal-atom ground states and their implications for atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Spherically symmetric ground states of alkali-metal atoms do not posses electric quadrupole moments. However, the hyperfine interaction between nuclear moments and atomic electrons distorts the spherical symmetry of electronic clouds and leads to nonvanishing atomic quadrupole moments. We evaluate these hyperfine-induced quadrupole moments using techniques of relativistic many-body theory and compile results for Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs atoms. For heavy atoms we find that the hyperfine-induced quadrupole moments are strongly (two orders of magnitude) enhanced by correlation effects. We further apply the results of the calculation to microwave atomic clocks where the coupling of atomic quadrupole moments to gradients of electric fields leads to clock frequency uncertainties. We show that for 133Cs atomic clocks, the spatial gradients of electric fields must be smaller than 30 V /cm2 to guarantee fractional inaccuracies below 10-16.

  15. Cs vapor microcells with Ne-He buffer gas mixture for high operation-temperature miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Maurice, V; Fouilland, B; Gorecki, C; Boudot, R

    2015-07-13

    We report on the characterization of Cs vapor microfabricated cells filled with a Ne-He buffer gas mixture using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is found to be canceled at the first order around a so-called inversion temperature higher than 80°C whose value depends on the buffer gas partial pressure ratio. This buffer gas mixture could be well-adapted for the development of miniature atomic clocks devoted to be used in specific applications such as defense and avionic systems with high operating temperature environment (typically higher than 85°C). This solution suggests an alternative to buffer gas mixtures generally used in optically-pumped vapor cell atomic clocks. PMID:26191895

  16. Controlling dipole-dipole frequency shifts in a lattice-based optical atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.E.; Lukin, M.D.; Ye Jun

    2004-02-01

    Motivated by the ideas of using cold alkaline-earth atoms trapped in an optical lattice for realization of optical atomic clocks, we investigate theoretically the perturbative effects of atom-atom interactions on a clock transition frequency. These interactions are mediated by the dipole fields associated with the optically excited atoms. We predict resonancelike features in the frequency shifts when constructive interference among atomic dipoles occur. We theoretically demonstrate that by fine tuning the coherent dipole-dipole couplings in appropriately designed lattice geometries, the undesirable frequency shifts can be greatly suppressed.

  17. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, H.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.

    2008-02-08

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ''new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10{sup -18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  18. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-01

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant. PMID:18352368

  19. NAVEX: A space shuttle experiment with atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starker, S.; Nau, H.; Hamesfahr, J.; Tschiesche, H.

    1983-01-01

    A navigation and time transfer experiment (NAVEX) to be flown within the payload of the first German Spacelab mission D-1 is discussed. The objectives of the experiment are to synchronize distant ground stations with an accuracy of better than 10 nsec and to demonstrate one way ranging with an accuracy of better than 30 m. Spread spectrum signals are used and the related technique is tested. On board a Cs and a Rb clock is used. The relativistic effect of these clocks is about -25 microsec per day. On the ground at least two receiving stations and one transmitting-receiving station will be installed. The synchronization of the ground clocks by shuttle signals is compared to those achieved with clock transportations and with GPS measurements. A system description of this experiment is given containing details on the technical concept, the hardware and the planned data evaluation. The present state of the preparatory work is briefly reviewed.

  20. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  1. The present development of time service in Brazil, with the application of the TV line-10 method for coordination and synchronization of atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, P. M.; Silva, I. M.

    1974-01-01

    Various methods presently used for the dissemination of time at several levels of precision are described along with future projects in the field. Different aspects of time coordination are reviewed and a list of future laboratories participating in a National Time Scale will be presented. A Brazilian Atomic Time Scale will be obtained from as many of these laboratories as possible. The problem of intercomparison between the Brazilian National Time Scale and the International one will be presented and probable solutions will be discussed. Needs related to the TV Line-10 method will be explained and comments will be made on the legal aspects of time dissemination throughout the country.

  2. Detecting Gravitational Wave Time Dilation Using Space-Based Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langellier, Nicholas; Kolkowitz, Shimon; Loeb, Avi; Lukin, Mikhail; Maoz, Dani; Ye, Jun; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Recently, atomic clocks have reached a fractional frequency instability of about 10-16/ √τ . With such precision it may be possible to measure differences in the ticking rates of a spaced-based network of atomic clocks due to time dilation induced by passing gravitational waves. Supermassive black hole binaries arising from galaxy mergers at cosmological distances are predicted to produce gravitational waves at mHz frequencies. The largest variations in clock ticking will occur on the scale of half a wavelength, which for mHz waves is on the 1 AU scale. We assess the sensitivity and feasibility of such a space clock network detector, and compare it to existing means of mHz gravitational wave detection.

  3. Is the time right for a redefinition of the second by optical atomic clocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Given the dramatic rate of progress in optical atomic clocks over the last decade, this paper presents the current state of play, and considers the possibilities, implications and timescales for a potential redefinition of the SI second in terms of an optical reference transition. In particular, the question of choice of a future standard is addressed, together with the requirements to accurately compare realisations of such standards, both for clocks local to, and remote from each other. Current performances of various optical clock systems are examined and possibilities for moving beyond potential limitations by alternative strategies are outlined.

  4. Higher-order effects on the precision of clocks of neutral atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Marmo, S. I.; Palchikov, V. G.; Katori, H.

    2016-04-01

    The recent progress in designing optical lattice clocks with fractional uncertainties below 10-17 requires unprecedented precision in estimating the role of higher-order effects of atom-lattice interactions. In this paper, we present results of systematic theoretical evaluations of the multipole, nonlinear, and anharmonic effects on the optical-lattice-based clocks of alkaline-earth-like atoms. Modifications of the model-potential approach are introduced to minimize discrepancies of theoretical evaluations from the most reliable experimental data. Dipole polarizabilities, hyperpolarizabilities, and multipolar polarizabilities for neutral Ca, Sr, Yb, Zn, Cd, and Hg atoms are calculated in the modified approach.

  5. Single-mode vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers for {sup 87}Rb-based chip-scale atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Derebezov, I. A. Haisler, V. A.; Bakarov, A. K.; Kalagin, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.; Kachanova, M. M.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Semenova, O. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2010-11-15

    The results of numerical simulation and study of lasing characteristics of semiconductor verticalcavity surface-emitting lasers based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As alloys are presented. Lasers exhibit stable single-mode lasing at a wavelength of 795 nm at low operating currents {approx}1.5 mA and an output power of 350 {mu}W, which offers prospects of their applications in next-generation chip-scale atomic clocks

  6. Optical Lattice Induced Light Shifts in an Yb Atomic Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Z. W.; Stalnaker, J. E.; Lemke, N. D.; Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Fortier, T. M.; Diddams, S. A.; Hollberg, L.; Hoyt, C. W.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2008-03-14

    We present an experimental study of the lattice-induced light shifts on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 0} optical clock transition ({nu}{sub clock}{approx_equal}518 THz) in neutral ytterbium. The 'magic' frequency {nu}{sub magic} for the {sup 174}Yb isotope was determined to be 394 799 475(35) MHz, which leads to a first order light shift uncertainty of 0.38 Hz. We also investigated the hyperpolarizability shifts due to the nearby 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}6s8p{sup 3}P{sub 0}, 6s8p{sup 3}P{sub 2}, and 6s5f{sup 3}F{sub 2} two-photon resonances at 759.708, 754.23, and 764.95 nm, respectively. By measuring the corresponding clock transition shifts near these two-photon resonances, the hyperpolarizability shift was estimated to be 170(33) mHz for a linear polarized, 50 {mu}K deep, lattice at the magic wavelength. These results indicate that the differential polarizability and hyperpolarizability frequency shift uncertainties in a Yb lattice clock could be held to well below 10{sup -17}.

  7. Systematic evaluation of an atomic clock at 2 × 10−18 total uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, T.L.; Campbell, S.L.; Hutson, R.B.; Marti, G.E.; Bloom, B.J.; McNally, R.L.; Zhang, W.; Barrett, M.D.; Safronova, M.S.; Strouse, G.F.; Tew, W.L.; Ye, J.

    2015-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. Here we take an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Our 87Sr optical lattice clock now achieves fractional stability of 2.2 × 10−16 at 1 s. With this improved stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, reducing many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as those in the lattice ac Stark shift, the atoms' thermal environment and the atomic response to room-temperature blackbody radiation. Our combined measurements have reduced the total uncertainty of the JILA Sr clock to 2.1 × 10−18 in fractional frequency units. PMID:25898253

  8. Systematic evaluation of an atomic clock at 2 × 10(-18) total uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, T L; Campbell, S L; Hutson, R B; Marti, G E; Bloom, B J; McNally, R L; Zhang, W; Barrett, M D; Safronova, M S; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Ye, J

    2015-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. Here we take an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Our (87)Sr optical lattice clock now achieves fractional stability of 2.2 × 10(-16) at 1 s. With this improved stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, reducing many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as those in the lattice ac Stark shift, the atoms' thermal environment and the atomic response to room-temperature blackbody radiation. Our combined measurements have reduced the total uncertainty of the JILA Sr clock to 2.1 × 10(-18) in fractional frequency units. PMID:25898253

  9. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  10. IGS Clock Products for Accurate Geodetic and Timing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senior, K. L.; Ray, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    The performance of any GNSS is intimately related to the characteristics of the satellite clocks, so an understanding of the clock behavior is vital. The accurate products of the IGS enable daily point positions to the sub-cm level and continuous global clock comparisons to the sub-ns level. Time transfers are less accurate than associated positioning because of: 1) difficult-to-measure hardware delays; 2) the limiting pseudorange measurement errors. Both factors arise from characteristics of the pseudorange signals, which are easily degraded by multipath and other effects. The behavior of the satellite clocks are also be important. Over sub-daily intervals, IGS products show that approximate power-law stochastic processes govern all GPS clocks. The Block IIA Rb and Cs clocks obey random walk noise, with the Rb clocks up to nearly an order of magnitude more stable. Due to the high-frequency noise of the onboard Time Keeping system in the newer Block IIR and IIR-M satellites, their Rb clocks are dominantly white noise up to a few 1000 s with standard deviations of 90 to 180 ps. Superposed on this random background, periodic signals are present at four harmonic frequencies, n × (2.0029 ± 0.0005) cycles per day for n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The equivalent fundamental period is 11.9826 hours, which surprisingly differs from the reported mean GPS orbital period of 11.9659 hours by 60 ± 11 s. We cannot account for this apparent discrepancy but note that a clear relationship between the periodic signals and the orbital dynamics is evidenced for some satellites by modulations of the spectral amplitudes with eclipse season. The Cs clocks are more strongly affected than the Rb clocks. All four harmonics are much smaller for the IIR/IIR-M satellites than for the older blocks. The strong 12- and 6-hour periodics in most GPS clocks dictate that these variations should be modeled in all high-accuracy applications, such as for timescale formation, interpolation of IGS clock products

