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Sample records for atomic collision physics

  1. On the utility and ubiquity of atomic collision physics

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is divided into three parts. In the introduction, we discuss the history and makeup of ICPEAC. In the second part, we discuss the extent of applicability of atomic collision physics. In the third part, we chose one subject (dielectronic excitation) to show the interrelationship of various sub-branches of atomic collision physics. 28 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  3. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  4. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    -coincidence technique / T. Kaneyasu, T. Azuma and K. Okuno. Recent developments in proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry / A. Wisthaler ... [et al.]. Interferences in electron emission from H[symbol] induced by fast ions / N. Stolterfoht. Atomic realization of the young single electron interference process in individual autoionization collisions / R. O. Barrachina and M. Šitnik. Multiple ionization processes related to irradiation of biological tissue / M. E. Galassi ... [et al.]. Atom-diatom collisions at cold and ultra-cold temperatures / F. D. Colavecchia, G. A. Parker and R. T. Pack. Interactions of ions with hydrogen atoms / A. Luca, G. Borodi and D. Gerlich. Analysis of all structures in the elastic and charge transfer cross sections for proton-hydrogen collisions in the range of 10[symbol]-10øeV / P. S. Krstić ... [et al.]. Ab-initio ion-atom collision calculations for many-electron systems / J. Anton and B. Fricke. Fully differential studies on single ionization of helium by slow proton impact / A. Hasan ... [et al.]. Dipole polarization effects on highly-charged-ion-atom electron capture / C. C. Havener ... [et al.]. Proton-, antiproton-, and photon-he collisions in the context of ultra fast processes / T. Morishita ... [et al.]. Impact parameter dependent charge exchange studies with channeled heavy ions / D. Dauvergne ... [et al.]. Crystal assisted atomic physics experiments using heavy ions / K. Komaki -- Collisions involving clusters and surfaces. Structure and dynamics of Van der Waal complexes: from triatomic to medium size clusters / G. Delgado Barrio ... [et al.]. Evaporation, fission and multifragmentation processes of multicharged C[symbol] ions versus excitation energies / S. Martin ... [et al.]. Fragmentation of collisionally excited fullerenes / M. Alcami, S. Diaz-Tendero and F. Martín. Lifetimes of C[symbol] and C[symbol] dianions in a storage ring / S. Tomita ... [et al.]. Clusters and clusters of clusters in collisions / B. Manil ... [et al

  6. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  7. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  8. Theory of slow atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, E. E.; Umanskii, S. Ia.

    The theory presented in this book is self-contained. It can be applied to the interpretation of various processes occurring in atomic collisions over a relatively wide energy range, from thermal energies to hundreds of eV. The general formulation of the scattering problem under quasi-classical conditions is discussed, taking into account scattering amplitudes and cross sections, scattering equations, collisions of two many-electron atoms, and integral cross sections for isotropic collisions. Other topics explored are related to diatomic electronic states, approximate calculations of the electronic states of diatoms, elastic scattering, approximate calculations of a multichannel quasi-classical scattering matrix, the two-state scattering problem, the linear two-state Landau-Zener model, nonlinear two-state models of nonadiabatic coupling, multistate models of nonadiabatic coupling, and a case study involving intramultiplet mixing and depolarization of alkalis in collisions with noble gases.

  9. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  10. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  11. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  12. The problems of solar-terrestrial coupling and new processes introduced to the physics of the ionosphere from the physics of atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergei

    2010-05-01

    Further progress in research of solar-terrestrial coupling requires better understanding of solar variability influence on the ionosphere. The most powerful manifestations of solar variability are solar flares and geomagnetic storms. During a flare EUV/X-ray irradiations are completely absorbed in the ionosphere producing SID. During geomagnetic storms precipitations of electrons with energy of several keV (and to a lesser extent protons precipitations) from radiation belts and geomagnetosphere produce additional ionization and low latitude auroras. Considering the physics of ionosphere during the last several decades we have been taking into account three novel processes well known in the physics of atomic collisions. These are Auger effect [S. V. Avakyan, The consideration of Auger processes in the upper atmosphere of Earth. In Abstracts of paper presented at the Tenth scien. and techn. Conf. of young specialists of S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, 1974, 29-31.], multiple photoionization of upper, valence shell [S.V. Avakyan, The source of O++ ions in the upper atmosphere, 1979, Cosmic Res, 17, 942 - 943] and Rydberg excitation of all the components of upper atmosphere [S.V. Avakyan, The new factor in the physics of solar - terrestrial relations - Rydberg atomic and molecules states. Conf. on Physics of solar-terrestrial relationships, 1994, Almaty, 3 - 5]. In the present paper the results of bringing these new processes in the ionospheric physics are discussed and also its possible role in the physics of solar-terrestrial coupling is considered. Involving these processes to the model estimations allowed us for the first time to come to the following important conclusions: - Auger electrons play the determinant role at the formation of energy spectrum of photoelectrons and secondary auroral electrons at the range above 150 eV; - double photoionization of the outer shell of the oxygen atom (by a single photon) plays a dominant role in the formation of

  13. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  14. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  15. Transition rates in proton - Rydberg atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrinceanu, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for energy and angular momentum transfer processes in proton - Ryderg atom collisions were performed and the corresponding rates are reported.The relevance of these rates in the context of cosmological recombination is discussed. The rates are contrasted with the similar rates in electron - Rydberg atom collisions. This work has been supported by National Science Foundation through grants for the Center for Research on Complex Networks (HRD-1137732) and Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (RISE) (HRD-1345173).

  16. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Electron-atom /molecule/ collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electron-atom (molecule) collision processes at low and intermediate energies, from near threshold to a few hundred electron volts, are discussed. Attention is given to experimental techniques and procedures, electron impact cross sections, impact excitation and electron-atom scattering in laser fields. Specific examples are presented that illustrate various experimental techniques and interpretations of observations.

  18. Role of atomic collisions in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

  19. Positronium collisions with rare-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribakin, G. F.; Swann, A. R.; Wilde, R. S.; Fabrikant, I. I.

    2016-03-01

    We calculate elastic scattering of positronium (Ps) by the Xe atom using the recently developed pseudopotential method (Fabrikant and Gribakin 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 052717) and review general features of Ps scattering from heavier rare-gas atoms: Ar, Kr and Xe. The total scattering cross section is dominated by two contributions: elastic scattering and Ps ionization (break-up). To calculate the Ps ionization cross sections we use the binary-encounter method for Ps collisions with an atomic target. Our results for the ionization cross section agree well with previous calculations carried out in the impulse approximation. Our total Ps-Xe cross section, when plotted as a function of the projectile velocity, exhibits similarity with the electron-Xe cross section for the collision velocities higher than 0.8 a.u., and agrees very well with the measurements at Ps velocities above 0.5 a.u.

  20. Electron collisions with coherently prepared atomic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.; LeClair, L.R.; Khakoo, M.S.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.; Csanak, G.

    1998-02-01

    The subject of electron scattering by laser-excited atoms is briefly reviewed. To demonstrate some aspects of these electron collision processes, the authors describe the procedures and the results of a joint experimental and theoretical study concerning elastic scattering by coherently excited {sup 138}Ba (...6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) atoms. Examples of experimental and theoretical collision parameters and magnetic sublevel differential cross sections for elastic scattering are given and compared. The convergent close coupling calculations (with the neglect of spin-orbit interaction) are in good agreement with experiment at 20 eV impact energy and 10, 15 and 20{degree} scattering angles and can be expected to yield reliable integral magnetic sublevel and alignment creation cross sections. The role of these quantities in plasma polarization spectroscopy is pointed out.

  1. Cold collisions of alkali-metal atoms and chromium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeung, G.-H.; Hagebaum-Reignier, D.; Jamieson, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    We present ab initio potentials for ground state lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium atoms interacting with ground state chromium atoms via the 6Σ+ and 8Σ+ states of the corresponding dimers. Each potential is matched to the leading van der Waals dispersion energy -C6/R6 - C8/R8 and an exchange energy; we list the values of C6, C8 and the exchange fitting parameters. We present calculated values from quantal and semi-classical approximations for the s-wave scattering length and effective range and the p-wave scattering volume for collisions of each of the alkali-metal atoms lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium with 52chromium atoms and comment on s-wave scattering by 53chromium atoms.

  2. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  3. Description of ionization in the molecular approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.; Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular treatments of atomic collisions have traditionally been restricted to low nuclear velocities because of their failure to reproduce the fall of the capture cross sections at higher velocities. The limitation has recently been seen to be due to their description of ionizing processes. This feature is shown here to be a general one for multicharged ion-atom collisions. Its origin and characteristics are described and illustrated for the prototypical Li{sup 3+}+H(1s) reaction. Ionization appears as a result of the inertia of the electron cloud to adiabatically follow the nuclear motion. This gives rise to nonadiabatic transitions, which represent an ionizing flux whenever the nuclear velocity is high enough that the energy of the traveling molecular orbitals involved is positive in both moving atomic reference frames. Two strongly connected mechanisms appear, corresponding to the relative translational and rotational nuclear motions. Because of the finiteness of the basis, these mechanisms terminate with unphysical trapping effects. While interesting {ital per se}, knowledge of these features is also useful with respect to improving molecular treatments of atomic collisions with the addition of pseudostates. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Atomic collision databases and data services -- A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.R.

    1997-12-31

    Atomic collision databases and data services constitute an important resource for scientific and engineering applications such as astrophysics, lighting, materials processing, and fusion energy, as well as an important knowledge base for current developments in atomic collision physics. Data centers and research groups provide these resources through a chain of efforts that include producing and collecting primary data, performing evaluation of the existing data, deducing scaling laws and semiempirical formulas to compactly describe and extend the data, producing the recommended sets of data, and providing convenient means of maintaining, updating, and disseminating the results of this process. The latest efforts have utilized modern database, storage, and distribution technologies including the Internet and World Wide Web. Given here is an informal survey of how these resources have developed, how they are currently characterized, and what their likely evolution will lead them to become in the future.

  5. Atomic collision databases and data services-a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David R.

    1998-07-01

    Atomic collision databases and data services constitute an important resource for scientific and engineering applications such as astrophysics, lighting, materials processing, and fusion energy, as well as an important knowledge base for current developments in atomic collision physics. Data centers and research groups provide these resources through a chain of efforts that include producing and collecting primary data, performing evaluation of the existing data, deducing scaling laws and semiempirical formulas to compactly describe and extend the data, producing recommended sets of data, and providing convenient means of maintaining, updating, and disseminating the results of this process. The latest efforts have utilized modern database, storage, and distribution technologies including the Internet and World Wide Web. Given here is an informal survey of how these resources have developed, how they are currently characterized, and what their likely evolution will lead them to become in the future.

  6. Positronium collisions with rare-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya; Gribakin, Gleb; Swann, Andrew; Wilde, Robyn

    2016-05-01

    We calculate elastic scattering of positronium (Ps) by the Xe atom using the recently developed pseudopotential method† and review general features of Ps scattering from heavier rare-gas atoms: Ar, Kr and Xe. The total scattering cross section is dominated by two contributions: elastic scattering and Ps ionization (break-up). To calculate the Ps ionization cross sections we use the binary-encounter method for Ps collisions with an atomic target. Our results for the ionization cross section agree well with previous calculations carried out in the impulse approximation. Our total Ps-Xe cross section, when plotted as a function of the projectile velocity, exhibits similarity with the electron-Xe cross section for the collision velocities higher than 0.8 a.u., and agrees very well with the measurements at Ps velocities above 0.5 a.u. † Fabrikant I I and Gribakin G F 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 052717 Supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  7. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  8. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  9. Orientational rainbows in atom--molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vervaat, M.G.M.; Spalburg, M.R.; Los, J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The experimental and calculated differential cross sections for ion pair formation in K (27 to 50 eV LAB) O/sub 2/ collisions show an orientational rainbow at small scattering angle. This rainbow is found to be due to the anisotropy of the K--O/sub 2/ interaction potential. Using the position of the orientational rainbow, the anisotropy in the repulsive part of the interaction potential is determined as G = (1+1.3( +- )*P/sub 2/(cos ..cap alpha..)), where P/sub 2/ is a Legendre polynomial and ..cap alpha.. the angle between the molecular axis and the radius vector of the atom. The interaction potential has the form V(R) = 102.9 exp(-0.571R)+(..delta..-1/R), where ..delta.. is the ionization potential of K minus the vertical electron affinity of O/sub 2/, the latter depending on the vibrational phase only; the term placed between the square brackets does not act during the complete collision, but only onward from that point during the collision where the ion-pair formation occurs.

  10. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  11. Contemporary Aspects of Atomic Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, R. G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approach generally used in writing undergraduate textbooks on Atomic and Nuclear Physics presents this branch as historical in nature. Describes the concepts of astrophysics, plasma physics and spectroscopy as contemporary and intriguing for modern scientists. (PS)

  12. Alignment and orientation in ion/endash/atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the theoretical study of alignment and orientation in atom-atom and ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies is reviewed. Recent systematic studies of the alignment and orientation of electronic charge cloud distributions of excited states resulting from such collisions clearly have provided more detailed information about the underlying collision dynamics. However, since accurate determination of these parameters is quite difficult, both theoretically and experimentally, a close collaboration between theory and experiment is necessary for a deeper understanding of the collision dynamics. A more complete approach, where the full density matrix is determined, is also discussed.

  13. Heavy particle atomic collisions in astrophysics: Beyond H and He targets

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Krstic, P.S.; Schultz, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The physical conditions relating to the emission of x-rays from Jovian and cometary atmospheres and to supernova ejecta are briefly described. Emphasis is placed on elucidating the relevance and importance of atomic collision processes, the availability of data, and the outstanding data needs for modeling these environments. Some preliminary theoretical studies of electron capture for important collisions systems, involving molecular and atomic metal targets, are presented.

  14. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  15. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    1998-09-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  16. Experimental atomic physics in heavy-ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.; Andersen, L.H.; Briand, J.P.; Liesen, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines the discussion which took place at the ''round table'' on experimental atomic physics in heavy-ion storage rings. Areas of discussion are: electron-ion interactions, ion-ion collisions, precision spectroscopy of highly charged ions, beta decay into bound final states, and atomic binding energies from spectroscopy of conversion elections. 18 refs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  17. Applications of atomic and molecular data to radiation physics

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.

    1982-01-01

    The general purpose of our work is to provide atomic and molecular collision cross sections useful for radiological physics, dosimetry, and other applications. Studies on the systematics of atomic oscillator-strength spectra and a survey of stopping power data are briefly described. (WHK)

  18. Landau quantization effects in ultracold atom-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    We study ultracold atom-ion collisions in the presence of an external magnetic field. At low collision energy the field can drastically modify the translational motion of the ion, which follows quantized cyclotron orbits. We present a rigorous theoretical approach for the calculation of quantum scattering amplitudes in these conditions. Collisions in different magnetic field regimes, identified by the size of the cyclotron radius with respect to the range of the interaction potential, are investigated. Our results are important in cases where use of a magnetic field to control the atom-ion collision dynamics is envisioned.

  19. Overview on collision processes of highly charged ions with atoms present status and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Janev, R.K.

    1983-05-01

    This paper provides a brief discussion on the present status of the collision physics of highly charged ions with atoms. The emphasis is on the main achievements in understanding and describing the most important collision processes, and as charge transfer, ionization and Auger-type processes, and even more on those open problems which, due either to their scientific or practical importance, represent challenges to current research in this field. The paper concentrates on general ideas and problems whose development and solutions have advanced or will advance our basic understanding of the collision dynamics of multiply charged ions with atoms.

  20. Ultracold collisions between Rb atoms and a Sr+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Ziv; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-Shlomi, Ruti; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2015-05-01

    In last decade, a novel field emerged, in which ultracold atoms and ions in overlapping traps are brought into interaction. In contrast to the short ranged atom-atom interaction which scales as r-6, atom-ion potential persists for hundreds of μm's due to its lower power-law scaling - r-4. Inelastic collisions between the consistuents lead to spin and charge transfer and also to molecule formation. Elastic collisions control the energy transfer between the ion and the atoms. The study of collisions at the μK range has thus far been impeded by the effect of the ion's micromotion which limited collision energy to mK scale. Unraveling this limit will allow to investigate few partial wave and even S-wave collisions. Our system is capable of trapping Sr+ ions and Rb and Sr atoms and cooling them to their quantum ground state. Atoms and ions are trapped and cooled in separate chambers. Then, the atoms are transported using an optical conveyer belt to overlap the ions. In contrast to other experiments in this field where the atoms are used to sympathetic cool the ion, our system is also capable of ground state cooling the ion before immersing it into the atom cloud. By this method, we would be able to explore heating and cooling dynamics in the ultracold regime.

  1. Four Weeks of Atomic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Presto, Michael C.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a strategy for presenting ideas of atomic physics in the laboratory portion of the course before it is introduced during a lecture in order to give students an appreciation for the concepts involved, a historical look at how the field developed, and a comprehensive review of physics concepts. Presents a worksheet for the Bohr atom…

  2. Collision assisted Zeeman cooling with multiple types of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Mathew S.; Wilson, Rebekah F.; Roberts, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    Through a combination of spin-exchange collisions in a magnetic field and optical pumping, it is possible to cool a gas of atoms without requiring the loss of atoms from the gas. This technique, collision assisted Zeeman cooling (CAZ), was developed theoretically assuming a single atomic species [G. Ferrari, Eur. Phys. J. D 13, 67 (2001)]. We have extended this cooling technique to a system of two atomic species rather than just one and have developed a simple analytic model describing the cooling rate. We find that the two-isotope CAZ cooling scheme has a clear theoretical advantage in systems that are reabsorption limited.

  3. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  4. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  5. Inelastic transitions in slow heavy-particle atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdo''rfer, J.

    2001-05-01

    It is a generally held belief that inelastic transition probabilities and cross sections in slow, nearly adiabatic atomic collisions decrease exponentially with the inverse of the collision velocity v [i.e., {sigma}{proportional_to}exp(-const/v)]. This notion is supported by the Landau-Zener approximation and the hidden crossings approximation. We revisit the adiabatic limit of ion-atom collisions and show that for very slow collisions radial transitions are dominated by the topology of the branch points of the radial velocity rather than the branch points of the energy eigensurface. This can lead to a dominant power-law dependence of inelastic cross sections, {sigma}{proportional_to}v{sup n}. We illustrate the interplay between different contributions to the transition probabilities in a one-dimensional collision system for which the exact probabilities can be obtained from a direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Scho''dinger equation.

  6. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  7. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M; Colgan, J; Wong, T G; Madison, D H

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  8. Atomic Collisions and free Lepton Pair Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gueclue, M.C.; Yilmaz, M.

    2005-10-26

    In this work, we have calculated the total cross sections of electron-positron pair production for the collisions of fully stripped gold ions for various energies. We have also compared our calculation with other methods.

  9. Foreword: Collision and reaction cell techniques in atomic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Eiden, Greg C.

    2004-01-01

    This contribution is a guest editorial statement and technical assessment for a special issue of the Royal Society of Chemistry journal entitled Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry (JAAS). The editorial introduces the subject area of collision and reaction cells in atomic mass spectrometry, reviews current literature and commercial instrumentation trends, and previews four perspective and numerous research articles contained in the special journal issue.

  10. Frequency evolution of radiatively assisted collisions of K Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Renn, M.J.; Thomson, D.S.; Gallagher, T.F. )

    1994-01-01

    Ramsey interference fringes are observed in the line shape of resonant Rydberg-atom--Rydberg-atom collisions occurring in the presence of a radiation field of frequency comparable to the inverse of the collision time. At low frequencies the fringes are phase dependent, but at high frequencies they are not. We present a theoretical interpretation based on a quasistatic field description which connects the low- and high-frequency regimes. In the high-frequency regime, this model gives results equivalent to those obtained using a dressed-atom'' approach.

  11. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2005-02-02

    Moving highly-charged ions carry strong electromagnetic fields which act as a field of photons. In collisions at large impact parameters, hadronic interactions are not possible, and the ions interact through photon-ion and photon-photon collisions known as ultra-peripheral collisions (UPC). Hadron colliders like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce photonuclear and two-photon interactions at luminosities and energies beyond that accessible elsewhere; the LHC will reach a {gamma}p energy ten times that of the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA). Reactions as diverse as the production of anti-hydrogen, photoproduction of the {rho}{sup 0}, transmutation of lead into bismuth and excitation of collective nuclear resonances have already been studied. At the LHC, UPCs can study many types of ''new physics''.

  12. Atomic and Molecular Collisions at Liquid Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tesa-Serrate, Maria A; Smoll, Eric J; Minton, Timothy K; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2016-05-27

    The gas-liquid interface remains one of the least explored, but nevertheless most practically important, environments in which molecular collisions take place. These molecular-level processes underlie many bulk phenomena of fundamental and applied interest, spanning evaporation, respiration, multiphase catalysis, and atmospheric chemistry. We review here the research that has, during the past decade or so, been unraveling the molecular-level mechanisms of inelastic and reactive collisions at the gas-liquid interface. Armed with the knowledge that such collisions with the outer layers of the interfacial region can be unambiguously distinguished, we show that the scattering of gas-phase projectiles is a promising new tool for the interrogation of liquid surfaces with extreme surface sensitivity. Especially for reactive scattering, this method also offers absolute chemical selectivity for the groups that react to produce a specific observed product. PMID:27090845

  13. Atomic and Molecular Collisions at Liquid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesa-Serrate, Maria A.; Smoll, Eric J.; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.

    2016-05-01

    The gas-liquid interface remains one of the least explored, but nevertheless most practically important, environments in which molecular collisions take place. These molecular-level processes underlie many bulk phenomena of fundamental and applied interest, spanning evaporation, respiration, multiphase catalysis, and atmospheric chemistry. We review here the research that has, during the past decade or so, been unraveling the molecular-level mechanisms of inelastic and reactive collisions at the gas-liquid interface. Armed with the knowledge that such collisions with the outer layers of the interfacial region can be unambiguously distinguished, we show that the scattering of gas-phase projectiles is a promising new tool for the interrogation of liquid surfaces with extreme surface sensitivity. Especially for reactive scattering, this method also offers absolute chemical selectivity for the groups that react to produce a specific observed product.

  14. Collision dynamics of two 238U atomic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Golabek, Cédric; Simenel, Cédric

    2009-07-24

    Collisions of actinide nuclei form, during very short times of few 10;{-21} s, the heaviest ensembles of interacting nucleons available on Earth. Such collisions have been proposed as an alternative way to produce heavy and superheavy elements. They are also used to produce superstrong electric fields by the huge number of interacting protons to test spontaneous positron-electron (e;{+}e;{-}) pair emission predicted by the quantum electrodynamics theory. The time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory is used to study collision dynamics of two 238U atomic nuclei. In particular, the role of nuclear deformation on collision time and on reaction mechanisms such as nucleon transfer is emphasized. The highest collision times (approximately 4 x 10;{-21} s at 1200 MeV) should allow experimental signature of spontaneous e;{+}e;{-} emission in case of bare uranium ions. Surprisingly, we also observe ternary fission due to purely dynamical effects. PMID:19659346

  15. Collision Dynamics of Two {sup 238}U Atomic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Golabek, Cedric; Simenel, Cedric

    2009-07-24

    Collisions of actinide nuclei form, during very short times of few 10{sup -21} s, the heaviest ensembles of interacting nucleons available on Earth. Such collisions have been proposed as an alternative way to produce heavy and superheavy elements. They are also used to produce superstrong electric fields by the huge number of interacting protons to test spontaneous positron-electron (e{sup +}e{sup -}) pair emission predicted by the quantum electrodynamics theory. The time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory is used to study collision dynamics of two {sup 238}U atomic nuclei. In particular, the role of nuclear deformation on collision time and on reaction mechanisms such as nucleon transfer is emphasized. The highest collision times (approx4x10{sup -21} s at 1200 MeV) should allow experimental signature of spontaneous e{sup +}e{sup -} emission in case of bare uranium ions. Surprisingly, we also observe ternary fission due to purely dynamical effects.

  16. Homonuclear ionizing collisions of laser-cooled metastable helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Stas, R. J. W.; McNamara, J. M.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2006-03-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental investigation of homonuclear ionizing collisions of laser-cooled metastable (2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}) helium atoms, considering both the fermionic {sup 3}He and bosonic {sup 4}He isotopes. The theoretical description combines quantum threshold behavior, Wigner's spin-conservation rule, and quantum-statistical symmetry requirements in a single-channel model, complementing a more complete close-coupling theory that has been reported for collisions of metastable {sup 4}He atoms. The model is supported with measurements (in the absence of light fields) of ionization rates in magneto-optically trapped samples that contain about 3x10{sup 8} atoms of a single isotope. The ionization rates are determined from measurements of trap loss due to light-assisted collisions combined with comparative measurements of the ion production rate in the absence and presence of trapping light. Theory and experiment show good agreement.

  17. Graphical R-matrix atomic collision environment (G RACE): the problem specification stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, N. S.; McMinn, A.; Burke, P. G.; Burke, V. M.; Noble, C. J.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of a graphical R-matrix atomic collision environment (G RACE). G RACE couples the graphical capability of powerful workstations with the processing power of supercomputers to provide an environment for the study of atomic collision properties and processes. At the core of G RACE is a new generation R-matrix program package, which is used to compute properties characterising electron atom and electron ion collisions. One of the motivations behind the project is to render this package simple to use by novice and experienced users alike, thereby significantly improving its usefulness to the physics community. G RACE is composed of a problem specification stage, a computation stage, and an interpretation stage. The focus of this paper is a description of the X Window graphical user interface which constitutes the problem specification stage of G RACE.

  18. Optically Pumped Atoms with Velocity- and Spin-Changing Collisions at Low Gas Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    We discuss optical pumping when: (a) the collision rates of optically pumped atoms with atoms or molecules of the background gas are small enough that individual velocity groups can be preferentially excited by a monochromatic light beam, (b) the collision rates are still fast enough to partially transfer the spin polarization to other velocity groups, and (c) there are non-negligible losses of polarization due to collisional spin relaxation and Larmor precession. These conditions lead to a strong correlation between the velocity and the spin polarization of the atoms-that is, to ``spin-tagging'' of the different velocity groups. This regime is similar to that of optically pumped 23Na atoms of the earth's upper atmosphere, but it is seldom encountered in laboratory experiments. For cooling and trapping experiments, the collision rates with background gas are negligible. For gas-cell experiments the velocity-changing rates are normally so fast compared to spin relaxation or Larmor precession rates, that the atoms have a Maxwellian velocity distribution with negligible correlation between the spin-polarization and the velocity. We analyze the limiting cases of strong and weak collisions, which change the velocity by a large or small fraction, respectively, of the mean thermal velocity. The Keilson-Storer model (J. Keilson and A. E. Storer, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 243 (1952)) is used to discuss strong collisions, with memory parameter =0, and weak collisions with $-> 1. For weak collisions, the physics can be modelled by coupled Fokker-Planck equations, identical to those for forced diffusion in a harmonic-oscillator potential well. In this limit there are solutions analogous to the quantum-mechanical coherent states of a harmonic oscillator.

  19. Optically pumped atoms with velocity- and spin-changing collisions at low gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Steven W.; Happer, William

    2010-04-15

    We discuss optical pumping when (a) the collision rates of optically pumped atoms with atoms or molecules of the background gas are small enough that individual velocity groups can be preferentially excited by a monochromatic light beam, (b) the collision rates are still fast enough to partially transfer the spin polarization to other velocity groups, and (c) there are nonnegligible losses of polarization due to collisional spin relaxation and Larmor precession. These conditions lead to a strong correlation between the velocity and the spin polarization of the atoms - that is, to 'spin-tagging' of the different velocity groups. This regime is similar to that of optically pumped {sup 23}Na atoms of the Earth's upper atmosphere, but it is seldom encountered in laboratory experiments. For cooling and trapping experiments, the collision rates with background gas are negligible. For gas-cell experiments the velocity-changing rates are normally so fast compared to spin relaxation or Larmor precession rates that the atoms have a Maxwellian velocity distribution with negligible correlation between the spin polarization and the velocity. We analyze the limiting cases of strong and weak collisions, which change the velocity by a large or small fraction, respectively, of the mean thermal velocity. The Keilson-Storer model [J. Keilson and A. E. Storer, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 243 (1952)] is used to discuss strong collisions, with memory parameter {alpha}=0 and weak collisions with {alpha}{yields}1. For weak collisions, the physics can be modeled by coupled Fokker-Planck equations, identical to those for forced diffusion in a harmonic-oscillator potential well. In this limit there are solutions analogous to the quantum mechanical coherent states of a harmonic oscillator.

  20. Collisions of Electrons with Atomic Oxygen: Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.; Tayal, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1990, two significant reviews of electron-atomic-oxygen collision processes were published. Since that time, a large volume of both experimental and theoretical research into these processes has occurred. These data are reviewed and recommendations regarding existing data sets and future research in this area are made. Attention is given to the challenges associated with handling atomic oxygen in terms of both experiment and theory.

  1. Light assisted collisions in ultra cold Tm atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, Alexey; Cojocaru, Ivan; Pyatchenkov, Sergey; Snigirev, Stepan; Luchnokov, Ilia; Sukachev, Denis; Kalganova, Elena; Sorokin, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    Recently laser cooled rare earth elements attracted considerable attention due to the high orbital and magnetic moments. Such a systems allow low-field Feshabach resonances enabling tunable in wide range interactions. In particular, thulium atom has one hole in 4f shell therefore having orbital moment of 3 in the ground state, magnetic moment of 4 Bohr magnetons in ground state. While magnetic moment of the thulium atom is less than that of Erbium or Dysprosium simpler level structure, possibility to capture thulium atoms and the dipole trap at 532 nm make thulium atom an extremely attractive subject for quantum simulations. Nevertheless collisional properties of thulium atom are not yet explored in details, in particular light assisted collision of thulium atom were not yet investigated. In this contribution, we performed studies of light assisted collisions near in Magneto optical trap operating on narrow 530.7 nm transition. We found, that light assisted inelastic binary collisions losses rate is around β ~10-9cm3cm3s s . Possible mechanism of losses from the trap are discussed

  2. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  3. Spin-axis relaxation in spin-exchange collisions of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlecek, S.; Walker, T.; Walter, D. K.; Erickson, C.; Happer, W.

    2001-05-01

    We present calculations of spin-relaxation rates of alkali-metal atoms due to the spin-axis interaction acting in binary collisions between the atoms. We show that for the high-temperature conditions of interest here, the spin-relaxation rates calculated with classical-path trajectories are nearly the same as those calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. We compare these calculations to recent experiments that used magnetic decoupling to isolate spin relaxation due to binary collisions from that due to the formation of triplet van der Waals molecules. The values of the spin-axis coupling coefficients deduced from measurements of binary collision rates are consistent with those deduced from molecular decoupling experiments, and follow a physically plausible scaling law for the spin-axis coupling coefficients.

  4. Optically pumped atoms with velocity- and spin-changing collisions at low gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Steven W.; Happer, William

    2010-04-01

    We discuss optical pumping when (a) the collision rates of optically pumped atoms with atoms or molecules of the background gas are small enough that individual velocity groups can be preferentially excited by a monochromatic light beam, (b) the collision rates are still fast enough to partially transfer the spin polarization to other velocity groups, and (c) there are nonnegligible losses of polarization due to collisional spin relaxation and Larmor precession. These conditions lead to a strong correlation between the velocity and the spin polarization of the atoms—that is, to “spin-tagging” of the different velocity groups. This regime is similar to that of optically pumped Na23 atoms of the Earth’s upper atmosphere, but it is seldom encountered in laboratory experiments. For cooling and trapping experiments, the collision rates with background gas are negligible. For gas-cell experiments the velocity-changing rates are normally so fast compared to spin relaxation or Larmor precession rates that the atoms have a Maxwellian velocity distribution with negligible correlation between the spin polarization and the velocity. We analyze the limiting cases of strong and weak collisions, which change the velocity by a large or small fraction, respectively, of the mean thermal velocity. The Keilson-Storer model [J. Keilson and A. E. Storer, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 243 (1952)] is used to discuss strong collisions, with memory parameter α=0 and weak collisions with α→1. For weak collisions, the physics can be modeled by coupled Fokker-Planck equations, identical to those for forced diffusion in a harmonic-oscillator potential well. In this limit there are solutions analogous to the quantum mechanical coherent states of a harmonic oscillator.

  5. Scattering of cold-atom coherences by hot atoms: frequency shifts from background-gas collisions.

    PubMed

    Gibble, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    Frequency shifts from background-gas collisions currently contribute significantly to the inaccuracy of atomic clocks. Because nearly all collisions with room-temperature background gases that transfer momentum eject the cold atoms from the clock, the interference between the scattered and unscattered waves in the forward direction dominates these frequency shifts. We show they are ≈ 10 times smaller than in room-temperature clocks and that van der Waals interactions produce the cold-atom background-gas shift. General considerations allow the loss of the Ramsey fringe amplitude to bound this frequency shift. PMID:23683186

  6. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2012-05-01

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that

  7. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Laoutaris, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Mertzimekis, T.; Andrianis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Benis, E. P.; Sulik, B.; Valastyán, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre "Demokritos" in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target.

  8. Few electron transitions in atomic collisions. Final report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, J.

    1997-04-01

    During the past three years we have evaluated probabilities and cross sections for few and multiple electron transitions in atomic collisions. Our studies included interactions of atoms and molecules with incident protons, bare ions, electrons, positrons, anti-protons, ions carrying electrons and photons. We also: studied the inter-relation between collisions with charged particles and collisions involving various processes with photons. This work has complemented various studies of collisions of atoms with charged particles and with photons as well as more general efforts to understand the nature of multi-electron systems. Our aim has been to begin with relatively simple two electron systems and to focus on fast processes in which there is too little time for complicated processes to occur. We have used a variety of computational techniques, but we emphasize those appropriate for fast collisions in which we hope to obtain insight into the physical nature of the process itself. We generally considered systems in which experimental data was available.

  9. Bringing Atoms into First-Year Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabay, Ruth W.; Sherwood, Bruce A.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that thermal physics should not be treated as a separate topic in introductory physics. Provides an example of a course that emphasizes physical modeling of the phenomenon in terms of the atomic nature of matter. (Author/CCM)

  10. Coherent coupling of alkali atoms by random collisions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Or; Peleg, Or; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2015-09-11

    Random spin-exchange collisions in warm alkali vapor cause rapid decoherence and act to equilibrate the spin state of the atoms in the vapor. In contrast, here we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a coherent coupling of one alkali species to another species, mediated by these random collisions. We show that the minor species (potassium) inherits the magnetic properties of the dominant species (rubidium), including its lifetime (T_{1}), coherence time (T_{2}), gyromagnetic ratio, and spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetic-field threshold. We further show that this coupling can be completely controlled by varying the strength of the magnetic field. Finally, we explain these phenomena analytically by mode mixing of the two species via spin-exchange collisions. PMID:26406827

  11. Atomic-orbital expansion model for describing ion-atom collisions at intermediate and low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.D.; Fritsch, W.

    1983-01-01

    In the description of inelastic processes in ion-atom collisions at moderate energies, the semiclassical close-coupling method is well established as the standard method. Ever since the pioneering work on H/sup +/ + H in the early 60's, the standard procedure is to expand the electronic wavefunction in terms of molecular orbitals (MO) or atomic orbitals (AO) for describing collisions at, respectively, low or intermediate velocities. It has been recognized since early days that traveling orbitals are needed in the expansions in order to represent the asymptotic states in the collisions correctly. While the adoption of such traveling orbitals presents no conceptual difficulties for expansions using atomic orbitals, the situation for molecular orbitals is less clear. In recent years, various forms of traveling MO's have been proposed, but conflicting results for several well-studied systems have been reported.

  12. Reactive collisions of atomic antihydrogen with H, He+ and He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    2006-03-01

    The fermion molecular dynamics (FMD) method is used to determine the rearrangement and destruction cross sections for collisions of antihydrogen (\\bar{H}) with H, He+ and He at collision energies above 0.1 au. The results for the H and He+ targets satisfactorily merge with previous calculations done for lower collision energies. Despite the absence of a critical distance, the destruction cross section for collisions of \\bar{H} with He, previously uncalculated, is found to be comparable with the destruction cross sections for \\bar{H} collisions with H and He+. All three cross sections are shown to be given quite reasonably by simple classical orbiting formulae at energies that are very low but still high enough for L > 0 partial waves to be dominant. The cross sections for formation of the antiprotonic atoms (Pn or \\barpHe ) and their initial quantum numbers with the \\bar{H} projectile are found to be significantly different from the analogous cross sections for \\barp projectiles.

  13. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  14. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents a program of research initiatives in atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The current state of atomic, molecular, and optical physics in the US is examined with respect to demographics, education patterns, applications, and the US economy. Recommendations are made for each field, with discussions of their histories and the relevance of the research to government agencies. The section on atomic physics includes atomic theory, structure, and dynamics; accelerator-based atomic physics; and large facilities. The section on molecular physics includes spectroscopy, scattering theory and experiment, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The section on optical physics discusses lasers, laser spectroscopy, and quantum optics and coherence. A section elucidates interfaces between the three fields and astrophysics, condensed matter physics, surface science, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, and nuclear physics. Another section shows applications of the three fields in ultra-precise measurements, fusion, national security, materials, medicine, and other topics.

  15. The Strange World of Ultracold Atomic Collisions: A Cornucopia of Quantum Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Carl J.

    1996-11-01

    The phenomenal experimental success of laser cooling and atom trapping has has helped to reinvigorate the field of atomic physics and has spawned the field of ultracold atomic collisions. This talk presents an overview of ultracold atomic collisions with an emphasis on some of the remarkable quantum phenomena -- including the Wigner threshold law -- that are inherent in these collisions. Additionally, we discuss the importance of ultracold collisions in Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of weakly interacting atomic systems and their role in the development of an atom laser and atomic clocks. Ultracold atomic collisions can be loosely broken into two classes of problems, collisions of ground state atoms (including metastable atoms) and the collision of atoms in external electric fields. In this latter class is the field of photoassociation spectroscopy. Theoretical analysis of the photoassociation spectrum of the Na2 purely long-range 0^-g state has recently produced three remarkable results. The first two results include the currently most accurate determination of the Na(3P) lifetime and the observation of the predicted but previously unobserved effect of retardation in the interaction between two atoms(K. M. Jones, P. S. Julienne, P. D. Lett, W. D. Phillips, E. Tiesinga, and C. J. Williams, Europhys. Lett. 35), 85 (1996).. Finally, the scattering length for the collision of two Na(3S) atoms in their F=1, M_F=-1 hyperfine state was extracted from the intensities and widths of the 0^-g spectra(E. Tiesinga, C. J. Williams, P. S. Julienne, K. M. Jones, P. D. Lett, and W. D. Phillips, J. Res. Nat. Inst. Stand. Technol. 101) (1996, in press).. Similar types of results have also been obtained in Li_2, K_2, and Rb_2. Ground state scattering lengths are essential for both modeling the formation of a BEC and for understanding collisional loss processes in a BEC. Similar collisional processes are important in pressure shifts in atomic clocks. We use the value of the of the

  16. The role of prompt electrons in the post-collision effect in fast ion - atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víkor, Gy; Ricz, S.; Kövér, Á.; Gulyás, L.; Pelicon, P.; Sulik, B.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the post-collision Coulomb effect of direct-electrons on the Auger-line energy shift has been studied in fast proton - atom collisions. KLL and LMM Auger spectra of neon and krypton target have been measured and analysed with high precision. The semiclassical theory of the post-collision interaction (PCI) has been extended to include the effect of both the receeding projectile ion and the ejected prompt electron. Experimental and theoretical line-energy shifts exhibit a reasonable agreement in the entire angular range of the Auger emission. In a narrow cone around 0953-4075/30/19/020/img9, the line-energy shift is influenced mainly by the PCI with the projectile ion, while at backward angles, it is predominantly governed by the ejected electron - Auger - electron interaction.

  17. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Interference Angle on Quantum Rotational Energy Transfer in Na + Na2 (A1 Σ+u, v = 8 ~ b3п0u, v = 14) Molecular Collision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Li; Miao, Gang; Li, Jian; Ma, Feng-Cai

    2009-12-01

    In order to study the collisional quantum interference (CQI) on rotational energy transfer in atom-diatom system, we have studied the relation of the integral interference angle and differential interference angle in Na + Na2 (A1 σ+u, v = 8 ~ b3п0u, v = 14) collision system. In this paper, based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory and taking into accounts the anisotropic effect of Lennard-Jones interaction potentials, we present a theoretical model of collisional quantum interference in intramolecular rotational energy transfer, and a relationship between differential and integral interference angles.