  11. Highly reliable optical system for a rubidium space cold atom clock.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Sun, Yanguang; Wang, Bin; Xia, Wenbing; Qu, Qiuzhi; Xiang, Jingfeng; Dong, Zuoren; Lü, Desheng; Liu, Liang

    2016-05-01

    We describe a highly reliable optical system designed for a rubidium space cold atom clock (SCAC), presenting its design, key technologies, and optical components. All of the optical and electronic components are integrated onto an optimized two-sided 300  mm×290  mm×30  mm optical bench. The compact optical structure and special thermal design ensure that the optical system can pass all of the space environmental qualification tests including both thermal vacuum and mechanical tests. To verify its performance, the optical system is carefully checked before and after each test. The results indicate that this optical system is suitably robust for the space applications for which the rubidium SCAC was built. PMID:27140378

  12. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  13. Near-Heisenberg-limited atomic clocks in the presence of decoherence.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, J; Sørensen, A S

    2013-08-30

    The ultimate stability of atomic clocks is limited by the quantum noise of the atoms. To reduce this noise it has been suggested to use entangled atomic ensembles with reduced atomic noise. Potentially this can push the stability all the way to the limit allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation, which is denoted the Heisenberg limit. In practice, however, entangled states are often more prone to decoherence, which may prevent reaching this performance. Here we present an adaptive measurement protocol that in the presence of a realistic source of decoherence enables us to get near-Heisenberg-limited stability of atomic clocks using entangled atoms. The protocol may thus realize the full potential of entanglement for quantum metrology despite the detrimental influence of decoherence. PMID:24033016

  14. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  15. Magic Wavelength to Make Optical Lattice Clocks Insensitive to Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E. Yu.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2009-10-09

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  16. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter; Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong; Gu, Sihong

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  17. Low-threshold short-cavity diode laser for a miniature atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kargapol'tsev, Sergei V; Velichansky, Vladimir L; Vasil'ev, V V; Kobyakova, M Sh; Morozyuk, A V; Shiryaeva, N V; Konyaev, V P

    2009-06-30

    Short-cavity diode lasers (SCDLs) emitting at the 894-nm D{sub 1} line of caesium are developed. Low threshold currents and power consumption will make it possible to use these lasers in chip-size atomic clocks (CSACs) and magnetometers. The SCDL parameters are comparable with the parameters of surface-emitting lasers. (lasers)

  18. LASERS: Low-threshold short-cavity diode laser for a miniature atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargapol'tsev, Sergei V.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Vasil'ev, V. V.; Kobyakova, M. Sh; Morozyuk, A. V.; Shiryaeva, N. V.; Konyaev, V. P.

    2009-06-01

    Short-cavity diode lasers (SCDLs) emitting at the 894-nm D1 line of caesium are developed. Low threshold currents and power consumption will make it possible to use these lasers in chip-size atomic clocks (CSACs) and magnetometers. The SCDL parameters are comparable with the parameters of surface-emitting lasers.

  19. Clock Technology Development for the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Time and Frequency Sciences and Technology Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a laser cooling capability for flight and has been selected by NASA to support the Laser-Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. Current work in the group includes design and development for tee two laser-cooled atomic clock experiments which have been selected for flight on the International Space Station.

  20. Absolute frequency of an atomic hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Hall, R. G.; Percival, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate determination was made of the unperturbed atomic hydrogen ground state hyperfine transition frequency (F=1,m=0 - F=0,m=0) in reference to present world wide realizations of internationally defined time interval. In relation to the international atomic time system, the composite value is 1,420,405,751.7755 plus or minus 0.0031 HZ.

  1. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber. PMID:25167146

  2. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  3. Spin waves and collisional frequency shifts of a trapped-atom clock.

    PubMed

    Maineult, Wilfried; Deutsch, Christian; Gibble, Kurt; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2012-07-13

    We excite spin waves with spatially inhomogeneous Ramsey pulses and study the resulting frequency shifts of a chip-scale atomic clock of trapped 87Rb. The density-dependent frequency shifts of the hyperfine transition simulate the s-wave collisional frequency shifts of fermions, including those of optical lattice clocks. As the spin polarizations oscillate in the trap, the frequency shift reverses and it depends on the area of the second Ramsey pulse, exhibiting a predicted beyond mean-field frequency shift. Numerical and analytic models illustrate these observed behaviors. PMID:23030137

  4. Towards rotation sensing with a single atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernholz, Thomas; Stevenson, Robin; Hush, Michael R.; Lesanovsky, Igor V.; Bishop, Thomas; Gentile, Fabio; Jammi, Sindhu; Pyragius, Tadas; Bason, Mark G.; Mas, Hèctor; Pandey, Saurabh; Vasilakis, Georgios; Poulios, Konstantinos; von Klitzing, Wolf

    2016-04-01

    We discuss a scheme to implement a gyroscopic atom sensor with magnetically trapped ultra-cold atoms. Unlike standard light or matter wave Sagnac interferometers no free wave propagation is used. Interferometer operation is controlled only with static, radio-frequency and microwave magnetic fields, which removes the need for interferometric stability of optical laser beams. Due to the confinement of atoms, the scheme may allow the construction of small scale portable sensors. We discuss the main elements of the scheme and report on recent results and efforts towards its experimental realization.

  5. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-06-01

    In this study we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancelation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits respectively two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 {m^2/s^2} based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s/s) level. Since optical-atomic clocks with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimeter level accuracy in the near future.

  6. Magic Traps for Clock Transitions in Neutral Cesium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Alexander; Saffman, Mark

    2014-05-01

    In a system of trapped atoms errors in quantum gates and precision spectroscopy can arise from a differential shift in atomic transitions caused by gradients in the electric and magnetic fields. The thermal motion of an atom in a trap allows it to sample changes in these two fields resulting in a constantly shifting transition frequency. ``Magic'' traps minimize this source of noise by finding experimental conditions where the first-order sensitivity to gradients is nulled. We present refinements to calculations of the Zeeman and A.C. Stark Shift for qubit states in the ground hyperfine state manifold of neutral Cesium atoms. We follow this with a discussion of implications for traps insensitive to electric fields, magnetic fields or both simultaneously.

  7. The Physics of Miniature Atomic Clocks: 0-0 Versus "End" Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Amber; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas; Happer, William

    2003-05-01

    The majority of traditional atomic-clock designs are based on the 0-0 hyperfine transition of a Cs 133 atom. We are currently investigating the advantages of operating a miniature optical atomic clock using the "end" transitions, e.g. connecting states |f=1, mf =+/-1> and |f=2, mf=+/-2> in 87Rb. In our paper we present extensive new measurements of relevant relaxation rates, such as those due to spin-exchange collisions, buffer-gas pressure shifts, Carver Rates and others, which ultimately determine the choices of an operating regime for the miniature optical atomic clock. The relationship between these rates is non-trivial: for example, using higher laser power will increase polarization and reduce the spin-exchange rate [1], but it can simultaneously increase the linewidth due to the optical pumping rate. The dependence of these and other relaxation rates on the cell size, temperature, pressure, a choice of buffer gas, and other parameters will be reported. Based on these measured rates, our modeling can be used to predict the transition linewidths, signal-to-noise ratios and thus the stability of the clock in different operating regimes. The trade-off between the stability of the clock and the desired small cell size and low power consumption needs to be carefully considered in order to optimize our design. In our experiments we used optical, microwave, and radio-frequency excitation to study hyperfine and Zeeman resonance lines in heated glass cells containing pure-isotope alkali-metal vapor and buffer gasses (N2, Ar, He, etc.) at low (0 - 10 G) magnetic fields. Simultaneous use of light, microwave and radio-frequency fields allowed us to calibrate surrounding magnetic fields by observing the corresponding shifts of the resonance, thus leading us to a quantitative understanding of our system. [1] S. Appelt, A. B. Baranga, A. R. Young, W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 59, 2078 (1999).

  8. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, T.; Derevianko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We predict the possibility of ‘triply magic’ optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the {}1{{{S}}}0 and {}3{{{P}}}0 clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  9. Microfabricated chip-scale rubidium plasma light source for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; de Rooij, Nico F; Shea, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    We present the microfabrication and characterization of a low-power, chip-scale Rb plasma light source, designed for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) configuration is used to ignite a Rb plasma in a micro-fabricated Rb vapor cell on which external indium electrodes were deposited. The device is electrically driven at frequencies between 1 and 36 MHz, and emits 140 μW of stable optical power while coupling less than 6 mW of electrical power to the discharge cell. Optical powers of up to 15 and 9 μW are emitted on the Rb D2 and D1 lines, respectively. Continuous operation of the light source for several weeks has been demonstrated, showing its capacity to maintain stable optical excitation of Rb atoms in chip-scale double-resonance atomic clocks. PMID:22481778

  10. Clock Shifts of Optical Transitions in Ultracold Atomic Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zhenhua; Pethick, C. J.

    2010-01-08

    We calculate the shift, due to interatomic interactions, of an optical transition in an atomic Fermi gas trapped in an optical lattice, as in recent experiments of Campbell et al.[Science 324, 360 (2009)]. Using a pseudospin formalism to describe the density matrix of atoms, we derive a Bloch equation which incorporates both spatial inhomogeneity of the probe laser field and interatomic interactions. Expressions are given for the frequency shift as a function of pulse duration, detuning of the probe laser, and the spatial dependence of the electric field of the probe beam. In the low temperature semiclassical regime, we find that the magnitude of the shift is proportional to the temperature.

  11. Optical clocks and relativity.

    PubMed

    Chou, C W; Hume, D B; Rosenband, T; Wineland, D J

    2010-09-24

    Observers in relative motion or at different gravitational potentials measure disparate clock rates. These predictions of relativity have previously been observed with atomic clocks at high velocities and with large changes in elevation. We observed time dilation from relative speeds of less than 10 meters per second by comparing two optical atomic clocks connected by a 75-meter length of optical fiber. We can now also detect time dilation due to a change in height near Earth's surface of less than 1 meter. This technique may be extended to the field of geodesy, with applications in geophysics and hydrology as well as in space-based tests of fundamental physics. PMID:20929843

  12. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  13. Gravity tests, differential accelerometry and interleaved clocks with cold atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant

    The remarkable success of light-pulse atom interferometer techniques has motivated competitive research in precision metrology. Gravimeters, gyroscopes and gradiometers based on these techniques are all at the forefront of their respective measurement classes. We show here the progress toward a compact gravity gradiometer for precision gravitational tests. It is well known that these devices suffer from environmental perturbations. Spurious noise may enter through beam steering effects which cause uncommon coupling to gravity in the two accelerometers. The horizontal configuration used here is particularly sensitive to this effect. Additionally, laser frequency noise may significantly limit the interferometer sensitivity. In our device, we have overcome these obstacles to achieve a differential acceleration sensitivity of 4.2 x 10-9g/ Hz over a 70 cm baseline. This corresponds to a phase noise of 3.1 mrad/ Hz inferred per interferometer which is the best performance achieved in such a system. Using this device, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept measurement of the gravitational constant with a precision of 3 x 10-4, which is competitive with the present limit of 1 x 10-4. I discuss improvements which can enable uncertainties falling below 10 -5. This experiment can also be interpreted as a test of the inverse square law which statistically constrains a putative Yukawa type fifth force to 8 x 10-3 near the poorly known length scale of 20 cm. Limits exceeding 10-4 appear to be feasible. We also perform an experiment which tests the atom interferometer in the context of a time-dependent gravity potential. Furthermore, we demonstrate a technique by which one may temporally link interferometer measurements together to provide continuous sampling. This can be used to eliminate the inertial sensor analog of the Dick effect and has important applications in the fields of optical and atomic clocks.

  14. Microwave lensing frequency shift of the PHARAO laser-cooled microgravity atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Phillip; Gibble, Kurt; Laurent, Phillipe; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the microwave lensing frequency shift of the microgravity laser-cooled caesium clock PHARAO. We find microwave lensing frequency shifts of δν/ν  =  11  ×  10-17 to 13  ×  10-17, larger than the shift of typical fountain clocks. The shift has a weak dependence on PHARAO parameters, including the atomic temperature, size of the atomic cloud, detection laser intensities, and the launch velocity. We also find the lensing frequency shift to be insensitive to selection and detection spatial inhomogeneities and the expected low-frequency vibrations. We conservatively assign a nominal microwave lensing frequency uncertainty of  ±4  ×  10-17.

  15. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Schärer, Andreas; Jetzer, Philippe; Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ˜ 10-16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β - 1|, |γ - 1| ≲ 10-6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  16. A compact, high-performance all optical atomic clock based on telecom lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John H.; Lemke, Nathan D.; Phelps, Gretchen R.; Martin, Kyle W.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss an optical atomic clock based on a two-photon transition at 778 nm in rubidium. In particular, we discuss the fundamental limitations to the short-term stability of a system based on a commercial C-band telecom laser as opposed to a near infrared laser. We show that this system is fundamentally capable of besting a hydrogen MASER in frequency stability and size.

  17. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  18. Distinguishing between evidence and its explanations in the steering of atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, John M.; Hadi Madjid, F.

    2014-11-15

    Quantum theory reflects within itself a separation of evidence from explanations. This separation leads to a known proof that: (1) no wave function can be determined uniquely by evidence, and (2) any chosen wave function requires a guess reaching beyond logic to things unforeseeable. Chosen wave functions are encoded into computer-mediated feedback essential to atomic clocks, including clocks that step computers through their phases of computation and clocks in space vehicles that supply evidence of signal propagation explained by hypotheses of spacetimes with metric tensor fields. The propagation of logical symbols from one computer to another requires a shared rhythm—like a bucket brigade. Here we show how hypothesized metric tensors, dependent on guesswork, take part in the logical synchronization by which clocks are steered in rate and position toward aiming points that satisfy phase constraints, thereby linking the physics of signal propagation with the sharing of logical symbols among computers. Recognizing the dependence of the phasing of symbol arrivals on guesses about signal propagation transports logical synchronization from the engineering of digital communications to a discipline essential to physics. Within this discipline we begin to explore questions invisible under any concept of time that fails to acknowledge unforeseeable events. In particular, variation of spacetime curvature is shown to limit the bit rate of logical communication. - Highlights: • Atomic clocks are steered in frequency toward an aiming point. • The aiming point depends on a chosen wave function. • No evidence alone can determine the wave function. • The unknowability of the wave function has implications for spacetime curvature. • Variability in spacetime curvature limits the bit rate of communications.

  19. Controlling the magnetic-field sensitivity of atomic-clock states by microwave dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sárkány, L.; Weiss, P.; Hattermann, H.; Fortágh, J.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate control of the differential Zeeman shift between clock states of ultracold rubidium atoms by means of nonresonant microwave dressing. Using the dc field dependence of the microwave detuning, we suppress the first- and second-order differential Zeeman shift in magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms. By dressing the state pair 5 S1 /2 F =1 , mF=-1 and F =2 , mF=1 , a residual frequency spread of <0.1 Hz in a range of 100 mG around a chosen magnetic offset field can be achieved. This is one order of magnitude smaller than the shift of the bare states at the magic field of the Breit-Rabi parabola. We further identify double magic points, around which the clock frequency is insensitive to fluctuations both in the magnetic field and in the dressing Rabi frequency. The technique is compatible with chip-based cold-atom systems and allows the creation of clock and qubit states with reduced sensitivity to magnetic-field noise.

  20. Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions to the electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperfine-induced electric dipole contributions may significantly increase probabilities of otherwise very weak electric octupole and magnetic quadrupole atomic clock transitions (e.g., transitions between s and f electron orbitals). These transitions can be used for exceptionally accurate atomic clocks, quantum information processing, and the search for dark matter. They are very sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model, such as temporal variation of the fine-structure constant, the Lorentz invariance, and Einstein equivalence principle violation. We formulate conditions under which the hyperfine-induced electric dipole contribution dominates and perform calculations of the hyperfine structure and E3, M2 and the hyperfine-induced E1 transition rates for a large number of atoms and ions of experimental interest. Due to the hyperfine quenching the electric octupole clock transition in +173Yb is 2 orders of magnitude stronger than that in currently used +171Yb. Some enhancement is found in 13+143Nd, 14+149Pm, 14+147Sm, and 15+147Sm ions.

  1. Scheme for a compact cold-atom clock based on diffuse laser cooling in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Xiao, Ling; Cheng, Huadong; Liu, Liang

    2015-12-01

    We present a scheme for a compact rubidium cold-atom clock which performs diffuse light cooling, microwave interrogation, and detection of the clock signal in a cylindrical microwave cavity. The diffuse light is produced by laser light reflection at the inner surface of the microwave cavity. The pattern of the injected laser beams is specially designed to accumulate the majority of the cold atoms in the center of the microwave cavity. Microwave interrogation of the cold atoms in the cavity leads to Ramsey fringes, which have a linewidth of 24.5 Hz with a contrast of 95.6 % when the free evolution time is 20 ms. Recently, a frequency stability of 7.3 ×10-13τ-1 /2 has been achieved. The scheme of this physical package can largely reduce the cold-atom clock complexity and increase clock performance.

  2. Low-temperature indium-bonded alkali vapor cell for chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straessle, R.; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Mileti, G.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-02-01

    A low-temperature sealing technique for micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clock applications is developed and evaluated. A thin-film indium bonding technique was used for sealing the cells at temperatures of ≤140 °C. These sealing temperatures are much lower than those reported for other approaches, and make the technique highly interesting for future micro-fabricated cells, using anti-relaxation wall coatings. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on first indium-bonded cells without wall coatings are used to evaluate the cleanliness of the process as well as a potential leak rate of the cells. Both measurements confirm a stable pressure inside the cell and therefore an excellent hermeticity of the indium bonding. The double-resonance measurements performed over several months show an upper limit for the leak rate of 1.5 × 10-13 mbar.l/s. This is in agreement with additional leak-rate measurements using a membrane deflection method on indium-bonded test structures.

  3. Quantum projection noise limited stability of a 88Sr+ atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, B.; Dubé, P.; Madej, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluated accuracy of a single trapped 88Sr+ ion clock referenced to the 5s2 S 1/2 - 4d 2 D 5/2 transition at 445 THz at the National Research Council of Canada has reached 1.2 x 10-17 over recent years. On the other hand, the stability of an atomic clock determines how long the signals from two similar clocks have to be compared to reach a given level of uncertainty. Here, we report on the improvement of the stability of NRC's 88Sr+ single ion clock by reducing the Allan deviation from 1 x 10-14 to 3 x 10-15 at 1 second averaging time. This is done by the implementation of a clear out laser that transfers the ion from the metastable state to the ground state at each cycle, followed by a state-preparation step that transfers the ion to the desired ground state magnetic sublevel of the probed transition.

  4. Reliability characteristics of microfabricated Rb mini-lamps for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; de Rooij, Nico; Shea, Herbert

    2013-03-01

    With the rising need for microfabricated chip-scale atomic clocks to enable high precision timekeeping in portable applications, there has been active interest in developing miniature (clocks. We reported in 2012 a first microfabricated chip-scale Rubidium dielectric barrier discharge lamp. The device's preliminary results indicated its high potential for optical pumping applications and wafer-scale batch fabrication. The chip-scale plasma light sources were observed to be robust with no obvious performance change after thousands of plasma ignitions, and with no electrode erosion from plasma discharges since the electrodes are external. However, as atomic clocks have strict lamp performance requirements including less than 0.1% sub-second optical power fluctuations, power consumption less than 20 mW and a device lifetime of at least several years, it is important to understand the long-term reliability of these Rb planar mini-lamps, and identify the operating conditions where these devices can be most reliable and stable. In this paper, we report on the reliability of such microfabricated lamps including a continuous several month run of the lamp where the optical power, electrical power consumption and temperature stability were continuously monitored. We also report on the effects of temperature, rf-power and the lamp-drive parasitics on the optical power stability and discuss steps that could be taken to further improve the device's performance and reliability.

  5. One-liter Hg ion clock for space and ground applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang; Le, Thanh; Beach, Maggie; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the development of a small Hg ion clock suitable for space use. A small clock occupying 1-2 liters volume and producing stability of 10 to the power negative twelve, divided by square root pi would significantly advance the state of space-qualified atomic clocks. Based on recent measurements, this technology should produce long-term stability as good as 10 to the power negative fifteen.