  18. Atomic collisions with 33-TeV lead ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.R.; Datz, S.; Krause, H.F.

    1996-10-01

    Recent availability of relativistic and ultrarelativistic beams of heavy ions has permitted the first controlled studies of atomic collisions at energies sufficient to measure effects of several new basic phenomena. These include measurements substantiating recently predicted finite nuclear size effects resulting in a reduction in the total electronic energy loss of heavy ions in matter, and measurements of Coulomb collisions in which electrons are excited from the Dirac negative energy continuum. Measurements of total energy loss, free electron-positron pair production, and electron capture from pair production have been recently performed using 33-TeV Pb{sup 82+} ions from the CERN SPS accelerator in Geneva. Results of these studies are presented, along with comparisons with relevant theory.

  19. Theoretical atomic physics code development I: CATS: Cowan Atomic Structure Code

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.; Cowan, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    An adaptation of R.D. Cowan's Atomic Structure program, CATS, has been developed as part of the Theoretical Atomic Physics (TAPS) code development effort at Los Alamos. CATS has been designed to be easy to run and to produce data files that can interface with other programs easily. The CATS produced data files currently include wave functions, energy levels, oscillator strengths, plane-wave-Born electron-ion collision strengths, photoionization cross sections, and a variety of other quantities. This paper describes the use of CATS. 10 refs.

  20. A distorted wave impulse approach for atom--diatom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dothe, H. ); Sharma, R.D. , Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731-5000 )

    1993-03-15

    A formalism is derived to include the effects of the long-range attractive part of the interaction potential in the calculation of atom--diatom collision cross sections using the impulse approach (IA). These calculations have, until now, assumed the atom--diatom potential given by a sum of two atom--atom interactions, consequently yielding a poor representation of the long-range attractive part. In the distorted wave impulse approach (DWIA) the long-range attractive part, located at the center of mass of the diatom, is a spherically symmetric potential which distorts'' the incoming and outgoing waves. The DWIA formalism is used to calculate differential cross sections for the rotationally inelastic process Li[sup +]+N[sub 2]([ital v]=0, [ital j]=2)[r arrow]Li[sup +]+N[sub 2]([ital v][prime]=0, [ital j][prime]), as a function of the final rotational level [ital j][prime], at a relative kinetic energy of 4.23 eV and center of mass scattering angles of 49.2[degree] and 37.1[degree]. It is shown that differential cross sections calculated using the DWIA formalism are in much better agreement with experimentally measured ones than IA differential cross sections using atom--atom interactions expressed by either hard-core, or exponential repulsive, functions.

  1. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  2. The Effect of Intense Laser Radiation on Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stephen Michael Radley

    1991-02-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We have carried out theoretical and experimental studies into the effect of intense laser radiation on atomic collisions. The first experiment used neon. Excitation by electron impact in a gas discharge demanded a pressure of at least 0.075 Torr. Measurement of the intensity of 3^1S_0to 3^1P_1 fluorescence has been made for the case where high intensity ASE wings in the laser profile and background laser scatter are unimportant, with the laser tuned to resonance. The field intensity required to produce strong field fluorescence (exemplified by the Mollow triplet) was found to give rise to complications capable of screening the effects sought. Our theoretical model has suggested that at finite detunings, line-centre fluorescence will dominate Rayleigh scatter and omega_3 fluorescence. Our measurements provide information on the saturation of neon fluorescence but not of the variation of the intense field collision rate. Absorption of weak field 253.7 nm laser photons by ground state mercury atoms yielded a high 6 ^3P_1 population at a lower pressure of 0.02 Torr. The Mollow triplet has been observed in the self-broadened mercury system. Dressing of the upper transition (6^3P_1rightarrow 7^3S_1) by an intense laser close to 435.8 nm yielded the strong field signal. Polarisation studies were made possible by the 3-level mercury system (radiation trapping in a 2-level system would depolarise fluorescence) perturbed by argon. The studies yielded results that were explainable in terms of the selective population of Stark shifted dressed states by a detuned, weak probe field. Use has been made of the electric-dipole radiation selection rule m_{J}=0 rightarrow m_{J^' } = 0 unless J=J^' to devise a 'Stark shift collision switch'. The competition between collision and radiation induced transitions within the mercury atom has then been studied. The resonant, strong lambda 435.8 nm field was used

  3. Atomic collision processes for modelling cool star spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The abundances of chemical elements in cool stars are very important in many problems in modern astrophysics. They provide unique insight into the chemical and dynamical evolution of the Galaxy, stellar processes such as mixing and gravitational settling, the Sun and its place in the Galaxy, and planet formation, to name a just few examples. Modern telescopes and spectrographs measure stellar spectral lines with precision of order 1 per cent, and planned surveys will provide such spectra for millions of stars. However, systematic errors in the interpretation of observed spectral lines leads to abundances with uncertainties greater than 20 per cent. Greater precision in the interpreted abundances should reasonably be expected to lead to significant discoveries, and improvements in atomic data used in stellar atmosphere models play a key role in achieving such advances in precision. In particular, departures from the classical assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) represent a significant uncertainty in the modelling of stellar spectra and thus derived chemical abundances. Non-LTE modelling requires large amounts of radiative and collisional data for the atomic species of interest. I will focus on inelastic collision processes due to electron and hydrogen atom impacts, the important perturbers in cool stars, and the progress that has been made. I will discuss the impact on non-LTE modelling, and what the modelling tells us about the types of collision processes that are important and the accuracy required. More specifically, processes of fundamentally quantum mechanical nature such as spin-changing collisions and charge transfer have been found to be very important in the non-LTE modelling of spectral lines of lithium, oxygen, sodium and magnesium.

  4. Coherence and correlations in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper focusses on the description, classification and interpretation of coherent excitation of atomic or ionic systems with Coulombic two-body final state interactions. A group-theoretical approach is used to classify and interpret coherent excitation. The most significant result is that the state of excitation represented by a density operator can be mapped one to one onto expectation values of a set of operators. Examples are used to illustrate what can be learned about the collision process from investigations of coherent excitation. (JDH)

  5. The Screening Effect in Electromagnetic Production of Electron Positron Pairs in Relativistic Nucleus-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jianshi; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Strayer, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the screening effects of the atomic electrons in the electromagnetic production of electron-positron pairs in relativistic nucleus-atom collisions for fixed target experiments. Our results are contrasted with those obtained in bare collisions, with particular attention given to its dependence on the beam energy and the target atom.

  6. Formation of positron-atom bound states in collisions between Rydberg Ps and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, A. R.; Cassidy, D. B.; Deller, A.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2016-05-01

    Predicted 20 years ago, positron binding to neutral atoms has not yet been observed experimentally. A scheme is proposed to detect positron-atom bound states by colliding Rydberg positronium (Ps) with neutral atoms. Estimates of the charge-transfer reaction cross section are obtained using the first Born approximation for a selection of neutral atom targets and a wide range of incident Ps energies and principal quantum numbers. We also estimate the corresponding Ps ionization cross section. The accuracy of the calculations is tested by comparison with earlier predictions for charge transfer in Ps collisions with hydrogen and antihydrogen. We describe an existing Rydberg Ps beam suitable for producing positron-atom bound states and estimate signal rates based on the calculated cross sections and realistic experimental parameters. We conclude that the proposed methodology is capable of producing such states and of testing theoretical predictions of their binding energies.

  7. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  8. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  9. Classical theory of atomic collisions - The first hundred years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, Petar V.

    2012-05-01

    Classical calculations of the atomic processes started in 1911 with famous Rutherford's evaluation of the differential cross section for α particles scattered on foil atoms [1]. The success of these calculations was soon overshadowed by the rise of Quantum Mechanics in 1925 and its triumphal success in describing processes at the atomic and subatomic levels. It was generally recognized that the classical approach should be inadequate and it was neglected until 1953, when the famous paper by Gregory Wannier appeared, in which the threshold law for the single ionization cross section behaviour by electron impact was derived. All later calculations and experimental studies confirmed the law derived by purely classical theory. The next step was taken by Ian Percival and collaborators in 60s, who developed a general classical three-body computer code, which was used by many researchers in evaluating various atomic processes like ionization, excitation, detachment, dissociation, etc. Another approach was pursued by Michal Gryzinski from Warsaw, who started a far reaching programme for treating atomic particles and processes as purely classical objects [2]. Though often criticized for overestimating the domain of the classical theory, results of his group were able to match many experimental data. Belgrade group was pursuing the classical approach using both analytical and numerical calculations, studying a number of atomic collisions, in particular near-threshold processes. Riga group, lead by Modris Gailitis [3], contributed considerably to the field, as it was done by Valentin Ostrovsky and coworkers from Sanct Petersbourg, who developed powerful analytical methods within purely classical mechanics [4]. We shall make an overview of these approaches and show some of the remarkable results, which were subsequently confirmed by semiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations, as well as by the experimental evidence. Finally we discuss the theoretical and

  10. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  11. Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Electron-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris

    2007-01-01

    It was with great pleasure and honour to accept the invitation to make a presentation at the symposium celebrating the life-long work of Aaron Temkin and Richard Drachman. The work of Aaron Temkin was particularly influential on our own during the development of the CCC method for electron-atom collisions. There are a number of key problems that need to be dealt with when developing a general computational approach to such collisions. Traditionally, the electron energy range was subdivided into the low, intermediate, and high energies. At the low energies only a finite number of channels are open and variational or close-coupling techniques could be used to obtain accurate results. At high energies an infinite number of discrete channels and the target continuum are open, but perturbative techniques are able to yield accurate results. However, at the intermediate energies perturbative techniques fail and computational approaches need to be found for treating the infinite number of open channels. In addition, there are also problems associated with the identical nature of electrons and the difficulty of implementing the boundary conditions for ionization processes. The beauty of the Temkin-Poet model of electron-hydrogen scattering is that it simplifies the full computational problem by neglecting any non-zero orbital angular momenta in the partial-wave expansion, without loosing the complexity associated with the above-mentioned problems. The unique nature of the problem allowed for accurate solution leading to benchmark results which could then be used to test the much more general approaches to electron-atom collision problems. The immense value of the Temkin-Poet model is readily summarised by the fact that the initial papers of Temkin and Poet have been collectively cited around 250 times to date and are still being cited in present times. Many of the citations came from our own work during the course of the development of the CCC method, which we now describe.

  12. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  13. ANGULAR MOMENTUM CHANGING TRANSITIONS IN PROTON-RYDBERG HYDROGEN ATOM COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.; Onofrio, R.; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com

    2012-03-01

    Collisions between electrically charged particles and neutral atoms are central for understanding the dynamics of neutral gases and plasmas in a variety of physical situations of terrestrial and astronomical interest. Specifically, redistribution of angular momentum states within the degenerate shell of highly excited Rydberg atoms occurs efficiently in distant collisions with ions. This process is crucial in establishing the validity of the local thermal equilibrium assumption and may also play a role in determining a precise ionization fraction in primordial recombination. We provide an accurate expression for the non-perturbative rate coefficient of collisions between protons and H(nl) ending in a final state H(nl'), with n being the principal quantum number and l, l' the initial and final angular momentum quantum numbers, respectively. The validity of this result is confirmed by results of classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. Previous results, obtained by Pengelly and Seaton only for dipole-allowed transitions l {yields} l {+-} 1, overestimate the l-changing collisional rate coefficients approximately by a factor of six, and the physical origin of this overestimation is discussed.

  14. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, March 16, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  15. Making More-Complex Molecules Using Superthermal Atom/Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, Brian; Chutjian, Ara; Orient, Otto

    2008-01-01

    A method of making more-complex molecules from simpler ones has emerged as a by-product of an experimental study in outer-space atom/surface collision physics. The subject of the study was the formation of CO2 molecules as a result of impingement of O atoms at controlled kinetic energies upon cold surfaces onto which CO molecules had been adsorbed. In this study, the O/CO system served as a laboratory model, not only for the formation of CO2 but also for the formation of other compounds through impingement of rapidly moving atoms upon molecules adsorbed on such cold interstellar surfaces as those of dust grains or comets. By contributing to the formation of increasingly complex molecules, including organic ones, this study and related other studies may eventually contribute to understanding of the origins of life.

  16. Physical Limits on Atomic Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyck, D.; van Aert, S.; den Dekker, A. J.

    2004-02-01

    It is shown that the ultimate resolution is not limited by the bandwidth of the microscope but by the bandwidth (i.e., the scattering power) of the object. In the case of a crystal oriented along a zone axis, the scattering is enhanced by the channeling of the electrons. However, if the object is aperiodic along the beam direction, the bandwidth is much more reduced. A particular challenge are the amorphous objects. For amorphous materials, the natural bandwidth is that of the single atom and of the order of 1 [Angstrom capital A, ring][minus sign]1, which can be reached with the present generation of medium voltage microscopes without aberration correctors. A clear distinction is made between resolving a structure and refining, that is, between resolution and precision. In the case of an amorphous structure, the natural bandwidth also puts a limit on the number of atom coordinates that can be refined quantitatively. As a consequence, amorphous structures cannot be determined from one projection, but only by using atomic resolution tomography. Finally a theory of experiment design is presented that can be used to predict the optimal experimental setting or the best instrumental improvement. Using this approach it is suggested that the study of amorphous objects should be done at low accelerating voltage with correction of both spherical and chromatic aberration.

  17. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  18. Quasiclassical Methods for Ion Collisions with Two-Electron Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    1996-05-01

    Results of two generalizations of the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method will be reported. The first is the model, termed CTMC-KW, originally proposed by Kirschbaum and Wilets(C. L. Kirschbaum and L. Wilets, Phys. Rev. A 21), 834 (1980). that achieves quasiclassical stability of multi-electron atoms via effective potentials motivated by the Heisenberg and Pauli principles. It was recently shown that this model gives fairly accurate binding energies for all atoms.(J. S. Cohen, Phys. Rev. A 51), 266 (1995) The second is a new model, termed CTMC-eb, that achieves stability via constraining potentials imposing lower bounds on the one-electron energies. The latter model is closer in spirit to the original CTMC method. Applications are made to single and double electron transfer and ionization cross sections for collisions of H^+, He^2+, and Li^3+ ions with the helium atom. All possible rearrangement processes are treated simultaneously and consistently. The cross sections will be compared with accurate experimental values.

  19. Charge Transfer and Dissociation in Collisions of Metal Clusters with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Ruiz, L. F.; Zarour, B.; Hervieux, P. A.; Hanssen, J.; Politis, M. F.; Martín, F.

    2002-10-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of charge transfer and dissociation in collisions of slow Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms. We provide a direct quantitative comparison between theory and experiment and show that good agreement is found only when the exact experimental time of flight and initial cluster temperature are taken into account in the theoretical modeling. We demonstrate the validity of the simple physical image that consists in explaining evaporation as resulting from a collisional energy deposit due to cluster electronic excitation during charge transfer.

  20. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system. PMID:27394110

  1. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-07-01

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  2. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  3. Magneto-optical trapping and ultracold collisions of potassium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. S., III; Walker, T.

    1995-08-01

    We present measurements of loading and loss rates for a vapor-cell optical trap of the two naturally occurring potassium isotopes 39 K and 41K. The unresolved excited-state hyperfine structure makes trapping of K fundamentally different from trapping of the other alkalis and leads to an enhanced loading rate. We measure the loading rate as a function of laser intensity, beam size, and detuning and find that the results are in reasonable agreement with a simple rate-equation model for the loading process. The dependence of the loss rate on trapped-atom density determines the contribution to the loss rates from excited-state collisions. We find a substantial difference between the collisional loss rates for the two isotopes.

  4. Cold Collision Frequency Shift in Two-Dimensional Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ahokas, J.; Jaervinen, J.; Vasiliev, S.

    2007-01-26

    We report a measurement of the cold collision frequency shift in atomic hydrogen gas adsorbed on the surface of superfluid {sup 4}He at T(less-or-similar sign)90 mK. Using two-photon electron and nuclear magnetic resonance in 4.6 T field we separate the resonance line shifts due to the dipolar and exchange interactions, both proportional to surface density {sigma}. We find the clock shift {delta}{nu}{sub c}=-1.0(1)x10{sup -7} Hz cm{sup -2}x{sigma}, which is about 100 times smaller than the value predicted by the mean field theory and known scattering lengths in the three-dimensional case.

  5. Atoms-for-Peace: A Galactic Collision in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    European Southern Observatory astronomers have produced a spectacular new image of the famous Atoms-for-Peace galaxy (NGC 7252). This galactic pile-up, formed by the collision of two galaxies, provides an excellent opportunity for astronomers to study how mergers affect the evolution of the Universe. Atoms-for-Peace is the curious name given to a pair of interacting and merging galaxies that lie around 220 million light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius. It is also known as NGC 7252 and Arp 226 and is just bright enough to be seen by amateur astronomers as a very faint small fuzzy blob. This very deep image was produced by ESO's Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. A galaxy collision is one of the most important processes influencing how our Universe evolves, and studying them reveals important clues about galactic ancestry. Luckily, such collisions are long drawn-out events that last hundreds of millions of years, giving astronomers plenty of time to observe them. This picture of Atoms-for-Peace represents a snapshot of its collision, with the chaos in full flow, set against a rich backdrop of distant galaxies. The results of the intricate interplay of gravitational interactions can be seen in the shapes of the tails made from streams of stars, gas and dust. The image also shows the incredible shells that formed as gas and stars were ripped out of the colliding galaxies and wrapped around their joint core. While much material was ejected into space, other regions were compressed, sparking bursts of star formation. The result was the formation of hundreds of very young star clusters, around 50 to 500 million years old, which are speculated to be the progenitors of globular clusters. Atoms-for-Peace may be a harbinger of our own galaxy's fate. Astronomers predict that in three or four billion years the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy will collide, much as has happened with Atoms-for-Peace. But don

  6. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  7. Theoretical studies relating to the interaction of radiation with matter: Atomic collision processes occurring in the presence of radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, P. R.

    1981-09-01

    Work is reported in the areas of: Two-Level Atom and Radiation Pulse; Effects of Collisions on Atomic Coherences; Effects of Collisions on Zeeman Coherences; Collision Effects in Degenerate-Four-Wave-Mixing; and Dressed-Atom Picture in Laser Spectroscopy.

  8. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  9. Magnetic Slowing Down of Spin Relaxation due to Binary Collisions of Alkali-Metal Atoms with Buffer-Gas Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D. K.; Griffith, W. M.; Happer, W.

    2002-03-01

    We report the first studies of magnetic decoupling of the spin relaxation of alkali-metal atoms due to binary collisions with buffer gases. When binary collisions are the dominant relaxation mechanism, the relaxation and its magnetic decoupling are well described by the S-damping rate ΓSD due to the spin-rotation interaction γN˙S, the spin exchange rate ΓEX for collisions between alkali atoms, and a new ``Carver rate'' ΓC, due to the pressure-shift interaction δAİS, which can substantially broaden the magnetic decoupling curve while having no influence on the zero-field rates.

  10. PREFACE: XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Hart, H. W.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2012-11-01

    The XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, 27 July - 2 August 2011. Members of the Local Organising Committee were drawn from the School of Mathematics and Physics of Queen's University Belfast, the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University, the School of Physics at University College Dublin and the Department of Experimental Physics at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The Conference was attended by 566 participants with contributions from 54 countries. The meeting attracted 786 contributed papers for presentation in the poster sessions. The conference included 20 Special Reports selected from the contributed papers, and these are included in part 1 of this volume. During the meeting a total of 65 Progress Reports were also presented, and the authors invited to submit written versions of their talks (see Part 1). Of the total number of contributed papers, 663 are included as refereed abstracts in parts 2 to 15 of this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Part 1 of this volume includes detailed write-ups of the majority of plenary lectures, progress reports and special reports, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting, and is additionally published in hard-copy as the Conference Proceedings. There were 5 plenary lectures given by Margaret Murnane on Ultrafast processes in atomic dynamics; Chris Greene on Few-body highly-correlated dynamics; Michael Allan on Electron-molecule collisions; Yasunori Yamazaki on Antiproton and positron collisions and Thomas Stöhlker on Relativistic ion collisions. Ian Spielman, winner of the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize for 2011, gave a special lecture entitled Modifying interatomic interactions using Raman coupling: a tale of slowly colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition an evening public lecture by Mike Baillie on How precise tree-ring dating raises issues concerning the

  11. Polarized noble-gas atoms: A tool for fundamental physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1993-05-01

    Polarized noble gas atom samples suitable for a variety of experiments can be produced by spin exchange with laser optically pumped alkali-metal vapors. Most stable and even radioactive isotopes of He, Ne, Kr, Xe and Rn have been polarized, and the field has been paced, in part by laser developments and study of the atomic collision processes. I will focus on two kinds of application: (1) precision measurement of free precession frequencies to probe fundamental concepts such as CP violation, Local Lorentz Invariance and Linearity in Quantum Mechanics; (2) a polarized {sup 3}He target for electron scattering to extract information on the structure of the neutron. The precision measurement techniques take advantage of long coherence times (measured in hours for {sup 3}He and {sup 21}Ne) and large signal to noise ratios to measure frequency shifts with precision 10{sup -7} Hz in one hour. The polarized {sup 3}He target is used to measure asymmetries in deep inelastic electron scattering which are dominated by the neutron since the proton spins are approximately paired in the ground state of the nucleus. The spin dependent structure function of the neutron is an essential probe of the quark-parton structure of the nucleon. All of these investigations combine fundamental and particle physics motivation with atomic physics and precision measurement techniques in a way that spans many subfields of physics.

  12. Theory of phonon inelastic atom--surface scattering. I. Quantum mechanical treatment of collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.H.; Poe, R.T.

    1985-08-01

    We present a systematic formulation of the atom--surface scattering dynamics which includes the vibrational states of the atoms in the solid (phonons). The properties of the total scattering wave function of the system, a representation of the interaction potential matrix, and the characteristics of the independent physical solutions are all derived from the translational invariance of the full Hamiltonian. The scattering equations in the integral forms as well as the related Green functions were also obtained. The configurational representations of the Green functions, in particular, are quite different from those of the conventional scattering theory where the collision partners are spatially localized. Various versions of the integral expression of scattering, transition, and reactance matrices were also obtained. They are useful for introducing approximation schemes. From the present formulation, some specific theoretical schemes which are more realistic compared to those that have been employed so far and at the same time capable of yielding effective ab initio computation are derived in the following paper. The time reversal invariance and the microscopic reversibility of the atom--surface scattering were discussed. The relations between the in and outgoing scattering wave functions which are satisfied in the atom--surface system and important in the transition matrix methods were presented. The phonon annihilation and creation, and the adsorption and desorption of the atom are related through the time reversal invariance, and thus the microscopic reversibility can be tested by the experiment.

  13. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  14. Guide to Laboratory Practicum in Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbulea, N. F.; Golban, G. N.; Scurtul, V. V.; Oleynik, V. A.

    1980-12-01

    The broshure represents a collection of 11 Laboratory works in Quantum Optics, Semiconductor, Atomic and Nuclear Physics for students of 2-nd years from Technical High Schools. A minimum of theoretical knowledges is given as well as a description of experimental installation (setup),a number of control questions and a task to be carried out is presented for every of the Laboratory work.

  15. Atomic and molecular physics at LURE

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, P.

    1994-08-01

    A short overview of the present research activity at LURE is given, in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Three selected examples are discussed in more detail and the {open_quotes}SOLEIL{close_quotes} project of a new French synchrotron facility is presented.

  16. United Atom Rotational Coupling in Proton + Helium Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiiling

    United-atom 2p(sigma)-2p(pi) rotational coupling in asymmetric collisions is influenced by an avoided crossing between the 2p(sigma) and 2s(sigma) orbitals. This influence is studied using the HeH('+) system as a prototype. In (SIGMA)(,2)-(SIGMA)(,3)-(pi)(,1) three-state calculations, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved numerically. Substantial population of the 2s(sigma) state is found, which disagrees with the estimates based on the Landau-Zener model. The (SIGMA)(,3) level is populated directly by transitions near the avoided crossing at b = 0.4 au and indirectly by (SIGMA)(,2)-(pi)(,1)-(SIGMA)(,3) rotational coupling for b > 0.4 au. The ratios of P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b)/ P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b) + P(,(pi)(,1))(b) are calculated and compared with Dr. R. Hippler's experimental data. A six-state calculation, in the basis of (SIGMA)(,1), (SIGMA)(,2), (SIGMA)(,3), (SIGMA)(,4), (pi)(,1) and (pi)(,2) molecular states, is also made. Cross sections and alignment and orientation parameters have been computed from the transition amplitudes for various energies.

  17. Atomic data for astrophysics: improved collision strengths for Fe viii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-10-01

    We describe, and present the results of, a new large-scale R-matrix scattering calculation for the electron collisional excitation of Fe viii. We first discuss the limitations of the previous calculations, in particular concerning some strong EUV lines observed in the solar corona by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer. We then present a new target which represents an improvement over the previous ones for this particularly complex ion. We developed a new method, based on the use of term energy corrections within the intermediate coupling frame transformation method, to calculate the collision strengths. We compare predicted and observed line intensities using laboratory and solar spectra, finding excellent agreement for all the main soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) transitions, using the present atomic data. In particular, we show that Fe viii EUV lines observed by Hinode EIS can now be used to provide reliable electron temperatures for the solar corona. The full dataset (energies, transition probabilities and rates) is only available in electronic form at our APAP website (http://www.apap-network.org) as well as at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A56

  18. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-02-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in astrophysical non-thermal Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed.

  19. The physics of proton antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, M. )

    1991-12-03

    This paper contains information information on: accelerator and detector; QCD studies; studies of the electroweak force; The search for the top quark; {beta} physics at hadron colliders; and the search for exotic objects and prospects for the future.

  20. The ALADDIN atomic physics database system

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    ALADDIN is an atomic physics database system which has been developed in order to provide a broadly-based standard medium for the exchange and management of atomic data. ALADDIN consists of a data format definition together with supporting software for both interactive searches as well as for access to the data by plasma modeling and other codes. 8AB The ALADDIN system is designed to offer maximum flexibility in the choice of data representations and labeling schemes, so as to support a wide range of atomic physics data types and allow natural evolution and modification of the database as needs change. Associated dictionary files are included in the ALADDIN system for data documentation. The importance of supporting the widest possible user community was also central to be ALADDIN design, leading to the use of straightforward text files with concatentated data entries for the file structure, and the adoption of strict FORTRAN 77 code for the supporting software. This will allow ready access to the ALADDIN system on the widest range of scientific computers, and easy interfacing with FORTRAN modeling codes, user developed atomic physics codes and database, etc. This supporting software consists of the ALADDIN interactive searching and data display code, together with the ALPACK subroutine package which provides ALADDIN datafile searching and data retrieval capabilities to user's codes.

  1. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  2. Efimov physics in {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-01-15

    A new narrow three-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the three-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the three-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex three-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the three-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at 672+-2 G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the three-body recombination rate at 759+-1 G where the three-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  3. Atomic Physics 15: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Walraven, J. T. M.; Reynolds, M. W.

    1997-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Generation of a "Schrödinger cat" of radiation and observation of its decoherence * Synthesis of entangled states and quantum computing * Entangled states of atomic ions for quantum metrology and computation * Entanglement and indistinguishability: Coherence experiments with photon pairs and triplets * Atom optics as a testing ground for quantum chaos * Coherent ultra-bright XUV lasers and harmonics * Hollow atoms * Interdisciplinary experiments with polarized noble gases * The creation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cold alkali vapor * oscopic quantum phenomena in trapped Bose-condensed gases * Doppler-free spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen * QED and the ground state of helium * Towards coherent atomic samples using laser cooling * Bose-Einstein condensation of a weakly-interacting gas * Zeeman and his contemporaries: Dutch physics around 1900 * Zeeman's great discovery * The Zeeman effect: A tool for atom manipulation * The Zeeman effect a century later: New insights into classical physics * QED effects in few-electron high-Z systems * Lamb shift experiments on high-Z one- and two-electron systems * Fundamental constants of nature * Response of atoms in photonic lattices * Hydrogen-like systems and quantum electrodynamics * New experiments with atomic lattices bound by light * Bloch oscillations of atoms in an optical potential * Quantum decoherence and inertial sensing with atom interferometers * Quantum effects in He clusters * Atoms in super-intense radiation fields * Wave packet dynamics of excited atomic electrons in intense laser fields * Nonlinear laser-electron scattering * Comparing the antiproton and proton and progress toward cold antihydrogen * Author Index

  4. Handbook explaining the fundamentals of nuclear and atomic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanlen, D. F.; Morse, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    Indoctrination document presents nuclear, reactor, and atomic physics in an easy, straightforward manner. The entire subject of nuclear physics including atomic structure ionization, isotopes, radioactivity, and reactor dynamics is discussed.

  5. PREFACE: XXVIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    The 28th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXVIII ICPEAC) was held by the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP) on 24-30 July, 2013 in Lanzhou, China. The 444 conference participants came from 37 countries and/or regions. Five plenary lectures, more than 80 progress reports and special reports had been arranged according to the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Meanwhile, more than 650 abstracts were selected as poster presentations. Before the conference, three highly distinguished scientists, Professor Joachim Burgdöorfer, Professor Hossein Sadeghpour and Professor Yasunori Yamazaki, presented tutorial lectures with the support of the IMP Branch of Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (IMP-YIPA). During the conference, Professor Jianwei Pan from University of Sciences and Technology in China presented an enlightening public lecture on quantum communication. Furthermore, 2013 IUPAP Young Scientist Prize was awarded to Dr T Jahnke from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Germany. The Sheldon Datz Prize for an Outstanding Young Scientist Attending ICPEAC was awarded to Dr Diogo Almeida from University of Fribourg of Switzerland. As a biannual academic conference, ICPEAC is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, atomic, ionic, molecular, cluster collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to China for the very first time. IMP has been preparing the conference six years before, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXVIII ICPEAC in Lanzhou. This proceedings includes the papers of the two plenary lectures, 40 progress reports, 17 special reports and 337 posters, which were reviewed and revised according to the comments of the referees. The Local Organizing Committee would like to

  6. Unified treatment of hadronic annihilation and protonium formation in slow collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-07-01

    Antiproton (p¯) collisions with hydrogen atoms, resulting in the hadronic process of particle-antiparticle annihilation and the atomic process of protonium (p¯p) formation (or p¯ capture), are investigated theoretically. As the collision energy decreases, the collision time required for the p¯ capture becomes necessarily longer. Then, there is the possibility that the p¯-p annihilation occurs significantly before the p¯ capture process completes. In such a case, one can no longer consider the annihilation decay separately from the p¯ capture process. The present study develops a rigorous unified quantum-mechanical treatment of the annihilation and p¯ capture processes. For this purpose, an R-matrix approach for atomic collisions is extended to have complex-valued R-matrix elements allowing for the hadronic annihilation. Detailed calculations are carried out at low collision energies ranging from 10-8 to 10-1 eV, and the annihilation and the p¯ capture (total and product-state selected) cross sections are reported. Consideration is given to the difference between the direct annihilation occurring during the collision and the annihilation of p¯p occurring after the p¯ capture. The present annihilation process is also compared with the annihilation in two-body p¯+p collisions.

  7. Theoretical studies relating to the interaction of radiation with matter: Atomic collision processes occurring in the presence of radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-10-01

    Work is reported in the areas of: (1) collisionally-aided radiative excitation; (2) model potential calculations in atom-field-radiation systems; (3) coherence effects in radiative collisions; (4) two level atom radiation pulse; (5) resonance fluorescence in three level systems; (6) modulation spectroscopy; and (7) effects of collisions on atomic coherences.

  8. V. S. Lebedev and I. L. Beigman, Physics of Highly Excited Atoms and Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, R.

    1999-07-01

    This book contains a comprehensive description of the basic principles of the theoretical spectroscopy and experimental spectroscopic diagnostics of Rydberg atoms and ions, i.e., atoms in highly excited states with a very large principal quantum number (n≫1). Rydberg atoms are characterized by a number of peculiar physical properties as compared to atoms in the ground or a low excited state. They have a very small ionization potential (∝1/n2), the highly excited electron has a small orbital velocity (∝1/n), the radius (∝n2) is very large, the excited electron has a long orbital period (∝n3), and the radiation lifetime is very long (∝n3-5). At the same time the R. atom is very sensitive to perturbations from external fields in collisions with charged and neutral targets. In recent years, R. atoms have been observed in laboratory and cosmic conditions for n up to ˜1000, which means that the size amounts to about 0.1 mm, ˜106 times that of an atom in the ground state. The scope of this monograph is to familiarize the reader with today's approaches and methods for describing isolated R. atoms and ions, radiative transitions between highly excited states, and photoionization and photorecombination processes. The authors present a number of efficient methods for describing the structure and properties of R. atoms and calculating processes of collisions with neutral and charged particles as well as spectral-line broadening and shift of Rydberg atomic series in gases, cool and hot plasmas in laboratories and in astrophysical sources. Particular attention is paid to a comparison of theoretical results with available experimental data. The book contains 9 chapters. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the basic properties of R. atoms (ions), Chapter 2 is devoted to an account of general methods describing an isolated Rydberg atom. Chapter 3 is focussed on the recent achievements in calculations of form factors and dipole matrix elements of different types of

  9. High charge state, ion-atom collision experiments using accel-decel

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Tanis, J.A.; Graham, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/ + He collisions between 2.5 and 200 MeV, which were made using the accel-decel technique with the Brookhaven National Laboratory coupled MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerators, are discussed. Cross sections were measured for single electron-capture and -loss as well as K x rays correlated to electron-capture. Other planned ion-atom collision experiments requiring accel-decel are also presented. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  11. Spin flip rates in collisions between muonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bracci, L.; Chiccoli, C.; Pasini, P.; Fiorentini, G.; Melezhik, V.S.; Wozniak, J.

    1988-12-27

    We present the calculation of spin flip rates for a wide range of temperatures in the case of (d..mu..)-d, (p..mu..)-p and (t..mu..)-t collisions. The calculations have been performed in the framework of the adiabatic representation of the three-body problem.

  12. Low-energy collisions of O/sup 2+/ with atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, M.S.; Champion, R.L.; Doverspike, L.D.

    1988-04-01

    Absolute total cross sections for single-electron capture have been measured for collisions of O/sup 2+/ ions with He, Ne, Ar, H/sub 2/, D/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/. The relative collision energies of these experiments range from approximately 3 to 400 eV. The electron-capture cross section for O/sup 2+/+He collisions is found to agree well with previous distorted-wave calculations. Capture cross sections are generally larger for molecular targets than for the atomic targets.

  13. Assessment of ion-atom collision data for magnetic fusion plasma edge modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaneuf, R. A.

    Cross-section data for ion-atom collision processes which play important roles in the edge plasma of magnetically-confined fusion devices are surveyed and reviewed. The species considered include H, He, Li, Be, C, O, Ne, Al, Si, Ar, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, W and their ions. The most important ion-atom collision processes occurring in the edge plasma are charge-exchange reactions. Excitation and ionization processes are also considered. The scope is limited to atomic species and to collision velocities corresponding to plasma ion temperatures in the 2 to 200 eV range. Sources of evaluated or recommended data are presented where possible, and deficiencies in the data base are indicated.

  14. Attosecond timing the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.

    2011-04-15

    By solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we have demonstrated that the ultrafast charge-transfer process in ion-atom collisions can be mapped out with attosecond extreme uv (xuv) pulses. During the dynamic-charge transfer from the target atom to the projectile ion, the electron coherently populates the two sites of both nuclei, which can be viewed as a 'short-lived' molecular state. A probing attosecond xuv pulse can instantly unleash the delocalized electron from such a ''transient molecule,'' so that the resulting photoelectron may exhibit a ''double-slit'' interference. On the contrary, either reduced or no photoelectron interference will occur if the attosecond xuv pulse strikes well before or after the collision. Therefore, by monitoring the photoelectron interference visibility, one can precisely time the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions with time-delayed attosecond xuv pulses.

  15. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  16. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suitemore » can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.« less

  17. Atomic physics at the Argonne PII ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Billquist, P.J.; Pardo, R.C.; Zabransky, B.J.; Bakke, E.; Groeneveld, K.O.; Hass, M.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.

    1987-01-01

    An atomic physics beam line has been set up at the Argonne PII ECR Ion Source. The source is on a 350-kV high-voltage platform which is a unique feature of particular interest in work on atomic collisions. We describe our planned experimental program which includes: measurement of state-selective electron-capture cross sections, studies of doubly-excited states, precision spectroscopy of few-electron ions, tests of quantum electrodynamics, and studies of polarization transfer using optically pumped polarized alkali targets. The first experiments will be measurements of cross sections for electron capture into specific nl subshells in ion-atom collisions. Our method is to observe the characteristic radiation emitted after capture using a VUV spectrometer. Initial data from these experiments are presented. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Dissociative Excitation of Even States of Tin Atoms in e-SnCl2 Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu. M.

    2001-12-01

    Dissociative excitation of even levels of tin atoms in collisions of slow electrons with tin dichloride molecules is studied experimentally. The levels studied belong to the configurations 5 s 25 pnp 1, 3 L ( n=6, 7; L= S, P, D) and 5 s 25 p 4 f. Absolute values of cross sections for dissociative excitation at the electron energy of 100 eV are 1.05-2.56 times greater than cross sections for excitation in electron-atom collisions at the energy of 50 eV.

  19. Energy loss straggling in collisions of fast finite-size ions with atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, D. N. Matveev, V. I.

    2013-03-15

    The influence of ion size on straggling of energy losses by fast partially stripped ions is studied using the nonperturbative approach based on the eikonal approximation. It is shown that such a consideration of collisions of ions with complex atoms can lead to considerable corrections in calculating root-mean-square straggling of energy losses by fast ions compared to the results obtained for point ions. The root-mean-square straggling of energy losses are calculated for bromide and iodine ions in collisions with copper, silver, and aluminum atoms. It is shown that allowance for the size of the electron 'coat' of an ion noticeably improves the agreement with experimental data.

  20. Theoretical study of resonances in low-energy collisions of three identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Chi Hong; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2016-05-01

    Resonances in low-energy collisions of three identical atoms are studied theoretically using hyperspherical coordinates. Two different methods are used and compared to determine positions and widths of three-body resonances: the complex absorbing potential and eigenchannel R-matrix approaches. Good agreement between the results of the two approaches is found. Cross sections for dimer formation in three-body recombination is determined. For this purpose the formula of Ref. is used (and re-derived). The developed code is applied to study collisions of three hydrogen atoms at low energies. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No PHY-15-06391.

  1. Differential collision cross-sections for atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    Differential collision cross-sections of O on N2 and other gases were measured to understand vehicle-environmental contamination effects in orbit. The following subject areas are also covered: groundbased scientific observations of rocket releases during NICARE-1; data compression study for the UVI; science priorities for UV imaging in the mid-1990's; and assessment of optimizations possible in UV imaging systems.

  2. Atomic physics at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Cowan, P.L.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne`s 7-GeV synchrotron light source (APS) is expected to commence operations for research early in FY 1996. The Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Research Center (BESSRC) is likewise expected to start its research programs at that time. As members of the BESSRC CAT (Collaborative Access Team), we are preparing, together with atomic physicists from the University of Western Michigan, the University of Tennessee, and University of Notre Dame, to initiate a series of atomic physics experiments that exploit the unique capabilities of the APS, especially its high brilliance for photon energies extending from about 3 keV to more than 50 keV. Most of our early work will be conducted on an undulator beam line and we are thus concentrating on various aspects of that beam line and its associated experimental areas. Our group has undertaken responsibilities in such areas as hutch design, evaluation of undulator performance, user policy, interfacing and instrumentation, etc. Initial experiments will probably utilize existing apparatus. We are, however, planning to move rapidly to more sophisticated measurements involving, for example, ion-beam targets, simultaneous laser excitation, and the spectroscopy of emitted photons.

  3. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed. This research was supported by Nuclear Fusion Research Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant No. 2015M1A7A1A01002786).

  4. Accurate abundance analysis of late-type stars: advances in atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    The measurement of stellar properties such as chemical compositions, masses and ages, through stellar spectra, is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. Progress in the understanding, calculation and measurement of atomic properties and processes relevant to the high-accuracy analysis of F-, G-, and K-type stellar spectra is reviewed, with particular emphasis on abundance analysis. This includes fundamental atomic data such as energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities, as well as processes of photoionisation, collisional broadening and inelastic collisions. A recurring theme throughout the review is the interplay between theoretical atomic physics, laboratory measurements, and astrophysical modelling, all of which contribute to our understanding of atoms and atomic processes, as well as to modelling stellar spectra.

  5. Formation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhao; Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2014-05-01

    Electron transfer in collisions between K(np)Rydberg atoms and electron attaching molecules can lead to formation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states comprising a weakly-bound positive-negative ion pair orbiting at large internuclear separations. In the present work ion-pair states are created in a small collision cell and allowed to exit into an analysis region where their binding energy and velocity distributions are determined with the aid of electric-field-induced dissociation and a position sensitive detector. Ion pair production is analyzed using a Monte Carlo collision code that models both the initial Rydberg electron capture and the subsequent behavior of the product ion pair. The data demonstrate that collisions with SF6 and CCl4 lead to formation of long-lived ion pair states with a broad distribution of binding energies whose velocity distribution is strongly peaked in the forward direction. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  6. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in collisions of Rydberg atoms with attaching targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhao; Kelley, Michael; Dunning, F. Barry

    2012-06-01

    Collisions between K(np) Rydberg atoms and electron attaching targets can lead to the creation of heavy-Rydberg ion-pair states comprising a weakly-bound positive-negative ion pair orbiting at large internuclear separations. The lifetimes of such states and their correlation with binding energy and the channels available for decay, which can be controlled by varying n, the Rydberg atom velocity, and the target species, are being investigated. The ion-pair states are produced in a small collision cell and allowed to exit to form a beam that passes between a pair of electrodes where their number and binding energy distribution is determined by electric field induced dissociation. Ion-pair production is analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models both initial Rydberg electron capture and the subsequent evolution of the product ion pair. Research supported by the Robert A Welch Foundation.

  7. Electronic spin-flipping collisions of hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zygelman, B.

    2010-03-15

    We present a unified multichannel approach to calculate electron spin-exchange and spin-flipping transition cross sections for collisions of H with H, H with T, and T with T. We use the theory to calculate the hyperfine quenching cross sections for collision energies that range from 1 mK to thermal temperatures. We show that spin-flipping transitions are induced by the splitting of the b {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u} Born-Oppenheimer potential via the long-range magnetic interactions among electrons. We find that the spin-flipping cross sections in the tritium dimer are about a magnitude larger than that predicted by mass scaling the H-H cross sections. For the former, we show that the spin-exchange cross sections are several magnitudes larger, at cold temperatures, than that of the hydrogen system. We compare the results of the multichannel approach with those obtained using approximate methods such as the degenerate internal-state, the elastic, and Born approximations and discuss their respective range of validity.

  8. Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1986-04-25

    Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Orientational invariance of the rotational transition probability in the sudden approximation. [atom-molecule collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Semiclassical collisions of an atom with a rigid-rotor molecule are examined in the sudden approximation. The rotational transition probability is shown to be invariant with respect to the choice of orientation for the molecular coordinate system; this fact contradicts recently reported results of a computer analysis. The present analysis may lead to an improved interpretation of recent molecular beam measurements.

  10. Measurement of doubly differential electron distributions induced by atomic collisions: Apparatus and related instrumental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, G.; Suárez, S.; Fregenal, D.; Focke, P.; Meckbach, W.

    1996-05-01

    We describe the experimental setup at Centro Atómico Bariloche for the measurement of doubly differential electron distributions, in energy and angle of emission, induced by atomic collisions. We present detailed information about the performance of the equipment including a discussion of instrumental effects that could have affected the measured spectra.

  11. Isotopic and Symmetry Effects in the Collision of Atomic Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouledroua, Moncef; Bouchelaghem, Fouzia; Tahar Bouazza, M.; Reggami, Lamia

    2006-11-01

    The thermophysical properties of a helium dilute gas at low and high temperatures are revisited with new and recent potential data points. The second virial coefficients are computed in order to assess the accuracy of the constructed He-He potentials. The results, mainly at high temperatures, are in a good agreement with the published values. The isotopic effects due to the presence of ^4He and ^3He atoms are also examined and the calculations of various transport parameters, namely diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity, are extended to include the nuclear spins and the symmetry effects, which arise from the identity and indistinguishability of the colliding atoms.

  12. Developing new theoretical models of the formation of atomic collision cascades and subcascades in irradiated solids

    SciTech Connect

    Metelkin, E. V.; Ryazanov, A. I. Semenov, E. V.

    2008-09-15

    A new theoretical model is developed for the investigation of atomic collision cascades and subcascades in irradiated solids consisting of atoms of a single type. The model is based on an analytical description of the elastic collisions between moving atoms knocked out of the crystal lattice sites and the immobile atoms of the lattice. The description is based on the linear kinetic Boltzmann equation describing the retardation of primary recoil atoms (PRAs) in irradiated solids. The laws of conservation for the total number and the kinetic energy of moving atoms, which follow from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, are analyzed using the proposed model. An analytical solution is obtained for the stationary kinetic Boltzmann equation, which describes the retardation of PRAs for a given source responsible for their production. A kinetic equation for the moving atoms and the corresponding laws of conservation are also analyzed with allowance for the binding energy of atoms at the crystal lattice sites. A criterion for determining the threshold energy of subcascade formation in irradiated solids is formulated. Based on this criterion, the threshold energy of subcascade formation is calculated using the Thomas-Fermi potential. Formulas are presented for determining the mean size and number of subcascades formed in a solid as functions of the PRA energy.

  13. PREFACE: XXIX International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; Rabadán, I.; García, G.; Méndez, L.; Martín, F.

    2015-09-01

    The 29th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXIX ICPEAC) was held at the Palacio de Congresos ''El Greco'', Toledo, Spain, on 22-28 July, 2015, and was organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). ICPEAC is held biannually and is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to Spain in 2015 for the very first time. UAM and CSIC had been preparing the conference for six years, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXIX ICPEAC in Toledo. The conference gathered 670 participants from 52 countries and attracted 854 contributed papers for presentation in poster sessions. Among the latter, 754 are presented in issues 2-12 of this volume of the Journal of Physics Conference Series. In addition, five plenary lectures, including the opening one by the Nobel laureate Prof. Ahmed H. Zewail and the lectures by Prof. Maciej Lewenstein, Prof. Paul Scheier, Prof. Philip H. Bucksbaum, and Prof. Stephen J. Buckman, 62 progress reports and 26 special reports were presented following the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Detailed write-ups of most of the latter are presented in issue 1 of this volume, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting. On the occasion of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and with the support of the Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología (FECYT), the program was completed with two public lectures delivered by the Nobel laureate Prof. Serge Haroche and the Príncipe de Asturias laureate Prof. Pedro M. Echenique on, respectively, ''Fifty years of laser revolutions in physics'rquot; and ''The sublime usefulness of useless science''. Also a

  14. Energy losses of fast heavy multiply charged structural ions in collisions with complex atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Sidorov, D. B.

    2007-07-01

    A nonperturbatve theory of energy losses of fast heavy multiply charged structural ions in collisions with neutral complex atoms is elaborated with allowance for simultaneous excitations of ionic and atomic electron shells. Formulas for the effective deceleration that are similar to the well-known Bethe-Bloch formulas are derived. By way of example, the energy lost by partially stripped U q+ ions (10 ≤ q ≤ 70) colliding with argon atoms and also the energy lost by Au, Pb, and Bi ions colliding with various targets are calculated. The results of calculation are compared with experimental data.

  15. Reaction of associative ionization N +O →NO+ +e- at slow collisions of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkov, Maxim G.; Ozerov, Georgy K.; Adamson, Sergey O.; Golubkov, Gennady V.; Malyshev, Nikolay S.; Dementiev, Andrey I.

    2015-11-01

    The endothermic reaction of associative ionization of nitrogen and oxygen atoms was studied in the case of slow atom collisions in the framework of multichannel quantum defect theory. The diabatic potential energy curves of the NO molecule excited states were calculated using multireference configuration interaction methods implemented in MOLPRO package. It was shown that cross section dependence on the energy of the colliding atoms is in a good agreement with the experiment. The rate coefficient of the reaction was defined at the temperature 100K ⩽ T ⩽ 1000K range. The obtained data may be used for calculating the tiered kinetics of highly excited Rydberg state population in low-temperature plasma.

  16. An independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, Hans Jürgen; Achenbach, Alexander; Kalkbrenner, Thilo; Jankowiak, Hans-Christian; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-04-01

    A new model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is introduced. The ion-molecule cross sections for net capture and net ionization are represented as weighted sums of atomic cross sections with weight factors that are determined from a geometric model of overlapping cross section areas. Results are presented for proton collisions with targets ranging from diatomic to complex polyatomic molecules. Significant improvement compared to simple additivity rule results and in general good agreement with experimental data are found. The flexibility of the approach opens up the possibility to study more detailed observables such as orientation-dependent and charge-state-correlated cross sections for a large class of complex targets ranging from biomolecules to atomic clusters.

  17. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  18. Broad Feshbach resonances in collisions of Dy atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, P.; Jachymski, K.; Maier, T.; Ferrier-Barbut, I.; Karan, H.; Schmitt, M.; Wenzel, M.; Wink, C.; Pfau, T.

    2016-05-01

    RF spectroscopy of weakly bound dimers of ultra cold bosonic Dy atoms gives evidence for the emergence of a universal s-wave halo state in a background of chaotic background resonance states. The halo state is associated with a broad magnetic Feshbach resonance. Using a coupled channels theory taking into account the short ranged van dear Waals interaction and a correction due to the strong dipole moment of Dy, we are able to extract the scattering length as a function of magnetic field tuning near two such broad resonances. These results offer prospects for tuning the interactions of Dy atoms in a regime where three-body losses are not too strong. Supported in part by the DFG, the Foundation for Polish Science International Ph. D Projects Programme, and an AFOSR MURI.

  19. Reactive collisions of atomic antihydrogen with H, He^+, He, H2^+, and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    2006-05-01

    The fermion molecular dynamics (FMD) method has been used to determine the rearrangement and destruction cross sections for collisions of antihydrogen (H) with H, He^+, He, H2^+, and H2 at collision energies above 0.1 au. The results for the H and He^+ targets satisfactorily merge with previous calculations done for lower collision energies. There are no previous calculations for the other targets. Despite the absence of a critical distance, the destruction cross section for collisions of H with He is found to be comparable with the destruction cross sections for H collisions with H and He^+, for which there are critical distances. The three atomic cross sections are shown to be given quite reasonably by simple classical orbiting formulas at energies that are very low but still high enough for L>0 partial waves to be dominant. The cross sections for formation of the antiprotonic atoms (Pn or pHe) and their initial quantum numbers are found to be significantly different from the analogous cross sections for p projectiles. The cross sections for the molecular targets are significantly larger.

  20. Project Physics Text 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Basic atomic theories are presented in this fifth unit of the Project Physics text for use by senior high students. Chemical basis of atomic models in the early years of the 18th Century is discussed n connection with Dalton's theory, atomic properties, and periodic tables. The discovery of electrons is described by using cathode rays, Millikan's…

  1. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  2. Delta-ray production in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.E.; Toburen, L.H.

    1980-07-01

    The stochastic energy concentrations randomly deposited in submicron volumes in and near the paths of charged particles is needed. Computational methods, especially Monte Carlo methods, required a comprehensive set of basic interaction cross sections for the primary and all secondary radiation products. Of particular importance for high LET radiations are the cross sections for the production of energetic secondary electrons, delta-rays, in primary ionizing events. In this paper, we review the present state of available data on the production of delta-rays by fast positive ions in collision with targets of biological interest. The systematics in the cross sections for proton ionization of molecular targets are discussed, indicating what scaling is possible and summarizing what can be concluded regarding the dependence of the mean delta-ray energies on the chemical makeup of the medium. A comparison of typical data is made with the binary-encounter approximation to illustrate the limitations of this theoretical treatment of the ionization process. A bibliography of relevant published works on this topic is included.

  3. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society. PMID:27317740

  4. GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF ATOMIC PHYSICS OBSERVATORY WHICH CONTAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF ATOMIC PHYSICS OBSERVATORY WHICH CONTAINS THE WHITE DOME STRUCTURE. THE SHED-LIKE STRUCTURE TO THE LEFT IS THE SEARCH-LIGHT BUILDING. - Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Atomic Physics Observatory, 5241 Broad Branch Drive Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. Multiple-ionization channels in proton-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Manson, S.T.

    1987-03-01

    A detailed investigation of multiple ionization of He (ionization charge states q = 1,2), Ne (q = 1--3), and Ar and Kr (q = 1--4) is presented for proton impact energies ranging from 10 keV to a few MeV. Absolute cross sections for various ionization pathways have been obtained by combining some new measurements with previously published experimental results and, in certain cases, with existing theoretical information. It is shown how each of these pathways contribute to the various stages of target ionization that are observed after the collision and how these experimentally measured quantities are related to the cross sections for initial inner- and outer-shell vacancy production. Areas where additional data are required or where the existing data are not internally consistent are pointed out. In general, it is shown that the existing data are sufficient to describe the ionization of helium as well as the lower levels of ionization of neon, argon, and krypton. However, for the higher degrees of ionization, particularly for Kr, our understanding is hampered by substantial gaps in the available inner-shell ionization data: both in cross-section and branching-ratio information. Nevertheless, the data are sufficient to indicate the relative importance of the various pathways. For all targets, direct multiple outer-shell cross sections were extracted. Analyzing the energy dependences of these cross sections provided some hints as to how to calculate multiple-ionization cross sections, e.g., information as to where the multiple ionization is dominated by the first-order or by a higher-order term in the perturbation expansion of the proton-target interaction is obtained.

  6. Atomic Physics, Science (Experimental): 5318.42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petit, Ralph E.

    Presented is the study of modern and classical concepts of the atom; the structure of the atom as a mass-energy relationship; practical uses of radioactivity; isotopes; and the strange particles. Performance objectives (16) are included as well as a detailed course outline. Experiments, demonstrations, projects and reports to enhance student…

  7. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  8. Tight Binding Models in Cold Atoms Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, J.

    2007-05-01

    Cold atomic gases placed in optical lattice potentials offer a unique tool to study simple tight binding models. Both the standard cases known from the condensed matter theory as well as novel situations may be addressed. Cold atoms setting allows for a precise control of parameters of the systems discussed, stimulating new questions and problems. The attempts to treat disorder in a controlled fashion are addressed in detail.

  9. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. I - Rotational transitions in the sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The impact parameter method and the sudden approximation are applied to determine the total probability of inelastic rotational transitions arising from a collision of an atom and a homonuclear diatomic molecule at large impact parameters. An analytical approximation to this probability is found for conditions where the electron exchange or overlap forces dominate the scattering. An approximate upper bound to the range of impact parameters for which rotational scattering can be important is determined. In addition, an estimate of the total inelastic cross section is found at conditions for which a statistical model describes the scattering well. The results of this analysis are applied to Ar-O2 collisions and may be readily applied to other combinations of atoms and molecules.

  10. Ion-biomolecule collisions studied within the independent atom model including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    A recently introduced model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is applied to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. We present net capture and net ionization cross sections over wide ranges of impact energy and analyze the strength of the screening effect by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  11. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    PubMed

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation. PMID:25907301

  12. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. II - Effect of rotation on vibrational transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Rotational and vibrational transitions in a diatomic molecule caused by collisions with an atom are analyzed by a semiclassical method for conditions where the rotational transitions can be handled well by the sudden approximation and the vibrational transitions belong to the adiabatic regime. The contribution to the vibrational transition probability from the correction, which takes the finite value of the spacing between rotational energy levels into account, is examined.-

  13. Rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms. [interstellar gas energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for rotational excitation of hydrogen molecules by collisions with hydrogen atoms have been obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations for kinetic temperatures between 100 and 5000 K. These calculations involve the rigid-rotator approximation, but other possible sources of error should be small. The calculations indicate that the early values of Nishimura are larger than accurate rigid-rotator values by about a factor of 20 or more.

  14. Atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation - Time dependence and the asymptotic wave function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, wave-packet description of atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation is extracted from the more conventional time-independent, stationary-state description. This approach resolves certain difficulties of interpretation in the time-independent approach which arise in the case of asymptotic near resonance. In the two-state model investigated, the approach predicts the existence of three spherically scattered waves in this asymptotically near-resonant case.

  15. Quantum-mechanical theory including angular momenta analysis of atom-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of two atoms colliding in the presence of an intense radiation field, such as that of a laser, is investigated. The radiation field, which couples states of different electronic symmetry, is described by the number state representation while the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction) are discussed in terms of a diabatic representation. The total angular momentum of the field-free system and the angular momentum transferred by absorption (or emission) of a photon are explicitly considered in the derivation of the coupled scattering equations. A model calculation is discussed for the Xe + F collision system.

  16. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    SciTech Connect

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions.

  17. Nonadiabatic coupling in cold collisions of spin-polarized metastable hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Forrey, Robert C.; Dalgarno, Alex; Vanne, Yulian V.; Saenz, Alejandro; Froelich, Piotr

    2007-11-15

    Previous calculations of low-temperature cross sections for collisions between spin-polarized metastable hydrogen atoms are improved to include nonadiabatic radial and angular coupling at large interatomic separations. The electrostatic dipole-quadrupole interaction produces nonadiabatic radial coupling between (2s,2p) and (2p,2p) states, while the Coriolis interaction produces nonadiabatic angular coupling. Both of these long-range contributions are handled in a space-fixed atomic gauge that is particularly convenient for a spin-polarized system. The improved theoretical results are compared with an existing experiment.

  18. On the relativistic and nonrelativistic electron descriptions in high-energy atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitkiv, A. B.

    2007-07-01

    We consider the relativistic and nonrelativistic descriptions of an atomic electron in collisions with point-like charged projectiles moving at relativistic velocities. We discuss three different forms of the fully relativistic first-order transition amplitude. Using the Schrödinger-Pauli equation to describe the atomic electron we establish the correct form of the nonrelativistic first-order transition amplitude. We also show that the so-called semi-relativistic treatment, in which the Darwin states are used to describe the atomic electron, is in fact fully equivalent to the nonrelativistic consideration. The comparison of results obtained with the relativistic and nonrelativistic electron descriptions shows that the latter is accurate within 20-30% up to Za<~ 50-60, where Za is the atomic nuclear charge.

  19. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom-molecule collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom-molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X1Σ+g ground state 85Rb2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom-molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85Rb2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 1011 cm-3.

  20. Charge transfer in slow collisions between hydrogen atoms and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, B.; Thumm, U.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a new two-center close-coupling approach [1] for slow ion (atom)-surface collision in which the continuum of metal conduction-band states is discretized by using Weyl wave packets [2] to represent the motion of the active electron in the metal subspace. Results for the time evolution of the atomic and metallic population amplitudes for a hydrogen atom in colliding at perpendicular incidence with an model aluminum surface are shown and discussed. For the n=2 hydrogenic manifold, we have obtained converged atomic populations amplitudes by including all projectile levels up to the n=5 manifold and 480 Weyl wave packets in the close-coupling expansion. We will discuss the electron dynamics in particular in view of possible dephasing effects (in distance and time) and recurrence effects that may arrise due to our continuum discretization in term of a finite number of localized Weyl packets. [1] B. Bahrim and U. Thumm, Surf. Sci. 451, 1 (2000), and to appear in Phys. Rev. A. [2] B.H. Bransden and M.R.C. McDowell, "Charge Exchange and the Theory of Ion-Atom Collisions" Clarendon Press (Oxford 1992). Supported by NSF and by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE

  1. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH {yields} H{sub 2} R reactions where RH is CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, or C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants.

  2. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ``Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,`` Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH {yields} H{sub 2} R reactions where RH is CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, or C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants.

  3. Investigation of cold collision in a two isotope magneto-optical trap for Krypton atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Tiwari, V. B.; Kale, Y. B.; Mishra, S. R.; Rawat, H. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report simultaneous cooling and trapping of metastable 84Kr (84Kr*) and metastable 86Kr (86Kr*) atoms by overlapping the cooling laser beams for these different isotopes in the same region of a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Approximately 2 × 105 atoms of each isotope were trapped in this two isotope-MOT (TIMOT). We have investigated the heteronuclear collision trap loss rates for each isotope due to the presence of cold atoms of other isotope using the TIMOT loading curves. The two body heteronuclear loss rate coefficient {β }{84Kr*-{}86Kr*} (i.e. for the loss of 84Kr* due to presence of 86Kr*) and the reciprocal loss rate coefficient {β }{86Kr*-{}84Kr*} (i.e. for the loss of 86Kr* due to presence of 84Kr*) are measured to be (8.7 ± 0.8) × 10-10 cm3 s-1 and (8.8 ± 0.8) × 10-10 cm3 s-1 respectively for laser beam intensity values of 21 mW cm-2 (for cooling of 84Kr*) and 64 mW cm-2 (for cooling of 86Kr*). The dependence of heteronuclear cold collision loss rate on cooling laser beams intensity has also been studied and compared with homonuclear cold collision loss rate.

  4. Theoretical studies relating to the interaction of radiation with matter: Atomic collision processes occurring in the presence of radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, P. R.

    1983-09-01

    Work is reported in the areas of: Saturation Spectroscopy; Heating and Cooling via Laser-Assisted Collisions; Creation of Electronic State Coherences via Laser-Assisted Collisions; Two-Level Atom Plus Radiation Pulse; Photon as Catalyst; and Collisional Effects in Four-Wave Mixing.

  5. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    point where the initial and final potentials cross, or at least come very close. Therefore, this mechanism would be applicable to the case where a gas is initially at very low temperature suddenly subjected to high energy heavy particle bombardment. This situation would model the measurement of excitation cross section by molecular beam techniques, for example. The purpose is to report values of cross sections and rate coefficients for collision excitation of ground state atoms estimated with the Landau-Zener transition theory and to compare results with measurement of excitation cross sections for a beam of Hydrogen atoms impacting Argon atom targets. Some very dubious approximations are used, and the comparison with measurement is found less than ideal, but results are at least consistent within order of magnitude. The same model is then applied to the case of N-N atom collisions, even though the approximations then become even more doubtful. Still the rate coefficients obtained are at least plausible in both magnitude and functional form, and as far as I am aware these are the only estimates available for such rate coefficients.

  6. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  7. The physics of spin polarized atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happer, William

    1988-05-01

    Research efforts are focussed on the study of spin polarized atoms, nuclei and electrons during the period covered by this report. Although this work is 6.1 basic research, it has applications to a number of important Air Force problems. For example, the atomic clocks used on the GPS satellite system operate with optically pumped rubidium absorption cells, very similar to the ones being investigated here. A number of the scientists and engineers working on atomic clocks used by Air Force satellite systems were trained with the support of this grant. We have participated in recent Air Force advisory panels to review concepts for high-energy-density fuels based on spin polarized atoms and molecules. The insights gained from research sponsored by this grant have been very useful in evaluating these ideas. Recent work has focussed on two main areas, the investigation of quadrupolar interactions between spin polarized noble gas nuclei and surfaces and the quantitative investigation of how magnetic field inhomogeneities cause spin relaxation.

  8. Atomic collisions in suprafluid helium-nanodroplets: timescales for metal-cluster formation derived from He-density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Collision times for the coinage metal atoms Cu, Ag and Au in He-droplets are derived from helium density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The strength of the attractive interaction between the metal atoms turns out to be less important than the mass of the propagating metal atoms. Even for small droplets consisting of a few thousand helium atoms, the collision times are shortest for Cu, followed by Ag and Au, despite the higher binding energy of Au2 compared to Cu2. PMID:25812719

  9. ATOMIC PHYSICS, AN AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM, VOLUME 2, SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DETERLINE, WILLIAM A.; KLAUS, DAVID J.

    THE AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN THIS TEXT WERE PREPARED FOR USE IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, OFFERING SELF-TUTORING MATERIAL FOR LEARNING ATOMIC PHYSICS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE (1) ISOTOPES AND MASS NUMBERS, (2) MEASURING ATOMIC MASS, (3) DISCOVERY OF THE NUCLEUS, (4) STRUCTURE OF THE NUCLEUS, (5) DISCOVERY OF THE NEUTRON, (6) NUCLEAR REACTIONS,…

  10. Project Physics Tests 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 5 are presented in this booklet. Included are 70 multiple-choice and 23 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of atomic model are examined on aspects of relativistic corrections, electron emission, photoelectric effects, Compton effect, quantum theories, electrolysis experiments, atomic number and mass,…

  11. NASA GSFC Science Symposium on Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    This document is the proceedings of a conference on atomic and molecular physics in honor of the retirements of Dr. Aaron Temkin and Dr. Richard Drachman. The conference contained discussions on electron, positron, atomic, and positronium physics, as well as a discussion on muon catalyzed fusion. This proceedings document also contains photographs taken at the symposium, as well as speeches and a short biography made in tribute to the retirees.

  12. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases Lecture: Electron and Photon Collisions with Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Philip G.

    2012-06-01

    After a brief historical introduction this talk will review the broad range of collision processes involving electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules that are now being considered. Their application in the analysis of astronomical spectra, atmospheric observations and laboratory plasmas will be considered. The talk will review the R-matrix computational method which has been widely used by international collaborations and by other scientists in the field to obtain accurate scattering amplitudes and cross sections of importance in these applications. Results of some recent calculations of electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules will be presented. In conclusion some challenges for future research will be briefly discussed.

  13. Physical meaning of the multiplicities of emitted nucleons in hadron-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of experimental data on hadron-nucleus collisions at energies from about 2 up to about 400 GeV was performed in order to discover a physical meaning of the multiplicity of emitted nucleons. Simple relations between the multiplicities and the thickness of the nuclear matter layer involved in collisions were obtained.

  14. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  15. New results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source is the world's first low-energy third-generation synchrotron radiation source. It has been running reliably and exceeding design specifications since it began operation in October 1993. It is available to a wide community of researchers in many scientific fields, including atomic and molecular science and chemistry. Here, new results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source demonstrate the opportunities available in atomic and molecular physics at this synchrotron light source. The unprecedented brightness allows experiments with high flux, high spectral resolution, and nearly 100% linear polarization.

  16. Selected bibliography on atomic collisions: Data collections, bibliographies, review articles, books, and papers of particular tutorial value

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E.W.; Flannery, M.R.; Thomas, E.W.; Manson, S.T.

    1985-07-01

    This bibliography deals mainly with binary and ternary collisions involving electrons, photons, and heavy particles (i.e., atoms, molecules, and ions). The energy range covered for each kind of collision is such that the interactions might be described as electronic, atomic, or chemical--higher-energy collisions involving nuclear forces are not treated. Also covered are particle and photon impact on surfaces, the passage of particles and radiation through bulk matter, and transport phenomena in gases. Practically all of the references cited are data compilations, other bibliographies, review articles, or books. The main objective is to provide easy access to atomic collision data, although some references are included principally for their tutorial value.

  17. Alkali--rare gas photodissociation lasers: Applications to laser physics and atom-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John Darby

    This dissertation describes several experiments in which alkali--rare gas laser systems are utilized as a simple platform with which to isolate and study atom-atom interactions and fundamental physical processes that are ill-understood or have never been investigated previously. Specifically, the minimum allowable energy separation between levels 2 and 3 in a three-level laser system has been investigated experimentally, as have two-photon absorption processes in atomic Rb and Cs.

  18. Capture of negative muons by hydrogen atoms at low collision energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-15

    A rigorous quantum mechanical calculation is carried out for negative muon capture by atomic hydrogen (mu{sup -}+H->mu{sup -}p+e) by using the R-matrix method. The total and final-state selected capture cross sections are calculated at low collision energies ranging from 0.001 to 1 eV. The total capture cross section can, on average, be explained in terms of a previously obtained empirical formula [K. Sakimoto, Phys. Rev. A 66, 032506 (2002)]. However, the present result exhibits additional undulation and cusp structures, which stem from quantum phenomena. The muons are predominantly captured into the highest energetically possible state of mu{sup -}p in the present energy region. However, the mu{sup -}p products having high angular momenta cannot be formed unless the collision energy becomes high.

  19. Rotational excitation of linear molecules by collisions with atoms - Comparison of classical and quantum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, S.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Exact quantum results for the rotational excitation of rigid linear molecules by collisions with atoms are compared with classical trajectory results. The systems studied are CO-He, CS-H2, OCS-H2, HCl-He, and HCl-Ar at collision energies up to 500/cm. Total cross sections and state to state rate constants are compared. The classical results are found to be in good agreement with the quantum results on the average. Differences arising from the existence of purely quantum effects are clearly evident, but consistent and predictable. Two methods of extracting state selective information from moments of the classical distribution are examined and found to be less reliable than the usual histogram method. In conjunction with previous comparisons of classical and quantum results these calculations provide a useful measure of the limitations and reliability of classical trajectories.

  20. Reactive collisions of atomic antihydrogen with the H2 and H2+ molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, James S.

    2006-09-01

    The fermion molecular dynamics (FMD) method is used to determine the protonium (Pn) formation and total destruction cross sections for collisions of antihydrogen (\\bar{H}) with the H2 molecule and the H2+ molecular ion at collision energies above 0.1 au in the centre-of-mass system. The cross sections and initial quantum numbers are compared with the analogous cross sections for \\bar{H}+H, \\barp+H, \\barp+H_2 and \\barp+H_2^+ previously calculated. Like the \\barp projectile, the protonium-formation cross sections for the \\bar{H} projectile are much larger and extend to higher energies with the molecular targets than with the atomic target. The possibility is considered that a relatively long-lived state of the \\bar{H}H molecule may be formed in rearrangement scattering of \\bar{H}+H_2 at low energies.

  1. Coincidence measurements of electron capture and loss in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    Collisions between fast, fully stripped projectiles and atomic targets predominantly result in target electrons being ejected to the continuum. For fast partially stripped projectiles which bring weakly bound electrons into the collision, projectile ionization can also contribute to the observed electron spectra. At lower impact velocities, electron capture by the projectile ion becomes important and higher order processes, often referred to as transfer ionization, can be a significant source of free electrons. In recent years, coincidence techniques have been used to evaluate the relative importance of electron capture and loss in free electron production, to separate the capture and loss contributions from those resulting from target ionization alone, and to provide more detailed information about electron capture and loss mechanisms than is available from total cross section measurements. A brief survey of these experiments will be presented. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  2. US-Japan workshop on atomic collisions in solids: Abstracts of lectures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This report contains abstracts on the following topics: techniques of scanning probe microscopy; new types of radiation; a search for wake-riding electrons using slow antiproton beams; antiproton wake: theory; bending of swift ion beams by graphite foils; angular momentum distribution of autoionizing rydberg states: produced by 64 MeV S ions in collisions with C foils; multiphonon energy exchange in atom-surface collisions; plans for positron experiments; resonant coherent excitation: experiment; line shapes in resonant coherent excitation: theory; MUSE experiments and Monte Carlo simulation; inelastic interactions of electrons and positrons with solids; density fluctuation detection; cluster-impact fusion; a model for cluster-impact fusion; thoughts on cold fusion; and plasmon decay.

  3. SOHO: Atomic physics and the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.

    1998-09-28

    Many aspects of the Sun's corona and wind are studied using data from the ultraviolet spectrum. Accurate atomic parameters are needed to interpret these data correctly, and a good understanding of the behaviors of atoms and ions in plasmas is essential to modeling the Sun's atmosphere. Here I present two examples of studies being carried out using the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) extreme ultraviolet spectrographs. The first of these is the study of flows in the Sun's chromosphere and corona. SOHO has provided new information concerning previous observations of the predominant down-flows in the Sun's lower atmosphere. Accurate measurements of Doppler line shifts have been extended to the corona. It has also been found that the Doppler shifts vary over different parts of the Sun. The second study discussed involves the use of SOHO data to measure elemental abundances in coronal structures know as streamers, giving more information on the 'FIP' effect--the observation that there is a relative deficit of elements with high first ionization potentials (FIPs) in the corona and solar wind.

  4. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, P.

    1993-10-01

    The past year has been a busy one for all three accelerators: the LINAC, EBIS, and the tandem. The EBIS continues to deliver beams of highly charged ions around the clock for the study of low energy collisions with gases and surfaces. The electron beam energy was upgraded to 10 keV, and intensities of highly charged species such as Xe(44+) were greatly increased. The tandem, the traditional source of highly charged binary encounter electron production at zero degrees were studied for medium Z (Si,Cl,Cu) projectiles. Recoil momentum spectroscopy has been used to separate the contributions to collisional ionization of one-electron ions (C(5+), O(7+), F(8+)) from the nucleus and the electrons of a He target. Marked structure in the binary encounter electron spectra for Cu(sup q+) on H2 targets was measured for moderate velocity projectiles. Electron capture by slow multiply charged (EBIS) projectiles from laser excited targets has been carried out. Cross sections for capture from Na(3s) and Na*(3p) were measured for velocities between 0.1 and 1 au. The extension of these experiments to laser excited Rydberg targets is proceeding. Electron capture cross sections and average Q values for Ar(16+) on He at velocities between 0.23 and 1.67 au were measured. The charge state distribution of the He recoils following large angle scattering of C(4+) and C(6+) ions at 7.5 keV/u has been measured. Cross sections have been measured for up to sextuple capture from C60 (buckminsterfullerene) by highly charged slow projectiles. Coupled channel calculations for double capture from He by slow multicharge ions were carried out.

  5. Database for inelastic collisions of sodium atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, K.; Schweinzer, J.; Bray, I.; Bridi, D.; Aumayr, F.

    2008-11-15

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data for inelastic collision processes of ground (3s) and excited (3p, 4s, 3d, 4p, 5s, 4d, and 4f) state Na atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions have been collected and critically assessed. In addition to existing data, electron-impact cross sections, for both excitation and ionization, have been calculated using the convergent close-coupling approach. In the case of proton-impact cross section, the database was enlarged by new atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations. Both electron-impact and proton-impact processes include excitation from the ground state and between excited states (n = 3-5). For electron-impact, ionization from all states is also considered. In the case of proton-impact electron loss, cross sections (the sum of ionization and single-electron charge transfer) are given. Well-established analytical formulae used to fit cross sections, published by Wutte et al. and Schweinzer et al. for collisions with lithium atoms, were adapted to sodium. The 'recommended cross sections' for the processes considered have been critically evaluated and fitted using the adapted analytical formulae. For each inelastic process the fit parameters determined are tabulated. We also present the assessed data in graphical form. The criteria for comprehensively evaluating the accuracy of the experimental data, theoretical calculations, and procedures used in determining the recommended cross sections are discussed.

  6. Multichannel quantum-defect theory for ultracold atom-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Simoni, Andrea; Calarco, Tommaso; Julienne, Paul S.

    2011-08-01

    We develop an analytical model for ultracold atom-ion collisions using the multichannel quantum-defect formalism. The model is based on analytical solutions of the r-4 long-range potential and on the application of a frame transformation between asymptotic and molecular bases. This approach allows the description of atom-ion interaction in the ultracold domain in terms of only three parameters: the singlet and triplet scattering lengths, assumed to be independent of the relative motion angular momentum, and the lead dispersion coefficient of the asymptotic potential. We also introduce corrections to the scattering lengths that improve the accuracy of our quantum-defect model for higher-order partial waves, a particularly important result for an accurate description of shape and Feshbach resonances at finite temperature. The theory is applied to the system composed of a 40Ca+ ion and a Na atom, and compared with numerical coupled-channel calculations carried out using ab initio potentials. For this particular system, we investigate the spectrum of bound states, the rate of charge-transfer processes and the collision rates in the presence of magnetic Feshbach resonances at zero and finite temperature.

  7. The impact of short-range forces on high-energy atom collisions in displacement cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, German; Stoller, Roger; Tamm, Artur; Beland, Laurent; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Caro, Alfredo; Slipchenko4, Lyudmila; Osetskiy, Yury; Aabloo, Alvo; Klintenberg, Mattias; Wang, Yang

    Simulation of primary radiation damage formation in solid materials involves collisions between atoms with a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. As a result, during these collisions, the distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm. For such small atomic separations, interatomic potentials significantly underestimate the potential energy. The common practice involves using a screened Coulomb pair potential to describe the high-energy interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium potential. However, there is no standard method for choosing the joining parameters and defect production during cascade evolution has been shown to be sensitive to how the joining is done. We developed a new procedure, which includes the use of ab initio, calculations to determine the pair interactions at intermediate distances, together with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel. Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, ``Center for Energy Dissipation to Defect Evolution''.

  8. Current Topics in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Chandana; Bhattacharyya, Shib Shankar

    Preface -- Ultrafast dynamics of nano and mesoscopic systems driven by asymmetric electromagnetic pulses / A. Matos-Abiague, A. S. Moskalenko and J. Berakdar -- One-dimensional non-linear oscillators as models for atoms and molecules under intense laser fields / A. Wadehra and B. M. Deb -- Experimenting with topological states of Bose-Einstein condensates / C. Raman -- Laser cooling and trapping of Rb atoms / S. Chakraborty ... [et al.] -- Pair-correlation in Bose-Einstein condensate and fermi superfluid of atomic gases / B. Deb -- Properties of trapped Bose gas in the large-gas-parameter regime / A. Banerjee -- A Feynman-Kac path integral study of Rb gas / S. Datta -- Mean field theory for interacting spin-1 bosons on a lattice / R. V. Pai, K. Sheshadri and R. Pandit -- Mixed internal-external state approach for quantum computation with neutral atoms on atom chips / E. Charron ... [et al.] -- Ultrafast pulse shaping developments for quantum computation / S. K. Karthick Kumar and D. Goswami -- Quantum information transfer in atom-photon interactions in a cavity / A. S. Majumdar, N. Nayak and B. Ghosh -- Liouville density evolution in billiards and the quantum connection / D. Biswas -- MRCPA: theory and application to highly correlating system / K. Tanaka -- Calculation of negative ion shape resonances using coupled cluster theory / Y. Sajeev and S. Pal -- Optical frequency standard with Sr+: a theoretical many-body approach / C. Sur ... [et al.] -- Fast heavy ion collisions with H[symbol] molecules and young type interference / L. C. Tribedi and D. Misra -- Estimation of ion kinetic energies from time-of-flight and momentum spectra / B. Bapat -- Third-order optical susceptibility of metal nanocluster-glass 28 composites / B. Ghosh and P. Chakraborty -- Study of atom-surface interaction using magnetic atom mirror / A. K. Mohapatra.

  9. Scattering of NH3 and ND3 with rare gas atoms at low collision energy.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; van der Avoird, A

    2015-11-14

    We present a theoretical study of elastic and rotationally inelastic collisions of NH3 and ND3 with rare gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) at low energy. Quantum close-coupling calculations have been performed for energies between 0.001 and 300 cm(-1). We focus on collisions in which NH3 is initially in the upper state of the inversion doublet with j = 1, k = 1, which is the most relevant in an experimental context as it can be trapped electrostatically and Stark-decelerated. We discuss the presence of resonances in the elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as the trends in the inelastic cross sections along the rare gas series and the differences between NH3 and ND3 as a colliding partner. We also demonstrate the importance of explicitly taking into account the umbrella (inversion) motion of NH3 in order to obtain accurate scattering cross sections at low collision energy. Finally, we investigate the possibility of sympathetic cooling of ammonia using cold or ultracold rare gas atoms. We show that some systems exhibit a large ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections in the cold regime, which is promising for sympathetic cooling experiments. The close-coupling calculations are based on previously reported ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH3-He and NH3-Ar, as well as on new, four-dimensional, potential energy surfaces for the interaction of ammonia with Ne, Kr, and Xe, which were computed using the coupled-cluster method and large basis sets. We compare the properties of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to the interaction of ammonia with the various rare gas atoms. PMID:26567658

  10. Experimental determination of the real elements of the density matrix of H({ital n}=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV collisions of H{sup +} on Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, N.; Gibson, N.D.; Risley, J.S.