  6. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-12

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, the package wasmore » sealed with a copper pinch-off and was then pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Yb+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11 / τ1/2.« less

  7. Metrological characterization of custom-designed 894.6 nm VCSELs for miniature atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gruet, F; Al-Samaneh, A; Kroemer, E; Bimboes, L; Miletic, D; Affolderbach, C; Wahl, D; Boudot, R; Mileti, G; Michalzik, R

    2013-03-11

    We report on the characterization and validation of custom-designed 894.6 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), for use in miniature Cs atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The laser relative intensity noise (RIN) is measured to be 1 × 10(-11) Hz(-1) at 10 Hz Fourier frequency, for a laser power of 700 μW. The VCSEL frequency noise is 10(13) · f(-1) Hz(2)/Hz in the 10 Hz < f < 10(5) Hz range, which is in good agreement with the VCSEL’s measured fractional frequency instability (Allan deviation) of ≈ 1 × 10(-8) at 1 s, and also is consistent with the VCSEL’s typical optical linewidth of 20-25 MHz. The VCSEL bias current can be directly modulated at 4.596 GHz with a microwave power of -6 to +6 dBm to generate optical sidebands for CPT excitation. With such a VCSEL, a 1.04 kHz linewidth CPT clock resonance signal is detected in a microfabricated Cs cell filled with Ne buffer gas. These results are compatible with state-of-the-art CPT-based miniature atomic clocks exhibiting a short-term frequency instability of 2-3 × 10(-11) at τ = 1 s and few 10(-12) at τ = 10(4) s integration time.. PMID:23482148

  8. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P.; Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm3 in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of 171Y b+. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10-11/τ1/2.

  9. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Schwindt, Peter D D; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P; Kellogg, James R; Prestage, John D

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm(3) in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of (171)Y b(+). The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10(-11)/τ(1/2). PMID:27250397

  10. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  11. Low-phase-noise frequency synthesizer for the trapped atom clock on a chip.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Martinez, Fernando; Lours, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Reinhard, Friedemann; Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We report on the realization of a 6.834-GHz synthesis chain for the trapped atom clock on a chip (TACC) that is being developed at LNE-SYRTE. The chain is based on the frequency multiplication of a 100-MHz reference signal to obtain a signal at 6.4 GHz. It uses a comb generator based on a monolithic GaAs nonlinear transmission line. This is a novelty in the fabrication of high-stability microwave synthesizers. Measurements give a low flicker phase noise of -85 dBrad(2)/Hz at 1-Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise floor < -115 dBrad(2)/Hz. Based on these results, we estimate that the performance of the synthesizer is at least one order of magnitude better than the stability goal of TACC. This ensures that the synthesizer will not be limiting the clock performance. PMID:20040431

  12. A Hertz-Linewidth Ultrastable Diode Laser System for Clock Transition Detection of Strontium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Lin, Yi-Ge; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Shao-Kai; Zhao, Yang; Meng, Fei; Lin, Bai-Ke; Cao, Jian-Ping; Li, Tian-Chu; Fang, Zhan-Jun; Zang, Er-Jun

    2014-02-01

    The frequencies of two 698 nm external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) are locked separately to two independently located ultrahigh finesse optical resonant cavities with the Pound—Drever—Hall technique. The linewidth of each ECDL is measured to be ~4.6 Hz by their beating and the fractional frequency stability below 5 × 10-15 between 1 s to 10 s averaging time. Another 698 nm laser diode is injection locked to one of the cavity-stabilized ECDLs with a fixed frequency offset for power amplification while maintaining its linewidth and frequency characteristics. The frequency drift is ~1 Hz/s measured by a femtosecond optical frequency comb based on erbium fiber. The output of the injection slave laser is delivered to the magneto-optical trap of a Sr optical clock through a 10-m-long single mode polarization maintaining fiber with an active fiber noise cancelation technique to detect the clock transition of Sr atoms.

  13. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf 12+ to U 34+, which have the 4 f 12 configuration of valence electrons, the Ir 17+ ion, which has a hole in almost filled 4 f subshell, the Ho 14+, Cf 15+, Es 17+ and Es 16+ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, α (α = e2/hbar c). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to α-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  14. Status of the atomic fountain clock at the National Research Council of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Alcock, J.; Jian, B.; Gertsvolf, M.; Bernard, J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the rapid advances in optical frequency standards, caesium fountain clocks retain a critical role as the most accurate primary frequency standards available. At the National Research Council Canada, we are working to develop a second generation caesium fountain clock. Work is currently underway to improve several systems of FCs1, such as the laser system and microwave local oscillator, which will be incorporated into its refurbished version, FCs2. In addition, we have added an optical pumping stage which has increased the detected atom number by over a factor of six. In collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), we are planning on replacing the physics package of FCs1. We will report on several recent improvements to FCs1, along with our progress in the development of FCs2.

  15. Applications of clocks and frequency standards: from the routine to tests of fundamental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute; Prestage, John

    2005-06-01

    The traditional applications of clocks and oscillators in navigation and scientific research continue to grow as new and more widespread applications emerge. Today, clocks and oscillators regulate the speed and efficiency of virtually every human endeavour ranging from the mundane to the exotic. In this paper we discuss some of the applications that require the service of high performance clocks and oscillators. In particular, we discuss space applications of clocks for navigation and scientific experiments. We also present a discussion of satellite navigation systems, especially the Global Positioning System, and comment on time dissemination over the Internet.

  16. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  17. Motional dephasing of atomic clock spin waves in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, S. D.; Zhang, T.; Kennedy, T. A. B.

    2012-06-01

    In a cold atomic ensemble the weak Raman scattering of an incident laser beam writes a spin-wave grating by transferring an atom between ground-level hyperfine states. These spin-waves serve as a basis for a quantum memory. For clock states, where magnetic dephasing is suppressed, thermal motion of the atoms across the spin-wave is the principal source of dephasing on the sub-millisecond timescale, limiting the quantum memory time achievable. An investigation of the role of the optical lattice in reducing motional dephasing is presented, using Monte Carlo simulations to study the influence of ensemble temperature, trap depth and differential ac Stark shifts in the case of rubidium.

  18. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Minissale, M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10-18 level.

  19. Automatic compensation of magnetic field for a rubidium space cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Jingwei, Ji; Wei, Ren; Xin, Zhao; Xiangkai, Peng; Jingfeng, Xiang; Desheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-07-01

    When the cold atom clock operates in microgravity around the near-earth orbit, its performance will be affected by the fluctuation of magnetic field. A strategy is proposed to suppress the fluctuation of magnetic field by additional coils, whose current is changed accordingly to compensate the magnetic fluctuation by the linear and incremental compensation. The flight model of the cold atom clock is tested in a simulated orbital magnetic environment and the magnetic field fluctuation in the Ramsey cavity is reduced from 17 nT to 2 nT, which implied the uncertainty due to the second order Zeeman shift is reduced to be less than 2×10‑16. In addition, utilizing the compensation, the magnetic field in the trapping zone can be suppressed from 7.5 μT to less than 0.3 μT to meet the magnetic field requirement of polarization gradients cooling of atoms. Project supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094304), the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11034008 and 11274324).

  20. Optical lattice polarization effects on magnetically induced optical atomic clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Oates, C. W.

    2007-08-15

    We derive the frequency shift for a forbidden optical transition J=0{yields}J{sup '}=0 caused by the simultaneous actions of an elliptically polarized lattice field and a static magnetic field. We find that a simple configuration of lattice and magnetic fields leads to a cancellation of this shift to first order in lattice intensity and magnetic field. In this geometry, the second-order lattice intensity shift can be minimized as well by use of optimal lattice polarization. Suppression of these shifts could considerably enhance the performance of the next generation of atomic clocks.

  1. Reaching 5.0×10-13 τ -1/2 short term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Meng, Y. L.; Wan, J. Y.; Wang, X. M.; Wang, Y. N.; Xiao, L.; Cheng, H. D.; Liu, L.

    2016-06-01

    We present an improvement of short term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock after increasing the intensities of clock signals and optimizing the feedback loop of the clock. A short term frequency stability of 5.0×10-13 τ -1/2 has been achieved and the limiting factors have been analyzed.

  2. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Gyromagnetic factors and atomic clock constraints on the variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Feng; Olive, Keith A.; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-11-01

    We consider the effect of the coupled variations of fundamental constants on the nucleon magnetic moment. The nucleon g-factor enters into the interpretation of the measurements of variations in the fine-structure constant, {alpha}, in both the laboratory (through atomic clock measurements) and in astrophysical systems (e.g. through measurements of the 21 cm transitions). A null result can be translated into a limit on the variation of a set of fundamental constants, that is usually reduced to {alpha}. However, in specific models, particularly unification models, changes in {alpha} are always accompanied by corresponding changes in other fundamental quantities such as the QCD scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. This work tracks the changes in the nucleon g-factors induced from changes in {Lambda}{sub QCD} and the light quark masses. In principle, these coupled variations can improve the bounds on the variation of {alpha} by an order of magnitude from existing atomic clock and astrophysical measurements. Unfortunately, the calculation of the dependence of g-factors on fundamental parameters is notoriously model-dependent.

  4. Variation of Fundamental Constants from the Big Bang to Atomic Clocks:. Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Berengut, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest the possibility of temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental "constants" in an expanding Universe. In this review we discuss the effects of variation of the fine-structure constant and fundamental masses on measurements covering the lifespan of the Universe from a few minutes after Big Bang to the present time. Measurements give controversial results, including some hints for variation in Big Bang nucleosynthesis and quasar absorption spectra data. Furthermore there are very promising methods to search for the variation of fundamental constants by comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancements of the relative variation effects happen in transitions between accidentally degenerate nuclear, atomic, and molecular energy levels.

  5. Testing for a cosmological influence on local physics using atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.; Hellings, R. W.; Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of a possible influence of the large-scale structure of the universe on local physics is discussed. A particular realization of such an influence is discussed in terms of the behavior in time of atomic and gravitational clocks. Two natural categories of metric theories embodying a cosmic infuence exist. The first category has geodesic equations of motion in atomic units, while the second category has geodesic equations of motion in gravitational units. Equations of motion for test bodies are derived for both categories of theories in the appropriate parametrized post-Newtonian limit and are applied to the Solar System. Ranging data to the Viking lander on Mars are of sufficient precision to reveal (1) if such a cosmological influence exists at the level of Hubble's constant, and (2) which category of theories is appropriate for a descripton of the phenomenon.

  6. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  7. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  8. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Micalizio, S; Boudot, R

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10(-14) for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10(-14) for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10(-15) level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards. PMID:26429467

  9. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  10. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  11. Suppression of collisional shifts via strong inter-atomic interactions in a 87Sr optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael; Swallows, Matthew; Bishof, Michael; Lin, Yige; Blatt, Sebastian; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2011-05-01

    Optical lattice clocks based on ensembles of neutral atoms have the potential to operate at the highest levels of stability due to the parallel interrogation of many atoms. However, the control of systematic shifts in these systems is correspondingly difficult due to the potential of collisional shifts. Clocks based on ultracold fermionic ensembles still exhibit these density-dependent shifts due to a loss of indistinguishability during the clock excitation process, limiting clock accuracy. By tightly confining samples of ultracold fermionic 87Sr atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice, as opposed to the conventional one-dimensional geometry, we increase the collisional interaction energy to be the largest relevant energy scale, thus entering the strongly interacting regime of clock operation. We show both theoretically and experimentally that this increase in interaction energy results in a paradoxical decrease in the collisional shift, reducing this key systematic to the 10-17 level. This work was supported by the ARO with funding from the DARPA OLE program, NIST, NSF, and AFOSR.

  12. Utilization of the Deep Space Atomic Clock for Europa Gravitational Tide Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seubert, Jill; Ely, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of Europa's gravitational tide can provide strong evidence of the existence of a subsurface liquid ocean. Due to limited close approach tracking data, a Europa flyby mission suffers strong coupling between the gravity solution quality and tracking data quantity and quality. This work explores utilizing Low Gain Antennas with the Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) to provide abundant high accuracy uplink-only radiometric tracking data. DSAC's performance, expected to exhibit an Allan Deviation of less than 3e-15 at one day, provides long-term stability and accuracy on par with the Deep Space Network ground clocks, enabling one-way radiometric tracking data with accuracy equivalent to that of its two-way counterpart. The feasibility of uplink-only Doppler tracking via the coupling of LGAs and DSAC and the expected Doppler data quality are presented. Violations of the Kalman filter's linearization assumptions when state perturbations are included in the flyby analysis results in poor determination of the Europa gravitational tide parameters. B-plane targeting constraints are statistically determined, and a solution to the linearization issues via pre-flyby approach orbit determination is proposed and demonstrated.

  13. Multipolar theory of blackbody radiation shift of atomic energy levels and its implications for optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Porsev, Sergey G.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2006-08-15

    Blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the {sup 3}P{sub 0}-{sup 1}S{sub 0} clock transition in the divalent atoms Mg, Ca, Sr, and Yb are evaluated. The dominant electric-dipole contributions are computed using accurate relativistic many-body techniques of atomic structure. At room temperatures, the resulting uncertainties in the E1 BBR shifts are large and substantially affect the projected 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy of the optical-lattice-based clocks. A peculiarity of these clocks is that the characteristic BBR wavelength is comparable to the {sup 3}P fine-structure intervals. To evaluate relevant M1 and E2 contributions, a theory of multipolar BBR shifts is developed. The resulting corrections, although presently masked by the uncertainties in the E1 contribution, are required at the 10{sup -18} accuracy goal.

  14. Test of relativistic time dilation with fast optical atomic clocks at different velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Sascha; Saathoff, Guido; Buhr, Henrik; Carlson, Lars A.; Wolf, Andreas; Schwalm, Dirk; Karpuk, Sergei; Novotny, Christian; Huber, Gerhard; Zimmermann, Marcus; Holzwarth, Ronald; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Gwinner, Gerald

    2007-12-01

    Time dilation is one of the most fascinating aspects of special relativity as it abolishes the notion of absolute time. It was first observed experimentally by Ives and Stilwell in 1938 using the Doppler effect. Here we report on a method, based on fast optical atomic clocks with large, but different Lorentz boosts, that tests relativistic time dilation with unprecedented precision. The approach combines ion storage and cooling with optical frequency counting using a frequency comb. 7Li+ ions are prepared at 6.4% and 3.0% of the speed of light in a storage ring, and their time is read with an accuracy of 2×10-10 using laser saturation spectroscopy. The comparison of the Doppler shifts yields a time dilation measurement represented by a Mansouri-Sexl parameter , consistent with special relativity. This constrains the existence of a preferred cosmological reference frame and CPT- and Lorentz-violating `new' physics beyond the standard model.

  15. Chronometric measurement of the orthometric height differences by means of atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Mazurova, Elena; Kanushin, Vadim F.; Karpik, Alexander P.; Tolstikov, Alexander S.; Gienko, Elena G.; Goldobin, Denis N.; Kosarev, Nikolay S.; Ganagina, Irina G.; Karaush, Artem A.; Hanikova, Ekaterina A.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the experimental results of the approbation of a new physical method of determination of the potential difference of the gravity force and the orthometric heights by means of the measurement of the gravitational red shift of frequency with atomic clocks. The experiment has been performed on the territory of Altai Mountains between two geodetic stations "Shebalino" and "Seminsky" which are separated in altitude by about 850 meters. The mean value of the frequency shift caused by the change in the potential of the gravity force measured between the two geodetic stations was found to be equal to δ f/f=7.98× 10^{-14} with the dispersion being equal to σ _{f} =7.27× 10^{-15} . This difference perfectly agrees with the independent geodetic measurements of the height difference between the two stations.

  16. Compact Microwave Mercury Ion Clock for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tu, Meirong; Chung, Sang K.; MacNeal, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We review progress in developing a small Hg ion clock for space operation based on breadboard ion-clock physics package where Hg ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole rf trap. With this architecture we have demonstrated short-term stability approx.1-2x10(exp -13) at 1 second, averaging to 10-15 at 1 day. This development shows that H-maser quality stabilities can be produced in a small clock package, comparable in size to an ultra-stable quartz oscillator required or holding 1-2x10(exp -13) at 1 second. We have completed an ion clock physics package designed to withstand vibration of launch and are currently building a approx. 1 kg engineering model for test. We also discuss frequency steering software algorithms that simultaneously measure ion signal size and lamp light output, useful for long term operation and self-optimization of microwave power and return engineering data.

  17. Proceedings of the Workshop on the Scientific Applications of Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The Workshop on Scientific Applications of Clocks in space was held to bring together scientists and technologists interested in applications of ultrastable clocks for test of fundamental theories, and for other science investigations. Time and frequency are the most precisely determined of all physical parameters, and thus are the required tools for performing the most sensitive tests of physical theories. Space affords the opportunity to make measurement, parameters inaccessible on Earth, and enables some of the most original and sensitive tests of fundamental theories. In the past few years, new developments in clock technologies have pointed to the opportunity for flying ultrastable clocks in support of science investigations of space missions. This development coincides with the new NASA paradigm for space flights, which relies on frequent, low-cost missions in place of the traditional infrequent and high-cost missions. The heightened interest in clocks in space is further advanced by new theoretical developments in various fields. For example, recent developments in certain Grand Unified Theory formalisms have vastly increased interest in fundamental tests of gravitation physics with clocks. The workshop included sessions on all related science including relativity and gravitational physics, cosmology, orbital dynamics, radio science, geodynamics, and GPS science and others, as well as a session on advanced clock technology.

  18. Direct Excitation of the Forbidden Clock Transition in Neutral {sup 174}Yb Atoms Confined to an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Z.W.; Hoyt, C.W.; Oates, C.W.; Hollberg, L.; Taichenachev, A.V.; Yudin, V.I.

    2006-03-03

    We report direct single-laser excitation of the strictly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition in {sup 174}Yb atoms confined to a 1D optical lattice. A small ({approx}1.2 mT) static magnetic field was used to induce a nonzero electric dipole transition probability between the clock states at 578.42 nm. Narrow resonance linewidths of 20 Hz (FWHM) with high contrast were observed, demonstrating a resonance quality factor of 2.6x10{sup 13}. The previously unknown ac Stark shift-canceling (magic) wavelength was determined to be 759.35{+-}0.02 nm. This method for using the metrologically superior even isotope can be easily implemented in current Yb and Sr lattice clocks and can create new clock possibilities in other alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Mg and Ca.

  19. Reference clock parameters for digital communications systems applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartaschoff, P.

    1981-01-01

    The basic parameters relevant to the design of network timing systems describe the random and systematic time departures of the system elements, i.e., master (or reference) clocks, transmission links, and other clocks controlled over the links. The quantitative relations between these parameters were established and illustrated by means of numerical examples based on available measured data. The examples were limited to a simple PLL control system but the analysis can eventually be applied to more sophisticated systems at the cost of increased computational effort.

  20. Quantum-noise-limited interferometric measurement of atomic noise: Towards spin squeezing on the Cs clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang; Vershovski, Anton K.; Mikkelsen, Jens K.; Soerensen, Jens L.; Petrov, Plamen G.; Garrido Alzar, Carlos L.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally a nondestructive interferometric measurement of the state population of an ensemble of laser-cooled and trapped atoms. This study is a step toward generation of (pseudo)spin squeezing of cold atoms targeted at the improvement of the cesium clock performance beyond the limit set by the quantum projection noise of atoms. We calculate the phase shift and the quantum noise of a near-resonant optical probe pulse propagating through a cloud of cold {sup 133}Cs atoms. We analyze the figure of merit for a quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of the collective pseudospin and show that it can be expressed simply as a product of the ensemble optical density and the pulse-integrated rate of the spontaneous emission caused by the off-resonant probe light. Based on this, we propose a protocol for the sequence of operations required to generate and utilize spin squeezing for the improved atomic clock performance via a QND measurement on the probe light. In the experimental part we demonstrate that the interferometric measurement of the atomic population can reach a sensitivity of the order of {radical}(N{sub at}) in a cloud of N{sub at} cold atoms, which is an important benchmark toward the experimental realization of the theoretically analyzed protocol.

  1. Optimization of FM spectroscopy parameters for a frequency locking loop in small scale CPT based atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Ben-Aroya, I; Kahanov, M; Eisenstein, G

    2007-11-12

    We describe the optimization of a Frequency Locked Loop (FLL) in an atomic clock which is based on Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) in (87)Rb vapor using the D(2) transition. The FLL uses frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy and we study the effect of FM parameters (modulation frequency and index) on the sensitivity and the signal to noise ratio of the feedback signal in the FLL. The clock which employs a small spherical glass cell containing (87)Rb atoms and a buffer gas, exhibits a short term stability of 3x10(-11)/ radicaltau. The long term relative frequency stability of the 10 MHz output is better than 10(-10) with a drift of 10(-11) per day. PMID:19550789

  2. Linearization of Schwarzschild's line element - Application to the clock paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.

    1971-01-01

    This article studies the relativistic theory of the motion of a particle in the presence of a uniform acceleration field. The problem is introduced as a linearization of the fundamental line element of general relativity. The linearized line element is a solution of Einstein's field equations. The equations of geodesics corresponding to this line element are solved and applied to the clock paradox problem.-

  3. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Danet, J M; Boudot, R

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad(2)/Hz and -129 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10(-14) at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out. PMID:25273756

  4. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Danet, J. M.; Boudot, R.