    1995-11-01

    In continuation of our previous work, charge transfer processes occurring in protons on rare-gas-atom collisions have been investigated. Diagonal and real off-diagonal coherence elements of the density matrix for H({ital n}=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV electron-capture collisions with Kr atoms are experimentally determined by analyzing the Balmer-{alpha} light from the decay of H atoms from the ({ital n}=3) state to the ({ital n}=2) state. The intensity and polarization of the emitted light are measured as functions of an axially symmetric electric field in the collision region. These data are fitted to a numerical model of the H atom in an electric field in order to extract density-matrix elements. The results are compared to previous studies of H{sup +} on He and Ar. The collisionally produced dipole moment of the H({ital n}=3) atom decreases for increasing atomic number of the rare-gas target atoms, which indicates that the final phase of the collision process is not essential for the formation of the dipole moment. This physical picture is further supported by our alignment data. Absolute cross sections for charge transfer to the 3{ital s}, 3{ital p}, and 3{ital d} levels are presented as well.

  11. Charge-transfer-induced evaporation in collisions of Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Ruiz, L. F.; Zarour, B.; Hervieux, P. A.; Hanssen, J.; Politis, M. F.; Martín, F.

    2003-12-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of dissociative charge transfer in collisions of slow Li2+31 clusters with Cs atoms. We provide a direct quantitative comparison between theory and experiment and show that good agreement is only found when the experimental time-of-flight and initial cluster temperature are taken into account in the theoretical modeling. This model explains evaporation as resulting from a collisional energy deposit due to cluster electronic excitation during charge transfer. We discuss in detail the basic mechanisms that are responsible for the charge-transfer reaction and different approximations to evaluate the energy deposit.

  12. Loss and excitation in single collisions of highly-stripped heavy ions with atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, W.G.; Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Oglesby, C.S.; Tanis, J.A.; Berkner, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Johnson, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cross sections for projectile loss and excitation (LE) in single collisions of heavy ions with atoms have been measured for 15 to 460 MeV S, Ar, Ca, and V ions, with charge states varying from 12+ to 21+ in H/sub 2/, He, Ne, and Ar gas targets. The results indicate that K x-ray production takes place through excitation rather than loss of a 1s electron. An independent electron model appears to provide a reasonable description of LE for Li-like projectiles. However, there are also indications that loss and excitation events are correlated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Laboratory studies of atomic collision processes of importance in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Smith, K.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the following research supported under NSG 7386 is reported: (1) measurement of differential cross sections for atomic and molecular collisions relevant to analysis and modeling of data from Pioneer 11, Pioneer 12, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2; (2) analysis of measured differential cross section results to provide scattering data in forms that are easy to apply to atmospheric modeling work; (3) analysis of the data to give basic information on the molecular potentials involved in the scattering process; and (4) development and initial use of apparatus to study dissociative processes in neutral molecules.

  14. Classical-quantum correspondence for ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. |; Reinhold, C.O.

    1994-10-01

    We analyze the interplay between classical and quantum dynamics in ionization of atoms by fast charged particles The convergence to the classical limit is studied as a function of the momentum transferred to the electron during the collision, the impact parameter. the energy and angle of the emitted electron, and the initial state of the target. One goal is to assess the validity of exact classical (CTMC) methods and approximate classical models such as the Thomson model. Applications to data for electron ejection at large angles are presented. The connection between collisional ionization by charged particles and ionization by half-cycle pulses is discussed.

  15. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms. II - Infinite order sudden approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1979-01-01

    The infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation is extended to rotational excitation of symmetric tops by collisions with atoms. After development of a formalism for 'primitive' or 'one-ended' tops, proper parity-adapted linear combinations describing real rotors are considered and modifications needed for asymmetric rigid rotors are noted. The generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are discussed. IOS calculations for NH3-He and H2CO-He are performed and compared with more accurate calculations, and the IOS approximation is found to provide a reasonably accurate description.

  16. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  17. TlII excitation cross-sections in collisions of slow electrons with thallium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    Excitation of a singly-charged thallium ion in electron collisions with thallium atoms has been studied experimentally. Seventy excitation cross sections have been measured at an exciting electron energy of 30 eV. Ten optical excitation functions (OEFs) have been recorded in the incident electron energy range of 0–200 eV. For seven TlII spectral series, the dependence of excitation cross-sections on the principal quantum numbers of upper levels has been studied. A comparison of findings with data from preceding publications is presented.

  18. Quantifying the physical demands of collision sports: does microsensor technology measure what it claims to measure?

    PubMed

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2013-08-01

    The physical demands of rugby league, rugby union, and American football are significantly increased through the large number of collisions players are required to perform during match play. Because of the labor-intensive nature of coding collisions from video recordings, manufacturers of wearable microsensor (e.g., global positioning system [GPS]) units have refined the technology to automatically detect collisions, with several sport scientists attempting to use these microsensors to quantify the physical demands of collision sports. However, a question remains over the validity of these microtechnology units to quantify the contact demands of collision sports. Indeed, recent evidence has shown significant differences in the number of "impacts" recorded by microtechnology units (GPSports) and the actual number of collisions coded from video. However, a separate study investigated the validity of a different microtechnology unit (minimaxX; Catapult Sports) that included GPS and triaxial accelerometers, and also a gyroscope and magnetometer, to quantify collisions. Collisions detected by the minimaxX unit were compared with video-based coding of the actual events. No significant differences were detected in the number of mild, moderate, and heavy collisions detected via the minimaxX units and those coded from video recordings of the actual event. Furthermore, a strong correlation (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) was observed between collisions recorded via the minimaxX units and those coded from video recordings of the event. These findings demonstrate that only one commercially available and wearable microtechnology unit (minimaxX) can be considered capable of offering a valid method of quantifying the contact loads that typically occur in collision sports. Until such validation research is completed, sport scientists should be circumspect of the ability of other units to perform similar functions. PMID:23090320

  19. Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

  20. The dependence of scattering length on van der Waals interaction and reduced mass of the system in two-atomic collision at cold energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAY, HASI

    2016-06-01

    The static-exchange model (SEM) and the modified static-exchange model (MSEM) recently introduced by Ray [1] is applied to study the elastic collision between two hydrogen-like atoms when both are in ground states considering the system as a four-body Coulomb problem in the center of mass frame, in which all the Coulomb interaction terms in direct and exchange channels are treated exactly. The SEM includes the non-adiabatic short-range effect due to electron-exchange. The MSEM added in it, the long-range effect due to induced dynamic dipole polarizabilities between the atoms e.g. the Van der Waals interaction. Applying the SEM code in different H-like two-atomic systems, a reduced mass dependence on scattering length is observed. Again applying the MSEM code on H(1s)-H(1s) elastic scattering and varying the minimum values of interatomic distance, the dependence of scattering length on the effective interatomic potential consistent with the existing physics are observed. Both these basic findings in low and cold energy atomic collision physics are quite useful and are being reported for the first time.

  1. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-26

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  2. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  3. Charge exchange collisions of slow C6 + with atomic and molecular H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidhan C.; Guevara, Nicolais L.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Öhrn, Yngve

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange in collisions of C6+ ions with H and H2 is investigated theoretically at projectile energies 0.1 < E < 10 keV/amu, using electron nuclear dynamics (END) - a semi-classical approximation which not only includes electron translation factors for avoiding spurious couplings but also employs full dynamical trajectories to treat nuclear motions. Both the total and partial cross sections are reported for the collision of C6+ ions with atomic and molecular hydrogen. A comparison with other theoretical and experimental results shows, in general good agreement except at very low energy, considered here. For H2, the one- and two-electron charge exchange cross sections are calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental results. Small but non-negligible isotope effects are found at the lowest energy studied in the charge transfer of C6+ with H. In low energy region, it is observed that H2 has larger isotope effects than H atom due to the polarizability effect which is larger than the mass effect.

  4. Wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions: Nonrearrangement scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-08-01

    A general single-center close-coupling approach based on a continuum-discretization procedure is developed to calculate excitation and ionization processes in ion-atom collisions. The continuous spectrum of the target is discretized using stationary wave packets constructed from the Coulomb wave functions, the eigenstates of the target Hamiltonian. Such continuum discretization allows one to generate pseudostates with arbitrary energies and distribution. These features are ideal for detailed differential ionization studies. The approach starts from the semiclassical three-body Schrödinger equation for the scattering wave function and leads to a set of coupled differential equations for the transition probability amplitudes. To demonstrate its utility the method is applied to calculate collisions of antiprotons with atomic hydrogen. A comprehensive set of benchmark results from integrated to fully differential cross sections for antiproton-impact ionization of hydrogen in the energy range from 1 keV to 1 MeV is provided. Contrary to previous predictions, we find that at low incident energies the singly differential cross section has a maximum away from the zero emission energy. This feature could not be seen without a fine discretization of the low-energy part of the continuum.

  5. Inner shell contribution to multiple ionization in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Toburen, L.H.; Manson, S.T.

    1984-08-01

    Energetic proton impact ionization data for atomic targets is useful in testing our theoretical understanding of atomic collisions. In general, our understanding of bare projectile impact leading to single target ionization is quite good. Multiple ionization mechanisms are, however, less well understood. In certain cases, multiple ionization can account for as much as 50% of the total ionization cross section and thus cannot be neglected in modeling the collision process. Multiple target ionization can occur in a variety of ways. In order to fully analyze the collisional process, cross sections for each of these ionization pathways are necessary but, in general, are unavailable. However, in certain cases combining various experimental and theoretical data allows us to obtain some information about channels heretofore unmeasured. Our purpose here is to outline a procedure that we are currently using to unravel the complex multiple ionization process. In some cases, cross sections for specific ionization pathways can be obtained while in others only information about total contributions of specific ionization channels is available.

  6. Ionization at the Noble Gases Ion-Atom Collisions in the 1-7 KeV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikiani, Boris; Chitaladze, Marika; Japaridze, Josif; Kavlashvili, Nana

    2002-10-01

    The absolute total cross sections for production of free electrons, all positive show target gas ions and partial cross sections for production of double charged slow target gas ions at these collisions have been measured. The measurements were carried out by improved transfers electric field ("condenser") and magnetic mass-analyzer methods[1]. It was shown that in the investigated energy range practically there are now slow ions with charged state more than two. Control experiments have been shown that process of electron's liberation from fast particles ("stripping" process) is unlikely in the investigated energy range. Therefore, one can to suppose that total cross sections for productions of free electrons are equal to the total cross sections of ionization of the target gas atoms. For symmetrical pairs of colliding particles (He+ _ He, Ne+ _ Ne , etc) and for pairs He+ _ Ne, Ar+ _ Kr and Kr+ _ Xe values of partial cross-sections are negligible. In the cases of He+ _ Kr and He+ _ Xe pairs value of these partial cross sections increases with colliding energy and reaches about three percent at the energy 4kev. However, in the cases of He+ _ Ar, Na+ _ Ar, Kr, Xe the values of relative portion of the double charged ions in the total amount of slow positive ions are significant (for example in He+ _ Ar collision at the energy of 4kev this portion is about 20-25 percent). Analyzes of the correlation diagrams of the diabetics terms of colliding particles system (MS) [2] show that the electron capture processes are accompanying by simultaneous excitation of auto- ionization states of target gas ions. The decay of these states are responsible for realize of double ionization process of the target gas atoms. 1. B. Kikiani, R.Lomsadze, N. Mosulishvili, Proceedings of Tbilisi State University, Physics, 34, 114, 1999; 2 M. Barat, W.Lichten, Phys. Rev, A6, 211, 1972.

  7. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  8. Zeeman relaxation of cold atomic iron and nickel in collisions with {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Cort; Newman, Bonna; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Brahms, Nathan; Doyle, John M.

    2010-06-15

    We have measured the ratio {gamma} of the diffusion cross section to the angular momentum reorientation cross section in the colliding Fe-{sup 3}He and Ni-{sup 3}He systems. Nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) atoms are introduced via laser ablation into a cryogenically cooled experimental cell containing cold (<1 K) {sup 3}He buffer gas. Elastic collisions rapidly cool the translational temperature of the ablated atoms to the {sup 3}He temperature. {gamma} is extracted by measuring the decays of the atomic Zeeman sublevels. For our experimental conditions, thermal energy is comparable to the Zeeman splitting. As a result, thermal excitations between Zeeman sublevels significantly impact the observed decay. To determine {gamma} accurately, we introduce a model of Zeeman-state dynamics that includes thermal excitations. We find {gamma}{sub Ni-}{sup 3}{sub He}=5x10{sup 3} and {gamma}{sub Fe-}{sup 3}{sub He{<=}}3x10{sup 3} at 0.75 K in a 0.8-T magnetic field. These measurements are interpreted in the context of submerged shell suppression of spin relaxation, as studied previously in transition metals and rare-earth-metal atoms [C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, R. V. Krems, and J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 013201 (2005); C. I. Hancox, S. C. Doret, M. T. Hummon, L. Luo, and J. M. Doyle, Nature (London) 431, 281 (2004); A. Buchachenko, G. Chaasiski, and M. Szczniak, Eur. Phys. J. D 45, 147 (2007)].

  9. A molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen atoms collisions on an H-preadsorbed silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutigliano, M.; Gamallo, P.; Sayós, R.; Orlandini, S.; Cacciatore, M.

    2014-08-01

    The interaction of hydrogen atoms and molecules with a silica surface is relevant for many research and technological areas. Here, the dynamics of hydrogen atoms colliding with an H-preadsorbed β-cristobalite (0 0 1) surface has been studied using a semiclassical collisional method in conjunction with a recently developed analytical potential energy surface based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The atomic recombination probability via an Eley-Rideal (E-R) mechanism, as well as the probabilities for other competitive surface processes, have been determined in a broad range of collision energies (0.04-3.0 eV) for off-normal (θv = 45°) and normal (θv = 0°) incidence and for two different surface temperatures (TS = 300 and 1000 K). H2,gas molecules form in roto-vibrational excited levels while the energy transferred to the solid surface is below 10% for all simulated conditions. Finally, the global atomic recombination coefficient (γE-R) and vibrational state resolved recombination coefficients (γ(v)) were calculated and compared with the available experimental values. The calculated collisional data are of interest in chemical kinetics studies and fluid dynamics simulations of silica surface processes in H-based low-temperature, low-pressure plasmas.

  10. A Investigation of a Possible Molecular Effect in Ion Atom Collision Using a Gaseous Argon Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Sanjeev

    1992-01-01

    The present work deals with an investigation of the molecular effect, which is defined as the difference in experimental results using isotachic atomic ion and molecular ion beams in ion atom collisions. Previous studies have dealt almost exclusively with total cross section measurements. This thesis explores the idea that the molecular effect may be more pronounced in the differential ionization probability of the target atoms. Also, a gaseous argon target of sufficiently low density was used in order to ensure that the two correlated protons in the H _2^{+} beam did not interact with two adjacent target atoms simultaneously. We report that, contrary to the expectations noted above, the molecular effect in the K shell differential ionization probability of argon for scattering angles up to 90^circ appears to be no more than the molecular effect in the total ionization probability. The uncertainity in our results is statistical in nature and can be improved upon by running the experiment for a longer duration of time.

  11. Feshbach resonances and transition rates for cold homonuclear collisions between {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lysebo, M.; Veseth, L.

    2010-03-15

    We report results from close-coupling calculations for homonuclear ultracold collisions between potassium atoms, using the most up-to-date Born-Oppenheimer potential curves. The present study includes both of the bosonic isotopes {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K. The s-wave scattering lengths as functions of the magnetic field strength for collisions between atoms in identical and different hyperfine states are obtained. Several Feshbach resonances are located and characterized for both isotopes. Comparison with experiments, where such data are available, show excellent agreement. We also study weakly bound molecular states of the K{sub 2} molecule in close relation to the calculated Feshbach resonances. Another objective of the present work is to study inelastic collisions in which the hyperfine states of the colliding atoms are changed. From this type of calculation we obtain transition rates as functions of the magnetic field strength. Finally, we discuss how such transition rates might be of importance for experimental work.

  12. Majorana: From Atomic and Molecular, to Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, R.; Angilella, G. G. N.

    2006-10-01

    In the centennial of Ettore Majorana's birth (1906-1938?), we re-examine some aspects of his fundamental scientific production in atomic and molecular physics, including a not well known short communication. There, Majorana critically discusses Fermi's solution of the celebrated Thomas-Fermi equation for electron screening in atoms and positive ions. We argue that some of Majorana's seminal contributions in molecular physics already prelude to the idea of exchange interactions (or Heisenberg-Majorana forces) in his later workson theoretical nuclear physics. In all his papers, he tended to emphasize the symmetries at the basis of a physical problem, as well as the limitations, rather than the advantages, of the approximations of the method employed.

  13. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-01

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold. PMID:11177990

  14. HISTRAP proposal: heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Hudson, E.D.; Johnson, J.W.; Lee, I.Y.; Lord, R.S.

    1986-11-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed 46.8-m-circumference synchrotron-cooling-storage ring optimized to accelerate, decelerate, and store beams of highly charged very-heavy ions at energies appropriate for advanced atomic physics research. The ring is designed to allow studies of electron-ion, photon-ion, ion-atom, and ion-ion interactions. An electron cooling system will provide ion beams with small angular divergence and energy spread for precision spectroscopic studies and also is necessary to allow the deceleration of heavy ions to low energies. HISTRAP will have a maximum bending power of 2.0 Tm and will be injected with ions from either the existing Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility 25-MV tandem accelerator or from a dedicated ECR source and 250 keV/nucleon RFQ linac.

  15. ATOMIC PHYSICS, AN AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM, VOLUME 4, SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DETERLINE, WILLIAM A.; KLAUS, DAVID J.

    THE AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN THIS TEXT WERE PREPARED FOR USE IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, OFFERING SELF-TUTORING MATERIAL FOR LEARNING ATOMIC PHYSICS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE (1) RADIATION USES AND NUCLEAR FISSION, (2) NUCLEAR REACTORS, (3) ENERGY FROM NUCLEAR REACTORS, (4) NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND FUSION, (5) A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW, AND (6) A…

  16. ATOMIC PHYSICS, AN AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM, VOLUME 3, SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DETERLINE, WILLIAM A.; KLAUS, DAVID J.

    THE AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN THIS TEXT WERE PREPARED FOR USE IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, OFFERING SELF-TUTORING MATERIAL FOR LEARNING ATOMIC PHYSICS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE (1) NUCLEAR BINDING ENERGY, (2) DISCOVERY OF RADIOACTIVITY, (3) RADIOACTIVE RADIATIONS, (4) ALPHA AND BETA DECAY, (5) BETA DECAY REACTIONS, (6) RADIOACTIVE DATING AND…

  17. Bringing atomic and nuclear physics laboratory data into the classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Eric B.; Larimer, Ruth-Mary; Rech, Gregory; Lee, Jeffrey; Vue, Chue; Leubane, Tholoana; Zamvil, Kenneth; Guthrie, Laura

    2003-05-27

    To illustrate a number of basic concepts in atomic and nuclear physics, we have developed three websites where students can analyze data from modern laboratories. By working through the on-line procedures, students will become acquainted with characteristic x-ray spectra, the concept of half-life, x-ray fluorescence, and neutron activation analysis.

  18. Project Physics Reader 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    As a supplement to Project Physics Unit 5, a collection of articles is presented in this reader for student browsing. Nine excerpts are given under the following headings: failure and success, Einstein, Mr. Tompkins and simultaneity, parable of the surveyors, outside and inside the elevator, the teacher and the Bohr theory of atom, Dirac and Born,…

  19. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical method is presented for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge-transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system. The calculation of potentials and nonadiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wave functions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H , Na+H , and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K.

  20. Interaction of positronium with helium atoms — the classical treatment of the 5-body collision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, Károly; DuBois, Robert D.; Mukoyama, Takeshi

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between positronium and a helium atom is studied using the 5-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. We present the total cross sections for the dominant channels, namely for single ionization of the target, and ionization of the projectile, resulting from pure ionization and also from electron transfer (capture or loss) processes for 1-5.7 a.u. incident velocities of the positronium atom. Our results were compared with the calculated data using hydrogen projectiles having the same velocities as well as with the experimental data in collisions between H and He [R.D. DuBois, Á. Kövér, Phys. Rev. A 40, 3605 (1989)]. We analyze the similarities and deviations for ionization of helium atoms by positronium and hydrogen projectile impact. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Electron and Positron Induced Processes", edited by Michael Brunger, Radu Campeanu, Masamitsu Hoshino, Oddur Ingólfsson, Paulo Limão-Vieira, Nigel Mason, Yasuyuki Nagashima and Hajime Tanuma.

  1. Treasure of the Past X: A Spectroscopic Determination of Scattering Lengths for Sodium Atom Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Tiesinga, Eite; Williams, Carl J.; Julienne, Paul S.; Jones, Kevin M.; Lett, Paul D.; Phillips, William D.

    2002-01-01

    We report a preliminary value for the zero magnetic field Na 2S(f = 1, m = − 1) + Na 2S(f = 1, m = − 1) scattering length, a1,−1. This parameter describes the low-energy elastic two-body processes in a dilute gas of composite bosons and determines, to a large extent, the macroscopic wavefunction of a Bose condensate in a trap. Our scattering length is obtained from photoassociative spectroscopy with samples of uncondensed atoms. The temperature of the atoms is sufficiently low that contributions from the three lowest partial waves dominate the spectrum. The observed lineshapes for the purely long-range 0g− molecular state enable us to establish key features of the ground state scattering wavefunction. The fortuitous occurrence of a p-wave node near the deepest point (Re = 72 a0) of the 0g− potential curve is instrumental in determining a1,−1 = (52 ± 5) a0 and a2.2 = (85 ± 3) a0, where the latter is for a collision of two Na 2S(f = 2, m = 2) atoms.

  2. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.D.

    1981-03-01

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

  3. Rovibrationally Inelastic Atom-Molecule Collision Cross Sections from a Hard Sphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashner, Jacob; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Hard-shell models have long been used to elucidate the principal features of molecular energy transfer and exchange reaction in the A + BC system. Nevertheless, no three-dimensional hard-shell calculation of inelastic collision cross sections has been reported. This work aims to fill that void. A particular motivation comes from our experimental results, which show the importance of equatorial impacts in the vibrational excitation process. Working with the simple hard-sphere model, we incorporated secondary impacts, defined as those in which A strikes C after striking B. Such collisions are important in systems such as Li2 - X, in which vibrational energy transfer occurs principally through side impacts. We discuss the complexity this adds to the model and present fully three-dimensional cross sections for rovibrational excitation of an initially stationary molecule in the homonuclear A + B2 system, examining the cross section as a function of the masses and radii of the atoms. We show how the features in the cross section evolve as these parameters are varied and calculate the contribution of secondary (near-equatorial) impacts to the dynamics. We compare with recent measurements in our laboratory and with the results of quasiclassical trajectories.

  4. B physics at CDF - the Beauty of hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tonelli, Diego

    2010-11-01

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides an unique, rich, and highly rewarding program that is currently reaching full maturity. I report a few recent world-leading results on rare decays, CP-violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing, and b {yields} s penguin decays.

  5. Redistribution - Why half a collision is better than a whole one. [spectra of scattered light from perturbed atomic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of spectral line shapes has traditionally been mainly concerned with the measurement and interpretation of absorption or emission profiles. Often only the line widths are studied. The present investigation has the objective to evaluate the additional information which can be obtained by scattering light (usually from a laser) from an atomic system which is being perturbed by collisions. A scattering experiment is discussed. The scattered light consists of two components, a (coherent) Rayleigh component and a redistributed (fluorescent) component. In order to obtain the absorption spectrum, questions regarding the probability of photon absorption are considered. By observing the fluorescence subsequent to absorption during a collision it is found possible to obtain information on the evolution of the system from the point of absorption to the completion of the collision. The information on the intracollisional evolution is the justification for the title of the study, namely 'Why half a collision is better than a whole one'.

  6. Differential electron-Cu5+ elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C. P.; Grabbe, S. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60° and 180°. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model.

  7. Alignment of H(2p) in collisions of protons and antiprotons with hydrogen atoms with screened Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimovski, Dragan; Janev, Ratko K.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of screened Coulomb interaction on the alignment of H(2p) state produced in collisions of hydrogen atoms with protons and antiprotons are investigated in the energy range 1-200 keV by using the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method. It is shown that the decrease of the binding energy of hydrogen nl-states and the reduction of the number of bound states with increasing the strength of the screening affect significantly the alignment degree and its energy dependence. In the case of antiproton-H collision the difference between the alignments with screened and unscreened Coulomb potential increases with increasing the strength of the screening in the entire energy range above 2 keV/u, while in the case of proton-H collision it does so only in the energy range 5-25 keV/u.

  8. Atomic physics experiments at the high energy storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri A.; the SPARC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), will offer unprecedented experimental opportunities. The Stored Particles Atomic Research Collaboration (SPARC) at FAIR aims at creating a worldwide unique research program with highly charged ions by utilizing storage ring and trapping facilities. The foreseen experiments will address physics at strong, ultra-short electromagnetic fields including the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei as well as the experiments at the border between nuclear and atomic physics. In view of the staged construction of the FAIR facility, SPARC worked out an early realization scheme for experiments with highly-charged heavy-ions at relativistic energies to be conducted in the High-Energy Storage Ring.

  9. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  10. Cold collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in a magnetic field: an ab initio study of He + CH2(X) collisions.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, T V; Grinev, T A; Yu, H-G; Dalgarno, A; Kłos, Jacek; Ma, Lifang; Alexander, Millard H

    2012-09-14

    We develop a rigorous quantum mechanical theory for collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. The theory is based on a fully uncoupled space-fixed basis set representation of the multichannel scattering wave function. Explicit expressions are presented for the matrix elements of the scattering Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 and spin-1 polyatomic molecular radicals interacting with structureless targets. The theory is applied to calculate the cross sections and thermal rate constants for spin relaxation in low-temperature collisions of the prototypical organic molecule methylene [CH(2)(X(3)B(1))] with He atoms. To this end, two accurate three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the He-CH(2)(X(3)B(1)) complex are developed using the state-of-the-art coupled-cluster method including single and double excitations along with a perturbative correction for triple excitations and large basis sets. Both PESs exhibit shallow minima and are weakly anisotropic. Our calculations show that spin relaxation in collisions of CH(2), CHD, and CD(2) molecules with He atoms occurs at a much slower rate than elastic scattering over a large range of temperatures (1 μK-1 K) and magnetic fields (0.01-1 T), suggesting excellent prospects for cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling of ground-state ortho-CH(2)(X(3)B(1)) molecules in a magnetic trap. Furthermore, we find that ortho-CH(2) undergoes collision-induced spin relaxation much more slowly than para-CH(2), which indicates that magnetic trapping can be used to separate nuclear spin isomers of open-shell polyatomic molecules. PMID:22979854

  11. Cold collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in a magnetic field: An ab initio study of He + CH2(X~) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Grinev, T. A.; Yu, H.-G.; Dalgarno, A.; Kłos, Jacek; Ma, Lifang; Alexander, Millard H.

    2012-09-01

    We develop a rigorous quantum mechanical theory for collisions of polyatomic molecular radicals with S-state atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. The theory is based on a fully uncoupled space-fixed basis set representation of the multichannel scattering wave function. Explicit expressions are presented for the matrix elements of the scattering Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 and spin-1 polyatomic molecular radicals interacting with structureless targets. The theory is applied to calculate the cross sections and thermal rate constants for spin relaxation in low-temperature collisions of the prototypical organic molecule methylene [CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1)] with He atoms. To this end, two accurate three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the He-CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1) complex are developed using the state-of-the-art coupled-cluster method including single and double excitations along with a perturbative correction for triple excitations and large basis sets. Both PESs exhibit shallow minima and are weakly anisotropic. Our calculations show that spin relaxation in collisions of CH2, CHD, and CD2 molecules with He atoms occurs at a much slower rate than elastic scattering over a large range of temperatures (1 μK-1 K) and magnetic fields (0.01-1 T), suggesting excellent prospects for cryogenic helium buffer-gas cooling of ground-state ortho-CH_2(tilde{X}^3B_1) molecules in a magnetic trap. Furthermore, we find that ortho-CH2 undergoes collision-induced spin relaxation much more slowly than para-CH2, which indicates that magnetic trapping can be used to separate nuclear spin isomers of open-shell polyatomic molecules.

  12. Processes involving electron capture and multiple ionization in collisions of fast H+ and He2+ ions with lead atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, P. C. E.; Shah, M. B.; Geddes, J.; Gilbody, H. B.

    1999-12-01

    A crossed-beam technique incorporating time-of-flight analysis and coincidence counting of the collision products has been used to study Pbq+ formation with q up to 8 in collisions between ground-state Pb atoms and H+ and He2+ ions within the range 50-600 keV amu-1. The separate cross sections for simple charge transfer, transfer ionization, and pure ionization leading to the formation of Pbq+ ions have been obtained and the relative importance of these processes has been established. Accurate measurements and rigorous theoretical descriptions of these multielectron processes in such heavy atoms are difficult and data are still very limited. The present measurements have been designed to extend our previous studies of multiple ionization of a few selected heavy metal atoms and to provide a further check on the extent to which the main collision processes can be described quantitatively in terms of simple models based on an independent electron description. In our previous work with Fe, Cu, and Ga atoms using the same experimental approach, we were able to describe the formation of multiply charged ions through both transfer ionization and pure ionization with a high degree of success using an independent electron model. However, the present results for Pb show that the success of this simple approach is much more limited for these much heavier atoms.

  13. Suppression of Zeeman relaxation in cold collisions of {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Buchachenko, A. A.; Lu, M.-J.; Weinstein, J. D.

    2009-10-15

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of angular momentum depolarization in cold collisions of {sup 2}P atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that collision-induced Zeeman relaxation of Ga({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) and In({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) atoms in cold {sup 4}He gas is dramatically suppressed compared to atoms in {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. Using rigorous quantum-scattering calculations based on ab initio interaction potentials, we demonstrate that Zeeman transitions in collisions of atoms in {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} electronic states occur via couplings to the {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state induced by the anisotropy of the interaction potential. Our results suggest the feasibility of sympathetic cooling and magnetic trapping of {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}-state atoms, such as halogens, thereby opening up exciting areas of research in precision spectroscopy and cold-controlled chemistry.

  14. Cross sections for electron capture and excitation in collisions of Liq+ (q=1, 2, 3) with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Li, X. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2014-06-01

    The two-center atomic orbital close-coupling method is employed to study electron capture and excitation reactions in collisions of Liq+ (q = 1-3) ions with ground state atomic hydrogen in the ion energy range from 0.1 keV/u to 300 keV/u, where u is the atomic mass unit. The interaction of the active electron with the projectile ions (Li+, Li2+) is represented by a model potential. Total and state-selective cross sections for charge transfer and excitation processes are calculated and compared with data from other sources when available.

  15. Researches on interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with aluminum and quartz surfaces. [atomic collisions with aluminum skin (structural member) of satellites (laboratory study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. M.; Knuth, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Three major areas were experimentally studied: (1) energy transfer in collisions of satellite-speed (700 m/sec) helium atoms with a cleaned satellite-type aluminum surface was investigated using the molecular-beam technique. Spatial and energy distributions of reflected helium atoms were measured and analyzed, (2) The gross accommodation coefficient for a satellite-speed (7000 m/sec) helium beam entering a 2-inch-diameter aluminum spherical cavity was determined by measuring the exit velocity distribution of the leaving helium atoms using a metastable time-of-flight method. Results indicate that the 7000-m/sec satellite-speed helium atoms entering the cavity gain full accommodation with the room-temperature inner surface of the sphere through a large number of collisions before leaving the spherical cavity; and (3) the feasibility of producing a satellite-speed atomic hydrogen beam by arc-heating, for use in studies of interactions of satellite-surfaces with hydrogen atoms under laboratory conditions, was investigated. It was found that a stable arc-heated molecular hydrogen beam can be obtained using the arc-heater, and that a partially dissociated hydrogen beam can be produced. Photographs of laboratory equipment are shown.

  16. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  17. Saturation physics and deuteron-gold collisions at RHIC [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Kovchegov, Yuri V.

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of parton saturation/Color Glass Condensate physics in the context of deuteron-gold ( d+Au) collisions at RHIC. Color Glass Condensate physics is a universal description of all high energy hadronic and nuclear interactions. It comprises classical (McLerran-Venugopalan model and Glauber-Mueller rescatterings) and quantum evolution (JIMWLK and BK equations) effects both in small- x hadronic and nuclear wave functions and in the high energy scattering processes. Proton-nucleus (or d+A) collisions present a unique opportunity to study Color Glass Condensate predictions, since many relevant observables in proton-nucleus collisions are reasonably well-understood theoretically in the Color Glass Condensate approach. In this article we review the basics of saturation/Color Glass Condensate physics and reproduce derivations of many important observables in proton (deuteron)-nucleus collisions. We compare the predictions of Color Glass physics to the data generated by d+Au experiments at RHIC and observe an agreement between the data and the theory, indicating that Color Glass Condensate has probably been discovered at RHIC. We point out further experimental measurements which need to be carried out to test the discovery.

  18. Intuitive Physics of Collision Effects on Simulated Spheres Differing in Size, Velocity, and Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicovaro, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This is an intuitive physics study of collision events. In two experiments the participants were presented with a simulated 3D scene showing one sphere moving horizontally towards another stationary sphere. The moving sphere stopped just before colliding with the stationary one. Participants were asked to rate the positions which both spheres…

  19. Sympathetic cooling of the Ba{sup +} ion by collisions with ultracold Rb atoms: Theoretical prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Krych, Michal; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawlowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2011-03-15

    nonrelativistic results and spin-orbit eigenvectors. The electronic structure input has been employed in the single-channel scattering calculations of the collisional cross sections between the Ba{sup +} ion and Rb atom. Both nonrelativistic and relativistic potentials were used in these calculations. Our results show that the inelastic cross section corresponding to the charge transfer from the Rb atom to the Ba{sup +} ion is much smaller than the elastic one over a wide range of energies up to 1 mK. This suggests that sympathetic cooling of the Ba{sup +} ion by collisions with ultracold Rb atoms should be possible.

  20. Sympathetic cooling of the Ba+ ion by collisions with ultracold Rb atoms: Theoretical prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krych, Michał; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2011-03-01

    employed in the single-channel scattering calculations of the collisional cross sections between the Ba+ ion and Rb atom. Both nonrelativistic and relativistic potentials were used in these calculations. Our results show that the inelastic cross section corresponding to the charge transfer from the Rb atom to the Ba+ ion is much smaller than the elastic one over a wide range of energies up to 1 mK. This suggests that sympathetic cooling of the Ba+ ion by collisions with ultracold Rb atoms should be possible.

  1. Electron collisions with cesium atoms - benchmark calculations and application to modeling an excimer-pumped alkali laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Babaeva, Natalia; Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    The B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates method was employed to describe electron collisions with cesium atoms. Over 300 states were kept in the close-coupling expansion, including a large number of pseudostates to model the effect of the Rydberg spectrum and the ionization continuum on the results for transitions between the discrete physical states of interest. Predictions for elastic scattering, excitation, and ionization for incident energies up to 200 eV are presented and compared to previous results [2,3] and experimental data. Our data were used to model plasma formation in the excimer-pumped alkali laser, XPAL, operating on the Cs (62P3 / 2 , 1 / 2 --> (62S1 / 2) (852nm and 894nm) transitions. At sufficiently high operating temperature, pump power, and repetition rate, plasma formation in excess of 1014--1015cm-3 occurs. This may reduce laser output power by electron collisional mixing of the upper and lower laser levels. Work supported by the NSF under PHY-1068140, PHY-1212450, and the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031 (OZ, KB), and by the DoD High Energy Laser Multidisciplinary Research Initiative (NYB, MJK).

  2. Efimov physics in atom-dimer scattering of {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-08-15

    {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine states display universal properties when the S-wave scattering length between each pair of states is large. Recent experiments reported four pronounced features arising from Efimov physics in the atom-dimer relaxation rate, namely two resonances and two local minima. We use the universal effective-field theory to calculate the atom-dimer relaxation rate at zero temperature. Our results describe the four features qualitatively and imply there is a hidden local minimum. In the vicinity of the resonance at 685 G, we perform a finite temperature calculation which improves the agreement of theory and experiment. We conclude that finite temperature effects cannot be neglected in the analysis of the experimental data.

  3. Four-body charge transfer processes in collisions of bare projectile ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2015-02-01

    Single-electron capture by a bare ion from a helium atom at intermediate and high energies in the framework of four-body distorted wave (DW-4B) approximation in both prior and post form has been considered. In the entrance channel, the initial bound state wave function is distorted by the incoming projectile ion, and the corresponding distortion is related to the Coulomb continuum states of the active electron and the residual target ion in the field of the projectile ion respectively. Continuum states of the active electron and the projectile ion in the field of the residual target ion are also included in the exit channel. It may be mentioned that the effect of dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The total single-electron capture cross sections are obtained by summing over all contributions up to n = 3 shells and sub-shells respectively. In addition, the differential cross sections for alpha particle-helium collision are calculated at impact energies of 60, 150, 300, 450, and 630 keV amu-1, respectively. The cross sections exhibit a monotonically decreasing angular dependence, with clear peak structures around 0.1 to 0.2 mrad being found at low impact energies. The current theoretical results, both in prior and post forms of the transition amplitude for symmetric and asymmetric collision, are compared with the available theoretical and experimental results. Current computed results have been found to be satisfactory in comparison with other theoretical and experimental findings.

  4. Electron-ion collisions. [Basic physics of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments.

  5. The effects of hyperfine interactions on collisions between optically trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.; Hoffmann, D.; Peters, M.; Tobiason, J.

    1993-12-01

    The authors report measurements of excited state collision rates of optically trapped {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb. The collision rates have been measured in the vicinity of the P{sub 3/2} and P{sub 1/2} states of both isotopes. By studying the collision rates as a function of the frequency of light used to cause the collisions, they obtain collision spectra that reveal the importance of hyperfine interactions on the collision dynamics. In certain frequency ranges the collision rates for the two isotopes are nearly identical, while in others they find substantially reduced rates for {sup 87}Rb (large hyperfine interaction) as compared to {sup 85}Rb (small hyperfine interaction). For the P{sub 1/2} states, where hyperfine splittings are large compared to the characteristic frequency scales for these collisions, the shapes of the spectra more closely correspond to those expected from simple models that neglect hyperfine interactions.

  6. [The physics of coal liquid slurry atomization]. Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chigier, N.; Brown, W.J.

    1994-06-01

    In order to understand the physics of atomization and to predict and improve the performance of atomizers, a survey on the effects of turbulence on atomization has been made. The influence of gas turbulence intensity on the disintegration of a liquid jet, while a constant mean velocity in both gas and liquid streams has been maintained, has been studied. A study has been made of the influence of changing dynamic surface tension on liquid surface wave characteristics and atomization. The dynamic surface tension of water was changed by adding Triton X-100 non-ionic surfactant into the liquid supplied to a two dimensional slot atomizer. Wave frequencies were measured using laser beam attenuation. Dynamic surface tension changes were found to influence liquid sheet disintegration with little effect on wave frequencies. A series of experiments have been conducted to determine the fundamental processes of injection and atomization of liquid propellants for rocket combustion chambers because of their direct influence on combustion instability. For coaxial injectors, liquid and gas flow rates have been progressively changed. Microphotography was used to obtain details of wave disturbances on liquid surfaces. Direct measurements were made of wavelength and frequency of wave propagation on liquid surfaces. Frequency was found to remain constant along the length of the liquid surface. Pulsations in the liquid jet caused drops to form clusters with the same frequency as that of jet surface waves. Measured frequencies were in the range of those measured in combustion instability experiments. Detailed measurements have been made in the sprays using the phase Doppler particle analyzer. Measurements of drop size, velocity and number density are related to the disintegration process. Increasing turbulence intensity in the gas stream is a very effective means of reducing drop size, increasing spray width, and therefore, improving combustion.

  7. A study of the collisional dynamics for collisions of UF with atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. D.

    1980-08-01

    Absolute total cross sections for the collisional decomposition of the negative ion of uranium hexafluoride into its three lowest asymptotic channels in collisions with the rare gases were measured for collision energies ranging from below thresholds for decomposition up to a laboratory collision energy of 500 eV. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the predictions of a two step collision model where the unimolecular decomposition of the excited molecular negative ions is described with a statistical theory.

  8. HISTRAP proposal: heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Datz, S.; Dittner, P.F.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Hudson, E.D.; Johnson, J.W.; Lee, I.Y.; Lord, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    HISTRAP is a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring optimized to accelerate, decelerate, and store beams of highly charged very-heavy ions at energies appropriate for advanced atomic physics research. The ring is designed to allow studies of electron-ion, photon-ion, ion-atom, and ion-ion interactions. An electron cooling system will provide ion beams with small angular divergence and energy spread for precision spectroscopic studies and also is necessary to allow the deceleration of heavy ions to low energies. HISTRAP will be injected with ions from either the existing Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility 25-MV tandem accelerator or from a dedicated ECR source and 250 keV/nucleon RFQ linac. The ring will have a maximum bending power of 2.0 T.m and have a circumference of 46.8 m.

  9. Bare- and Dressed-Ion Impact Collisions from Neon Atoms Studied Within a Nonperturbative Mean-Field Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gerald; Kirchner, Tom

    We study electron removal processes in collisions of bare and dressed doubly charged ions with neon atoms in the 20 keV/u to 1 MeV/u impact energy regime. The many-electron problem is represented by a single mean field, which in the case of dressed-ion impact includes the projectile electrons. Moreover, the same basis is used to propagate all active orbitals thereby ensuring orthogonality at all times and allowing for a final-state analysis in terms of standard Slater determinantal wave functions. The same approach was used in a recent work for B2+ -Ne collisions [Phys. Rev. A 88 012712], in which we examined the role of the projectile electrons for target-recoil-charge-state production. The present study expands on that work by considering additional collision channels and comparing results of equicharged dressed and bare ions in order to shed more light on the role of the projectile electrons.

  10. Electron capture in collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Sato, H.; Gu, J. P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2001-09-01

    Electron capture resulting from collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms from 0.15 to 1000 keV/u is investigated using a molecular-orbital representation within a semiclassical frame. Molecular electronic states and corresponding couplings are determined by the ALCHEMY program. Sixteen molecular states all connecting to single-electron-capture processes are included, and hence radial and rotational couplings among these channels are fully considered. The trajectory effect arising from the straight-line, Coulomb, and ground-state potential trajectories for electron-capture and excitation processes is carefully assessed. The electron-capture cross section by ground-state Al2+(2S) ions slowly increases before it reaches a maximum of 1.3×10-16 cm2 at 100 keV/u. Those for metastable Al2+(2P) ions sharply increase with increasing energy, and reach a peak at 1 keV/u with a value of 1.5×10-16 cm2. The earlier experimental data are found to be larger by an order of magnitude although their energy dependence is in good accord with the present result. Excitation cross sections for both the ground and metastable states are found to be much larger by a factor of 2-3 than corresponding capture cross sections above 1 keV/u although they become comparable below this energy.

  11. Pion correlations as a function of atomic mass in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, A.D.

    1989-11-26

    The method of two pion interferometry was used to obtain source-size and lifetime parameters for the pions produced in heavy ion collisions. The systems used were 1.70 {center dot} A GeV {sup 56}Fe + Fe, 1.82 {center dot} A GeV {sup 40}Ar + KCl and 1.54 {center dot} A GeV {sup 93}Nb + Nb, allowing for a search for dependences on the atomic number. Two acceptances (centered, in the lab., at {approximately} 0{degrees} and 45{degrees}) were used for each system, allowing a search for dependences on the viewing angle. The correlation functions were calculated by comparing the data samples to background (or reference) samples made using the method of event mixing, where pions from different events are combined to produce a data sample in which the Bose-Einstein correlation effect is absent. The effect of the correlation function on the background samples is calculated, and a method for weighting the events to remove the residual correlation effect is presented. The effect of the spectrometer design on the measured correlation functions is discussed, as are methods for correcting for these effects during the data analysis. 58 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, {eta}{sub e}{sup crit}, is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient.

  13. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  14. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  15. Atomic physics measurements using an ECR ion source located on a 350-kV high-voltage platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Liu, C.J.; Hass, M.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a new atomic physics facility at the Argonne PII ECR ion source which was built for the Uranium Upgrade of the ATLAS heavy-ion accelerator. An important feature of our ECR ion source is that it is on a high-voltage platform which provides beam energies of up to 350q keV, where q is the charge of the ion. We discuss the experimental program in progress at this ion source which includes measurements of state-selective electron capture cross sections, photon and electron spectroscopy, studies of quasi-molecular collisions, and polarization studies using an optically pumped Na target. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Suppression of Angular Momentum Transfer in Cold Collisions of Transition Metal Atoms in Ground States with Nonzero Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancox, Cindy I.; Doret, S. Charles; Hummon, Matthew T.; Krems, Roman V.; Doyle, John M.

    2005-01-01

    The Zeeman relaxation rate in cold collisions of Ti(3d24s2 3F2) with He is measured. We find that collisional transfer of angular momentum is dramatically suppressed due to the presence of the filled 4s2 shell. The degree of electronic interaction anisotropy, which is responsible for Zeeman relaxation, is estimated to be about 200times smaller in the Ti-He complex than in He complexes with typical non-S-state atoms.

  17. Recent advances in Rydberg physics using alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this brief review, the opportunities that the alkaline-earth elements offer for studying new aspects of Rydberg physics are discussed. For example, the bosonic alkaline-earth isotopes have zero nuclear spin which eliminates many of the complexities present in alkali Rydberg atoms, permitting simpler and more direct comparison between theory and experiment. The presence of two valence electrons allows the production of singlet and triplet Rydberg states that can exhibit a variety of attractive or repulsive interactions. The availability of weak intercombination lines is advantageous for laser cooling and for applications such as Rydberg dressing. Excitation of one electron to a Rydberg state leaves behind an optically active core ion allowing, for high-L states, the optical imaging of Rydberg atoms and their (spatial) manipulation using light scattering. The second valence electron offers the possibility of engineering long-lived doubly excited states such as planetary atoms. Recent advances in both theory and experiment are highlighted together with a number of possible directions for the future.

  18. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  19. Aneesur Rahman Prize for Computational Physics Talk: Black Hole Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretorius, Frans

    2010-02-01

    The class of spacetimes describing the merger of two black holes contain some of the most fascinating solutions to the equations of general relativity. In this talk I will review what has been learnt about the binary black hole problem over the past several years from numerical simulations of the Einstein field equations, focusing on the more ``extreme'' solutions obtained in the high velocity limit. This is of possible relevance to LHC and cosmic ray physics in certain proposed large extra dimension scenarios. Some of the interesting results include the near-Planck scale luminosity in radiated gravitational waves, recoil velocities of on the order of ten thousand kilometers per second or larger, zoom-whirl orbital motion, the formation of near-extremal Kerr black holes, and that in the ultra relativistic limit the internal nature of the colliding object, whether black holes or not, seemingly becomes irrelevant. )

  20. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: Moscow State University physics alumni and the Soviet Atomic Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Gennadii V.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, two closely related themes are addressed: (1) the role that M V Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) played in training specialists in physics for the Soviet Atomic Project, and (2) what its alumni contributed to the development of thermonuclear weapons. In its earlier stages, the Soviet Atomic Project was in acute need of qualified personnel, without whom building nuclear and thermonuclear weapons would be an impossible task, and MSU became a key higher educational institution grappled with the training problem. The first part of the paper discusses the efforts of the leading Soviet scientists and leaders of FMD (First Main Directorate) to organize the training of specialists in nuclear physics at the MSU Physics Department and, on the other hand, to create a new Physics and Technology Department at the university. As a result, a number of Soviet Government's resolutions were prepared and issued, part of which are presented in the paper and give an idea of the large-scale challenges this sphere of education was facing at the time. Information is presented for the first time on the early MSU Physics Department graduates in the structure of matter, being employed in the FMD organizations and enterprises from 1948 to 1951. The second part discusses the contribution to the development of thermonuclear weapons by the teams of scientists led by Academicians I E Tamm, A N Tikhonov, and I M Frank, and including MSU physics alumni. The paper will be useful to anyone interested in the history of Russian physics.

  1. Applications of many-body physics to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, Francois

    In this dissertation, many-body physics techniques are used to study and improve ideas related to the description of heavy ion collisions at very high energy. The first part of the thesis concerns the production of tensor mesons in proton-proton (pp) collisions. An effective theory where the f2 meson couples to the energy-momentum tensor is proposed and a comparison of the inclusive cross-section computed in the collinear factorization, the k⊥-factorization and the color glass condensate is performed. A study of the phenomenology in pp collisions then shows a strong dependence on the parametrization of the unintegrated distribution function. The conclusion is that f2 meson production can be utilized to improve the understanding of the proton wave-function. In the second part, a similar investigation is performed by analysing the production cross-section of the eta' meson in pp and proton-nucleus (pA) collisions. The nucleus and proton are described by the CGC and the k⊥ -factorization respectively. A new technique for the computation of Wilson lines---color charge densities correlators in the McLerran-Venugopalan model is developped. The phenomenology shows that the cross-section in pA collisions is very sensitive to the value of the saturation scale, a crucial ingredient of the CGC picture. In the third part of the thesis, the collision term of the Boltzmann equation is derived from first principles at all orders and for any number of participating particles, starting from the full out-of-equilibrium quantum field theory and using the multiple scattering expansion. Finally, the emission of photons from a non-abelian strong classical field is investigated. A formalism based on Schwinger-Keldysh propagators relating the production rate of photons to the retarded solution of the Dirac equation in a background field is presented.

  2. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Lecture: Exploring Flatland with Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalibard, Jean

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional Bose fluid is a remarkably rich many-body system, which allows one to revisit several features of quantum statistical physics. Firstly, the role of thermal fluctuations is enhanced compared to the 3D case, which destroys the ordered state associated with Bose-Einstein condensation. However interactions between particles can still cause a superfluid transition, thanks to the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless mechanism. Secondly, a weakly interacting Bose fluid in 2D must be scale-invariant, a remarkable feature that manifests itself in the very simple form taken by the equation of state of the fluid. In this talk I will present recent experimental progress in the investigation of 2D atomic gases, which provide a nice illustration of the main features of low dimensional many-body physics.

  3. Dissociation of internally excited UF 6- ions in collision with argon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, J. A. D.

    1987-06-01

    Uranium hexafluoride negative ions (UF 6-) of controlled average internal and kinetic energy were collided with argon. A qualitative change was observed in the dependence of ionic fragmentation on internal excitation prior to collision, as the laboratory collision energy was increased above 150 eV.

  4. Atom optics and space physics: A summary of an 'Enrico Fermi' summer school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2008-03-01

    We describe the scientific content of the International School of Physics 'Enrico Fermi' on atom optics and space physics, organized by the Italian Physical Society in Varenna at Lake Como, Italy, 2-13 July 2007.

  5. Atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations for collisions involving fusion relevant highly charged impurity ions using very large basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, Katharina; Wallerberger, Markus; Schweinzer, Josef; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2012-05-25

    The atomic-orbital close-coupling formalism is a well-known method for the semiclassical treatment of ion-atom collisions. Cross sections for these kinds of collisions are mainly needed in the analysis of certain spectroscopic data from nuclear fusion experiments as well as astrophysical data. We shall outline how the computational implementation can be improved in such a way that collisions involving heavy, highly charged impurity ions, such as Ar{sup 18+} can be treated. Furthermore we show and discuss exemplary results.

  6. Efimov Physics in a 6Li-133Cs Atomic Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Jacob; Feng, Lei; Parker, Colin; Chin, Cheng; Wang, Yujun

    2015-05-01

    We investigate Efimov physics based on three-body recombination in an atomic mixture of 6Li and 133Cs in the vicinity of interspecies Feshbach resonances at 843 and 889 G. This allows us to compare the loss spectra near different resonances and test the universality of Efimov states. Theoretically the Efimov spectrum near 889 G is expected to be similar to that near 843 G, except that the first resonance is absent near the former Feshbach resonance. This is due to the difference in the Cs-Cs scattering length near the two resonances: At 843 G it is negative, whereas at 889 G it is positive. Although it is primarily the Li-Cs interactions that lead to Efimov resonances, the Cs-Cs scattering length is expected to influence the spectrum. This work is supported by NSF and Chicago MRSEC.

  7. The Collective Vector method in nuclear and atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, S.D.

    1989-12-01

    We present a brief review of the method of the Collective Vector (CV) and its use in conjunction with the Lanczos algorithm (LA). The combination of these two ideas produces a method for contracting super-large hamiltonians (up to 10{sup 6} {times} 10{sup 6}) by factors of 1000 or more. The contracted hamiltonians, which we call quasi-hamiltonians, typically have dimensions of the order of 10{sup 2} {times} 10{sup 2} and produce corresponding quasi-spectra with associated quasi-eigenfunctions which reproduce the features of the full microscopic spectrum thru the conservation of the spectral moments. Examples of applications to both nuclear and atomic physics are given demonstrating the convergence properties of the method. The application of the LA/CV approach to the problem of modelling nuclear level densities is described and finally we discuss the possibility of conjoining new collective models of nuclear structure with the LA/CV method. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Atomic Physics in the Quest for Fusion Energy and ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Charles H. Skinner

    2008-02-27

    The urgent quest for new energy sources has led developed countries, representing over half of the world population, to collaborate on demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of magnetic fusion through the construction and operation of ITER. Data on high-Z ions will be important in this quest. Tungsten plasma facing components have the necessary low erosion rates and low tritium retention but the high radiative efficiency of tungsten ions leads to stringent restrictions on the concentration of tungsten ions in the burning plasma. The influx of tungsten to the burning plasma will need to be diagnosed, understood and stringently controlled. Expanded knowledge of the atomic physics of neutral and ionized tungsten will be important to monitor impurity influxes and derive tungsten concentrations. Also, inert gases such as argon and xenon will be used to dissipate the heat flux flowing to the divertor. This article will summarize the spectroscopic diagnostics planned for ITER and outline areas where additional data is needed.

  9. Probing non-Hermitian physics with flying atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jianming; Xiao, Yanhong; Peng, Peng; Cao, Wanxia; Shen, Ce; Qu, Weizhi; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hermtian optical systems with parity-time (PT) symmetry provide new means for light manipulation and control. To date, most of experimental demonstrations on PT symmetry rely on advanced nanotechnologies and sophisticated fabrication techniques to manmade solid-state materials. Here, we report the first experimental realization of optical anti-PT symmetry, a counterpart of conventional PT symmetry, in a warm atomic-vapor cell. By exploiting rapid coherence transport via flying atoms, we observe essential features of anti-PT symmetry with an unprecedented precision on phase-transition threshold. Moreover, our system allows nonlocal interference of two spatially-separated fields as well as anti-PT assisted four-wave mixing. Besides, another intriguing feature offered by the system is refractionless (or unit-refraction) light propagation. Our results thus represent a significant advance in non-Hermitian physics by bridging a firm connection with the AMO field, where novel phenomena and applications in quantum and nonlinear optics aided by (anti-)PT symmetry can be anticipated.

  10. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  11. Collision cross sections and diffusion parameters for H and D in atomic oxygen. [in upper earth and Venus atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Modeling the behavior of H and D in planetary exospheres requires detailed knowledge of the differential scattering cross sections for all of the important neutral-neutral and ion-neutral collision processes affecting these species over their entire ranges of interaction energies. In the upper atmospheres of Earth, Venus, and other planets as well, the interactions of H and D with atomic oxygen determine the rates of diffusion of escaping hydrogen isotopes through the thermosphere, the velocity distributions of exospheric atoms that encounter the upper thermosphere, the lifetimes of exospheric orbiters with periapsides near the exobase, and the transfer of momentum in collisions with hot O. The nature of H-O and D-O collisions and the derivation of a data base consisting of phase shifts and the differential, total, and momentum transfer cross sections for these interactions in the energy range 0.001 - 10 eV are discussed. Coefficients of mutual diffusion and thermal diffusion factors are calculated for temperatures of planetary interest.

  12. I.I. Rabi Prize in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Talk: Novel Quantum Physics in Few- and Many-body Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Cheng

    2011-05-01

    Recent cold atom researches are reaching out far beyond the realm that was conventionally viewed as atomic physics. Many long standing issues in other physics disciplines or in Gedanken-experiments are nowadays common targets of cold atom physicists. Two prominent examples will be discussed in this talk: BEC-BCS crossover and Efimov physics. Here, cold atoms are employed to emulate electrons in superconductors, and nucleons in nuclear reactions, respectively. The ability to emulate exotic or thought systems using cold atoms stems from the precisely determined, simple, and tunable interaction properties of cold atoms. New experimental tools have also been devised toward an ultimate goal: a complete control and a complete characterization of a few- or many-body quantum system. We are tantalizingly close to this major milestone, and will soon open new venues to explore new quantum phenomena that may (or may not!) exist in scientists' dreams.

  13. Formation of Triplet Positron-helium Bound State by Stripping of Positronium Atoms in Collision with Ground State Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of triplet positron-helium bound state by stripping of positronium atoms in collision with ground state helium JOSEPH DI RlENZI, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, RICHARD J. DRACHMAN, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center - The system consisting of a positron and a helium atom in the triplet state e(+)He(S-3)(sup e) was conjectured long ago to be stable [1]. Its stability has recently been established rigorously [2], and the values of the energies of dissociation into the ground states of Ps and He(+) have also been reported [3] and [4]. We have evaluated the cross-section for this system formed by radiative attachment of a positron in triplet He state and found it to be small [5]. The mechanism of production suggested here should result in a larger cross-section (of atomic size) which we are determining using the Born approximation with simplified initial and final wave functions.

  14. Non-negligible collisions of alkali atoms with background gas in buffer-gas-free cells coated with paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Naota; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    We measured the rate of velocity-changing collisions (VCCs) between alkali atoms and background gas in buffer-gas-free anti-relaxation-coated cells. The average VCC rate in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells prepared in this work was 1× 106 hbox {s}^{-1}, which corresponds to 1 mm in the mean free path of rubidium atoms. This short mean free path indicates that the background gas is not negligible in the sense that alkali atoms do not travel freely between the cell walls. In addition, we found that a heating process known as "ripening" increases the VCC rate, and also confirmed that ripening improves the anti-relaxation performance of the coatings.

  15. Bulk atomic relocation in low-energy collision cascades in silicon: Molecular Dynamics versus Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, V.; Caturla, M. J.; Abril, I.; Gras-Marti, A.

    1994-05-01

    We investigate the atomic mixing produced in the bulk of a zero-temperature silicon target by internally-starting low-energy (100 eV) self-recoils. Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are applied. The many-body Tersoff potential connected smoothly with the pairlike Ziegler-Biersack potential is used in the MD simulation. The collisional model of the MC code is based on the Ziegler-Biersack potential and includes a calculation of the mean free-flight path and the random impact parameter by using the energy-dependent total cross-section for elastic collisions. For a quantitative description of the process of ion-induced atomic mixing we calculate the depth dependence of the number of displaced atoms, and the first and second moments of the relocation cross-section. We analyse the discrepancies between the two computer simulations, and suggest an adjustment of the pertinent parameters in the MC model.

  16. Atomic and molecular collision aspects of thermospheric uranium-vapor releases. Technical report, 15 February 1980-31 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, D.A.

    1990-05-01

    The DNA Uranium (Oxides) LWIR Review Committee considered the effectiveness of field measurements of the LWIR from uranium oxides produced by (hypothetical) controlled releases of uranium vapor from rockets in the thermosphere. Collated here is the writer's work supporting the committee on atomic and molecular collision aspects of such releases. Included is an essential auxiliary study to (a) understand, in terms of atomic and molecular parameters, coefficients for Ba+ diffusion along the magnetic field as measured and predicted for Ba-release events and (b) apply that (limited) understanding to U-release studies. For particles colliding with neutral atmospheric species, several interaction potentials are used to compute velocity-dependent momentum-transfer cross sections, stopping power and range versus energy, and diffusion coefficients. The momentum-transfer cross sections are also compared with cross sections for certain uranium oxide reactions specially atom-transfer reactions.

  17. The effects of hyperfine interactions on collisions between optically trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.; Feng, P.; Hoffmann, D.

    1993-05-01

    We report measurements of excited-state collision rates of optically trapped {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb. The collision rates have been measured in the vicinity of the P{sub 3/2} and P{sub 1/2} states of both isotopes. By studying the collision rates as a function of the frequency of light used to cause the collisions, we obtain collision spectra that reveal the importance of hyperfine interactions on the collision dynamics. In certain frequency ranges the spectra for the two isotopes are nearly identical, while in others we find substantially reduced rates for {sup 87}Rb (large hyperfine interaction) as compared to {sup 85}Rb (small hyperfine interaction). For the P{sub 1/2} states, where hyperfine splittings are large compared to the characteristic frequency scale for these collisions, the shapes of the spectra more closely correspond to those expected from simple models that neglect hyperfine interactions. Many of our observations can be qualitatively explained by our calculations of the long-range resonance potential curves including hyperfine interactions.

  18. Toward a deeper understanding of how experiments constrain the underlying physics of heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangaline, Evan; Pratt, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Recent work has provided the means to rigorously determine properties of superhadronic matter from experimental data through the application of broad scale modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions within a Bayesian framework. These studies have provided unprecedented statistical inferences about the physics underlying nuclear collisions by virtue of simultaneously considering a wide range of model parameters and experimental observables. Notably, this approach has been used to constrain both the QCD equation of state and the shear viscosity above the quark-hadron transition. Although the inferences themselves have a clear meaning, the complex nature of the relationships between model parameters and observables has remained relatively obscure. We present here a novel extension of the standard Bayesian Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach that allows for the quantitative determination of how inferences of model parameters are driven by experimental measurements and their uncertainties. This technique is then applied in the context of heavy-ion collisions in order to explore previous results in greater depth. The resulting relationships are useful for identifying model weaknesses, prioritizing future experimental measurements, and, most importantly, developing an intuition for the roles that different observables play in constraining our understanding of the underlying physics.

  19. Charge-exchange collisions in the low-velocity regime between multiply charged ions and atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, L.R. )

    1993-06-05

    Close-coupling calculations using a full quantum mechanical molecular-orbital model have been carried out for low-energy charge-exchange collisions with multiply charged ions. Trajectory effects at eV/amu energies are exemplified by the isotope-dependence of the charge-exchange cross sections and the polarization-induced enhancement of the capture probability in O[sup 5+]--H(D) collisions. An unfavorable comparison with experimental differential cross sections for Ar[sup 6+]--He collisions leads to a discussion of transfer-excitation caused by configuration mixing in the Ar[sup 5+] capture states.

  20. Projectile energy and atomic number dependence of electron capture from pair production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, A.; Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, B.; Bossingham, R.; Meyerhof, W. E.

    1994-10-01

    We report the first measurement of the energy dependence of electron capture from electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy ion collisions. For a La57+ beam incident on Au, Ag, and Cu targets at energies of 0.405, 0.956, and 1.3 GeV/u we find that the cross sections for capture from pair production and the free pair production process increase with increasing collision energy at similar rates. Combining with uranium data reported previously gives a projectile atomic number dependence for 0.956 GeV/u ions on a Au target of Z6.54+/-0.65p for capture from pair production and Z1.53+/-0.80p for the free pair production process.

  1. Physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, Ning-bo; Cao, ShanShan; Chen, Bao-yi; Chen, Shi-yong; Chen, Zhen-yu; Ding, Heng-Tong; He, Min; Liu, Zhi-quan; Pang, Long-gang; Qin, Guang-you; et al

    2016-01-15

    We expect heavy-ion collisions at very high colliding energies to produce a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at the highest temperature obtainable in a laboratory setting. Experimental studies of these reactions can provide an unprecedented range of information on properties of the QGP at high temperatures. We also report theoretical investigations of the physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at a future high-energy collider. These include initial parton production, collective expansion of the dense medium, jet quenching, heavy-quark transport, dissociation and regeneration of quarkonia, photon and dilepton production. Here, we illustrate the potential of future experimental studies of the initial particle production andmore » formation of QGP at the highest temperature to provide constraints on properties of strongly interaction matter.« less

  2. Physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ning-bo; Cao, ShanShan; Chen, Bao-yi; Chen, Shi-yong; Chen, Zhen-yu; Ding, Heng-Tong; He, Min; Liu, Zhi-quan; Pang, Long-gang; Qin, Guang-you; Rapp, Ralf; Schenke, Björn; Shen, Chun; Song, HuiChao; Xu, Hao-jie; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhang, Ben-wei; Zhang, Han-zhong; Zhu, XiangRong; Zhuang, Peng-fei

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at very high colliding energies are expected to produce a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at the highest temperature obtainable in a laboratory setting. Experimental studies of these reactions can provide an unprecedented range of information on properties of the QGP at high temperatures. We report theoretical investigations of the physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at a future high-energy collider. These include initial parton production, collective expansion of the dense medium, jet quenching, heavy-quark transport, dissociation and regeneration of quarkonia, photon and dilepton production. We illustrate the potential of future experimental studies of the initial particle production and formation of QGP at the highest temperature to provide constraints on properties of strongly interaction matter.

  3. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report, FY 1989--91

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  4. Scattering of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with rare gas atoms at low collision energy

    SciTech Connect

    Loreau, J.

    2015-11-14

    We present a theoretical study of elastic and rotationally inelastic collisions of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with rare gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) at low energy. Quantum close-coupling calculations have been performed for energies between 0.001 and 300 cm{sup −1}. We focus on collisions in which NH{sub 3} is initially in the upper state of the inversion doublet with j = 1, k = 1, which is the most relevant in an experimental context as it can be trapped electrostatically and Stark-decelerated. We discuss the presence of resonances in the elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as the trends in the inelastic cross sections along the rare gas series and the differences between NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} as a colliding partner. We also demonstrate the importance of explicitly taking into account the umbrella (inversion) motion of NH{sub 3} in order to obtain accurate scattering cross sections at low collision energy. Finally, we investigate the possibility of sympathetic cooling of ammonia using cold or ultracold rare gas atoms. We show that some systems exhibit a large ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections in the cold regime, which is promising for sympathetic cooling experiments. The close-coupling calculations are based on previously reported ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH{sub 3}–He and NH{sub 3}–Ar, as well as on new, four-dimensional, potential energy surfaces for the interaction of ammonia with Ne, Kr, and Xe, which were computed using the coupled-cluster method and large basis sets. We compare the properties of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to the interaction of ammonia with the various rare gas atoms.

  5. Suppression of angular momentum transfer in cold collisions of transition metal atoms in ground States with nonzero orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Hancox, Cindy I; Doret, S Charles; Hummon, Matthew T; Krems, Roman V; Doyle, John M

    2005-01-14

    The Zeeman relaxation rate in cold collisions of Ti(3d(2)4s(2) 3F2) with He is measured. We find that collisional transfer of angular momentum is dramatically suppressed due to the presence of the filled 4s(2) shell. The degree of electronic interaction anisotropy, which is responsible for Zeeman relaxation, is estimated to be about 200 times smaller in the Ti-He complex than in He complexes with typical non-S-state atoms. PMID:15698077

  6. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  7. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-09-27

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS).

  8. Interaction of atoms with solid surfaces: Energy transfer in hyperthermal collisions of Li/sup +/ with W(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Micha, D.A.

    1981-02-01

    A recently developed many-body approach to atom--polyatomic collisions at hyperthermal energies is applied to scattering of light ions by metal surfaces. Following a brief description of the scattering model, which can in principle describe surface diffraction, surface rainbows, and phonon excitation, we concentrate on energy transfer processes. Cross sections are related to atom--pair correlation functions of the target surface, which are expressed in terms of the normal vibrational modes of a solid slab. The correlation functions are calculated within a short-time expansion which gives Gaussian distributions for energy transfer probabilities. A simple surface model of Einstein anisotropic oscillators is worked out in detail. Results of calculations for scattering of Li/sup +/ by W(110) at kinetic energies of several eV show good agreement with experimental values of most probable final energies and of distribution widths for several angles and initial ion energies.

  9. Laboratory studies of atomic collision processes of importance in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Smith, K.

    1985-01-01

    A series of differential cross sections for angular scattering and charge transfer was measured. These studies employ position-sensitive detectors (PSD's) to collect collision products scattered over a wide range of angles; and the research program includes investigation of differential cross sections for total angular scattering, charge transfer, stripping, and other collisions. All of these processes can be studied with the same basic apparatus, but minor modifications in the equipment details and in the data acquisition programs and techniques are required for each individual experiment.

  10. Precision atomic mass spectrometry with applications to fundamental constants, neutrino physics, and physical chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Brianna J.; Redshaw, Matthew; Myers, Edmund G.

    2011-07-01

    We present a summary of precision atomic mass measurements of stable isotopes carried out at Florida State University. These include the alkalis 6Li, 23Na, 39,41K, 85,87Rb, 133Cs; the rare gas isotopes 84,86Kr and 129,130,132,136Xe; 17,18O, 19F, 28Si, 31P, 32S; and various isotope pairs of importance to neutrino physics, namely 74,76Se/74,76Ge, 130Xe/130Te, and 115In/115Sn. We also summarize our Penning trap measurements of the dipole moments of PH + and HCO + .

  11. Theoretical atomic physics for fusion. Annual Report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pindzola, M.S.

    1992-12-31

    The understanding of electron-ion collision processes in high temperature plasmas remains a key factor in the ultimate development of nuclear fusion as a viable energy source for the nation. Our 1990--1992 research proposal delineated 3 main areas of research in electron-ion scattering theory. Summaries our 1992 efforts in each of these research areas are presented.

  12. Interactions and low-energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of a different nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Arpita; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low-energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems such as X + {{{Y}}}+, where X({{{Y}}}+) is either Li(Cs+) or Cs(Li+), Na(Cs+) or Cs(Na+) and Li(Rb+) or Rb(Li+). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using a pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We derive ground-state scattering wave functions and analyze the cold collisional properties of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order 1 K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. The low-energy scattering properties calculated in this paper may serve as a precursor for experimental exploration of quantum collisions between an alkali atom and an alkali ion of a different nucleus.

  13. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms I. Package outline and high energy code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    Being motivated by the applied researchers’ persisting need for accurate scattering data for the collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms, we developed a computer package-Hex-that is designed to provide trustworthy results for all basic discrete and continuous processes within non-relativistic framework. The package consists of several computational modules that implement different methods, valid for specific energy regimes. Results of the modules are kept in a common database in the unified form of low-level scattering data (partial-wave T-matrices) and accessed by an interface program which is able to produce various derived quantities like e.g. differential and integral cross sections. This article is the first one of a series of articles that are concerned with the implementation and testing of the modules. Here we give an overview of their structure and present (a) the command-line interface program hex-db that can be also easily compiled into a derived code or used as a backend for a web-page form and (b) simple illustrative module specialized for high energies, hex-dwba, that implements distorted and plane wave Born approximation. Catalogue identifier: AETH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data etc.: 30367 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data etc.: 232032 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11 Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). RAM: Test run 3 MiB. CPC Library Classification: 2.4 Electron scattering External libraries:GSL [49], FFTW3[52], SQLite3 [46]. All of the libraries are open-source and maintained. Nature of problem: Extraction of derived (observable) quantities from partial

  14. l- and n-changing collisions during interaction of a pulsed beam of Li Rydberg atoms with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubreuil, B.; Harnafi, M.

    1989-07-01

    The pulsed Li atomic beam produced in our experiment is based on controlled transversely-excited-atmospheric CO2 laser-induced ablation of a Li metal target. The atomic beam is propagated in vacuum or in CO2 gas at low pressure. Atoms in the beam are probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. This allows the determination of time-of-flight and velocity distributions. Li Rydberg states (n=5-13) are populated in the beam by two-step pulsed-laser excitation. The excited atoms interact with CO2 molecules. l- and n-changing cross sections are deduced from the time evolution of the resonant or collision-induced fluorescence following this selective excitation. l-changing cross sections of the order of 104 AṦ are measured; they increase with n as opposed to the plateau observed for Li* colliding with a diatomic molecule. This behavior is qualitatively well explained in the framework of the free-electron model. n-->n' changing processes with large cross sections (10-100 AṦ) are also observed even in the case of large electronic energy change (ΔEnn'>103 cm-1). These results can be interpreted in terms of resonant-electronic to vibrational energy transfers between Li Rydberg states and CO2 vibrational modes.

  15. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Moos, H. W.; Pacella, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Fournier, K.; Goldstein, W.; Gregory, B.

    1999-01-01

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3-1600 Å), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.)

  16. Design, fabrication and characterization of tunable external cavity diode laser and atom trapping chips for atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao

    External cavity diode laser systems (ECDLs) have been well documented for their suitability in the fields of laser cooling and atom trapping, and are now widely used in optical and atomic physics. A particularly simple implementation of this idea uses feedback from a diffraction grating mounted in the Littrow configuration and the typical size of this laser is quite large (120mmx90mmx90mm). For atom optics, the current atom trapping chips are not in a feedthrough configuration, which makes the chips to glass cell assembly process complicated and the wires and solder areas vulnerable, resulting in an unreliable vacuum seal. Recent experimental realizations of atom optical devices such as atomic waveguides, beam splitters, and on-chip Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sources have opened a new field for the development of more complex devices such as, e.g., BEC-based atom transistor. This work focuses on micro/nano fabrication techniques to build three different devices for the miniature BEC system. The research work focuses on the development of new ECDLs, a novel fabrication process of feedthrough atom trapping chips for atomic optics and a fabrication process for atom transistor chips. In the ECDLs part, we describe a new method for constructing a smaller external-cavity diode laser by use of a micromachined silicon flexure and a VHG (Volume Holographic Grating). It is much smaller, inexpensive and easy to build because it is based on simple modifications of a few commercial optical and mechanical components but with a specific silicon flexure design enabled by micro-fabrication technology for the laser frequency tuning. In the feedthrough chips part, we present a novel fabrication process for feedthrough atom trapping chips in atomic condensate optics cells using the copper electroplating to seal the vias. The advantages of using feedthrough atom trapping chips are the simple microfabrication process and reduction of the overall chip area bonded on the glass atom

  17. Pre-service physics teachers' ideas on size, visibility and structure of the atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Pervin

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the atom gives the opportunity to both understand and conceptually unify the various domains of science, such as physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy and geology. Among these disciplines, physics teachers are expected to be particularly well educated in this topic. It is important that pre-service physics teachers know what sort of theories regarding the atom they will bring into their own classrooms. Six tasks were developed, comprising size, visibility and structure of the atom. These tasks carried out by pre-service physics teachers were examined by content analysis and six categories were determined. These are size, visibility, subatomic particles, atom models, electron orbit and electron features. Pre-service physics teachers' ideas about the atom were clarified under these categories.

  18. Many-body processes in atomic and molecular physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Shih-I.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Dynamics of Multiphoton Excitation in Rydberg Atoms; Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation and Dissipative Quantum Dynamics in Periodic Fields; Density Matrix Formulation of Complex Geometric Phases in Dissipative Systems; and A. C. Stark Shifts of Excited States of Atoms in Strong Fields.

  19. Deactivation of krypton atoms in the metastable 5s({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state in collisions with krypton and argon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V

    2009-09-30

    The collision deactivation of the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state of krypton atoms is studied by the absorption probe method in electron-beam-excited high-pressure Ar-Kr mixtures with a low krypton content. The rate constants of plasma-chemical reactions Kr* + Kr + Ar {yields} Kr{sub 2}* + Ar [(4.1{+-}0.4)x10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + 2Ar {yields} ArKr* + Ar (less than 10{sup -35} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}) are measured for the first time and the rate constant of the reaction Kr* + Ar {yields} products + Ar [(3.8{+-}0.4)x10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] is refined. (active media)

  20. Monte Carlo event generators in atomic collisions: A new tool to tackle the few-body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.; Schulz, M.

    2010-04-01

    We present a set of routines to produce theoretical event files, for both single and double ionization of atoms by ion impact, based on a Monte Carlo event generator (MCEG) scheme. Such event files are the theoretical counterpart of the data obtained from a kinematically complete experiment; i.e. they contain the momentum components of all collision fragments for a large number of ionization events. Among the advantages of working with theoretical event files is the possibility to incorporate the conditions present in a real experiment, such as the uncertainties in the measured quantities. Additionally, by manipulating them it is possible to generate any type of cross sections, specially those that are usually too complicated to compute with conventional methods due to a lack of symmetry. Consequently, the numerical effort of such calculations is dramatically reduced. We show examples for both single and double ionization, with special emphasis on a new data analysis tool, called four-body Dalitz plots, developed very recently. Program summaryProgram title: MCEG Catalogue identifier: AEFV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2695 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 501 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 with parallelization directives using scripting Computer: Single machines using Linux and Linux servers/clusters (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Linux (any version and flavor) and FORTRAN 77 compilers Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 64-128 kBytes (the codes are very cpu intensive) Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem: The code deals with single and double

  1. Studies of electron correlation effects in multicharged ion atom collisions involving double capture

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, N.; Sommer, K.; Griffin, D.C.; Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Meyer, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    We review measurements of L-Coster Kronig and Auger electron production in slow, multicharged collision systems to study electron correlation effects in the process of double electron capture. The n/sup /minus/3/ law was confirmed for the production of the Coster-Kronig configurations 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ (n greater than or equal to 6) in O/sup 6 +/ + He collisions. Enhancement of high angular momentum /ell/ in specific 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations was observed by means of high-resolution measurements of the Coster-Kronig lines. The importance of electron correlation effects in couplings of potential energy curves leading to the 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations is verified by means of Landau-Zener model calculations. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Solid state effects in electron emission from atomic collisions near surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Minniti, R.; Elston, S.B.

    1996-10-01

    We present a brief progress report of recent studies of the ejected electron spectra arising from glancing-angle ion-surface scattering involving collision energies of hundreds of keV/u. A broad range of electron energies and emission angles is analyzed containing prominent structures such as the convoy electron peak and the binary ridge. Particular emphasis is placed on the search for signatures of dynamic image interactions and multiple scattering near surfaces. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Ionization and excitation in collisions between antiprotons and H(1s) atoms studied with Sturmian bases

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2011-02-15

    Coupled two-center as well as one-center Sturmian cross sections have been determined for ionization and excitation in p-bar-H(1s) collisions at p-bar energies from 1 to 16 000 keV, following the author's recent work for p-H(1s) collisions [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032701 (2009)]. Basis convergence is studied in detail. Results for ionization and excitation are compared to other coupled-state results and to numerical results, as well as limited experimental results for ionization only. Except for the large, two-center coupled-Gaussian-pseudostate calculation of Toshima for ionization only [Phys. Rev. A 64, 024701 (2001)], previous calculations employed one-center bases, including a one-center Sturmian calculation by Igarashi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 61, 062712 (2000)]. A strong contrast with p-H collisions is confirmed at intermediate energies, while at high energies the extent of agreement is revealed between coupled-state results for the two collisional systems, as well as with first Born results.

  4. Close-coupling study of rotational energy transfer in H2O collisions with He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Benhui; Stancil, Phillip

    2007-06-01

    Due to the astrophysical importance of water and helium, the H2O-He collisional system has been the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. For numerical astrophysical models, quantitative determinations of state-to-state cross sections and rate coefficients for H2O-He collisions are crucial. In this work quantum close-coupling scattering calculations of rotational energy transfer (RET) of rotationally excited H2O due to collisions with He are presented for collision energies between 10-6 and 1000 cm-1 with para-H2O initially in levels 11,1, 20,2, 21,1, 22,0, and ortho-H2O in levels 11,0, 21,2, 22,1. Differential cross section, quenching cross sections and rate coefficients for state-to-state RET were computed on three new H2O-He potential energy surfaces (PESs). The inelastic and elastic differential cross sections are also compared with available experimental measurements.

  5. Ultracold atomic collisions in tight harmonic traps: Quantum-defect model and application to metastable helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, Gillian; Whittingham, Ian B.; Beams, Timothy J.

    2004-09-01

    We analyze a system of two colliding ultracold atoms under strong harmonic confinement from the viewpoint of quantum defect theory and formulate a generalized self-consistent method for determining the allowed energies. We also present two highly efficient computational methods for determining the bound state energies and eigenfunctions of such systems. The perturbed harmonic oscillator problem is characterized by a long asymptotic region beyond the effective range of the interatomic potential. The first method, which is based on quantum defect theory and is an adaptation of a technique developed by one of the authors (G.P.) for highly excited states in a modified Coulomb potential, is very efficient for integrating through this outer region. The second method is a direct numerical solution of the radial Schroedinger equation using a discrete variable representation of the kinetic energy operator and a scaled radial coordinate grid. The methods are applied to the case of trapped spin-polarized metastable helium atoms. The calculated eigenvalues agree very closely for the two methods, and with the eigenvalues computed using the generalized self-consistent method.

  6. Population transfer collisions involving nD Rydberg atoms in a CO2 optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Jorge M.; Goncalves, Luis F.; Tallant, Jonathan E.; Marcassa, Luis G.