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad2/Hz and -129 dB rad2/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10-14 at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  5. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Boudot, R.; Calosso, C. E.; Danet, J. M.

    2014-09-15

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz and −129 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10{sup −14} at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  6. Compact Microwave Mercury Ion Clock for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tu, Meirong; Chung, Sang K.; MacNeal, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We have recently completed a breadboard ion-clock physics package based on Hg ions shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole rf trap. With this architecture we have demonstrated short-term stability approximately 1 - 2 x 10(exp -13) at 1 second, averaging to 10(exp -15) at 1 day. This development shows that H-maser quality stabilities can be produced in a small clock package, comparable in size to an ultra-stable quartz oscillator required for holding 1 - 2 x 10(exp -13) at 1 second. This performance was obtained in a sealed vacuum configuration where only a getter pump was used to maintain vacuum. The vacuum tube containing the traps has now been under sealed vacuum conditions for nearly three years with no measurable degradation of ion trapping lifetimes or clock short-term performance. We have fabricated the vacuum tube, ion trap and UV windows from materials that will allow an approximately 400 C bake-out to prepare for tube seal-off. This approach to the vacuum follows the methods used in flight vacuum tube electronics, such as flight TWTA's where tube operation lifetime and shelf life of up to 15 years is achieved.

  7. Miniaturized Mercury Ion Clock for Ultrastable Deep Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang; Lim, Lawrence; Le, Thanh

    2006-01-01

    We have recently completed a prototype ion-clock physics package based on Hg ions shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole rf trap. With this architecture we have demonstrated short-term stability 2-3x10-13 at 1 second, averaging to 10-15 at 1 day. This development shows that H-maser quality stabilities can be produced in a small clock package, comparable in size to an ultra-stable quartz oscillator required for holding 1-2x10-13 at 1 second. This performance was obtained in a sealed vacuum configuration where only a getter pump was used to maintain vacuum. The vacuum tube containing the traps has now been under sealed vacuum conditions for nearly 1.5 years with no measurable degradation of ion trapping lifetimes or clock short-term performance. Because the tube is sealed, the Hg source and Neon buffer gas are held indefinitely, for the life of the tube. There is no consumption of Hg in this system unlike in a Cs beam tube where lifetime is often limited by Cs depletion.

  8. Progress on Small Mercury Ion Clock for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Thompson, Robert J.; MacNeal, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We have recently completed a breadboard ion-clock physics package based on Hg ions shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole rf trap. With this architecture we have demonstrated short-term stability approx.1-2x10-(sup 1)(sup 3) at 1 second, averaging to 10-(sup 1)? at 1 day. This development shows that H-maser quality stabilities can be produced in a small clock package, comparable in size to an ultra-stable quartz oscillator required for holding 1-2x10-(sup 1)(sup 3) at 1 second. This performance was obtained in a sealed vacuum configuration where only a getter pump was used to maintain vacuum. The vacuum tube containing the traps has now been under sealed vacuum conditions for over three years with no measurable degradation of ion trapping lifetimes or clock short-term performance. We have fabricated the vacuum tube, ion trap and UV windows from materials that will allow approx. 400 deg C bake-out to prepare for tube seal-off. This approach to the vacuum follows the methods used in flight vacuum tube electronics, such as flight TWTA's where tube operation lifetime and shelf life of up to 15 years is achieved.

  9. Circadian rhythms. Atomic-scale origins of slowness in the cyanobacterial circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jun; Hiyama, Takuya B; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Son, Seyoung; Mori, Toshifumi; Saito, Shinji; Osako, Masato; Wolanin, Julie; Yamashita, Eiki; Kondo, Takao; Akiyama, Shuji

    2015-07-17

    Circadian clocks generate slow and ordered cellular dynamics but consist of fast-moving bio-macromolecules; consequently, the origins of the overall slowness remain unclear. We identified the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) catalytic region [adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase)] in the amino-terminal half of the clock protein KaiC as the minimal pacemaker that controls the in vivo frequency of the cyanobacterial clock. Crystal structures of the ATPase revealed that the slowness of this ATPase arises from sequestration of a lytic water molecule in an unfavorable position and coupling of ATP hydrolysis to a peptide isomerization with high activation energy. The slow ATPase is coupled with another ATPase catalyzing autodephosphorylation in the carboxyl-terminal half of KaiC, yielding the circadian response frequency of intermolecular interactions with other clock-related proteins that influences the transcription and translation cycle. PMID:26113637

  10. Atomic clocks based on extened-cavity diode laser in multimode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Sin; Cho, D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrated the possibilities to develope an atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) without using a local oscillator and a modulator. Instead of using a modulator, we use two modes from a single extended-cavity diode laser in multimode operation. Two different types of feedback system are applied to stabilize a difference frequency between the two modes and eliminate the need for an extra frequency modulation. In the first type, we employ an electronic feedback using dispersion of the CPT resonance as an error signal. The two modes are phase locked with reference to a dispersion signal from a CPT resonance of 85Rb at 3.036 GHz ground hyperfine splitting. We use D1 transition at 794.8 nm with lin ⊥lin polarizations to obtain large-contrast CPT signal. Allan deviation of the beat frequency between the two modes is 1 ×10-10 at 200-s integration time. In the second type, we employ optoelectronic feedback to construct an opto-electronic oscillator (OEO). In an OEO, the beating signal between two modes is recovered by a fast photodiode, and its output is amplified and fed back to the laser diode by using a direct modulation of an injection current. When the OEO loop is closed, oscillation frequency depends on variations of the loop length. In order to stabilize an OEO loop length and thereby its oscillation frequency, CPT cell is inserted to play a role of microwave band pass filter. Allan deviation of the CPT-stabilized OEO is 2 ×10-10 at 100-s integration time.

  11. N -atom collective-state atomic clock with √{N }-fold increase in effective frequency and √{N }-fold reduction in fringe width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, May E.; Sarkar, Resham; Fang, Renpeng; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2015-06-01

    We describe a collective state atomic clock (COSAC) with Ramsey fringes narrowed by a factor of √{N } compared to a conventional clock—N being the number of noninteracting atoms—without violating the uncertainty relation. This narrowing is explained as being due to interferences among the collective states, representing an effective √{N }-fold increase in the clock frequency, without entanglement. We discuss the experimental inhomogeneities that affect the signal and show that experimental parameters can be adjusted to produce a near ideal signal. The detection process collects fluorescence through stimulated Raman scattering of Stokes photons, which emits photons predominantly in the direction of the probe beam for a high enough optical density. By using a null measurement scheme, in which detection of zero photons corresponds to the system being in a single collective state, we detect the population in a collective state of interest. The quantum and classical noise of the ideal COSAC is still limited by the standard quantum limit and performs only as well as the conventional clock. However, when detection efficiency and collection efficiency are taken into account, the detection scheme of the COSAC increases the quantum efficiency of detection significantly in comparison to a typical conventional clock employing fluorescence detection, yielding a net improvement in stability by as much as a factor of 10.

  12. Compact Microwave Mercury Ion Clock for Deep-Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Lim, Lawrence; Matevosian, Annond

    2007-01-01

    We have recently completed a breadboard ion-dock physics package based on Kg ions shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole rf trap. With this architecture we have demonstrated short-term stability -1-2xl0-13 at 1 second, averaging to 10-15 at 1 day. This development shows that 8- maser quality stabilities can be produced in a small clock package, comparable in size to an oItra-stable quartz oscillator required for holding 1-2xl0-13 at 1 second. This performance was obtained in a sealed vacuum configuration where only agetter pump was used to maintain vacuum. The vacuum tube containing the traps has now been onder sealed vacuum conditions for nearly two years with no measurable degradation of ion trapping lifetimes or clock short-term performance. We have fabricated the vacuum tube, ion trap and UV windows from materials that will allow a - 400 C tube bake-out to prepare for tube sealoff. This approach to the vacuum follows the methods used in mght vacuum tube electronics, such as flight TWTA's where tube operation lifetime and shelf life of up to 15 years is achieved. We use neon as a buffer gas with 2-3 times less pressure induced frequency pulling than helium and, being heavier, negligable diffusion losses will occur over the operation lifetime.

  13. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ovsiannikov, Vitali D.; Derevianko, Andrei; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-08-26

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10{sup -16} accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10{sup -18}.

  14. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  15. Design and implementation of fast bipolar clock drivers for CCD imaging systems in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajan, Jayesh; Kumar, Nishant; Verma, Amarnath; Thaker, Ramkrishna

    2016-05-01

    Drive electronics for generating fast, bipolar clocks, which can drive capacitive loads of the order of 5-10nF are indispensable for present day Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs). Design of these high speed bipolar clocks is challenging because of the capacitive loads that have to be driven and a strict constraint on the rise and fall times. Designing drive electronics circuits for space applications becomes even more challenging due to limited number of available discrete devices, which can survive in the harsh radiation prone space environment. This paper presents the design, simulations and test results of a set of such high speed, bipolar clock drivers. The design has been tested under a thermal cycle of -15 deg C to +55 deg C under vacuum conditions and has been designed using radiation hardened components. The test results show that the design meets the stringent rise/fall time requirements of 50+/-10ns for Multiple Vertical CCD (VCCD) clocks and 20+/-5ns for Horizontal CCD (HCCD) clocks with sufficient design margins across full temperature range, with a pixel readout rate of 6.6MHz. The full design has been realized in flexi-rigid PCB with package volume of 140x160x50 mm3.

  16. Interim results from the characterization testing of the Engineering Development (EDM) rubidium clocks for satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Edward D., Jr.; Danzy, Fredrick

    1990-01-01

    Some interim results from the environmental testing program to evaluate the Engineering Design Model (EDM) of the EG and G Spaceborne Rubidium Clock are presented. This effort is in support of the Global Positioning System (GPS) BLOCK IIR program and is intended to characterize the performance of EG and G design for BLOCK IIR satellite applications. Two EG and G EDM units are currently under test at NRL's Clock Test Facility to measure the long-term frequency stability, drift, and frequency versus temperature characteristics.

  17. Accuracy budget of the 88Sr optical atomic clocks at KL FAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzewicz, Czesław; Bober, Marcin; Morzyński, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Masłowski, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a detailed accuracy budget of two independent strontium optical lattice clocks at the National Laboratory FAMO (KL FAMO) probed with a single shared ultra-narrow laser. The combined instability of the two frequency standards was 7× {10}-17 after 105s of averaging.