    2014-05-01

    There has been an increasing interest in cold Rydberg atoms over the last several years. The primary reason for this attention is that interactions between Rydberg atoms are strong and lead to many interesting and useful phenomena, which require high atomic density samples. In this work, we have loaded Rb atoms into a CO2 optical dipole trap. After the loading, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a combination of two cw laser beams at 780 nm and 480 nm respectively. Finally, the Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. By analyzing the electrons signal, we can study the population transfer from the nD state to the (n + 2)P as a function of the atomic density for 37 <= n <= 45. As the atomic density increases, the excitation of the nD state saturates, suggesting the occurrence of dipole blockade. Nevertheless, the (n + 2)P is quadratically proportional to the nD population. We have also investigated the role of a dc electrical field in such process. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  7. An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics, at KACST - a status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, Mohamed O. A.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatic storage ring has been designed following the pioneering storage ring ELISA [1], and it is currently being built as a new core laboratory for atomic and molecular collisions at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this paper, the design of the electrostatic storage ring together with an outline on the status of the construction are given.

  8. Physics and the New Games -- or Pretend You're an Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Ronald D.

    1982-01-01

    Describes several games in which physics principles are demonstrated using students. These include Pirates Treasure Game (vectors), Three-Meter Dash (kinematics), Knee-Bend Game (energy and power), Wave Game, Reaction Kinematics, Statics-People Pyramids, and games demonstrating nuclear reactions, collisions, electrons in a wire, close packing, and…

  9. Studying Atomic Physics Using the Nighttime Atmosphere as a Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpee, B. D.; Slanger, T. G.; Huestis, D. L.; Cosby, P. C.

    2006-01-01

    A summary of our recent work using terrestrial nightglow spectra, obtained from astronomical instrumentation, to directly measure, or evaluate theoretical values for fundamental parameters of astrophysically important atomic lines.

  10. Heavy Flavor Physics in Heavy-Ion Collisions with STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifei

    2010-02-01

    Heavy quarks are a unique tool to probe the strongly interacting matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. Due to their large mass, energetic heavy quarks are predicted to lose less energy than light quarks by gluon radiation when they traverse a Quark-Gluon Plasma. In contrast, recent measurements of non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays at high transverse momentum (pT) show a jet quenching level similar to that of the light hadrons. Heavy quark are produced mainly at early stage in heavy-ion collisions, thus they are proposed to probe the QCD medium and to be sensitive to bulk medium properties. Ultimately, their flow behavior may help establish whether light quarks thermalize. Therefore, topological reconstruction of D-mesons and identification of electrons from charm and bottom decays are crucial to understand the heavy flavor production and their in medium properties. The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) is a micro-vertex detector utilizing active pixel sensors and silicon strip technology. The HFT will significantly extend the physics reach of the STAR experiment for precise measurement of charmed and bottom hadrons. We present a performance study with full detector on the open charm nuclear modification factor, elliptic flow v2 and λc measurement as well as the measurement of bottom mesons via a semi-leptonic decay. )

  11. Deactivation of xenon atoms in the 6s resonant state in collisions with xenon and helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnyi, D A; Semenova, Ludmila V; Ustinovskii, N N; Kholin, I V; Chugunov, A Yu

    1999-02-28

    The absorption probing method was used to investigate collisional deactivation of the 6s[3/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of the xenon atom in high-pressure He - Xe mixtures with a low xenon concentration. Measurements were made of the rate constants of the following plasma-chemical reactions: Xe* + Xe + He {yields} Xe{sub 2}* + He [(2.1 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -32} cm{sup 6}s{sup -1}], Xe* + 2He {yields} HeXe* + He (less than 10{sup -35} cm{sup 6}s{sup -1}), and Xe* + He {yields} products + He (less than 3 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}). (active media)

  12. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  13. Numerical study of charge transfer processes in collisions of Be^4+ and He^2+ with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tatsuya; Pindzola, Michael S.; Lee, Teck-Gee

    2005-05-01

    We have calculated state-selective charge-transfer cross sections in collisions of Be^(4+ with H(1s) and of He^2+ with H(1s). We have used the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (LTDSE) approach, the atomic orbital coupled channel (AOCC) method, and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The calculations are performed with impact energy ranging between 1keV/u and 1MeV/u. With a well chosen basis-function set, we have found that AOCC gives good agreement with LTDSE. Also, with regard to Wigner's n-3 law, we have found that CTMC gives good extrapolations to the cross sections calculated by LTDSE and AOCC toward high n levels such as for those greater than 6. Thus, in our presentation, we will propose theoretical values of the total charge-transfer cross sections for these collision systems based on a combination of the most reliable results of the various method. This research used resources of the Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725, and also of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  14. Optical emission generated by collisions of 5 eV O(3P) atoms with surface-absorbed hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Martus, K. E.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1992-01-01

    Optical emission has been observed corresponding to vibrational bands in the NH (A 3Pi - X 3Sigma(-)) electronic transition during collisions of 5 eV, ground-state oxygen O(3P) atoms with MgF2 and Ni surfaces continuously exposed to a beam of hydrazine (N2H4). The NH emission intensity is observed to be about five times greater for MgF2 than for Ni. No dependence on temperature was observed for either surface in the range 240 - 340 K, implying that the NH-producing intermediate species is tightly bound. The half-lifetime for desorption of hydrazine from each surface was measured. This was found to be 120 min for the MgF2 surface at 240 K, and less than 20 min for Ni. After exposure, the surface composition was measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the exposed and unexposed areas of both targets.

  15. Kinetic-energy release distributions of fragment anions from collisions of potassium atoms with D-Ribose and tetrahydrofuran*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, André; Cunha, Tiago; Mendes, Mónica; da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; García, Gustavo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic-energy release distributions have been obtained from the width and shapes of the time-of-flight (TOF) negative ion mass peaks formed in collisions of fast potassium atoms with D-Ribose (DR) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules. Recent dissociative ion-pair formation experiments yielding anion formation have shown that the dominant fragment from D-Ribose is OH- [D. Almeida, F. Ferreira da Silva, G. García, P. Limão-Vieira, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114304 (2013)] whereas in the case of THF is O- [D. Almeida, F. Ferreira da Silva, S. Eden, G. García, P. Limão-Vieira, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 690 (2014)]. The results for DR and THF show an energy distribution profile reminiscent of statistical degradation via vibrational excitation and partly due to direct transformation of the excess energy in translational energy.

  16. Transport properties derived from ion-atom collisions: 6Li-6Li+ and 6Li-7Li+ Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouledroua, Moncef; Bouchelaghem, Fouzia; LPR Team

    2014-10-01

    This investigation treats quantum-mechanically the ion- atom collisions and computes the transport coefficients, such as the coefficients of mobility and diffusion. For the case of lithium, the calculations start by determining the gerade and ungerade potential curves through which ionic lithium approaches ground lithium. Then, by considering the isotopic effects and nuclear spins, the elastic and charge-transfer cross sections are calculated for the case of 6Li+and7Li+ colliding with 6Li. Finally, the temperature-dependent diffusion and mobility coefficients are analyzed, and the results are contrasted with those obtained from literature. The main results of this work have been recently published in. This work has been realized within the frames of the CNEPRU Project D01120110036 of the Algerian Ministry of Higher Education.

  17. Total single electron capture cross sections for collisions of multicharged ions with He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, M.; Shojaei, F.; Fathi, R.

    2016-09-01

    The three-body boundary corrected Born distorted wave method is utilized to compute the total cross sections for single electron capture in the collisions of the fast ions ({{{H}}}1+, He{}2+, Li{}3+, {{{B}}}5+ and {{{C}}}6+) with helium targets in their ground states. Both post and prior forms of the transition amplitude are obtained in terms of two-dimensional integrals and the total cross sections are computed via three-dimensional numerical integrations. The present results show reasonable agreement with the measurements and three- and four-body theoretical computations, especially at higher incident energies.

  18. Regular and chaotic quantum dynamics in atom-diatom reactive collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Nyman, G.

    2008-05-15

    A new microirreversible 3D theory of quantum multichannel scattering in the three-body system is developed. The quantum approach is constructed on the generating trajectory tubes which allow taking into account influence of classical nonintegrability of the dynamical quantum system. When the volume of classical chaos in phase space is larger than the quantum cell in the corresponding quantum system, quantum chaos is generated. The probability of quantum transitions is constructed for this case. The collinear collision of the Li + (FH) {sup {yields}}(LiF) + H system is used for numerical illustration of a system generating quantum (wave) chaos.

  19. A study of the collisional dynamics for collisions of UF6(-) atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, R. L.; Doverspike, L. D.

    1981-08-01

    Absolute total cross sections for the collisional decomposition of the negative ion of Uranium Hexafluoride have been measured for laboratory collision energies up to 500 eV. The results have been analyzed with a statistical theory of unimolecular decomposition. By varying the temperature of the carbon surface upon which the negative ions are created, the average initial internal energy in the negative molecular ion can be selected. Experiments performed with 'hot' negative molecular ions indicate larger decomposition cross sections and lower energy thresholds when compared to results for 'cold' negative molecular ions.

  20. Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Ideas on Size, Visibility and Structure of the Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unlu, Pervin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the atom gives the opportunity to both understand and conceptually unify the various domains of science, such as physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy and geology. Among these disciplines, physics teachers are expected to be particularly well educated in this topic. It is important that pre-service physics teachers know what sort of…

  1. Atomic data on inelastic processes in low-energy beryllium-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, Svetlana A.; Voronov, Yaroslav V.; Belyaev, Andrey K.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Inelastic processes in low-energy Be + H and Be+ + H- collisions are treated for the states from the ground and up to the ionic state with the aim to provide rate coefficients needed for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) modeling of beryllium spectra in cool stellar atmospheres. Methods: The electronic molecular structure is determined by using a recently proposed model quantum approach that is based on an asymptotic method. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics is treated by means of multichannel formulas, based on the Landau-Zener model for nonadiabatic transition probabilities. Results: The cross sections and the rate coefficients for inelastic processes in Be + H and Be+ + H- collisions are calculated for all transitions between 13 low-lying covalent states plus the ionic state. It is shown that the highest rate coefficient values correspond to the mutual neutralization processes with the final states Be(2s3s 1S), Be(2s3p 1,3P), Be(2s3d 3D). These processes, as well as some of the excitation, de-excitation and ion-pair formation processes, are likely to be important for non-LTE modeling. Tables A.1-A.10 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A27

  2. An investigation of antiprotons collisions with positronium atom in Debye plasma environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, M. K. Lin, Y.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2015-05-15

    The effects of Debye plasmas on antihydrogen formation and ionization processes are investigated in antiprotons (p{sup ¯}) and positronium (Ps) collisions. The classical trajectory Monte Carlo method with Debye Hückel potentials has been used for cross section calculations. In this process, antihydrogen formation and ionization cross sections have been calculated in unscreened as well as in Debye plasmas conditions in energies ranging from 1 to 500 keV. Partial cross sections for antihydrogen formation are also calculated which show the largest cross sections correspond to production of antihydrogen in the n = 2 (2s, 2p) states. Comparative study has been carried out to determine the differences of cross sections in screening and unscreening cases. The results show that the cross sections for both antihydrogen formation and positronium ionization depend on Debye screening lengths as well as on collision energies. The effects of plasmas conditions on antihydrogen formation and positronium ionization are explained in terms of classical trajectory framework. Our results for the unscreened case are in agreement with previously reported results.

  3. Universal ultracold collision rates for polar molecules of two alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul; Hanna, Thomas; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2011-05-01

    Highly reactive ultracold polar molecules have universal near-threshold reaction rate constants that depend only on the long-range interaction potential, as shown for the KRb molecule. We extend these calculations to estimate universal reaction rate constants for the bosonic and fermionic isotopes of the reactive species LiNa, LiK, LiRb, LiCs, and also the universal vibrational quenching rate constants for vibrationally excited states of the non-reactive species NaK, NaRb, NaCs, KCs, and RbCs. We also examine the variation with electric field of the universal collision rates for these species in quasi-2D geometry in a one-dimensional optical lattice. For many of these species an electric field of a few kV/cm perpendicular to the lattice plane should be effective in shielding the molecules from destructive collisions even at relatively modest lattice confinement strength. Supported by an AFOSR MURI and a Polish government grant.

  4. Construction of a physics minimal formalism using the collision symbols: systematical condensing of the resulting laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    In this article, a formalism of physics is built by using only algebric combinations of symbols which represent collisions between bodies. The connection with reality is made by measures of time. The formalism is brought down to that of Dirac's matrices in a constant curvature space (De Sitter space). As a result it becomes possible to condense most of the physical basic laws, that are moreover written in a unified symbolism. The general application of this formalism will be the numerical treatment of physical problems. L'article bâtit un formalisme de la physique ne mettant en œuvre que les combinaisons algébriques de symboles représentatifs des chocs entre objets; le raccord au réel s'effectue par l'intermédiaire des mesures de temps. Le formalisme se ramène à celui d'une algèbre des matrices de DIRAC dans un espace à courbure constante (espace de De Sitter). Il en résulte la possibilité potentielle de condenser la plupart des lois physiques de base, écrites de surcroît dans un symbolisme unifié. L'application générale de ce formalisme est le traitement numérique des problèmes de physique.

  5. Electron-atom collision studies using optically state-selected beams. Final report, May 15, 1991--May 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.H.; McClelland, J.J.

    1998-03-15

    As stated in the original proposal, the goal of the project has been to perform electron-scattering experiments on a few model systems with emphasis on resolving all the quantum-state variables possible. The purpose of these experimental studies has been to provide a set of measurements of unprecedented accuracy and completeness that can be used as benchmarks for comparison with theoretical calculations. During the period covered by this report, the work has concentrated on measuring low-energy electron scattering from sodium and chromium. Sodium provides an ideal one-electron test case, since it has a single loosely bound valence electron, making it approachable by even the most complex electron scattering calculations. In addition, the atom has a strong optical transition from the 3{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ground state to the 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} excited state whose wavelength (589 nm) matches the peak output of the laser dye rhodamine 6G. Thus optical pumping techniques can be readily applied in the laboratory, leading to either a population of ground state atoms in which the spin of the valence electron is oriented either up or down in the laboratory, or a spin polarized pure angular momentum state of the excited 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Such an excited state makes possible superelastic scattering, where the internal energy of the atom is transferred to the electron during the collision. This turns out to be a very efficient way to study the inelastic scattering process. Unlike sodium, chromium provides an extremely exacting test for theoretical methods because of its very complex electronic structure, not because it is simple. With a valence configuration consisting of five electrons in a half-filled 3d shell, plus another electron in a 4s shell, this atom provides a test case that can challenge even the simplest approximations.

  6. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  7. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  8. Analysis of In-Flight Collision Process During V-Type Firing Pattern in Surface Blasting Using Simple Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Lalit Singh; Raina, Avtar K.

    2015-10-01

    Blasting is a unit operation in Mine-Mill Fragmentation System (MMFS) and plays a vital role in mining cost. One of the goals of MMFS is to achieve optimum fragment size at minimal cost. Blast fragmentation optimization is known to result in better explosive energy utilization. Fragmentation depends on the rock, explosive and blast design variables. If burden, spacing and type of explosive used in a mine are kept constant, the firing sequence of blast-holes plays a vital role in rock fragmentation. To obtain smaller fragmentation size, mining professionals and relevant publications recommend V- or extended V-pattern of firing sequence. In doing so, it is assumed that the in-flight air collision breaks larger rock fragments into smaller ones, thus aiding further fragmentation. There is very little support to the phenomenon of breakage during in-flight collision of fragments during blasting in published literature. In order to assess the breakage of in-flight fragments due to collision, a mathematical simulation was carried over using basic principles of physics. The calculations revealed that the collision breakage is dependent on velocity of fragments, mass of fragments, the strength of the rock and the area of fragments over which collision takes place. For higher strength rocks, the in-flight collision breakage is very difficult to achieve. This leads to the conclusion that the concept demands an in-depth investigation and validation.

  9. Nonadiabatic couplings in low-energy collisions of hydrogen ground-state atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wolniewicz, L.

    2003-10-01

    The effect of nonadiabatic couplings on low-energy s-wave scattering of two hydrogen atoms is investigated. Coupling matrix elements are computed in a wide range of internuclear distances. The resulting scattering equations are numerically unstable and therefore are integrated only approximately. Computations are performed for H, D, and T atoms. The phase shifts in the zero velocity limit are inversely proportional to the nuclear reduced mass {delta}{sub 0}{approx_equal}0.392/{mu}. This leads to infinite scattering lengths.

  10. From Casimir-Polder Force to Dicke Physics: Interaction between Atoms and a Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Buhmann, Stefan

    We apply the theory of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics in dispersing and absorbing media to study the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a topological insulator. The electromagnetic response of a topological insulator surface leads to a mixing of electric and magnetic fields, breaking the time-reversal symmetry. The coupling of these fields to an atom causes shifts of the atom's eigenenergies and modified decay rates near the surface of the topological insulator. Energy shifts and modified decay rates cannot only be triggered by the presence of a material, but can be caused by other atoms in close proximity as well. The collective dynamics of atoms (Dicke Physics) leads to a superradiant burst. Combining macroscopic QED and Dicke physics opens the door to the investigation of cooperative atom-surface interactions.

  11. Learning Pathways in High-School Level Quantum Atomic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedderer, Hans; Petri, Juergen

    Investigations of changes in conceptions during physics instruction are the logical and necessary steps to follow successful international research on students' preinstructional conceptions. The theoretical perspective integrates currently available frameworks of cognition, cognitive states, and cognitive processes in physics. Particular emphasis…

  12. The Light at the End of the Tunnel: Uncertainties in Atomic Physics, Bayesian Inference, and the Analysis of Solar and Stellar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    We report on the efforts of a multidisciplinary International Space Science Institute team that is investigating the limits of our ability to infer the physical properties of solar and stellar atmospheres from remote sensing observations. As part of this project we have estimated the uncertainties in the collisional cross sections and radiative decay rates for Fe XIII and O VII and created 1000 realizations of the CHIANTI atomic database. These perturbed atomic data are then used to analyze solar observations from the EIS spectrometer on Hinode and stellar observations from the LETG on Chandra within a Bayesian framework. For the solar case we find that the systematic errors from the atomic physics dominate the statistical uncertainties from the observations. For many cases the uncertainties are about 10 times larger when variations in the atomic data are included. This indicates the need for very accurate atomic physics. Comparisons among recent Fe XIII calculations suggest that for some transitions the collision rates are currently known well enough to measure the electron density and emission measure to about 15%.

  13. Photon emission from translational energy in atomic collisions: A dynamic Casimir-Polder effect

    SciTech Connect

    Westlund, Per-Olof; Wennerstroem, H.

    2005-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using a Liouville formalism, that the relative motion of two atoms can result in the emission of photons and conversely that photons can be absorbed to excite the relative translational motion. The mechanism responsible for the energy transfer between the radiation field and the translational motion of the atoms is a dynamic version of the long-range Casimir-Polder interaction between two fixed atoms. The phenomenon is analogous to the dynamic Casimir effect discussed for moving macro- (or meso)scopic objects and we term it the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect. The absorption or emission is a two-photon process and we find that the transition probability is proportional to the spectral density of a correlation function involving the relative translational motion of two atoms. An energy transfer only occurs for photons with energies smaller than or of the same magnitude as the thermal energy. The effect provides a microscopic mechanism for establishing thermal equilibrium between the radiation field and a gas. A sufficiently large volume of gas would be perceived as a black-body radiator. Applications of the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect might be found in the microscopic description of the cosmic low-temperature black-body radiation.

  14. Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions

    DOE Data Explorer

    The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

  15. Electron, Ion and Atom Collisions Leading to Anomalous Doppler Broadening in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj.; Stojanović, Vladimir D.; Nikitović, Željka D.

    2007-09-01

    DC high E/N swarm experiment (self sustained discharge operating in the Townsend regime) may be modeled directly and exactly as it does not require self consistent calculation of the electric field and is thus open to a simple Monte Carlo simulation that may include complexity at the level of representation of collisional events. Thus such an experiment operating under swarm conditions is the best way to test the mechanism of generation of anomalously large Doppler broadening that was often observed in low pressure discharges. In this paper we show revised results of modeling of Doppler profiles by using a well tested Monte Carlo procedure and revised models of heavy particle collisions. In particular we study the importance of fast H2 and fast H particles, the effect of different models of angular distribution of particles scattered of the surface and of the molecules and we study the role of the energy losses due to vibrational excitation.

  16. Superheavy nuclei and quasi-atoms produced in collisions of transuranium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V.I.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Itkis, M.G.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-03-15

    Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei ({sup 238}U+{sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th+{sup 250}Cf, and {sup 238}U+{sup 248}Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multidimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found to result from the 'inverse quasi-fission' process leading to the formation of the surviving superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events, the lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficiently long for the spontaneous formation of positrons to occur from a super-strong electric field - a fundamental QED process.

  17. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  18. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  19. Physics of the missing atoms: technetium and promethium

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, H.

    1987-05-01

    Technetium (Z = 43) and promethium (Z = 61) are by far the least abundant of all atoms below the radioactive elements (Z = 84 onwards). Their scarcity confirms theoretical predictions emerging from a theory of the photon derived from synchronous lattice electrodynamics. This theory has given precise theoretical values for the fine-structure constant and the constant of gravitation G and is now shown in this paper to indicate resonant interactions between the vacuum lattice oscillations and technetium and promethium. In the case of promethium there is strong reason for believing that this atom can assume supergravitational or antigravitational properties, accounting for its scarcity. This paper not only adds support to the earlier theoretical work on the photon and gravitation, but suggests a research route that might lead to new technology based on controlled interactions with gravity fields.

  20. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented.

  1. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  2. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets.

  3. The Atomic Relay: Integrating Physical Education and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menelly, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for teaching abstract science concepts to gifted middle school students. The lesson integrates a physical education component into science instruction to reinforce the abstract notion that electrons emit energy in the form of visible light. (CR)

  4. Coupled-Channel Investigation of the Collision of Protons and Antiprotons with hydrogen-Like Atoms in the 2s States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Reda S.

    2003-03-01

    The influence of the electric charge of both the projectile and the target nucleus on the cross section of the inelastic collision of protons and antiprotons with atoms is investigated at energies ranging from 1 to 2500 KeV. The impact parameter method is used to analyse the cross sections of the excitation of the n = 3 states of H atom and He+, Li2+ ions being initially in the excited 2s states. The calculated cross sections for hydrogen atoms are compared with the other theoretical results based on coupled-channels methods.

  5. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-01

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He∗(2S1 and 2S3 ) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He∗-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN .

  6. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-15

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He*(2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He*-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN.

  7. Internal consistency in the close-coupling approach to positron collisions with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Igor; Bailey, Jackson J.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Kadyrov, Alisher S.; Utamuratov, Ravshanbeck

    2016-01-01

    The positron-atom scattering problem contains the rearrangement channel of positronium (Ps) formation. While this makes the problem particularly difficult to calculate, it has the unusual benefit of validation via consideration of the internal consistency of the vastly different one- and two-centre close-coupling approaches. For example, the ionisation cross section in the former must be the same as the sum of breakup and Ps formation cross sections in the latter. This places a severe test on both approaches, which we review here for positron scattering on hydrogen and helium atoms. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  8. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  9. Non-statistical fragmentation of large molecules in collisions with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Adoui, L.; Anderson, E. K.; Chen, T.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; de Ruette, N.; Gatchell, M.; Giacomozzi, L.; Huber, B. A.; Kulyk, K.; Maclot, S.; Rousseau, P.; Wolf, M.; Zettergen, H.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.

    2015-09-01

    Non-statistical fragmentation processes are important when Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, fullerenes, or other large molecules collide with atoms at center- of-mass energies from a few tens to a few hundreds of eV. The typical result is the prompt, billiard-ball-like knockout of single atoms (CHx-loss). This is distinct from the well-known statistical fragmentation patterns of these molecules, which are dominated by H- and C2H2-loss for PAHs and C2-loss for fullerenes. We have explored the role of non-statistical fragmentation of PAHs and fullerenes in a series of experimental and theoretical studies. In general, the yield of non-statistical fragments depends sensitively on their stability against secondary statistical fragmentation following knockout.

  10. Application of the Convergent Close-Coupling method to collisions of electrons, positrons, and protons with light atomic and molecular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) method for electron-atom collisions has been applied successfully for around two decades for quasi one- and two-electron atomic targets. The underlying engine is the complete Laguerre basis for treating to convergence the target discrete and continuous spectra via a square-integrable approach, together with a formulation of the close-coupling equations in momentum space. The method has continued to be extended, and now incorporates collisions with positrons with allowance for positronium formation. This is a major advancement because it addresses the complexity associated with treating multi-center collision problems. These techniques have then been readily transferred to collisions with protons, where charge-exchange can be a substantial scattering outcome. The latter also required a move to solving the CCC equations using an impact parameter formalism. Most recently, in addition to the extension of the variety of projectiles, the collision targets have been generalized to molecules. Presently, just the H2+and the H2 molecules have been implemented. In the talk a broad range of applications of the CCC method will be discussed and future developments will be indicated. coauthors: A. S. Kadyrov, D.V. Fursa, I. Abdurakhmanov, M. Zammit.

  11. Molecular collisions. 11: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    In a paper of this series a distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed which is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  12. Molecular collisions 21: Semiclassical approximation to atom-symmetric top rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D.; Curtiss, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    A distorted wave approximation to the T matrix for atom-symmetric top scattering was developed. The approximation is correct to first order in the part of the interaction potential responsible for transitions in the component of rotational angular momentum along the symmetry axis of the top. A semiclassical expression for this T matrix is derived by assuming large values of orbital and rotational angular momentum quantum numbers.

  13. Dynamics of carbon-hydrogen and carbon-methyl exchanges in the collision of 3P atomic carbon with propene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Huang; Chen, Wei-Kan; Chin, Chih-Hao; Huang, Wen-Jian

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the dynamics of the reaction of 3P atomic carbon with propene (C3H6) at reactant collision energy 3.8 kcal mol-1 in a crossed molecular-beam apparatus using synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet ionization. Products C4H5, C4H4, C3H3, and CH3 were observed and attributed to exit channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H, and C3H3 + CH3; their translational-energy distributions and angular distributions were derived from the measurements of product time-of-flight spectra. Following the addition of a 3P carbon atom to the C=C bond of propene, cyclic complex c-H2C(C)CHCH3 undergoes two separate stereoisomerization mechanisms to form intermediates E- and Z-H2CCCHCH3. Both the isomers of H2CCCHCH3 in turns decompose to C4H5 + H and C3H3 + CH3. A portion of C4H5 that has enough internal energy further decomposes to C4H4 + H. The three exit channels C4H5 + H, C4H4 + 2H, and C3H3 + CH3 have average translational energy releases 13.5, 3.2, and 15.2 kcal mol-1, respectively, corresponding to fractions 0.26, 0.41, and 0.26 of available energy deposited to the translational degrees of freedom. The H-loss and 2H-loss channels have nearly isotropic angular distributions with a slight preference at the forward direction particularly for the 2H-loss channel. In contrast, the CH3-loss channel has a forward and backward peaked angular distribution with an enhancement at the forward direction. Comparisons with reactions of 3P carbon atoms with ethene, vinyl fluoride, and vinyl chloride are stated.

  14. Atomic Parity Violation and Related Physics in Ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri Robert

    Atomic parity violation has been observed in the 408 nm 1 S0→3D1 forbidden transition of ytterbium. The parity violating amplitude is 8.7(1.4)e-10 ea0, two orders of magnitude larger than in cesium, where the most precise experiments to date have been performed. This is in accordance with theoretical predictions and constitutes the largest atomic parity violating amplitude yet observed. This also opens the way to future measurements of neutron skins and anapole moments by comparing parity-violating amplitudes for various isotopes and hyperfine components of the transition. We present a detailed description of the observation. Linearly polarized 408 nm light interacts with ytterbium atoms in crossed electric (E) and magnetic fields (B). The probability of the 1 S0→3D1 transition contains a parity-violating term, proportional to E'B[( E'xE B], arising from interference between the amplitudes of transitions induced by the electroweak interaction and the Stark effect ((E' is the optical electric field). The transition probability is detected by measuring the population of the metastable 3P0 state, to which 65% of the atoms excited to the 3D1 state spontaneously decay. The population of the 3P0 state is determined by resonantly exciting the atoms with 649 nm light to the 3S1 state and collecting the fluorescence resulting from its decay. Systematic corrections due to imperfections in the applied electric and magnetic fields are determined in auxiliary experiments. The statistical uncertainty is dominated by parasitic frequency excursions of the 408-nm excitation light due to imperfect stabilization of the optical reference with respect to the atomic resonance. The present uncertainties are 9% statistical and 8% systematic. Methods of improving the accuracy for the future experiments are discussed. We further present a measurement of the dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of ytterbium's 3D1 state. The polarizabilities were measured by analyzing the spectral

  15. Plasma injection and atomic physics models for use in particle simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Electronics Research Lab.)

    1991-06-12

    Models of plasma injection (creation) and charged/neutral atomic physics which are suitable for incorporation into particle simulation codes are described. Both planar and distributed source injection models are considered. Results obtained from planar injection into a collisionless plasma-sheath region are presented. The atomic physics package simulates the charge exchange and impact ionization interactions which occur between charged particles and neutral atoms in a partially-ionized plasma. These models are applicable to a wide range of problems, from plasma processing of materials to transport in the edge region of a tokamak plasma. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Atomic physics techniques for studying nuclear ground state properties, fundamental interactions and symmetries: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” held during 2009 in Poznan gave an excellent overview on the latest experimental and theoretical results regarding the investigation of radionuclides by atomic physics techniques and the extraction of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. This publication intends to summarize the progress recently achieved by laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as by weak interaction studies using atomic physics techniques. Furthermore, it tries to point to some areas requiring urgent improvements and to indicate some routes of future research and challenging opportunities.

  17. Nuclear beta-decay, Atomic Parity Violation, and New Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf

    2000-08-01

    Determinations of vuds with super-allowed Fermi beta-decay in nuclei and of the weak charge of the cesium in atomic parity-violation deviate from the Standard Model predictions by 2 sigma or more. In both cases, the Standard Model over-predicts the magnitudes of the relevant observables. I discuss the implications of these results for R-parity violating (RPV) extensions of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. I also explore the possible consequences for RPV supersymmetry of prospective future low-energy electroweak measurements.

  18. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2012-12-01

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X+ + H- have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  19. Quenching of the resonance 5s({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of krypton atoms in collisions with krypton and helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V

    2014-11-30

    The processes of collision quenching of the resonance 5s[3/2]{sub 1}{sup o}({sup 3}P{sub 1}) state of the krypton atom are studied by the absorption probe method in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He – Kr mixtures with a low content of krypton. The rate constants of plasmochemical reactions Kr* + Kr + He → Kr*{sub 2} + He [(4.21 ± 0.42) × 10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}], Kr* + 2He → HeKr* + He [(4.5 ± 1.2) × 10{sup -36} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + He → products + He [(2.21 ± 0.22) × 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] are measured for the first time. The rate constants of similar reactions are refined for krypton in the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o} ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Deactivation of the 6s and 6s' states of a xenon atom in collisions with helium, argon, and xenon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Semenova, Ludmila V; Ustinovskii, N N; Kholin, I V

    2004-03-31

    A series of publications devoted to the study of collisional deactivation of Xe atoms in the 6s and 6s' states in high-pressure Ar - He and He - Xe mixtures with a low content of Xe is summarised. The processes of quenching of the *P{sub 1}, *P{sub 0}, *P{sub 1}, and *P{sub 2} levels are studied in two-particle Xe*+Ar(He) {yields} products+Ar(He), three-particle Xe*+ 2Ar(2He) {yields} ArXe*(HeXe*+Ar(He), and three-particle Xe*+Xe+Ar(He) {yields} Xe*{sub 2}+Ar(He) collisions. The gases were excited by a fast-electron beam. The measurements were performed by the method of absorption probing by analysing the time dependence of the concentration of the excited states in the afterglow of the electron beam. The rate constants of 24 plasma-chemical reactions were measured, 17 of which - for the first time. (invited paper)

  1. The Role of High-Energy Ion-Atom/Molecule Collisions in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, Dževad

    2014-12-01

    The need for ions in radiotherapy stems from the most favorable localization of the largest energy deposition, precisely at the tumor site with small energy losses away from the target. Such a dose conformity to the target is due to heavy masses of ions that scatter predominantly in the forward direction and lose maximal energy mainly near the end of their path in the vicinity of the Bragg peak. The heavy masses of nuclei preclude noticeable multiple scattering of the primary ion beam. This occurrence is responsible for only about 30% of ion efficiency in killing tumor cells. However, ionization of targets by fast ions yields electrons that might be of sufficient energy to produce further radiation damage. These δ-electrons, alongside radicals produced by ion-water collisions, can accomplish the remaining 70% of tumor cell eradication. Electrons achieve this chiefly through multiple scattering due to their small mass. Therefore, energy depositions by both heavy (nuclei) and light (electrons) particles as well as highly reactive radicals need to be simultaneously transported in Monte Carlo simulations. This threefold transport of particles is yet to be developed for the existing Monte Carlo codes. Critical to accomplishing this key goal is the availability of accurate cross section databases. To this end, the leading continuum distorted wave methodologies are poised to play a pivotal role in predicting energy losses of ions in tissue as discussed in this work.

  2. Atomic collision experiments utilizing low-velocity, highly-charged ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intense beams of highly-stripped ions are now routinely produced at low velocities using the Brookhaven dual MP-tandens in a unique four-stage accel/decel mode. This mode of operation combines three stages of acceleration, stripping at high energy, and one stage of deceleration to near-zero velocity. To date, experiments have used 10-100 nA beams of bare and few-electron heavy ions at energies as low as 0.2 MeV/amu, and upgrades of the facility should push the lower limit below 0.1 MeV/amu. Recent experiments, such as measurements of charge transfer and x-ray production for S/sup 6-16+/ on He and Ar at 6 to 20 MeV and P(b) measurements for MO x-rays produced in Cl/sup 16 +/ + Ar collisions at 20, 10, and 5 MeV have demonstrated the usefulness of highly-stripped, low-velocity projectiles. These experiments and a few possibilities for future experiments are discussed.

  3. Origin of the Universal Three-body Parameter in Atomic Efimov Physic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidon, Pascal; Endo, Shimpei; Ueda, Masahito

    2013-05-01

    Several experiments with different kinds of ultra-cold atoms have revealed that the three-body parameter that fixes the Efimov spectrum of few-atom systems near broad Feshbach resonances is universally determined by the atoms' van der Waals length. Using model potential calculations we find that the three-body parameter originates from a deformation of the three-atom system due to universal two-body correlations at separations on the order of the van der Waals length scale. This simple physical picture is consistent with the universality of the three-body parameter observed in the experiments, as well as previous numerical calculations. It explains why the low-energy physics of three bosonic atoms near a broad resonance is solely determined by their two-body parameters.

  4. Quantum mechanical theory of a structured atom-diatom collision system - A + BC/1-Sigma/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of a 2-p state atom colliding with a singlet sigma state diatom, which involves multiple potential surfaces, is investigated. Within a diabatic representation for the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction), coupled scattering equations are derived in both space-fixed and body-fixed coordinate systems. Coefficients, analogous to Percival-Seaton coefficients, are obtained. Approximations to the exact equations, including angular momenta decoupling approximations, are discussed for both the space-fixed and body-fixed formalisms.

  5. Project Physics Teacher Guide 5, Models of the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Teaching procedures of Project Physics Unit 5 are presented to help teachers make effective use of learning materials. Unit contents are discussed in connection with teaching aid lists, multi-media schedules, schedule blocks, and resource charts. Brief summaries are made for transparencies, 16mm films, and reader articles. Included is information…

  6. Physical state of interstellar atoms. [from Copernicus satellite UV data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    Brief survey of the physical conditions along the lines of sight to reddened and unreddened stars, as determined from Copernicus observation of interstellar lines between 95 and 300 nm. Differences in ionization structure and density between clouds and the local intercloud medium are discussed. Some new data for beta Centauri is used to supplement the previously available data.

  7. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom).

    PubMed

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F

    2014-11-01

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. PMID:25368422

  8. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom)

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. PMID:25368422

  9. Selected Topics in the Physics of Heavy Ion Collisions (1/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    In these lectures, I discuss some classes of measurements accessible in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. How can these observables be measured, to what extent can they be calculated, and what do they tell us about the dense mesoscopic system created during the collision? In the first lecture, I shall focus in particular on measurements that constrain the spatio-temporal picture of the collisions and that measure centrality, orientations and extensions. In the subsequent lectures, I then discuss on how classes of measurements allow one to characterize collective phenomena, and to what extent these measurements can constrain the properties of matter produced in heavy ion collisions.

  10. Selected Topics in the Physics of Heavy Ion Collisions (1/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-15

    In these lectures, I discuss some classes of measurements accessible in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. How can these observables be measured, to what extent can they be calculated, and what do they tell us about the dense mesoscopic system created during the collision? In the first lecture, I shall focus in particular on measurements that constrain the spatio-temporal picture of the collisions and that measure centrality, orientations and extensions. In the subsequent lectures, I then discuss on how classes of measurements allow one to characterize collective phenomena, and to what extent these measurements can constrain the properties of matter produced in heavy ion collisions.

  11. Laser-assisted free-free transition in electron-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-06-15

    The free-free transition is studied for an electron-hydrogen atom system in the ground state at very low incident energies in the presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic, and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the initial and final channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron-exchange interactions, short-range interactions, as well as of long-range interactions. The laser-assisted differential as well as total elastic cross sections are calculated for single-photon absorption or emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser-assisted cross sections as compared to the field-free situations. A significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  12. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. II. Ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of the Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) States by Ca, Sr, and Ba atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    Electron-transfer processes are studied in thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}), Sr(5s{sup 2}), and Ba(6s{sup 2}) atoms capable of forming negative ions with a weakly bound outermost p-electron. We consider the ion-pair formation and resonant quenching of highly excited atomic states caused by transitions between Rydberg covalent and ionic terms of a quasi-molecule produced in collisions of particles. The contributions of these reaction channels to the total depopulation cross section of Rydberg states of Rb(nl) and Ne(nl) atoms as functions of the principal quantum number n are compared for selectively excited nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n and for states with large orbital quantum numbers l = n - 1, n - 2. It is shown that the contribution from resonant quenching dominates at small values of n, and the ion-pair formation process begins to dominate with increasing n. The values and positions of the maxima of cross sections for both processes strongly depend on the electron affinity of an alkaline-earth atom and on the orbital angular momentum l of a highly excited atom. It is shown that in the case of Rydberg atoms in states with large l {approx} n - 1, the rate constants of ion-pair formation and collisional quenching are considerably lower than those for nl-levels with l Much-Less-Than n.

  13. Absolute Doubly Differential Cross Sections for Ejection of Electrons in - and Five-Body Collisions of 20 TO 114-KEV Protons on Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, George W., III

    A crossed-beam experiment was performed to detect ejected electrons from ground-state atomic and molecular hydrogen after collisions with 20- to 114-keV protons. Because a pure atomic hydrogen target is not readily attainable, a method has been devised which yields atomic to molecular hydrogen doubly differential cross section (DDCS) ratios. Since the molecular hydrogen DDCS's were independently measured, the atomic cross sections could be directly calculated. Absolute cross sections differential in electron energy and angle were measured for electron energies ranging from 1.5 to 400 eV and scattering angles from 15^circ to 165^circ with respect to the fast beam. Electrons and ions were energy analyzed by an electrostatic hemispherical analyzer, which has an energy resolution of 5% and is rotatable in the scattering plane about the collision center. Atomic hydrogen is produced by a radio-frequency discharge of the type devised by J. Slevin. Hydrogen gas effuses from a 1 mm diameter nozzle in a nearly cos theta distribution. The projectile beam intersects the thermal gas targets 4 mm below the tip of the nozzle. Dissociation fractions of 74% and atomic hydrogen densities of 7 times 10 ^{11} cm^ {-3} were typical. The fraction of dissociated hydrogen was measured by detecting the reduced 9-eV ion signal from the molecular target when the RF is on. This characteristic ion signal originates from the coulomb breakup of the molecule and dissociative channels of excited H _sp{2}{+}. An auxiliary experiment was performed to determine the target densities with the aid of a low-resolution magnetic mass spectrometer after the slow recoil ions were extracted from the collision volume by a weak electric field. Comparisons of the atomic cross sections are made with theories such as the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method, the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA) and the continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximation.