  18. Detection of ultrahigh resonance contrast in vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinda; Deng, Jianliao; Ma, Yisheng; He, Huijuan; Wang, Yuzhu

    2012-12-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel detection scheme of clock signals and obtain an ultrahigh resonance contrast up to 90%, which leads to the remarkable improvement of the precision of the signal-to-noise ratio. The frequency stability in terms of Allan deviation of the proposed detection scheme is improved by an order of magnitude under equivalent conditions. PMID:23257996

  19. Innovation and reliability of atomic standards for PTTI applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, R.

    1981-01-01

    Innovation and reliability in hyperfine frequency standards and clock systems are discussed. Hyperfine standards are defined as those precision frequency sources and clocks which use a hyperfine atomic transition for frequency control and which have realized significant commercial production and acceptance (cesium, hydrogen, and rubidium atoms). References to other systems such as thallium and ammonia are excluded since these atomic standards have not been commercially exploited in this country.

  20. ECL gate array with integrated PLL-based clock recovery and synthesis for high-speed data and telecom applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosky, David S.; Coy, Bruce H.; Friedmann, Marc D.

    1992-03-01

    A 2500 gate mixed signal gate array has been developed that integrates custom PLL-based clock recovery and clock synthesis functions with 2500 gates of configurable logic cells to provide a single chip solution for 200 - 1244 MHz fiber based digital interface applications. By customizing the digital logic cells, any of the popular telecom and datacom standards may be implemented.

  1. Ab initio calculations of external-field shifts of the 661-nm quadrupolar clock transition in neutral Ag atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Topcu, Suat; Nasser, Jamil; Daku, Latevi Max Lawson; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2006-04-15

    Frequency shifts of the Ag I 4d{sup 10}5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}(F=0,M{sub F}=0) to 4d{sup 9}5s{sup 2} {sup 2}D{sub 5/2}(F{sup '}=2,M{sub F{sup '}}=0) electric-quadrupole transition at 330.6 nm due to external fields are calculated using multiconfigurational self-consistent field methods. As this forbidden transition is free from first order Doppler and Zeeman effects, it is under investigation for the realization of an atomic optical clock. The calculated perturbations are the light shift, the blackbody frequency shift, and the quadratic Zeeman shift. Results show that a total uncertainty of 10{sup -18} could be reach without confining the atoms in a Lamb-Dicke regime in an optical lattice.

  2. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  3. A CPT-based Cs vapor cell atomic clock with a short-term fractional frequency stability of 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Liu, Xiaochi; Guérandel, Stéphane; De Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on the development and short-term fractional frequency stability of a continuous-regime (CW) Cs vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The push-pull optical pumping technique is used to increase the number of atoms that participate to the clock transition, yielding a typical CPT resonance contrast of 25% for a CPT linewidth of about 450 Hz. The clock short-term fractional frequency stability is measured to be 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2 up to 100 seconds averaging time, in correct agreement with the signal-to-noise ratio limit. The mid-term frequency stability results are currently mainly limited by laser power effects. The detection of high-contrast narrow Raman-Ramsey fringes is demonstrated with this setup by making the atoms interact with a light pulse sequence.

  4. Ytterbium in quantum gases and atomic clocks: van der Waals interactions and blackbody shifts.

    PubMed

    Safronova, M S; Porsev, S G; Clark, Charles W

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the C(6) coefficients of Yb-Yb, Yb-alkali, and Yb-group II van der Waals interactions with 2% uncertainty. The only existing experimental result for such quantities is for the Yb-Yb dimer. Our value, C(6)=1929(39) a.u., is in excellent agreement with the recent experimental determination of 1932(35) a.u. We have also developed a new approach for the calculation of the dynamic correction to the blackbody radiation shift. We have calculated this quantity for the Yb 6s(2) (1)S(0)-6s6p (3)P(0)(o) clock transition with 3.5% uncertainty. This reduces the fractional uncertainty due to the blackbody radiation shift in the Yb optical clock at 300 K to the 10(-18) level. PMID:23368178

  5. Selection and amplification of a single optical frequency comb mode for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical clock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Yin, Mojuan; Kong, Dehuan; Xu, Qinfang; Zhang, Shougang; Chang, Hong

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we report on the active filtering and amplification of a single mode from an optical femtosecond laser comb with mode spacing of 250 MHz by optical injection of two external-cavity diode lasers operating in cascade to build a narrow linewidth laser for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical lattice clock. Despite the low injection of individual comb mode of approximately 50 nW, a single comb line at 689 nm could be filtered and amplified to reach as high as 10 mW with 37 dB side mode suppression and a linewidth of 240 Hz. This method could be applied over a broad spectral band to build narrow linewidth lasers for various applications.

  6. Cesium clocks keep the world on time

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, H.

    1985-09-01

    The development of timekeeping systems based on the natural resonance of cesium atoms is reviewed. The design of a typical cesium clock using a frequency lock servo is described. Some common applications of cesium beam frequency and time reference systems are discussed, including Navstar GPS navigation referencing; military satellite communications; and measurements of relative gravitational effects. The possibility of increasing timekeeping accuracies using improved cesium clock designs is evaluated.

  7. An analytic technique for statistically modeling random atomic clock errors in estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Minimum variance estimation requires that the statistics of random observation errors be modeled properly. If measurements are derived through the use of atomic frequency standards, then one source of error affecting the observable is random fluctuation in frequency. This is the case, for example, with range and integrated Doppler measurements from satellites of the Global Positioning and baseline determination for geodynamic applications. An analytic method is presented which approximates the statistics of this random process. The procedure starts with a model of the Allan variance for a particular oscillator and develops the statistics of range and integrated Doppler measurements. A series of five first order Markov processes is used to approximate the power spectral density obtained from the Allan variance.

  8. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  9. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  10. GPS.DM Observatory: Search for Dark Matter and Exotic Physics with Atomic Clocks and GPS Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Derevianko, Andrei; Lundholm, Nathan; Pospelov, Maxim; Rollings, Alex; Sherman, Jeff; GPS. DM Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Despite the overwhelming cosmological evidence for the existence of dark matter, and the considerable effort of the scientific community over decades, there is no evidence for dark matter in terrestrial experiments. The GPS.DM observatory uses the existing GPS constellation as a 50,000 km-aperture sensor array, analyzing the satellite and terrestrial atomic clock data for exotic physics signatures. In particular, the collaboration searches for evidence of transient variations of fundamental constants correlated with the Earth's galactic motion through the dark matter halo. This type of search is particularly sensitive to exotic forms of dark matter, such as topological defects. We will present an update on the search. Supported by the NSF.

  11. Compact Yb+ optical atomic clock project: design principle and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroûte, Clément; Souidi, Maël; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Millo, Jacques; Saleh, Khaldoun; Bigler, Emmanuel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Giordano, Vincent; Kersalé, Yann

    2016-06-01

    We present the design of a compact optical clock based on the 2 S 1/2→2 D 3/2 435.5 nm transition in 171 Yb+. The ion trap will be based on a micro-fabricated circuit, with surface electrodes generating a trapping potential to localize a single Yb ion a few hundred μm from the electrodes. We present our trap design as well as simulations of the resulting trapping pseudo-potential. We also present a compact, multi-channel wavelength meter that will permit the frequency stabilization of the cooling, repumping and clear-out lasers at 369.5 nm, 935.2 nm and 638.6 nm needed to cool the ion. We use this wavelength meter to characterize and stabilize the frequency of extended cavity diode lasers at 369.5 nm and 638.6 nm.

  12. Military applications of high-accuracy frequency standards and clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, John R.

    1993-08-01

    Frequency control and timing devices are essential components in modern military electronics systems. Reviewed in this paper are the applications of these devices, and the manner in which the stability and accuracy of these devices impact the performance of military communication, navigation, surveillance, electronic warfare, missile guidance, and identification-friend-or-foe systems.

  13. First nuclear clock?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    A nuclear clock that is more precise than any atomic clock available today could soon be a reality after physicists in Germany detected a crucial low-energy transition in the thorium-229 nucleus, which could be used to create a new frequency standard.

  14. Coherent population trapping resonances in Cs-Ne vapor microcells for miniature clocks applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boudot, R.; Dziuban, P.; Hasegawa, M.; Chutani, R. K.; Galliou, S.; Giordano, V.; Gorecki, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the characterization of dark line resonances observed in Cs vapor microcells filled with a unique neon (Ne) buffer gas. The impact on the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance of some critical external parameters such as laser intensity, cell temperature, and microwave power is studied. We show the suppression of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the microwave power. The temperature dependence of the Cs ground state hyperfine resonance frequency is shown to be canceled in the 77-80 deg. C range for various Ne buffer gas pressures. The necessity to adjust the Ne buffer gas pressure or the cell dimensions to optimize the CPT signal height at the frequency inversion temperature is pointed out. Based on such Cs-Ne microcells, we preliminary demonstrate a 852 nm vertical cavity surface emitted laser (VCSEL)-modulated based CPT atomic clock exhibiting a short term fractional frequency instability {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=1.5x10{sup -10{tau}-1/2} until 30 s. These results, similar to those published in the literature by others groups, prove the potential of our original microcell technology in view of the development of high-performance chip scale atomic clocks.

  15. Relativistic effects of the rotation of the earth on remote clock synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1974-01-01

    A treatment is given of relativistic clock synchronization effects due to the rotation of the earth. Unlike other approaches, the point of view of an earth fixed coordinate system is used which offers insight to many problems. An attempt is made to give the reader an intuitive grasp of the subject as well as to provide formulae for his use. Specific applications to global timekeeping, navigation, VLBI, relativistic clock experiments, and satellite clock synchronization are discussed. The question of whether atomic clocks are ideal clocks is also treated.

  16. Single-Ion Atomic Clock with 3 ×10-18 Systematic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntemann, N.; Sanner, C.; Lipphardt, B.; Tamm, Chr.; Peik, E.

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the 2S1/2 (F =0 )→ 2F7/2 (F =3 ) electric octupole (E 3 ) transition of a single trapped 171Yb+ ion. For the spectroscopy of this strongly forbidden transition, we utilize a Ramsey-type excitation scheme that provides immunity to probe-induced frequency shifts. The cancellation of these shifts is controlled by interleaved single-pulse Rabi spectroscopy, which reduces the related relative frequency uncertainty to 1.1 ×10-18. To determine the frequency shift due to thermal radiation emitted by the ion's environment, we measure the static scalar differential polarizability of the E 3 transition as 0.888 (16 )×10-40 J m2/V2 and a dynamic correction η (300 K )=-0.0015 (7 ) . This reduces the uncertainty due to thermal radiation to 1.8 ×10-18. The residual motion of the ion yields the largest contribution (2.1 ×10-18 ) to the total systematic relative uncertainty of the clock of 3.2 ×10-18.

  17. Optical clocks and their contribution to gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Mohammad; Mohamadhosseini, Babak; Hatami, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Optical clocks, as one of the latest achievements in atomic and molecular physics, have applications more than timing, due to their accuracy and stability. In general relativity, gravitational potential differences in space and time, cause frequency difference in optical clocks. Hence, ultra precise optical clocks can be used as a tool to observe potential differences and consequently as a new gravimetry technique. In this contribution, we investigate the latest optical clocks based on atomic transition in Al+ and derive a simple equation for frequency change related to geo-potential differences. Moreover, we consider the capability of optical clocks for gravity modeling in combination with other gravity observations. Finally, the possibility to detect potential changes in geo-dynamically active zones, such as East-Asia and the requirements for such studies are discussed.

  18. Improved limit on a temporal variation of mp/me from comparisons of Yb+ and Cs atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Chr; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Peik, E

    2014-11-21

    Accurate measurements of different transition frequencies between atomic levels of the electronic and hyperfine structure over time are used to investigate temporal variations of the fine structure constant α and the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ. We measure the frequency of the (2)S1/2→(2)F7/2 electric octupole (E3) transition in (171)Yb(+) against two caesium fountain clocks as f(E3)=642,121,496,772,645.36  Hz with an improved fractional uncertainty of 3.9×10(-16). This transition frequency shows a strong sensitivity to changes of α. Together with a number of previous and recent measurements of the (2)S1/2→(2)D3/2 electric quadrupole transition in (171)Yb(+) and with data from other elements, a least-squares analysis yields (1/α)(dα/dt)=-0.20(20)×10(-16)/yr and (1/μ)(dμ/dt)=-0.5(1.6)×10(-16)/yr, confirming a previous limit on dα/dt and providing the most stringent limit on dμ/dt from laboratory experiments. PMID:25479483

  19. Short-scale atomic clock based on the quantum magnetometers system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The experimental results of dependence of Allan variance as averaging time for system of two quantum magnetometers with laser pumping of the alkaline atoms are presented. Also the role of different components of luminous frequency shift of a radio optical resonance in case of an optimum operation mode of quantum magnetometers in such system is noted. It is shown that the effect of compensation of luminous shift components allows to reduce Allan variance in times of averaging more, than hundreds of seconds in comparison with the quantum standard of frequency on 0-0 transition.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity to the fine-structure-constant variation in the Th IV atomic clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Porsev, S. G.

    2009-12-15

    Our calculations have shown that the 5f{sub 5/2}-7s{sub 1/2} 23 131 cm{sup -1} transition from the ground state in the ion Th{sup 3+} is very sensitive to the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant alpha=e{sup 2}/(Planck constant/2pi)c (q=-75 300 cm{sup -1}). The line is very narrow, the ion has been trapped and laser cooled, and the positive shifter line 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} 4325 cm{sup -1} (q=+2900 cm{sup -1}) may be used as a reference. A comparison may also be made with a positive shifter in another atom or ion. This makes Th{sup 3+} a good candidate to search for the alpha variation.

  1. Comparison of mode estimation methods and application in molecular clock analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Shah, Prachi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distributions of time estimates in molecular clock studies are sometimes skewed or contain outliers. In those cases, the mode is a better estimator of the overall time of divergence than the mean or median. However, different methods are available for estimating the mode. We compared these methods in simulations to determine their strengths and weaknesses and further assessed their performance when applied to real data sets from a molecular clock study. RESULTS: We found that the half-range mode and robust parametric mode methods have a lower bias than other mode methods under a diversity of conditions. However, the half-range mode suffers from a relatively high variance and the robust parametric mode is more susceptible to bias by outliers. We determined that bootstrapping reduces the variance of both mode estimators. Application of the different methods to real data sets yielded results that were concordant with the simulations. CONCLUSION: Because the half-range mode is a simple and fast method, and produced less bias overall in our simulations, we recommend the bootstrapped version of it as a general-purpose mode estimator and suggest a bootstrap method for obtaining the standard error and 95% confidence interval of the mode.

  2. A quantum network of clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Peter; Kessler, Eric; Bishof, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Sorensen, Anders; Ye, Jun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Shared timing information constitutes a key resource for positioning and navigation with a direct correspondence between timing accuracy and precision in applications such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). By combining precision metrology and quantum networks, we propose here a quantum, cooperative protocol for the operation of a network consisting of geographically remote optical atomic clocks. Using non-local entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of the global network resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental limit set by quantum theory yielding an ultra-precise clock signal. Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with basic techniques from quantum communication, guarantees security both from internal and external threats. Realization of such a global quantum network of clocks may allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy. See also: Komar et al. arXiv:1310.6045 (2013) and Kessler et al. arXiv:1310.6043 (2013).

  3. Microwave Cavity Clocks On Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. a.; Nissen, J. A.; Wang, S.; Stricker, D. A.; Avaloff, D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the status of a microwave cavity clock experiment to perform improved tests of Local Position Invariance and Lorentz Invariance on the International Space Station in conjunction with atomic clocks. Significant improvements over present bounds are expected in both cases. The oscillators can also be used to enhance the performance of atomic clocks at short time scales for other experiments.

  4. Applications of Bayesian filtering in wireless networks: Clock synchronization, localization, and RF tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Benjamin Russell

    In this work, we investigate the application of Bayesian filtering techniques such as Kalman Filtering and Particle filtering to the problems of network time synchronization, self-localization and radio-frequency (RF) tomography in wireless networks. Networks of large numbers of small, cheap, mobile wireless devices have shown enormous potential in applications ranging from intrusion detection to environmental monitoring. These applications require the devices to have accurate time and position estimates, however traditional techniques may not be available. Additionally RF tomography offers a new paradigm to sense the network environment and could greatly enhance existing network capabilities. While there are some existing works addressing these problems, they all suffer from limitations. Current time synchronization methods are not energy efficient on small wireless devices with low quality oscillators. Existing localization methods do not consider additional sources of information available to nodes in the network such as measurements from accelerometers or models of the shadowing environment in the network. RF tomography has only been examined briefly in such networks, and current algorithms can not handle node mobility and rely on shadowing models that have not been experimentally verified. We address the time synchronization problem by analyzing the characteristics of the clocks in small wireless devices, developing a model for it, and then applying a Kalman filter to track both clock offset and skew. In our investigation into RF tomography, we present a method using a Kalman filter which jointly estimates and tracks static and dynamic objects in the environment. We also use channel measurements collected from a field test of our RF tomography testbed to compare RF shadowing models. For the localization problem, we present two algorithms incorporating additional information for improved localization: one based on a distributed extended Kalman filter that

  5. Timing in the NOvA detectors with atomic clock based time transfers between Fermilab, the Soudan mine and the NOvA Far detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A.; Niner, E.; Habig, A.

    2015-12-01

    The NOvA experiment uses a GPS based timing system both to internally synchronize the readout of the DAQ components and to establish an absolute wall clock reference which can be used to link the Fermilab accelerator complex with the neutrino flux that crosses the NOvA detectors. We describe the methods that were used during the commissioning of the NOvA DAQ and Timing systems to establish the synchronization between the Fermilab beam and the NOvA far detector. We present how high precision atomic clocks were trained and transported between the MINOS and NOvA detectors during a Northern Minnesota blizzard to validate the absolute time offsets of the experiments and make the first observation of beam neutrinos in the NOvA far detector.

  6. Optical clock transition in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal: coherence lifetime extension for quantum storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongning, Robert-Christopher; Chanelière, Thierry; Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Florencia Pascual-Winter, María

    2015-04-01

    Atomic clock transitions are desirable for quantum information storage and processing thanks to the protection from decoherence they provide. In the context of rare- earth-ion-doped crystals for quantum information storage, clock Zeeman or hyperfine transitions have been identified and exploited for long-lived storage in spin degrees of freedom. We present a theoretical and experimental analysis on the existence of an optical clock transition in Tm3+:YAG, in view of storage in optical coherences. The combination of a Zeeman-like term and a quadratic electronic Zeeman term in the Hamiltonian, lead to the existence of a magnetic field amplitude (12 mT) for which the derivative of the optical transition energy with respect to the field amplitude vanishes, regardless of the magnetic field orientation. We have verified this prediction through hole-burning spectroscopy experiments. In addition to that, a study of the behavior of the Hamiltonian as a function of the magnetic field orientation yields the direction for which both derivatives with respect to the magnetic field angular coordinates also vanish. The condition for an optical clock transition with three vanishing partial derivatives is met.

  7. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard. PMID:25734183

  8. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard. PMID:25734183

  9. Clocking in the face of unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2015-05-01

    In earlier papers we showed unpredictability beyond quantum uncertainty in atomic clocks, ensuing from a proven gap between given evidence and explanations of that evidence. Here we reconceive a clock, not as an isolated entity, but as enmeshed in a self-adjusting communications network adapted to one or another particular investigation, in contact with an unpredictable environment. From the practical uses of clocks, we abstract a clock enlivened with the computational capacity of a Turing machine, modified to transmit and to receive numerical communications. Such "live clocks" phase the steps of their computations to mesh with the arrival of transmitted numbers. We lift this phasing, known in digital communications, to a principle of logical synchronization, distinct from the synchronization defined by Einstein in special relativity. Logical synchronization elevates digital communication to a topic in physics, including applications to biology. One explores how feedback loops in clocking affect numerical signaling among entities functioning in the face of unpredictable influences, making the influences themselves into subjects of investigation. The formulation of communications networks in terms of live clocks extends information theory by expressing the need to actively maintain communications channels, and potentially, to create or drop them. We show how networks of live clocks are presupposed by the concept of coordinates in a spacetime. A network serves as an organizing principle, even when the concept of the rigid body that anchors a special-relativistic coordinate system is inapplicable, as is the case, for example, in a generic curved spacetime.

  10. Pulsed Optically Pumped Rb clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micalizio, S.; Levi, F.; Godone, A.; Calosso, C. E.; François, B.; Boudot, R.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Gharavipour, M.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    INRIM demonstrated a Rb vapour cell clock based on pulsed optical pumping (POP) with unprecedented frequency stability performances, both in the short and in the medium-long term period. In the frame of a EMRP project, we are developing a new clock based on the same POP principle but adopting solutions aimed at reducing the noise sources affecting the INRIM clock. At the same time, concerning possible technological applications, particular care are devoted in the project to reduce the size and the weight of the clock, still keeping the excellent stability of the INRIM clock. The paper resumes the main results of this activity.