  14. A model for charge transfer in ultracold Rydberg ground-state atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markson, Samuel; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2016-06-01

    In excited molecules, the interaction between the covalent Rydberg and ion-pair channels forms a unique class of excited states, in which the infinite manifold of vibrational levels are the equivalent of atomic Rydberg states with a heavy electron mass. Production of the ion-pair states usually requires excitation through one or several interacting Rydberg states; these interacting channels lead to loss of flux, diminishing the rate of ion-pair production. Here, we develop an analytical, asymptotic charge-transfer model for the interaction between ultracold Rydberg molecular states, and employ this method to demonstrate the utility of off-resonant field control over the ion-pair formation, with near unity efficiency.

  15. Electron emission in H sup 0 --atom collisions: A coincidence study of the angular dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, O.; Maier, R.; Kuzel, M.; Groeneveld, K.O. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); DuBois, R.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Differential electron emission occurring as the result of fast hydrogen atom impact on helium and argon targets has been studied using standard non-coincidence and emitted electron-ionized projectile coincidence techniques. Impact energies were 0.5 and 1 MeV; electron emission was measured between approximately 20 and 2000 eV for selected laboratory emission angles ranging from 0{degree} to 180{degree}. These data demonstrate the importance of simultaneous target-projectile ionization as was previously observed for energetic He{sup +} impact. The experimental data for the helium target, when compared to PWBA calculations using hydrogenic wave functions, indicate good agreement with theory for projectile ionization and, indirectly, reasonably good agreement for target ionization. Simultaneous target-projectile ionization events were not included in the model. The argon data are compared with more sophisticated calculations for electron loss. These comparisons indicate the importance of second order effects at large emission angles.

  16. LS Channel Estimation and Signal Separation for UHF RFID Tag Collision Recovery on the Physical Layer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hanjun; Wu, Haifeng; Zeng, Yu; Chen, Yuebin

    2016-01-01

    In a passive ultra-high frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID) system, tag collision is generally resolved on a medium access control (MAC) layer. However, some of collided tag signals could be recovered on a physical (PHY) layer and, thus, enhance the identification efficiency of the RFID system. For the recovery on the PHY layer, channel estimation is a critical issue. Good channel estimation will help to recover the collided signals. Existing channel estimates work well for two collided tags. When the number of collided tags is beyond two, however, the existing estimates have more estimation errors. In this paper, we propose a novel channel estimate for the UHF RFID system. It adopts an orthogonal matrix based on the information of preambles which is known for a reader and applies a minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) criterion to estimate channels. From the estimated channel, we could accurately separate the collided signals and recover them. By means of numerical results, we show that the proposed estimate has lower estimation errors and higher separation efficiency than the existing estimates. PMID:27023560

  17. LS Channel Estimation and Signal Separation for UHF RFID Tag Collision Recovery on the Physical Layer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hanjun; Wu, Haifeng; Zeng, Yu; Chen, Yuebin

    2016-01-01

    In a passive ultra-high frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID) system, tag collision is generally resolved on a medium access control (MAC) layer. However, some of collided tag signals could be recovered on a physical (PHY) layer and, thus, enhance the identification efficiency of the RFID system. For the recovery on the PHY layer, channel estimation is a critical issue. Good channel estimation will help to recover the collided signals. Existing channel estimates work well for two collided tags. When the number of collided tags is beyond two, however, the existing estimates have more estimation errors. In this paper, we propose a novel channel estimate for the UHF RFID system. It adopts an orthogonal matrix based on the information of preambles which is known for a reader and applies a minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) criterion to estimate channels. From the estimated channel, we could accurately separate the collided signals and recover them. By means of numerical results, we show that the proposed estimate has lower estimation errors and higher separation efficiency than the existing estimates. PMID:27023560

  18. PROBING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF ATOMIC GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2015-02-10

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyα systems (DLAs). Using high-resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper and lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C{sup +} and Si{sup +}. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5% of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ∼100 cm{sup –3} and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log (P/k{sub B} ) = 3.4 (K cm{sup –3}), which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsecs. We show that the majority of the systems are consistent with having densities significantly higher than expected for a purely canonical warm neutral medium, indicating that significant quantities of dense gas (i.e., n {sub H} > 0.1 cm{sup –3}) are required to match observations. Finally, we identify eight systems with positive detections of Si II*. These systems have pressures (P/k{sub B} ) in excess of 20,000 K cm{sup –3}, which suggest that these systems tag a highly turbulent ISM in young, star-forming galaxies.

  19. Versatile single-chip event sequencer for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, Edward

    2010-03-01

    A very inexpensive dsPIC microcontroller with internal 32-bit counters is used to produce a flexible timing signal generator with up to 16 TTL-compatible digital outputs, with a time resolution and accuracy of 50 ns. This time resolution is easily sufficient for event sequencing in typical experiments involving cold atoms or laser spectroscopy. This single-chip device is capable of triggered operation and can also function as a sweeping delay generator. With one additional chip it can also concurrently produce accurately timed analog ramps, and another one-chip addition allows real-time control from an external computer. Compared to an FPGA-based digital pattern generator, this design is slower but simpler and more flexible, and it can be reprogrammed using ordinary `C' code without special knowledge. I will also describe the use of the same microcontroller with additional hardware to implement a digital lock-in amplifier and PID controller for laser locking, including a simple graphics-based control unit. This work is supported in part by the NSF.

  20. PREFACE: International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics & 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas L. S.; deHarak, Bruno A.

    2010-01-01

    From 30 July to 1 August 2009, over a hundred scientists from 18 countries attended the International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics and the 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions which were held at the W T Young Library of the University of Kentucky, USA. Both conferences were satellite meetings of the XXVI International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) held in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, 21-28 July 2009. These symposia covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical topics involving excitation, ionization (single and multiple), and molecular fragmentation, of a wide range of targets by photons and charged particles (polarized and unpolarized). Atomic targets ranged from hydrogen to the heavy elements and ions, while molecular targets ranged from H2 to large molecules of biological interest. On the experimental front, cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS), also known as the Reaction Microscope because of the complete information it gives about a wide variety of reactions, is becoming commonplace and has greatly expanded the ability of researchers to perform previously inaccessible coincidence experiments. Meanwhile, more conventional spectrometers are also advancing and have been used for increasingly sophisticated and exacting measurements. On the theoretical front great progress has been made in the description of target states, and in the scattering calculations used to describe both simple and complex reactions. The international nature of collaborations between theorists and experimentalists is exemplified by, for example, the paper by Ren et al which has a total of 13 authors of whom the experimental group of six is from Heidelberg, Germany, one theoretical group is from Australia, with the remainder of the theoreticians coming from several different institutions in the United States. A total of 52 invited talks and

  1. Multiple ionization of neon atoms in collisions with bare and dressed ions: A mean-field description considering target response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gerald; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-05-01

    We investigate projectile-charge-state-differential electron removal from neon atoms by impact of He2+, Li3+, B2+, and C3+ ions at intermediate projectile energies (25 keV/u to 1 MeV/u ). The many-electron problem is described with an independent electron model in which active electrons at both collision centers are propagated in a common mean-field potential. Response to electron removal is taken into account in terms of a time-dependent screening potential, and a Slater-determinant-based method is used for the final-state analysis. Total cross sections for net recoil ion production, multiple ionization, and capture channels are mostly in good agreement with published experimental data. Results from equicharged bare and dressed ions are compared and the net recoil ion production cross section is broken down into contributions associated with different final projectile charge states in order to shed light on the role of the projectile electrons.

  2. Absolute cross sections for the dissociation of hydrogen cluster ions in high-energy collisions with helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, S.; Tabet, J.; Samraoui, K.; Louc, S.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2006-02-15

    Absolute dissociation cross sections are reported for H{sub n}{sup +} clusters of varied mass (n=3,5,...,35) following collisions with He atoms at 60 keV/amu. Initial results have been published previously for a smaller range of cluster sizes [Ouaskit et al., Phys. Rev. A 49, 1484 (1994)]. The present extended study includes further experimental results, reducing the statistical errors associated with the absolute cross sections. The previously suggested quasilinear dependence of the H{sub n}{sup +} dissociation cross sections upon n is developed with reference to expected series of geometrical shells of H{sub 2} molecules surrounding a H{sub 3}{sup +} core. Recent calculations identify n=9 as corresponding to the first closed H{sub 2} shell [e.g., Stich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9482 (1997)]. Recurrence of the distinct characteristics observed in the dissociation-cross-section dependence upon cluster size around n=9 provides the basis for the presently proposed subsequent closed shells at n=15, 21, 27, and 33, in agreement with the calculations of Nagashima et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 96, 4294 (1992)].

  3. Computation of Free-Free Transitions in Atomic Physics: Foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Sucher, J.

    2003-01-01

    The amplitude T for "free-free" processes, such as bremsstrahlung or photo- absorption by an electron in the continuum in the presence of an external field, is usually written as the matrix element of the radiation operator taken between two continuum states. However, unlike the case when at least one of the states is bound, as in radiative transitions, electron capture, or the photo-effect, this expression contains an unphysical term, proportional to a delta-function and is not really the physical amplitude Tphys. This continues to be true for both the velocity and length form of the dipole approximation to the amplitude T. We first give an a priori definition of Tphys in terms of the scattering parts of the continuum functions, which has an obvious interpretation in terms of time-ordered diagrams. We then show that when the formal amplitude is modified by a long- distance cutoff, the modified form approaches Tphys as the cutoff is removed. The modified form then serves as a basis for the definition of a physical velocity dipole amplitude and this in turn leads to an equivalent length form of the dipole amplitude. This exercise provides a clear theoretical basis for many extant calculations in which cutoff factors are introduces somewhat ad hoc, as needed.

  4. Cold collisions of ground-state calcium atoms in a laser field: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Bussery-Honvault, Beatrice; Launay, Jean-Michel; Moszynski, Robert

    2003-09-01

    State-of-the-art ab initio techniques have been applied to compute the potential-energy curves for the ground X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} and excited {sup 1}{pi}{sub g}(4s3d) states of the calcium dimer in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The weakly bound ground state was calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, while the strongly bound excited state was computed using a combination of the linear-response theory within the coupled-cluster singles and doubles framework for the core-valence electronic correlation and of the full configuration interaction for the valence-valence correlation. The ground-state potential has been corrected by considering the relativistic terms resulting from the first-order many-electron Breit theory, and the retardation corrections. The magnetic electronic transition dipole moment governing the {sup 1}{pi}{sub g}(leftarrow){sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} transitions has been obtained as the first residue of the polarization propagator computed with the coupled-cluster method restricted to single and double excitations. The computed energies and transition moments have been analytically fitted and used in the dynamical calculations of the rovibrational energy levels, ground-state scattering length, photoassociation intensities at ultralow temperatures, and spontaneous emission coefficients from the {sup 1}{pi}{sub g}(4s3d) to the X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state. The spectroscopic constants of the theoretical ground-state potential are in a good agreement with the experimental values derived from the Fourier-transform spectra [O. Allard et al., Eur. Phys. J. D (to be published)]. The theoretical s-wave scattering length for the ground state is a=44 bohrs, suggesting that it should be possible to obtain a stable Bose-Einstein condensate of calcium atoms. Finally, the computed photoassociation intensities and spontaneous emission coefficients suggest that it should be possible to obtain cold calcium molecules by

  5. Formation rate for Rb 2 + molecular ions created in collisions of Rb Rydberg and ground-state atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, Jovica; Côté, Robin

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the formation rate of the molecular Rb2+ion in its various bound states produced in the associative ionization of a Rydberg and a ground-state atom. Before the formation takes place, the colliding atoms are accelerated by an attractive force between the collision partners. In this way the ground-state atom is first captured by the Rydberg electron and then guided towards the positive ion-core where a molecular ion is subsequently formed. As recently demonstrated, this process results in giant collisional cross sections for the molecular ion formation, with the cross sections essentially determined by the size of the Rydberg atom. For sufficient high principal quantum numbers and atomic densities, many ground-state atoms are already located inside the Rydberg atom and ready to participate in the associative ionization. The same process can occur between a Rydberg and a ground-state atom that form a long-range Rydberg molecule, possibly contributing to the shortening of the lifetimes of Rydberg atoms and molecules. Partial support from the US Army Research Office (ARO-MURI W911NF-14-1-0378), and from NSF (Grant No. PHY-1415560).

  6. Lattice, Time-Dependent Schrodinger Equation Approach for Charge Transfer in Collisions of Be4+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Tatsuya; Pindzola, Michael S; Lee, Teck G; Schultz, David Robert

    2006-01-01

    A test of the lattice, time-dependent Schrodinger equation (LTDSE) method for treating inelastic ion-atom collisions is performed by treating state-selective charge transfer in 10-1000 keV/u Be4+ + H collisions. This system possessesa greater charge asymmetry of the colliding nuclei than has been treated in previous applications of the method. Consequently, its ability to represent well the dynamical evolution of the electronic wavefunction within the combination of a shallow and a deep potential well with a single coordinate- and momentumspace discretization is tested. New results are also computed using other, standard approaches, the atomic-orbital close-coupling and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods, to provide comparisons with the LTDSE results owing to their well-established regimes of applicability and behaviours.

  7. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  8. Solitary wave and multi-front wave collisions for the Bogoyavlenskii-Kadomtsev-Petviashili equation in physics, biology and electrical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xi-Yang; Tian, Bo; Sun, Wen-Rong; Wang, Ming; Wang, Yun-Po

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate a Bogoyavlenskii-Kadomtsev-Petviashili equation, which can be used to describe the propagation of nonlinear waves in physics, biology and electrical networks. We find that the equation is Painlevé integrable. With symbolic computation, Hirota bilinear forms, solitary waves and multi-front waves are derived. Elastic collisions between/among the two and three solitary waves are graphically discussed, where the waves maintain their shapes, amplitudes and velocities after the collision only with some phase shifts. Inelastic collisions among the multi-front waves are discussed, where the front waves coalesce into one larger front wave in their collision region.

  9. Clock Technology Development for the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Time and Frequency Sciences and Technology Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a laser cooling capability for flight and has been selected by NASA to support the Laser-Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. Current work in the group includes design and development for tee two laser-cooled atomic clock experiments which have been selected for flight on the International Space Station.

  10. Otto Stern (1888-1969): The founding father of experimental atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toennies, J. P.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Friedrich, B.; Lower, J. C. A.

    2011-12-01

    We review the work and life of Otto Stern who developed the molecular beam technique and with its aid laid the foundations of experimental atomic physics. Among the key results of his research are: the experimental determination of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of molecular velocities (1920), experimental demonstration of space quantization of angular momentum (1922), diffraction of matter waves comprised of atoms and molecules by crystals (1931) and the determination of the magnetic dipole moments of the proton and deuteron (1933).

  11. Storage-ring experiments on dielectronic recombination at the interface of atomic and nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandau, Carsten; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Lestinsky, Michael; Müller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan; Stöhlker, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    A brief review about topical developments in the exploitation of the resonant electron-ion collision process of dielectronic recombination (DR) as a sensitive spectroscopic tool is given. The focus will be on DR storage-ring experiments of few-electron highly charged ions. Among others, the questions addressed in these studies cover diverse topics from the areas of strong-field quantum electrodynamics, of lifetime studies using DR resonances, and of nuclear physics. Examples from the storage rings CRYRING in Stockholm, TSR in Heidelberg, and ESR in Darmstadt are given. In addition, an overview is provided about the ongoing developments and future perspectives of DR collision spectroscopy at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany.

  12. Charged Particle Multiplicity and Open Heavy Flavor Physics in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yujiao

    In this thesis, two independent measurements are presented: the measurements of centrality dependence and pseudo-rapidity dependence of charged particle multiplicities, and the measurements of centrality dependence of open heavy flavor suppression. These measurements are carried out with the Pb+Pb collisions data at the LHC energy sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector. For the charged particle measurements, charged particles are reconstructed with two algorithms (2-point "tracklet" and full tracking) from the pixel detector only. Measurements are presented of the per-event charged particle density distribution, dNch /deta and the average charged particle multiplicity in the pseudo-rapidity interval |eta| <0.5 in several intervals of collision centrality. The results are compared to previous mid-rapidity measurements at the LHC and RHIC. The variation of the mid-rapidity charged particle yield per colliding nucleon pair with the number of participants is consistent with the lower sNN results measured at RHIC. The shape of the dNch/deta distribution is found to be independent of centrality within the systematic uncertainties of the measurement. For the open heavy flavor suppression measurements, muons identified by the muon spectrometer are classified as heavy flavor decays and background contributions by using a fitting procedure with templates from Monte Carlo samples. Results are presented for the per-event muon yield as a function of muon transverse momentum, p T, over the range of 4 < pT < 14 GeV. Over that momentum range single muon production results largely from heavy quark decays. The centrality dependence of the muon yields is characterized by the "central to peripheral" ratio, RCP. Using this measure, muon production from heavy quark decays is found to be suppressed by a centrality-dependent factor that increases smoothly from peripheral to central collisions. Muon production is suppressed by approximately a factor of two in central collisions relative to

  13. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the

  14. Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  15. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies:Dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca+ or Ba+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, O.; Hall, F. H. J.; Eberle, P.; Hegi, G.; Raoult, M.; Aymar, M.; Willitsch, S.

    2013-05-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca+ or Ba+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the collision energy range Ecoll /kB = 20 mK-20 K. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes including the radiative formation of CaRb+ and BaRb+ molecular ions has been analyzed using accurate potential energy curves and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. It is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rates is governed by long-range interactions, while its magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings. The quantum character of the collisions is predicted to manifest itself in the occurrence of narrow shape resonances at well-defined collision energies. The present results highlight both universal and system-specific phenomena in cold ion-neutral collisions. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the COST Action ''Ion Traps for Tomorrow's Applications''.

  16. The dynamics of gas-surface energy exchange in collisions of Ar atoms with ω-functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, B. Scott; Shuler, Shelby F.; Ducre, Adonis; Morris, John R.

    2003-10-01

    Atomic-beam scattering experiments using n-alkanethiol and ω-functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold are employed to explore the dynamics of gas-surface energy exchange in collisions with model organic surfaces. The studies are performed by directing a nearly monoenergetic beam of 80 kJ/mol Ar atoms onto a particular SAM at an incident angle of 30° with respect to the surface normal and recording the time-of-flight distributions for the atoms as they scatter from the surface at a final angle of 30°. Among the monolayers studied, long-chain CH3-terminated SAMs are found to be the most effective at dissipating the translational energy of impinging atoms. For alkanethiols with greater than seven total carbon atoms (HS(CH2)n>6CH3), we find that, for specular scattering conditions, over 80% of the incident energy is transferred to the surface and that over 60% of the impinging atoms approach thermal equilibrium with the surface before scattering back into the gas phase. In contrast to CH3-terminated monolayers, SAMs constructed from hydrogen-bonding alkanethiols: HS(CH2)11OH, HS(CH2)10COOH, and HS(CH2)11NH2, exhibit characteristics of more rigid collision partners. The Ar atoms transfer about 77% of their energy to these surfaces with only 43% of the atoms reaching thermal or near thermal equilibrium before recoiling. Further comparisons of mixed OH- and CH3-terminated SAMs and alkene-terminated SAMs suggest that intramonolayer hydrogen bonding of terminal functional groups may play an important role in determining the extent of energy transfer and thermalization.

  17. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: status report 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumberidze, A.; Stöhlker, Th; Litvinov, Yu A.; SPARC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    In this contribution, a brief overview of the Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration scientific program at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is given. The program comprises a very broad range of research topics addressing atomic structure and dynamics in hitherto unexplored regimes, light-matter interactions, lepton pair production phenomena, precision tests of quantum electrodynamics and standard model in the regime of extreme fields and many more. We also present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned physics program within the modularized start version (MSV) of FAIR.

  18. Search for New Physics with a Monojet and Missing Transverse Energy in 7 TeV pp collisions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergili, Mehmet

    2012-03-01

    We present a search for new physics in events with a single energetic jet and large missing energy in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The search is performed using data collected by the CMS detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. The topology is a signature of many new physics models, including large extra dimensions in the framework of ADD, Unparticle production and several dark matter scenarios. Results are interpreted within the context of each of these models, including the production of dark matter.

  19. Clock Technology Development in the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Dave; Thompson, R. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. It focuses on clock technology development. The topics include: 1) Overview of LCAP Flight Projects; 2) Space Clock 101; 3) Physics with Clocks in microgravity; 4) Space Clock Challenges; 5) LCAP Timeline; 6) International Space Station (ISS) Science Platforms; 7) ISS Express Rack; 8) Space Qualification of Components; 9) Laser Configuration; 10) Clock Rate Comparisons: GPS Carrier Phase Frequency Transfer; and 11) ISS Model Views. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  20. Physical re-examination of parameters on a molecular collisions-based diffusion model for diffusivity prediction in polymers.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Hidenori; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2011-12-29

    Molecular collisions, which are the microscopic origin of molecular diffusive motion, are affected by both the molecular surface area and the distance between molecules. Their product can be regarded as the free space around a penetrant molecule defined as the "shell-like free volume" and can be taken as a characteristic of molecular collisions. On the basis of this notion, a new diffusion theory has been developed. The model can predict molecular diffusivity in polymeric systems using only well-defined single-component parameters of molecular volume, molecular surface area, free volume, and pre-exponential factors. By consideration of the physical description of the model, the actual body moved and which neighbor molecules are collided with are the volume and the surface area of the penetrant molecular core. In the present study, a semiempirical quantum chemical calculation was used to calculate both of these parameters. The model and the newly developed parameters offer fairly good predictive ability. PMID:22082054

  1. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. I. Long-range interaction effects in the ionic-covalent coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. S. Narits, A. A.

    2013-10-15

    Ion-pair formation processes are studied in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles possessing small electron affinities. Nonadiabatic transitions from a Rydberg covalent term to an ionic term of a quasi-molecule are considered using the modified Landau-Zener theory supplemented with calculation of survival factors of an anion decaying in the Coulomb field of a positive ion core. Using the technique of irreducible tensor operators and the momentum representation of the wavefunction of a highly excited atom, exact expressions are obtained for transition matrix elements and the ionic-covalent coupling parameter. The approach developed in the paper provides the description beyond the scope of a conventional assumption about a small variation of the wavefunction of the Rydberg atom on the range of electron coordinates determined by the characteristic radius of the wavefunction of the anion. This allows one to correctly consider long-range effects of the interaction between a weakly bound electron and the neutral core of a negative ion in processes under study. It is shown by the example of thermal collisions of Xe(nf) atoms with CH{sub 3}CN molecules that this is very important for a reliable quantitative description of anion formation with a low binding energy. The results are compared with experiments and calculations performed within the framework of a number of approximate methods.

  2. Do General Physics Textbooks Discuss Scientists' Ideas about Atomic Structure? A Case in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Kwon, Sangwoon; Kim, Nahyun; Lee, Gyoungho

    2013-01-01

    Research in science education has recognized the importance of teaching atomic structure within a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to evaluate general physics textbooks published in Korea based on the eight criteria developed in previous research. The result of this study shows that Korean general…

  3. Collision experiments with fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. E. B.; Ehlich, R.; Westerburg, M.; Hertel, I. V.

    1993-12-01

    Relative fragmentation cross sections for fullerene ion collisions with rare gas atoms and SF6 are presented over a range of collision energies. Structure in the cross sections and threshold energy determinations can shed some light on the fragmentation dynamics. Cluster cluster collisions with fullerenes are also described which show evidence of fusion reactions.

  4. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is it Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Mercè; Adúriz-Bravo, Agustín

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process of evidence construction, new contributions from physicists and physical chemists that were incorporated to chemical research acquired ‘chemical’ meaning, since they were related to research questions that genuinely came from chemistry. Conversely, the core ideas of 19th-century chemical atomism, among which we must highlight valence and Mendeleev’s periodic system, provided ‘clues’ for imagining an atom in terms of the elements adjusted to their chemical behaviour, which changed periodically as a function of atomic mass. With this, chemistry ceased to be a descriptive science and began to be a ‘law-based’, theoretical science. Little by little, chemistry teaching became the teaching of the internal structure of atoms, which were arranged in the Periodic Table according to criteria and ‘construction rules’ related to quantum mechanics. We pose the question: ‘how can we now teach general chemistry in a way that does not disregard current knowledge about the structure of the atom yet, at the same time, gives priority to chemical criteria, thus making such structure useful to interpret chemical change?’.

  5. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    SciTech Connect

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  6. Two-center effect on low-energy electron emission in collisions of 1-MeV/u bare ions with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and helium. I. Atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Richard, P.; Gulyás, L.; Rudd, M. E.; Moshammer, R.

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated ionization mechanisms in fast ion-atom collisions by measuring the low-energy electron emission cross sections in a pure three-body collision involving bare carbon ions (v=6.35 a.u.) colliding with atomic hydrogen targets. The measurements have also been extended to molecular hydrogen and helium targets. In this paper we provide the energy and angular distributions of double differential cross sections of low-energy electron emission for atomic hydrogen targets. The Slevin rf source with a high degree of dissociation was used to produce the atomic H target. It is found that the two-center effect has a major influence on the observed large forward-backward angular asymmetry. A detailed comparison is presented with calculations based on the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) and CDW-EIS (eikonal initial-state) approximations. Both the continuum distorted-wave calculations provide a very good understanding of the data, whereas the first Born calculation predicts almost symmetric forward-backward distributions that do not agree with the data. The two-center effect is slightly better represented by the CDW calculations compared to the CDW-EIS calculation. The total cross sections are, however, in good agreement with the theories used. The results for molecular hydrogen and helium will be discussed in the following paper.

  7. Threshold Laws for Two-Electron Ejection Processes: A Still Controversial Problem in Atomic Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    This talk deals with collision processes of the following kind: (a) an ionizing collision of an electron with a neutral atom, (b) a photon incident of a negative ion resulting in two-electron ejection. In both cases the final state is a positive ion and two outgoing electrons, and in principle both processes should be governed by the same form of threshold law. It is generally conceded that this is one of the most difficult basic problems in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The standard treatment (due to Wannier) will be briefly reviewed in terms of the derivation of his well- known threshold law for the yield (Q) of positive ions vs. the excess energy (E): Q(sub w) varies as E(exp 1.127...). The derivation is a brilliant analysis based on Newton's equations, leading to the dominance of events in which the two electrons emerge on opposite sides of the residual ion with similar energies. In contrast, I will argue on the basis of quantum mechanical ideas that in the threshold limit the more likely outcome are events in which the electrons emerge with decidedly different energies, leading to a formally different (Coulomb-dipole) threshold law Q(sub CD) varies as E(1 + C sin(alpha ln(E)+mu)]/[ln(E)](exp 2). Additional aspects of that approach will be discussed . Some: experimental results will be presented, and more incisive predictions involving polarized projectiles and targets will be given.

  8. Do general physics textbooks discuss scientists’ ideas about atomic structure? A case in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, Mansoor; Kwon, Sangwoon; Kim, Nahyun; Lee, Gyoungho

    2013-01-01

    Research in science education has recognized the importance of teaching atomic structure within a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to evaluate general physics textbooks published in Korea based on the eight criteria developed in previous research. The result of this study shows that Korean general physics textbooks often lack detail about the history and philosophy of science. This result is quite similar to those published for the USA. Furthermore, chemistry textbooks published in the USA, Turkey and Venezuela are quite similar to the physics textbooks. This is a cause for concern as textbooks present theories as facts and ignore the historical reconstructions based on the development of scientific theories that frequently involve controversies and conflicts among scientists. The inclusion of historical reconstructions of ideas about atomic structure can provide students with a better appreciation of the dynamics of scientific progress.

  9. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms: Close coupling, coupled states, and effective potential calculations for NH3-He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1976-01-01

    The formalism for describing rotational excitation in collisions between symmetric top rigid rotors and spherical atoms is presented both within the accurate quantum close coupling framework and also the coupled states approximation of McGuire and Kouri and the effective potential approximation of Rabitz. Calculations are reported for thermal energy NH3-He collisions, treating NH3 as a rigid rotor and employing a uniform electron gas (Gordon-Kim) approximation for the intermolecular potential. Coupled states are found to be in nearly quantitative agreement with close coupling results while the effective potential method is found to be at least qualitatively correct. Modifications necessary to treat the inversion motion in NH3 are discussed.

  10. Collision-energy-resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of p-benzoquinone: Study of electronic structure and anisotropic interaction with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Okamura, Kohji; Ohno, Koichi

    2004-06-01

    Collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) of p-benzoquinone with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms indicates that interaction potentials between p-benzoquinone and He*(2 3S) are highly anisotropic in the studied collision energy range (100-250 meV). Attractive interactions were found around the C=O groups for in-plane and out-of-plane directions, while repulsive interactions were found around CH bonds and the benzenoid ring. Assignment of the first four ionic states of p-benzoquinone and an analogous methyl-substituted compound was examined with CEDPICS and anisotropic distributions of the corresponding two nonbonding oxygen orbitals (nO+,nO-) and two πCC orbitals (πCC+,πCC-). An extra band that shows negative CEDPICS was observed at ca. 7.2 eV in Penning ionization electron spectrum.

  11. Cross sections of electron capture and electron capture ionization versus the impact parameter in collisions of a proton with multielectron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Ogurtsov, G. N.; Panov, M. N.

    2014-05-01

    The absolute differential cross sections of scattering of hydrogen atoms resulting from an electron capture and an electron capture ionization are measured for collisions of 4.5- and 11-keV protons with argon and xenon atoms. The range of scattering angles is 0°-2°. From the scattering differential cross section found experimentally, the probabilities of single-electron capture and electron capture ionization as a function of the impact parameter are calculated. The dependences of the incident particle scattering angle on the impact parameter (deviation function) for interactions with Ar and Xe atoms are calculated in terms of classical mechanics using the Moliére—Yukawa potential to describe the interaction of atomic particles. Analysis is given to the probabilities of electron capture and electron capture ionization versus the impact parameter and to the distribution of the electron density on different electron shells in a target atom versus a distance to the core. It is concluded that only electrons from the outer shell of the target atom are involved in the process of electron capture ionization. The cross section of electron capture ionization is calculated in the proton energy range 5-20 keV.

  12. PREFACE: Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Kasai, Hideaki

    2011-10-01

    To realize next generation functional devices, atomic level controllability of the application and fabrication techniques is necessary. The conventional route to advance solid state devices, which involves improvement of 'instrumental accuracy', is now facing a major paradigm shift towards 'phenomenal accuracy'. Therefore, to keep up with this critical turn in the development of devices, pioneering research (both theoretical and experimental) on relevant materials, focusing on new physics at the atomic scale, is inevitable. This special section contains articles on the advancements in fabrication of functional devices with an emphasis on the exploration, clarification and understanding of atomistic phenomena. Research articles reporting theoretical and experimental findings on various materials such as semiconductors, metals, magnetic and organic systems, collectively present and 'capture' the appropriate processes and mechanisms of this rapidly developing field. The theoretical investigations employ first-principles quantum-mechanical simulations to clarify and bring about design principles and guidelines, or to develop more reliable computational methods. Experimental studies, on the other hand, introduce novel capabilities to build, view and manipulate materials at the atomic scale by employing pioneering techniques. Thus, the section pays significant attention to novel structures and properties and the accompanying fabrication techniques and design arising from the understanding of properties and structures at the atomic scale. We hope that researchers in the area of physics, materials science and engineering, interested in the development of functional devices via atomic level control, will find valuable information in this collaborative work. We are grateful to all of the authors for their contributions. Atomically controlled fabrication contents On the mechanism of carbon nanotube formation: the role of the catalyst G N Ayre, T Uchino, B Mazumder, A L Hector

  13. Polarization and electronic excitation in nonreactive collisions: Basic formulation for quantum calculations of collisions between /sup 2/P-state alkali-metal atoms and H/sub 2/ or D/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Baylis, W.E.; Pascale, J.; Rossi, F.

    1987-11-01

    The inelastic scattering of two structured systems: for example, an excited atom and a molecule: is considered in the case of nonreactive collisions. Explicit formulas are presented for cross sections corresponding to transitions between arbitrary eigenstates of the two isolated systems. These formulas are then used to derive cross sections for polarization transfer and multipole relaxation in one system when the other system is unpolarized. Both space-fixed and body-fixed formulations are given. Explicit matrix elements are worked out for interactions such as occur between model alkali-metal atoms and rigid-rotor diatomic molecules. An effective interaction method is also discussed and related to an adiabatic-state approach.

  14. Photoemission from solids: the transition from solid-state to atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.A.

    1980-08-01

    As the photon energy is increased, photoemission from solids undergoes a slow transition from solid-state to atomic behavior. However, throughout the energy range h..nu.. = 10 to 1000 eV or higher both types of phenomena are present. Thus angle-resolved photoemission can only be understood quantitatively if each experimenter recognizes the presence of band-structure, photoelectron diffraction, and photoelectron asymmetry effects. The quest for this understanding will build some interesting bridges between solid-state and atomic physics and should also yield important new insights about the phenomena associated with photoemission.

  15. The Advanced Light Source: A new tool for research in atomic and molecular physics

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1991-04-01

    The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the world's brightest synchrotron radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum when it begins operation in 1993. It will be available as a national user facility to researchers in a broad range of disciplines, including materials science, atomic and molecular physics, chemistry, biology, imaging, and technology. The high brightness of the ALS will be particularly well suited to high-resolution studies of tenuous targets, such as excited atoms, ions, and clusters. 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. The Physics of Miniature Atomic Clocks: 0-0 Versus "End" Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Amber; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Kuzma, Nicholas; Happer, William

    2003-05-01

    The majority of traditional atomic-clock designs are based on the 0-0 hyperfine transition of a Cs 133 atom. We are currently investigating the advantages of operating a miniature optical atomic clock using the "end" transitions, e.g. connecting states |f=1, mf =+/-1> and |f=2, mf=+/-2> in 87Rb. In our paper we present extensive new measurements of relevant relaxation rates, such as those due to spin-exchange collisions, buffer-gas pressure shifts, Carver Rates and others, which ultimately determine the choices of an operating regime for the miniature optical atomic clock. The relationship between these rates is non-trivial: for example, using higher laser power will increase polarization and reduce the spin-exchange rate [1], but it can simultaneously increase the linewidth due to the optical pumping rate. The dependence of these and other relaxation rates on the cell size, temperature, pressure, a choice of buffer gas, and other parameters will be reported. Based on these measured rates, our modeling can be used to predict the transition linewidths, signal-to-noise ratios and thus the stability of the clock in different operating regimes. The trade-off between the stability of the clock and the desired small cell size and low power consumption needs to be carefully considered in order to optimize our design. In our experiments we used optical, microwave, and radio-frequency excitation to study hyperfine and Zeeman resonance lines in heated glass cells containing pure-isotope alkali-metal vapor and buffer gasses (N2, Ar, He, etc.) at low (0 - 10 G) magnetic fields. Simultaneous use of light, microwave and radio-frequency fields allowed us to calibrate surrounding magnetic fields by observing the corresponding shifts of the resonance, thus leading us to a quantitative understanding of our system. [1] S. Appelt, A. B. Baranga, A. R. Young, W. Happer, Phys. Rev. A 59, 2078 (1999).

  17. Physical essence of the multibody contact-sliding at atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    Investigation the multibody contact-sliding occurred at atomic discrete contact spot will play an important role in determine the origin of tribology behavior and evaluates the micro-mechanical property of nanomaterials and thus optimizing the design of surface texture. This paper carries out large scale parallel molecular dynamics simulation on contact-sliding at atomic scale to uncover the special physical essence. The research shows that some kind of force field exists between nanodot pair and the interaction can be expressed by the linear combination of exponential function while the effective interaction distance limited in 1 angstrom for nanodot with several tens of nanometer diameter. The variation tendency about the interaction force between nanodot array is almost the same between nanodot pairs and thus the interaction between two nanodot array can be characterized by parallel mechanical spring. Multibody effect which dominates the interaction between atoms or molecules will gradually diminish with the increasing of length scales.

  18. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, John F.; Emmert, Gilbert A.

    2013-11-07

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  19. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization.

  20. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization. PMID:26787443

  1. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  2. Construction and Characterization of External Cavity Diode Lasers for Atomic Physics

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Kyle S.; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E.; Kuhn, Carlos C. N.; McDonald, Gordon D.; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs1,2. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling1,2 makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman3, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  3. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  4. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: The development of the first Soviet atomic bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, German A.; Ryabev, Lev D.

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1930s and early 1940s, two remarkable physical phenomena — the fission of heavy nuclei and the chain fission reaction — were discovered, implying that a new powerful source of energy (nuclear fission energy) might become a practical possibility for mankind. At that time, however, the political situation in the world made the development of the atomic bomb the main objective of nuclear energy research in the countries involved. The first atomic bombs, notoriously used in the war against Japan, were produced by the United States of America only six and a half years after the discovery of fission. Four years later, the first Soviet atomic bomb was tested. This was a major step toward the establishment of nuclear parity which led to stability and global peace and thus greatly influenced the destiny of human kind. Based on documentary materials covering the period from 1939 to 1949, this paper traces the origin and evolution of the physical ideas behind the first Soviet atomic bomb and discusses the most important events associated with the project.

  5. Focus on topological physics: from condensed matter to cold atoms and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Hui; Rechtsman, Mikael; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Kun

    2016-08-01

    The notions of a topological phase and topological order were first introduced in the studies of integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, and further developed in the study of topological insulators and topological superconductors in the past decade. Topological concepts are now widely used in many branches of physics, not only limited to condensed matter systems but also in ultracold atomic systems, photonic materials and trapped ions. Papers published in this focus issue are direct testaments of that, and readers will gain a global view of how topology impacts different branches of contemporary physics. We hope that these pages will inspire new ideas through communication between different fields.

  6. Enhanced synthesis of Sn nanowires with aid of Se atom via physical vapor transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huacheng; Wang, Wendong; Liu, Peiwen; Wang, Guangming; Liu, Ankang; He, Zhe; Cheng, Zhaofang; Zhang, Shengli; Xia, Minggang

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate tin (Sn) nanowires growth enhanced by Selenium (Se) atoms via physical vapor transport (PVT) method. The Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that Sn nanowires are synthesized with a large quantity, good quality and high purity of Sn. The growth of Sn nanowires is attributed to Solid-Vapor-Liquid mechanism. The effects of gold nanoparticles catalyst, Si substrate, and Se atoms on Sn nanowires growth are discussed in detail. We find that Se atom plays a key role in the growth of Sn nanowires. The gaseous Sn atoms are absorbed by the eutectic alloy droplets of Se-Au at first. Then Sn atoms precipitate at the liquid-solid phase interface due to a supersaturated solution and form a one-dimensional nanostructure. In all, this PVT method could provide a simple and quick way to synthesize monocrystalline Sn nanowires with an advantage in both quality and quantity. The optical transmittance of Sn nanowires thin film with 2 μm2 density approaches 85-90% in visible wavelength. Therefore, the Sn nanowires thin film can be applied to transparent electrode along with their metallic property.

  7. Atomic Physics in ITER — The Foundation for the Next Step to Fusion Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Bell, R. E.; Hill, K. W.; Johnson, D. W.; Levinton, F. M.

    2007-04-01

    ITER represents the next step towards practical magnetic confinement fusion power. Its primary physics objective is to study plasmas in which the fusion power exceeds the external heating power by a factor of 5 to 10; its technological objectives include the use of superconducting magnets and remote maintenance. We will describe the ITER experiment and then detail the fundamental roles that will be played by atomic physics processes in facilitating the achievement of ITER's objectives. First, atoms and molecules generated by the interaction of the ITER plasma with surrounding material surfaces will impact and, in some respects, dominate the particle, momentum, and energy balances in both the adjacent and confined, core plasmas. Second, impurity radiation in the edge plasma, either from intrinsic or extrinsic species, will ensure that heat coming out from the core is spread more uniformly over the surrounding material surfaces than it would otherwise. Third, many of the diagnostics used to monitor the dense (ne ˜ 1020 m-3), hot (˜ 1 × 108 K) core plasma leverage off of atomic physics effects.

  8. From the Dawn of Nuclear Physics to the First Atomic Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolbright, Stephen; Schumacher, Jacob; Michonova-Alexova, Ekaterina

    2014-03-01

    This work gives a fresh look at the major discoveries leading to nuclear fission within the historical perspective. The focus is on the main contributors to the discoveries in nuclear physics, leading to the idea of fission and its application to the creation of the atomic bombs used at the end of the World War II. The present work is a more complete review on the history of the nuclear physics discoveries and their application to the atomic bomb. In addition to the traditional approach to the topic, focusing mainly on the fundamental physics discoveries in Europe and on the Manhattan Project in the United States, the nuclear research in Japan is also emphasized. Along with that, a review of the existing credible scholar publications, providing evidence for possible atomic bomb research in Japan, is provided. Proper credit is given to the women physicists, whose contributions had not always been recognized. Considering the historical and political situation at the time of the scientific discoveries, thought-provoking questions about decision-making, morality, and responsibility are also addressed. The work refers to the contributions of over 20 Nobel Prize winners. EM-A is grateful to Prof. Walter Grunden and to Prof. Emeritus Shadahiko Kano, Prof. Emeritus Monitori Hoshi for sharing their own notes, documents, and references, and to CCCU for sponsoring her participation in the 2013 Nuclear Weapons Seminar in Japan.

  9. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Study of Atom-Diatomic Molecule Collisions in Symmetric Hyperspherical Coordinates: The F + HCl Reaction as a Test Case.

    PubMed

    Freixas-Lemus, Victor Manuel; Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Uranga-Piña, Llinersy

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reactive dynamics of the triatomic system F + HCl → HF + Cl for total angular momentum equal zero and for different low-lying rovibrational states of the diatomic molecule. For each of the initial vibrational quantum numbers, the time evolution of the atom-diatom collision process is investigated for a wide range of impact angles and collision energies. To this purpose, the Quasi-Classical Trajectories (QCT) method was implemented in a hyperspherical configuration space. The Hamilton equations of motion are solved numerically in an intermediate effective Cartesian space to exploit the relative simplicity of this intermediate representation. Interatomic interactions are described by a London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy surface, specifically developed for the title reaction, and the results of the QCT simulations are discussed in terms of the time-evolution of the hyperangles. The analysis of the collision dynamics using symmetric hyperspherical coordinates provides, in addition to the description in terms of a natural reaction coordinate (the hyperradius), a more striking representation of the exchange dynamics, in terms of the time-dependent probability distribution along the kinematic rotation hyperangle, and a precise distinction between direct and indirect mechanisms of the reaction. PMID:27002240

  10. Influence of inelastic collisions with hydrogen atoms on the formation of AlI and SiI lines in stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L. I.; Belyaev, A. K.; Shi, J.-R.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed calculations by abandoning the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (within the so-called non-LTE approach) for Al I and Si I with model atmospheres corresponding to stars of spectral types F-G-Kwith differentmetal abundances. To take into account inelastic collisions with hydrogen atoms, for the first time we have applied the cross sections calculated by Belyaev et al. using model approaches within the formalism of the Born-Oppenheimer quantum theory. We show that for Al I non-LTE leads to higher ionization (overionization) than in LTE in the spectral line formation region and to a weakening of spectral lines, which is consistent with earlier non-LTE studies. However, our results, especially for the subordinate lines, differ quantitatively from the results of predecessors. Owing to their large cross sections, the ion-pair production and mutual neutralization processes Al I( nl) + HI(1 s) ↔ Al II(3 s 2) + H- provide a close coupling of highly excited Al I levels with the Al II ground state, which causes the deviations from the equilibrium level population to decrease compared to the calculations where the collisions only with electrons are taken into account. For three moderately metal-deficient dwarf stars, the aluminum abundance has been determined from seven Al I lines in different models of their formation. Under the assumption of LTE and in non-LTE calculations including the collisions only with electrons, the Al I 3961 ˚A resonance line gives a systematically lower abundance than the mean abundance from the subordinate lines, by 0.25-0.45 dex. The difference for each star is removed by taking into account the collisions with hydrogen atoms, and the rms error of the abundance derived from all seven Al I lines decreases by a factor of 1.5-3 compared to the LTE analysis. We have calculated the non- LTE corrections to the abundance for six subordinate Al I lines as a function of the effective temperature (4500 K ≤ T eff ≤ 6500 K

  11. State-Selective and Total Single-Capture Cross Sections for Fast Collisions of Multiply Charged Ions with Helium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-11-01

    The four-body boundary corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B) is used to calculate the single electron capture cross sections for collisions between fully stripped ions (He2+, Be4+, B5+ and C6+) and helium target at intermediate and high impact energies. The main goal of this study is to assess the usefulness of the CB1-4B method at intermediate and high impact energies for these collisions. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  12. Quantum-mechanical calculation of three-dimensional atom-diatom collisions in the presence of intense laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    A formalism is presented for describing the collision of fluorine with the hydrogen molecule in the presence of intense radiation. For a laser frequency on the order of the spin-orbit splitting of fluorine, the interaction of the molecular system with the radiation occurs at relatively long range where, for this system, the electric dipole is vanishingly small. Hence the interaction occurs due to the magnetic dipole coupling. Even so, at low collision energies a substantial enhancement of the quenching cross section is found for a radiation intensity of 10 to the 11th W/sq cm.

  13. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Conclusions Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear

  14. Laser-Induced Optical Pumping Measurements of Cross Section for Fine- and Hyperfine-Structure Transitions in Sodium Induced by Collisions with Helium and Argon Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Sung, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Optical pumping of the ground states of sodium can radically alter the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating measurements of temperature, pressure, etc., which are based on these spectra. Modeling of the fluorescence using rate equations for the eight hyperfine states of the sodium D manifolds can be used to quantify the contribution to the ground state pumping of transitions among the hyperfine excited states induced by collisions with buffer gas atoms. This model is used here to determine, from the shape of experimental spectra, cross sections lor DELTA.F transitions of the P(sub 3/2) state induced by collisions with helium and argon atoms, for a range of values assumed for the P(sub 1/2), DELTA.F cross sections. The hyperfine cross sections measured using this method, which to our knowledge is novel, are compared with cross sections for transitions involving polarized magnetic substates m(sub F) measured previously using polarization sensitive absorption. Also, fine-structure transition cross sections were measured in the pumped vapor, giving agreement with previous measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  15. Laser Induced Optical Pumping Measurements of Cross Sections for Fine and Hyperfine Structure Transitions in Sodium Induced by Collisions with Helium Argon Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Sung, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical pumping of the ground states of sodium can radically alter the shape of the laser induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating measurements of temperature, pressure, etc., which are based on these spectra. Modeling of the fluorescence using rate equations for the eight hyperfine states of the sodium D manifolds can be used to quantify the contribution to the ground state pumping of transitions among the hyperfine excited states induced by collisions with buffer gas atoms. This model is used here to determine, from the shape of experimental spectra, cross sections for (Delta)F transitions of the P(sub 3/2) state induced by collisions with helium and argon atoms, for a range of values assumed for the P(sub 1/2), (Delta)F cross sections. The hyperfine cross sections measured using this method, which is thought to be novel, are compared with cross sections for transitions involving polarized magnetic substates, m(sub F), measured previously using polarization sensitive absorption. Also, fine structure transition ((Delta)J) cross sections were measured in the pumped vapor, giving agreement with previous measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  16. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for “production use”, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis. Catalogue identifier: AETI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 440 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 643 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11. Computer: Any. Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized by OpenMP and MPI. RAM: Depending on input; 4.9 GiB for the test run. Classification: 2.4. External routines: GSL [1], HDF5 [2], UMFPACK [3], FFTW3 [4], optionally with OpenBLAS [5]. Nature of problem: Solution of the two-particle Schrödinger equation in central field. Solution method: The two-electron states are expanded into angular momentum eigenstates, which gives rise to the coupled bi-radial equations. The bi-radially dependent solution is then represented in a B-spline basis, which transforms the set of equations into a large matrix equation in this basis. The boundary condition

  17. Phases and Interfaces from Real Space Atomically Resolved Data: Physics-Based Deep Data Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-09-14

    Advances in electron and scanning probe microscopies have led to a wealth of atomically resolved structural and electronic data, often with ∼1-10 pm precision. However, knowledge generation from such data requires the development of a physics-based robust framework to link the observed structures to macroscopic chemical and physical descriptors, including single phase regions, order parameter fields, interfaces, and structural and topological defects. Here, we develop an approach based on a synergy of sliding window Fourier transform to capture the local analog of traditional structure factors combined with blind linear unmixing of the resultant 4D data set. This deep data analysis is ideally matched to the underlying physics of the problem and allows reconstruction of the a priori unknown structure factors of individual components and their spatial localization. We demonstrate the principles of this approach using a synthetic data set and further apply it for extracting chemical and physically relevant information from electron and scanning tunneling microscopy data. This method promises to dramatically speed up crystallographic analysis in atomically resolved data, paving the road toward automatic local structure-property determinations in crystalline and quasi-ordered systems, as well as systems with competing structural and electronic order parameters. PMID:27517608

  18. Stalking the Anti-Racist Atom: Engaging Educational Equity and Diversity in Physics Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodari, Apriel K.

    2006-12-01

    One of the first articles I ever read on diversity in physics education stated, “There’s no such thing as an anti-racist atom.” This perspective, that the science of physics is itself inherently unbiased, illustrates the difficulty of engaging our intellectual community on this topic. We genuinely believe that our science is devoid of the complications of the human condition, and therefore we need not worry about these things. It is clear however, as people competing for scarce resources in a non-equitable society, we engage in all of the same behaviors everyone else does, include those that work against equity and diversity. Over the last several years, my colleagues and I have held workshops aimed at addressing educational equity and diversity in physics teaching. In this discussion, I will present some of the questions we have posed, along with lessons learned and ideas about what we can do next.

  19. Resolving all-order method convergence problems for atomic physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gharibnejad, H.; Derevianko, A.; Eliav, E.; Safronova, M. S.

    2011-05-15

    The development of the relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory led to many important results for the study of fundamental symmetries, development of atomic clocks, ultracold atom physics, and others, as well as provided recommended values of many atomic properties critically evaluated for their accuracy for a large number of monovalent systems. This approach requires iterative solutions of the linearized coupled-cluster equations leading to convergence issues in some cases where correlation corrections are particularly large or lead to an oscillating pattern. Moreover, these issues also lead to similar problems in the configuration-interaction (CI)+all-order method for many-particle systems. In this work, we have resolved most of the known convergence problems by applying two different convergence stabilizer methods, namely, reduced linear equation and direct inversion of iterative subspace. Examples are presented for B, Al, Zn{sup +}, and Yb{sup +}. Solving these convergence problems greatly expands the number of atomic species that can be treated with the all-order methods and is anticipated to facilitate many interesting future applications.

  20. Preparation of a mixture of ultracold Cs-133 and Li-6 atoms for the study of inter- species collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Kuang; Parker, Colin; Johansen, Jacob; Chin, Cheng

    2012-06-01

    We report experimental progress toward a Bose-Fermi mixture of Cs-133 (Boson) and Li-6 (Fermion) atoms. Based on a dual-species magneto-optical trap, we trap 10^8 Cs atoms and 10^9 Li atoms at temperatures of ˜30 μK and ˜300 μK, respectively. Further optical cooling, including optical molasses and degenerate Raman sideband cooling, also have been implemented to cool Cs atoms down to a temperature of 2 μK. The cooling allows us to load 2*10^7 Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap. We plan to load Li atoms into a second dipole trap, which spatially separates Li atoms from Cs atoms. After evaporative cooling Li atoms down to a temperature of few μK in the second dipole trap, we will merge the two samples to study collisional properties between the two species. The collisional properties will provide essential knowledge for us to work toward achieving a degenerate quantum gas of cesium and lithium mixture. Furthermore, the result will give important information to identify Li-Cs molecular states below the continuum, from which a scalable quantum information processing can be implemented.

  1. Collisions of Sodium Atoms with Liquid Glycerol: Insights into Na Atom Solvation and Ionization and the Reactions of Near-Interfacial Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanson, Gilbert

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 70 years, thousands of reactions between solvated electrons and dissolved species have been investigated in water and other protic solvents. Electrons born at the surface of the solvent, however, may react differently than those created within it. We have explored this interfacial reactivity by directing sodium atoms at the surface of liquid glycerol in vacuum. Gas-liquid scattering experiments show that electrons generated from the Na atoms produce hydrogen atoms and hydrogen molecules, hydroxide ions and water, and glycerol fragments. Remarkably, nearly half the hydrogen atoms created near the surface escape into vacuum before reacting with the solvent. Complementary ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of Na striking a 17-molecule glycerol cluster indicate that the glycerol hydroxyl groups reorient around the Na atom as it makes contact with the cluster and begins to ionize on the picosecond timescale. The experiments and simulations together indicate that Na-atom deposition provides a low-energy pathway for generating solvated electrons in the near-interfacial region of protic liquids.

  2. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leibrandt, D. R. Heidecker, J.

    2015-12-15

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of {sup 27}Al{sup +} in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  3. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrandt, D. R.; Heidecker, J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of 27Al+ in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  4. Testing for a cosmological influence on local physics using atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.; Hellings, R. W.; Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of a possible influence of the large-scale structure of the universe on local physics is discussed. A particular realization of such an influence is discussed in terms of the behavior in time of atomic and gravitational clocks. Two natural categories of metric theories embodying a cosmic infuence exist. The first category has geodesic equations of motion in atomic units, while the second category has geodesic equations of motion in gravitational units. Equations of motion for test bodies are derived for both categories of theories in the appropriate parametrized post-Newtonian limit and are applied to the Solar System. Ranging data to the Viking lander on Mars are of sufficient precision to reveal (1) if such a cosmological influence exists at the level of Hubble's constant, and (2) which category of theories is appropriate for a descripton of the phenomenon.

  5. Broadening of the Interplanetary Helium Cone Structure Due to Elastic Collisions of LISM Helium Atoms with Solar Wind Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, H. J.; Nass, H. U.; Rucinski, D.

    1984-01-01

    Neutral interstellar particles penetrating into the heliosphere, besides being subject there to specific loss processes, suffer elastic collisions with KeV-solar wind ions. The momentum transfer to the neutrals connected with these collisions leads to a loss of angular momentum with respect to the Sun and to a fractional compensation of the effective solar gravity. The dynamical particle trajectories hence are changed into non-Keplerians leading to density and temperature distributions differing from those calculated in the past. This is found from a solution of the Boltzmann equation that linearizes the effect of this additional force. It is shown that the HeI-584A resonance glow of the heliospheric helium cone lead to substantially lower interstellar helium temperatures if re-interpreted on the basis of this revised theory. These temperatures now seem to be in accordance with the derived temperatures for interstellar hydrogen.

  6. Broadening of the interplanetary helium cone structure due to elastic collisions of LISM helium atoms with solar wind ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahr, H.J.; Nass, H.U.; Rucinski, D.

    1984-11-01

    Neutral interstellar particles penetrating into the heliosphere, besides being subject there to specific loss processes, suffer elastic collisions with KeV-solar wind ions. The momentum transfer to the neutrals connected with these collisions leads to a loss of angular momentum with respect to the Sun and to a fractional compensation of the effective solar gravity. The dynamical particle trajectories hence are changed into non-Keplerians leading to density and temperature distributions differing from those calculated in the past. This is found from a solution of the Boltzmann equation that linearizes the effect of this additional force. It is shown that the HeI-584A resonance glow of the heliospheric helium cone lead to substantially lower interstellar helium temperatures if re-interpreted on the basis of this revised theory. These temperatures now seem to be in accordance with the derived temperatures for interstellar hydrogen.

  7. Studies of fluctuation processes in nuclear collisions. [Dept. of Physics, Tennessee Technological Univ. , Cookeville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S.

    1993-02-01

    Investigations of various aspects of heavy-ion collisions were carried out in the framework of the Boltzmann-Langevin Model (BLM). In a previous work, by projection the BLM onto a collective space, a memory-dependent collective transport model was reduced. This model was applied to thermal fission to investigate the influence of the memory effects on the fission dynamics. Some results of the calculations are presented. In addition a reduction of the relativistic BLM to a two-fluid model was carried out, and transport coefficients associated with fluid dynamical variables was carried out. Then this model was applied to investigate equilabration and fluctuation properties in a counter-streaming nuclear fluid.

  8. Particle-in-cell charged-particle simulations, plus Monte Carlo collisions with neutral atoms, PIC-MCC

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences)

    1991-04-01

    Many-particle (meaning 100's) charged-particle plasma simulations using spatial meshes for the electromagnetic field solutions, particle-in-cell (PIC) merged with Monte Carlo collision (MCC) calculations, are coming into wide use for application to partially ionized gases. This paper emphasizes the development of PIC computer experiments since the 1950's starting with one-dimensional (1-D) charged-sheet models, the addition of the mesh, and fast direct Poisson equation solvers for 2-D and 3-D. The finite-size particle-in-mesh (finite {Delta}{chi}, {Delta}t) theory of Langdon is presented in part to display the effects of too small {lambda}{sub D}/{Delta}{chi}, even for Maxwellian velocity distributions, as a caution, for example, when some ions are cooled to background gas temperatures by charge exchange. Early work on adding collisions to 1-D charge-sheet models by Burger and Shanny et al. are presented, with many of the elements of current Monte Carlo codes. Bounded plasma modeling is presented with electrode charges and external R, L, C, and V(t), I(t) sources now in use on fast desktop computers as real-time computer experiments, complementing analytic modeling and laboratory experiments. This paper reports that the addition of Monte Carlo collisions (usually done with irregular timesteps) to PIC (usually done with uniform {Delta}t's) is displayed as a developing art, relying on experimental total cross sections and approximate analytical differential cross sections to produce changes in charged-particle speed and direction due to collisions with neutrals, so far including elastic, excitation, ionization, charge exchange, and attachment processes.

  9. Interacting He and Ar atoms: Revised theoretical interaction potential, dipole moment, and collision-induced absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Wilfried; Frommhold, Lothar

    2015-09-21

    Coupled cluster quantum chemical calculations of the potential energy surface and the induced dipole surface are reported for the He–Ar van der Waals collisional complex. Spectroscopic parameters are derived from global analytical fits while an accurate value for the long-range dipole coefficient D{sub 7} is obtained by perturbation methods. Collision-induced absorption spectra are computed quantum mechanically and compared with existing measurements.

  10. Using an Advanced Computational Laboratory Experiment to Extend and Deepen Physical Chemistry Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    A computational laboratory experiment is described, which involves the advanced study of an atomic system. The students use concepts and techniques typically covered in a physical chemistry course but extend those concepts and techniques to more complex situations. The students get a chance to explore the study of atomic states and perform…

  11. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing the atom to a "tiny solar system" is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate…

  12. Quantum-mechanical transport equation for atomic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical transport equation (QMTE) is derived which should be applicable to a wide range of problems involving the interaction of radiation with atoms or molecules which are also subject to collisions with perturber atoms. The equation follows the time evolution of the macroscopic atomic density matrix elements of atoms located at classical position R and moving with classical velocity v. It is quantum mechanical in the sense that all collision kernels or rates which appear have been obtained from a quantum-mechanical theory and, as such, properly take into account the energy-level variations and velocity changes of the active (emitting or absorbing) atom produced in collisions with perturber atoms. The present formulation is better suited to problems involving high-intensity external fields, such as those encountered in laser physics.

  13. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  14. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, F; Martínez, J I; García-Lastra, J M; Rossmeisl, J; Koper, M T M

    2012-03-16

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phenomenon between any set of adsorbates bound similarly to the surface. On the example of the near-surface alloys of Pt, we show that scalability is a result of identical variations of adsorption energies with respect to the valence configuration of both the surface components and the adsorbates. PMID:22540492

  15. Application of the Finite Element Method in Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine

    2007-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a numerical algorithm for solving second order differential equations. It has been successfully used to solve many problems in atomic and molecular physics, including bound state and scattering calculations. To illustrate the diversity of the method, we present here details of two applications. First, we calculate the non-adiabatic dipole polarizability of Hi by directly solving the first and second order equations of perturbation theory with FEM. In the second application, we calculate the scattering amplitude for e-H scattering (without partial wave analysis) by reducing the Schrodinger equation to set of integro-differential equations, which are then solved with FEM.

  16. Nuclear-Spin-Independent Short-Range Three-Body Physics in Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Noam; Shotan, Zav; Khaykovich, Lev; Kokkelmans, Servaas

    2010-09-03

    We investigate three-body recombination loss across a Feshbach resonance in a gas of ultracold {sup 7}Li atoms prepared in the absolute ground state and perform a comparison with previously reported results of a different nuclear-spin state [N. Gross et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 163202 (2009)]. We extend the previously reported universality in three-body recombination loss across a Feshbach resonance to the absolute ground state. We show that the positions and widths of recombination minima and Efimov resonances are identical for both states which indicates that the short-range physics is nuclear-spin independent.

  17. ELASR - An electrostatic storage ring for atomic and molecular physics at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, Mohamed O. A.

    A new ELectrostAtic Storage Ring (ELASR) has been designed and built at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was developed to be the core of a new storage ring laboratory for atomic and molecular physics at KACST. ELASR follows the standard design of the pioneering storage ring ELISA and it thereby features a racetrack single-bend shaped ring. Complementary simulation code packages were used to work out the design under the requirements of the projected experiments. This paper reports a short description of the ELASR storage ring through an overview of its design and construction.

  18. Future frontiers for e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions: physics of SLC and LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    A brief historical review is given of the contribution to particle physics of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions, followed by a discussion of the LEP and SLC machines and the reasons for developing linear colliders. A brief overview of the Standard Model and some essential formalism for the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. f anti f are presented, followed by a discussion of detectors. Tests of the Standard Model and physics beyond the Standard Model that can be made running at the Z/sup 0/ are considered. LEP physics at energies above the Z/sup 0/ is discussed. (LEW)

  19. The design of the RF cavity for the heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mosko, S.W.

    1990-01-01

    An rf cavity and drive system have been designed for the proposed Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics,'' HISTRAP, at Oak Ridge. A peak accelerating voltage of 2.5 kV per turn is required with a continuous tuning range from 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. A single-gap, half-wave resonant configuration is used with biased ferrite tuning. The cavity structure is completely outside of the beam line/vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window that serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line components at 300{degree}C. A prototype cavity was designed, built, and tested. Development of frequency synthesizer and tuner control circuitry is under way.

  20. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2014: Workshop for young scientists on the physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-05-01

    The 6th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2014) was held in Las Negras, Spain from 21-28 September 2014. Following the traditions of the conference, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the first years of their scientific careers. The present issue contains the proceedings of this workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed as well as the perspectives for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt and the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2014 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), CPAN (Spain), Czech Science Foundation (GACR) under grant 13-20841S (Czech Republic), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council under grant 259612 (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz Association and GSI under grant VH-NG-822, Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), National Science Foundation under grant No.1359622 (USA), Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR (Czech Republic), Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife (Spain) and the Universidad de Granada (Spain). Javier López Albacete, Universidad de Granada (Spain) Jana Bielcikova, Nuclear Physics Inst. and Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic) Rainer J. Fries, Texas A&M University (USA) Raphaël Granier de Cassagnac, CNRS-IN2P3 and École polytechnique (France

  1. SU-E-T-64: CG-Based Radiation Therapy Simulator with Physical Modeling for Avoidance of Collisions Between Gantry and Couch Or Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanouchi, M; Arimura, H; Yuda, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is time-consuming and might cause re-planning to check couch-gantry and patient-gantry collisions on a radiotherapy machine when using couch rotations for non-coplanar beam angles. The aim of this study was to develop a computer-graphics (CG)-based radiation therapy simulator with physical modeling for avoidance of collisions between gantry and couch or patient on a radiotherapy machine. Methods: The radiation therapy simulator was three-dimensionally constructed including a radiotherapy machine (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems), couch, and radiation treatment room according to their designs by using a physical-modeling-based computer graphics software (Blender, free and open-source). Each patient was modeled by applying a surface rendering technique to their planning computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 16-slice CT scanner (BrightSpeed, GE Healthcare). Immobilization devices for patients were scanned by the CT equipment, and were rendered as the patient planning CT images. The errors in the collision angle of the gantry with the couch or patient between gold standards and the estimated values were obtained by fixing the gantry angle for the evaluation of the proposed simulator. Results: The average error of estimated collision angles to the couch head side was -8.5% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and -5.5% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Moreover, the average error of estimated collision angles to the couch foot side was -1.1% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and 1.4% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Conclusion: The CG-based radiation therapy simulator could make it possible to estimate the collision angle between gantry and couch or patient on the radiotherapy machine without verifying the collision angles in the radiation treatment room.

  2. Independent-electron analysis of the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in Ne10 + collisions with He, Ne, and Ar atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-09-01

    We present a theoretical study on the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in 4.54 keV/amu Ne10 +-He, -Ne, and -Ar collisions. Single-particle capture probabilities were calculated using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. In this framework we investigated the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on capture cross sections and x-ray spectra. Excellent agreement is shown with the previously measured relative cross sections and x-ray spectra and calculations based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method using the no-response single-particle electron capture probabilities in a multinomial single-electron capture analysis. Our results demonstrate the importance of using this consistent statistical analysis of single-electron capture within the independent electron model; a requirement that a previous calculation for the same collision problem using the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method may not have considered.

  3. Atomic physics and synchrotron radiation: The production and accumulation of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Meron, M.; Agagu, A.; Jones, K. W.

    1987-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used to produce highly-charged ions, and to study photoexcitation and photoionization for ions of virtually any element in the periodic table. To date, with few exceptions, atomic physics studies have been limited to rare gases and a few metal vapors, and to photoexcitation energies in the VUV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These limitations can now be overcome using photons produced by high-brightness synchrotron storage rings, such as the X-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven. Furthermore, calculations indicate that irradiation of an ion trap with an intense energetic photon beam will result in a viable source of highly-charged ions that can be given the name PHOBIS: the photon beam ion source. Promising results, which encourage the wider systematic use of synchrotron radiation in atomic physics research, have been obtained in recent experiments on VUV photoemission and the production and storage of multiply-charged ions. An overview of the field, current plans, and future possibilities will be presented.

  4. A time-dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities - Theory and application to the H + H2(J = 0) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the study of atom-diatom reactive collisions in three dimensions employing wave packets and the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The method uses a projection operator approach to couple the inelastic and reactive portions of the total wave function and optical potentials to circumvent the necessity of using product arrangement coordinates. Reactive transition probabilities are calculated from the state resolved flux of the wave packet as it leaves the interaction region in the direction of the reactive arrangement channel. The present approach is used to obtain such vibrationally resolved probabilities for the three-dimensional H + H2 (J = 0) hydrogen exchange reaction, using a body-fixed system of coordinates.

  5. Search for New Physics in Dielectron Events in 1.96-TeV Proton - Anti-proton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ikado, Koji

    2004-03-01

    The authors have searched for new physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary particle physics in dielectron decay mode at the CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) experiment in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected during the 2002-2003 runs corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 200 pb{sup -1}. Many extensions of the Standard Model have been proposed. Grand Unified Theories (GUT) assumes a larger gauge symmetry group and predict new gauge bosons. GUT has hierarchy problem in it and there have been many attempts to solve the hierarchy problem. Solutions for the hierarchy problem are supersymmetry, technicolor, large extra dimensions, warped extra dimensions and little Higgs models. The authors analyze the differential distribution of dielectron events in terms of their invariant mass and no significant excess is found in very high mass region. They present a 95% confidence level limit on the production cross section times branching ratio for new resonant particles decaying into an electron pair as a function of invariant mass. New resonant particles include new neutral gauge boson Z', Randall-Sundrum graviton, R-parity violating sneutrino, and technicolor particles. They also present limits on the effective Planck scale of large extra dimensions.

  6. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K; Miller, W O; Levatin, J L; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

    2010-09-06

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  7. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H.; Miller, W.; Levatin, J.; Pertica, A.; Olivier, S.

    2010-09-01

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  8. Non-local physics: Applications from the universe evolution to the atom structure in the frame of the unified theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, B. V.

    2013-10-01

    The main principles of the non-local physics are delivered. The unified theory of transport processes is applicable to the physical systems in tremendous diapason of scales - from atom structures to the Universe evolution. The origin of difficulties connected with the hypothetical dark matter and dark energy consists in the total Oversimplification following from the principles of local physics and reflects the general shortcomings of the local kinetic transport theory.

  9. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2012: Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Markus; Caines, Helen; Calderón de la Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Fries, Rainer; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphaël; Hippolyte, Boris; Mischke, André; Mócsy, Ágnes; Petersen, Hannah; Ruan, Lijuan; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The 5th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2012) was held in Copamarina, Puerto Rico from 14-20 October 2012. As in previous years, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the early years of their scientific careers. This issue contains the proceedings of the workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Measurements from the proton-led run at the CERN-LHC were shown for the first time at this meeting. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed, as well as the proposals for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven, and the LHeC. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2012 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), IN2P3/CNRS (France) and the European Research Council via grant #259612, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (USA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA), National Science Foundation (USA), and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Netherlands). Marcus BleicherAndré Mischke Goethe-University Frankfurt and HIC4FAIRUtrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam GermanyThe Netherlands Helen CainesÁgnes Mócsy Yale UniversityPratt Institute and Brookhaven National

  10. Evaluation of interatomic potentials for noble gas atoms from rainbow scattering under axial channeling at Ag(1 1 1) surface by computer simulations based on binary collision approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    The rainbow angles corresponding to pronounced peaks in the angular distributions of scattered projectiles with small angle, attributed to rainbow scattering (RS), under axial surface channeling conditions are strongly dependent on the interatomic potentials between projectiles and target atoms. The dependence of rainbow angles on normal energy of projectile energy to the target surface that has been experimentally obtained by Schüller and Winter (SW) (2007) for RS of He, Ne and Ar atoms from a Ag(1 1 1) surface with projectile energies of 3-60 keV was evaluated by the three-dimensional computer simulations using the ACOCT code based on the binary collision approximation with interatomic pair potentials. Consequently, the ACOCT results employing the Moliere pair potential with screening length correction close to adjustable one of O'Connor and Biersack (OB) formula are almost in agreement with the experimental ones, being self-consistent with the SW's ones analyzed by computer simulations of classical trajectory calculations as RS from corrugated equipotential planes based on continuum potentials including the Moliere pair potential with screening length correction of the OB formula.

  11. Two-body physics in quasi-low-dimensional atomic gases under spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Kun; Yi, Wei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    One of the most dynamic directions in ultracold atomic gas research is the study of low-dimensional physics in quasi-low-dimensional geometries, where atoms are confined in strongly anisotropic traps. Recently, interest has significantly intensified with the realization of synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). As a first step toward understanding the SOC effect in quasi-low-dimensional systems, the solution of two-body problems in different trapping geometries and different types of SOC has attracted great attention in the past few years. In this review, we discuss both the scattering-state and the bound-state solutions of two-body problems in quasi-one and quasi-two dimensions. We show that the degrees of freedom in tightly confined dimensions, in particular with the presence of SOC, may significantly affect system properties. Specifically, in a quasi-one-dimensional atomic gas, a one-dimensional SOC can shift the positions of confinement-induced resonances whereas, in quasitwo- dimensional gases, a Rashba-type SOC tends to increase the two-body binding energy, such that more excited states in the tightly confined direction are occupied and the system is driven further away from a purely two-dimensional gas. The effects of the excited states can be incorporated by adopting an effective low-dimensional Hamiltonian having the form of a two-channel model. With the bare parameters fixed by two-body solutions, this effective Hamiltonian leads to qualitatively different many-body properties compared to a purely low-dimensional model.

  12. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  13. An all-optical vector atomic magnetometer for fundamental physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, David; Mateos, Ignacio; Zhivun, Elena; Patton, Brian; Fierlinger, Peter; Beck, Douglas; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a laboratory prototype of a compact all-optical vector magnetometer. Due to their high precision and absolute accuracy, atomic magnetometers are crucial sensors in fundamental physics experiments which require extremely stable magnetic fields (e.g., neutron EDM searches). This all-optical sensor will allow high-resolution measurements of the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field without perturbing the magnetic environment. Moreover, its absolute accuracy makes it calibration-free, an advantage in space applications (e.g., space-based gravitational-wave detection). Magnetometry in precision experiments or space applications also demands long-term stability and well-understood noise characteristics at frequencies below 10-4 Hz. We have characterized the low-frequency noise floor of this sensor and will discuss methods to improve its long-time performance.

  14. The AMS Measurements and Its Applications in Nuclear Physics at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Shan; Shen Hongtao; He Ming; Dong Kejun; He Guozhu; Wang Xianggao; Yuan Jian; Wang Wei; Wu Shaoyong; Ruan Xiangdong; Wu Weimin

    2010-05-12

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), initiated in late 1970s at McMaster university based on the accelerator and detector technique, has long been applied in the studies on archaeology, geology, and cosmology, as a powerful tool for isotope dating. The advantages of AMS in the analysis of rare nuclides by direct counting of the atoms, small sample size and relatively free from the interferences of molecular ions have been well documented. This paper emphasizes that AMS can not only be used for archaeology, geology, environment, biology and so on, but also served as a unique tool for nuclear physics research. In this paper, the determination of the half-lives of {sup 79}Se, the measurements of the cross-sections of {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92g}Nb and {sup 238}U(n,3n){sup 236}U reactions, the detection and determination of ultratrace impurities in neutrino detector materials, and the measurement of the fission product nuclide {sup 126}Sn, are to be introduced, as some of examples of AMS applications in nuclear research conducted in AMS lab of China Institute of Atomic Energy. Searching for superheavy nuclides by using AMS is being planned.

  15. Making custom fiber lasers for use in an atomic physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademian, Ali; Cameron, Garnet; Nault, Kyla; Shiner, David

    2016-05-01

    Fiber lasers can be a reasonable choice for a laser source in atomic physics. Our particular applications involve the optical pumping and in some applications cooling of various transitions in atomic helium. Doped fiber with emission at the required wavelengths is necessary. Readily available fiber and approximate wavelength emission ranges include Yb (990 - 1150 nm), Er/Yb (1530 - 1625 nm) and Th (1900 -2100 nm). High efficiency conversion of pump photons into stable single frequency laser emission at the required wavelength is the function of the fiber laser. A simple fiber laser cavity uses a short (~ few mm) fiber grating high reflector mirror, a doped fiber section for the laser cavity, and a long (~ few cm) fiber grating output coupler. To ensure reliable single frequency operation, the laser cavity length should be within 2-3 times the output grating length. However the cavity length must be long enough for round trip gains to compensate for the output mirror transmission loss. Efficiency can be maximized by avoiding fiber splices in the fiber laser cavity. This requires that the gratings be written into the doped fiber directly. In our previous designs, back coupling of the fiber laser into the pump laser contributes to instability and sometimes caused catastrophic pump failure. Current designs use a fiber based wavelength splitter (WDM) to study and circumvent this problem. Data will be presented on the fiber lasers at 1083 nm. Work on a Thulium 2057 nm fiber laser will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF Grant # 1404498.

  16. ATOMIC PHYSICS PROCESSES IMPORTANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCRAPE-OFF LAYER OF TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    WEST, W.P.; GOLDSMITH,; B. EVANS,T.E.; OLSON, R.J.

    2002-05-01

    The region between the well-confined plasma and the vessel walls of a magnetic confinement fusion research device, the scrape-off layer (SOL), is typically rich in atomic and molecular physics processes. The most advanced magnetic confinement device, the magnetically diverted tokamak, uses a magnetic separatrix to isolate the confinement zone (closed flux surfaces) from the edge plasma (open field lines). Over most of their length the open field lines run parallel to the separatrix, forming a thin magnetic barrier with the nearby vessel walls. In a poloidally-localized region, the open field lines are directed away from the separatrix and into the divertor, a region spatially separated from the separatrix where intense plasma wall interaction can occur relatively safely. Recent data from several tokamaks indicate that particle transport across the field lines of the SOL can be somewhat faster than previously thought. In these cases, the rate at which particles reach the vessel wall is comparable to the rate to the divertor from parallel transport. The SOL can be thin enough that the recycling neutrals and sputtered impurities from the wall may refuel or contaminate the confinement zone more efficiently than divertor plasma wall interaction. Just inside the SOL is a confinement barrier that produces a sharp pedestal in plasma density and temperature. Understanding neutral transport through the SOL and into the pedestal is key to understanding particle balance and particle and impurity exhaust. The SOL plasma is sufficiently hot and dense to excite and ionize neutrals. Ion and neutral temperatures are high enough that charge exchange between the neutrals and fuel and impurity ions is fast. Excitation of neutrals can be fast enough to lead to nonlinear behavior in charge exchange and ionization processes. In this paper the detailed atomic physics important to the understanding of the neutral transport through the SOL will be discussed.

  17. Exchange effects and second-order Born corrections in laser-assisted (e ,2 e ) collisions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajana, I.; Makhoute, A.; Khalil, D.; Chaddou, S.

    2015-04-01

    The triple differential cross section for laser-assisted ionization of a helium target by slow electrons is analyzed within the framework of the second Born approximation. We evaluate the S -matrix elements using Volkov and Coulomb-Volkov wave functions for describing the continuum states of the scattered and the ejected electrons, respectively. The required scattering amplitudes are performed by expanding the atomic wave functions onto a complex-scaled Sturmian basis, which allows us to exactly take into account the contribution of the continuous spectrum to the dressing of the atomic states. Our results have been improved by taking into account exchange effects. Furthermore, the second-order Born correction is seen to be important and significantly affects the magnitudes of the binary and recoil peaks.

  18. Free-free absorption of infrared radiation in collisions of electrons with neutral rare-gas atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A relationship between the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption cross section and the electron neutral momentum transfer cross section has been utilized to determine the infrared free-free continuum absorption coefficient for the negative ions of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. The values of the momentum transfer cross section for this calculation have been obtained from experimental measurements. Analytical expressions for the absorption coefficient have also been developed. From the results of this calculation, it is possible to determine the absorption coefficient per unit electron density per neutral atom for temperatures in the range from 2500 to 25,000 K. The results are compared with those from tabulations of previous calculations and those computed from theoretical values of the phase shifts for the elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms.

  19. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions. [Cyclotron Inst. , Texas A M Univ. , College Station, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the double ionization of He by high-energy N[sup 7+] ions was extended up in energy to 40 MeV/amu. Coincidence time-of-flight studies of multicharged N[sub 2], O[sub 2], and CO molecular ions produced in collisions with 97-MeV Ar[sup 14+] ions were completed. Analysis of the total kinetic energy distributions and comparison with the available data for CO[sup 2+] and CO[sup 3+] from synchrotron radiation experiments led to the conclusion that ionization by Ar-ion impact populates states having considerably higher excitation energies than those accessed by photoionization. The dissociation fractions for CO[sup 1+] and CO[sup 2+] molecular ions, and the branching ratios for the most prominent charge division channels of CO[sup 2+] through CO[sup 7+] were determined from time-of-flight singles and coincidence data. An experiment designed to investigate the orientation dependence of dissociative multielectron ionization of molecules by heavy ion impact was completed. Measurements of the cross sections for K-shell ionization of intermediate-Z elements by 30-MeV/amu H, N, Ne, and Ar ions were completed. The cross sections were determined for solid targets of Z = 13, 22, 26, 29, 32, 40, 42, 46, and 50 by recording the spectra of K x rays with a Si(Li) spectrometer.

  20. Excitation of atoms and molecules in collisions with highly charged ions. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the double ionization of He by high-energy N{sup 7+} ions was extended up in energy to 40 MeV/amu. Coincidence time-of-flight studies of multicharged N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO molecular ions produced in collisions with 97-MeV Ar{sup 14+} ions were completed. Analysis of the total kinetic energy distributions and comparison with the available data for CO{sup 2+} and CO{sup 3+} from synchrotron radiation experiments led to the conclusion that ionization by Ar-ion impact populates states having considerably higher excitation energies than those accessed by photoionization. The dissociation fractions for CO{sup 1+} and CO{sup 2+} molecular ions, and the branching ratios for the most prominent charge division channels of CO{sup 2+} through CO{sup 7+} were determined from time-of-flight singles and coincidence data. An experiment designed to investigate the orientation dependence of dissociative multielectron ionization of molecules by heavy ion impact was completed. Measurements of the cross sections for K-shell ionization of intermediate-Z elements by 30-MeV/amu H, N, Ne, and Ar ions were completed. The cross sections were determined for solid targets of Z = 13, 22, 26, 29, 32, 40, 42, 46, and 50 by recording the spectra of K x rays with a Si(Li) spectrometer.